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1365

VIEWS: 1 PAGES: 479

									1365.   DA CAMARA, Kathleen. Laredo on the Rio Grande.
San Antonio: Naylor, [1949]. ix [3] [4, photographic
plates] 85 [9] [17, ads] pp., text illustrations. 8vo,
original blue cloth. Small spot on upper cover, foxing
to fore-edges and front free endpapers, otherwise fine
in slightly soiled d.j. with a few small voids and minor
chips.
    First edition. CBC 4667. Laredo was established in
1755, when Tomás Sánchez de la Barrera y Garza received
permission from José de Escandón to form a new
settlement about thirty miles upriver from Nuestra
Señora de los Dolores Hacienda, in what is now Zapata
County. Laredo, the oldest independent settlement in
Texas, was founded on the site of Tomás Sánchez’
ranchería. The raising of livestock—chiefly goats,
sheep, and cattle—thus became the principal livelihood
of Laredo. In 1757 the population of the town was
eighty-five persons and 9,000 head of sheep, goats, and
cattle. “Some of the world’s greatest ranches are
located within a few miles of Laredo. Of the 2,050,760
acres of county land, over 1,819,000 acres is pasture
land” (p. 36). Includes information on problems with
Native American rustling and raids in the early decades
of the nineteenth century and the Republic era. $125.00

1366.   DABNEY, Owen P. The True Story of the Lost
Shackle; or, Seven Years with the Indians. [Salem,
Oregon: Capital Printing Co., 1897]. [6] 98 pp.,
frontispiece, text illustrations. 12mo, light original
blue    pictorial   wrappers.   Slight    spotting   and
discoloration to wrappers, otherwise very fine.
    First edition. Ayer (supp.) 38 (conjectures the work
is fictional). Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the
Plains and the Rockies 116. Flake (supp.) 2641a. Graff
966. Howes (1954) 2527. Rader 1017. Smith 2200. If one
is to believe what appears to be lurid fiction, the
family of Lillian Ainsley migrated to the Yellowstone
Valley in the 1870s, where they established a cattle
ranching operation. In the family’s first year in the
Valley, Lillian was taken captive by Native Americans.
Most of this volume consists of an account of her
capture, the time she spent with the tribe, and her
eventual rescue. Included is an account of a case of
Brigham Young’s wife stealing.  $65.00

1367.   DABNEY, Owen P. The True Story of the Lost
Shackle.... [Salem, Oregon: Capital Printing Co., 1897].
Another copy, 12mo, original red pictorial wrappers.
Wrappers with a few minor chips and splits, otherwise
fine.   $50.00

1368.   DACUS, J. A. Life and Adventures of Frank and
Jesse James, the Noted Western Outlaws. St. Louis: N. D.
Thompson & Co.; San Francisco: A. L. Bancroft;
Indianapolis: Fred L. Horton & Co., Chicago: J. S.
Goodman, 1880. 383 [1, ad for Buel’s biography of Wild
Bill Hickok] pp., engraved text illustrations (including
“Fight with Mexican Cattle Thieves”). 8vo, original
maroon decorative cloth gilt. Worn, faded, shelf-
slanted, hinges cracked, lacking free endpapers, title
and first few signatures with mild to moderate staining
at top corner, some old pencil scrawls on rear pastedown
and ad, later gift inscription on front free endpaper.
    First edition, the issue with the combined imprint
as shown above (no priority established). In this issue,
the copyright is to N. D. Thompson & Co., and the final
chapter is entitled “Jesse James Still a Free Rover.”
Guns 538 (lists this imprint first and mentions the
following Indianapolis imprint in his note). Dykes, Rare
Western    Outlaw  Books,   pp.   16-17   (listing   and
illustrating only this combined imprint): “Rare.” Howes
D6. The book contains information on the James gang’s
run-ins with Mexican cattle thieves, as well as a
description of their cattle ranch in South Texas.
    $350.00

1369.  DACUS, J. A. Life and Adventures of Frank and
Jesse James, the Noted Western Outlaws. Indianapolis:
Fred L. Horton & Co., 1880. 383 [1, ad for Buel’s
biography of Wild Bill Hickok] pp., engraved text
illustrations. 8vo, original maroon decorative cloth
gilt. Considerable outer wear, especially at edges and
corners (frayed with portions of boards exposed); hinges
cracked and very loose; front free endpaper removed;
tear to rear free endpaper. In marked contrast to the
external condition, the interior is fine, with only a
few scattered spots to blank margins in this scarce
Indianapolis first edition.
First edition, the Indianapolis issue (same collation as
the 1880 combined imprint of St. Louis, San Francisco,
Indianapolis, and Chicago—see preceding entry; no
priority established). In this issue, the copyright is
to W. S. Bryan, and the final chapter is entitled
“Anecdotes of the Great Outlaws” (however, content is
same as in preceding issue). Guns 538n (lists the St.
Louis, etc. imprint first and mentions this imprint in
note). Dykes, Rare Western Outlaw Books, pp. 16-17n
(listing only the combined imprint): “Rare.” Howes D6
(refers to present imprint as another issue, while
noting a similar imprint with Chicago publisher only).
                             $350.00

1370.   DACUS, J. A. Illustrated Lives and Adventures of
Frank and Jesse James and the Younger Brothers.... New
York & St. Louis: N. D. Thompson & Co., 1882. 518 [2]
pp.,     including    engraved     frontispiece,    text
illustrations. 8vo, original green textured cloth gilt.
Shelf-slanted, covers rubbed and worn at edges, corners
bumped, hinges cracked, interior shaken, occasional mild
staining to text.
    Best edition (“most complete edition”—Howes D6). At
p. x is “Publisher’s Preface to the New Electrotype
Edition” declaring: “The extraordinary demand for this
history having worn out the original set of electrotype
plates within the first year of its issue, the
publishers, at heavy outlay, had the entire work reset
and newly electrotyped. Advantage was taken of this
opportunity to revise and also to enlarge and greatly
improve the work, as befits its character as the
standard authority on this important and popular
historic subject.” Graff 967. Guns 540: “This edition
has forty-two pages on the Youngers not included in the
1880   edition   and   has  different   portraits   and
illustrations.”    $150.00

1371.   DACUS, J. A. & James W. Buel. A Tour of St.
Louis; or, The Inside Life of a Great City. St. Louis:
Western Publishing Company, Jones & Griffin, 1878. [4]
ix [1] 5-564 pp., engraved frontispiece portrait,
numerous text illustrations (some full-page), maps
(including Map of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and
Southern Railway and Connections, 15.3 x 10 cm). 8vo,
original blindstamped brown cloth with gilt lettering on
upper cover and spine. Light shelf wear, corners frayed,
front hinge starting, interior very fine. Miscellaneous
unrelated items laid in: certificate of promotion of
Margaret Means of Denver from 1st to 2nd grade,
typewritten poem, and two souvenirs.
    First edition of a well-illustrated, early history
of St. Louis, Gateway to the West. Rader 1021. Contains
a full-page plate and section of text on the St. Louis
National Stockyards: “Of the numerous institutions built
in St. Louis during the past quarter of a century
calculated to advance her commercial interests, there
are none of such vast importance as the National Stock
Yards” (p. 331). Also present are sections on the hide
trade, horses and mules, the Texas Land and Immigration
Company, etc. Excellent ads, business history, material
culture, social history, etc. The lurid side of St.
Louis life is not neglected, with disclosure on tramps,
grave robbers, “clandestine depravity” (seduction of the
innocent), organized prostitution, gamblers, saloons,
swindlers, murders, etc. $150.00

1372.  DACUS, J. A. & James W. Buel. A Tour of St.
Louis; or, The Inside Life of a Great City. St. Louis:
Western Publishing, 1878. Another copy. 8vo, original
blindstamped blue cloth with gilt lettering on upper
cover and spine. Corners and edges worn, spine darkened,
front and rear free endpapers not present, covers and
spine rubbed, interior fine and bright. $125.00

1373.   DAGGETT, Carleen M. Noah McCuistion: Pioneer
Texas Cattleman. [Waco: Texian Press, 1975]. vii [1] 308
pp.,    frontispiece,    text   illustrations    (mostly
photographic). 8vo, original brown cloth. Top edge
slightly foxed, otherwise very fine in very fine d.j.
Prospectus laid in.
    First edition. This biography of pioneer Panhandle
rancher and cattleman Noah McCuistion (1857-1937) was
taken from old letters, journals, a diary kept by Noah’s
sister, and personal papers of members of one of Texas’
early ranch families of Scottish descent. McCuistion
also operated ranches in New Mexico, Wyoming, and
Montana.
    Included is an account of McCuistion’s 1880s Montana
trail drive with 2,636 head of cattle, relating a risky
and complex crossing of the hazardous frozen Platte
River. “‘It took all hands and the cook’ was an old
ranch saying, and this time it brought into play a whole
village, but a finer set of people, the cowboys never
knew” (p. 202). During the two-month delay waiting for
the Platte to freeze hard enough for the cattle to
cross, thirty-two-year-old McCuistion took time out to
marry Miss Grace Dean of Kansas, who was living at
Sheridan, Wyoming. McCuistion and his Texas cowboys
never did adjust to the unrelenting cold of Montana;
McCuistion would say “I’d like to be in Texas when they
round up in the spring.” McCuistion’s words were put to
music and became a classic cowboy song. Excellent social
history, local history, and good coverage of the
McCuistion women, as well as their slaves both before
and after the Civil War. $75.00

1374.   DAHLQUIST, Laura. “Meet Jim Bridger”: A Brief
History of Bridger and His Trading House on Black’s Fork
[wrapper   title].   N.p.,    [1948].   38   pp.,   text
illustrations (mostly photographic, including early map
of the Wyoming region in charcoal on hide, transcribed
by Col. William O. Collins from Bridger’s drawing made
in the sand). 8vo, original cream wrappers with
photographic illustration of Bridger. Fine.
    First edition. This history and description of Fort
Bridger mentions Bridger’s establishment of a herd of
cattle for supplying overland emigrants (perhaps one of
the first cattle operations in Wyoming). Also discussed
is Bridger’s assistance with the U.S. Army’s expedition
into Utah from Fort Leavenworth in 1857 with a cavalcade
of 800 beef cattle, 3,250 oxen, 360 men, 312 wagons, and
48 mules. $40.00

1375.   DAKIN, Susanna Bryant. The Lives of William
Hartnell. Stanford: Stanford University Press, [1949].
viii [4] 308 pp., frontispiece portrait of Hartnell, 10
plates (photographic and from early prints). 8vo,
original orange pictorial cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
(price-clipped).
    First   edition.   Herd 628:   “Has  a   chapter  on
ranching.” Rocq 5660. Hartnell (1798-1854) arrived in
Monterey in 1822 as resident manager for an English
trading company and married into the prominent Guerra y
Noriega family. He spent the remainder of his life in
California as a prominent rancher, educator, politician,
and diplomat. In 1831 Hartnell acquired former mission
lands in the Salinas-Monterey foothills country where he
established his rancho with an initial herd of 500
cattle. The ranching chapter includes vivid descriptions
of early ranchero life in 1830s California. “A vaquero’s
whole fortune was often displayed in [his] trappings,
and his devotion to a chosen animal sometimes seemed
deeper than to any human being. Actually his horse knew
the cattle business, exclusive of buying and selling, as
well as he.”    $50.00
1376.   DAKIN, Susanna Bryant. A Scotch Paisano, Hugo
Reid’s Life in California, 1832-1852 Derived from His
Correspondence. Berkeley: University of California,
1939. xvii [1] 312 pp., folding map (Spanish and Mexican
land grants of old ranchos within the limits of Los
Angeles), 2 full-page text illustrations (by Maynard
Dixon). 8vo, original orange cloth. Very fine in fine
d.j.
    First    edition.   Dykes,   Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Dixon 49). Hill 408. Rocq 2883. Hugo Reid
(1811-1852), a Scottish trader who settled in California
in 1832, formed a partnership with Jacob Leese and
traded in hides and tallow with Yankee ships. An
influential and important figure, Reid served as a
delegate to the California Constitutional Convention.
    Besides its value for ranching and the hide and
tallow trade in California, this book is essential for
other areas of study. The work is a primary source for
the social history of Pastoral California. Reid’s
sympathetic letters on the Los Angeles County Indians
(pp. 215-86) must be consulted for any serious study of
Native Americans of California. Another value of this
work   is   for   women’s  history,   with  biographical
information on Reid’s wife, Victoria Bartolomea Reid,
the highly cultivated daughter of a Gabrielino chief
whose dowry included the two substantial landholdings of
Rancho Santa Anita (eventually transferred to her
husband’s name) and La Huerta del Cuati, both in
present-day Los Angeles. She was one of the few Native
Americans to hold a Mexican land grant in Alta
California. A useful feature is a register of British
and U.S. residents of California prior to 1840. Reid,
his family, and lifestyle were the prototypes for Helen
Hunt Jackson’s Ramona. $125.00

               Dakota Territory Imprints
1377.  [DAKOTA TERRITORY]. House Journal of the Sixth
Session of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of
Dakota, Begun and Held at Yankton...December 3rd, A.D.
1866, and Concluded January 11th, A.D. 1867. Yankton,
Dakota Territory: Geo. W. Kingsbury, Public Printer,
Union and Dakotaian Office, 1867. 228 pp. 8vo,
contemporary three-quarter law sheep over drab blue
boards, red leather spine label. Sheep abraded, hinges
cracked (but strong), interior very fine.
    First edition of an early Dakota Territory imprint,
printed by the second territorial printer (see Trienens,
Pioneer Imprints from Fifty States). Allen, Dakota
Imprints 54 (14 copies located). Printer Kingsbury went
west in 1858, arriving at Fort Leavenworth where he
intended to be a driver of government ox trains. A
portion of an afternoon witnessing the yoking of several
hundred oxen and getting them into a train convinced
Kingsbury to take a job as a compositor for the Daily
Ledger. After printing stints in Kansas (including the
first imprint west of Topeka—at that time Colorado),
Kingsbury settled in Dakota Territory in 1862, where
began the publication of the Weekly Dakotian and created
some of the earliest Dakota imprints.
    The present journal includes legislation concerning
ranching, such as the establishment of a fence law in
Union County (“the amendment was adopted”) and an act to
restrain unspecified “certain animals” from running at
large (“which motion was lost”). $250.00

1378.   [DAKOTA TERRITORY]. Public and Private Laws,
Memorials and Resolutions of the Territory of Dakota
Passed by the Legislative Assembly at the Seventh
Session Thereof Begun and Held at Yankton.... December
2d. A.D., 1867, and Concluded January 10th, A.D.
1868.... Yankton, Dakota Territory: [Printed by George
W. Kingsbury], 1867-[18]68. 327 pp., printed errata
affixed to rear pastedown. 8vo, original sheep, later
crude cloth backstrip (original brown gilt-lettered
spine label preserved). Binding worn and rubbed, hinges
cracked, text fine with occasional pencil notes.
    First edition of an early Dakota imprint. Allen,
Dakota Imprints 61. See preceding entry for more on
pioneer printer Kingsbury, who also printed the first
history of Dakota (Armstrong’s History and Resources of
Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.... Yankton, 1866) [see Item
137 in Part I of this catalogue]. Laws and legislation
regarding construction of wagon roads, Native Americans
(removals, citizenship, etc.), land grants, settlers,
squatters,   fences,   suffrage,   mines   and   mining,
territorial   library,   creation   of   South   Dakota,
incorporation of cities and counties (e.g., Cheyenne and
Laramie), mail, railroads, etc. In the sections on land
offices and land grants, the potential for grazing and
agriculture in the Red River Valley is extolled, with
offerings of land at $1.25 per acre. A wagon road and
military post are proposed for the Red River Valley to
protect settlers from the Pembina and Red Lake bands of
Chippewa and Cree. $300.00

1379.   DALE, Edward Everett. The Cherokee Strip Live
Stock Association...and Charter and By-Laws of the
Cherokee Strip Live Stock Association. Wichita: First
National Bank, 1951. [2] 19 [3] pp. 8vo, original
terracotta printed wrappers. Very fine.
    Facsimile reprint of the exceedingly rare charter
and by-laws of the Cherokee Strip Live Stock Association
(first published in 1883), with Dale’s scholarly article
(first appeared in the Proceedings of the Fifth Annual
Convention of the Southwestern Political and Social
Science Association, March 24-26, 1924; see Herd 630).
Herd 631: “Scarce.” Dale provides an excellent history
of ranching in the Cherokee Strip, including formation
of the Association and its leasing of lands from the
Cherokee Nation and eventual public pressure on the
Cherokee to sell the Strip in order to open the area to
farming and settlement. Cattle were introduced into the
unfenced Cherokee Strip in the early 1870s, and by 1880
the range was well stocked. The Cherokee Strip Live
Stock Association leased six million acres at $100,000
(less than two cents per acre).   $50.00
1380.   DALE, Edward Everett. Cow Country. Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press, 1942. ix [3] 265 [1] pp.,
text   illustrations   (line   drawings  by   Richard  G.
Underwood). 8vo, original light brown cloth. Very fine
in slightly worn d.j. (price-clipped).
    First collected edition (this collection of essays
first appeared in various periodicals 1917-1942).
Campbell, p. 104: “Expert interpretation and history of
the land of cattle. Humorous, humane, and nostalgic.”
Guns 543. Herd 632. Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 18: “Largely
an economic history.” Reese, Six Score 27n.
    From d.j. blurb by J. Frank Dobie: “Dale has been a
top hand for a good while in writing about the range.
Cow   Country   is   certainly   his  climax.   It  is  a
delicious...blend of the knowledge mastered by Dale the
historian and of an easy intimacy with the subject
acquired by Dale the man while he rode horseback over
grass, bached in a dugout and owned his own cows. The
two chapters ‘Riders of the Range’ and ‘The Humor of the
Cowboy’ have more bully anecdotes than any other
chapters, with the possible exception of Charlie
Russell’s, ever printed. A historian without a sense of
humor can’t possibly tell the truth about human beings.
Dale’s humor and humanity make him the grass roots
historian.”
    Dale (1879-1972) grew up in Greer County (then part
of Texas, but now several counties in southwest
Oklahoma). He witnessed the transition from cattle trail
to railroad. After failing in a small ranching operation
with his brother, Dale entered the University of
Oklahoma when he was almost thirty years old. He studied
under Frederick Jackson Turner and did field work with
Native Americans for the Brookings Institution, but is
best known for writing on cattlemen and ranching
history.    $100.00
1381.   DALE, Edward Everett. The Cow Country in
Transition [caption title]. N.p., n.d. (ca. 1937). 3-20
pp. 8vo, stapled (as issued). Very fine.
    Separate issue of an address first printed in the
Mississippi Valley Historical Review 24:1 (June 1937).
Herd 633 (lists a separate printing without imprint but
attributed to Torch Press at Cedar Rapids in 1937; same
collation as present item, but apparently wrappers were
added; Torch Press version is 25.3 cm tall and present
offprint is 25 cm tall). This essay appears in Dale’s
Cow Country (see preceding entry).   $35.00

1382.   DALE, Edward Everett. Frontier Ways: Sketches of
Life in the Old West. Austin: University of Texas Press,
[1959]. xiv, 265 pp., full-page text illustrations by
Malcolm Thurgood. 8vo, original tan cloth. Very fine in
very fine d.j.
    First edition. King, Women on the Cattle Trail and
in the Roundup, p. 15: “Good view of women’s social
activities in the cattle country.” A picture of the
lives of the cowboys and pioneers of the Old West,
including information on pioneer families, social
customs, schools, and cooking.    $40.00

1383.   DALE, Edward Everett. “History of the Ranch
Cattle Industry in Oklahoma,” in Annual Report of the
American Historical Association for the Year 1920.
Washington: GPO, 1925. Pp. 307-322. 8vo, original blue
cloth. Moderate outer wear and mild staining, corners
bumped, internally fine.
    First printing. Herd (635) and Rader (1030) list the
separate printing of Dale’s article. History of ranching
in Oklahoma from its beginning through statehood in
1907, focusing on historical evolution rather than
economics. Of the U.S. policy regarding leasing of lands
to the Cherokee Live Stock Association in 1883, Dale
comments: “[U.S.] policy was little short of absurd. It
invited ranchmen to enter the Indian Territory and
intrigue with savage tribesmen. It placed a premium upon
bribery and corruption [and] could not be enforced....
For more than six years the Cherokee Strip Live Stock
Association was a great power in the Southwest.” $35.00
1384.   DALE, Edward Everett. Indians of the Southwest.
Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1949. xvi, 283 [2]
pp., 32 plates (photographic), 5 maps. 8vo, original
grey cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition of author’s best-known book (Lamar, p.
284). Civilization of the American Indian Series 28.
Campbell, pp. 113-14: “The author...once served on the
Meriam Commission and visited most of the reservations
in the West. He is therefore well aware of the various
difficulties of the tribes, of the problems of Indian
agents caught in a tangle of red tape, with limited
funds, inadequate help, and wayward wards.... His
solution—to abolish racial prejudice and intolerance—he
thinks can be brought about by better education.
Scholarly, readable, and enlightened.” Edwards, Enduring
Desert, p. 64. Paher, Nevada 426n: “A standard source on
Indian-federal      government     relationships,      this
publication    gives   the    reader   a   knowledge    and
understanding of the southwestern tribes by tracing
events which created existing conditions.” Wallace,
Arizona History XIV:8. Dale includes discussion and
photographs   of   Native   American   sheep  and    cattle
enterprises.    $75.00

1385.   DALE, Edward Everett. The Prairie Schooner and
Other Poems. Guthrie, Oklahoma: Co-operative Publishing
Co., 1929. 85 pp. 8vo, original embossed pictorial
leatherette. Other than minor outerwear, very fine.
Signed by author. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his
bookplate.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 227: “Book of genial and
regional verses by one of the most eminent historians of
Oklahoma.” Range verse, including “The Poet Lariat,”
“The Westerner,” and “The Ballad of Jesse James.” In his
introduction, Dale writes, “The cowboy with his boots
and spurs, his wide-brimmed hat and trusty forty-five.
Full of strange oaths and stranger humors too. Jealous
of honor, sudden and quick in quarrel. Pointing the
winding herd across the prairies green, joining in the
roundup or the dusty toil of noisy branding pen. Seeking
his pleasures in the wild night life of roystering
cowtowns, and too often closing out an ill-spent life in
hectic argument with the town marshal or the county
sheriff” (p. 11). $75.00

 A Merrill Aristocrat – Dale’s Range Cattle Industry in
                         Dust Jacket
1386.   DALE, Edward Everett. The Range Cattle Industry.
Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1930. 216 pp.,
frontispiece,    photographic   plates,    maps,   decorated
endpapers. 4to, original green cloth. Very fine in d.j.
(lightly worn and spotted).
    First edition of a Merrill Aristocrat. Campbell, pp.
130, 186. Dobie, p. 101. Herd 639: “Rare.” Howes D20.
Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 17. One
Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 75:
“Important aspects of this study...are the author’s
recommendations for the cattle industry to develop more
scientific methods of grazing, to effect long-term
planning and to work toward the restoration of the
range.    Equally    important   are    the   ‘dot    maps,’
photographs, and extensive bibliography.” Rader 1036.
Reese, Six Score 27: “A classic study of ranching on the
Great Plains from 1865 to 1925.... His writings were
pioneering works in the historiography of the range
cattle   industry.”    Saunders   4008.   The    documentary
photographs are excellent. $375.00

1387.   DALE, Edward Everett. The Range Cattle Industry.
Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1930. Another
copy. Slightly rubbed, otherwise fine.   $250.00

1388.   DALE, Edward Everett. The Range Cattle Industry:
Ranching on the Great Plains from 1865 to 1925. Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press, [1960]. xv [1] 207 pp.,
photographic plates, maps. 8vo, original tan cloth. Very
fine in d.j. with minor wear. Autographed by author.
    Second edition, with a new introduction by Dale.
   $100.00

1389.   DALE, Edward Everett & J. Frank Dobie. An
Exhibition   of   Paintings   and  Bronzes   by   Frederic
Remington, Charles M. Russell May to October, 1950
[wrapper title]. Tulsa: Thomas Gilcrease Foundation,
1950.   [37]   pp.,   photographic   illustrations.   8vo,
original pale orange printed wrappers. Very fine.
    First    edition.   Dykes,    Fifty   Great    Western
Illustrators (Remington 43). McVicker B77. Yost &
Renner, Russell II:67. Introductions by Dale (Remington)
and J. Frank Dobie (Russell). $35.00

1390.   DALE, Kittie. Echoes and Etchings of Early
Ellis. [Denver]: Big Mountain Press, [1964]. 224 pp.,
text illustrations (mostly photographic). 8vo, original
yellow cloth. Very fine in lightly worn, price-clipped
d.j.
    First edition. Pioneer history of a small Kansas
town, including mention of cowboys, early ranching
activities of the area, and Ellis’s short stint as a
cowtown. From 1875 to 1880, Ellis served as a shipping
point for cattle herds driven up from the south.
“Because of exceptional railroad facilities, Ellis had a
large part in the Texas longhorn cattle trade...and took
its turn as a wild rough cowtown, with the open doors of
saloons and gambling houses never closing for the trail
riders, the buffalo hunters, mule skinners, cowboys,
gamblers, and adventurers of all kinds who drifted
within its borders” (p. 195).
    The author includes material on apprehension of a
rustler, the inevitable conflict between trail bosses
and the homesteaders whose fields the herds ruined, and
the interesting snippet that “when herds of Texan
longhorns came to Ellis to be shipped, the bawl of the
cattle could be heard for days ahead of their arrival”
(p. 203). $50.00

1391.   DALE LAND & CATTLE COMPANY. Incorporated under
the Laws of the State of Texas. No. 131. ___ Shares. The
Dale Land & Cattle Co. Places of Business Bonham &
Henrietta, Texas. Headquarter Ranches in Clay County,
Texas. Capital Stock, $300,000. 3,000 Shares of $100
Each...Certificate of Stock. [St. Louis, Geo. D. Bernard
& Company, ca. 1900]. Lower left: Geo. D. Barnard & Co.
St. Louis. Engraved stock certificate measuring 23.2 x
29.5 cm. Very fine, unused.
    A handsome stock certificate with illustration of a
two men on horseback with a small herd of cattle, cactus
in the foreground, and fenced homestead in the
background. This stock certificate documents ranching
roots in the Texas Panhandle near the Oklahoma border.
Henrietta was one of the last areas of Texas to be
settled by Anglos. George D. Barnard created prints for
other promotional materials for Texas in the late
nineteenth century and assisted with creation of the
great series of Texas county maps put out by the General
Land Office in the nineteenth and early twentieth
century.   $125.00

1392.   DALTON, Emmett & Jack Jungmeyer. When The
Daltons Rode. Garden City: Doubleday, Doran & Co., 1931.
viii, 313 pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic
plates (including opening of Cherokee Strip), pictorial
endpapers. 8vo, original brown pebble cloth with
illustration of a smoking six-shooter. Light ownership
ink stamps of Geo. T. Bradley on title and half-title,
otherwise fine (text very clean and fresh), in the rare
d.j. with illustration by Ross Santee (price-clipped,
torn, and lightly soiled).
    First    edition.  Dykes,    Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Santee 350); Rare Western Outlaw Books,
pp. 38-39 (title illustrated): “Of the books about the
Oklahoma outlaws, I like Emmett Dalton’s When the
Dalton’s Rode and Col. Bailey C. Hanes’s Bill Doolin.”
Guns 549: “Scarce.” Howes D39.
    This book purports to present the true story of the
Dalton gang told by the only survivor of the Coffeyville
bank robbery, which effectively put an end to the gang’s
forays. “In 1882, the [Dalton family] moved into the
Cherokee Nation in what is now Oklahoma. The boys still
at home were soon working as cowboys and consorting with
a rough crowd that included several men who would later
become members of their gang.... In [1889] Oklahoma
opened up to settlement, and the Daltons moved into a
profitable horse-stealing operation, in spite of the
badges they still wore. For a time after the Osage
caught on to their activities, they carried on their
clandestine operations as officers for the Cherokee. By
1890, however, they were discredited as lawmen and had
turned to horse stealing as a full-time enterprise”
(Lamar, p. 185).
    Emmett Dalton declares at the end: “Vanished was the
virgin wild along the Cimarron, the Canadian, and the
Red Rivers where we rough-shod young riders had galloped
and marauded. Some of the cowboys, shamefaced, were
beginning to guide plows. A few of them actually fell so
low as to milk a cow!” Handbook of Texas Online: Dalton
Gang.   $250.00
1393.   DALTON, John Edward. Forged in Strong Fires: The
Early Life and Experiences as Told by John Edward
Dalton, Looking Back over the Years, and Taken Down and
Edited by M. P. Wentworth. Caldwell: Caxton Printers,
1948. 373 pp., color frontispiece, illustrations and
pictorial endpapers by Cecil Smith. 8vo, original
textured terracotta cloth. Fine, in two dust wrappers,
as issued (a plain brown d.j. in fine condition and a
moderately worn, chipped, and price-clipped pictorial
d.j.).
    First edition, limited edition (#556 of 1000, signed
by Wentworth). Herd 2471. Here is the fantastic life
story of John E. Dalton, who grew up in the Red River
area of North Texas in the late 1800s. “He was the
prototype of the gay and fearless American cowboy” (from
d.j. blurb). Dalton states that his grandfather was from
Kilkenny, two of his great-uncles were killed at the
Alamo, and in the late 1860s his father dealt in hides
and cattle in Texas and sent trail herds to Kansas.
Dalton did it all: pioneer Texas ranch kid; rodeo trick
rider and roper; hunting wild elephants in India;
incarceration   in  Czarist   Russia;   hobnobbing  with
royalty; prize-fighting and rodeoing in Ireland, New
Zealand, and elsewhere; joining a circus in France;
gambling in Algiers; riding horseback across the Sahara
Desert; visiting a ranch (“bullock station”) and
participating in a rodeo and kangaroo and dingo hunts in
Adelaide, Australia, where he was called a “cow laddie”
rather than a cowboy, and more.   $75.00

1394.   DALTON, John Edward. Forged in Strong Fires....
Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1948. Another copy. Light
shelf wear, otherwise very fine in the brown d.j.
    First edition, limited edition (#112 of 1,000
copies, signed by Wentworth). $50.00

1395.   DALTON, John Edward. Forged in Strong Fires....
Caldwell:   Caxton  Printers,   1948.   373   pp.,  color
frontispiece,   illustrations   by  Cecil    Smith.  8vo,
original terracotta cloth. Light shelf wear, fore-edges
foxed, otherwise fine in chipped and lightly foxed
pictorial d.j.
    First trade edition. Herd 2471.   $40.00

1396.   DALTON, Kit. Under the Black Flag by Captain Kit
Dalton, a Confederate Soldier: A Guerilla Captain under
the Fearless Leader Quantrell [sic] and a Border Outlaw
for Seventeen Years Following the Surrender of the
Confederacy. Associated with the Most Noted Band of Free
Booters the World Has Ever Known. [Memphis: Lockard
Publishing Co., 1914]. 252 pp., frontispiece (photograph
of author and Frank James), text illustrations (mostly
photographic). 12mo, original wrappers (illustrated with
portrait of author), sewn. Wraps lightly browned and
with a bit of minor chipping, interior fine. Difficult
to find in decent condition.
    First edition. Graff 993. Guns 550 (calling for
stiff wrappers, whereas the present copy has thin paper
wrappers): “Scarce. One cannot understand why a writer
like this one, supposedly writing about his own life,
could possibly make the statements he does, unless in
his   dotage  his   memory  has   turned   to  fantastic
hallucinations [see Burs Under the Saddle for more of
Adams’ grumbling].” Rader 1048.
    The focus is primarily Quantrill, the Civil War, and
outlawry, but the author includes a chapter on his stint
as a cowpuncher right after the Civil War. Dalton was on
the run and decided that being a cowpuncher was a good
way to hide his true identity. Dalton was hired for $45
to accompany a drive of four thousand head of cattle
from Little Rock to Fort Scott, Kansas (“I passed off as
a western cattleman, and as I could talk pretty
intelligently about this section of the country [and]
they had no occasion to doubt my statements”).
    After the stress of the Civil War and outlaw life,
Dalton comments on the trail drive as if it was a Zen
experience: “In the long, long march across the plains I
had heard nothing more thrilling than the crack of whips
and the bleating of cattle. Not a gun had been fired for
any reason whatsoever. How soothing the sensation, how
peaceful appeared the broad extended prairie! It was
like paradise to me, and I wished it could endure
always.”
    Dalton includes a warm chapter on Belle Starr, noted
female outlaw and alleged rustler (complete with a
portrait of Belle wearing a jaunty feather head-dress
and looking more like a gorgeous Cherokee maiden than
her usual hatchet-faced incarnation): “As a cattle
rustler, she has never had an equal among the stronger
sex, and as a horse thief, she has no superiors. To sum
up her character in one trite paragraph, I will simply
state that Belle was a maroon Diana in the chase, a
Venus in beauty, a Minerva in wisdom, a thief, a robber,
a murderer, and a generous friend. A more fearless human
being never went forth to deeds of bloody mischief nor
washed bloodier hands to dance nimbly over the ivory
keys of a piano.”   $300.00

1397.   [DANA, C. W.]. The Garden of the World; or, The
Great West: Its History, Its Wealth, Its Natural
Advantages.... A Complete Guide to Emigrants, with a
Full Description of the Different Routes Westward. By an
Old Settler.... Boston: Wentworth and Company, 1856. [8]
[13]-396 pp., text engravings (full-page illustrations
of state seals). 12mo, original purple blindstamped
cloth. Cloth faded, moderate outer wear, rear free
endpaper   not   present,  interior   fine   except  for
occasional light foxing and spotting. Contemporary ink
ownership inscription and library ink stamp on front
free endpaper.
    First edition. Buck 564. Cowan, p. 155. Flake 2655.
Graff 995. Howes (1954) 2571.        Plains & Rockies
IV:279a:1: “The author describes a number of routes to
the West. He also offers instructions for prospective
immigrants.” Rader 1051. Smith 2244.
    Chapters are devoted to Texas, California, New
Mexico, Utah, Oregon, Washington Territory, Kansas,
Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois,
Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. Each state is dealt
with in gazetteer-like fashion, and the section entitled
“agriculture” gives livestock statistics. The chapter on
Texas includes a long letter by Sam Houston extolling
the advantages that Texas offers as a field for
immigration. The chapter on Kansas includes a section on
the “Vegetarian Settlement Company.” $150.00

1398.   DANA, C. W. The Great West; or the Garden of the
World:    Its   History,   Its   Wealth,   Its   Natural
Advantages.... Boston: Wentworth and Co., 1858. [8]
[13]-396 [4, ads] pp., engraved text illustrations.
12mo, original brown blindstamped cloth. Worn and faded,
occasional mild to moderate foxing to text, light
marginal water staining to about the last twenty leaves.
Nineteenth-century lending library rules of Union
Library of Providence affixed to front free endpaper,
remains of library slip and pocket on rear pastedown.
    Third edition. Plains & Rockies IV:279a:3. Smith
2246.   $75.00

1399.   DANA, Julian. Sutter of California, a Biography.
New York: Halcyon House, [1938]. xi [3] 423 pp.,
frontispiece portrait, plates (photographic and from old
prints)   maps,   illustrations,  endpaper   maps.  8vo,
original red cloth gilt. Very fine in lightly worn,
price-clipped d.j. (on d.j.: 1839—Sutter Centennial
Edition—1939). Bookseller’s label on lower pastedown.
    Halcyon House Centennial edition (first published in
1934). Rocq 6681. A biography of German-Swiss California
pioneer John Sutter, on whose early California forted
rancho gold was first discovered, triggering the
California Gold Rush. In 1839 Governor Alvarado granted
Sutter eleven square leagues (nearly 50,000 acres) in
the Sacramento Valley and authorized him to represent
the establishment of New Helvetia. “New Helvetia
prospered far beyond most California ranchos because
Sutter diversified his operations to include trapping
and agriculture as well as cattle-raising.... The Gold
Rush was Sutter’s ruin. His workers abandoned him for
the gold fields and squatters and miners...overran his
lands,   dispersed   and  slaughtered   his  herds,   and
destroyed fields” (Lamar, p. 1152).   $30.00

  “Best account of the early hide trade of California”
                   (Reese, Six Score)
1400.   DANA, Richard Henry, Jr. Two Years before the
Mast: A Personal Narrative of Life at Sea. New York:
Harper & Brothers, 1840. 483 pp. 16mo, original black
cloth, spine gilt-lettered. Wear to extremities, hinges
starting, text lightly foxed. Overall a very good copy
of a book difficult to find in collector’s condition.
    First edition of author’s first book, first issue
(copyright notice—letter “i” in “in” dotted, unbroken
running head on p. 9), in BAL binding A. BAL 4434.
Bennett, American Book Collecting, pp. 86-87. Cowan, p.
156n: “One of the most widely read books relating to
California. The author spent much of the years 1835 and
1836 in various parts of that territory, and his
pictures of its life and times are the most brilliant
that we possess.” Dobie, p. 101: “The classic of the
hide and tallow trade of California.” Dykes, Collecting
Range Life Literature, p. 14; Western High Spots, p. 14n
(“Western Movement—Its Literature”); p. 20 (cites the
first edition as #1 in “My Ten Most Outstanding Books on
the West”). Graff 998.
    Grolier American Hundred 46: “Our only trustworthy
account [of California] before the 1849 gold rush.” Herd
642: “The first state is very difficult to come by.”
Hill, pp. 78-79: “[Dana’s] book has become a classic
account of the life and adventures of an ordinary seaman
in the American merchant service. It concerns his
experiences in California in 1835-36, Juan Fernandez
Island, Cape Horn, etc., and is invaluable for its
descriptions of California ranching and social life in
Mexican times, including San Diego, Santa Barbara, and
Monterey.” Howell 50, California 53. Howes D49: “This
account of California in 1835 and 1836 surpassed in
popularity all other books relating to that state.”
Johnson, High Spots of American Literature, pp. 26-27.
LC, California Centennial 173. Libros Californianos
(Hanna list), p. 65. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow
Country, p. 8: “While this book deals primarily with
life at sea, it probably contains more detailed
information on the hide and tallow trade than all other
books on the subject combined.... Its importance cannot
be overemphasized.” Powell, California Classics, pp.
151-62. Reese, Six Score 28: “This classic of American
literature contains the best account of the early hide
trade of California.” Zamorano 80 #26.   $6,000.00

1401.   [DANA, Richard Henry, Jr.]. Two Years before the
Mast.... New York: Harper & Brothers, 1840. Another
copy, binding variant (BAL Binding B, no priority).
16mo, original tan muslin printed in black. Joints
neatly mended, a bit of scattered foxing, but a near
fine copy in a notoriously fragile binding, much better
than most. The muslin binding is more difficult to find
than   the   black  cloth   binding  (see   preceding).
    $6,000.00

1402.   DANA, Richard H. Two Years before the Mast....
New York: Heritage Press, [1941]. x, 347 [1] pp., text
illustrations (some in color) by Dale Nichols, endpaper
maps. 8vo, original blue gilt-pictorial cloth. Spine
faded, otherwise fine in publisher’s slipcase. Related
copy of the Heritage Club Sandglass (no. 6E) laid in.
Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate.
    Modern illustrated edition of Dana’s classic work.
    $30.00

1403.   DANIELL, L. E. (comp.). Personnel of the Texas
State Government with Sketches of Distinguished Texans,
Embracing the Executive and Staff, Heads of the
Departments, United States Senators and Representatives,
Members of the Twentieth Legislature. Austin: Published
by L. E. Daniell (at the Press of the City Printing
Company), 1887. 317 pp., frontispiece of the State
capitol, engraved plates (mostly portraits). 8vo,
original brown cloth. Binding worn and faded, front
hinge cracked. Old paper spine labels and contemporary
ink ownership inscription partially removed.
    First   edition.   Rader   1056.  Raines,   p.   61.
Biographies (many with portraits) of Texans, including
many of interest for ranching history, for example,
Robert J. Kleberg, C. C. Slaughter, Charles Goodnight,
et al. Daniell prepared biographical compilations of
legislators and other Texans in 1887, 1889, 1890, and
1892. Each compilation represents the men in service at
the time of publication, and although some biographies
are repeated in the series, each compilation is a new
work in itself. Taken together, Daniell’s compilations
are a rich source of history and biography, sometimes
providing details not found elsewhere on men, local
history, the cattle industry, and the Civil War. $250.00

1404.   DANIELL, L. E. (comp.). Personnel of the Texas
State   Government,   with   Sketches   of   Distinguished
Texans.... Austin: Published by L. E. Daniell (at Smith,
Hicks & Jones, State Printers), 1889. 436 pp.,
frontispiece engraving of the State capitol, text
illustrations and plates (engraved and photographic
portraits). 8vo, original maroon cloth gilt. Moderate
outer wear, lower portion of spine missing, covers
almost   detached,   interior   fine.   Contemporary   ink
ownership signature of noted collector J. C. Ingram,
with his pencil notes on the pages of his ancestor,
James M. Ingram.
    First edition. Raines, p. 61. Another of Daniell’s
compilations (see preceding), including Curran Michael
Rogers of South Texas (stock raiser and legislator who
served   on   the   special   legislative   committee   on
lawlessness in Texas arising from fence cutting);
William Frederick Miller of San Antonio (cowboy, farmer,
and stock raiser); Blucher H. Erskine (representative
for Guadalupe, Uvalde, Kinney, and surrounding counties
“engaged in milling and stockraising” in Guadalupe
County); Norton Moses of Burnet County (chairman of the
Committee on Agriculture and Stock Raising); stock
raiser Sam Whitted of San Saba County; Edward LeGrand
Dunlap of Refugio (ranched in Refugio and Victoria
counties); and many more. $125.00

1405.   DANIELL, L. E. (comp.). Personnel of the Texas
State Government, with Sketches of Representative Men of
Texas. San Antonio: Maverick Printing House, 1892. xvi,
682 pp., frontispiece of Huddle’s painting of the
surrender of Santa Anna to Sam Houston at San Jacinto,
numerous plates (photographic and engraved portraits—
many after Huddle’s paintings). Thick 8vo, original
maroon calf stamped in gilt and blind, bevelled edges.
Binding worn and spine almost detached, hinges cracked,
intermittent browning to text. J. C. Ingram’s signature
on front endpaper and pastedown and his card tipped onto
front pastedown.
    First edition. Raines, p. 62. This compilation
includes Richard King (“known wherever the English
language is spoken as the greatest individual ranchman
and cattle owner in the world”); Charles Schreiner;
Santiago Sanchez (“one of the leading citizens of Laredo
and principal land and cattle owner in Tamaulipas”);
Thomas O’Connor (“a real-live Texas cattle king”);
Dennis O’Connor and his wife, Mary Virginia Drake
O’Connor; William Kuykendall; and many more. In our
opinion, this is the best of the Daniell compilations,
much larger, with interesting additions, more women, and
higher quality illustrations. $300.00

1406.   DANIELS, Helen Sloan (comp.). The Ute Indians of
Southwestern Colorado. Durango: Durango Public Library
Museum Project, National Youth Administration, 1941.
[14]    136    [14,   bibliography   and    index]   pp.
(mimeographed), illustrations (mostly artifacts, some in
color), maps. 4to, original stiff beige pictorial
wrappers. Fine.
    First edition. Wilcox, p. 36. Wynar 1753. This
publication was created as part of the National Youth
Administration program. The compiled articles by Anglo
and Ute authors include D. H. Wattson (Superintendent of
the Consolidated Ute Agency in Colorado), Ford C. Frick
(on Ute legends), Buckskin Charley (head chief at the
Ute Reservation at Ignacio, Colorado), and others.
    Adair Wilson, et al., in “The Southern Ute Indians
of Colorado” document that the Meeker massacre was due
to Ute dissatisfaction with the long, narrow reservation
(15 by 110 miles) allotted them in 1874 by the U.S.
government. Quoted is an 1878 report by Ute agent F. H.
Weaver: “Experience has shown that the shape into which
this reservation has been thrown has been very
unfortunate. A strip of ground fifteen miles wide with
herds of cattle from both sides pouring in upon it,
eating up all the grass is no place to keep Indians.”
When asked what the Utes expected in a reservation when
removal from Colorado to Utah was proposed, Buckskin
Charley replied: “We want to go west and get grass land
and raise stock.” He testified in 1886 that his people
wished to become self-supporting, but could not because
of   the    shape   of   their   reservation,   constant
encroachments, and Ute stock roaming beyond reservation
confines.
    Indian Commissioner Atkins testified in 1886 that at
the time the pastoral Utes numbered about 983 souls with
a herd of over 8,000 head of cattle, horses, mules, and
sheep. Included is a map of the reservation. Among the
folklore documented is Buckskin Charley’s account of
“The Branded Buffalo,” relating a disturbing boyhood
buffalo hunt near Spanish Peaks, in which the warriors
discovered that each of the buffalo they killed bore a
brand on its shoulder. $250.00

1407.   DANIELSON, Clarence L. & Ralph W. Danielson.
Basalt: Colorado Midland Town. Boulder: Pruett Press,
[1965]. xiii [1] 371 pp., frontispiece map, text
illustrations (some full-page and/or in color—mostly
photographs, including several aerial views and many
vintage portraits), brands, maps in back pocket. Large
8vo, original brown buckram. Fine in d.j. with one small
spot and neat tape repair on back. Scarce, privately
printed local history.
    First edition, limited edition (#357 of 1,500 copies
signed by the authors). Wynar 902. This local history of
Basalt includes a list of early cattlemen in the Roaring
Fork and Frying Pan Valleys, along with an illustrated
list of early brands. The author describes his boyhood
adventures on the Smith Ranch.    $75.00

1408.   DARLEY, George M. Pioneering in the San Juan:
Personal Reminiscences of Work Done in Southwestern
Colorado during the “Great San Juan Excitement.”
Chicago, New York & Toronto: Fleming H. Revell Co.,
1899. 225 [1] pp., frontispiece (photographic portrait
of author), photographic plates. 12mo, original grey and
blue embossed pictorial cloth. Moderate shelf wear and a
few light stains to cloth, a good to very good copy,
with author’s signed and dated presentation copy to S.
B. Hardy.
    First edition. Guns 556: “Scarce.” Wilcox, p. 36.
Wynar 9115. In chapter 26 (“Picking Bullets from the
Pulpit    the   Sabbath   Following    Mob   Violence”),
Presbyterian minister Darley relates the lynching of the
cattle rustlers known as the Lee Roy Brothers: “At Del
Norte...we had some men who were not considered good
citizens, and the county contained a few more of like
character. One in particular was not loved by the
ranchmen, because he was accused of counting more cattle
for his own than belonged to him.”
    A lynch mob gathered on a Saturday but politely
waited until Monday to invade the Del Norte courthouse
and jail where Darley conducted religious services on
Sunday. The head rustler escaped but his accomplice was
killed by the mob. Darley sagely observes that “hanging
is the only thing that will make some men quit their
cussedness” (p. 187). Darley recalls twenty years of
ministry among the towns of the San Juan Mountains of
Colorado, with descriptions of miners and mining,
establishing first the churches on the Western Slope,
gambling, sporting men and fast women, fatalities from
snow slides, Ute horse racing, animosity of Utes toward
Anglos (“all they know is they have been robbed and
their only desire is for revenge”), etc.
    The documentary photographs are wonderful, including
“Ouray, Colo., Looking East in 1898,” “Dealing Faro in a
San Juan Gambling Hall,” “Wheel of Fortune—Miners at
Home in 1877,” “Prospector on His Way to a New Gold
Field,” “Four Ute Chief, Agent, and Interpreter,” “Elder
James K. Herring and Rev. Geo. M. Darley, D.D. [on skis]
Ready for a Swift Run,” etc. $300.00

1409.   DARLEY, George M. Pioneering in the San Juan....
Chicago, New York & Toronto: Fleming H. Revell Co.,
1899. Another copy. Binding rubbed and spotted, lower
edge stained. Author’s signed and dated presentation
copy to W. W. Rowan, M.D. $225.00

1410.   DARLEY, George M. Pioneering in the San Juan....
Chicago, New York & Toronto: Fleming H. Revell Co.,
1899. Another copy. Slight shelf wear, front upper
corner lightly bumped, one spot on upper cover,
otherwise fine, tight, and fresh inside. $300.00




          Limited Edition of Dary’s Buffalo Book
1411.   DARY, David A. The Buffalo Book. Chicago: Sage
Books, The Swallow Press, [1974]. [12] 374 pp., plates
and text illustrations (photographic and illustrations
by Remington, Russell, and others), tables. 8vo, full
buffalo hide with embossed swallow on lower cover. Mint
in publisher’s slipcase.
    First edition, second printing, limited edition (#22
of 50 numbered and signed copies, in the special buffalo
hide binding, with note that no animals were killed in
order to provide hides for this special edition). Dykes,
Western High Spots, p. 68 (“High Spots of Western
Illustrating” #224): “Best of all the buffalo books to
date.”
    In the chapter titled “In Captivity” there is
extensive discussion of riding, roping, and harnessing
buffalo, with many photographs of cowboys riding bucking
buffalo and perpetuating other rodeo customs upon the
hapless and truculent beasts. “Bridles were slipped over
their heads and a harness was thrown from a safe
distance onto their backs. The tongue of a heavy freight
wagon was slowly shoved between the bulls and fixed into
a neck-yoke. The traces were fastened to the singletrees
with a long hooked iron rod. Then a lariat was fastened
around the horns of each bull and held by a mounted
cowboy, one on each side of the buffalo, to prevent a
general smash-up should the buffalo stampede when turned
loose. Seven cowboys climbed aboard the large freight
wagon and the buffalo were released. Like the angry
animals they were, they broke for open country. The
cowboys in the wagon fired their pistols onto the air
and the wagon shot across the open country like a dog
with tin cans tied to his tail. It was indeed a strange
sight” (p. 250).
    The book includes material on Charles Goodnight’s
attempts to preserve the buffalo, “Buffalo” Jones,
cattalo, buffalo in rodeo events, “The American Buffalo
as a Symbol,” etc. The appendix contains an article “So
You Want to Raise Buffalo!” $400.00
1412.   DAUGHTERS OF UTAH PIONEERS. Beneath Ben Lomond’s
Peak: A History of Weber County, 1824-1900.... Compiled
by Milton R. Hunter. Salt Lake City: Publishers Press,
1966.    xxiv,    606   pp.,    frontispiece,   numerous
illustrations (some full-page, many photographic), maps.
8vo, original black cloth. Fine.
    Third printing of 1944 edition. Discusses pioneer
cattle operations, including mention of Miles Goodyear,
“the first cattleman in Weber County” (p. 295). $45.00

1413.   DAVID, Robert B. Malcolm Campbell, Sheriff: The
Reminiscences of the Greatest Frontier Sheriff in the
History of the Platte Valley, and the Famous Johnson
County Invasion of 1892. Casper: Wyomingana, Inc.,
[1932]. [2] 361 [5] pp., frontispiece portrait of
Campbell, photographic plates, maps, facsimiles, plans.
8vo, original turquoise cloth. An exceptionally fine,
bright copy of a book that is usually found in faded
covers or with a dull spine. Signed by Sheriff Malcolm
Campbell on frontispiece portrait.
    First edition, limited edition (350 copies). Dobie,
pp. 102: “Much of the ‘Johnson County War’ between
cowmen and thieving nesters.” Graff 1012. Guns 557:
“Scarce.” Herd 647. Howes D85. Malone, Wyomingiana, p.
3.
    These are the personal reminiscences of the sheriff
at the center of the Johnson County War that erupted
after two unusually harsh winters reduced herd numbers
drastically, making cattle a prized commodity. The
epochal confrontation played out in Wyoming in 1892
between two groups, the small local cattlemen and
settlers vs. the “cattle kings” (many of whom were
nonresident investor-owned companies) organized as the
Wyoming Stock Growers Association. The latter hired
Texas gunmen to invade Johnson County, kill suspected
rustlers, and exile and intimidate the remaining small
ranchers.
    Campbell comments (pp. 149-50): “In the spring of
1892, in defiance of the Live Stock Commission and the
laws which authorized that body to designate and divide
the state into roundup districts, there was held a
meeting of small cattlemen and rustlers at Buffalo, the
county seat of Johnson County, where they formed a body
which they called the Northern Wyoming Farmers and Stock
Growers Association. There they proceeded to arrange
roundups to be held on May 1st, a month previous to the
date of the legal roundups, which would enable them to
collect the mavericks before the wagons and men of the
large cattle companies could get on the ground. It was
recognized throughout the state that this was the last
straw. To allow this aggressive action to proceed
unchecked was impossible, and the range expectantly
waited for the first move of retaliation from the
cattlemen.” $350.00

1414.   DAVID, Robert B. Malcolm Campbell, Sheriff....
Casper: Wyomingana, Inc., [1932]. Another copy, signed
by Malcolm Campbell on frontispiece portrait. A few
scratches on covers, which are slightly stained.
Contemporary ink notes of L. R. A. Condit of Barnum,
Wyoming, and February 1932 ink presentation from T. J.
Gatchell. $250.00

1415.  DAVID, Robert B. Malcolm Campbell, Sheriff....
Casper: Wyomingana, Inc., [1932]. Another copy, author
Robert B. David’s signed presentation copy: “Best regard
to my old friend ‘Bill’ Raine from Robert B. David (the
recipient was William MacLeod Raine, noted English
writer on Western subjects; see Thrapp III, pp. 1188-
89). Light shelf wear, lower corner of upper cover
bumped, spine sunned and small split to cloth on spine,
interior is quite fine.   $225.00

1416.   DAVID, Robert B. Malcolm Campbell, Sheriff....
Casper: Wyomingana, Inc., [1932]. Another copy. Spine
faded, otherwise fine and bright. Pictorial presentation
label pasted onto front free endpaper, “Presented to J.
A. Shoemaker by C. A. ‘Chuck’ Bresnahan.” $225.00

1417.   DAVID, Robert B. Malcolm Campbell, Sheriff....
Casper: Wyomingana, Inc., [1932]. Another copy. Mint.
    $200.00

1418.   DAVIDSON,  Harold   G.  Edward   Borein,  Cowboy
Artist: The Life and Works of John Edward Borein, 1872-
1945. Garden City: Doubleday & Co., 1974. 189 pp.,
frontispiece, color plates, text illustrations (artwork
and photographs). Small folio, original maroon cloth.
Very fine in fine d.j.
    First trade edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p.
62 (“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #137). First
biography and compilation of one of the great artists of
the Western range (Borein’s close friend Charles Russell
is reputed to have once called him the better artist of
the two). Borein (1872-1945) left school at age
seventeen and worked with a saddler where he learned
about gear and braided riatas. After working at odd jobs
on a California ranch, he briefly attended art school in
San Francisco and met Maynard Dixon and James G.
Swinnerton.
    The first sketches Borein sold were printed in the
Los Angeles publication, The Land of Sunshine, where he
was described as a vaquero on the Jesús María Rancho,
Santa Barbara County. The “cowpuncher artist” went on to
become one of the most important western genre painters,
often working in a seldom-used medium in Western art—
etching.   $100.00

1419.   DAVIDSON, Levette J[ay] (ed.). Poems of the Old
West: A Rocky Mountain Anthology. [Denver]: University
of Denver Press, [1951]. 240 pp. 8vo, original greyish
blue cloth. A few spots to front free endpaper,
otherwise very fine in price-clipped d.j. with one small
tear (no loss).
    First edition. Campbell, p. 221. The section on
“Cowboys and Cattle” contains contributions by S. Omar
Barker, Frank Benton, E. A. Brininstool, Robert V. Carr,
Wallace D. Coburn, Sarah Elizabeth Howard, and others.
Each poem is preceded by a short statement about the
genesis or background history of the poem.
    Wallace D. Coburn remarks on his poem “The Cowboy’s
Fate”: “The cowboy has never admitted that he is just
another agricultural worker. In the wild days, he could
look forward to a death more spectacular than that of
Robert Frost’s ‘Hired Man.’” $30.00

1420.   DAVIDSON,   Levette  J[ay]  &  Forrester   Blake
(eds.). Rocky Mountain Tales. Norman: University of
Oklahoma Press, 1947. xiv, 302 pp., text illustrations
by Skelly Scholnick. 8vo, original green cloth. Very
fine in d.j. with slight wear.
    First   edition.   Guns  558.  Herd   649.   Malone,
Wyomingiana, p. 19 “The lighter side of life in the
Rocky Mountains.” The section entitled “Open Range”
presents authentic recollections of cowboys from early
twentieth-century periodicals, WPA Writers’ Project
interviews, etc.
    Adelbert H. Whaite in “Cowpoke” (1912) recalls
various tenderfoot mistakes he made, such as camping in
an arroyo on the Purgatoire and having his fine new
bearskin chaps washed away in a great rush of water in
the middle of the night. “Cowpunching was glorious work
for me; all day long in the saddle, with some night
herding along with it, in all sorts of weather. All days
were the same to us—we forgot their names and the
calendar was no part of our lives. The work was hard but
more or less exciting and the hours were long. We turned
in with the chickens and got up with the cows” (p. 193).
    $35.00

1421.   DAVIDSON,  Levette   J[ay]  &   Forrester   Blake
(eds.). Rocky Mountain Tales.... Norman: University of
Oklahoma Press, 1947. Another copy. Contemporary gift
inscription, otherwise fine, d.j. not present.    $15.00

1422.   DAVIDSON,   Levette    Jay   & Prudence  Bostwick
(eds.). The Literature of the Rocky Mountain West, 1803-
1903. Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1939. 449 pp. 8vo,
original red cloth. Exceptionally fine in fine d.j.
(price-clipped).
    First edition. Campbell, p. 28. Dobie, pp. 24, 72.
Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 2 (“Introduction—My
Sport”). Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 19: “Selections from a
large variety of writings of the early period of western
literature, many from rare and precious books, chosen
for interest and value in showing the history of the
region. Biographical sketches and evaluations of the
authors quoted.” Smith 2290. Wynar 8215.
    Among the authors are Andy Adams (“Celebrating in
Frenchman’s Ford,” an excerpt from Log of a Cowboy);
Walt Whitman (describing Colorado: “One wants new words
in writing about these plains, all the inland American
West,—the    terms,    far,     large,  vast,   &c.   are
insufficient”); Mark Twain (“Memorable Sights on the
Overland Trail”); Isabella Bird’s account of her ascent
of Long’s Peak; etc.    $75.00

1423.   DAVIS, Britton. The Truth about Geronimo. New
Haven, London & Oxford: Yale University Press, Humphrey
Milford & Oxford University Press, 1929. xvii [1] 253
pp., frontispiece (photographic portrait of Geronimo),
photographic plates, map. 8vo, original grey cloth. An
unusually fine copy in fine d.j. (price-clipped, two
small, closed tears).
    First edition, edited and with introduction by Milo
Milton Quaife. Campbell, pp. 39-40. Dobie, p. 33: “Davis
helped run Geronimo down.” Powell, Arizona Gathering II
428n. Rader 1066. Saunders 719. Wallace, Arizona History
XIV: 34. WLA, Literary History of the American West, p.
107: “With the exception of Custer’s Last Stand, no
incident in the Indian Wars became more clouded in
controversy than did the surrender of Geronimo.... None
of those writers, however, had credentials superior to
those of Britton Davis, one of the promising junior
officers selected to serve with the Apache scouts.... A
key participant in many of the important events of the
last Apache campaigns, Davis writes of them with
surprising skill.”
    Davis  includes   material  on   transborder  cattle
rustling carried out by Geronimo and his band. In
Chapter 7, Davis recounts the 1886 surrender of Geronimo
to Davis and his Apache scouts at Sulfur Springs Ranch
in Arizona. Geronimo’s entourage of almost one hundred
men, women, and children also included a herd of ponies
and cattle stolen from Mexican ranches. “I called
[Geronimo’s] attention to the cloud of dust that was
slowly approaching. ‘Ganado’ he explained, laconically,
in Spanish. And cattle they were, 350 head of beeves,
cows, and half-grown calves stolen from the Mexican
ranches just below the international line. My heart
beats went up to a record!” (p. 85). $125.00

1424.   DAVIS, Britton. The Truth about Geronimo. New
Haven & London: Yale University Press & Oxford
University Press, 1929. Another copy, variant binding.
8vo, original navy blue cloth. Slight abrading to
binding, top edge of text-block foxed, overall very
good, in worn d.j. with front inner flap missing.
    $85.00

1425.   DAVIS,   Britton.   The   Truth   about   Geronimo.
Chicago: The Lakeside Press & R. R. Donnelley & Sons,
1951.   lxxi  [1]   379   pp.,    frontispiece portrait,
illustrations. 16mo, original maroon cloth, t.e.g. Very
fine.
    Second edition, augmented with a new 25-page
introduction by M. M. Quaife, improved map, and
appendices (“The War in Arizona” by General Crook;
“Difficulties of Indian Warfare” by the author; and
“Hardships of Army Wives”).    $35.00

1426.   DAVIS,    Carlyle   Channing.   Olden  Times   in
Colorado. Los Angeles: Phillips Publishing Company,
1916. [16] 448 pp., frontispiece (5 photographic
portraits of author at various stages of his life),
numerous photographic plates (mostly portraits and
scenes   in    nineteenth-century   Colorado  and   early
twentieth-century Southern California). Large, thick
8vo, original limp pictorial gilt morocco, t.e.g. Spine
light (as usual), otherwise a very fine, bright, tight,
and partially unopened copy of a book difficult to find
in collector’s condition.
    First edition, limited edition (#57 of 300 copies,
signed by author). Campbell, p. 97. Graff 1014. Howes
D105. Wilcox, p. 36. Wynar 334. The emphasis of this
work is pioneer Colorado history, especially mining and
the author’s newspaper work. In the 1880s Davis owned
several newspapers in Leadville and edited the Rocky
Mountain News, the Denver Times, and other papers; he
continued with newspaper work intermittently when he
later migrated to Santa Barbara and Southern California.
Davis claims to have been the first newspaperman in
America to hire a woman reporter.
    The present volume is filled with interesting
history not found elsewhere, running the gamut from his
1879 arrival in the wide-open “gambling hell” and roost
of soiled doves found at Leadville (chapter 27, “First
Night amidst Scenes Never Before Witnessed in a
Civilized Country”) to refined social reportage with
photographs of early Leadville society belles in
extravagant Victorian attire.
    Davis includes an account of his three-month stint
as a sheepherder on the William Batchelder ranch, then
the largest ranch in the Cache la Poudre Valley: “My
duties, with the aid of a number of those singularly
intelligent animals known as shepherd dogs, consisted
mainly in keeping the sheep from straying away, and
protecting them from the ravages of mountain lions and
other beasts of prey. Occasionally they were stampeded
at night by those predatory animals, and scattered for
miles over the foothills.... When such visitations were
coincident with thunder storms, the element of danger in
the task was three-fold”). A run-in with a nine-foot-
long mountain lion with a lamb in its mouth convinced
Davis to return to journalism.
    In chapter 20 (“Glimpse of Early Colorado: Progress
from Grazing to Gold and Silver Greatness”), Davis
observes: “Mining was not a flourishing industry [in
1876]. Cattle and sheep raising were esteemed the more
remunerative.” In his later years Davis attempted to
engage in ranching in Southern California, but notes:
“Ranch life in Southern California is ideal, especially
if one has a bank or other profitable business...to
compensate for the usual hiatus between income and
outgo.... Finally, I hit upon one thing that could be
raised   with  certainty...the   price   on   a Southern
California ranch.... Before I was aware of it, I was
engaged in the real estate business.” $475.00

1427.   DAVIS, Carlyle Channing & William A. Alderson.
The True Story of “Ramona”: Its Facts and Fictions,
Inspiration and Purpose. New York: Dodge Publishing
Company, [1914]. xx, 265 pp., text printed within ornate
borders with California mission motifs, frontispiece,
numerous photographic plates of California in the 1880s.
Large 8vo, original brown pictorial cloth with gilt
lettering, t.e.g. Binding faded, worn, upper cover
soiled, corners bumped and frayed, hinges cracked, free
endpapers    missing.    Contemporary   ink    ownership
inscription.
    First edition. BAL V, p. 116. Cowan, p. 158. Yost &
Renner, Russell XVI:20. This pleasantly printed book is
a study of the people, places, and events that inspired
Helen   Hunt   Jackson’s   famous   book,   Ramona,   “[the
author’s] finest achievement, a romance of genuine
vitality   about   the   tottering   Spanish   society   in
California   and   the   Indians   victimized   by   gringo
usurpers.” Powell (California Classics, pp. 268-78)
designates Ramona “the first novel about Southern
California.” See also Zamorano Eighty #46.
    Included are extensive materials and illustrations
of the Camulos Ranch, home of the real Ramona; other
Southern California ranches are mentioned in the work.
Jackson’s inspiration for Ramona was Uncle Tom’s Cabin,
and Hunt declared: “If I can do one hundredth part for
the Indian that Mrs. Stowe did for the Negro, I will be
thankful.”    Jackson    stated:    “Every   incident    in
Ramona...is true.” Davis and Alderson’s book amply
documents the authenticity of Jackson’s novel, which she
based on research, field investigations, and interviews
with Don Antonio Coronel, former mayor of Los Angeles,
an authority on early California life, and former
inspector of missions for the Mexican government. He
described to Jackson the plight of mission Indians after
1833, when secularization policies led to the sale of
vast mission lands and ranchos and the dispersal of
their residents.
    “Many of the original Mexican grants included
clauses protecting the Indians on the lands they
occupied,” writes Valerie Mathes, author of Helen Hunt
Jackson: Official Agent to the California Mission
Indians. “When Americans assumed control,” Mathes
continues, “they ignored Indian claims to lands, which
led to their mass dispossessions. In 1852, there were an
estimated 15,000 mission Indians in Southern California,
but because of the adverse impact of dispossessions by
Americans, they numbered less than 4,000 by the time of
Helen’s visit.”     $60.00
1428.   DAVIS, Duke. Flashlights from Mountain and
Plain. Bound Brook, New Jersey: Pentecostal Union
(Pillar of Fire), 1911. 266 [5, ads] pp., frontispiece
portrait, plates (photographic, plus 4 color and 7
black-and-white plates by Charles M. Russell), text
illustrations. 12mo, original light blue gilt-pictorial
cloth. Binding lightly stained and worn, endpapers and
fore-edges lightly foxed, upper hinge cracked, interior
fine. Contemporary ink ownership signature on front free
endpaper
    First edition. Herd 653: “Scarce.” Howes D108. Rader
1067. Smith 2301. Yost & Renner, Russell XVI:20. In 1896
the author left his Kentucky home to become a teenage
cowboy on a ranch in Grasshopper Valley, Beaverhead
County, Montana, and thereafter juggled cowboying with
preaching. Although Davis includes much good firsthand
information and valuable documentary photographs on
cowboys and ranches in Montana, at times the cowboy-
preacher becomes tedious with declarations such as:
“Most cowboys become hardened in sin and often drift
beyond the reach of the Gospel,” and “Though once having
been addicted to these habits [swearing, stealing
strays, drinking liquor, etc.] I had long since gained
mastery over them and Satan seldom tempted me with these
things.”
    We found an internet listing of this book on ABE.com
with notes by the Holiness Archives of Hazleton,
Pennsylvania that says it all: “This book is important
for its western heritage and descriptions of outdoor
cowboy life. It is also important to holiness studies
for that same reason! Very little was written from
holiness sources about the cowboys and western life, but
here’s one.”   $75.00

1429.  DAVIS, Duke. Flashlights from Mountain and
Plain. Bound Brook, New Jersey: Pentecostal Union
(Pillar of Fire), 1911. Another copy, variant binding.
12mo, original maroon gilt-pictorial cloth. Light to
moderate shelf   wear,   upper   hinge   starting,   interior
fine.   $85.00

1430.  DAVIS, Duke. Flashlights from Mountain and
Plain. Bound Brook, New Jersey: Pentecostal Union
(Pillar of Fire), 1911. Another copy, variant binding.
12mo, original red gilt-pictorial cloth. Light shelf
wear, upper cover stained, front hinge cracked, interior
fine.  $75.00

1431.   DAVIS,   Ellis    A.   (ed.).   Davis’   Commercial
Encyclopedia of the Pacific Southwest: California,
Nevada, Utah and Arizona. Berkeley: Ellis A. Davis,
[1911].   [28]    196   [70]   pp.,   numerous   portraits,
photographic illustrations, color maps (including 3
folding maps of the western states). Small folio,
original full brown leather gilt. Binding worn and
rubbed, overall very good.
    First edition. Cowan S128. Paher, Nevada 446n. A
copiously illustrated mine of local history, including
biographies    and    descriptions   of   states,   cities,
commerce, and trade. Some of the biographies are of men
involved in the cattle trade. Ranching and the cattle
are discussed in various sections of the book.      $250.00

1432.   DAVIS,  Ellis   A.   (ed.).   Davis’ Commercial
Encyclopedia of the Pacific Southwest, California,
Nevada, Utah and Arizona. Berkeley: Ellis A. Davis,
[1914]. [31] 396 pp., numerous portraits, photographic
illustrations, maps (some folding and in color). Small
folio, original full brown leather gilt. Binding worn
and extremities rubbed, overall very good.
    An enlarged edition of Davis’s valuable compendium
(see preceding). Flake 2684n. $250.00

1433.   DAVIS, Ellis A. & Edwin H. Grobe. The New
Encyclopedia of Texas [pictorial title]. Dallas: Texas
Development Bureau, [1922]. [2, pictorial title] [4] 766
[15] + [2, pictorial title] 769-1,504 [13] + [2,
pictorial title] 1,505-2,250 [13] + [2, pictorial title]
2,249-3,002 [13] pp., including pictorial titles,
hundreds of full-page portraits (photographic, some from
prints or paintings), text illustrations (documentary
photographs of architecture, city views, industries,
attractions, etc.), color maps. 4 vols., large 4to,
original black textured cloth, each cover with embossed
Lone Star and Texas Capitol in gilt and colors. Light
edge wear and mild abrasion to covers, upper hinge
cracked on vol. 2, hinges loose on vol. 3, foxing to
interior of all volumes (mainly affecting pictorial
titles), overall a very good to fine set of work
difficult to find complete.
    First edition. CBC 4310a, 4375a, 4477a, 4545a,
4671a, 6782a. Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. 6. Rader
1068. A massive Texas mug book, with many portraits of
individuals from every walk of life, including cattle
barons such as King, Kleberg, Littlefield, Slaughter, et
al., along with a host of other ranchers—large and
small.
    The first 261 pages contain a chronicle of Texas
history, culture, prospects, industries (much on oil and
photos of gushers), agriculture, etc. Articles on
ranching include: “Cattle Raising in Texas” (by E. B.
Spiller); “The Cattle Industry” (by H. L. Kokernot);
“The Texas Cowboy” (by Tom L. Burnett, with photos of
Theodore Roosevelt in Texas); “The Old Trail Drivers”
(by Ike T. Pryor); “History of the West Texas Cattle
Industry” (by Claude C. Broome); “History of the Texas
Sheep and Goat Industry” (by T. A. Kinkaid); and “Texas
Cattle Industry” (T. D. Hobart). Many of the regional
and    local    histories   contain   documentation   and
photographs relating to ranching, e.g. Kingsville (with
photo of “Santa Gertrudis, King Ranch Headquarters,
Kingsville, Finest Ranch Home in Texas”), Del Rio
(Fawcett    Ranch),   Kerrville   (much  on   Schreiner).
Excellent local and social history (fairly good coverage
of women, including photos), with much on businesses and
economy, transportation, medicine, laws and legal
history, etc.   $400.00

1434.   DAVIS, Lute L. Blankets on the Sand. [Wichita
Falls: Terry Brothers, 1948]. [7] 73 pp., portrait, text
illustrations (photographic). 12mo, original stiff brown
wrappers printed in terracotta, stapled. Very fine.
    First edition. CBC 4733. Herd 655. Authentic
firsthand account of pioneer life in Oklahoma, including
the land rush, Fort Sill, Native Americans (with a
section on their humor), ranching and cowboys, wild
horses, the oil boom in Burkburnett, Texas, etc. $100.00

1435.   DAVIS, Oscar Ezekiel. Recollections 1872-1951:
An Autobiography. El Paso: Carl Hertzog, 1951. [4] 61
pp.,   frontispiece   portrait   (Davis    and  family),
photographic plates, text illustrations. 8vo, original
slate blue printed wrappers, stapled (as issued). Very
fine in original printed mailing envelope.
    First edition, limited edition (200 copies). Lowman,
Printer at the Pass 74B. The author gives an account of
his pioneering experiences in western Oklahoma at the
turn of the nineteenth century. At one point he signed
on as a cook with a cattle outfit. “One spring I took
the job and made the drive with them. They were always a
jolly bunch and kept adding to the number I had to cook
for as we continued the drive. The cowboys gathered all
horses and cattle as we went, as did other camps. Each
cowboy had a mount of from three to five horses and rode
a different horse each day. After a few days we had
quite a good-sized throng of men and beasts, each day
covering about ten miles toward the final goal. Reminded
me of Moses and the children of Israel” (p. 22). $175.00

1436.   DAVIS, R. B. & R. L. Spicer. Status of the
Practice of Brush Control in the Rio Grande Plain.
Austin: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Bulletin 46,
1965. 40 pp., photographic text illustrations, tables,
map laid in. 8vo, original olive green wrappers. Very
fine.
    First printing. An agricultural study of the brush
country of south Texas, with much on its ranches and
rangeland, including the King Ranch. $35.00

1437.   DAVIS, Richard Harding. The West from a Car-
Window. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1892. [10] 242 [1]
pp.,   numerous   text   and   full-page   illustrations
reproduced from photographs and art work by Frederick
Remington and others), including frontispiece (“A
Bucking Broncho” by Remington). 12mo, original blue
cloth with illustration and lettering in silver.
Slightly shelf-slanted, stain on lower cover, text
lightly age-toned, overall a very good copy, with neat
contemporary ink ownership inscription on front free
endpaper.
    First edition. BAL 4513. Campbell, p. 104. Dykes,
Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Remington 507). Guns
566: “Scarce.” Herd 656: “A chapter on Texas ranch life,
mostly on the King Ranch.” Rader 1072. Raines, p. 64: “A
spicy book.” Wynar 2100.
    This account of western travel contains a lively
account of the author’s railroad tour through Texas,
Colorado, and Oklahoma, with chapters: “From San Antonio
to Corpus Christi,” “Our Troops on the Border,” “At a
New Mining Camp, A Three-Year-Old City,” “Ranch Life in
Texas,” “On An Indian Reservation,” “A Civilian at an
Army Post,” and “The Heart of the Great Divide.”
    In the chapter “Ranch Life in Texas,” Davis writes:
“The largest ranch in the United States, and probably in
the world, owned by one person, is in Texas, and belongs
to Mrs. Richard King.... The ‘Widow’s’ ranch, as the
Texans call it, is as carefully organized and moves on
as conservative business principles as a bank.” $100.00
1438.   DAVIS, Richard Harding. The West from a Car-
Window. New York: Harper & Brothers, [1892]. [10] 242
[1] pp., including frontispiece, plates, and text
illustrations. 12mo, original blue pictorial cloth.
Shelf-worn and slightly cocked, covers lightly abraded,
spine darkened, paper lightly age-toned.
    First edition,   later   printing   (without   1892   on
title). $35.00

                       Zamorano 80
1439.   DAVIS, William Heath. Sixty Years in California:
A History of Events and Life in California; Personal,
Political and Military, under the Mexican Regime, during
the Quasi-Military Government of the Territory by the
United States, and after the Admission of the State into
the Union, Being a Compilation by a Witness of the
Events Described. San Francisco: A. J. Leary, 1889.
xxii, 639 pp. 8vo, original purple pebble cloth, spine
gilt-lettered, marbled edges. Spine slightly faded,
hinges cracked (but strong), otherwise very fine.
    First   edition.   Barrett,   Baja    California   647.
Bradford 1234. Cowan, pp. 160-61. Graff 1020. Herd 659:
“A scarce book with chapters on the cattle industry of
California.” Hill, pp. 396-97. Howell 50, California
407: “One of the most trustworthy sources for the period
before 1850.... There were few people of importance he
did not know and his narrative is one of the most
interesting and valuable accounts we have.” Howes D136.
Kurutz,   The   California   Gold    Rush    170a.   Libros
Californianos, pp. 67-68. Rocq 9092. Wheat, Books of the
California Gold Rush 55. Zamorano 80 #27.
    The firsthand information on the early California
cattle trade is quite detailed: “When I was at the port
of San Luis Obispo, in the bark ‘Louisa’ in the year
1831, the Mission of that name was wealthy, with sixty
thousand head of cattle and thousands of sheep and
horses. The great wealth of the Missions, while under
Spanish and Mexican control, will be shown by the
following enumeration of their live stock...” (p. 591);
over the next ten pages Davis lists the holdings of
missions as well as “solid men of the department.”
    $225.00

1440.  [DAVIS, WILLIAM HEATH]. The Following Are the
Reviews of the San Francisco and Alameda County
Newspapers, Favorable As to the Merit of the “Sixty
Years in California,” As a History; Also the Actions of
the State Board of Education, and the Board of Education
of Alameda County, All of Which Is Respectfully
Submitted by the Author. [N.p., 1890]. 29 pp. 12mo,
original tan printed wrappers. Wraps lightly soiled and
foxed, split at spine, and lower corner of upper cover
chipped and repaired with tape, internally clean, a very
good though fragile copy, with ephemera laid in (review
of Rolle’s biography of William Heath Davis with
Streeter’s pencil notes indicating source and date of
1957, along with a slip of paper with a Pony Express
Green backstamp “Pony Express The Central Overlander
California & Pikes Peak Express Company Jan 20 St.
Joseph, Mo” with an old typed note of explanation).
Scarce Zamorano 80 ephemera.
    First separate printing. Cowan p. 160. Among the
reviews is one from the San Francisco News Letter, May
25, 1889, stating: “Mr. Davis also gives an insight into
the cattle business of the country, and speaks without
any comment upon the killing of 2,000 cattle at the
Mission San José for their hides and tallow. No one at
this time had any idea that California had any
agricultural possibilities. All the Californians cared
for were horses; and in their bands of fine horses they
took great pride. To ride after stock, hunt the bear,
and fill up the evening hours with dance and song, was
the attitude of the early Californian’s ambition.”
    $175.00

1441.   DAVIS, William Heath. Seventy-Five Years in
California: Recollections and Remarks by One Who Visited
These Shores in 1831, and Again in 1833, and Except When
Absent on Business Was a Resident from 1838 until the
End of a Long Life in 1909. San Francisco: [Lawton &
Alfred Kennedy for] John Howell-Books, 1967. xi [9] 345
pp., color frontispiece portrait, 19 plates (4 folding,
some in color). Large 8vo, original gilt-decorated
cloth. Unopened and very fine.
    Third edition, edited and corrected from Davis’s own
copy of the 1889 original printing, with added
illustrations, maps, and reference materials. Howell 50,
California 1261: “The definitive edition of the most
readable book on 19th century California.” Kurutz, The
California Gold Rush 170C. Mohr, The Range Country 658n:
“Lots of material on ranching in California.”    $100.00

1442.   DAVIS, W[illiam] W. H. El Gringo; or, New Mexico
and Her People. New York: Harper, 1857. 432 pp.,
engraved frontispiece, 12 wood-engraved plates (views
after original drawings by Brevet Lieut.-Col. Eaton and
F. A. Percey). 8vo, original brown blind-embossed cloth,
gilt-lettered   spine.   Light  shelf   wear,   endpapers
darkened, occasional mild foxing (mainly confined to
first and last leaves), overall very good to fine.
    First edition of one of the earliest full-length
books on New Mexico in English (the copyright notice on
title verso is dated 1856, but this 1857 imprint is the
first edition). Campbell, p. 104. Dobie, p. 76:
“Excellent on manners and customs.” Dykes, Western High
Spots, p. 12 (“Western Movement—Its Literature”). Graff
1021. Howes D139. Laird, Hopi 536. Larned 2026: “Few
narratives   of  any   period  are   more   interestingly
written.” Munk (Alliott), p. 63. Plains & Rockies
IV:289: “Davis traveled the Santa Fe Trail from
Independence to Santa Fe in 1853 and made an excursion
to the Navajo country in 1855.” Rader 1073. Raines, p.
64: “Touches somewhat on the early exploration of the
Rio Grande region of Texas.” Rittenhouse 153. Saunders
4013. Streeter Sale 437.
    Davis, a U.S. Attorney and later acting governor of
New Mexico, was one of the first writers to gain access
to the archives in Santa Fe. His account of early New
Mexico includes much incidental information on sheep
grazing and cattle raising across the region, and
chapter 8 (“Manners and Customs of the People—
Continued”) describes skills and sports of the vaqueros
(e.g., el coleo, the lazo, etc.); minute description of
costume of the mounted caballero, saddles, horse
equipage, horsemanship, brands and branding, etc.;
upland grazing grounds (“the pasturage of New Mexico
excels every other branch of agriculture”); local
practices with cattle, sheep, and goats; etc. Davis
describes various ranches he visited on his law circuit,
such as the Crabb Ranch near Las Cruces, whose stock had
just been stolen by Mescalero Apaches. Davis includes
good material on El Paso. At the end is a sixty-word
vocabulary of Navajo and English. $350.00

                Photogravures of Big Bend
1443.   DAVIS MOUNTAIN FEDERATION OF WOMEN’S CLUBS. The
Big Bend of Texas [wrapper title]. [Brooklyn: Albertype,
ca. 1928]. [80] pp., numerous sepia-tone photogravures.
Oblong 16mo, original cream printed wrappers with
photograph of Fort Davis on upper wrapper, map on lower
wrapper, string tie. Very fine, sealed in original
mailing envelope. Very scarce.
    First edition. CBC 647 (plus 2 additional entries).
Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. 6. According to the
preface, the prime mover behind this project was Mrs. O.
L. Shipman (see Basic Texas Books 184 and Herd 2062 &
2063). This superb guidebook contains descriptive text
and excellent photogravures, including Gage Hotel,
Rancho Valle la Cienega (“the first dude ranch ever
established in Texas”), Brite Ranch, Jones Ranch, Fort
Stockton, Alpine, Presidio-Ojinaga, and other landmarks
of the region. A photogravure is a photographic image
produced from an engraving plate. The process, which was
introduced in the mid-nineteenth century, is rarely used
today due to the very high cost. Photogravure prints
have the subtlety of a photograph and the art quality of
a lithograph. $750.00

1444.  DAWDY, Doris Ostrander. Artists of the American
West: A Biographical Dictionary. Chicago: Sage Books,
The Swallow Press, [1974]. viii, 275 pp. 8vo, original
black cloth. Light shelf wear and rubbing, otherwise
fine.
    First edition. This work lists over 1,300 artists
and illustrators born before 1900 who portrayed the West
in various media. About 300 of the entries present brief
biographical sketches of the artists, analyses of their
work, and holdings where their work can be found. The
artists include the big guns of cowboy and ranch art
(Remington, Russell, Borein, et al.), along with some of
our lesser-known favorites, such as Texas artist Mary
Bonner. $30.00

1445.   DAWSON,   Nicholas.   Narrative    of   Nicholas
“Cheyenne” Dawson (Overland to California in ’41 & ’49,
and Texas in ’51).... Introduction by Charles L.
Camp.... San Francisco: Grabhorn Press, 1933. [12] 100
[7] pp., text illustrations in color by Arvilla Parker.
Tall 8vo, original tan linen over brown pictorial
boards, printed paper spine label. Corners slightly
bumped, endpapers browned, usual light offsetting
opposite text illustrations, otherwise fine in plain
brown d.j.
    Limited edition (500 copies) of the rare original
edition printed in Austin around the turn of the century
in an edition of 50 copies for private distribution.
Grabhorn Press Rare Americana Series 7. Cowan, p. 161n.
Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains and the
Rockies 123. Graff 1027n. Herd 661: “The author...was in
the first company to cross the Rocky Mountains in
1841.... Some scattered information on cattle of
California and Texas.” Howes D159. Mattes, Platte River
Road Narratives 54: “Dawson got his nickname from the
time he was caught by Cheyenne Indians, stripped, and
robbed of knives and gun.” Kurutz, The California Gold
Rush 171: “In 1841, Dawson of Austin, Texas, was a part
of the famed Bidwell-Bartleson Party.... His Gold Rush
[trip] was organized at Sherman, Texas on March 1, 1849,
and aimed at the Southern route.... His fellow pioneer
Charles Weber of Stockton tried to coax him into
ranching, [but] in 1851, he began the return journey to
Texas via the Isthmus.” Mintz, The Trail 118n. Rader
1084n. Vandale 47n.
    Dawson’s observations are some of the earliest and
least stereotyped writing on the West, and include good
content on cattle: description of specific ranches
Dawson visited, such as Marsh’s Ranch near Mount Diablo;
cult of horsemanship in Mexican California; social
history (e.g., attending a fandango at a ranch near San
Jose Mission); hide and tallow trade (“cattle are the
only source of wealth of this country”); Anglos and
other foreigners acquiring ranches by becoming Mexican
citizens,   marrying   Mexican  women,   or   professing
Catholicism; rustling by runaway mission Indians; bull
and bear fights; etc. Upon his return to Texas, Dawson
settled in Austin and engaged in freighting, farming,
and stock raising. $100.00

1446.   DAWSON, Nicholas. California in ’41, Texas in
’51. Austin & New York: The Pemberton Press, Jenkins
Publishing   Company,   [1969].   [8]  119   [13]   pp.,
frontispiece portrait of Dawson. 8vo, original blue
cloth. Very fine in slightly rubbed d.j.
    Facsimile of the Streeter copy of the first edition,
with added index. $25.00

                 Dawson & Skiff’s Ute War
1447.   DAWSON, Thomas F. & F. J. V. Skiff. The Ute War:
A History of the White River Massacre and the Privations
and Hardships of the Captive White Women among the
Hostiles on Grand River. Denver: Tribune Publishing
House, 1879. 184 pp., wood-engravings in text (some
full-page; mostly portraits including Chief Ouray and
Josie Meeker). 8vo, later dark brown morocco. Without
the four leaves of ads at end (we have had this book
only once before, and the ads were not present in that
copy, nor are they found in the Denver Public Library
copy and other copies offered on the market). Minor
rubbing to upper edge of front cover of binding,
interior fine.
    First edition. Ayer (Supp.) 42. Bauer 108. Braislin
572: “Excessively rare and almost unknown Indian
captivity, and regarded by Colorado connoisseurs as the
rarest book printed in the state.” DPL, Nothing Is Long
Ago: A Documentary History of Colorado 1776-1976 #65
(illustrated): “By 1868 most of the Indians of Colorado
had been removed.... Only the Utes—some 3,000 of them—
remained. A delegation of their leaders was escorted to
Washington in 1868 and induced to sign a treaty ceding
the San Luis Valley and the eastern portion of their
range, but the reservation they retained west of the
107th meridian still comprised one-third of Colorado....
Although temporarily satisfied, white land hunger,
particularly for the agricultural regions of the lower
Gunnison and Grand (Colorado) river valleys, shortly
produced a swelling chorus: ‘Utes must go!’ Events at
the   White   River    Agency  in   1879    provided   the
rationalization for Ute removal.”
    Flake 2732. Graff 1028. Holliday 277. Howes D161:
“After Hollister...the rarest Colorado imprint.” Jones
1601. Littell 257: “An excessively rare and little-known
Indian captivity regarded by collectors as the rarest
book printed in Colorado.” Streeter Sale 2194: “The
famous account of western Indian captivity. It is the
story of the Meeker Massacre in which nine white men
were killed and three white women carried off to be
ravished by the Utes. The incident provided reason for
depriving the Utes of the extensive lands in western
Colorado.” Wilcox, p. 37. Wynar 1800.
    The authors state in chapter 2 that the Ute trouble
arose because of the tribe’s discontent with their
reservation and their intrusions upon the ranches and
settlers in the more desirable grazing land adjacent to
their reservation. The Ute perspective was quite
different on the second point (see entry above, Helen
Sloan   Daniels’   The   Ute  Indians    of   Southwestern
Colorado). Again, two cultures competed for the same
land to use for grazing, agriculture, mining, and other
pursuits. In this case, the losers were the Utes.
    The book lore regarding the rarity of the imprint
probably derives in part from Eberstadt (107:117): “Mr.
Dawson, co-author of this narrative was, in his latter
days, Curator of the Colorado Historical Society. He met
his death in an automobile accident on the trail to
Lookout Mountain, while escorting President Harding to
Cody’s grave. He once told me why his book was so rare.
‘There are,’ he explained, ‘probably not more than a
dozen copies in existence. You see, just about the time
the book went to press we had another Indian outbreak,
cartridge wadding was needed by the troops, and my book—
mere paper stock at the time—was used to supply the
deficiency.”
    Although this work is often referred to as the
rarest book printed in Colorado, the number of copies
located and offered on the market would seem to suggest
otherwise. The book is also interesting for providing
details on the Black cavalry troops that fought in the
Ute War.   $2,000.00

1448.   DAY, A. Grove. Coronado’s Quest: The Discovery
of the Southwestern States. Berkeley & Los Angeles:
University of California Press, 1940. xvi [2] 419 pp.,
large folding map, text illustrations. 8vo, original
black cloth. Fine in slightly chipped d.j. (price-
clipped). Ink ownership inscription on front free
endpaper.
    First edition. Saunders 2489n. Tate, Indians of
Texas 1724. Wallace, Arizona History III:40. This
history of the Coronado expedition is for the general
reader,   with   index,  good   footnotes,   chronology,
bibliography, and a large folding map of the region
traversed. Coronado’s expedition to the Southwest in
1540 was a cavalcade of noteworthy proportions, during
which the indigenous people of the region experienced
their first extensive exposure to Europeans. Coronado
left Mexico with an entourage of 274 mounted men, 62
foot soldiers, 6 Franciscan padres, 700 slaves, a remuda
of 1,000 horses, 600 pack animals, and a walking larder
of 1,000 cattle and 4,000 sheep. Coronado introduced
horses, cattle, and sheep to the indigenous peoples of
the Southwest. Coronado, who is often referred to as the
last   conquistador,  returned  to   Spain   a  failure,
financially ruined and physically ill, but the legacy he
left behind in the form of strayed and stolen Andalusian
cattle formed the nucleus for the wild herds of
longhorns that transformed the landscape and life of the
American Southwest.   $65.00

1449.   DAY, B. F. Gene Rhodes, Cowboy (Eugene Manlove
Rhodes). New York: Julian Messner, [1955]. 192 pp., text
illustrations by Lorence Bjorklund. 8vo, original tan
pebble cloth. Text browned throughout due to the cheap
acidic paper on which it is printed, otherwise fine in
slightly worn d.j. with Bjorklund illustration.
    Weekly Reader edition (first edition 1954). Dykes,
Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Bjorklund 29n). Guns
571n: “Contains some material about the Apache Kid,
Billy the Kid, Bill Doolin, and the Dalton gang.” Herd
662n. Biography of Gene Rhodes’ ranching days, written
for adolescents.   $25.00

1450.   DAY, Beth. A Shirttail To Hang To: The Story of
Cal Farley and His Boys Ranch. New York: Henry Holt,
[1959]. xviii, 232 pp., photographic plates. 8vo,
original salmon cloth. Endpapers slightly browned,
otherwise fine in lightly worn d.j.
    First edition, second printing. Preface by J. Edgar
Hoover. Biography of Farley who reformed truants and
delinquents on his orphanage/reform school ranch. Julian
Bivins donated an abandoned ranch near Amarillo to
Farley to establish a home for “bottom of the barrel”
boys.   $20.00

1451.   DAY, Donald. Big Country: Texas. New York:
Duell, Sloan & Pearce, [1947]. x, 326 pp., endpaper
maps. 8vo, original blue cloth. Light shelf wear,
otherwise fine in slightly chipped d.j. (price-clipped).
    First edition. American Folkways Series; edited by
Erskine Caldwell. Campbell, p. 104: “Manners and
customs, history and legends.... A rich, racy variety of
interesting materials.” Guns 572. Herd 663. A large
portion of the book is devoted to ranching and the
related issue of water, including much discussion of
longhorns, fencing, mesquite, and railroads. $25.00

1452.   DAY, Donald & Beth Day. Will Rogers, the Boy
Roper. Boston & Cambridge: Houghton Mifflin & Riverside
Press, [1950]. [6] 201 pp., text illustrations by
William Moyers. 8vo, original brown pictorial cloth.
Very fine in fine d.j. autographed by both authors.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 206. Biography of Will
Rogers for children, focusing on his early days and his
desire to become the best trick rider and roper in the
world. $35.00

1453.   DAY, Jack Hays. The Sutton-Taylor Feud. [San
Antonio: Privately printed, 1937]. 40 pp., frontispiece
portrait of author, 7 photographic plates. 12mo,
original white printed wrappers. A few minor stains to
wraps, otherwise very fine, signed by author in pencil.
    First edition. Guns 573: “This scarce little book
tells some of the inside facts of the feud from the
Taylor side by one of the participants and a kinsman of
the Taylors.” Handbook of Texas Online: Sutton-Taylor
Feud: “The Sutton-Taylor Feud, the longest and bloodiest
in Texas, grew out of the bad times following the Civil
War.... [In 1869] ostensibly in pursuit of horse and
cattle thieves, the State Police terrorized a large
portion of Southeast Texas.... There was constant
pursuing and lying in wait, and deaths were frequent.
Sutton moved to Victoria in an adjoining county and
finally determined to leave the country. Some say he was
going away for good; others believe he was merely
following a herd of cattle to a northern market. He had
boarded a steamer at Indianola on March 11, 1874, when
Jim and Bill Taylor rode up to the dock and killed him
and his friend Gabriel Slaughter. The Suttons got even
by lynching three Taylors. Kute Tuggle, Jim White, and
Scrap Taylor were among a group of cowboys who had
engaged to take a herd up the trail for John Wesley
Hardin. At Hamilton they were arrested, charged with
cattle theft.... On the night of June 20, 1874, they
were taken out of the courthouse and hanged, though they
were probably innocent of any wrongdoing.”   $125.00

1454.   DAY, Jack Hays. The Sutton-Taylor Feud. [San
Antonio: Privately Printed, 1937]. Another copy. One
small closed tear on back wrapper, otherwise fine.
    $100.00

1455.   DAY, James M. Paul Horgan. Austin: Steck-Vaughn
Company, [1967]. [4] 44 pp. 12mo, original beige printed
wrappers. Fine.
    First edition. Southwest Writers Series 8. Includes
discussion of Horgan’s classic Pulitzer Prize-winning
Great River: The Rio Grande in North American History
(see Herd 1065 and Item XXX in this catalogue). $15.00

1456.   DAY, James M., et al. Soldiers of Texas. Waco:
Texian Press, 1973. xiii [1] 160 pp., full-page color
illustrations. 4to, original beige and red cloth. Very
fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. This illustrated history of the Texas
soldier from San Jacinto to World War II includes a
chapter on the Rough Riders, the volunteer “cowboy
cavalry” of the Spanish American War. “During his self-
imposed exile in the Dakotas, [Theodore Roosevelt]
developed a genuine appreciation for the people in the
West. He believed that the average cowboy groups had
riding skills and marksmanship equal to any equestrian
force in the world” (pp. 100-101).   $45.00

1457.   DAYTON, Edson C. Dakota Days: May 1886-August
1898. [Hartford or Clifton Springs, New York]: Privately
printed, 1937. [10] 128 pp., frontispiece map, plate.
8vo, original gilt-lettered blue cloth. Superb copy, in
original paper box.
    First edition, limited edition (#241 of 300 copies).
Loring Campbell, My Favorite 101 Books about the Cattle
Industry 28. Dobie, p. 102: “[Dayton] had spiritual
content. His very use of the world intellectual on the
second page of his book; his estimate of Milton and
Gladstone, adjacent to talk about a frontier saloon; his
consciousness of his own inner growth—something no
extrovert cowboy ever noticed, usually because he did
not have it; his quotation to express harmony with
nature...all indicate a refinement that any gambler
could safely bet originated in the East and not in Texas
or the South.” Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature,
p. 14. Herd 665: “Scarce.” Howes D165. Reese, Six Score
29: “Dayton had more connection with sheep than with
cattle, but he saw a good deal of both. A well educated
easterner, he gives an interesting perspective on life
in the Dakotas during the hard years of the 1890s.”
    $500.00

1458.   DAYTON, Edson C. Dakota Days.... [Hartford or
Clifton Springs, New York]: Privately printed, 1937.
Another copy, without box. Very fine. $400.00

1459.   DE BARTHE, Joe. The Life and Adventures of Frank
Grouard,   Chief  of   Scouts,   U.S.A....   St.   Joseph,
Missouri:   Combe   Printing   Co.,   [1894].   545   pp.,
frontispiece (photographic portrait of Grouard), plates
(mostly photographic). Thick 8vo, original tan gilt-
lettered pictorial cloth (rebacked, original spine
preserved, new endpapers). Spine faded, binding worn,
upper right blank corner of title neatly clipped,
occasional marginal browning and chipping to some pages
and plates. Tipped in at front is a typed note dated
1953 on engraved stationery of Charles D. Humberd, M.D.,
of Barnard, Missouri. The note contains a long
description of the book (“splendid & unusual with mostly
unique full-page plates...these are largely half-tone
cuts of otherwise unknown photographic portraits of
personages who come in for comment in the text”).
Following the book description are biographical notes on
Grouard, stating he died of alcoholism at St. Joseph,
Missouri, on August 16, 1905, and was a pauper. “The
scout’s friends raised funds to pay for his burial.”
    First edition. Eberstadt 105:105: “Huntington No.
231: ‘Of the highest importance historically; probably
the most thorough and reliable work on scouting on the
plains that has ever been written.’ Nearly the entire
edition was lost in the St. Joe flood.... The noted
scout tells of his journey to Helena in 1865; his
capture by the Sioux and his intercourse with Sitting
Bull; of Ventres and the Blackfeet War; of his campaigns
with Gen. Crook and in the government service; of
California   Joe;   the  killing  of   McGloskey,  etc.”
Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains and the
Rockies 124. Flake 2743. Graff 1035. Guns 574: “Rare....
Contains a chapter on Frank and Jesse James.” Holliday
280. Howes D183. Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 70.
Jones 1669. Littell 259. Luther, High Spots of Custer
33: “An interwoven western classic.” Rader 1090.
Streeter Sale 3090.
    According to Finerty, General Crook once said that
he would rather lose a third of his command than be
deprived of Grouard’s scouting services. Grouard’s
minute knowledge of the country and its Native American
inhabitants was essential to the U.S. Army in its
campaign against tribes in the Dakotas, Wyoming,
Montana, Idaho, and Nebraska at the critical juncture
when the original inhabitants were struggling to retain
their lands against the encroachments of miners,
ranchers, and settlers.
    Grouard was in the unique position of having lived
for seven years as a Sioux warrior under Sitting Bull
after being taken captive as a teenager. Grouard gives a
firsthand account of the 1877 Nez Percé War, which
resulted from the government’s double-dealing on the
farm and grazing lands of the Lapwai and Wallowa valleys
secured by Chief Joseph and his people in 1855. In 1875
disputes regarding stock arose between the Nez Percé and
Anglo settlers, and by 1877 the Nez Percé were forced to
give up their homes to the Anglos.
    In   the  final   chapters,  Grouard  recounts   his
participation in quelling the Sioux and Cheyenne
uprising in South Dakota in 1890. Grouard was sent to
determine why the tribes were stealing and butchering
the range stock of the regional cattlemen. He reported
that rather than the Ghost Dance being the cause of the
trouble, the depredations were due to the government’s
litany of broken promises, including not honoring its
commitment to provide beef and other provisions to the
Pine Ridge Agency. After assisting the Army with the
“Indian Problem” in the region, Grouard then turned his
attention to thieves and rustlers who infiltrated the
area (“It just seemed as if all the thieves in the
universe had been turned loose [and] they were, in my
opinion, infinitely worse than the Indians ever were.”).
    $550.00

1460.   DE BARTHE, Joe. The Life and Adventures of Frank
Grouard.... St. Joseph, Missouri: Combe Printing Co.,
[1894]. Another copy, variant binding. Thick 8vo,
original blue gilt-lettered pictorial cloth. Binding
worn, book block almost detached (first few signatures
detached), text with mild marginal browning. Ink date on
front free endpaper (January, 1895). Laid in is an
original typed letter signed from Albert W. Johnson
(Historic Research Pioneer Life, Trails, and Indian War
History, Marine-On-St. Croix, Minn.), dated October 14,
1931, to Logan’s Book and Curio Store in Cheyenne,
Wyoming, with information about the book, including: “I
stopped off at St. Joseph, Mo. and made some inquiries
there about Frank Grouard’s book...and found that it was
scarce now. Mr. Bundy the City Librarian had some copies
two or three ye[a]rs ago which he offered for about
$30.00, this being the lowest price I have had mentioned
to me. The Librarian at Kansas City who had originally
had the plates was asking $100.00. As you know the
plates were destroyed by accident. I was told by a man
in St. Joseph who knew Frank Grouard well in St Joseph,
and was informed of his latter days, that the book had
no sale when published and that blocks of it were turned
over to the Grocery stores who advertised it as prizes
in connection with sales.” $600.00

1461.   DE BARTHE, Joe. The Life and Adventures of Frank
Grouard.... St. Joseph, Missouri: Combe Printing Co.,
[1894]. Another copy, variant binding. Thick 8vo,
original green gilt-lettered pictorial cloth. Mild to
moderate outer wear and soiling, hinges cracked, text
with mild marginal browning. Contemporary ink ownership
stamp of Joseph S. Browne of St. Joseph, Mo. on front
pastedown. $550.00

1462.   DE BARTHE, Joe. The Life and Adventures of Frank
Grouard.... St. Joseph, Missouri: Combe Printing Co.,
[1894]. Another copy, variant binding. Thick 8vo,
original red gilt-lettered pictorial cloth. Binding
worn, snagged, and stained, text with very mild marginal
browning, front hinge cracked.    $450.00

1463.   DE BARTHE, Joe. The Life and Adventures of Frank
Grouard.... Buffalo, Wyoming: Buffalo Bulletin, n.d.
[1930s?]. [2] 326 pp. 8vo, original grey printed
wrappers. Light outer wear and short, clean short tear
at top of front cover adjacent to spine, interior fine.
Ink ownership stamps of noted historian Grace Raymond
Hebard on cover and title.
    Second edition. Reprinted by the Buffalo Bulletin,
without the illustrations that appeared in the first
edition.    $100.00

1464.   DE BARTHE, Joe. The Life and Adventures of Frank
Grouard.... Buffalo, Wyoming: Buffalo Bulletin, n.d.
[1930s?]. Another copy. Thick 8vo, original grey printed
wrappers. Wrappers lightly worn and a few minor chips,
otherwise fine.   $85.00

1465.   DE BARTHE, Joe. The Life and Adventures of Frank
Grouard.... Norman: University of Oklahoma Press,
[1958].   xxvii   [1]   268   pp.,  illustrated   title,
frontispiece,     7    photographic     plates,    maps,
illustrations. 8vo, original terracotta cloth. Fine in
slightly worn d.j.
    Third edition, first printing of the University of
Oklahoma Press edition, edited and with introduction by
Edgar I. Stewart, who describes the work as “one of the
greatest classics of the history of the American
frontier, especially as relates to the wars against the
Indian tribes of the Northern Plains.”    $65.00

    Author’s Presentation Copy to Commodore Moore of
               Republic of Texas Navy Fame
1466.   DE CORDOVA, Jacob. Texas: Her Resources and Her
Public Men. A Companion for J. De Cordova’s New and
Correct Map of the State of Texas...First Edition.
Philadelphia: E. Crozet, 1858. 371 [1, calendar] pp.
8vo, original embossed green cloth, title in gilt on
spine. Green cloth faded (especially at spine), light
outer staining and shelf wear, interior with light
scattered foxing, front free endpaper with small strip
clipped at top, generally very good. Signed ink
presentation from E. W. Moore. Title page with author’s
ink note: “Com E. W. Moore with the respects of The
Author.” Moore was named commander of the Republic of
Texas Navy in 1839 (see Handbook of Texas Online: Moore,
Edwin Ward).
    First    edition,   first    issue.    A  persistent
bibliographical tradition, dating back to at least
Howes, describes this book as 371 pp. but implies it
does not have the index, here present on pp. 365-371.
Despite that confusion, this would appear to be the
genuine first edition. This issue may be readily
distinguished by the facts that the page number on p. 67
is battered, p. 351 is misnumbered 251, p. 369 is
misnumbered, and signature 8, on pp. 188-190, has a
discussion entitled “Slave and Free Labor.” The sheets
bulk 2.3 cm.
    Basic Texas Books 38: “The first attempt at an
encyclopedia of Texas, this work contains a wealth of
still-useful material....        DeCordova, a native of
Jamaica [and] one of the earliest Jewish settlers in
Texas...did some of the first genuine scholarly research
ever   done   in   Texas    while    compiling   the   book,
interviewing leading men, researching newspaper files,
searching county court records.... The volume includes
biographies,    land    laws,    climatology,    statistics,
articles on railroads, the cotton industry, sheep
raising, geology, schools, farming, slavery, churches,
cattle, the lumber industry, gambling, and other
subjects.” Bradford 1262: “A cyclopædia of Texas.”
Dykes,   Western   High    Spots   (“Western    Movement—Its
Literature”), pp. 12-13. Howes D201. Rader 1098. Raines,
p. 68. Sabin 16775.
    De   Cordova    includes    numerous    references   and
discussions about the rise in value of livestock in the
state, and p. 54 has a general discussion on “Texas
Cattle” concluding: “One fact that always attracts the
attention of graziers from the older States is the early
maturity of our cattle and the immense size and power of
our oxen.” Cattle raising and its prospect are covered
in most all of the essays on the individual Texas
counties. Goliad, Harris, and San Saba counties are
especially highly praised as livestock raising areas.
Regarding the latter, De Cordova remarks on p. 256:
“Texas is emphatically a grazing-country, and it would
be invidious in us to designate any one spot as
presenting superior advantages over the rest of the
State for stock-raising; yet we must acknowledge that
the region of country watered by the San Saba and Upper
Colorado River and her tributaries is pre-eminently
adapted to this business. The cattle appear to grow
larger and fatter, and come to maturity at least one
year sooner, than they do in the southern counties.” On
p. 257 the author sets out the difference between the
outlay necessary for stock in Connecticut and Texas.
    $1,000.00

1467.   DE CORDOVA, Jacob. Texas: Her Resources and Her
Public Men. A Companion for J. De Cordova’s New and
Correct Map of the State of Texas...First Edition.
Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1858. 375 pp. 8vo,
original blind-stamped plum cloth, spine gilt lettered.
Binding mostly faded to brown, spine light, minor
chipping at extremities and some light shelf wear,
endpapers browned, scattered mild to moderate foxing to
text, generally a very good copy. Ink ownership
inscription of Benj. F. French on title (likely
historian Benjamin Franklin French, 1799-1877, who moved
to New Orleans in 1830. Contemporary ink notes on wealth
of Texas on front free endpaper. Laid in are several
contemporary news clippings relating to Texas.
    First edition, second issue. This issue may be
readily distinguished by the fact that p. 200 is
misnumbered 00, p. 330 is misnumbered 30, and signature
8 has been partially reset so that pp. 187-190 now have
a biography of James Pinckney Henderson. The discussion
of “Slave and Free Labor” has been moved to pp. 351-354.
Everything after p. 350 is a new setting of type, and
the sheets bulk to 3.3 cm. This copy is printed on thick
paper. Basic Texas Books 38A. Dykes, Western High Spots
(“Western Movement—Its Literature”), pp. 12-13: “Another
emigration pitch. De Corcova owned much land script that
he was anxious to market—despite the obvious profit
motive, it is a good book.” Howes D201. Rader 1097.
Raines, p. 68. $650.00

1468.   DE MÉZIÈRES, Athanase. Athanase de Mézières and
the Louisiana-Texas Frontier, 1768-1780.... New York:
Kraus Reprint Company, 1970. 351 [1]; 392 pp., large
folding map. 2 vols. in one, 8vo, original red buckram.
Fine.
    Facsimile of the original edition (Arthur H. Clark
Co., 1914; edited and annotated by Herbert Eugene
Bolton). Spain in the West, a Series of Original
Documents from Foreign Archives, volume 1. Basic Texas
Books 41A: “Provides the best insight into the Indians
of Texas during the period, and into the Spanish and
French activities among them.” Howes B584n. Rader 392n.
Rittenhouse 66n. Saunders 2469n. Tate, Indians of Texas
1686n. Tyler, Big Bend, p. 240. The author’s valuable
report discusses friction between cattle ranchers and
Native Americans and provides information on the early
cattle trade in Texas and Louisiana (a somewhat
neglected subject).   $125.00

1469.   DE SHIELDS, J. T. Border Wars of Texas: Being an
Authentic and Popular Account, in Chronological Order,
of the Long and Bitter Conflict Waged between Savage
Indian Tribes and the Pioneer Settlers of Texas.
Wresting of a Fair Land from Savage Rule; A Red Record
of Fierce Strife.... Tioga, Texas: Matt Bradley, Herald
Company, 1912. 400 pp., 40 plates (some photographic)
and maps, including frontispiece, text illustrations.
8vo, original three-quarter leather over brown gilt-
lettered cloth. Light outer wear, otherwise very fine
(much better than usually found).
    First edition. Agatha, p. 61. Campbell, p. 177.
Eberstadt 110:251: “De Shields spent more than thirty
years in assembling the material for this book, and
collected a host of facts from pioneers who took part in
the events described.” Graff 1063. Howes D277. Rader
1125. Tate, Indians of Texas 2362: “An encyclopedia of
Indian atrocity stories as revealed directly by pioneers
and nineteenth-century newspapers.”
    The time period covered in this Anglocentric
compilation is 1819-1845. In addition to captivities and
massacres, many of the depredations involved theft of
horses and cattle, particularly that of pioneer stock
raisers   and  farmers   living   in  remote,  virtually
unsettled areas. De Shields discusses the problems of
German stock raisers in the Fisher and Miller Grant in
the area drained by the Pedernales, Llano, San Saba, and
lower Concho Rivers. The book includes much on Jack Hays
and other Texas Rangers. $300.00

1470.   DE SHIELDS, J. T. Border Wars of Texas....
Tioga, Texas: Matt Bradley, Herald Company, 1912.
Another copy, variant binding. 8vo, original brown
pictorial cloth stamped in red and purple. Slight shelf
wear, front hinge weak, back hinge cracked, interior
very fine. $225.00

1471.   DE SHIELDS, J. T. Border Wars of Texas....
Tioga, Texas: Herald, 1912. Another copy, variant
binding. 8vo, original grey pictorial cloth stamped in
red and brown. Light ex-library with call numbers neatly
inked on spine and dedication page. Covers slightly
soiled, otherwise very fine. $200.00

1472.   DEAREN, Patrick. A Cowboy of the Pecos. [Plano:]
Republic of Texas Press, 1997. v [1] 266 pp., text
illustrations, map. 8vo, original pictorial wrappers.
Very fine.
    First edition. Description of cowboy life on the
Pecos, from the first Goodnight-Loving trail drive to
the advent of barbed wire and cattle trucks. $15.00

1473.   DEBO, Angie. Prairie City: The Story of an
American Community. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1944.
xiv, 245 [1] viii [1] pp., photographic plates. 8vo,
original navy blue cloth. Very fine in slightly worn and
price-clipped d.j.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 121: “Story of a typical
town in western Oklahoma, from its founding. A social
study. Authentic and interpretive.” Guns 575. Herd 668.
Historical fiction on the Oklahoma land rush and the
Cherokee Strip, with excellent documentary photographs
and much information on ranching through the years
(cowboys of the Cherokee Strip, cattle ranching during
World War I, etc.).
    Angie Debo (1890-1988), historian and pioneer,
traveled with her family by covered wagon to Manhattan,
Kansas, in 1895, and to Marshall, Oklahoma, in 1899. Her
invaluable documentary history And Still the Waters Run:
The Betrayal of the Five Civilized Tribes proved too
incendiary for the University of Oklahoma to publish,
but after several years Princeton University Press
published the book, albeit with some names excised to
avert possible libel suits (see Thrapp IV, p. 131).
    $40.00

1474.   DECKER, Peter. The Diaries of Peter Decker:
Overland to California in 1849 and Life in the Mines,
1850-1851. Georgetown, California: The Talisman Press,
1966. 338 pp., frontispiece, foldout facsimile maps.
8vo,   original   terracotta   cloth.   Very  fine,   in
publisher’s red board pull-off case within green board
slipcase with printed paper label on spine.
    Limited edition (#72 of 100 copies, signed by editor
Helen S. Giffen). Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 174:
“Decker was one of the first to arrive in the remote
Trinity mining district. From there, the gold seeker
went on to work the South Fork of the Yuba River and
tells of the rigors of everyday mining life including
the building of a diversion dam. Decker devoted the last
part of the diary to his experiences as a storekeeper in
Nevada City. He became mayor of Marysville in 1858.”
Mattes, Platte River Road Narratives 422: “Decker was
‘overpowered’ by the scenic splendor of Independence
Rock and Devil’s Gate, and called South Pass ‘the
backbone of America.’.... This account is outstanding
for its wealth of detail and unique literary quality....
Packed with data on fauna, flora, fellow emigrants,
Indians, scenery, and the author’s own thoughts.” Mintz
120. Rocq S2492.
    Decker describes California cattle: “In my rambles
after mules met a lot of Spanish or Wild Cattle which is
herds on the plains on the west side of the Sacramento
where the Spaniards go & ‘lasso’ them, bring them here &
some sell for beef & other times for milk cows & work
oxen. This cattle is the finest in the world. Is easily
known by the wild staring look.... Have very large horns
very thick & high hump, full quarters and look very
round bodied.... Have seen Mexicans lassoo Spanish
Cattle which they do on horseback where they delight to
be with a Lassoo.” Decker provides details on ranches he
visited, such as those of William Brown Ide, Joseph P.
Chiles, John Lawson, John Bidwell, and others.   $200.00

1475.   DELANO, A[lonzo]. Life on the Plains and among
the Diggings, Being Scenes and Adventures of an Overland
Journey to California: With Particular Incidents of the
Route, Mistakes and Sufferings of the Emigrants, the
Indian Tribes, the Present and the Future of the Great
West. New York: C. M. Saxton, Barker, & Co., 1861. 384
pp., engraved frontispiece and plates by Frederick M.
Coffin (engraved by N. Orr). 12mo, original black
blindstamped cloth, gilt-lettered spine with gilt-
stamped illustration of encampment with tents. Outer
wear (spinal extremities chipped, one-inch split of
cloth in upper joint, corners frayed); interior fine
except for moderate foxing to first few leaves. Two
small old pencil notations to front endpapers, two
bookshop stamps on back pastedown.
    Reprint of first edition (first published at Auburn
in 1854). Bradford 1281n. Cowan, p. 163n. Flake 2752n.
Graff 1042n. Hamilton, Early American Book Illustrators
and Wood Engravers 504. Howes D230. Kurutz, The
California Gold Rush 177f: “While providing what has
become one of the great classics of the Overland Trail,
Delano also wrote in detail about his adventures in the
mines and the general conditions of newly arrived
emigrants, miners, and Indians.” Mattes, Platte River
Road Narratives 423: “An overland classic...among the
earliest published...admired for being both lively and
abundantly detailed.” Mintz, The Trail 121n: “This may
be the most interesting of early California overland
books.” Paher, Nevada 463n: “Recounts the mistakes and
sufferings of the immigrants, Mexican muleteers and
Indian tribes and discusses the present and future of
the great West.” Plains & Rockies IV:238:6. Smith 2381.
Wheat, Books of the California Gold Rush 57n.
    Though primarily an overland and Gold Rush account,
the author briefly delves into matters relating to
cattle and ranching. Besides accounts of ranches visited
(Nye, Nichols, etc.), Delano provides details on the
wretched state of former mission Native Americans
working on California ranches and the increase of cattle
rustling in the Sacramento Valley in 1850.    $100.00

1476.   DELANO, Alonzo. Across the Plains and among the
Diggings. New York: Wilson-Erickson, 1936. xviii [2] 192
pp., text illustrations (photographs by Louis Palenske).
Small folio, original red moiré cloth. Adhesive remains
from book plate on front pastedown, otherwise fine in
the scarce d.j. (some marginal chipping and dust-
soiling).
    Reprint of the first edition, with numerous modern
photographs of the sites referred to in Delano’s text.
Foreword and epilogue by Rufus Rockwell Wilson. Rocq
6042.   $60.00

1477.   DELAVAN, James. Notes on California and the
Placers, How to Get There, and What to Do Afterwards.
Oakland: Biobooks, 1956. xv [1] 156 [1] pp., text
illustrations. 8vo, original blue cloth. Fine.
    Limited edition (700 copies); the first edition was
published at New York in 1850. California Relations 44.
Foreword by Joseph A. Sullivan. Cowan, p. 164n.
Eberstadt 104:38n: “This is one of the earliest diaries
kept by an actual Gold Hunter and gives an unusually
frank and detailed account of daily life at the
diggings.” Graff 1044n. Hill, p. 400n. Howes D237.
Kurutz,   The   California   Gold  Rush   183b.  Libros
Californianos, p. 26n. Rocq 15773n. Wheat, Books of the
California Gold Rush 58n.
    Delavan notes the large number of hide houses for
the hide and tallow trade in San Diego (“the principal
exports of the country, until gold became the staple”)
and describes large herds of horses and cattle (“a most
agreeable   and   interesting   spectacle”),  branding,
roundup, superb horsemanship of the Californians,
California spurs and saddles, rustling of horses and
cattle, and various ranches (Leidesdorff, Williams,
etc.). $40.00

1478.   DELLENBAUGH,     Frederick    S.     Breaking    the
Wilderness: The Story of the Conquest of the Far West
from the Wanderings of Cabeza de Vaca to the First
Descent of the Colorado by Powell, and the Completion of
the Union Pacific Railway.... New York & London: G. P.
Putnam’s Sons & The Knickerbocker Press, 1905. [1] xxiii
[1]   360   [1]   [6,   ads]    pp.,   color    frontispiece
(illustration     of     Dellenbaugh     painting),     text
illustrations (documentary photographs by Dellenbaugh,
J. K. Hillers, C. R. Savage, et al., vintage prints,
maps), text vignettes and pictorial chapter headings by
Dellenbaugh. 8vo, original tan decorative cloth stamped
in brown, black, and terracotta, t.e.g. (designed by
Dellenbaugh). Fine. Calling card of Lucius Montrose
Cuthbert and ad for this book at front.
    First edition. Flake 2757: “Much of Chapter XVI is
devoted to the history of the Mormons.” Paher, Nevada
464. Saunders 2493. We include this book because
Dellenbaugh contends that it is easy to domesticate
buffalo and discusses cross-breeding buffalo with
cattle. This handsomely printed and designed book
includes much information and iconography on the buffalo
(Osage use of buffalo wool in weaving blankets; López de
Gómara’s contention that a tribe in northwestern Mexico
domesticated buffalo before the arrival of Europeans,
etc.). There is also occasional general material on
cattle and sheep (especially New Mexico and Navajo
weaving with wool).
    For     more      on      artist-photographer-explorer
Dellenbaugh, see Samuels, Encyclopedia of Artists of the
American West. Dellenbaugh accompanied Powell’s second
voyage down the Colorado River (1871-1872). $125.00
1479.   DELLENBAUGH,   Frederick    S.    Breaking  the
Wilderness.... New York & London: G. P. Putnam’s Sons &
The Knickerbocker Press, [1905]. [1] xxiii [1] 360 [1]
[6, ads] pp., frontispiece, text illustrations (photos,
prints, maps), 2 folding maps, text vignettes and
pictorial chapter headings. 8vo, original navy blue
cloth, spine gilt. Very fine in original chipped
glassine d.j.
    First edition, second issue, with two added folding
maps and illustration, list of illustrations and a few
pages reset, imprint undated, in plain undecorated blue
cloth binding (rather than Dellenbaugh’s pictorial
design).    $125.00

1480.   DELLENBAUGH, Frederick S. Frémont and ’49: The
Story of a Remarkable Career and Its Relation to the
Exploration and Development of our Western Territory,
Especially of California.... New York & London: G. P.
Putnam’s Sons & The Knickerbocker Press, 1914. [1] xiv,
547 [7, ads] pp., color frontispiece (illustration of
Dellenbaugh painting), plates (photographs and vintage
prints), maps (some folding), text vignettes and
pictorial chapter headings. 8vo, original tan pictorial
cloth decorated in brown and blue, t.e.g. Light to
moderate shelf wear, otherwise fine.
    First edition. Cowan, p. 164. Flake 2759: “Numerous,
but scattered references to Mormon settlements in Utah,
Brigham Young, Mormon battalion, etc.” Paher, Nevada
466: “Reproduces maps showing the routes of all five of
Fremont’s western expeditions. He crossed and recrossed
Nevada during 1844-1853.” Rocq 16817.
    This   handsome  biography   includes   material   on
Frémont’s Mariposa estate, the Mexican grant which “The
Pathfinder” bought before American occupation and the
discovery of gold. This grant turned out to be in a rich
gold-bearing   district   and   caused   Frémont   untold
difficulty. According to Dellenbaugh, Frémont’s daughter
stated that Mariposa was bought in lieu of a mission
farm and that at the time of purchase it was a cattle
range considered of small value. “The price paid was
$3,000. It was a grant of land suitable for grazing
purposes lying in the basin of the Mariposa River, but
like so many similar grants, ‘the boundaries were not
fixed, and the grantee had the right of locating the
claim on any land within a large area.’.... [Frémont]
had provided a large amount of machinery and supplies
based on the development of Mariposa as a cattle ranch,
but the new turn of affairs made it inexpedient to
proceed in that way.” $125.00

1481.   DELLENBAUGH, Frederick S. Frémont and ’49....
New York & London: G. P. Putnam’s Sons & The
Knickerbocker Press, 1914. Another copy, variant binding
(not pictorial). 8vo, original royal blue cloth. Fine
and bright. $100.00

1482.   DELLENBAUGH, Frederick S. Frémont and n49....
New York & London: G. P. Putnam’s Sons & The
Knickerbocker   Press,  1914.   Another  copy,  variant
binding. 8vo, original navy blue cloth. Light wear and
mild staining to binding, interior fine. $90.00

       Rare Ranger Account—Trail Drives & Rustlers
1483.   DELONY, Lewis S. Forty Years a Peace Officer: A
True Story of Lawlessness and Adventure in the Early
Days in Southwest Texas [wrapper title]. [Abilene,
1907].   [4]   61  pp.   (printed  in   double   column),
photographic portrait of author. 8vo, original grey
printed wrappers, stapled (as issued). Exceptionally
fine. Rare.
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:107. Guns 580: “This
interesting and little-known book contains material on
the Taylor-Sutton feud, the hanging of Bill Longley, and
the capture and killing of John Wesley Hardin, as well
as many other crimes in Texas.” Howes D246.
    Texas Ranger Delony (born in DeWitt County, Texas,
in 1857) describes several cattle drives he made, the
last being when he was twenty-two years old (1879),
herding five thousand yearlings from Goliad, Texas, to
Dodge City, Kansas: “When we arrived within about forty
miles of Dodge City...we had a heavy hail storm and a
great deal of lightning. A bolt of lightning would
strike in the herd and kill two or three head and the
cattle would stampede. Then it would take an hour or two
to get them quiet again. After one of these stampedes,
we were sitting [on] our horses singing to the cattle,
when a bolt of lightning struck a cow boy in the head.
It burnt the cord in two on his hat, went through his
body, and split his boots from top to bottom, killed his
horse as well as himself. He was within about twenty
feet of me, I felt the shock.... We laid him on his back
and closed his eyelids, that was all we could do for
him. In the meantime the cattle had run off and the
other boys did not know that he was killed. Jim Summers
told me to stay there with the corpse, and he would go
and help with the cattle. It was about two hours before
day light, and I was left alone with that dead body in
the night without any light, except flashes of
lightning. The wolves would howl and come up close to
me. I would shoot at them and they would run off.”
    The author narrates several episodes of apprehending
cattle rustlers on the Slaughter, Runge, Weldon, King,
and other ranches. This section contains excellent
material on how rustlers changed brands. Delony also
rode as a Texas Ranger under Captains Lee Hall and
Leander H. McNelly, and served as Special Ranger under
Governor Oran M. Roberts (1882). $850.00

1484.   DELONY, Lewis S. Forty Years A Peace Officer....
[Abilene, 1907]. Another copy, variant wrappers. 8vo,
original beige printed wrappers, stapled (as issued).
Upper wrapper lightly browned along left edge, otherwise
fine.   $750.00

1485.   DeMARCO, Mario. Tim McCoy: The Last Plainsman
[wrapper title]. N.p., [after 1978]. 100 pp., profusely
illustrated (movie and circus show bills, personal
photographs, studio shots, stills from films, etc.).
4to, original pictorial wrappers with photograph of
McCoy. Some loose pages at rear, a few ink notations in
blank margins, otherwise fine.
    First edition. McCoy (1891-1978) was born in
Saginaw, Michigan, where as a youngster he was
spellbound by cowboys who brought their horses from the
west to sell. While in college in Chicago, the turning
point of his life came when he attended a performance of
the Miller Brothers 101 Ranch Wild West Show. He
promptly dropped out of college and headed west, where
he worked rounding up wild horses and as a cowboy on
ranches in Wyoming and the Rocky Mountains, finally
settling on a ranch in Wyoming. McCoy came to Hollywood
to assist with technical details on the film “The
Covered Wagon” (1923), serving as interface between the
production crew and Native American participants, since
he was able to converse with them by sign language. He
and William S. Hart were among the few early Western
film stars who actually were real cowboys.   $30.00

               Roosevelt in the Bunk House
1486.   DEMING, William Chapin. Roosevelt in the Bunk
House: Visits of the Great Rough Rider to Wyoming in
1903 and 1910. N.p., n.d. [2] 38 pp., text illustrations
(some full-page, mostly photographic). 8vo, original
brown printed wrappers. Fine.
    First edition. Herd does not mention this edition,
but he cites the second edition (see next entry), which
was expanded to 80 pages. Theodore Roosevelt first went
west in 1883; after a week in the Dakota Badlands, he
decided to go into ranching himself and established two
ranches. Roosevelt never ceased to cherish his memories
of cowboy life and had the deepest respect for western
ways, as this rare pamphlet documents. Author William
Chapin Deming, publisher of the Wyoming Tribune-Leader,
chronicles Roosevelt’s visits to the Wyoming cattle
country, including accounts by various individuals (such
as   John    Clay)   and   many   excellent    documentary
photographs.
    Deming describes the “real” Roosevelt at ease in the
range country: “Gathered in groups about the room were
ex-cabinet    officers,  senators,   newspaper   men   and
magazine writers, governors, city officials, chauffeurs,
and ranchmen. The cowboys, sheep herders, and ranch
hands...came and went...now and then lingering to catch
a word from the old cowman whose range was the
universe.... In the midst of the smoke and babel of
tongues sat Roosevelt, surrounded by eager listeners....
He   is   a   veritable  torrent   of   conversation,   an
overflowing reservoir of experience, a restless, rolling
sea of thought. He talks like a whirlwind, shows his
teeth like a bull pup, shakes his head like a buffalo,
and threshes around with his arms and legs like his
unconquered bucking prototype.”    $750.00

1487.   DEMING, William Chapin. Roosevelt in the Bunk
House and Other Sketches: Visits of the Great Rough
Rider to Wyoming in 1900, 1903, and 1910. Second
Edition. Laramie: Laramie Printing, [1927]. [4] 80 pp.,
photographic   illustrations   (some  full-page).  8vo,
original blue printed wrappers, stapled (as issued).
Wrappers with a bit of very mild staining, otherwise
very fine. Author’s signed presentation inscription
below his portrait: “For Dr. A. R. Butler, With best
wishes from William C. Deming.” Butler’s small ink
ownership inscription on upper wrapper. Roosevelt-
related newspaper clipping (1934) laid in.
    Second edition, revised and enlarged. Herd 674 (not
mentioning the wrappers issue): “Scarce.” $500.00

1488.   DEMING, William Chapin. Roosevelt in the Bunk
House.... Laramie: Laramie Printing, [1927]. Another
copy. 8vo, original blue printed wrappers. Very fine,
armorial bookplate of Langdon Hardy Larwill inside front
wrap.   $400.00
1489.   DENHARDT, Robert Moorman. The Horse of the
Americas. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1948.
xvii   [1]    286   pp.,   photographic   plates,   text
illustrations. 8vo, original tan cloth. Fine in price-
clipped d.j. with slight wear.
    Second printing. Campbell, p. 130: “A book on an
appealing subject written by one who is thoroughly
familiar with his theme. As former editor of The Western
Horseman magazine he is an unquestioned authority....
Horses of the Spanish conquerors were cherished, since
they frightened the enemy ‘and after God, to them
belonged the victory.’ A thorough job destined to be a
classic in horse literature.... Well illustrated and
handsomely turned out.” Dobie, p. 132. Herd 675.
McVicker B65. Mohr, The Range Country 814. Foreword by
J. Frank Dobie.    $30.00

1490.   DENHARDT, Robert Moorman. The King Ranch Quarter
Horses and Something of the Ranch and the Men That Bred
Them. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1970]. xiv,
256 [2] pp., photographic plates, tables, map. Large
8vo, original tan cloth with “Running W.” Minor spotting
to binding, else very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #65: “Some
ranch history and much on the men who guided the
remarkable breeding and selection programs that brought
about a superior race of sturdy and fleet cow horses.”
    $150.00

1491.   DENHARDT, Robert Moorman. Quarter Horses: A
Story of Two Centuries. Norman: University of Oklahoma
Press, [1969]. xiv, 192 [2] pp., photographic plates.
8vo, original brown cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    Second printing (first printing 1967). See Herd 676-
77 for two related works by the same author. $45.00

1492.  DENTON, B. E. (“Cyclone”). A Two-Gun Cyclone: A
True Story. Dallas: B. E. Denton, [1927]. viii [4] 145
pp., frontispiece portrait, 7 plates (one in color—a
1926 invitation to “The Last Buffalo Hunt in America” at
Antelope Island in Salt Lake), cartoons by Jack Patton
(of Texas History Movies fame). 12mo, original orange
pictorial cloth stamped in dark green. Signed by author
in ink on front free endpaper. Spine a bit light, small
snag on spine, corners bumped, interior fine.
    First edition. Guns 583: “Scarce.” Herd 678: “A
little book of reminiscences written by an old-time
cowboy after he had reached his seventies. He was a
typical old-time Texas cowboy, uneducated and big
hearted. I knew him well.” The author, who was born on
Hog Creek in Brazos County, Texas, cowboyed and herded
in Texas, Kansas, Montana, New Mexico, Arizona, Wyoming,
and the Cherokee Strip in Indian Territory (he
participated in the Run). In his later years, he
performed in Cody’s Wild West Show.
    Denton lit out for the West at age sixteen and
drifted to Arizona, where he worked on a ranch on the
Gila River. Denton remarks in the chapter on “Buffalo
Huntin’” that the extermination of the buffalo “was
pretty bad at the time, but if they was still there on
the plains in the same numbers they was before, there
would be no big cow ranches, no farms, no people livin’
out there and nothin’ but a wild country with buffalo
herds and Indians and bad men.”
    Denton’s first cattle drive was for the XIX outfit,
from Colorado City, Texas, to the Cherokee Strip.
Because of his raw youth and perceived greenness, he was
given an outlaw horse that had already killed two men,
but he won the respect of the trail boss and other
cowboys by taming the beast on his first ride. Near the
Wichita Mountains, rustlers shot off one of Denton’s
fingers. Denton describes a stampede: “Cattle, hosses
and men were often killed in the stampedes. You can hear
a stampede comin’ for miles, with a roarin’ and a
clickin’ of horns, it sounds like a storm. The cow
critters when a stampede is goin’ on, will run over
anything or into anything.... Herds of cows has lots of
heat and they draws litenin’, and it was nothing unusual
to see flashes of fire playin’ over their horns and
backs.” Denton laconically sums up this drive: “It shore
was a kinder tame sort of drive.” $200.00
1493.   DENTON, B. E. (“Cyclone”). A Two-Gun Cyclone: A
True Story. Dallas: B. E. Denton, [1927]. Another copy.
Other than mild dust-soiling to binding, a very fine
copy.   $125.00

1494.   DERBY, George Horatio. The Topographical Reports
of Lieutenant George H. Derby. With Introduction and
Notes   by   Francis   P.   Farquhar.   [San   Francisco]:
California Historical Society, [1933]. [2] 81 pp.,
frontispiece portrait of Derby (from a portrait by F. B.
Carpenter), maps (two of which are large and folding),
text illustrations. 8vo, original grey printed wrappers
bound in dark green buckram. Very fine.
    First edition (most of the reports originally
appeared in government documents: San Joaquin and
Sacramento Valley report: HRED 17, 1850, pp. 941-43; SED
47, 1850, pp. 2-16; SED 110, 1852, pp. 1-17; Colorado
River and Gulf of California report: SED 81, 1852, pp.
1-28; Oregon military roads: SED 1, 1855, 502-03;
Derby’s previously unpublished report from San Diego is
from the archives of the U.S. Army Engineers). The
present work consists of reprints from the Quarterly of
the   California    Historical   Society    11:2-4,   with
additional   material   (CHS   Special   Publication   6).
Barrett, Baja California 680. Farquhar, The Colorado
River and the Grand Canyon 15b. Graff 1058n: “First
reconnaissance of the Colorado River.” Powell, Arizona
Gathering II 457n. Rocq 16819. Wheat, Maps of the
California Gold Region 79n; Transmississippi West 668 &
III,   pp.   212-13   (citing   Colorado   River–Gulf   of
California map): “The basis for cartography of the
singular area until the Ives map appeared in 1860.”
    Although best known for his humorous writings under
the pseudonyms of John “Phoenix” and “Squibob,” Derby
served with distinction as a topographical engineer with
the U.S. Army, creating an important map of the
California gold regions and performing the first
reconnaissance of the Colorado River (see Thrapp I, p.
394). The emphasis of the present work is Derby’s
topographical surveys, but also present are interesting
comments on various ranches in the San Joaquin and
Sacramento Valley region. Even in this bureaucratic
report, Derby’s sensitive intelligence and keen wit
shine through. Describing Nicholaus Altgeier’s rancho,
Derby comments: “He...owns a large adobe house of two
stories in height, which presents quite an imposing
appearance in this country of log-huts and Indian
rancherias. About 100 wretched Indians, playfully termed
Christian, live in the vicinity upon the bank of the
Feather river.... The more intelligent and docile of
these creatures are taken and brought up on the farm,
where in time they become excellent vaqueros, or
herdsmen, and where they are content to remain,
receiving in return for their services such food and
clothing as it may suit the interest or inclination of
its owner to bestow upon them.”   $100.00

1495.   DESPREZ, Frank. Lasca: The Story of a Texas
Cowboy—Down by the Rio Grande [wrapper title]. Waco:
[Privately printed by Roger N. Conger at Davis Brothers
Publishing], 1980. [8] pp., text illustrations by
Wilfred Stedman. 8vo, original white printed wrappers,
stapled (as issued). Light marginal browning to wraps,
otherwise very fine.
    Limited edition (#175 of 300 copies, signed by Roger
N. Conger; type and illustrations photographically
reproduced from the 1931 edition by the Rein Company).
The poem Lasca first appeared in a London periodical in
1882. Campbell, p. 227: “An Englishman from Bristol, who
went to Texas and probably up the Chisholm Trail, as his
reference to Kansas seems to show.... There is scarcely
any early poem so generally known in Texas, or one which
lends itself so well to declamation.”
    Desprez (1853-1916), of French descent but born in
England, was a playwright, essayist, poet, jeweler, and
silversmith who moved to Texas in his teens and worked
three years on a Texas ranch. “His best known work...is
‘Lasca,’ about a Mexican girl and her cowboy sweetheart
caught in a cattle stampede ‘in Texas down by the Rio
Grande.’   The   ballad-like   poem...has  often   been
reprinted...and recited in the English-speaking world”
(Handbook of Texas Online: Frank Desprez).  $40.00

1496.   DEVINNY,  V.   The  Story   of  a   Pioneer:  An
Historical Sketch in Which Is Depicted Some of the
Struggles and Exciting Incidents Pertaining to the Early
Settlement of Colorado. Denver: Reed Publishing Co.,
1904. 164 pp., frontispiece photographic portrait of
author, 6 photographic plates, illustrations. 12mo,
original green pictorial cloth stamped in black and red.
Light shelf wear, but generally fine.
    First edition. Introduction by Buffalo Bill Cody
(one of the plates is a portrait of Cody, and the text
includes an heroic account of fifteen-year-old Cody
halting a stampede of buffalo during the author’s
overland trek). Eberstadt 138:204. Eberstadt, Modern
Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 131. Howes
D294.
    This work is primarily an overland and Colorado gold
rush account of 1860 centering on pioneer Neal Norton
and his family, but the final chapter (pp. 136-64)
“Minta Abel, the Cow-Herder Girl” chronicles the unusual
life of young bookworm Minta at the well-stocked ranch
outside Denver belonging to her mother and cruel
stepfather. “Most of her time was occupied in herding
the cows on the prairies, often five or more miles from
her home. She naturally thus became a skillful rider,
could ride a horse bareback sideways or otherwise, with
a wondrous grace and security. And, as she thus did a
‘cowboy’s’ work, she was named ‘the cowboy-girl.’” At
the age of thirteen, Minta was named best young lady
rider at the Colorado Agricultural Fair held in Denver,
winning a purse of three hundred dollars in gold, which
she used to obtain her education    in Denver. After many
hardships, Minta received her law   degree from an eastern
university and practiced law in      Helena, Montana. The
author imbues this account with      a breathless air of
fiction, but the authorities seem   to agree that the work
is nonfiction. $250.00

1497.   DEVINNY, V. The Story of a Pioneer.... Denver:
Reed Publishing Co., 1904. Another copy, variant
binding. 12mo, original beige pictorial cloth stamped in
tan and red. Slight shelf wear, but generally fine.
    $250.00

1498.   DEVOE, Caryl. In Borderland: A Story of Frontier
Life in the Early Eighties. N.p., n.d. [1920s or 1930s].
36 pp. 8vo, original red pictorial wrappers, stapled (as
issued). Two-inch clean diagonal cut to upper wrapper
and first few leaves, wraps and a few leaves slightly
stained. With J. Frank Dobie’s signed and dated ink
note: “Very strange that such as this should be printed
as it is printed. Yet it is no worse than most of the
picture shows—just as convincing. J. Frank Dobie
11/4/38.” No locations cited by OCLC or RLIN.
    First edition? Lively novella about a band of rowdy
Texas cowboys, set in a cowtown named Coltsville, with
dialogue along these dreadful lines: “Now, Pap, them cow
punchers ain’t done nothin’ onlawful, an’ what’s more,
if they’re treated right, they ain’t goin’ to. There’s
no better hearted man livin’ than th’ average cowboy, ’f
he does shoot up the town once in a while.” The author
also wrote nonfiction, including Legends of the Kaw: The
Folk-Lore of the Indians of Kansas River Valley (Kansas,
1904). $35.00

1499.   DEVOL, George H. Forty Years a Gambler on the
Mississippi: A Cabin Boy in 1839; Could Steal Cards and
Cheat the Boys at Eleven; Stock a Deck at Fourteen;
Bested Soldiers on the Rio Grande during the Mexican
War; Won Hundreds of Thousands from Paymasters, Bottom
Buyers, Defaulters, and Thieves; Fought More Rough-and-
Tumble Fights Than Any Man in America, and Was the Most
Daring Gambler in the World. Austin: Steck-Vaughn,
[1967]. [16] 300 pp., portrait, plates. 8vo, original
maroon cloth gilt with gilt illustration of a hand
holding three playing cards. Very fine in publisher’s
slipcase. Christmas card from Steck-Vaughn laid in.
    Facsimile of the first edition (Cincinnati, 1887).
Introduction by John O. West. Graff 1071n. Howes D295n.
In the introduction, editor West discusses the strange
coincidence of two orphan runaways both on board the
steamer Corvette on the Rio Grande during the Mexican-
American War. One was George H. Devol, and the other was
Richard King, who went on to found the King Ranch. West
also reveals that early in his gambling career, Devol
played roulette alongside Juan Cortinas, the noted
Mexican bandit and cattle rustler. Among Devol’s
anecdotes are some relating to cowboys, a favorite
target of gamblers of the day. In “Rattlesnake Jack”
Devol tells of cleverly extracting several thousand
dollars from “Rattlesnake Jack” (Jackson McGee) in a
game   of  three-card   monte.  In   an   ironic  twist,
“Rattlesnake Jack” had told Devol that he was on his way
to Texas and intended to utilize three-card monte to win
the money of Texas cowboys. In “The Cattle Buyer” Devol
tells of “getting a nice slice” ($4,700) from a good-
natured, cool-headed Texas cattle buyer in a game of
euchre. In “The Green Cow Boy” Devol used the old
reliable game of euchre to sucker $10,000 from an El
Paso cowboy.   $75.00

1500.   DeVOTO, Bernard. Across the Wide Missouri, with
an Account of the Discovery of the Miller Collection by
Mae Reed Porter. Boston & Cambridge: Houghton Mifflin
Company & Riverside Press, 1947. xxvii [1] 483 pp., 81
plates (16 in color) after artwork by Bodmer, Catlin,
Miller, et al., endpaper maps. Large 8vo, original red
pictorial gilt cloth, t.e.g. Exceptionally fine in
original glassine d.j. and publisher’s slipcase with
very minor wear.
    First edition, limited edition (#161 of 265 copies,
signed by author) of DeVoto’s Pulitzer Prize-winning
history; best edition (“Although since reprinted by
others, this original Houghton Mifflin edition is by far
the best because of its rich art”—Orlan Sawey, DeVoto’s
biographer). Dobie, pp. 72, 85. Dykes, Western High
Spots, p. 54 (“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #69).
Harvard Guide to American History, p. 366. Howes D296.
Malone, Wyomingiana, pp. 19-20: “Centering his account
around the hunting trips of Captain William Drummond
Stewart and his painter, Alfred Jacob Miller, DeVoto
presents a picture of the fur trade in the Rocky
Mountains, 1832-38, describing it not as chronological
history but as a business and a manner of life.” Plains
& Rockies IV:125n. Smith 2430. Tweney, Washington 89 #9.
    DeVoto includes material on Richard Henry Dana and
the California hide and tallow trade. In a section on
Joseph Reddeford Walker, DeVoto masterfully depicts
California rancho life: “If not for the mission Indians
(whose lot may be too easily pitied), it was for white
men one of the most delightful ways of life the world
has ever known. These Californians were a feckless,
indolent people: their habitat permitted them to be.
None except the Indian peons worked hard, they contrived
not to exhaust themselves, and few others had to work at
all. They lived outdoors and on horseback.... Almost
uncountable herds of horses and cattle increased
geometrically with only the most casual supervision. One
of the first lessons Walker’s men learned was that
persons who had taken their horses—always punishable
with death on the American frontier—had not stolen them.
There were horses for everyone: take what you want. They
helped their new friends break horses (in a manner of
speaking), butcher cattle for the hide and tallow trade,
ride after and slaughter some absconding Indians. They
joined the continuous fiestas and competed with their
hosts, easily besting them at marksmanship and taking an
equally offhand beating at every form of horsemanship.”
   $350.00

1501.   DEWEES, W. B. Letters from an Early Settler of
Texas.... Compiled by Cara Cardelle. Louisville: Hull &
Brother,   Printers,   1854.    312   pp.  8vo,   original
blindstamped red cloth (spine crudely reinforced with
black cloth and endpapers replaced at an early date).
Front pastedown damaged where a label was removed, back
free endpaper and blanks absent, interior fine. Early
ownership inscriptions on front free endpaper.
    Second edition (the rare first edition, published at
Louisville in 1852, was limited to 250 copies). Bradford
1311n. Clark, Old South III:298n: “The preface states
that   the   compiler,   Cara   Cardelle,  pseudonym   for
Emmaretta C. Kimball, chanced to find among a friend’s
papers a large stack of Texas letters with much
information on the events of Texas history from 1819-
1852. The letters were written by William B. DeWees to a
friend in Kentucky...over a period of about 33 years....
Unembellished pictures of the journey to Texas, personal
incidents, and facts and events in Texas development.”
Eberstadt, Texas 162:251. Field 422: “The adventures of
a ranger in the border wars of Texas, against the
Comanches and other tribes of the plains, are here
narrated with spirit and apparent truthfulness.” Graff
1073n: “DeWees traveled from Nashville to Arkansas in
1819 and describes buffalo hunting.” Herd 671 (citing
only the first edition). Howes D299. Rader 1131n.
Raines, p. 67n. Tate, Indians of Texas 2039.
    Dewees (1799-1878), one of Austin’s Old Three
Hundred, first visited Texas in 1819 during a keelboat
excursion up the Red River and served as a public
official in Colorado County during the Republic era and
early statehood. Included are primary letters and
documents relating to the Revolution and Republic
(Travis’s   letter   from   the   Alamo,  Declaration   of
Independence, etc.).
    Dewees describes hunting wild cattle and the
suitability of Texas for stock raising: “The most
profitable business which a person can follow in this
country is stock-raising; especially if he has but a
small force. A poor man can probably make a living here
more easily than in any other country; but still if he
would turn his attention to stock-raising he would find
it far more profitable.” $250.00

1502.   D’HAMEL, E. B. The Adventures of a Tenderfoot,
History of 2nd Regt. Mounted Rifles and Co. G, 33 Regt.
and Capt Coopwood’s Spy Co. and 2nd Texas in Texas and
New Mexico. Waco: W. M. Morrison, [1965]. [4] 24 pp.,
photographic portrait of author in uniform. 8vo,
original goldenrod printed wrappers. Fine.
    Limited edition (175 copies), facsimile of the rare
1914 edition. In 1858, at the age of twenty-three, the
author left Cuba for New Orleans and ended up a flat-
broke miner in the Pikes Peak gold rush. He next hired
on as a Spanish interpreter for New York Herald
correspondent W. A. Buffom, but was fired for shooting
quail with Buffom’s gun. D’Hamel began a lonely tramp to
El Paso with only the clothing he wore and a Bowie
knife, when Kit Carson happened along and gave him a
ride to his ranch at Taos (“beautifully situated with
rich lands and cattle”).
    Traveling onward, he describes “Dead Man’s Desert”
and the hospitality shown him at New Mexico ranches:
“The activity of the Indians made travelling dangerous.
The country from Albuquerque was lined with frontier
ranches, plenty of cattle, sheep and goats; all the
ranchmen had their own adobe houses well white-washed
and beautiful. Every night I was invited to enjoy their
hospitality, a good supper, generally consisting of pig
or kid roasted, tortillas, frijoles, asaderas, and a
good woolen mattress to sleep on.”
    In El Paso, D’Hamel worked at Simon Hart’s flour
mills until the Civil War broke out. He enlisted as a
Volunteer with the San Elisario Spies and Guides (“all
of the members of the company were Texas backwoodsmen,
ranchers and cowboys who knew the country”). He also saw
service with the Texas Mounted Rifles under Rip Ford and
John Baylor (wonderful Civil War content). After the
war, D’Hamel served as Provost Marshall in San Antonio,
but the Vigilance Committee forced him to flee and take
refuge at the ranches of Antonio Navarro (his wife’s
uncle), Sam Stewart, and Santos Benavides.   $75.00

1503.   DICK, Everett. The Sod-House Frontier, 1854-
1890: A Social History of the Northern Plains from the
Creation of Kansas and Nebraska to the Admission of the
Dakotas. New York & London: D. Appleton-Century Company,
1937.    xviii   [2]   550    pp.,   photographic  plates
(documentary photos and vintage prints), illustrations,
endpaper maps. 8vo, original gray pictorial linen
stamped in terracotta. Mild staining along gutter
between front flyleaf and half-title, otherwise fine in
near fine d.j. (slightly chipped and price-clipped).
    First edition, first printing, with figure “(I)” at
end of index. Campbell, p. 105: “This book deals with
the states of the Great Plains.... Detailed treatment of
a most interesting phase of culture on the Plains—a
wonderful place to study cultures, as they pass rapidly
over the open country like cloud shadows, leaving little
trace.” Dobie, pp. 50-51. Guns 589: “Contains a
chapter...on the homesteader-cattleman war of the early
frontier.” Herd 685. Howes D315.
    This standard includes excellent social history with
much on women (“one of the first frontier historians to
place a special emphasis on the social life of western
settlers”—Lamar, Reader’s Encyclopedia of the American
West, p. 302). Many of the excellent documentary
photographs are by Solomon Butcher (see item 745 in Part
I of this catalogue). Chapter 7 is devoted to one of the
few scholarly studies of road ranches, whose proprietors
often were the first permanent settlers in the West.
Although universally called ranches, these isolated
posts were more in the nature of primitive trading and
dining    establishments   for   trail  herders,  buffalo
hunters, emigrants, and miners rushing to California,
Colorado, and the Black Hills.    $75.00

1504.   DICK, Everett. Vanguards of the Frontier: A
Social History of the Northern Plains and Rocky
Mountains from the Earliest White Contacts to the Coming
of the Homemaker. New York & London: D. Appleton-Century
Company, 1941. xvi [2] 574 pp., frontispiece portrait of
Jim Baker (after a painting by Waldo Love), plates
(vintage prints and documentary photographs, some by W.
H.   Jackson),  endpaper   maps.  8vo,   original   beige
pictorial linen stamped in black, gilt lettering on
upper cover and spine. Very fine in very good price-
clipped d.j. with a few short tears.
    First edition, first printing, with figure “(I)” at
end of index. Dobie, pp. 50-51. Guns 590: “Another
extensive work by this author, touching upon, among many
other subjects, vigilantes and the Johnson County War.”
Herd 686. Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 21: “Descriptive of
the work and manner of life of the frontiersmen of the
region....     Extensive      bibliography.      Somewhat
disillusioning.” Smith 2442. $75.00

1505.   DICK, Everett. Vanguards of the Frontier.... New
York & London: D. Appleton-Century Company, 1941.
Another copy, variant binding. 8vo, original grey
pictorial cloth with lettering in black. Very fine in
very good d.j. (lightly soiled, a few short tears, and
price-clipped).    $50.00

1506.   DICK, Everett. Vanguards of the Frontier.... New
York & London: D. Appleton-Century Company, 1941.
Another copy, variant binding. 8vo, original tan
pictorial cloth. Very fine in chipped and price-clipped
d.j.    $50.00

1507.   DICKEY, Roland F. New Mexico Village Arts.
Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1949. xii,
266 pp., color illustrations from drawings by Lloyd
Lozes Goff, text illustrations, calligraphy by Robert
Stanford Wallace. Large 8vo, original grey cloth
decorated in red. Very fine in d.j.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 134: “All about Spanish-
American handicrafts, villages, houses, and furnishings,
their creation and use. A large, handsome volume.”
Powell, Southwest Century 20. Among the ranching
subjects covered are branding and ranchero equipage:
“Every man took pride in his horsemanship and his
accuracy with the lasso. Rancheros invested small
fortunes in elaborate tooled leather saddles and
bridles, shining with silver ornaments. Severe curb bits
were preferred by the Spaniards, and as one American
officer remarked, ‘with their large, cruel bits, they
harass their horses.... ’ Apaches and the poorer
Spaniards shod their horses and mules with rawhide shoes
instead of metal. The ownership of horses, and all other
animals, was determined by a brand burnt in the hip....
These brands were large curlicues resembling rubrics.
Under Spanish law, the fierro was the brand of the
original owner. When the animal was sold, a second
brand, called the venta or buyer’s brand, obliterated
the first. Illegal branding seems to have been no less
common then than it came to be in the heyday of American
cattle ranching” (pp. 13-14).
    This book also contains details on santos branded
onto leather; sheep and sheep-rustling by Navajo and
Apache; weaving and textiles (including discussion of
armas de pelo—or chaps—of the professional vaquero).
    $125.00

1508.   DICKINSON, Donald C., et al. (eds.). Voices from
the Southwest: A Gathering in Honor of Lawrence Clark
Powell. Flagstaff: Northland Press, 1976. xv [1] 159 [1]
pp., frontispiece portrait of Powell, text illustrations
(one by Cisneros), photographic text illustrations
(including some by Ansel Adams). 8vo, original dark grey
cloth. Small spot on fore-edge, otherwise very fine in
fine d.j. Laid in is a publisher’s prospectus addressed
to Carl Hertzog. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his
bookplate.
    First edition. A collection of Southwest studies
honoring Lawrence Clark Powell on his seventieth
birthday. Contributors include Ansel Adams, Paul Horgan,
Al Lowman, Ward Ritchie, José Cisneros, William Everson,
Harwood P. Hinton, Frank Waters, and Jake Zeitlin. The
appendix includes a bibliography of Powell keepsakes and
published works. In her essay “Voices from the
Southwest,” Sarah Bouquet discusses women in the
Southwest, including some ladies of the cattle country
(Alice Marriott, Mary Rak, and Eulalia Bourne).
    Bernard L. Fontana in “The Faces and Forces of
Pimería   Alta”  gives    fascinating  details  on   the
introduction of cattle to the northernmost reaches of
the Sonoran Desert. The Pima of Remedios told Kino in
1687 they did not want a priest because he would waste
their time making them sow crops and pasturing cattle
would cause their waterholes to go dry. At first the
Pima hunted the cattle just as they would deer or
antelope, but over time, hunting territories became
cattle ranges. Fontana comments: “With man as an ally,
livestock are given an unfair advantage over the plants
and other animals in an arid environment. But the
advantage may well be short-termed. Over centuries, if
not decades, human beings appear to husband domestic
livestock in deserts to eventual forced removal or utter
extinction” (p. 51).   $75.00

1509.   DICKSON, Albert Jerome (editor). Covered Wagon
Days: A Journey across the Plains in the Sixties, and
Pioneer Days in the Northwest; from the Private Journals
of.... Edited by Arthur Jerome Dickson. Cleveland: The
Arthur H. Clark Company, 1929. 287 pp., frontispiece
(photograph of the sun dance of the Shoshones), plates
(mostly    documentary   photographs),   folding    map,
illustrations. 8vo, original light blue cloth, t.e.g.
Very fine.
    First edition, first issue (printed and bound in
1929, in either dark or light blue cloth). Clark &
Brunet 62: “Albert Dickson’s journals include an
overland trip from Wisconsin into the northern Plains
and finally to Virginia City, Montana Territory. An
accessible and detailed account of wagon train life, it
includes information of the vigilantes of Montana.”
Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains and the
Rockies 135. Flake 2833. Graff 1082. Guns 591. Mattes,
Platte River Road Narratives 1941. Mintz, The Trail 126:
“One of the best overland narratives.... Tells, perhaps
more poignantly than any other journal, how much any
small dose of entertainment meant to those travelling
the plains month after month; and just how it felt to be
there by the night time fire enjoying the diversion....
Dickson was a young boy when he wrote this.” Smith 2445.
    On pages 121-29, Dickson gives an account and
journal of an unusual trail drive by Dr. Kenyon L.
Butterfield across the Lander Trail from Nebraska City
to Sacramento in 1861: “The people of California were
just beginning to turn their attention to agriculture
and there began a demand for pure-bred stock to replace
the old Spanish stock. Mr. Butterfield was a member of a
party who drove a herd of pure-bred stock (seventy
Shorthorn and Devon cattle and six hundred Merino sheep)
to California in 1861, for John D. Patterson, [who] had
been...shipping them by way of the Isthmus of Panama.
Steamer freights were very high and he conceived the
idea of driving a large number overland.” Butterfield
reported that only a fourth of the sheep were lost and
characterizes the drive as “one of the most remarkable
trains that crossed the country up to 1870, and perhaps
no other just like it ever made the whole distance from
Wisconsin to Sacramento.... It was a daring undertaking
and only a peaceable Indian situation made it possible.”
    Also present is material on Crow stock raids, Jack
Slade, the Montana Vigilantes, mountain men along the
trail dealing in stock, etc. $200.00

1510.   DICKSON, Albert Jerome (editor). Covered Wagon
Days.... Cleveland: The Arthur H. Clark Company, 1929.
Another copy. 8vo, original navy blue cloth, t.e.g. Very
fine.  $200.00

1511.   DICKSON, Albert Jerome (editor). Covered Wagon
Days.... Cleveland: The Arthur H. Clark Company, 1929
[1938]. 8vo, original maroon cloth, t.e.g. Very fine, in
publisher’s plain d.j.
    First edition, second issue, reissued by Clark in
1938.   $150.00

1512.   DICKSON, Albert Jerome (editor). Covered Wagon
Days.... Cleveland: The Arthur H. Clark Company, 1929
[1938].   Another   copy   in  maroon    cloth, without
publisher’s plain d.j. Very fine. $125.00

1513.   DIEKER, Leo E. A Brief Historical Sketch:
Hollenberg Ranch, Pony Express Station, Hanover, Kansas.
[Hanover]: The Hanover News, n.d. [7] pp., photographic
plate of the Hollenberg Ranch. 8vo, original stiff blue
printed wrappers, stapled. Very fine. Uncommon.
    First edition. Herd 687. A brief history of the
Hollenberg Ranch, which German pioneer G. H. Hollenberg
(1823-1874) established in 1857 as a waypoint on the
Pony Express route, as well as a post office, working
cattle ranch, and stage stop for emigrants. Emigrants
needed cattle for food, and horses and oxen were
required to replace animals that fell by the wayside in
the grueling westward trek. The house on the Hollenberg
Ranch was the first home constructed in Washington
County, Kansas, and today it is the only remaining
original and unaltered Pony Express station still
standing in its original location. In the early days,
the Ranch was known as Cottonwood Station.   $45.00

1514.  DILLON, Richard H. J. Ross Browne, Confidential
Agent in Old California. Norman: University of Oklahoma
Press, [1965]. xix [1] 218 [2] pp., plates (photographs
and vintage prints, some by Browne). 8vo, original brown
cloth. Corners slightly bumped, otherwise a fine copy in
lightly rubbed and price-clipped d.j. Autographed by
author.
    First edition. Rocq S2499. J. Ross Browne (Thrapp I,
pp. 180-81) led a double life as government employee and
humorist-artist-travel writer (see item 672-675 in Part
I of this catalogue). In 1853 the U.S. Treasury
Department appointed him to the post of “confidential
government agent of the Treasury Department and quasi-
minister without portfolio of both the General Land
Office and the Office of Indian Affairs.” Armed with
this long and mysterious title, he set out to inspect,
observe, and muckrake the various far-flung branches of
the bourgeoning federal bureaucracy. He investigated
trail herding into post-gold rush California, thus
shedding light on a scarcely explored area of the cattle
industry. After scrutinizing practices of U.S. Customs,
Browne recommended that Mexican cattle be duty-free (a
measure eventually approved by Congress). $40.00

1515.   DILS, Lenore. Horny Toad Man. [El Paso]: Boots
and Saddle Press, [1966]. [6] 190 pp., photographic
plates, endpaper maps. 8vo, original maroon cloth
decorated in gilt. Very fine, with two versions of d.j.,
one of which bears the author’s printed label.
Presentation copy to Carl Hertzog, signed by author.
Hertzog   bookplate  on   front   pastedown.  Occasional
manuscript corrections by author.
    First edition. Guns 595: “There is mention of such
gunmen and outlaws as Pat Garrett, Bat Masterson, George
Scarborough, Dallas Stoudenmire, Jeff Milton, J. B.
Gillett, Billy the Kid, Bass Outlaw, and John Wesley
Hardin.” The Horny Toad Division of the Santa Fe Railway
(established 1881) ran from Albuquerque to El Paso, with
branch lines to Deming, Silver City, Santa Rita, and
other points west. The line was christened the Horny
Toad Division because of the large number of now-
endangered horned lizards that covered the tracks.
    The Horny Toad line assisted ranchers and cattlemen
in the transition from trail driving to shipping by
rail. Weeks were saved, and cattle did not lose weight
as they did on long trail drives. Burt Mossman and
others rounded up wild horses, broke them at Engle,
shipped them on the Horny Toad line, and sold them for a
dollar a head. Engle, the half-way point on the line,
became a stomping ground for cattlemen and cowboys. The
chapter on Engle includes material on Eugene Manlove
Rhodes, Burt Mossman, Bo Harkness, and many other
ranchers and cowboys.
    This book is filled with a great deal of local
history and unusual material not found elsewhere. For
instance, we learn that Western showman and poet-scout
Captain Jack Crawford (see items 1214-1219 in Part I of
this Catalogue) lived on a ranch at Fort Craig near the
Horny Toad line and that his wife never approved of his
fancy fringed buckskin suit, long flowing locks, and
extravagant facial hair. When Captain Jack would emerge
from his room all decked out, he would ask his wife how
he looked. Invariably she would reply, “Silly.” $300.00

                  The Code of the West
1516.   DIMSDALE,  Tho[ma]s   J[osiah].  Vigilantes   of
Montana; or, Popular Justice in the Rocky Mountains:
Being a Correct and Impartial Narrative of the Chase,
Trial, Capture, and Execution of Henry Plummer’s
Notorious Road Agent Band, Together with Accounts of the
Lives and Crimes of Many of the Robbers and Desperadoes,
the Whole Being Interspersed with Sketches of Life in
the Mining Camps of the “Far West.” Virginia City,
Montana: D. W. Tilton, 1882. 241 pp. 12mo, original grey
printed upper wrapper (neatly rebacked, spine and lower
wrap supplied in sympathetic grey paper). Fragile upper
wrapper lightly chipped and stained. Tear on upper wrap
and title neatly reinforced with tape on inside wrap and
title verso (no losses). Interior fine, overall a very
good, presentable copy.
    Second edition (the first edition, printed at
Virginia City, Montana, in 1866, is exceedingly rare).
Adams, One-Fifty 48n: “All editions [were] issued by
different publishers except the second.... The original
edition is said to be the first book produced by a
printing press in Montana. Perhaps no book excels
Dimsdale’s in presenting the lawless condition that
characterized the mining camps of the Rocky Mountain
country. The author was editor of the Virginia City
Montana Post and a participant in the extraordinary
campaign against lawlessness.” Guns 596n. Graff 1088n.
Howes D345: “Textually the most important book ever
printed in Montana.” Smith 2458. Streeter, Americana
Beginnings 72n (citing first edition): “One of the best
accounts of the action of the Vigilance Committee, the
institution   that  brought   justice    to   the   western
frontier.”
    Dimsdale’s classic book is a cornerstone in the
literature of the Code of the West, setting out the
cardinal principles of extra-legal justice as a means to
justify an end. With great verve, Oxford-educated
Englishman   Dimsdale  chronicles    one    of   the   most
successful lynch-law campaigns in American history. The
events described in the book took place in the Montana
cattle country in 1863 and 1864, with many of the
pivotal events of the tragic drama played out on area
ranches. The turning point for Plummer’s gang, who
called themselves the Innocents, occurred at Dempsey’s
Cottonwood Ranche, when quasi-Innocent George W. Brown
spilled the beans to the Vigilantes. Once the veil of
secrecy of the Innocents had been pierced by Brown,
captured gang member Erastus “Red” Yager got the coup de
grace rolling by disclosing inside information on the
gang—its members, hierarchy, secret codes, passwords,
and nefarious methods. After that, the Innocent game was
up, except for the “hempen neckties” (Dimsdale’s
euphemistic term for hanging).
    The Innocents and their ruthless crimes exercised a
profound and baleful effect on the area ranchers, as
Dimsdale points out: “The owner [of Cottonwood Ranche]
knew the character of the robbers, but had no connection
with them; in those days a man’s life would not have
been worth fifteen minutes purchase, if the possessor
had been foolish enough even to hint at his knowledge of
their doings.... All along the route, the ranchmen knew
the road agents, but the certainty of instant death in
case they revealed what they knew enforced their
silence, even when they were really desirous of giving
information or warning.”
    Often a book is fascinating for what it says, but
occasionally a book intrigues by what the author does
not say. Dimsdale’s Vigilantes fits both categories. We
find it interesting that assiduous chronicler Dimsdale
does not mention Granville Stuart, an active member of
the Vigilance Committee that ended the reign of Plummer
and his Innocents. Stuart’s vigilante activities are
considered by some historians to be the most notorious
in American history. Stuart was in western Montana by
the 1860s and is often credited with starting the
Montana gold rush when he discovered gold at Deer Lodge
Valley. He began as a road rancher in Montana,
eventually becoming a legendary cattle baron. Recent
scholarship has challenged Dimsdale’s account as one of
the most successful cases of spin-doctoring in history.
    $1,000.00

1517.   DIMSDALE,  Tho[ma]s   J[osiah].  Vigilantes   of
Montana.... Butte: W. F. Bartlett, 1915. 276 pp. 12mo,
original grey printed wrappers, stapled (as issued).
Blank right lower corner of upper wrap missing,
otherwise fine. Very scarce.
    “Third printing” (same text as first and second
edition, but with added introduction by John F. Davies,
Librarian, Butte Free Public Library; Davies refers to
the 1882 printing as a second impression and states that
10,000 copies sold). Smith 2460. WLA, Literary History
of the American West, pp. 830-31: “Long before the end
of the frontier era, the Rocky Mountains had generated a
considerable historical literature of an informal and
polemic nature. A notable specimen is Thomas J.
Dimsdale’s The Vigilantes of Montana.... Dimsdale served
as Montana Territory’s first superintendent of public
instruction and edited Virginia City’s Montana Post.
Dimsdale’s book narrates the effective but controversial
vigilante campaign against Henry Plummer, who had
doubled as elected sheriff and leader of road agents
preying upon travelers between Montana’s isolated mining
camps.... Dimsdale argues that frontier vigilante
justice was a necessary step toward a civilized state of
law and order.”    $150.00

1518.   DIMSDALE,  Tho[ma]s   J[osiah].  Vigilantes   of
Montana.... Helena: State Publishing Co., [1915]. 290
pp., frontispiece portrait of Dimsdale, photographic
plates (mostly portraits and early views of Montana).
8vo, original green pictorial cloth stamped and lettered
in white. Light shelf wear, hinges loose, back free
endpaper not present, overall very good and bright.
Autographed by editor A. J. Noyes.
    Third edition (with additional material on Southern
Montana). Howes refers to this edition as the best.
Adams, One-Fifty 48n: “The third edition in 1915 was
issued by Al Noyes with footnotes and illustrations and
with an appended history of Southern Montana.” Graff
1089. Smith 2459. The additional 90 pages following
Dimsdale’s book contain excellent documentary history
and firsthand accounts by pioneer ranchers, miners,
settlers, and legislators in southern Montana. This
appendix is filled with fugitive information, such as
mining laws of various districts; Jack Slade—his two
ranches, his fabulous wife, probate of his estate; the
first beer brewed with hops in Montana by Charles
Beehrer (as a youth Beehrer almost joined a large gang
led by Texans, who were later arrested, to “procure”
cattle); buffalo currency; the Flour Riot; good material
on women (list of women residing in Bannack in 1862;
first woman miner, Annette Stanley, who bought a claim
on Geary’s Bar for $20 in 1862; etc.).   $125.00

1519.   DIMSDALE,   Tho[ma]s   J[osiah].   Vigilantes   of
Montana.... Helena: State Publishing Co., [ca. 1915 or
after]. 290 pp., frontispiece photographic view of
Virginia City, plates. 8vo, original olive pictorial
cloth gilt. Minor shelf wear, lower hinge loose,
occasional pencil notations to blank margins, overall
very good to fine, a bright copy.
    “Fourth edition” (another edition of preceding, with
slight rearrangement of material). Dimsdale, who spices
his brilliant and bloody account with quotations from
Cato, Byron, Shakespeare, Milton, et al., states: “It is
not pleasant to write of blasphemous and indecent
language, or to record foul and horrible crimes; but, as
the anatomist must not shrink from the corpse, which
taints the air as he investigates the symptoms and
examines the results of disease, so, the historian must
either tell the truth for the instruction of mankind, or
sink to the level of a mercenary banterer, who writes,
not to inform the people, but to enrich himself.”
    $125.00

1520.   DIMSDALE,  Tho[ma]s   J[osiah].   Vigilantes  of
Montana.... Butte: McKee Printing Co., 1929. 269 pp.,
photographic plates. 12mo, original white pictorial
wrappers colored in red and black, upper cover with
headline: A Vivid and Truthful Tale of the Old West, and
printed statement: From the P.O. News Stand, 25 W. Park
St., Butte, Mont. Wholesale and Retail Booksellers,
Newsdealers and Stationers. Fragile wrappers with light
wear and last gathering browned, otherwise fine.
    “Seventh printing” (reprint of the first edition).
Smith 2463. The appeal of this book is perennial, as
evidenced by this and the following popular reprint
editions. WLA, Literary History of the American West,
pp. 69-70: “Literary works of the middle ground provide
strong evidence of the value to the literary historian
of studying western works that might not be classified
as belles-lettres. Even so early a western book as Mark
Twain’s Roughing It (1872) relies on even earlier books
such as The Vigilantes of Montana (1866) by Thomas
Dimsdale.” $75.00

1521.   DIMSDALE,  Tho[ma]s   J[osiah].   Vigilantes  of
Montana.... Butte: McKee Printing Co., 1945. 269 pp.,
photographic plates. 12mo, original maroon cloth. Fine.
    “Tenth printing” (reprint of the first edition).
“Charles Dickens is reported to have said: ‘This is the
most interesting book I ever read in my life’” (The
Collector’s Journal, 3:6, April-June 1933, p. 367).
    $35.00

1522.   DIMSDALE,  Tho[ma]s   J[osiah].  Vigilantes  of
Montana.... Butte: McKee Printing Co., 1949. 269 pp.,
photographic plates. 12mo, original beige pictorial
wrappers colored in red and black, upper cover with
headline: A Truthful and Colorful Record of the Triumph
of Law and Order in Montana. Fine.
    “Eleventh printing” (reprint of the first edition).
    $35.00

1523.   DIMSDALE,  Tho[ma]s   J[osiah].   Vigilantes  of
Montana.... Butte: McKee Printing Co., 1949. Another
copy of preceding, variant binding. 12mo, original green
and black faux marbled cloth. Fine.   $35.00

                The Battle of Adobe Walls
1524.   DIXON, [William] “Billy” [& Olive Dixon]. Life
and Adventures of “Billy” Dixon of Adobe Walls, Texas
Panhandle: A Narrative in Which Is Described Many Things
Relating to the Early Southwest, with an Account of the
Fight between Indians and Buffalo Hunters at Adobe
Walls,   and   the  Desperate   Engagement  at   Buffalo
Wallow.... Compiled by Frederick Barde. Guthrie: [Co-
operative Publishing, 1914]. 320 pp., frontispiece
(reproduction of Gwynfred Jones’s painting of “The Fight
at Adobe Walls”), text illustrations (photographic, some
full-page, including Quanah Parker). 8vo, original gilt-
lettered slate blue cloth. Light wear and staining to
binding, but a bright, tight copy, interior very fine.
Very scarce (book lore maintains that many copies of the
first edition were burned in a fire).
    First edition. Anderson Sale 1642:156: “Privately
issued by the widow, after Dixon’s death, from the
manuscript narrative of his adventures dictated to her
by Gen. Miles’ noted scout. Exceedingly rare.” Braislin
606. Campbell, p. 62. Dobie, p. 159. Eberstadt, Texas
162:53: “An important narrative of early days in the
Southwest, taken chiefly from Dixon’s own statements.
The preface includes a letter from Bat Masterson,
recalling his services with Dixon at Adobe Walls in June
1875.” Graff 183. Herd 204: “Scarce.” Howes B135. Tate,
Indians of Texas 3112.
    This book, a classic of the buffalo hunter as a
type, contains much on early ranching in the Panhandle
(Charles Goodnight, XIT, JA, Hansford, etc.). “After the
Indians had been swept from the South Plains, and when
the buffalo herds existed only in men’s minds, Billy
Dixon settled down to relive his past on paper, and
these reminiscences, collected and edited by his wife
[Olive Dixon] shortly after his death were published in
1914” (McLoughlin, Wild & Woolly, pp. 110-11). “Dixon,
scout and buffalo hunter (1850-1913)...was one of the
first hunters to work south of the Canadian in Comanche
country and by 1874 was in the Panhandle.... In 1883
Dixon quitted the army payroll and, since the buffalo
were gone from the South Plains, ranched, homesteaded,
built a residence at the site of Adobe Walls” (Thrapp I,
pp. 406-07). Dixon comments on his buffalo hunting (pp.
183-84): “No mercy was shown the buffaloes.... I killed
as many as my three men could handle, working them as
hard as they were willing to work. This was a deadly
business, without sentiment; it was dollars against
tender-heartedness, and dollars won.”
    For women’s history, it should be noted that a lone
woman (Mrs. William Olds) was among the twenty-eight
persons under siege during the second Battle of Adobe
Walls (1874), an attack of approximately a thousand
Comanche, Arapahoe, Cheyenne, and Kiowa warriors, led by
Quanah Parker. Only four of the Adobe Walls men were
killed (including Mrs. Olds’ husband). Dixon’s comments
on the presence of Mrs. Olds at the Battle of Adobe
Walls reveal gender attitudes on the frontier: “The
anxiety of [our men] was increased by the presence of a
woman.... If the latter fact should be learned by the
Indians, there was no telling what they might attempt,
and a determined attack by the Indians would have meant
death for everybody...for none would have suffered
themselves to be taken alive nor permitted Mrs. Olds to
be captured.... Mrs. Olds was as brave as the bravest.
She knew only too well how horrible her fate would be if
she should fall into the hands of the Indians, and under
such circumstances it would have caused no surprise had
she gone into the wildest hysterics.... When the hand of
death seemed to be reaching from every direction, this
pioneer woman was cool and composed and lent a helping
hand in every emergency.”
    For perspective, it should be noted that the Adobe
Walls stockade where Dixon and his companions were
setting up their village was in territory previously
guaranteed by treaty to Native Americans. $750.00

1525.   DIXON, [William] “Billy” [& Olive Dixon]. Life
and Adventures of “Billy” Dixon.... Guthrie: [Co-
operative Publishing, 1914]. Another copy, variant
binding. 8vo, original gilt-lettered green cloth.
Binding worn, stained, and frayed, spine defective
(split at lower front joint, small piece of cloth
missing from upper spine affecting gilt rule and few
letters of title) and hinges cracked. In marked contrast
to the outside, the text is clean and bright.    $500.00

1526.   DIXON, [William] “Billy” [& Olive Dixon]. Life
and Adventures of “Billy” Dixon.... Guthrie: [Co-
operative Publishing, 1914]. Another copy. 8vo, rebound
in   later   black  cloth,   marbled  endpapers.  Fine,
exceptionally clean and fresh text.  $400.00
1527.   DIXON, [William] “Billy” & Olive Dixon. Life of
“Billy” Dixon, Plainsman, Scout and Pioneer.... Dallas:
P. L. Turner, [1927]. xviii, 251 pp., frontispiece
portrait (photograph of Dixon in his prime), plates
(photographic). 8vo, original dark green cloth. Fine in
the scarce pictorial d.j. (fine with only slight wear).
Bookplate of William MacLeod Raine, noted English writer
on Western subjects (see Thrapp III, pp. 1188-89).
    Second edition, revised. Tate, Indians of Texas
3123: “Although written as a work of praise by a loving
wife for her celebrated husband, this book remains very
valuable to researchers interested in an insider’s view
of the buffalo hide trade of the Texas Panhandle and the
Red River War. Dixon’s legendary exploits at Adobe Walls
and the Buffalo Wallow Fight are fully detailed in this
account, as are the facts of the gradual surrender of
various Comanche, Kiowa, and Southern Cheyenne bands
during 1874 and 1875.” $300.00

1528.   DIXON, [William] “Billy” & Olive Dixon. Life of
“Billy” Dixon.... Dallas: P. L. Turner, [1927]. Another
copy. Long diagonal strip of pp. 33-34 missing, with
loss of about a third of text (Xerox copy supplied),
occasional mild foxing, generally very good in the rare
d.j. (lightly soiled, spine darkened).   $75.00

1529.   DIXON, Sam Houston. The Men Who Made Texas Free:
The Signers of the Declaration of Independence—Sketches
of Their Lives and Patriotic Services to the Republic
and State with a Facsimile of the Declaration of
Independence.   Houston:   Texas  Historical  Publishing
Company, [1924]. 345 pp., text illustrations (facsimiles
and full-page portraits of signers). 8vo, original gilt-
lettered brown cloth. Light shelf wear, front hinge
cracked, back hinge separated, otherwise very good,
interior clean and bright.
    First edition. Compiled biographical work, including
details on signers engaged in stock raising: Samuel
Augustus Maverick (linguistic source of the term
“maverick” for an unbranded cow), John        W. Bunton
(originator of the famous “Turkey Foot”       brand and
credited for the bill that established        the Texas
Rangers), Francisco Ruiz, et al. $50.00

1530.   DIXON, William H. White Conquest. London: Chatto
and Windus, 1876. viii, 356 [32, ads] + vi, 373 [2] pp.
2 vols., 8vo, original blindstamped green cloth. Very
worn ex-library copy, titles with ink stamp of Young
Folks’ Library, La Junta, Colorado, old paper spine
labels with ink call numbers, library slips removed
(some damage to endpapers), lower corner of free
endpaper in vol. 1 torn away, hinges broken (some
signatures loose). The outward appearance of the set is
fairly wretched, but the text is clean.
    First edition. Clark, New South I:61. Cowan, p. 176.
Cowan & Dunlap, Bibliography of the Chinese Question
174:   “`Our   yellow   Brothers,’  `Mongol   Migration,’
`Chinese labor,’ and other articles.” Flake 2849. Guns
598. Norris 975. Raines, p. 68.
    Dixon, historian, traveller, and former editor of
the   London   Athenaeum,   wrote  an  entertaining   and
thoughtful account, with an emphasis on race relations.
The four chapters on desperado Tiburcio Vásquez include
information on his rustling activities. Dixon devotes
several chapters to Oklahoma and Texas, with good
observations on ranching and the cattle trade: “From
Denison to Hearne, from Hearne to Galveston, the plains
of Texan are dotted with cattle.... A Texan builds no
cattle-sheds. Once he has turned his herds into the
grazing lands, he lets them run wild, and stay out all
the year.”
    Dixon obtained a unique firsthand perspective on the
history and plight of formerly missionized Native
Americans in California when he encountered at Carmel
125-year-old Native American “Captain Carlos.” This
wizened patriarch claimed to Dixon he witnessed the
arrival of Father Serra and Don José Rivera in Monterey
in 1770 and personally experienced the transition from
tribal ways to mission life to dismemberment of the
missions to the shift of sovereignty from Spain to
Mexico and from Mexico to the U.S. Dixon met a similar
patriarch at Santa Clara, Marcella, who was a child when
the cloister at Santa Clara was constructed, and who
over the decades saw himself reduced from prince to
pauper.
    Dixon’s descriptions of California ranch life are
lively and articulate. Dixon attended a cascarón ball at
the rancho of Mariano Vallejo. At Salinas, Dixon noted
that the British had effectively taken the region from
“the drovers and herdsmen...of the Bedouin type, half-
naked savages, tawny of skin and black of eye, with
curly beards and golden earrings; nomads as wild and
reckless as the bulls they chased and slew.”
    Dixon’s chapter on Salt Lake City (“Red Mormonism”)
compares the belief systems of Mormons and Native
Americans and discusses polygamy. $200.00

1531.   DOBIE, Bertha M. The Pleasure Frank Dobie Took
in Grass. [College Station: Friends of the Texas A&M
University Library, 1972]. [19] pp., text illustrations
of range grasses by Thomas Rowell. 4to, original beige
pictorial wrappers. Fine. From the library of Carl
Hertzog, with his bookplate.
    First   edition,   limited   edition   (500  copies).
Keepsake 2. “A Talk given by Mrs. J. Frank Dobie on the
presentation of ‘My Dobie Collection’ by Jeff Dykes and
Martha Dykes Goldsmith to the University Library, Texas
A&M University.” Introduction by Dykes, who describes
the restoration of the range on the 17,000-acre Flat Top
Ranch (Bosque County, Texas), where his father ran some
cows in the 1880s. In this little keepsake, Dykes
acknowledges     Bertha    McKee     Dobie’s    excellent
contributions to and influence on J. Frank Dobie’s
writings. $45.00

1532.  DOBIE, Bertha M., et al. Growing Up in Texas,
Recollections of Childhood.... Austin: Encino Press,
1972. [6] 153 pp., woodcut illustrations by Barbara
Whitehead. 8vo, original red pictorial cloth. Very fine
in fine d.j.
    First edition. Whaley, Wittliff 89. This pleasantly
designed    and   printed   book    includes   nostalgic
recollections by Bertha McKee Dobie, Joe B. Frantz, John
Graves, A. C. Greene, and others. Bertha describes the
scene of driving her cow home in the evenings: “The
Velasco prairie...was unfenced grazing ground well into
the twentieth century, long after most open range was a
thing of the past. During my childhood and girlhood
herds of beef cattle as well as the townspeople’s milch
cows fed there. They watered from ditches and from the
River, in which it was not uncommon for an animal to
bog.... Mosquitoes were a scourge to cattle and people
alike.”
    Some of the other memoirs contain ranching material,
and a personal favorite of ours is John Graves’
contribution about growing up in cow-town Fort Worth and
summers as a greenhorn kid on a South Texas stock farm
trying to keep up with “gnarled Mexicans” speedily
digging postholes. $40.00

1533.  DOBIE, Bertha M., et al. Growing Up in Texas.
Austin: Encino Press, 1972. Another copy. Very fine,
d.j. not present. From the library of Carl Hertzog, with
his bookplate. $20.00

1534.   DOBIE, Dudley R. A Brief History of Hays County
and San Marcos Texas. San Marcos: Privately printed,
1948. 71 pp. 8vo, original beige wrappers. Fine.
    First edition. CBC 2362. Includes interviews with
and accounts of old-timers who went up the cattle trail.
    $40.00

1535.  [DOBIE, DUDLEY R.]. LOWMAN, Al. Remembering
Dudley Dobie: The First Bookseller to Enrich My Life and
Empty My Pockets. Austin: [Designed by William R. Holman
and printed by David Holman at Wind River for] Dorothy
Sloan–Books,   1993.   [4]   33   [1]   pp.,   including
photographic frontispiece of Dudley R. Dobie. 8vo,
original brown cloth over beige boards with woodcut
illustration by Barbara Whitehead. Very fine, in plain
white d.j.
    First edition, limited edition (50 copies). Al
Lowman’s warm personal memoir of Dudley, with some good
book lore relating to cowmen Jack Thorp, James F.
Hinkle, “Colonel” Jack Potter, and others.   $50.00

                     J. Frank Dobie
Note:   The following essay is quoted with permission
from Henry L. Alsmeyer, Jr. “J. F. Dobie” in A Literary
History of the American West (Fort Worth: TCU, 1987, pp.
535-543).

THE WRITINGS OF J. FRANK DOBIE appeal strongly to readers
who appreciate good tales, students of the southwestern
land, and all who value freedom and the natural order.
Known to a generation of admirers as “Mr. Texas,” Pancho
Dobie inhabited a world that was never limited by the
borders of his native region. The man who knows all
there is to know about longhorns, to paraphrase the
Latin citation accompanying an honorary degree conferred
during his year of teaching at Cambridge University,
became a man whose works were increasingly concerned
with exploring the universal principle of freedom and
the relationships of humans and the physical world
around them. Like Robert Frost, Dobie became a realmist
rather than a regionalist.
 The author’s decades of writing yielded varied and
voluminous publications. These works reflect Dobie’s
skills as a storyteller, chronicler, folklorist, and
historian of sorts. They also reflect his deep love for
the land and its people, combined with an equally deep
affection    for  classic   literature   in  the  English
language. Love for literature, particularly English
literature, and for the natural world began to grow in
Dobie almost from the time of his birth in 1888 on a
ranch in Live Oak County, deep in South Texas. However,
he was in his forties before his first major work, A
Vaquero of the Brush Country, appeared in 1929.
Publication of Coronado’s Children shortly thereafter
brought national attention. Dobie’s desire to chronicle
the life of his region never waned, although his
interests eventually transported him far beyond the
bounds of the cattle kingdom of his birth. In 1952, in
The Mustangs, Pancho Dobie noted proudly that searching
out the stories for that book had carried him out of the
confines of his native region, across centuries and
geographical boundaries.
 The roots of any writer’s growth are complex. Dobie’s
early years included ample time for riding and working
on his father’s ranch; there was also time for
considerable reading and attending a country school. The
first crucial turn in the author’s life came while he
was enrolled at Southwestern University, a Methodist
college in Georgetown, Texas: it was there that thoughts
of studying for the bar changed to a desire to teach
literature. Dobie indeed became a teacher, principally
at the University of Texas at Austin, until he and the
school’s administrators parted company in 1947 in a
widely publicized dispute. On the surface the matter
concerned Dobie’s request for an extension of a leave of
absence; the request was denied, and Dobie subsequently
declined to report for classes as he had been ordered to
do. The grounds for the conflict were actually highly
political. Dobie had made no bones about being
dissatisfied with what he perceived as a “fascist”
mentality dominating the university’s board of regents.
 Dobie’s years at Southwestern University, in any case,
engendered in him a love of literature and an early
commitment to teaching. They were also the time when he
met Bertha McKee, an undergraduate at Southwestern and a
student of language, literature, and the Southwest in
her own right. Frank and Bertha Dobie were married in
1916 after a six-year “courtship.” The author’s life for
more than a decade after he left Southwestern in 1910
was a series of comings and goings. He taught and served
as highschool principal in the Big Bend country of West
Texas, and there met John Young, whose story became the
subject of his first book. He was briefly on the staffs
of several Texas newspapers and thought, fleetingly, of
becoming a fulltime reporter. In 1912 he returned to
Southwestern University as a special assistant and
teacher of English. Enrollment as a graduate student at
Columbia University in 1913 led to a deeper commitment
to English literature and also expanded Dobie’s world in
other ways. That academic year marked his first extended
visit to a major city, New York, where he learned to
appreciate the theatre and the pleasures of out-of-the-
way bookshops. The antipodal pulls of city and ranch
country were to remain a strong internal conflict in
Dobie throughout his life.
 Completing the Master of Arts degree in mid-1914, Dobie
in the fall joined the English faculty of the University
of Texas. Among the most important of the author’s early
friendships was a lasting one with the great folklorist
Stith Thompson. At Thompson’s urging, Dobie became a
member of the Texas Folklore Society, an organization
Dobie was to rejuvenate in the 1920s. With America’s
entry into World War I, Dobie volunteered for military
service, even though he was by then married, and was
awarded a commission as lieutenant in the field
artillery. He served overseas with a battery of horse-
drawn field pieces, but saw no combat. He became
acquainted with France during the war, but was not to
visit the England he loved through its literature until
he went to Cambridge University in the midst of World
War II. His army service and his stint at Cambridge are
joined in a sense for, as Dobie wrote in the 1940s, the
interval spent learning how to fire artillery and his
stay at Cambridge studying and teaching American history
were the times he had “gained more brain power” than he
had in any other periods of his life.
 Dobie returned to Texas in 1919. For the next year he
managed his Uncle Jim Dobie’s ranch on the Nueces River
south of San Antonio. It was on his uncle’s ranch that
Dobie befriended a vaquero named Santos Cortez, and as a
result finally established a goal for his life. He
listened with fascination as Santos spun stories through
the long South Texas nights. As Dobie wrote in his
newspaper column of November 17, 1957:
 While Santos talked, while Uncle Jim and other cow men
talked or stayed silent, while the coyotes sang their
songs, and the sandhill cranes honked their lonely music
I seemed to be seeing a great painting of something I’d
known all my life. I seemed to be listening to a great
epic of something that had been commonplace in my youth
but now took on meanings. I was familiar with John A.
Lomax’s Cowboy Songs and Other Frontier Ballads. Indeed,
I knew John Lomax himself very well. One day it came to
me that I would collect and tell the legendary tales of
Texas as Lomax had collected the old-time songs and
ballads of Texas and the frontier.
 While this passage is perhaps filtered through the
well-known Dobie romanticism, the decision to collect
and to tell the folk stories of his native region was
firm, and the vision recounted in the passage remained
with the author throughout his life. In the early 1920s
disastrous financial conditions for cowmen, including
Jim Dobie, hastened Pancho’s return to the University of
Texas, where he remained, except for a brief period
spent as head of the English Department at what is now
Oklahoma State University, until 1947.
 In the 1920s and 1930s Dobie’s life was increasingly
active with teaching, public appearances, and writing.
Establishing himself in the 1920s as a well-paid author
of magazine articles for national publications, he also
became a steady contributor to the Southwest Review, an
excellent regional journal. Opening another channel of
communication as the decade closed, he developed his
“Life and Literature of the Southwest” course at the
University of Texas; the class, one of the most popular
offered at the University during the 1930s, demonstrated
Dobie’s knowledge of the land, people, and literature of
the Southwest, as well as his great vitality as a
teacher. A brief mimeographed reading list prepared as
the course was organized in 1929 evolved into the
renowned Guide to Life and Literature of the Southwest
(1942; revised edition, 1952). As late as 1979, James K.
Folsom, writing in The Western: A Collection of Critical
Essays, adjudged the Guide “the most useful single
bibliography of Western Americana.”
 In the 1920s Dobie commenced interviewing scores of
trail drivers, cowmen, treasure hunters, and other
oldtimers likely to have good tales to tell. He traveled
countless miles to secure these interviews, placing the
tales in his growing files for use and reuse; it is not
an exaggeration to say that Dobie practiced oral history
of a sort long before tape recorders were invented. He
loved the open road, and he enjoyed getting away from
campus to refresh his mind and spirits in the
countryside. Still his primary responsibilities were
academic and urban in setting.
 Much of Dobie’s scholarly work in the 1920s was
associated with the Texas Folklore Society, which he was
largely responsible for reorganizing in the early part
of the decade. Dobie edited the Society’s annual
publication from 1922 to 1943. His literary reputation
was finally and firmly established with the publication
of A Vaquero of the Brush Country ( 1929) and Coronado’s
Children (1930), the latter title chosen as a Literary
Guild selection. These works reflect the methods of
assembling materials and of writing that Dobie was to
employ for the remainder of his career. He gathered the
tales, wrote short articles for the Texas Folklore
Society annual or for magazines, then rewrote the
shorter   pieces  for   book   publication.  The   books
themselves are a blend of narrative, short lyrical
passages, history, folklore, and natural history. In
Vaquero, Dobie used autobiographical materials provided
by John Young, an old cowman who had once trailed cattle
from Texas northward toward Canada before fences ended
the trail-driving epoch. Dobie was later to claim, in a
list he made of outstanding range country books, that A
Vaquero of the Brush Country, along with The Longhorns
(1941), supplies “a fairly full and accurate account of
the beginnings and early development of ranching in
Texas.”
 If Vaquero is a story of the open range, Coronado’s
Children takes as its theme the quest for lost treasure.
“These tales are not creations of mine,” Dobie writes in
introducing Coronado’s Children. “They belong to the
soil and to the people of the soil.” He then says the
book is a collection of “just tales.” The reader
familiar with Dobie’s work will note characteristic
touches here. The author often pointedly identifies
himself with the soil and its people. He also often
injects a disclaimer, such as the “just tales” phrase,
to avoid being labeled a folklorist or historian or
scientist of any kind. As Vaquero was followed some
years later by The Longhorns, so the treasure tales
published in 1930 were followed in 1939 by Apache Gold
and Yaqui Silver. The latter was the first of many of
his works to be brought out by Little, Brown and
Company; the author dealt with five publishers during
the 1930s before establishing a permanent relationship
with the Boston company.
 Dobie had grown up among Spanish-speaking people and
was always interested in their folk culture. During the
early   1930s  he   traveled   extensively  in   Mexico,
adventures funded in part by a grant from the Guggenheim
Foundation. The literary result of his travels was
Tongues of the Monte (1935), reprinted as The Mexico I
Like (1942). Francis E. Abernethy, in his excellent
pamphlet J. Frank Dobie (1967), notes that this book on
Mexico, while never a big seller, has become for many
readers their favorite Dobie volume. Cast as a
picaresque novel, Tongues of the Monte features Don
Federico as its central character; the extent to which
Don Federico is also Frank Dobie remains vague. The
protagonist, in any event, rides through five separate
episodes in northwestern Mexico. The geography of the
narrative is never clearly mapped out, but it seems to
be set in the dry brush country east of the Sierra Madre
and south of the Texas Big Bend and New Mexico. A
highlight of the work is the tale of Juan Oso, son of a
bear and of a woman (a variant, of course, of the Bear’s
Son Tale, an archetypal story that appears in the
folklore of many cultures). Tongues of the Monte does
not go very far in developing the character of Don
Federico, and is therefore not a good novel; the book is
successful, however, in vividly showing “the life of the
Mexican earth” and its people.
 The Longhorns, published in 1941, represents Dobie at
the peak of his powers. The author begins the book with
a statement that the longhorns belong to history, “a
past so remote and irrevocable that sometimes it seems
as if it might never have been.” He advises readers “who
object to facts” to begin with chapter four “and then
merely to skim all the others.” The work is a rewarding
mixture of fact, lore, and history. Entertaining tales,
such as that of Sancho, the steer who returned, on
instinct, to his native Texas range after being trailed
to Wyoming, enliven the text. “Sundown,” the twelfth and
final chapter of The Longhorns, carries a double
meaning, one imposed by history, for as this work
appeared World War II was about to become a global
conflict with Americans involved directly. Dobie closes
the book with praise for the longhorns for their great
strength, vitality, endurance, and nobility.
 Within three years of finishing The Longhorns, the
writer would be admiring the English people for some of
these same qualities. Dobie went to England during the
war to serve as a visiting professor at Cambridge
University. It was there that he became “contemporary
with myself,” as he expressed it, a transformation that
can best be seen by following the Sunday newspaper
column he began in September, 1939 and produced without
fail until his death. “My Texas” was the original title
of the column which was published in several newspapers,
notably the Houston Post and Fort Worth Star-Telegram.
In An American Original: The Life of J. Frank Dobie
(1978), Lon Tinkle cites a note found in one of Dobie’s
“Autobiographical” files, a note in which the author
wrote of becoming unconsciously contemporary with the
world at “about the time World War II arrived.” He could
not, he said, be aware of the “Nazis bombing English
civilization out of existence and...go on tall-taling
about Texas as if all were right with the world.” He
concluded by speaking of “the Fascist spirit asserting
itself at home.”
 Dobie’s responsibility at Cambridge was to lecture on
American   history   from   1774   to   the   1940s,   a
responsibility that set him to cramming like a college
freshman before an exam. The Dobie who long had loved
English literature, especially Shakespeare and the
Romantics, found in England a civility and civilized
freedom, a serenity and a sense of harmony that moved
him deeply. He had not planned to write of his
experiences in England, but an article about Cambridge
for the Saturday Evening Post and notes jotted down for
the Sunday column became, with rewriting, a book unique
to his long list of publications, A Texan in England
(1944). In a notable chapter, “The Lark at Heaven’s
Gate,” he writes as a Wordsworthian Romantic preparing
to go out onto Grantchester Meadows to hear the skylarks
of which such poets as Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Shelley
had written; but in the same chapter he poignantly and
realistically describes the longing for liberty that he
had seen in two golden eagles in the London zoo,
creatures that remind him of a caged eagle observed
years earlier on an Oklahoma ranch. “What England Did to
Me,” the final chapter, reveals a man very different
from the creator of The Longhorns, a book written just a
few years previously. As Tinkle noted in An American
Original (p. 185): “The year at Cambridge crystallized
many points of view for Dobie, ideas that had
invigorated and enlarged him in the past but that had
never dominated his thought.” Among the ideas were the
relationship of the universal and the provincial, a
growing attachment to the metaphor of “the earth,” and
increased respect for imagination as contrasted with
illusion. Notable also is the strengthening of Dobie’s
affection for England.
 The break with the University of Texas in 1947, the
involved details of which need not be of concern here,
freed Dobie to devote his entire time and energy to
writing. The files of materials he had collected,
earlier publications in magazines and newspapers, and
memories stored over the years formed the basis for
several important works published in the late 1940s and
early 1950s. The Voice of the Coyote (1949), like his
other animal books, blends folklore with natural and
cultural history. How humans perceive the coyote is at
least as important in the book as factual information
and description. The author is forceful in his
opposition to the frontier tradition of killing for the
sake of killing. A hunter from boyhood, Dobie in The
Voice of the Coyote expresses anger at those who
slaughter coyotes for no good reason.
 As opposed to the traditional Anglo attitude, Dobie was
attracted to the Indian view of nature, a view which
stresses   living   in   harmony  with   one’s   natural
environment. The author seemed to see such a view
reflected in the career of the old hunter Ben Lilly, who
had begun on the eastern fringes of the Southwest and
eventually moved across Texas into the mountains of
northern Mexico, New Mexico, and Arizona. Lilly was in
his seventies when Dobie first met him in New Mexico in
1928, and the file of materials on Lilly gathered over
the years finally evolved into The Ben Lilly Legend
(1950). Lilly was a paradoxical man, impossible in human
relationships because of his devotion to hunting and
moving on. Dobie was fascinated with Lilly’s primitive
knowledge of forest and mountain range, with his energy,
vitality, strength, and love of freedom. Old Ben Lilly
was a son of the natural world that Dobie adored, but it
is interesting that the writer gives only a few words in
his Guide to Life and Literature of the Southwest to the
Lilly book, fewer words in fact than to any of his other
works.
 The Mustangs, published in 1952, may well prove to be
the most enduring of Dobie’s books. The English
Romantic, the lover of the open range, and the critic of
contemporary society merge into the marvelously elegiac
opening lines of the volume: “Like the wild West Wind
that Shelley yearned to be, the mustangs, the best ones
at least, were `tameless, and swift, and proud.’ “ The
author says that he has chosen to write about the
mustangs “at a time when so many proclaimers of liberty
are strangling it.” The reference is to the McCarthyism
of the early 1950s, an “ism” that Dobie deplored because
of the fears and the tightening of freedoms that it
engendered. Pancho Dobie was often more direct in his
political commentary, such as in the newspaper column in
which   he  compared   a   prominent   Texas  politician
unfavorably with a rattlesnake, but in The Mustangs he
wrote obliquely of the spiritual truth of freedom, a
value he believed the wild horses and their world
embodied. Such a principle, of course, had been defined
by Ralph Waldo Emerson, one of the few American writers
to significantly influence Dobie. The tales and facts
collected in the book, however, have a vital tang of
actual experience that transcends the abstract message.
 Years of collecting notes and of reading about the
horses of the West preceded the writing of The Mustangs.
Prior to composing the book the author also did
concentrated research under a grant from the Huntington
Library in California; Dobie later said the research
conducted at the Huntington was equal to that required
for the writing of a doctoral dissertation. Pride in the
resulting work is apparent in the lengthy annotation
found in Guide to Life and Literature of the Southwest
(revised edition). Dobie explains in the annotation that
the volume “incorporates” an earlier, briefer work, as
well as “a large part” of the Texas Folklore Society
annual of 1940. The first third of The Mustangs traces
the Arabian progenitors of the Spanish horse, the horses
brought to the New World by Spaniards, and the horse
strains developed by the western Indians. Later there is
room for legends and tales of Anglo mustangers.
“Probably a million range horses,” Dobie notes, left
Texas during the time of the longhorn drives, and by the
end of the nineteenth century the last herds of mustangs
had been reduced to scrub stock. In The Mustangs Dobie
largely avoids sentiment, something he was not always
able to do in previous works. The concluding prose hymn
to the mustangs, once free upon a vast range and now
“free of all confines of time and flesh,” seems noble
and fitting rather than sentimental. Tales of Old-Time
Texas (1955) continued to mine the familiar lode, as did
I’ll Tell You a Tale (1960), a selection of some of the
best of Dobie’s previously published stories. The tales
in the latter volume were chosen by Isabel Gaddis,
herself from the range country and a former student of
Dobie’s. The stories are gathered under such headings as
“The Longhorn Breed” and “Characters and Happenings of
Long Ago,” and they represent Dobie at his best in doing
what he did with artistry–telling a tale. An advance
copy of Cow People was in Dobie’s hands only days before
his peaceful death in September, 1964. The book
summarizes and distils all the vast knowledge of
cattlemen that Dobie had acquired over a lifetime of
personal experiences and reading. Lon Tinkle claims that
Dobie became a better, more realistic writer during his
final years. Cow People bears out that judgment. The
portraits of cattlemen in Cow People are expertly drawn,
sometimes with humor, always with canny understanding.
 Following Dobie’s death several posthumous volumes–most
notably Rattlesnakes (1965), Some Part of Myself (1967),
Out of the Old Rock (1972), and Prefaces (1975)–were
sewn together and published. The lengthy bibliography
compiled in 1968 by Mary Louise McVicker shows, through
its more than 700 entries (excluding newspaper columns),
how    voluminously    Dobie    wrote.    Tinkle’s     “A
Bibliographical Note” at the close of An American
Original   nicely   supplements   McVicker’s   essential
bibliography and summarizes well the significant body of
writings by and about Dobie as of the late 1970s. That
Dobie was a literary son of the cattle kingdom is known
widely; less well known are the extent and variety of
his writings. As McVicker’s bibliography demonstrates,
he not only wrote extensively for periodicals, but also
contributed 134 items to books by varied hands.
 Pancho Dobie could ride the range and treat cattle
infected with screwworms, but he was also a literate
writer firmly grounded in the best standards of English
literature. At times late in his life Dobie worried that
he was perceived by the public only as a colorful yarn-
spinner. Tinkle ponders the question of whether or not
Dobie became “trapped” in the image he so carefully
cultivated early in his career. In the final chapter of
An American Original, “A Joy to Him and a Joy to Hear,”
Tinkle concludes that indeed Dobie found himself
entrapped “within his loyalties and his public role,”
but that Dobie the man “never stopped growing.” Pancho
Dobie was in general a beloved figure in his native
Texas and Southwest, and his long life spanned a period
of remarkable transitions within the region. His life,
if not his works, reflects many of those transitions.
 How will Dobie’s reputation fare in the future?
Students of literature know that judging a writer’s
accomplishments    is    usually   a   lengthy  process;
reputations   must    be   sifted.   A  single  doctoral
dissertation devoted solely to Dobie and a few
worthwhile undergraduate papers cited by Tinkle suggest
that there has not been an excessive amount of scholarly
interest in the author. Larry McMurtry, the Texas
novelist, offers strong, generally negative criticism of
Dobie (and of the writer’s friends, historian Walter
Prescott Webb and naturalist Roy Bedichek) in a piece
included in In a Narrow Grave: Essays on Texas (1968).
Dobie and his colleagues, McMurtry writes, “revered
Nature,” but were never able to resolve their ambivalent
passions: love for the range and love for “the library.”
McMurtry asserts that Dobie is at his best in Tongues of
the Monte and in the “terse opinionated annotations” of
the Guide. Only time will test the validity of
McMurtry’s belief that Dobie’s audience “will probably
not outlive him much more than a generation.” Another
Texas writer, Larry Goodwyn, concludes in his essay “The
Frontier Myth and Southwestern Literature” that Dobie
was “the most significant...of the interpreters of the
oral tradition,” but while he “described a way of life,”
he never found a way “to describe its meaning.”
 Perhaps the best judgment of Dobie now possible is
suggested   by   the   opening  sentences   of   Francis
Abernethy’s pamphlet J. Frank Dobie. Abernethy begins
with a story Dobie relates in A Vaquero of the Brush
Country. A thirsty, bored cowboy rides into Dogtown, and
after a visit to the saloon mounts his horse, spurs it,
and whoops for a while to “express the buoyancy of his
unconquerable spirit.” Dobie, Abernethy says, “decided
to whoop us into consciousness of what we had and what
we have, and of the tremendous life and vitality of
things of which we are a part.” Chronicler of the cattle
kingdom and teller of tales, folklorist, historian,
bibliographer, man of letters, teacher, lover of freedom
and of nature and of life, and a well-loved figure–Dobie
was all of these. Future generations of readers will no
doubt confirm that he wrote at least a handful of
enduring books about his native region and its animals
and people. At times, in addition, he did a lot of
whooping and stirring the dust.
                            ***
 Joe Frantz remarked that Dobie was “Texas’ first
liberated mind to achieve a wide audience and the first
truly professional writer produced by the state” (Third
Coast, 1983). Many Texas writers have credited Dobie
with inspiring them not only to be a writer but to feel
comfortable using their home state as a subject. Billy
Lee Brammer admitted, “It never occurred to me—ever—
until I read Frank Dobie, that I could be a writer.
There simply were no writers in Texas” (Texas Observer
21). Fred Gipson confided that he had never realized it
was possible to live in Texas and be a writer until
Dobie set the example (Austin American Statesman B5).
Publisher and screenwriter Bill Wittliff acknowledged
that “Dobie was the prime moving force of my life.”

 Note: Please contact our firm if you desire other
titles by or about J. Frank Dobie not present in this
catalogue.

       Tom Lea’s Presentation Copy to Carl Hertzog
1536.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Apache Gold and Yaqui Silver.
Boston: Little, Brown, and Co., 1939. xvii [1] 366 pp.,
color frontispiece, color plates, and text illustrations
by Tom Lea. 8vo, original half brown cloth over beige
boards, silver paper spine label. Light shelf wear and
slightly faded, front hinge cracked (but strong),
otherwise very fine in publisher’s black slipcase with
pink printed label; additional envelope of plates of
Lea’s paintings for the book included (as issued, but
often lacking). Publisher’s plain glassine d.j. not
present. Wonderful presentation copy—with artist Tom
Lea’s signed note to “Carl Hertzog, whose imprint would
have improved this work, Tom, March 1939.”
    First edition, Sierra Madre edition (#259 of 265
copies signed by Dobie and Lea). Basic Texas Books 45n.
Cook 29. Dobie, p. 40. Dykes, Fifty Great Western
Illustrators (Lea 126); Kid 266; My Dobie Collection, p.
8 (#6 on his rarities list); Western High Spots, p. 52
(“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #59). Guns 599.
Hinshaw & Lovelace, Lea 30F. McVicker A7a(1). One
Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 6. Paher,
Nevada 482. Powell, Heart of the Southwest 29:
“Illuminated by the alchemical magic of Dobie’s feeling
for places and people of the Southwest.” Saunders 4030.
Sloan, Auction 9 (quoting Pingenot): “A sequel to
Coronado’s Children, focusing on New Mexico, Arizona,
and Sonora.... It is the handsomest collaboration
between the two men and one of Dobie’s most enjoyable
books.”
    Unusual nuggets of ranching history may be mined
from this unlikely source: “Not the Will of God”
(related by Tomás, pastor for a border rancher in
Chihuahua); “The Man Who Was Not Dead” (cowboy-trapper-
prospector Ammon Tenney’s account of John Brewer’s 1888
search for lost treasure on Windmill Ranch in Arizona);
“Hound Hunters” (“Numerous otherwise level-headed forest
rangers, cowmen, barkeeps and sheepherders...become loco
with the Adams Diggings and leave their firesides,
campfires, cattle, coin counters, sheep and families to
take up the search”); “Can You Read Shadder Writing?”
(search for Tayopa treasure by John Williams, range
foreman of William Randolph Hearst’s hacienda, La
Babícora: “He was on the Babícora when it was unfenced
and maverick bulls and cows of the longhorn breed would
run for thirty miles, once they got a good scare from
men”); and more.   $1,000.00

1537.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Apache Gold and Yaqui Silver.
Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1939. Another copy. A few
minor chips to paper spine label, otherwise a very fine
copy in publisher’s slipcase, and with the additional
envelope of Lea’s paintings for the book included, as
issued. Limited edition (#259 of 265 copies).    $750.00

1538.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Apache Gold and Yaqui Silver.
Boston: Little, Brown, and Co., 1943. xvii [1] 366 pp.,
color frontispiece, color plates, and text illustrations
by Tom Lea. 8vo, original brown cloth. Fine in
moderately worn d.j. (price-clipped). Signed by author.
    First edition, third printing.    $25.00

1539.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Apache Gold and Yaqui Silver.
Boston: Little, Brown, and Co., 1945. xvii [1] 366 pp.,
text illustrations (some full-page) by Tom Lea. 8vo,
original terracotta cloth. Fore-edges foxed, else fine
in d.j. Signed by author.
    World War II edition (reprinted from original plates
in slightly reduced format, thinner paper, color plates
omitted, d.j. illustration altered, back d.j. text with
JFD’s plea to Americans to buy war bonds). McVicker
A7a(3). $25.00

1540.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Apache Gold and Yaqui Silver.
New York: Bantam Books, [1951]. [12] 212 pp. 16mo,
original   multicolor  pictorial   wraps  by  Tom   Lea.
Remarkably fine, especially for a popular paperback of
this vintage. This one is from Dudley R. Dobie’s library
and looks so fresh that it must have been immediately
stashed with his other treasures.
    First paperback edition (unabridged). Dykes, Fifty
Great Western Illustrators (Lea 128) McVicker A7b. Dobie
for the masses, with histrionic advertising blurb on
half-title: “Fabulous wealth and incredibly savagery....
The REAL Southwest. Out of the turbulent history of the
Southwest comes this record of blood and treasure. Here
are the arrogant Spaniards sweltering in armor and
encased in fear. Here is the twang of an Apache arrow,
the flat crack of a rifle, the rattle of pistol fire.
And here is also silence—the shimmering, heat-cracked
silence of the vast Southwest.”   $25.00

1541.   DOBIE, J. Frank. As the Moving Finger Writ.
[Austin]: Privately printed, [1955]. 12 pp. Large 8vo,
original salmon printed wrappers. Very fine.
    First separate printing, offprint from Southwest
Review (Autumn 1955). McVicker D53. Mohr, The Range
Country 664. Christmas greeting from the Dobies,
containing an essay on the Texas Review and its
successor, the Southwest Review, with references to
Edward Gosse (including his barbed criticism of an
article on cowboy songs), Walter Prescott Webb, John
Lomax, Henry Nash Smith, William Faulkner, et al.
    $25.00

1542.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Babícora. N.p., [1954]. 8 pp.,
map. 8vo, original blue printed wrappers. Very fine,
signed by author.
    First separate printing, offprint from American
Hereford Journal (January 1, 1954). Cook 52. Dykes, My
Dobie Collection, p. 9: “Among the scarce and rare Dobie
booklets” (#17 on his rarities list). McVicker D51. One
Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 18. JFD’s
account of his 1953 visit to William Randolph Hearst’s
vast Babícora Ranch in Chihuahua, “where thousands of
commercial Herefords were raised each year over a long
period. The breaking up of this property last year
marked the end of an era.” $75.00

1543.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Babícora. N.p., [1954]. Another
copy, not signed. Very fine. $65.00

1544.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Ben Lilly Legend. Boston:
Little, Brown, 1950. [vi] [2, inserted autograph leaf]
[vii-xv] [3] 237 pp., color frontispiece portrait by Tom
Lea, plates (photographic and reproductions of drawings
by Lilly and Dunton). 12mo, original tan pictorial
cloth. Slight foxing to fore-edges, otherwise very fine
in d.j. with Lea illustration. Signed by J. Frank Dobie.
    First edition, signed issue, with signed leaf bound
in after title. This special signed issue was not noted
by McVicker. Campbell, p. 59: “Story of that eccentric
Ben Lilly, mighty hunter of bears and panthers, who
spent most of his life hunting big game.” Dykes, Fifty
Great Western Illustrators (Dunton 41), (Lea 143).
    “[Dobie’s] biography of Ben Lilly...is an excellent
book on a man no one but Dobie could have got to”
(McMurtry, In a Narrow Grave, p. 48). Among his many
muy-macho activities, Lilly was a cattle trader and
trail driver (one of his clients was Zack Miller’s 101
Ranch); chief huntsman for Theodore Roosevelt (1907);
bounty-hunter for stock-killers (bears, lions, wolves)
on New Mexico ranches for the federal government (1914);
and “surpassed all other men in horn-blowing, cow-
calling, and whip-popping.” The book contains much on
the GOS Ranch in New Mexico, whose owner Victor
Culberson introduced Lilly to JFD.
    Our favorite story in this book is how one of
Lilly’s interminable perverse pranks back-fired on Lilly
himself. When leading a herd of about a hundred and
fifty cattle, Lilly encountered a circus caravan and got
the bright idea that it would be fun to stampede the
circus animals. Lilly headed his cattle toward the
caravan, but when his cattle saw the elephant, they were
the ones to stampede. It took Lilly a week to regather
his cattle. $400.00

1545.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Ben Lilly Legend. Boston:
Little, Brown, 1950. xv [3] 237 pp., color frontispiece
portrait   by   Tom   Lea,  plates   (photographic   and
reproductions of drawings by Lilly and Dunton). 12mo,
original tan pictorial cloth. Slight foxing to fore-
edges, otherwise very fine in d.j. illustrated by Lea.
    First trade edition. $60.00

  “First item to bear the Encino Press device” (Whaley)
1546.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Bob More: Man and Bird Man.
Dallas: Encino Press, 1965. vii [1] 27 [2] pp., title
and text illustrations by William Wittliff. Square 8vo,
original tan cloth, printed paper label on upper cover.
Superb condition, in publisher’s brown slipcase with
printed paper spine label. Inscribed and signed by
publisher-printer William Wittliff: “Con mucho gusto.”
Laid in is an Encino Press invoice for $7.65, with
Wittliff’s ink note to purchaser: “This includes a
dinner with us some evening soon.”
    First edition, limited edition (#453 of 550 copies),
originally printed in Southwest Review 27:1 (Autumn
1941), with added introduction containing Wittliff’s
touching tribute to JFD and a terrific description of
Bill’s first visit with “The Man of Texas Letters.” Cook
70. One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 34:
“A month before his death, Dobie granted Wittliff
permission to reprint his Bob More essay. This reprint
was the first book published by Encino Press....
Scarce.” Whaley, Wittliff 8.
    An excellent essay on Robert Lee More (1873-1941),
ornithologist and ranch manager-partner with William T.
Waggoner on the vast Three D Ranch, where More often
carried out his ornithological research. Bob More
considered the Waggoner Ranch along Beaver Creek and the
Wichita River to be the greatest bird preserve in Texas.
He assembled, organized, and scientifically marked a
collection of some 12,000 to 15,000 bird eggs from 750
species (including the rare California condor). More’s
collection is “considered the finest west of the
Mississippi River and the outstanding private collection
of the world” (Handbook of Texas Online: Robert Lee
More).
    Bob More, a pioneer conservationist both in his
ornithological and ranching activities, insisted on
light stocking and extra tanks to bring native grasses
back to the pristine lushness that would benefit land,
cattle, birds, and man. JFD tells us that Bob More’s
standing order to the Three D Ranch harvesters was to
leave a patch of grain around every wild turkey nest
discovered in the field.
    According to JFD, Bob More often said: “Birds are
man’s best friends. If they were suddenly destroyed,
insects would within a short time destroy the vegetation
on which the human race is dependent.” JFD interviewed
Bob More three times and wrote this essay to document
his contributions to ranching and zoology. Amidst the
field of JFD’s cornerstone works, little gems like this
one make us realize the great legacy JFD left us by
taking the time to interview people and preserve
fugitive history that might otherwise have been lost.
The Wittliff-Encino connection only adds to the appeal
of this excellent book.   $150.00

1547.   DOBIE, J. Frank. “Bovine Sense of Smell: J.
Frank Dobie in American Cattle Producer Says Old Time
Longhorns Could Smell Water Miles Away,” in The Purebred
1:2 (February 1941). Pp. 7, 44-45, illustration from The
Longhorns. 8vo, original dark blue printed wrappers with
photographic illustration. Edges a bit worn, moderately
foxed, overall very good.
    McVicker C181b.    $15.00
.

1548.   DOBIE, J. Frank. “The Brush Country of Texas,”
in Lincoln-Mercury Times 2:6 (November-December, 1950).
Pp. 1-4, color illustrations by H. O. Kelly. 4to,
original multi-color pictorial wrappers with color
illustration by H. O. Kelly. Fine.
    McVicker C296. The illustrations of ranch life in
the brush country are by H. O. Kelly (1884-1955),
retired cowpuncher living at Blanket, Texas, who worked
in thirty states as a cowboy, sheepherder, cowhand,
logger, bullwhacker, sharecropper, and occasionally,
rodeo rider. Kelly came to public notice through a one-
man exhibit arranged by Jerry Bywaters in 1950.
“According to Francis Henry Taylor, once director of the
Metropolitan Museum of New York, Kelly was ‘one of the
few genuine primitive painters we have had in our
country’” (Handbook of Texas Online: Harold Osman
Kelly). JFD’s accompanying article on the brush country
of Southwest Texas, where he was raised on a ranch in
Live Oak County, is elegiac. $25.00

1549.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Charm in Mexican Folktales.
N.p., [1951]. 8 pp. 8vo, original light green printed
wrappers. Very fine.
    First   separate  printing,   offprint  from   Texas
Folklore Society Publication 24 (The Healer of Los Olmos
and Other Mexican Lore). McVicker D43. In this Christmas
keepsake, JFD recounts gathering folklore for his book
The Longhorns. Among the yarns he spins is that of José
Beltrán, an old spent vaquero on the Tom O’Connor Ranch
near Refugio, whose job consisted of trapping wild
cattle. One moonlit night while waiting patiently at the
waterhole for his quarry, Beltrán encountered a maverick
bull (puro negro) that actually turned out to be el
diablo. $50.00
1550.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children: Tales of
Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest. New
York: Literary Guild of America, 1931. xv [1] 367 pp., 6
plates     (including     frontispiece),      maps,    text
illustrations, and endpaper maps by Ben Carlton Mead.
8vo,    original    orange     pictorial     cloth.   Faint
discoloration to binding, mild foxing to frontispiece.
Very good in lightly worn and soiled d.j. with one small
tape repair. Related clipping laid in. Signed by J.
Frank Dobie and Ben Carlton Mead.
    Literary Guild of America edition, printed from the
same plates as the first edition, second printing (also
issued in the same year), with dedication to JFD’s
father, a “clean” cowman (clean is added in this issue),
glossary revised. Basic Texas Books 45B: “Best book ever
written on hidden treasure, and one of the most
fascinating books on any subject to come out of Texas.”
Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography, p. [7]. Dykes, Fifty Great
Western Illustrators (Mead 29n). Greene, Fifty Best
Books on Texas, p. 9. Howes D374. McVicker A2a(2).
Powell, Southwest Classics, pp. 343-55: “I have chosen
Coronado’s Children...not because it is his best book—my
favorite is The Mustangs, his was Tongues of the Monte—
but rather because it is the one that made him the
legendary figure he became, the one that first brought
him national recognition. It is an enthralling book.”
    Chapter 5 is devoted to “Tales of the Cow Camp”;
other references to ranching and cowboys are found in
the book. The last chapter (“Shadows and Symbols”)
contains the first printing of the enigmatic symbols
that   buriers   of   treasure   have    used   since  time
immemorial. $50.00

1551.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children.... New
York: Literary Guild of America, 1931. Another copy.
Covers worn and stained, mild foxing to title, d.j. not
present. Reading copy. $10.00
1552.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children: Tales of
Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest. New
York: Grosset & Dunlap, [early 1940s]. xiv, 367 pp. 8vo,
original tan pictorial cloth. Endsheets lightly browned,
otherwise very fine in fine d.j. with text illustrations
by Mead. Signed by J. Frank Dobie.
    Wartime edition, with printed statement to that
effect on title page, complete and unabridged text on
thinner paper and slightly reduced format, plates
omitted. McVicker A2a(6). $15.00

1553.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children: Tales of
Lost Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest. New
York: Grosset & Dunlap, n.d. (ca. 1946). xiv, 367 pp.
8vo, original terracotta pictorial cloth. Endsheets
lightly browned, else fine in fine d.j. with Mead
illustration. Signed by J. Frank Dobie.
    McVicker A2a(7). The wartime government regulation
of paper statement has been removed from the title page.
Publisher’s ads on d.j. verso altered from preceding.
    $15.00

1554.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Lost Mines of the Old West:
Coronado’s Children. London: Hammond, Hammond and
Company, [1960]. xv [1] 367 pp., text illustrations by
Mead. 8vo, original ecru cloth. Very fine in very fine
d.j. with illustration of treasure hunter looking very
much like JFD.
    First British edition. Basic Texas Books 45H.
McVicker A2d, “A line-by-line reprint from the Southwest
Press trade edition.” Mead’s plates omitted. $35.00

1555.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Lost Mines of the Old West:
Coronado’s Children. London: Hammond, Hammond and
Company, [1960]. Another copy, variant binding. 8vo,
original red cloth. Mild staining at lower hinge, else
very fine in d.j. with same illustration as preceding.
    $30.00
1556.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children: Tales of
Los Mines and Buried Treasures of the Southwest.
Foreword by Frank H. Wardlaw. Austin & London:
University of Texas Press, [1978]. xxii, 329 [2] pp.,
title and text illustrations by Charles Shaw. 8vo,
original half terracotta cloth over tan mottled boards.
Mint in publisher’s slipcase.
    Limited edition (#135 of 300 numbered copies),
signed by Frank Wardlaw and illustrator Charles Shaw.
Barker Texas History Center Series, No. 3.  $75.00

1557.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Coronado’s Children. Austin &
London: University of Texas Press, [1978]. xxii, 329
pp., title and text illustrations by Charles Shaw. 8vo,
original half terracotta cloth over tan boards. Very
fine in very fine d.j. illustrated by Charles Shaw.
    First trade edition. Basic Texas Books 45I. $20.00

1558.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Cow People. Boston: Little,
Brown,   and  Co.,   [1964].   x  [2]   305  pp.,   text
illustrations (a few by Mead, but mostly photographic
and full-page). 8vo, original brown cloth. Exceptionally
fine, in very fine d.j. (with photos of cowmen on front
and Tom Lea’s portrait of JFD on back).
    First edition. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #55. Dykes,
Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 15; Fifty Great
Western Illustrators (Crawford 24), (Lea 144), (Mead
29). Guns 601. Reese, Six Score 31: “Pure cow country,
with sketches of Ike Pryor, Ab Blocker, Shanghai Pierce,
and many other lesser known cattlemen.” McVicker 18a(1).
Powell, Southwest Classics, p. 351. “Cow People [is] a
delightful compendium of tales of eccentric southwestern
ranchers and stockmen, springs from the author’s
firsthand knowledge of such people as well as from
extensive reading about them. Some may downgrade Dobie’s
efforts and others dismiss him altogether, but his books
will be read and his influence will endure as long as
there are people who love the lore and legendry of Texas
and the Southwest” (WLA, Literary History of the
American West, p. 504).   $75.00

1559.   DOBIE, J. Frank. “A Cowboy and His Polecats,” in
Frontier Times 38:1 (January 1964). Pp. 13, 67. 4to,
original color photographic wrappers. Back wrap slightly
foxed, otherwise fine.
    First   printing.   Dykes,   Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators McVicker C489. JFD, who likes skunks and
does not mind their smell (“provided I am not close
enough to receive its full intensity”), states that
skunks have been known to stampede a herd of longhorns.
This issue also includes William D. Wittliff’s “The
Bandana, ‘Flag’ of the Range Country” (p. 43) and is
signed by him. Charles Russell illustrations grace Mary
Stuart Abbott’s article written at the age of ninety-
three: “Child of the Open Range: The Daughter of
Granville Stuart and Later Wife of Teddy Blue Abbott
Reminisces about the Old Days in Montana.” Remington
article on Babícora region, etc. $25.00

1560.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Do Rattlesnakes Swallow Their
Young? Austin: Texas Folklore Society, 1946. 24 pp. 8vo,
original grey printed wrappers. Very fine. Inscribed and
signed by J. Frank Dobie to Lester Jones: “What a
beautiful medallion that Pony Express! I cherish it.
Thank you so much.... June 16, 1947.”
    First   separate  printing,   offprint  from   Texas
Folklore Society Publication 21 (Austin, 1946). McVicker
D36. JFD, who likes rattlesnakes because “they make the
country more interesting and more natural,” presents
firsthand accounts (mostly from cowboys and ranchers)
documenting that rattlesnakes sometimes swallow their
young to protect them. $75.00

1561.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Do Rattlesnakes Swallow Their
Young? Austin: Texas Folklore Society, 1946. Another
copy. Fine. $50.00

1562.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Ella Byler Dobie and Christmas.
[Austin]: The American-Statesman, 1961. Folio broadside
printed in three columns. Very fine.
    First separate printing of an article that appeared
in the American-Statesman on December 24, 1961. McVicker
D78. JFD’s tribute to his mother, with recollections of
incidents at Rancho Seco in Nueces County, Texas. “When
she was very young, raiders from below the Rio Grande
came up into the border ranches and drove off cattle,
killed them and skinned them for the hides, raided the
Noakes Store in Nueces County, occasionally killed a
man. The caution she grew up with never entirely left
her so long as she lived on the ranch. When I was a
child and Papa was gone, Mama always had the old .44
Winchester right at her head when she went to bed.”
    $20.00

1563.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The First Cattle in Texas and
the Southwest Progenitors of the Longhorns. Pp. 171-97.
8vo, original beige wrappers. Very fine.
    First   separate   printing,   offprint   from   The
Southwestern Historical Quarterly 42:3 (January 1939).
Cook 238: “Formed Chapter One of The Longhorns.” Herd
690. McVicker C163a. In this excellent treatise JFD
traces the introduction of cattle to Texas by various
Catholic missions and early Spanish expeditions. The
astonishing vitality and incredible proliferation of
longhorn cattle in Texas influenced the lifestyle of
Spanish Texas (“stock-raising [in mission-era Texas]
became almost the only civilian occupation, despite
governmental attempts to enforce farming”). JFD compares
the physical nature and mindset of Texas longhorns with
cattle in California, New Mexico, and Arizona and
discusses how they impacted regions in different ways
(e.g., the rise of the hide and tallow trade in
California, which was practically nonexistent in Texas).
    JFD tells how longhorns were so profuse in early
nineteenth-century Texas that they were generally
considered more as game animals than domesticated
creatures. Occasionally Native Americans hunted the
longhorns, too, although, according to JFD, they
preferred buffalo and horse meat to beef. He describes
how Texas plantation owners often hired a professional
hunter to bring in wild cattle (mentioning Captain
Flack). JFD surmises the longhorns were not domesticated
because they were too difficult to capture and the
natural antipathy between longhorns and domesticated
stock Anglo settlers imported to Texas. This treatise is
filled with fascinating information on the nature of
longhorns, including observations and quotations from
the great longhorn painter, Frank Reaugh. $65.00

1564.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The First Cattle in Texas and
the Southwest Progenitors of the Longhorns. Austin,
1939. Pp. [3]-29. 8vo, original white printed wrappers.
Fine.
    Reprint from The Southwestern Historical Quarterly
42:3 (January 1939). McVicker D24.   $50.00

1565.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Flavor of Texas. Dallas:
Dealey & Lowe, 1936. [12] 287 pp., frontispiece and text
illustrations by Alexander Hogue (mostly full-page).
8vo, original patterned salmon and cream cloth printed
in brown, spine with GTT at foot, top edge pale green.
Very fine in fine d.j. (green, brown, and beige, with
rider on rearing horse). Signed by JFD.
    First edition, first issue binding, first issue d.j.
(chapter 1 first appeared in The Country Gentleman, the
other chapters were printed serially in The Fort Worth
Press). Campbell, p. 105. Cook 16. Dobie, p. 51:
“Considerable social history”; p. 55: “Chapters on Bean,
Green, Duval, Kendall, and other representers of the
fighting Texans.” Dykes, My Dobie Collection, p. 8:
“Hard to find and expensive” (#11 on his rarities list).
Guns 602. Herd 691. McVicker A5. One Hundred Head Cut
Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 8.
    References to cowboys and ranching are found
throughout, and two chapters are specifically devoted to
ranching history (“Riders of the Stars” and “The Trail
Driver Breed”). One of Hogue’s striking black-and-white
illustrations shows a cowboy drinking water from a cow
track, with Ab Blocker’s famous quote about how he had
“drunk more water out of cow tracks than any trail
driver left alive.” JFD includes a first-rate chapter on
“How Texas Was Hell on Women.”    $400.00

1566.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Flavor of Texas. Dallas:
Dealey & Lowe, 1936. Another copy. Fore-edges slightly
foxed, otherwise very fine, d.j. not present.  $150.00

1567.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Flavor of Texas. Dallas:
Dealey & Lowe, 1936. [12] 287 pp., frontispiece,
illustrations by Alexander Hogue. 8vo, original orange
and cream cloth printed in dark blue, plain beige spine,
without GTT at foot, top edges uncolored. Very fine in
d.j. (salmon and cream pattern with illustration of
Texas flag and leaping man firing a pistol). Signed by
author.
    First edition, second issue binding, second issue
d.j.    $175.00

1568.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Flavor of Texas. Austin:
[Designed by Larry Smitherman for] Jenkins Publishing
Company, 1975. [8] 167 pp. Large 8vo, original tan
cloth. Very fine in d.j.
    Second edition (illustrations omitted). $25.00

   “The Best of All Books of Its Kind” (Lawrence Clark
                         Powell)
1569.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Guide to Life and Literature of
the   Southwest,   with  a   Few   Observations.   Austin:
University of Texas Press, 1943. Austin: University of
Texas   Press,   1943.  111    pp.,   frontispiece,   text
illustrations (some full-page) by Russell, Borein,
Bugbee, et al. 8vo, original grey printed wrappers.
Faint rust stain to back wrapper from clasp on mailing
envelope, else very fine, in original mailing envelope,
signed by JFD in ink on title: “1st edition—J. Frank
Dobie.”
    First edition of a pivotal book in the literary
historiography of the West (“one of J. Frank Dobie’s
most significant contributions to the recognition and
study of southwestern literature was his initiation and
teaching of a celebrated course at the University of
Texas at Austin: ‘The Life and Literature of the
Southwest’.... From this course emerged Dobie’s...Guide
to Life and Literature of the Southwest”—WLA, Literary
History of the American West, p. 505). Basic Texas Books
B73: “A delightful, intensely subjective guide to
Dobie’s favorite books.” Dykes, Fifty Great Western
Illustrators (Borein 51), (Bugbee 65), (Dunton 40),
(Hurd 67), (Lea 140), (Leigh 91), (Santee 40), (Thomason
21). Guns 603. Herd 692. McVicker A10a(1).
    Powell, Southwest Classics, p. 348: “[Dobie] met
departmental skepticism of a course he proposed on the
Life and Literature of the Southwest. When his
colleagues questioned that there was any literature,
Dobie countered that there was plenty of life and he’d
teach it. He did both. The course proved legendary. He
kept expanding its syllabus until its final publication
as Guide to the Life and Literature of the Southwest,
then and now the best of all books of its kind.”
Saunders   273b.  Yost   &  Renner,   Russell,   p.  248
(“Appearances”).
    Dobie includes sections on “Cowboys and Range Life,”
“Cowboy Songs and Other Ballads,” “Horses: Mustangs and
Cow Ponies,” “Buffaloes and Buffalo Hunters,” “Women
Pioneers,” etc. The copyright notice on the title verso
may be our favorite of all time, and it is very much in
the generous spirit of J. Frank Dobie: “NOT COPYRIGHTED.
Anybody is welcome to help himself to any of it in any
way.”   $100.00

1570.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Guide to Life and Literature of
the Southwest.... Austin: University of Texas Press,
1943. Another copy. Very fine, in original mailing
envelope.
   First edition. Guns 603. Herd 692. McVicker A10a(1).
   $50.00

1571.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Guide to Life and Literature of
the Southwest.... Dallas: University Press in Dallas,
Southern    Methodist   University,   1943.   111   pp.,
frontispiece, text illustrations (some full-page) by
Russell, Borein, Bugbee, et al. 8vo, original yellow
pictorial cloth. Fine. No d.j. (as issued), signed by
author.
    First SMU edition, cloth issue (printed from the
original plates with a new title page). McVicker
A10a(3).    $75.00

1572.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Guide to Life and Literature of
the Southwest.... Dallas: University Press in Dallas,
Southern Methodist University, 1943. Another copy. Fine.
    $50.00

1573.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Guide to Life and Literature of
the Southwest....   Dallas: University Press in Dallas,
Southern Methodist University, 1943. Another copy,
variant binding. 8vo, original blue pictorial wrappers.
Wrappers slightly browned, otherwise fine.   $35.00

1574.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Guide to Life and Literature of
the Southwest, Revised and Enlarged in Both Knowledge
and Wisdom. Dallas: Southern Methodist University Press,
1952. vii [1] 222 pp., text illustrations (some full-
page) by Russell, Lea, Cisneros, et al. 8vo, original
tan cloth. Fine in rubbed, lightly chipped d.j. Dudley
R. Dobie’s copy with several sheets of notes relating to
his teaching and research laid in.
    Second edition, revised and enlarged, illustrations
vary (some illustrations from first edition retained,
but new ones by Cisneros and others added). Basic Texas
Books B73. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators
(Bugbee 66), (Cisneros 63), (Lea 141), (Leigh 52),
(Thomason 23); Kid 329; Western High Spots, p. 2
(“Introduction—My Sport”): “Number one on my list for
reading”; p. 32 (“High Spots in Western Fiction: 1902-
1952”). Guns 604. Herd 693. McVicker A10b. Yost &
Renner, Russell, p. 249 (“Appearances”).
    JFD comments in his new preface: “I have made more
additions to the ‘Range Life’ chapter than any other. I
am a collector of such books. A collector is a person
who gathers unto himself the worthless as well as the
worthy. Since I did not make a nickel out of the
original printing of the Guide and hardly expect to make
enough to buy a California ‘ranch’ out of the present
printing, I have added several items, with accompanying
remarks, more for my own pleasure than for benefit to
society.” $65.00

1575.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Guide to Life and Literature of
the Southwest.... Dallas: Southern Methodist University
Press, 1952. Another copy. 8vo, original tan cloth. Very
fine in rubbed and lightly soiled d.j.   $45.00

1576.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Guide to Life and Literature of
the Southwest.... Dallas: Southern Methodist University
Press, 1952. Another copy, variant binding. 8vo,
original goldenrod pictorial wrappers. Exceptionally
fine.   $25.00

1577.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Guide to Life and Literature of
the Southwest.... Dallas: Southern Methodist University
Press, [1957]. vii [1] 222 pp., text illustrations (some
full-page) by Russell, Lea, Cisneros, et al. 8vo,
original orange printed wrappers. Moderate shelf wear,
upper fore-edge slightly foxed, otherwise fine.
    Seventh printing. $10.00

1578.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Life and Literature of the
Southwest: An Incomplete Guide to Books on Texas and the
Southwest. Austin: University of Texas, 1936. 28 leaves,
mimeographed and stapled. Fine.
    McVicker D14b. First compiled and issued in 1933,
this is the second version of the mimeographed precursor
to Dobie’s Guide to Life and Literature of the
Southwest. “[Dobie] developed his ‘Life and Literature
of the Southwest’ course at the University of Texas; the
class, one of the most popular offered at the
University...demonstrated Dobie’s knowledge of the land,
people, and literature of the Southwest, as well as his
great vitality as a teacher. A brief mimeographed
reading    list    prepared    as   the     course   was
organized...evolved in the renowned Guide to Life and
Literature of the Southwest.... As late as 1979, James
K. Folsom, writing in The Western: A Collection of
Critical Essays, adjudged the Guide ‘the most useful
single   bibliography   of  Western   Americana’”  (WLA,
Literary History of the American West, p. 537). $65.00

1579.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Hunting Cousin Sally [wrapper
title]. Austin: Privately published, 1963. 14 pp.
(printed in double column). Large 8vo, original blue
pictorial wrappers (portrait of Ike Pryor in his hand-
me-down Union uniform, by William Wittliff). A few
foxmarks to fore-edges, else fine.
    First separate issue, offprint from Southwest Review
(Summer 1963), the Dobies’ Christmas greeting for 1963.
McVicker D84. Whaley, Wittliff 3. JFD’s biographical
notes on cattleman Ike Pryor are followed by Pryor’s
firsthand recollections, including how the eighteen-
year-old orphan became involved with the cattle business
when he was working as a farmhand near Austin: “I could
watch the herds of Longhorns trailing by, see the
cowboys, and smell the trail dust. I wasn’t a bit
satisfied with keeping my eyes on a pair of mule ears
and walking up one row and down another between a pair
of plow handles. Moreover, I had learned that cowboys
were getting thirty dollars a month, while here I was
getting just fifteen. I took the cow fever.” One of
Pryor’s witticisms is: “Any cowman of open range days
who claimed never to have put his brand on somebody
else’s animal was either a liar or a poor roper.”
   $45.00

1580.   DOBIE, J. Frank. I’ll Tell You a Tale: Selected
and Arranged by the Author and Isabel Gaddis. Boston:
Little,   Brown,  [1960].   xvii  [1]   362  pp.,  text
illustrations by Ben Carlton Mead. 8vo, original tan
cloth. Top edge slightly foxed, else fine in lightly
worn d.j. Signed by artist Ben Carlton Mead.
    First edition, second printing. Dykes, Fifty Great
Western Illustrators (Mead 27). McVicker A17a. WLA,
Literary History of the American West, p. 542): “The
tales were chosen by Isabel Gaddis, herself from the
range country and a former student of Dobie’s. The
stories are gathered under such headings as ‘The
Longhorn Breed’...and they represent Dobie at his best
in doing what he did with artistry—telling a tale.”
    $35.00

1581.   DOBIE, J. Frank. An Informal Hour with J. Frank
Dobie: Stories of the Southwest. New York: Spoken Arts
722, 1957. Phonograph record (33-1/3 r.p.m.; 12 inches,
read by JFD). Some foxing to sleeve, else fine, in
original mailing package.
    McVicker D58. Among selections read by J. Frank
Dobie are: “The Mezcla Man,” “Bigfoot Wallace and the
Hickory Nuts,” and “Bears Are Intelligent People.”
    $45.00

1582.   DOBIE, J. Frank. J. Frank Dobie Tells “The Ghost
Bull of the Mavericks” and Other Tales. [Austin]: Domino
Records, [1960]. Phonograph record (33-1/3 r.p.m.; 12
inches, read by JFD). Very fine in original pictorial
album cover with portrait of Dobie, record in original
glassine sleeve.
    McVicker D75. Selections include “The Dream That
Saved Wilbarger”; “Diamond Bill, Confederate Ally”; and
“Too Much Pepper” (all from Tales of Old-Time Texas);
and “Drouthed Out” (from I’ll Tell You a Tale). $35.00
1583.   DOBIE, J. Frank. John C. Duval, First Texas Man
of Letters: His Life and Some of His Unpublished
Writings. Dallas: Southwest Review, 1939. 105 [1] pp.,
tinted frontispiece and text illustrations by Tom Lea.
8vo, original brown cloth over beige cloth. Fine in fine
d.j. Signed by author.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 45: “Not merely a
critical and biographical study, but includes a series
of Duval’s unpublished writings.” Cook 28. Dobie, p. 55.
Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea 131);
Western High Spots, p. 116 (“Ranger Reading”). McVicker
A8a(1). One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd
14: “Dykes says: ‘Tom Lea illustrated the book with some
of his best drawings and naturally the Lea collectors
compete when an occasional copy appears for sale.’....
Scarce.”
    The chapter entitled “An Old Time Texas Ranch” deals
with the theme of hold-up hospitality on early Texas
ranches and gives some pointers on detecting greenhorns
(strapping one’s gun to the saddle, carrying an umbrella
while on horseback, etc.). Duval (1816-1897), came to
Texas in 1835, and, unlike his brother Burr H. Duval,
escaped the Goliad Massacre. John was surveying land in
Texas in 1840, served as a Texas Ranger with Bigfoot
Wallace in Jack Hays’ company beginning in 1845, rose to
rank of captain in the Confederate Army, and wrote two
early classics on Texas. “His writings justify his being
called the first Texas man of letters.... Of all
personal adventures of old-time Texans, [Early Times in
Texas] is perhaps the best written and the most
interesting.... Duval’s most artistic and most important
book is The Adventures of Bigfoot Wallace” (Handbook of
Texas Online: John Crittenden Duval). One of the good
features of this book is Dobie’s detailed bibliography
on the various confusing editions and issues of Duval’s
published works.   $250.00

1584.  DOBIE, J. Frank. John C. Duval, First Texas Man
of Letters.... Dallas: Southwest Review, 1939. Another
copy, unsigned. Very fine in fine d.j.   $125.00

1585.   DOBIE, J. Frank. John C. Duval, First Texas Man
of Letters.... Dallas: Southern Methodist University
Press, [1964 or 1965]. 105 pp., frontispiece and
illustrations by Tom Lea. 8vo, original brown cloth.
Very fine in fine d.j.
    Second edition.    $20.00

  “One of the True Classics of Range Cattle Literature”
                    (Reese, Six Score)
1586.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Longhorns. Boston: Little,
Brown, 1941. xxiii [1] 388 pp., title with color
illustration (extending across two pages) and text
illustrations by Tom Lea (some full-page), photographic
illustrations. 8vo, original full calf with blindstamp
of brand. Minor shelf wear and spine very slightly
rubbed, usual mild marginal browning on endsheets due to
contact of calf binding with endpapers, pp. 2-3 browned
where an item was formerly laid in, overall a fine copy,
in   publisher’s   white   cloth   slipcase  with   color
illustration by Lea (case slightly stained, confined
mainly to lower edge). Association copy with typed
letter, signed by Carl Hertzog, to “Bibliophiles and
Book Dealers and Friends of Tom Lea and J. Frank Dobie”
about the sale and purchase of this copy of the book:
“To stop some critical gossip I traded $200 worth of
books to get a copy of The Longhorns with the letter
from Dobie to E. A. Brinissttool (sic) concerning the
‘bat-wing’ chaps in the illustration by Tom Lea.... I
didn’t like the idea of circulating conversation putting
Dobie and Tom Lea in the negative, so I bought the book.
Later I mentioned this to Tom and he was not perturbed
in the least. He said they don’t understand design and
should know that this painting was not made for the book
but for a mural in the Odessa post office. I made the
chaps this way as an element of design. If they want to
criticize, did you ever see a cowboy with a shirt this
white?” Affixed to front free endpaper is book dealer
Charles P. Everitt’s typed, signed note about the book
with manuscript note below. Laid in is the 16-page
promotional with Lea illustrations and photographic
plates (specially printed for Dudley R. Dobie). Carl
Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplates.
    First edition, limited “Rawhide” edition (#258 of
265 copies signed by Dobie and Lea, with special
limitation leaf with illustration by Lea showing Dobie
and Lea in cowboy gear; in the special full calf binding
and slipcase illustrated by Lea). Loring Campbell, My
Favorite 101 Books about the Cattle Industry 30. Cook
34. Dobie, p. 102: “History of the Longhorn breed,
psychology of stampedes; days of maverickers and
mavericks; stories of individual lead steers and outlaws
of the range; stories about rawhide and many other
related subjects.” Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #18. Dykes,
Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 5; Fifty Great
Western Illustrators (Lea 135); Kid 295; Western High
Spots, p. 15 (“Western Movement: Its Literature”);
(“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #62); pp. 82, 86
(“A Range Man’s Library”): “Based on a terrific amount
of research and written as only ‘Mr. Southwest’ could
write it—a major contribution to the history of the
West”; p. 103 (“The Texas Ranch Today”).
    Graff 1099. Herd 694. Hinshaw & Lovelace, Lea 42B.
Howes D375. McVicker A9a(1). Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 21:
“Though chiefly about Texas and Texas cattle, a general
history of the early cattle industry, its techniques,
and anecdotes about cowboys.” Merrill, Aristocrats of
the Cow Country, p. 18. One Hundred Head Cut Out of the
Jeff Dykes Herd 5. Reese, Six Score 32: “This is the
most desirable edition.... One of the true classics of
range   cattle  literature.   The  limited  edition   is
increasingly hard to procure.” Saunders 4032. Streeter
Sale 2399. $3,500.00

1587.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Longhorns. Boston: Little,
Brown, 1941. xxiii [1] 388 pp., title with color
illustration (extending across two pages) and text
illustrations by Tom Lea (some full-page), photographic
illustrations. 8vo, original white pictorial cloth
(color illustration by Tom Lea). Exceptionally fine in
very fine d.j. illustrated by Lea. Original prospectus
laid in. Difficult to find in fine condition like this
copy, and with the prospectus.
    First trade edition. Hinshaw & Lovelace, Lea 42C.
McVicker A9a(2). “The Longhorns...represents Dobie at
the peak of his powers. The author begins the book with
a statement that the longhorns belong to history, ‘a
past so remote and irrevocable that sometimes it seems
as if it might never have been’.... The work is a
rewarding mixture of fact, lore, and history.... Dobie
closes the book with praise for the longhorns for their
great strength, vitality, endurance, and nobility” (WLA,
Literary History of the American West, p. 539). $250.00

1588.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Longhorns. Boston: Little,
Brown, 1941. Another copy, without prospectus. Very fine
in very good d.j. (price-clipped, light wear, one chip
on back panel).    $200.00

1589.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Longhorns. Boston: Little,
Brown, [April 1945]. xxiii [1] 388 pp., title with color
illustration (extending across two pages) and text
illustrations by Tom Lea (some full-page), photographic
illustrations. 8vo, original tan cloth. Fore-edges
foxed, else very fine in fine d.j. Signed by author.
    First edition, sixth printing, war issue (first
printing of this issue). Printed on thinner paper stock,
with d.j. setting out the changes necessary for the war
issue and JFD’s appeal to buy war bonds. $25.00

1590.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Longhorns. Boston: Little,
Brown, [April 1945]. Another copy. Fore-edges foxed,
else fine in d.j. $15.00

1591.   DOBIE, J. Frank. “Mesquite.” [San Angelo],
December 1, 1938. 4 pp., photographic illustration and
portrait of JFD, 2 text illustrations. Small folio, new
brown cloth. Fine, signed by JFD.
    First separate printing, offprint from Southwestern
Sheep & Goat Raiser. Dykes, My Dobie Collection, p. 10
(#36 on his rarities list). McVicker D22. JFD traces the
use of all parts of the mesquite tree through history
and waxes eloquently on how the humble mesquite
epitomizes the range country of Texas. This offprint is
replete    with   interesting   facts    and   discussion,
including: Mexican vaqueros wore mesquite leaves under
their hats to prevent sunstroke; use of the handsome
wood for construction and furniture (timbers in the
Alamo; ranch houses between Laredo and Brownsville and
elsewhere; King Ranch furniture); mesquite used as posts
for the first barbed wire in Texas (some still
standing);   mesquite   roots  for    whips  and   quirts;
consumption of mesquite beans by cattle (in dry weather
only!) as a preventative to worms; trail drivers such as
Goodnight adhering to the theory that the presence of
mesquites indicated water; astute observation that
mesquite proliferation is probably due to overgrazing
stock; methods of mesquite eradication. $85.00

1592.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Mezcla Man. El Paso del
Norte: [Carl Hertzog for Bertha and Frank Dobie], 1954.
[4] 11 pp., frontispiece by José Cisneros. 8vo, original
“adobe print” wrappers, stapled. Slight rust stain at
one staple, else very fine.
    First edition. Cook 53. Dykes, Fifty Great Western
Illustrators (Cisneros 64); My Dobie Collection, p. 10
(#40 on his list of rarities). Lowman, Printer at the
Pass 89 (quoting Hertzog to Dobie, 1954): “I had trouble
getting the paper I wanted for The Mezcla Man...so I had
to use two kinds of paper.... Won’t the bibliographers
of 1987 have fits when a copy shows up with the 2-color
paper combination reversed, or maybe even an odd color?”
McVicker D52. One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes
Herd 38.
    Borderlands vaquero Elejio Juárez of Ranchos de los
Olmos (on the south side of the Nueces River) told this
story to JFD, who used it in his book On the Open Range.
In this incarnation, the length of the story was doubled
“thanks to an improved memory” (JFD). This is our
favorite Dobie pamphlet—a wonderful story, creative
design and printing, and illustrated by Cisneros.
According to a note at the back: “The cover design was
obtained by making prints from an adobe—the native
‘bricks’ of the Southwest for more than four centuries.
Mud, straw and pebbles create textural design.” $150.00

1593.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Mezcla Man. El Paso del
Norte: [Carl Hertzog for Bertha and Frank Dobie], 1954.
Another copy. 8vo, loose in original wrappers. Slight
abrasion to endpapers. Printer Carl Hertzog’s copy, with
his bookplate. $125.00

     “Fuzzy Mustangs”—With Artist’s Original Drawing
1594.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Mustangs. Boston: Little,
Brown and Company, [1952]. [3] xvii [1] 376 pp., color
frontispiece, original pen and ink drawing (tipped on
opposite limitation page) and text illustrations (some
full-page) by Charles Banks Wilson. 8vo, original pinto
hide, gilt-lettered leather spine label, t.e.g. Other
than usual mild foxing adjacent to frontispiece, a
superb copy in plain brown paper d.j. and publisher’s
tan cloth pictorial slipcase (illustrated by Banks).
    Limited edition, Pinto Edition (#61 of 100 copies,
signed by Dobie and Wilson, with original drawing by
Wilson, and in the special “Fuzzy Mustangs” binding in
horse-hide with hair). Campbell, p. 130: “Stories of
mustangs and mustangers.... This book incorporates
Dobie’s Tales of the Mustang (1936) and part of Mustangs
and Cow Horses, edited by Dobie, Boatright, and
Ransom.... Famous mustangs are mentioned and their
stories told. We learn of the ways, methods, and
hardships of those who caught and tamed wild horses. It
is the love of liberty of the wild horse which inspires
the author and provides the theme of his book.” Dobie,
pp. 33, 81, 132, 151, 180. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #66:
“Rated by many as the best of Dobie’s books.”
    Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 14;
Western High Spots, p. 21 (“My Ten Most Outstanding
Books on the West” #10): “The Pinto Edition failed to go
around among the dedicated Dobie collectors. You had to
‘know’ a dealer to get a copy, and the casual Dobie
collectors are simply out of luck on this beautiful
issue of The Mustangs”; pp. 82, 86 (“A Range Man’s
Library”): “The number one book about range horses;” p.
103 (“The Texas Ranch Today”). Graff 1100. Herd 696.
McVicker A14a(1). Powell, A Southwestern Century 28:
“The fact that the horse is a nobler creature than the
cow raises this ‘sequel’ to The Longhorns to the highest
pinnacle of Dobie’s art, in which he sees the wild horse
as symbolic of all that is best in the free and
individualistic American tradition.” Reese, Six Score
33: “Certainly the best book on range horses, with much
on cattle work.... Many feel this to be one of Dobie’s
best books.”   $4,000.00

1595.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Mustangs. Boston: Little,
Brown and Company, [1952]. xvii [1] 376 pp., color
frontispiece and text illustrations (some full-page),
illustrated endpapers by Charles Banks Wilson. 8vo,
original blue and tan pictorial cloth. Very fine in fine
d.j. (Wilson illustrations on front and back).
    First trade edition, first issue d.j. (with Wilson
drawing of mustangs on rear panel). McVicker A14a(3).
WLA, Literary History of the American West, p. 541: “The
Mustangs may well prove to be the most enduring of
Dobie’s books. The English Romantic, the lover of the
open range, and the critic of contemporary society merge
into the marvelously elegiac opening lines of the
volume: ‘Like the wild West Wind that Shelley yearned to
be, the mustangs, the best ones at least, were
“tameless, and swift, and proud”.... ’ He wrote
obliquely of the spiritual truth of freedom, a value he
believed the wild horses and their world embodied. Such
a principle, of course, had been defined by Ralph Waldo
Emerson,   one   of   the  few   American   writers   to
significantly influence Dobie. The tales and facts
collected in the book, however, have a vital tang of
actual experience that transcends the abstract message.”
    $75.00

1596.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Mustangs. London: Hammond,
Hammond, and Company, [1954]. xiv, 346 pp., color
frontispiece and text illustrations (some full-page) by
Charles Banks Wilson. 8vo, original terracotta cloth.
Foxing to fore-edges and occasional text. Very good copy
in rubbed d.j. with tear (no loss of image). Laid in are
publisher’s printed presentation slip to author and
clipping of a short review. JFD pencil note on contents
page, indicating that the English publisher did not
include his footnotes.
    First English edition. McVicker A14c. For the
English edition the acknowledgements at the end of “A
Personal Introduction” have been omitted, as have the
notes at the back of the book.    $50.00

1597.   DOBIE, J. Frank. My Salute to Gene Rhodes. [El
Paso: Carl Hertzog for J. Frank Dobie], 1947. [2] 12 [2]
pp., tailpiece by Bugbee. 8vo, original tan printed
wrappers. Very fine.
    First separate printing, limited issue (600 copies).
Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Bugbee 67).
Herd 697. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 46: “This simple
and unadorned pamphlet is a complete resetting, ‘with a
few corrections and emendations’ of Dobie’s introduction
to The Little World Waddies.... It was sent by the
Dobies as a Christmas greeting in 1947.” McVicker D37.
    $75.00

1598.   DOBIE, J. Frank.     On the Open Range. Dallas:
Southwest Press, [1932?].    xii, 312 pp., 4 color plates
(including frontispiece),   text illustrations (some full-
page), and pictorial free    endpaper by Ben Carlton Mead,
brands illustrated in text. 12mo, original dark blue
pictorial cloth stamped in orange. Small bruise to upper
edge of front cover, front endpapers browned (from
newspaper clipping), pages adjacent to plates lightly
foxed (including title), overall very good, with
newspaper clipping of brands affixed to front pastedown.
    First edition, textbook issue, printed on lighter-
weight paper, Mead illustrations retained on free
endpapers, but pastedowns substituted with: “This book
is the property of the State of Texas” with lines for
students’ names, etc. The first edition (1930) was
limited to 750 copies, but the textbook edition was
printed in 15,000+ copies. The textbook issue went
through at least four printings under Southwest Press.
Reprints were not distinguished as such. According to
Lon Tinkle’s biography of JFD, the book was recommended
by the State for adoption as a textbook in October 1932.
    Campbell, p. 207. Dykes, Fifty Great Western
Illustrators (Mead 23n); My Dobie Collection, p. 8
(citing first edition): “It is seldom that a copy of the
first [edition] reaches the market” (#10 on his list of
rarities); Western High Spots, p. 103 (“The Texas Ranch
Today”).    Herd   698n.    McVicker  A3a(2).    Merrill,
Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 17 (citing first
edition). Yost & Renner, Russell, p. 268 (“References”).
    On the Open Range was the first of Dobie’s
commercially published anthologies, dedicated to the
boys and girls of the Southwest. Dobie was upset because
the trade issue mistakenly had the same text as this
“school book” issue. He had wanted to delete certain
parts in the trade issue that duplicated material from
his earlier books, rightly thinking that many who would
buy the trade issue would have his earlier books, while
most   schoolchildren   would   not. Because   of   money
difficulties the corrections were never made by the
publisher and Dobie was not happy with this regular
issue (see Tinkle’s biography of Dobie, p. 127). $45.00

1599.   DOBIE,   J.   Frank.   Picthing   [sic]   Horses   and
Panthers. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1940. 15 pp.,
text illustration by Will James. 8vo, original tan
printed wrappers. Very fine.
    First separate printing, offprint from Mustangs and
Cow Horses (Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1940). Cook 33.
Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Dufault [James]
56); My Dobie Collection, p. 10 (#37 on his rarities
list). Herd 699. McVicker D27. One Hundred Head Cut Out
of the Jeff Dykes Herd 31: “Scarce.”
    JFD explores the American range horse’s ability to
buck (as compared to its European counterpart), and
discusses the possibility that this was an evolved
protective skill to assist horses in warding off
panthers. JFD tells of some famous outlaw horses,
including Pecos Bill’s Widow-Maker, the Strawberry Roan,
and Zebra Dun. He mentions Phillip Ashton Rollins’
allusion to “a mythical bronco named Armageddon that ate
nothing but gunpowder and cholla cactus, and, having
bucked itself completely out of its skin, continued to
pitch until nothing of it remained beyond its ears and
memory.” Dobie Christmas greeting for 1940. $50.00

1600.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Prefaces. Boston & Toronto:
Little, Brown and Company, [1975]. ix [1] 204 pp. 8vo,
original half black cloth over orange boards. Very fine
in fine d.j. with slight wear.
    First edition. Compilation of prefaces written for
books by other writers, some not previously published.
Essays on Andy Adams, Gene Rhodes, Charlie Siringo,
Charles M. Russell, Frederic Remington, and others.
Includes a discussion of James Cox’s The Cattle Industry
of Texas and Adjacent Territory. $30.00

1601.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Rattlesnakes. Boston: Little,
Brown, [1965]. [9] 201 pp., illustrated title page. 8vo,
original blue cloth. Very fine in very fine d.j.
    First edition. McVicker A19. The majority of the
rattler incidents JFD describes occurred on ranches or
trail drives. JFD interviewed Charles Goodnight in 1926,
and includes his account of the giant rattler that saved
the lives of Oliver Loving and One-Armed Bill Wilson
during an encounter with Comanche warriors on their
grueling trail drive from Palo Pinto County, Texas, to
Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 1867. In typical JFD style,
he supplements Goodnight’s account of the same incident
with those of Bill Wilson, J. Evetts Haley, Loving’s
great grand-daughter, and others.
    A. C. Greene and His Library: “I am not one of that
recent tribe that seems so eager to topple [Dobie] from
the lofty position he continues to hold in Southwestern
letters. Dobie wrote about what Dobie knew: nature and
what he called ‘natural men.’ Rattlesnakes is a good
example of Dobie writing about nature in a serious but
amusing vein.” $75.00

1602.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Roadrunner in Fact and
Folk-Lore. Austin: [Texas Folk-Lore Society for] Texas
Game, Fish, and Oyster Commission, 1939. 31 pp. 8vo,
original blue pictorial wrappers. Moderate marginal
browning, small chip in upper cover, otherwise fine.
    McVicker D26. Reprint from In the Shadow of History,
the 1939 publication of the Texas Folk-Lore Society. An
abbreviated version of this essay originally appeared in
Natural History Magazine. Another of the Dobies’
Christmas greetings, this one exploring the natural
history of a quintessential denizen of the southern
ranges. JFD was actively involved in the movement to
protect    the  roadrunner   by   law,   sympathy,   and
understanding. $125.00

1603.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Seven Mustangs. [Austin:
Adams Publications], 1948. [2] 12 [2] pp. 8vo, original
green wrappers with photograph of Alec Phimister
Proctor’s “Seven Mustangs” sculpture. Mild to moderate
staining to back wrapper, otherwise fine.
    First edition, the Austin issue (without statement
below title: “Address delivered at the unveiling of the
monument”); another issue came out in Fort Worth at the
same time. Cook 40. Dykes, My Dobie Collection, p. 10
(#39 on his rarities list). McVicker D39b. One Hundred
Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 37: “Scarce.”
    Christmas greeting reprinting an address made by
Dobie at the unveiling of Procter’s monument on the
University of Texas campus at Austin. Brief history of
the mustang in America, from Spanish introduction to
trail drives and Charles Siringo to modern breeding at
the San Antonio Viejo Ranch in Jim Hogg County (where
Proctor did his research for the sculpture). $50.00

1604.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Some Part of Myself. Boston:
Little, Brown, [1967]. xiii [3] 282 pp., portrait of
Dobie, photographic plates. 8vo, original green cloth.
Very fine in fine d.j., with Bertha Dobie’s presentation
card laid in.
    First   edition.  McVicker   A20.  JFD   (1888-1964)
intended to write his autobiography, but did not finish
before he rode to the other side. He left behind the
beginning chapters covering his life up to the 1930s.
Bertha McKee, his ever-faithful wife, companion, and
editor, gathered JFD’s notes and edited them to create
this book. JFD begins his account with “A Plot of
Earth,” an account of his youth on the Dobie family’s
ranch in the brush country west of the Nueces River in
Live Oak County, Texas. Over half the chapters are on
ranching, including “The Cowman Who Was My Father”
(Richard J. Dobie), “My Mother—Ella Byler Dobie,” “Uncle
Frank Byler,” “Ranch Neighbors,” “Horses out of My
Boyhood,” etc. $75.00

1605.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Some Part of Myself. Boston &
Toronto: Little, Brown, [1967]. Another copy, without
presentation card laid in. Very fine in d.j. with some
wear and chipping. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his
bookplate. $50.00

1606.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Some Part of Myself. Boston &
Toronto: Little, Brown, [1967]. Another copy. Very fine
in fine d.j.   $50.00

1607.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Storytellers I Have Known.
[Austin], 1961. 29 pp. 8vo, original salmon printed
wrappers. Fine.
    First separate printing (reprinted from Singers and
Storytellers, Texas Folk-Lore Publication 30, 1961).
McVicker D79. Mohr, The Range Country 662. Christmas
greeting from the Dobies, with tales and storytellers of
the range country. The first of these raconteurs was a
“panther man” riding a tired canelo horse who dropped by
the Dobie ranch at night and “shivered the timbers” of
the young JFD. $30.00

1608.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Tales of Old-Time Texas.
Boston: Little, Brown, [1955]. vi [2, signed leaf] vii-
xvi, 336 pp., frontispiece and text illustrations (many
full-page) by Barbara Latham. 8vo, original half brown
cloth over yellow boards. Very fine in very fine d.j.
Uncommon.
    First edition, signed issue, with leaf autographed
by JFD bound in after title. Guns 605. Herd 701.
McVicker A15a(1) (not noting this special issue with the
signed leaf). The chapter on “A Ranch on the Nueces”
gives the history of the Ray Ranch established in 1868
amidst great tribulations from raiders and Native
Americans. Other chapters include “The Wild Woman of the
Navidad,” “Big Foot Wallace and the Hickory Nuts,”
“Northers, Drouths and Sandstorms,” “The Headless
Horseman of the Mustangs,” “Desperate Rides,” “The
Planter Who Gambled Away His Bride,” “Guarded by
Rattlesnakes,” “The Apache Secret of the Guadalupes,”
“The Mezcla Man,” and many more. $300.00

1609.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Tales of Old-Time Texas.
Boston:    Little,  Brown,  [1955].   xvi,   336   pp.,
frontispiece and illustrations by Barbara Latham. 8vo,
original half brown cloth over yellow boards. Very fine
in very fine d.j.
   First edition, trade issue.   $100.00

              Illustrated by Jerry Bywaters
1610.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Tales of the Mustang. Dallas:
[The Rein Company for] The Book Club of Texas, 1936. 89
[1] pp., tinted title and text illustrations by Jerry
Bywaters. 8vo, original grey boards, printed paper label
on upper cover. Light foxing to endpapers and usual
faint offsetting from illustrations, generally very fine
in original glassine d.j. Signed by JFD on half-title.
    First edition, limited edition (300 copies). Cook
17. Dobie, p. 132. Dykes, My Dobie Collection (#7 on his
list rarities): “It may be as difficult to find as any
of the other Dobie limiteds except The Mustangs.” Herd
700. Lowman, Printing Arts in Texas, p. 61: “One of the
most sought after modern rarities.... Chef d’oeuvre of
the Book Club of Texas.” Marcus, Book Club of Texas 6.
McVicker A6. Merrill, Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p.
18. One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 7.
    This handsomely printed and designed work was the
precursor for JFD’s monumental The Mustangs. JFD
comments in the preface to the present work: “For years
I have been gathering data on mustangs and have enough
about them to make a good-sized book. If el bueno Dios
lends me life, I hope some day to put it into form.”
JFD’s   text   is   pleasingly   illustrated  by  artist
Williamson Gerald (Jerry) Bywaters (see Handbook of
Texas Online: Williamson Gerald Bywaters).
    JFD discusses the dispersion of range horses in the
Southwest and Texas, noting that before the cattle
trails were fenced and plowed under, “Texas cowboys had
trailed more than 10,000,000 Texas cattle and more than
1,000,000 Texas horses upon them. The horses were
Spanish—tough,    wiry,  thoroughly   adapted  to  their
environment. Their chief use was in developing the ranch
industry over Nebraska, the Dakotas, Wyoming, Montana,
Nevada, Idaho—all the vast territory of the Northwest
that by the close of the seventies had been finally
wrested from the Plains Indians.” $1,000.00
1611.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Tales of the Mustang. Dallas
[Rein for] The Book Club of Texas, 1936. Another copy.
Small stain to top fore-edge, endpapers foxed, and usual
faint offsetting from illustrations, overall very fine
in original glassine d.j. Signed by JFD on half-title.
Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate. $1,000.00

1612.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Texan in England. Boston:
Little, Brown and Company, 1945. xiii [3] 285 pp. 12mo,
original tan cloth. Fine in near fine d.j. (one short
tear and price-clipped). Signed by author.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 45: “Autobiographical,
an account of Dobie’s impressions during a year at
Cambridge University as visiting professor of American
History in 1943.... Of course, a Texan of the cattleman
tradition   was  already   conditioned  to   admire  the
tradition of the English gentleman who came to the West
and engaged in the cattle business.” Dykes, Fifty Great
Western Illustrators (Lea 142). McVicker A11a.   $50.00

1613.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Texan in England. Boston:
Little, Brown and Company, 1946. xiii [3] 285 pp. 12mo,
original tan cloth. Very fine in price-clipped d.j.
Signed by JFD.
    First edition, eighth printing.  $15.00

1614.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Texan in England. London:
Hammond, Hammond & Co., [1946]. 192 pp., frontispiece
portrait, plates. 8vo, original beige buckram. Endsheets
browned, else fine in near fine d.j. with one tear.
Publisher’s sample copy label tipped in.
    First British edition. Publisher’s sample complete
copy.   $75.00

1615.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Texan in England. London:
Hammond, Hammond & Co., [1946]. Another copy. First
edition but not publisher’s sample. Fine in somewhat
worn and soiled d.j.  $35.00
1616.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Texan in England. London:
Hammond, Hammond & Co., [1946]. Another copy. Corners
bumped, else fine, d.j. not present. $15.00

1617.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Tongues of the Monte. Garden
City: Doubleday, Doran & Company, 1935. vii [3] 301 pp.,
text illustrations. 8vo, original yellow decorated cloth
stamped in red and black. A very fine, bright copy in
fine d.j. with design matching binding (price-clipped).
The flamboyant binding and d.j. on this unusual and
attractive book are very fresh and bright.
    First edition, second printing (“first edition”
removed from title verso). Campbell, pp. 156-57.
“Creative in Dobie’s best manner.” McVicker A4a(1).
“Tongues of the Monte is about as close as Dobie ever
got to writing a novel” (Abernethy, J. Frank Dobie, p.
18).
    Tongues of the Monte is a key work on the life,
social history, and folklore of the vast ranches and
haciendas of the Borderlands and the world of the
Mexican vaquero. JFD spent his youth among Spanish-
speaking people and was always fascinated by their
culture. The book opens with protagonist Don Federico
(thought to be JFD himself) riding through the eastern
cordillera of Mexico, where he encounters four vaqueros
killing a bull (“Blood-drinkers are rare among vaqueros,
and I was enthralled by the sight”).
    Tongues of the Monte, JFD’s favorite of his own
works and deemed by Larry McMurtry as JFD at his best,
is a quasi-picaresque novel vividly revealing the life
of the Mexican earth and its people, based on JFD’s
Guggenheim-funded adventures traveling two thousand
miles through the brush country east of the Sierra Madre
in the early 1930s.    $100.00

1618.   DOBIE, J. Frank. [Tongues of the Monte] The
Mexico I Like. Dallas: University Press [for] Southern
Methodist University, 1942. xii [4] 301 pp., text
illustrations. 8vo, original green cloth. Faint foxing
to upper fore-edge and endsheets, otherwise very fine in
very good pictorial d.j. (slight wear and mild foxing).
Signed by author.
    Second edition of Tongues of the Monte, issued under
a different title and with revised foreword by author.
McVicker A4a(2). In the expanded foreword JFD reveals
the permutations of the title Tongues of the Monte,
originally to be The Hacienda of the Five Wounds (for
the vast hacienda of the Marqués de Aguayo, “which
included almost half of Coahuila”—Handbook of Texas
Online: Marqués de San Miguel de Aguayo).
    In the new preface JFD comments: “I must have been
about grown before I came to know that ‘cowboy’ is not a
literary word. Most of the cowhands I knew were
Mexicans, and all of them were called vaqueros. My
father was a stockman, having driven horses up the trail
to Kansas with Mexican vaqueros, then turning to
cattle.”   $75.00

1619.   DOBIE, J. Frank. [Tongues of the Monte] The
Mexico I Like. Dallas: University Press [for] Southern
Methodist University, 1942. Another copy, signed “Pancho
Dobie.” Faint foxing to upper fore-edge and endsheets,
otherwise very fine in very good d.j. (slight wear and
mild foxing). $75.00

1620.   DOBIE, J. Frank. [Tongues of the Monte] The
Mexico I Like. Dallas: University Press [for] Southern
Methodist University, 1942. Another copy, not signed by
JFD. Some staining and spotting to binding, otherwise
fine in fine d.j. $25.00

1621.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Tongues of the Monte. Boston:
Little, Brown, and Company, 1949. xiv [4] 301 pp., text
illustrations. 8vo, original yellow decorated cloth
stamped in red and black. Very fine in fine d.j. (price-
clipped).
    Third edition, second printing, with the expanded
preface   that  appeared   in  the   SMU edition (see
preceding), and the neat original binding design
repeated. McVicker A4a(3)n.   $35.00

1622.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Two Kinds of People. Pasadena:
Grant Dahlstrom at the Castle Press for the Friends of
Lawrence Clark Powell, 1953. 4to broadside printed in
black    and  terracotta   in   double   column,   small
illustration of a Southwestern landscape. Very fine.
    First separate printing (#3 of the Southwest
Broadsides). McVicker D50. JFD worries about the impact
of the oil industry on Texas land, referring to the Tom
O’Connor ranch on the Texas coast (“A kind of oil
culture dominates Texas with more force than cattle ever
dominate...only the devil would want to pipe it into the
green pastures of heaven”). JFD then relates the
poignant story of Tom O’Connor’s demise and how the old
cattleman ordered all of his cattle herded and brought
to the ranch house so that he could hear “natural”
sounds in his last hours. Most excellent printing and
very strong text. $40.00

1623.   DOBIE, J. Frank. Up the Trail from Texas. New
York: Random House, [1955]. [8] 182 [2, ads] pp., tinted
text   illustrations   (some  full-page)   by  John   C.
Wonsetler, illustrated endpapers. 12mo, original rose
decorated cloth stamped black and blue. Superb copy in
very fine d.j.
    First edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 78 (“A
Range    Man’s   Library”):   “Primarily   for   younger
readers...dandy book about real trail drivers.” McVicker
A16a(1). This book remains a fun, informative book for
readers of all ages.   $30.00

              A Vaquero of the Brush Country
                  Branded by Dobie in Ink
1624.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country...Partly from the Reminiscences of John Young.
Dallas: Southwest Press, 1929. xv [1] 314 pp., 6 plates
(photographic, including color frontispiece of the
formidable J. M. Dobie longhorn), text illustrations and
endpaper maps by Justin C. Gruelle. 8vo, original half
tan cloth over snakeskin-patterned boards, tan printed
paper label on upper cover. Fragile board edges worn as
usual, front free endpaper detached, some foxing
(heavier at endsheets and adjacent to plates, including
title), good to very good copy. Signed by J. Frank Dobie
and with his manuscript brands in ink.
    First edition, “Rio Grande River” on endpaper maps.
Basic Texas Books 44: “Dobie’s first complete book...a
lasting contribution to the literature of the Texas
range. It presents the memoirs of John Duncan Young, a
South Texas cattleman, as interpreted by Dobie.... The
text includes, in addition to Young’s life as a pioneer
cattleman, sections on roundups and cattle drives, on
the hide and tallow business in Texas, on Billy the Kid
and the Mexican outlaw Cortina, on life in the South
Texas brush country, on Mexican and Indian warfare along
the border after the Civil War, and on the folk ways of
the Texas cattle industry.” Campbell, p. 85. CBC 84 &
3164. Cook 7. Dobie, p. 102. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #11.
Dykes, Kid 141; Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature,
p. 14; My Dobie Collection, p. 8: “Scarce” (#31 on his
rarities list); Western High Spots, p. 20 (“My Ten Most
Outstanding Books on the West” #8); p. 103 (“The Texas
Ranch Today”). Guns 606. Herd 702. Howes D376. McVicker
A1a(1). One Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd
12. Rader 1162. Reese, Six Score 34.
    A Vaquero of the Brush Country makes clear how much
the Texas cowboy owes to his Mexican counterpart for
techniques, equipment, and colorful language. “Gallons
of ink have been spilled by historians and other
interpreters of the cowboy in an attempt to set the
record straight, to preserve the cowboy in print as he
really was. Some of the best nonfiction on the cowboy
may be found in the memoirs and autobiographies of
cowboys themselves.... Many of old-time cowboys left
behind accounts of their adventures.... Perhaps the most
literary of these accounts is J. Frank Dobie’s A Vaquero
of the Brush Country” (WLA, Literary History of the
American West, pp. 499-500).
    In his introduction, JFD sets the stage for John
Young, telling of George Saunders’ declaration: “John
Young would charge hell with a bucket of water.” JFD
further remarks: “A common object of both Mr. Young and
myself has been to place in a clear light certain
characteristics of ranch people that, on account of the
prolific work of sensation mongers and sentimentalists,
require stressing. The men of the Western saddle,
however untutored in books some of them may have been—
were not ignorant. Their profession was one that
demanded   skill,   alertness,   resourcefulness,  close
observation, will power, and fidelity. It was a
profession that engendered pride. They were laborers of
a kind, it is true, but they regarded themselves as
artists, and they were artists. Years of experience, of
practice in deftness, and of study in animal psychology
were necessary to perfect a top hand. No genuine cowboy
ever suffered from an inferiority complex or ranked
himself in the ‘laboring class’.... He considered
himself a cavalier in the full sense of that word—a
gentleman on horse, privileged to come it proud over all
nesters, squatters, Kansas Jay-hawkers, and other such
earth-clinging creatures.” $400.00

1625.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country.... Dallas: Southwest Press, 1929. Another copy.
Covers worn (especially edges), front hinge cracked,
some foxing (heavier at endsheets and adjacent to
plates,   including   title).   Contemporary  ink   gift
inscription on verso of frontispiece. $125.00

1626.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country.... Dallas: Southwest Press, 1929. xv [1] 314
pp.,   6    plates  (photographic,   including  color
frontispiece of the J. M. Dobie longhorn), text
illustrations and endpaper maps by Justin C. Gruelle.
8vo, original half tan cloth over snakeskin-patterned
boards, tan printed paper label on upper cover. Some
edge wear, occasional slight foxing, a few small ink
ownership stamps, else fine in the scarce and beautiful
pictorial d.j., which is lightly worn and foxed and
split along spine with no losses.
    First edition, second printing, title verso states
second edition, “Rio Grande River” on endpaper maps.
McVicker A1a(2). Reese, Six Score 34: “Supposedly, the
word ‘River’ [in the words ‘Rio Grande River’ on the
endsheet map] was later removed at Dobie’s insistence,
as being redundant. However, I have recently handled a
copy of the second edition, so noted on the verso of the
title page, with the map still reading ‘Rio Grande
River’” (Reese Company catalogue 42, item 440), and have
seen other similar copies, so I doubt the accuracy of
this point.”   $125.00

1627.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country.... Dallas: Southwest Press, 1929. Another copy.
Ex-library (ink stamps on front endpapers and dedication
leaf, embosure on imprint, call number in pencil on
title verso and dedication, back endpapers abraded where
library materials removed), worn and foxed, d.j. not
present. Reading copy. $20.00

1628.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country.... Dallas: Southwest Press, 1929. xv [1] 314
pp.,    6   plates   (photographic,   including   color
frontispiece of the J. M. Dobie longhorn), text
illustrations and endpaper maps by Justin C. Gruelle.
8vo, original half tan cloth over snakeskin-patterned
boards, tan printed paper label on upper cover. Fragile
binding lightly stained and with usual wear (especially
corners), mild to moderate foxing to text, otherwise
very good, with 1933 gift inscription on front free
endpaper.
    First edition, fourth printing (title verso states
“fourth edition”), “Rio Grande River” gaffe on endpaper
maps corrected. McVicker A1a(3).   $25.00

1629.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country....    Dallas: Southwest Press, 1929. Another
copy. Binding worn, occasional foxing, generally very
good, with printed label of Herbert Fletcher’s Houston
bookstore on front free endpaper. For more on bookseller
and publisher Fletcher, see Handbook of Texas Online:
Herbert Herrick Fletcher. $35.00

1630.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country....    Dallas: Southwest Press, 1929. Another
copy, variant binding. 8vo, original navy blue cloth.
Fine in publisher’s original glassine d.j. (worn).
Signed by J. Frank Dobie, and with his manuscript brands
in ink. $45.00

1631.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country....    Dallas: Southwest Press, 1929. Another
copy, variant binding. 8vo, original dark maroon cloth.
Offsetting to endsheets, otherwise fine in pictorial
d.j. (worn and chipped). $35.00

1632.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A   Vaquero of the Brush Country.
Dallas: Southwest Press,     1929. Another copy, variant
binding. 8vo, original       rose cloth. Bookplate and
ownership signature of        E. C. Crampton on front
pastedown. $20.00

1633.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country....   New York: Grosset & Dunlap, [1936]. xvi,
302 pp., frontispiece, text illustrations, and endpaper
maps by Justin C. Gruelle. 8vo, original tan cloth.
Spine light, mild staining along joints, internally
fine, in d.j. (lightly worn and price-clipped).
    Second edition. McVicker A1b(1). $25.00

1634.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country.... London: Hammond, Hammond & Co., [1949]. 274
[2] pp., 2 plates (including frontispiece), text
illustrations by Justin C. Gruelle. 8vo, original brown
cloth. Endsheets and fore-edges foxed, else fine in d.j.
with a few small, closed tears.
    First British edition. McVicker A1c. $45.00

1635.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush
Country.... Boston: Little, Brown and Company, [1952].
xvi, 302 pp., frontispiece, text illustrations, endpaper
maps by Justin Gruelle. 8vo, original brown cloth. Very
fine in fine, bright, price-clipped d.j. with full-color
Gruelle illustration. Signed by JFD.
    Third American edition, first issue, fourth printing
(February 1952).   $25.00

1636.   DOBIE, J. Frank. A Vaquero of the Brush Country
(Condensed Edition)....      New York: Pennant Books,
[1954]. [6] 184 pp. 12mo, original color pictorial
wrappers. Superb copy, remarkable for a paperback of
that era.
    Fourth American edition, first printing of the
Pennant paperback edition. McVicker A1d. $15.00

1637.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Voice of the Coyote.
Boston: Little, Brown, 1949. viii [2, signed leaf] ix-
xx, 386 pp., tinted frontispiece and illustrated title,
text illustrations (some full-page) by Olaus Murie. 8vo,
original brown cloth with gilt illustration of coyote.
Very fine in near fine d.j. (a few short closed marginal
tears, no losses).
    First edition, signed issue, with leaf autographed
by JFD bound in after title. Campbell, p. 127. Dobie,
pp. 22, 167: “Not only the coyote but his effect on the
human imagination and ecological relationships. Natural
history and folklore; many tales from factual trappers
as well as from Mexican and Indian folk.” Dykes, Kid
398. Herd 703. Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 21: “Fascinating
account of the coyote’s behavior and of other plains
animals. Usable in any plains state.” McVicker A12a(1).
    WLA, Literary History of the American West, p. 540:
“Dobie...expresses anger at those who slaughter coyotes
for no good reason.” On the perennial debate of coyotes
as predators of the cattle range, JFD remarks: “The
master studies of the relationships of the coyote to
other animals of its environment have been made within
the past ten years by Adolph Murie, biologist and
naturalist, a pioneer in the field. His yet unpublished
study of Cattle Losses and the Coyote on a Southwestern
Range (Arizona) leaves the coyote generally guiltless of
predation on cattle, though exceedingly active on
carrion. However, Emerson’s Law of Compensation always
works. As cows are bred up for sow-like weight and form
they lose their protective instincts.... I still think
that a range cow should have enough elemental life in
her to keep coyotes off her offspring. Unless she has,
the meat from her kind will descend to the level of
hothouse chicken so far as invigorating qualities are
concerned.” $450.00

1638.   DOBIE, J. Frank. The Voice of the Coyote.
Boston: Little, Brown, 1949. xx, 386 pp., tinted
frontispiece and illustrated title, text illustrations
(some full-page) by Olaus Murie. 8vo, original brown
cloth with gilt illustration of coyote. Condition fine,
but rated only as very good due to former owner’s
occasional ink notes. Dust jacket price-clipped and with
a few short tears.
    First edition, trade issue.   $75.00

1639.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). E 342: A Collection of
Stray Mavericks Caught, Roped, and Branded by Members of
the “Big Corral” (English 342: Life and Literature of
the Southwest)....   Austin: University of Texas, 1941.
[4] 47 leaves (mimeographed). 4to, tan wrappers with
title and brand printed in red, stapled (as issued).
Very fine.
    First printing. McVicker B44. Second in a series of
anthologies from student writings, edited and with a
foreword by their professor, JFD. “Dobie affected to
scorn what he termed ‘our institutions of so-called
higher learning,’ but in fact (and almost single-
handedly for a long time) he worked to make the study of
western   regional   literature   respectable   in   the
university” (WLA, Literary History of the American West,
p. 247).   $100.00

1640.   DOBIE, J. Frank & Jeff Dykes. Forty-Four Range
Country Books Topped Out by J. Frank Dobie in 1941, and
Forty-Four More Range Country Books Topped Out by Jeff
Dykes in 1971. Austin: Encino Press, 1972. vii [1] 32
pp., illustrated title page of a cowhand reading a book
(by Will Crawford). 8vo, original brown cloth, upper
cover with pictorial paper label (repeating Crawford’s
illustration on title). Very fine in original glassine
d.j. Signed by Dykes. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his
bookplate.
    First edition, limited edition (1,000 copies). Basic
Texas Books B72. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators
(Crawford 27). Whaley, Wittliff 88. Superb notes by two
experts on range literature. JFD comments on his
selections: “In picking the following titles, I have
considered vitality, readability, fidelity to range
life, and historical information.... I realize how easy
it would be to add forty-four more titles and still not
get down to skimmed milk.” To Dobie’s original 1941
choices, Dykes adds 44 more well-annotated selections,
all published between 1941 and 1971. $65.00

1641.   DOBIE, J. Frank & Jeff Dykes. Forty-Four...and
Forty-Four...Range Country Books....   Austin: Encino
Press, 1972. Another copy. Very fine in original
glassine d.j. Jeff Dykes’ signed presentation copy to
noted collector Dorothy Josey: “For Mrs. Clint Josey—
discriminating book buyer and range life collector. I
think my old paisano Pancho would have loved this one
and I hope you do—Jeff.” $65.00
1642.   DOBIE, J. Frank & Jeff Dykes. Forty-Four...and
Forty-Four...Range Country Books....   Austin: Encino
Press, 1972. Another copy. Very fine in original
glassine d.j. Signed by Dykes.  $50.00

1643.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Foller de Drinkin’ Gou’d.
Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1928. 201 pp., printed
music. 8vo, original red pictorial wrappers bound in
brown and green mottled cloth. Top edge slightly foxed,
several spots on title page, otherwise fine.
    First edition, wrappers issue. Publications of the
Texas Folk-Lore Society 7. Basic Texas Books 203:7. CBC
3427. Dobie, p. 129: “Scores, with music and anecdotal
interpretations.” McVicker B7. WLA, Literary History of
the American West, p. 503: “Unquestionably, Dobie’s
major achievement was that almost single-handedly he
made southwesterners of the 1920s and 1930s, when very
little southwestern literature as such existed, aware of
the literary possibilities of their folk heritage.” In
his contribution “More Ballads and Songs of the Frontier
Folk,” JFD provides biographical information on Charlie
Johnson, “a genuine cowboy balladist” and writer of “The
Cowboy’s Stroll.” JFD tells how Johnson went to work on
Tom O’Connor’s ranch in South Texas in 1877 at age
sixteen, first went up the trail in 1880, and claimed to
have branded more cattle than any other man in Texas.
Also included in this anthology is Newton Gaines’s “Some
Characteristics of Cowboy Songs.” $40.00

1644.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Legends of Texas. Austin:
Texas    Folk-Lore  Society,   1924.   xii,   282   pp.,
photographic plate, map, 2 text illustrations. 8vo,
original blue cloth gilt. Binding dull and moderately
worn, hinges weak, occasional mild to moderate foxing
(especially to fore-edges and endsheets), overall a very
good copy.
    First edition. Texas Folk-Lore Society Publications
3. Basic Texas Books 203:3. Dykes, My Dobie Collection,
(#8 on his rarities list), p. 9: “Of the books edited by
Dobie, I regard Legends of Texas...as the hardest to
find and apt to be the most expensive. Frank wrote in my
copy...on March 1, 1943: ‘How proud I was of this
book...my first.... A rare book now.’ Twenty-eight more
years have added to the problem of finding a copy.”
McVicker B3(a).
    JFD wrote approximately one-third of the material
for Legends and edited the remainder. Depending on how
one wishes to interpret bibliography, this could be
considered Dobie’s first “book.” John R. Craddock’s “The
Legend of Stampede Mesa” tells a legend from the Texas
Panhandle about a murdered cattle buyer. His ghost
reputedly haunted a spot in Crosby County considered
excellent for holding cattle on a trail drive, and thus
herd bosses avoided the area because the ghost was said
to cause stampedes.   $100.00

1645.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Legends of Texas. Austin:
Texas    Folk-Lore  Society,   1924.   xii,   282    pp.,
photographic plate, map, 2 text illustrations. 8vo,
original blue cloth gilt. Minor shelf wear, generally
fine.
    First edition, second printing (“Second Edition” on
title page). The second printing was also available in
wrappers, according to promotional material. $45.00.

1646.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Man, Bird, and Beast.
Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1930. 185 pp., 2
illustrations by Will James. 8vo, original blue printed
wrappers, hand bound by Dr. S. K. Stroud in half brown
calf over tan cloth. Light wear, old tape stains and
writing on wrappers.
    First edition. Publications of the Texas Folk-Lore
Society 8. Basic Texas Books 203:8. CBC 4754. Dobie, pp.
40, 70 (referring to Woodhull’s article): “Richest and
most readable collection of pioneer remedies yet
published.” Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators
(Dufault [James] 54). McVicker B11(a).
    Of range country interest are Frost Woodhull’s
“Ranch Remedios,” Jovita González’ “Tales and Songs of
the   Texas-Mexicans”  (folklore   among   vaqueros and
pastores of the borderlands). Further, Betty Smedley,
long-time rare book dealer, contributed “Legends of
Wichita County,” commenting: “Stories of the Wichita
cattle country are almost as numerous as mesquite
trees.” Smedley goes on to relate four of the best.
    This book and several other copies (see below) of
Texas Folk-Lore Society publications were hand bound by
Dr. Stroud, a Corpus Christi book collector whom Dudley
R. Dobie met through Dan Kilgore. $40.00

1647.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Man, Bird, and Beast.
Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1930. Another copy.
8vo, later navy blue buckram. A few spots to binding,
upper fore-edge lightly foxed.  $25.00

1648.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Publications of the Texas
Folk-Lore Society, Number IV. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore
Society, 1925. 133 pp., photographic plate, text
illustrations (printed music and pictographs). 8vo,
original tan printed wrappers. Text block detached from
fragile wrappers (light wear). Very good copy, with
small ownership ink stamp (“C. E. Kelly”) on upper cover
and blank endpaper. From the library of Carl Hertzog,
with his bookplate.
    First edition, wrappers issue. Basic Texas Books
203:4. McVicker B4(a). Ranching content in this volume
consists of JFD’s “Versos of the Texas Vaqueros” and Roy
S. Scott’s “The Cowboy Dance of the Northwest.” $75.00

1649.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Publications of the Texas
Folk-Lore Society, Number IV. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore
Society, 1925. Another copy. 8vo, original grey printed
wrappers bound in later red cloth. Slight wear to wraps,
top edge lightly foxed, overall fine. $60.00

1650.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Publications of the Texas
Folk-Lore Society V. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society,
1926. 190 pp., printed music. 8vo, original tan printed
wrappers bound in later green cloth. Binding lightly
stained, fore-edges lightly foxed, else very fine.
    First edition, wrappers issue. Basic Texas Books
203:5. CBC 290 & 4204. Cook 77B. McVicker B5(a).
    Ranch content includes: Branch Isbell’s “Episodes at
Ranch Community Dances”; JFD’s “The Tournament in Texas”
(early Texas rodeo-like affairs with a Southern flavor
of chivalry); Mary Daggett Lake’s “Pioneer Christmas
Customs of Tarrant County” (includes cowboy dances);
John K. Strecker’s “On the Origin of Reptile Myths”
(cow-puncher beliefs that rattlesnakes, owls, and
prairie dogs cohabit burrows; horse-hair rope protects
against rattlesnakes; cowboy mythology about “The Great
Water Dog of the Plains”; etc).   $45.00

1651.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Publications of the Texas
Folk-Lore Society V. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society,
1926. Another copy. 8vo, original tan printed wrappers
hand bound in half red calf over green cloth by Dr. S.
K. Stroud. Wraps lightly chipped, else fine. $45.00

1652.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Publications of the Texas
Folk-Lore Society V. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society,
1926. Another copy. 8vo, original tan printed wrappers.
Upper wrapper detaching, wrappers chipped and torn.
    $30.00

1653.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Puro Mexicano. Austin:
[Designed by H. Stanley Marcus for the] Texas Folk-Lore
Society, 1935. [2] x, 261 pp., title illustrated with
sombrero. 8vo, half black cloth over rose cloth. Fore-
edges lightly foxed, otherwise fine, in original
glassine d.j.
    First edition, cloth issue. Publications of the
Texas Folk-Lore Society 12. Basic Texas Books 203:12.
McVicker B21. Paul S. Taylor’s “Songs of Mexican
Migration” includes the corrido “The Two Rancheros”
(dialogue between a returned emigrant and a rancher who
remained in Mexico). Sarah S. McKellar, a native Texan
and the wife of a Scottish rancher in Mexico, relates
the tale “Br’er Coyote” as told by her ranch cook. In
the telling, McKellar provides social history on ranch
life at La Mariposa in northern Coahuila. In Joe Storm’s
“Sons of the Devil,” Jim Jackson, a cowman of the old
school, tells of Mescalero Apache stealing horses from
Texan and Mexican ranches and the tale of Diablo, a big
black stallion thought to be a medicine horse. Simple,
elegant design by Stanley Marcus of Nieman-Marcus fame.
    $45.00

1654.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Puro Mexicano. Austin:
[Designed by H. Stanley Marcus for the] Texas Folk-Lore
Society, 1935. Another copy, without original glassine
d.j. Slight foxing to fore-edges, else fine. $35.00

1655.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Texas and Southwestern
Lore. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1927. 259 [1]
pp., printed music. 8vo, original grey pictorial
wrappers with ranching images. Very fine, with only
slight wear to the attractive, fragile wraps.
    First edition, wrappers issue. Publications of the
Texas Folk-Lore Society 6. Basic Texas Books 203:6.
Dobie, pp. 40, 43, 129: “Tales about Texas-Mexican
vaquero folk.” Dykes, Kid 176: “‘Folk-Lore Shooting,’ an
article...by Frost Woodhull, debunks the reputations of
some of our better-known gunmen, including that of the
Kid.” McVicker B6. Robinson, Haley (1978) 286, 303.
    This is one of the best Texas Folk-Lore Society
publications for a ranching collection, with Jovita
González’s “Folk-Lore of the Texas-Mexican Vaquero”;
Bertha McKee Dobie’s “Tales and Rhymes of a Texas
Household”; J. Evetts Haley’s “Lore of the Llano
Estacado” and “Cowboy Songs Again”; JFD’s “Ballads and
Songs of the Border Folk”; John R. Craddock’s “Songs the
Cowboys Sing”; Ina Sires’ “Songs of the Open Range”;
Arbie Moore’s “The Texas Cowboy”; and more. $125.00
1656.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Texas and Southwestern
Lore. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1927. Another
copy. 8vo, original grey pictorial wrappers hand bound
by Dr. S. K. Stroud in tan calf over grey cloth.
Wrappers and a few leaves foxed. $75.00

1657.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Texas and Southwestern
Lore. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1927. 259 [1]
pp., printed music. 8vo, original blue cloth. Main
portion of upper and lower panels of the very rare
original pictorial d.j. neatly trimmed and affixed to
upper and lower pastedowns. Light shelf wear, upper
hinge loose, lower hinge cracked. Contemporary ink
ownership inscription on front free endpaper, owner’s
blindstamp on title.
    First edition, cloth issue. $50.00

1658.   DOBIE, J. Frank (ed.). Tone the Bell Easy.
Austin: Texas Folk-Lore Society, 1932. 199 [1] pp.,
illustrations by Ben Carlton Mead and Tom Smith, printed
music. 8vo, later three-quarter maroon calf over white
cloth (bound by Dr. S. K. Stroud). A few leaves spotted
and a bit worn, generally very good.
    First edition. Publications of the Texas Folk-Lore
Society 10. Basic Texas Books 203:10. Cook 82. Dobie, p.
177 (citing J. Mason Brewer’s article “Juneteenth”):
“Outstanding as a collection of tales.” Dykes, Fifty
Great Western Illustrators (Mead 31): “Including the
first use of the Mead paisano drawing as official emblem
of the [Texas Folk-Lore] Society.” McVicker B15(a).
    In his introduction, JFD speaks of the Society’s
adoption of the roadrunner as its emblem and how this
came to be. Ruth Dodson’s excellent “Folk Curing among
the Mexicans” discusses various folk medicines of the
brush country and curandero Don Pedro Jaramillo (based
on contributions by J. T. Canales of Brownsville, and A.
T. Canales, of Premont, sons of the late Don Andrés
Canales, pioneer ranchman of the region where Don Pedro
lived). Jovita González in “Among My People” documents
customs   of  the   ranch  folk   of   the   Texas-Mexico
borderlands. JFD in “Mustang Gray: Fact, Tradition, and
Song” explores the swashbuckling adventures of San
Jacinto veteran M. B. (“Mustang”) Gray, including
evidence that Gray was a leader among the raiders who
beginning in 1839 preyed on Mexican ranches between the
Nueces and the Rio Grande. Gray and his men, who
attempted to establish the Republic of the Rio Grande,
“became known as ‘Cow-Boys’—thus not only contributing a
name to the men whose occupation was to make Texas
famous but also fixing on them a reputation that the
public at large has never forgotten.” $65.00

1659.   DOBIE, J. Frank, Mody C. Boatright & Harry H.
Ransom (eds.). Coyote Wisdom. Austin: Texas Folk-Lore
Society, [1938]. [2] 300 pp., text illustrations by Ben
Carlton Mead and others, printed music. 8vo, original
blue cloth over beige cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Publications of the Texas Folk-Lore
Society 14. Basic Texas Books 203:14. Dykes, Fifty Great
Western Illustrators (Mead 32). McVicker B29a. In
addition to coyote lore, this anthology includes ranch
folklore, such as Fannie E. Ratchford’s “Legend Making
on the Concho”; John Gould’s “Pie-Biter” (about Jim
Baker, Burk Burnett cow-camp cook who refused to be
hampered by the bonds of truth); etc. $150.00

1660.   DOBIE, J. Frank, Mody C. Boatright & Harry H.
Ransom (eds.). Mustangs and Cow Horses. Austin: Texas
Folk-Lore Society, 1940. xi [1] 429 pp., illustrations
by Russell, Lea, Bugbee, Santee, and others, map (modern
rendering of Stephen F. Austin’s map of Texas from
1829). 8vo, original maize cloth. Cover shelf-worn and
lightly stained, lower cover with a few abrasions), text
fine. From the library of Carl Hertzog, with his
bookplate, as well as the bookplate of W. S. Broome.
    First edition. Publications of the Texas Folk-Lore
Society 16. Basic Texas Books 203:16. Cook 89. Dobie, p.
40: “Tales about Texas-Mexican vaquero folk.” Dobie &
Dykes, 44 & 44 #19: “Richest assemblage of material on
range horses ever published.” Dykes, Fifty Great Western
Illustrators (Bugbee 68), (Dufault [James] 55), (Lea
145), (Santee 39), (Thomason 19); My Dobie Collection,
p. 9 (#9 on his rarities list): “Rare.... Add to the
Dobie fans seeking the book for its illustrations, the
horse book buffs and the range life collectors and,
pardon the pun, you have a hoss race anytime a copy
appears on the market.” Herd 705. McVicker B36a. One
Hundred Head Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 11. Yost &
Renner, Russell XVI:65. Four contributions by J. Frank
Dobie (“As Smart as a Cutting Horse,” “The Deathless
Pacing White Stallion,” “Pitching Horses and Panthers,”
“Cow Horse Names, Colors and Cures”).
    A few of the other first-rate contributions include:
Florence Fenley’s “The Mustanger Who Turned Mustang”;
Frank Collinson’s “Fifty Thousand Mustangs”; R. B.
Cunninghame Graham’s “The Horse of the Pampas”; Ruth
Dodson’s “Texas-Mexican Horse-Breaking”; W. H. Hudson’s
“Cristiano, A Sentinel Horse”; John A. Lomax’s “Peepy-
Jenny”; James K. Greer’s “Anti-Indian Horse”; Frank
Goodwyn’s “Ballad of Manuel Rodriguez”; Jovita González
de Mireles, “The Mescal-Drinking Horse”; and more.
    $125.00

1661.   [DOBIE,    J.   FRANK]. Dobie   at   Southwestern
University: The Beginnings of His Literary Career, 1906-
1911. Compiled and Edited by Judson S. Custer. Austin:
Jenkins Publishing Company, 1981. 87 pp., frontispiece
photograph of JFD, photographic illustrations (many
full-page). 8vo, original cream cloth. Very fine in
slightly rubbed d.j.
    First edition. Reprints early writings by or about
J.   Frank   Dobie    from  the Southwestern   University
Magazine, contains a bibliography of JFD manuscript
holdings at Southwestern, and presents an article on JFD
by Jeff Campbell entitled “Pancho at College—Toga or
Sombrero.” Includes young JFD’s “A Cow Drive” and “The
Buried Lariat.”      $35.00
1662.   [DOBIE, J. FRANK]. COOK, Spruill (comp.). J.
Frank Dobie Bibliography. [Waco: Texian Press, 1968]. x
[2] 64 pp., frontispiece, facsimiles of title pages.
8vo, original green cloth. Very fine in d.j.
    First edition, limited edition (#22 of 500 copies,
signed by Cook). Basic Texas Books B53. $50.00

1663.   [DOBIE, J. FRANK]. DANIEL, Price, Jr. Texas and
the West: Catalogue No. 24 Featuring the Writings of J.
Frank Dobie; A Contribution towards a Bibliography.
Waco: [Designed by Carl Hertzog for Price Daniel, Jr.,
1963]. [36] pp., frontispiece portrait of Dobie (by Tom
Lea),    text    illustrations    (including   photographic
portrait of JFD). 8vo, original terracotta cloth with
JFD symbolic roadrunner stamped in brown on upper cover.
Very fine. Scarce in the cloth limited edition.
    First edition, limited edition (#52 of 210 numbered
copies bound in cloth). Basic Texas Books B62: “One of
the earliest attempts at a Dobie checklist.” Dykes,
Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea 121); “Not in
Cook”   203.    Lowman,    Printer   at   the  Pass   159A.
Introductory material includes Lawrence Clark Powell’s
“Mr. Southwest” and Jeff C. Dykes’ “J. Frank Dobie and
His Books.” Handsome catalogue with good annotations.
    In    discussing    JFD’s   range   collection,   Dykes
comments: “Frank’s critical annotations and comments are
in many of his range books, and while the practice of
writing in books is frowned on by most dealers and
collectors, who among us would turn down one personally
annotated by a Dobie or a Webb or a Bedichek?” $50.00

1664.   [DOBIE, J. FRANK]. DANIEL, Price, Jr. Texas and
the West.... Waco: [Designed by Carl Hertzog for Price
Daniel, Jr., 1963]. [32] pp., text illustrations
(including photographic portrait of JFD). 8vo, original
brown illustrated wrappers with Tom Lea’s portrait of
Dobie. Very fine.
    First edition, wrappers issue. Lowman, Printer at
the Pass 159B. $35.00

1665.   [DOBIE, J. FRANK]. FRONTIER TIMES. “Southwestern
Author Is Honored,” in Frontier Times 8:6 (March 1931).
Pp. 242-246, photograph of Dobie, map (from Coronado’s
Children).    4to,   original   beige    wrappers   with
photographic illustration. Browned, with ink stamp of
W[alter] P[rescott] Webb on upper wrap and Dudley R.
Dobie’s pencil note.
    Reprinted from Dallas News. See also in this issue:
“Cattle Trail to Louisiana in 1866” as told by Judge Ed
Kone to T. U. Taylor (pp. 249-56, 273-77) and Harry
Williams, “Texas Cattle Trails” (pp. 279-81). Not in
Cook or McVicker. $20.00

1666.   [DOBIE, J. FRANK]. GADDIS, Isabel. Presentation
of the Isabel Gaddis Collection of J. Frank Dobie by Dr.
and Mrs. Charles N. Prothro. [Austin: Von Boeckmann-
Jones], 1970. [24] pp., frontispiece portrait of Dobie,
text illustrations. 8vo, original pale grey wrappers
with illustration of Dobie’s symbolic roadrunner. Mint
in original mailing envelope.
    First printing. Dykes, “Not in Cook” 241. Includes
an introduction on J. Frank Dobie and Isabel Gaddis,
along with photographs illustrating the collection.
    $15.00

1667.   [DOBIE, J. FRANK]. GEDDIE, Jack. “What Is a
Texan?” in The Cattleman 28:8 (January 1942). Pp. 28-29,
31, photograph of Dobie. 4to, original wrappers with
photographic illustration. Slight abrasion to edges of
wrappers, light foxing to first and last leaves,
otherwise very fine.
    First printing. Cook 245 (see also end of note to
Cook 383). Geddie pronounces JFD to be “an authentic
image of the Texas heritage” and includes a section
“Raised in Cow-Country.” At pp. 34-37 is C. E. Fisher’s
“Mesquite Eradication Studies at Spur, Texas” (using
sodium arsenic and lye). Great ads, including Flat Top
Ranch, Adair Ranch, Houston Fat Stock Show (with photo
of Gene Autry touting the world premiere of the Flying
“A” Ranch Rodeo). $20.00

1668.   [DOBIE, J. FRANK]. McVICKER, Mary Louise. The
Writings of J. Frank Dobie: A Bibliography. Lawton:
Museum of the Great Plains, [1968]. xv [1] 258 [2] pp.,
frontispiece   portrait,   text  illustrations   (mostly
photographic, some by Lea and Mead), facsimiles. 8vo,
original white cloth over brown cloth. Very fine in
publisher’s acetate d.j. and slipcase.
    First edition, limited edition (#487 of 500 copies,
signed by author). Basic Texas Books B132: “The best
bibliography so far.” Dykes, Fifty Great Western
Illustrators (Lea 194), (Mead 52). Introduction by Harry
H. Ransom. $75.00

1669.   [DOBIE, J. FRANK]. MOLYNEAUX, Peter. “A Vaquero
of the Brush Country: New Book Reveals That J. Frank
Dobie Is an Authentic Literary Artist,” in Texas Monthly
5:1 (January 1930). Pp. 7-23, photographic portrait of
Dobie. 8vo, original orange printed wrappers. Wrappers
lightly stained and chipped. Two ink stamps of Oscar
Dancy.
    Cook 278. This issue contains a fine portrait of JFD
and Peter Molyneaux’s review of Vaquero of the Brush
Country, concluding: “About the most genuine book about
cowboys and cow country ever written.” Also present is
T. J. Cauley, “Longhorns and Chicago Packers: Relation
of Texas Cattle to the Rise of the Packing Industry in
the Windy City.”   $25.00

1670.   [DOBIE,  J.   FRANK].   Photographs:  3   color
snapshots of Dobie and friends taken at Cactus Lodge,
John P. Barnes Ranch, December 5, 1946. Each photo
measures 8.3 x 11.1 cm, in envelope addressed to J.
Frank Dobie from Central Motor Company, Waco, Texas.
Faded, small tear on one photograph. Notes taped to
backs of photos with subjects and place listed. Address
on envelope (702 Park Place, Austin, Texas) marked
through with pencil and rerouted to General Delivery,
Kerrville, Texas.
    Photos are of: (1) L. L. (Tex) Colbert, “Pancho”
Allen, Joe N. Mitchell, John F. Barnes, Gen. Thomas
Hardin, and JFD; (2) L. L. (Tex) Colbert, John F.
Barnes, and JFD; (3) John Evans, Joe Baldwin, Herbert
Calhoun.   $75.00

1671.   [DOBIE, J. FRANK]. SLOAN, Dorothy–Books. The
Library of Dudley R. Dobie Part I: J. Frank Dobie
Collection. Austin: [Designed and Printed by David
Holman at Wind River Press for] Dorothy Sloan–Books,
1993.   [239]   pp.,   plates   (some   in   color),   text
illustrations. 8vo, original cream printed wrappers.
Fine copy.
    First    printing.    Exhaustive    (and    exhausting)
catalogue with 3,551 annotated entries and index,
documenting every facet of JFD’s literary output, from
manuscripts, autograph letters, and exceedingly rare
limited editions to copious listings of magazine
articles    and   newspaper    columns.    Also    includes
promotional materials and other ephemera, works about
JFD, and selected books and pamphlets from his library.
    $50.00

1672.   DODGE, Grenville M. The Indian Campaign of
Winter of 1864-65, Written in 1877, by Major General
Grenville M. Dodge, Read to the Colorado Commandery
Loyal Legion of the United States at Denver.... Denver,
1907. 20 [1] pp. 8vo, original grey printed wrappers,
stapled. Covers lightly browned at edges, otherwise
fine. Rare.
    First edition. Graff 1108. See Mattes, Platte River
Road Narratives 2006. Rader 1168. Wynar 1701. Dodge
reports stock rustling by Cheyenne, Ogallala, and Brule
Sioux and road ranches along the overland route from
Fort Leavenworth and Omaha. He records that some of the
action took place at the ranch of Old Jules (Jules Beni
or Bene, French-Canadian-Indian trader deprived of his
ears and executed by Jack Slade a few years before).
    Dodge declares: “I predict that if more troops are
not sent into this district immediately, this road will
be stripped of every ranch and white man on it.... What
we need are troops, supplies for them, and a vigorous
campaign against these hostile Indians. They must be put
on the defensive instead of us. No difficulty can arise
in finding them. Over 2,000 cattle accompany them” (p.
11).    $450.00

       Lithographed Views & Map of the Black Hills
1673.   DODGE, Richard Irving. Black Hills: A Minute
Description of the Routes, Scenery, Soil, Climate,
Timber, Gold, Geology, Zoology, Etc. with an Accurate
Map, Four Sectional Drawings, and Ten Plates from
Photographs, Taken on the Spot. New York: James Miller,
1876. 151 [1] [4, ads] pp., 10 tinted lithographic
plates (including frontispiece), 4 charts & profiles
(one folding & 2 colored), folding lithographed map (The
Black Hills of the Cheyenne Map of Exploring Surveys
made under the Direction of Lieut. Colonel R. L. Dodge,
23d. U.S. Infantry 1875, 55 x          36.8 cm,    scale:
approximately nine miles to one inch). 12mo, original
green cloth, sides and spine ruled and decorated in
black, spine gilt-lettered. Light shelf wear (slightly
more pronounced at spinal extremities), folding map torn
(two clean tears on one panel, no losses), mild to
moderate foxing near plates (mainly affecting blank
margins), overall a very good to fine copy, tight and
clean.
    First edition. Graff 1111. Howes D401. Jennewein,
Black Hills Booktrails 59: “Colonel Dodge, in charge of
the military escort for the Newton-Jenney party, quickly
capitalized on his venture. A good share of the book
concerns geology and resources.” This handsome color
plate book on the Black Hills was published hurriedly
after gold was discovered in the area, and before
Custer’s last fight. The work contains much on the
Dakotas, Wyoming, Montana, with discussion of gold,
miners, Native Americans, and routes. The attractive
plates include “Dodge’s Pass & Trouper’s Mount, W.T.,
the outer Rampart,” “From Harney’s Peak Looking South
East,” “Coldspring Cañon, W.T. in Red Beds,” “Devil’s
Tower, Distant View,” “Miner’s Stockade, French Creek,”
etc.
    The author frequently discusses the suitability of
the Black Hills for cattle ranching, states that the
Black Hills “are closed to settlers by virtue of a
treaty with the Indians,” predicts war, and notes
rustling and depredations by Native Americans: “This
summer several hundred head of valuable brood mares were
run off from the Laramie plains. The Indians from the
Agencies made no less than four pillaging expeditions to
the Loup this summer, and about the 1st of October, a
young man, peaceably herding cattle on Cottonwood Creek,
not far from the post of Fort Laramie, was set upon,
killed, scalped by a party of friendly Indians from the
Agencies. These facts, and many similar ones, are
perfectly known to the men who wish to settle the Black
Hills...” (pp. 139-40); “As a grazing country it cannot
be surpassed; and small stock-farms of fine cattle and
sheep cannot, I think fail of success” (p. 150). $300.00

1674.   DODGE, Richard Irving. The Black Hills....
Minneapolis: Ross & Haines, 1965. 151 [4, index] pp.,
frontispiece, color illustrations. 8vo, original grey
buckram. Very fine in slightly rubbed and price-clipped
d.j.
    Reprint of preceding. $45.00

1675.   DODGE, Richard Irving. The Hunting Grounds of
the Great West: A Description of the Plains, Game, and
Indians of the Great North American Desert.... With an
Introduction by William Blackmore. London: Chatto &
Windus,    1878.  lvii  [1]   448   pp.,   photographic
frontispiece portrait of author, 20 engraved plates,
folding lithographed map with partial and outline
coloring (Map of the Western States and Territories of
the United States Showing All the Existing Indian
Reservations and the Buffalo Range in 1830 and 1876,
21.7 x 31.5 cm). Thick 8vo, original red gilt-pictorial
cloth stamped in black. Moderate outer wear, book block
partially detached from binding, lower blank margins of
two preliminary leaves stained, a few old tape repairs
to map verso, text and plates clean and fine. Engraved
armorial bookplate of John George Fenwick and British
bookdealer’s small printed label on front pastedown.
    Second   English  edition  (first   English   edition
London, 1877; first American edition New York, 1877).
Campbell, p. 127: “The best part of the book is on the
bison. This information the author obtained in 1870 from
the buffalo hunter J. Wright Moar, when he visited Fort
Dodge.”    Dobie,  p.   151:  “Outstanding    survey   of
outstanding wild creatures.” Graff 1113n. Howes D404.
    Though primarily a survey of Native American culture
in the Great Plains and Rockies, we include this book
here for its excellent material on buffalo and wild
cattle. J. Frank Dobie cited this work extensively in
his Longhorns for its chapter on “Wild Cattle,” which is
mostly concerned with Texas longhorns. Dodge believes
that buffalo and wild cattle can be cross-bred, but only
when the buffalo cow is the mother of the mule. One of
the plates depicts Native Americans rustling livestock.
    $100.00

1676.   DODGE, Richard Irving. Our Wild Indians: Thirty-
Three Years’ Personal Experience among the Red Men of
the Great West.... Hartford: A. D. Worthington & Co.,
1882. 653 pp., 25 plates (engraved frontispiece portrait
of author after photograph by Brady; engraved plate of
portraits   of  Generals   Crook,  Miles,   Custer,  and
Mackenzie; 6 chromolithographs of Native American
artifacts; 17 engravings of scenes and events). Thick
8vo, original three-quarter leather over marbled boards.
Binding rubbed, spine dry, very light ink stamps on
front pastedown, front hinge cracked (but strong),
overall a very good copy, plates excellent.
    First edition. Introduction by Gen. W. T. Sherman,
in which he describes the book as “the best description
extant   of  the   habits,  manners,   customs,  usages,
ceremonies, etc., of the American Indian, as he now is.”
Bennett, American Nineteenth-Century Color Plate Books,
p. 34: “Minutely and beautifully drawn.” Campbell, p.
114. Eberstadt 104:81. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of
the Plains and the Rockies 137. Graff 1114. Howes D403.
Larned 628. Luther, High Spots of Custer 120: “Suggests
that possibly Custer committed suicide.”
    McCracken, 101, p. 26: “According to Eberstadt,
Dodge spent an extended period among the Plains Indians.
During this time he was able to make many firsthand
observations in regard to ‘their character and customs.’
In his introduction to the book, Dodge states he
compared many of his observations with those of leaders
in the field—Catlin, Schoolcraft, etc.—and where his
observations differed from theirs, relied on the Indians
themselves.” Pilling 1060. Rader 1172. Raines, p. 68:
“The Texas Indians come in for a share of treatment, and
some incidents occur in Texas.” Rosenstock 516. Saunders
2143. Smith 2496. Tate, The Indians of Texas 2777:
“Views the western tribes as depraved and barbaric, but
includes considerable information on Southern Plains
tribes.”
    Ranching material is found throughout, including
“Texas Cow-Boys” and “Stealing a Herd of Cattle”
(chapter 47); Buffalo Bill; Native American stock
(chapter 46 “Domestic Animals” includes a section on
“Indian Stockbreeders”); stock rustling (especially
chapter 42, “A Race of Thieves and Plunderers”);
horsemanship (good coverage of Native American equipage
and methods of making saddles, lasso, etc.); etc.
    $250.00

1677.   DODGE, Richard Irving. Our Wild Indians....
Hartford: A. D. Worthington & Co., 1884. 653 pp., 25
plates (engraved frontispiece portrait of author after
photograph by Brady; engraved portraits of Generals
Crook, Miles, Custer, and Mackenzie; 6 chromolithographs
of Native American artifacts; 17 engravings). 8vo,
original brown gilt decorated cloth. Slight shelf wear,
spine slightly faded, front hinge cracked, small
contemporary purple ownership stamp on title and
preliminary page, overall a very good to fine copy,
plates excellent.
    Early reprint. Some of the reprints did not include
the color plates, but they are present in this copy.
    $125.00

1678.   DODGE,   Ruby   McGill.  Reynolds   Presbyterian
Academy and College. Belton: Peter Hansborough Bell
Press, 1960. [14] 128 [4] 16 [1] pp., frontispiece
portrait, photographs, illustrations. 8vo, original tan
cloth. Light shelf wear, ink notations to text,
otherwise a fine copy. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his
bookplate.
    First edition. Not in CBC. This scarce local history
is an unusual source for social history and education in
the cattle country. The foreword is by Rupert N.
Richardson, well-known historian(see Herd 188-90). Noted
Scotch-Irish   cattleman   and  judge,  John   Alexander
Matthews, (Handbook of Texas Online: John Alexander
Matthews) founded the Reynolds Presbyterian Academy,
located in the ranch country of Albany, Texas. Matthews
was the head of the celebrated Reynolds-Matthews clan of
Interwoven fame (see Reese, Six Score 78 and Handbook of
Texas Online: John Alexander Matthews & Sallie Ann
Matthews Reynolds).    $40.00

              Curandero of the Brush Country
1679.   DODSON,     Ruth.    Don    Pedrito   Jaramillo,
“Curandero.” San Antonio: Casa Editorial Lozano, [1934].
159 pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original green
cloth with red lettering and ruling. Text browned (due
to the acidic paper on which it was printed), small
closed tear (2.5 cm) at lower portion of gutter on title
page, otherwise fine. Signed by the author at Mathis,
Texas. A Borderlands rarity.
    First edition. Dobie (p. 70) and Borderlands
Sourcebook (p. 332) both list only the 1951 reprint by
the Texas Folk-Lore Society. A classic in the field of
folklore and native medicine documenting the life and
work of Pedro Jaramillo (1829?-1907), the legendary
curandero, whose medicines and remedies were used by
five generations and whose shrine in Falfurrias at
Rancho Los Olmos is still visited by the faithful today.
The University of New Mexico website on Jaramillo refers
to him as “perhaps the most famous curandero of all
time, known as “The Saint of Falfurrias (Texas)”
<http://www.unm.edu/~cheo/DonPedrito.htm>   and  he   is
discussed in Chapter 35 of Andrés Saénz’s Early Tejano
Ranching in Duval County published by the Institute of
Texan Cultures.
    “Don Pedrito...was born of Tarascan Indian parents
near Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, in the mid-nineteenth
century. He moved to South Texas as a young man in 1881
and settled on the Los Olmos Ranch.... At that time the
only doctor between Corpus Christi and Laredo lived in
San Diego; therefore, Don Pedrito’s powers were often
sought. At first he treated only close neighbors, but
soon he began visiting ranches throughout the region
between the Nueces River and the Rio Grande. Dressed as
a Mexican peasant, wearing heavy shoes, a sombrero, and
a cowboy vest, he either walked or rode a donkey on his
healing missions.... He constantly received money
through the mail in the form of donations, usually in
the amount of fifty cents or a dollar. He made generous
donations to several area churches and to the constant
stream of poor people visiting his ranch. He bought food
in wagonloads and kept his storeroom well stocked. More
than $5,000 in fifty-cent pieces was found at his home
when he died. Don Pedrito never married, but he adopted
two boys. He died on July 3, 1907, and was buried in the
old ranch cemetery near Falfurrias. His resting place
has become a shrine and is visited by several hundred
persons yearly.” (Handbook    of   Texas   Online:   Pedro
Jaramillo). $750.00

1680.   DOMÍNGUEZ, Francisco Atanasio. The Missions of
New Mexico, 1776: A Description.... Translated and
Annotated by Eleanor B. Adams and Fray Angelico Chávez.
Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, [1956]. xxi
[1] 387 pp., tipped-in color frontispiece, maps, text
illustrations. 4to, original beige pictorial linen. Very
fine in near fine d.j. (minor marginal chipping). Laid
in is a related offprint article, “Paging Procrustes” by
Roland F. Dickey.
    First edition. Father Domínguez was Commissary
Visitor to the Franciscan missions of New Mexico. The
present work is his travel journal, beginning on March
1, 1776, with departure from El Paso. He spent the next
fourteen months touring and documenting his observations
for an official report and wrote private letters to his
superior as well.
    Domínguez’    provides   a    description   of   the
establishments of New Mexico (including Isleta), with
good   documentation   on  cattle    and  sheep  grazing
operations: favorable pasturage at Laguna and Taos
(noting that Comanche sometimes share pasturage at
Taos); introduction of cattle at various missions;
Apache depredations against cattle at Carnué leading to
abandonment of the area; 1681 López expedition to Texas
which involved converting 1,490 head of cattle into
silver for buying wine, wax, etc.
    The editors comment on the use of the word “rancho”
in Spanish New Mexico: “It might be misleading to
translate rancho as ranch in view of the present
association of the word in the United States with large
establishment for grazing and breeding horses, cattle,
or sheep. The rancho was a hut, or group of huts,
outside the settlement used by farmers and herdsmen, or
by extension, a very modest farm or hacienda. The term
originally referred to a mess, usually a military one,
and to the tents or huts used for the lodging of
soldiers.” $150.00

1681.   DONALDSON,   Thomas   C.   Idaho   of   Yesterday.
Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1941. 406 pp., frontispiece
portrait, plates (photographic and vintage prints). 8vo,
original green pictorial cloth. Light shelf wear,
otherwise fine in price-clipped d.j. (marginal chipping
and two 2.5-cm sections missing from head and foot of
d.j. spine).
    First edition of a foundation stone of Idaho
history; this work was edited and compiled by the
author’s son, Thomas Blaine Donaldson, in 1903, after
his father’s death. Guns 613. Smith 2508. Donaldson
(1843-1898), historian and government official, has left
us an excellent firsthand, inside accounts of early
Idaho, with good material on establishment of the
Territory, biographies of pioneers, politics, stage
lines, vigilantes, outlaws, Native Americans, social and
business history, mining, agriculture, and ranching.
Donaldson discusses establishment of the first ranches
in the Territory in 1869 and provides biographical
information on some of the early stock raisers.
    The   author   gives   insights   into   the   special
challenges of ranching in Idaho: problems with hostile
Native Americans, limited markets in Idaho, arid
climate, and the lack of adequate transportation
facilities until the coming of the railroad. “The
railroad enabled the individual cattle ranchers to
market beef in Omaha and Chicago. Prior to this date,
the capitalists or wealthy ranchers bought up small
bunches of cattle, placed them in immense herds, and
drove them to the nearest shipping points: viz.,
Winnemucca, Nevada, or Kelton, Utah, for the San
Francisco market; or Ogden, Utah, for the Eastern
market. A cattle drive was expensive not alone because
herders and horses were scarce, but also because of the
scarcity of water made it hazardous to trail range-
fattened stock through a desert” (p. 22).
    Lamar (Reader’s Encyclopedia of the American West,
pp. 314-15) refers to Donaldson’s massive The Public
Domain: Its History, with Statistics (Washington, 1881 &
1884) as “the vade mecum of western historians” and
“indispensable to students of the history of the West.”
Donaldson had an intimate knowledge of and strong
official influence on the realm of public lands and
their use. Stockmen, miners, and lumbermen who wanted
special favors or their violations overlooked often
exerted pressure on Donaldson.    $50.00

              Native American Stock Raising
1682.   [DONALDSON, Thomas C. (ed.)]. UNITED STATES.
INTERIOR DEPARTMENT. CENSUS BUREAU. Report on Indians
Taxed and Indians Not Taxed in the United States (except
Alaska) at the Eleventh Census: 1890. Washington: GPO,
1894. vii [1] 683 pp., 203 chromolithograped, engraved,
and photographic plates (some folding, 20 colored, 25
uncolored, 158 photographic), 25 maps (some folding
and/or colored), text illustrations. Large, thick 4to,
original black cloth. The massive binding is worn (small
splits at top joints) and the heavy text is a bit loose,
otherwise very fine, the plates and maps superb. Ink
ownership signature on title. Despite the few flaws,
this is the best copy we have seen of this book that is
difficult to locate in collector’s condition. Not only
is the book far too heavy for one volume, but also it is
a book that people understandably used and read.
    First edition. Graff 4396. Howes D418. McCracken,
101, p. 47: “Prior to 1850 Indians were not included in
the United States Census. By 1890 the census included
Indians living both on and off of the reservations, as
well as those who had ‘abandoned their tribal relations
and became citizens.’ This beautifully illustrated
volume enumerates the Indian population in every
imaginable category [and] contains a wealth of the sort
of statistical information that only the government can
produce.” This massive state-by-state survey includes a
mine of detailed information and statistics on stock
raising among Native American tribes. The accompanying
iconography offers excellent exhibit potential, such as
Julian Scott’s colored lithograph “Issue Day, Indians
Running Beef before Killing.—Kiowa, Comanche, and
Wichita, and Oklahoma, 1890” and photograph by W. R.
Cross “South Dakota. Issuing Beef Cattle to the Sioux at
Rosebud Agency.” The chromolithographs are by Julian
Scott, Gilbert W. Gaul, Peter Moran, Henry Rankin Poore,
and Walter Shirlaw. Photographers include Muybridge,
Cantwell, T. H. Sullivan, and W. H. Jackson.
    One plate of special interest is Scott’s colored
portrait of noted Comanche leader Quanah Parker, who not
only was a prominent rancher, but also influenced
ranching history after his tribe settled on the Kiowa-
Comanche    reservation   in    southwestern   Oklahoma.
“Economically, Parker promoted the creation of a
ranching industry and led the way by becoming a
successful and quite wealthy stock raiser himself. He
also supported agreements with white ranchers allowing
them to lease grazing lands within the Comanche
reservation” (Handbook of Texas Online: Quanah Parker).
The print of Quanah Parker by Julian Scott is listed in
Tyler, Unpublished Typescript on Texas Lithographs of
the Nineteenth Century.   $2,000.00

1683.   DONNELLY,  Thomas   C.  (ed.).   Rocky  Mountain
Politics. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press,
[1940]. vi [2] 304 pp., text maps. 8vo, original navy
blue cloth. Very fine in d.j. with minor chipping and a
some light staining.
    First edition. Herd 715. Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 21:
“Introductory chapter discussing geography, people,
economic picture, voting habits of the region. Gives an
excellent general history and survey of the state as a
background for its politics.” Paher, Nevada 488.
Saunders 4043. State-by-state review of Utah, Colorado,
Nevada, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, and
Arizona, with sheep and cattle discussed in sections on
economy.    $30.00
1684.   DONNELLY,  Thomas  C.  (ed.).  Rocky  Mountain
Politics. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press,
[1940]. Another copy. Very fine, d.j. not present.
    $25.00

1685.   DONOHO, M[ilford] H[ill]. Circle-Dot: A True
Story of Cowboy Life Forty Years Ago. Topeka: Crane,
1907. 256 pp., photographic frontispiece by Kansas
photographer R. B. Hansford. 8vo, original red cloth
stamped in gilt and black (title and a dot within a
circle). Exceptionally fine, bright, and tight.
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:111. Graff 1129. Guns
614: “Material on some of the outlaws of the Indian
Territory, and the gunmen of Dodge City.” Herd 716:
“Scarce.” Howes D427. Rader 1174.
    History interwoven with rustic dialogue, written by
a cowboy about a ranch located in west-central Texas,
with descriptions of raising cattle, roundups, trail
drives to Abilene in the 1870s, Comanche raids, Texas
fever, and the hardships and joys of cowboy life. The
heroine, Edna, takes over the family Circle-Dot Ranch
after her father is killed in the Civil War and becomes
known as “Circle-Dot, the Cattle Queen.” There was an
actual ranch in Texas named Circle-Dot (Frank Collinson
worked at the Circle-Dot at one time).
    From the preface: “The Author was a cowboy...and is
thoroughly conversant with every phase of cowboy life.
After the lapse of many years, some of the most pleasant
recollections engraved on the tablets of his memory are
of   the   open   plains, the   wild   cattle,  and  the
irresistible cowboy.... To portray this wild, active and
strenuous life, and to give an accurate pen-picture of
this past and forgotten industry, is the mission of
Circle-Dot.”    $125.00

1686.   DOTEN, Alfred. The Journals of Alfred Doten,
1849-1903. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1973. xx
[2] 808 + [6] 809-1,575 + [6] 1,577-2,381 pp.,
frontispiece portrait, plates, maps, illustrations. 3
vols., 8vo, original tan buckram gilt. Very fine in
publisher’s slipcase.
    First edition of one of the most valuable sources on
the social history of the American West. Edited by
Walter Van Tilburg Clark. Kurutz, The California Gold
Rush 201: “Throughout, Doten provides amazingly detailed
descriptions of life in the Mother Lode.”
    “Feisty Alf Doten is Nevada’s premier diarist. No
less than 55 of his rambunctious years are recorded in
79 leather bound journals containing more than 20,000
entries and about 3-1/2 million words.... The final
entry was penned just before his death in Carson City in
November 1903.... Noted novelist Walter Van Tilburg
Clark devoted massive amounts of time in digging into
archives from Plymouth to San Francisco to make certain
what Doten meant.... Starting as a carpenter, [Doten]
became a rancher and miner in California’s Sierra.... In
1865 he began a 39 year journalistic career—first with
Virginia City’s Daily Union, and then after 1867 at the
Gold Hill Daily News where he became editor-owner in
1872. Under Doten, the News became Nevada’s leading
political and mining journal.... He was also a horse
breaker, a surgeon’s assistant, a musical entertainer, a
politician,   mining    expert,   lime-burner,   hunter,
fisherman, insurance salesman and vigilante—truly an Alf
of all trades. Of unusual social historic interest is
Doten’s coverage of the Comstock after 1878” (Paher,
Nevada 491).   $100.00

1687.   DOTY, Sile. The Life of Sile Doty 1800-1876: A
Forgotten Autobiography. The Most Noted Thief and Daring
Burglar of His Time.... [Detroit]: Alved of Detroit,
Inc.,   1948.  x   [4]  288   pp.,   frontispiece,  text
illustrations. 8vo, original black cloth. Fine in near
fine d.j. (minor wear and a few chips).
    Modern reprint of the rare first edition (Toledo,
1880), which Ramon Adams states is scarce “owing to the
fact that the subject’s family succeeded in destroying
many copies of it” (Guns 462). Howes C556: “A predatory
profession, practised chiefly in Michigan, Indiana and
Ohio, and told of with gusto by the old rogue at
seventy-five;   his   horrified   family  succeeded   in
destroying many copies.” Not in Garrett, The Mexican-
American War. Compiled by J. G. W. Colburn, with an
introduction by Randolph G. Adams.
    Doty led a gang which specialized in cattle rustling
and horse theft. When the Mexican-American War broke
out, Doty was pardoned of his crimes and lit out for
Mexico with a team of stolen horses. Finding army life
not to his taste, Doty arranged a rumor of his death and
plundered in Mexico, alternately in U.S. or Mexican
uniform. When the Mexicans were about to surrender
formally, Doty felt sorry for General Scott, who was
poorly mounted, and immediately remedied the situation
by stealing the finest Mexican charger and equestrian
equipage he could find. General Scott proudly rode to
the surrender conference on his splendid new steed.
    $50.00

       Photographs of Cowboy Life by L. A. Huffman
1688.   DOUBLEDAY, Russell. Cattle Ranch to College: The
True Tale of a Boy’s Adventures in the Far West. New
York: Doubleday & McClure Company, 1899. xii [4] 347
pp., pictorial title printed in red and black,
photographic frontispiece, photographic plates of cowboy
life, numerous marginal and text illustrations (by Janet
MacDonald and Ernest Seton Thompson). 8vo, original dark
blue pictorial cloth stamped in green, white, and black
(cowboy on a rearing horse), spine lettered and
decorated in gilt. Light shelf wear, hinges starting,
otherwise fine.
    First edition, with 1899 on title and no ads. Herd
717: “Scarce.” The author describes a boyhood on a
working cattle ranch in the Dakota region in the 1870s,
complementing   the   text   with   superb   unattributed
documentary photographs of day-to-day ranch life. Some,
or perhaps all, of the photographs are the work L. A.
Huffman, pioneer Montana photographer. “The Huffman
pictures constitute one of the finest pictorial records
of life on the western frontier” (Thrapp II, pp. 688-
89).
    From author’s preface: “This is a true tale of a
boy’s life in the West twenty-five years ago. It is an
account of his amusements, his trials, his work, his
play. The incidents described actually happened and are
described substantially as ‘the boy’ [John Worth]
related them to the writer.” $75.00

1689.   DOUBLEDAY, Russell. Cattle Ranch to College....
New York: Doubleday & McClure Company, 1899. [2, half-
title with ad on verso] iii-xii [4] 347 [1] [1, ad] pp.,
pictorial title printed in red and black, frontispiece,
photographic plates of cowboy life, numerous marginal
and text illustrations (by Janet MacDonald and Ernest
Seton Thompson). 8vo, original dark blue pictorial cloth
stamped in green, white, and black (cowboy on a horse),
spine lettered and decorated in gilt. Light shelf wear
and moderately rubbed, interior very fine.
    First edition, early reprint, with date of 1899
retained on title but with added advertisement on half-
title for H. H. Lewis’s A Gunner aboard the “Yankee” and
page of publisher’s ads at end. The rear ad refers to
the book as a “6th Thousand” printing and declares: “The
immediate success of this book was to be expected from
its unique attractiveness.”   $30.00

1690.   DOUGAL, William H. Off for California: The
Letters, Log, and Sketches of William H. Dougal, Gold
Rush Artist.... Oakland: Biobooks, 1949. vi [2] 62 [3]
pp., illustrated title page in color, photographic
portrait of author, plates of original drawings (one
folding). Oblong small folio, original blue moiré cloth
decorated   in   gilt.  Upper  corners   bumped,   slight
offsetting to endpapers, otherwise very fine.
    First   edition,   limited  edition   (600   copies).
California Centennial Editions 22; edited by Frank M.
Stanger, foreword by Joseph A. Sullivan. Mintz, The
Trail 545. Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 202:
“Trained as an engraver, Dougal arrived in California on
November 22, 1849. This handsome publication reproduces
his sketches of scenes in present-day San Mateo County;
Mission Dolores, and San Francisco, including a superb
panorama from Nob Hill.... Dougal later did the
engraving work for Cadwalader Ringgold’s ‘Series of
Charts with Sailing Directions, State of California.’”
Rocq 13296.
    The illustration of the Sánchez Rancho in 1850 has a
caption beneath: “This dilapidated-looking adobe house,
which would now be on the Mills Estate at Millbrae, had
been headquarters of the famous 15,000-acre Rancho Buri
Buri, and the home of its founder and owner, José
Sánchez.... Few of the early travelers down the
Peninsula failed to stop at the ‘Sánchez Ranch’ for a
brief rest, perhaps a meal or a night’s lodging, or at
least a drink from the creek for their thirsty horses.”
Also present is a sketch of Angelo’s Ranch, and Dougal’s
journal refers to the Whisman Ranch, among others.
    $50.00

1691.   DOUGLAS, C. L. Cattle Kings of Texas. Dallas:
Cecil Baugh, [1939]. xiv [2] 376 pp., frontispiece
photograph, text illustrations (including photographs,
some full-page, by Erwin E. Smith, W. D. Smithers, et
al.), brands, map, pictorial endpapers. 8vo, original
tan pictorial cloth stamped in brown. Endpapers and
adjacent leaves browned, otherwise very fine in fine
d.j. with Smith photo on back panel.
    First edition, second printing. Loring Campbell, My
Favorite 101 Books about the Cattle Industry 31. Dykes,
Western High Spots, p. 103 (“The Texas Ranch Today”).
Guns 619. Herd 719: “First appeared serially in The
Cattleman magazine.... Short histories of some of the
famous Texas ranches and their owners.” Howes D434.
    This standard work on Texas cattle kings is filled
with   wonderful   illustrations,    including  valuable
documentary photos, reproductions of vintage prints, and
lively text illustrations. Douglas maintains that Cortez
as one of the first cattle kings of America, and
includes a chapter on Marin de León (subtitled in
contents as “Spanish Rancheros Cleared Way for American
Stockmen”). All of the big names are here (Shanghai
Pierce, Samuel Maverick, King & Kenedy, et al.), along
with some of the lesser lights.   $100.00

1692.   DOUGLAS, C. L. Famous Texas Feuds. Dallas:
Turner Co., [1936]. v [3] 173 pp., frontispiece, plates
(mostly photographic portraits). 8vo, original half red
cloth over black cloth embossed with leaf pattern, upper
cover with gilt-stamped pistol (placed 5 cm from top
edge of binding). Occasional mild to moderate foxing,
gilt lettering on spine flecked, otherwise fine, in the
uncommon d.j. (slight marginal chipping and mild dust-
soiling to rear panel).
    First edition. Dykes, Kid 236: “Discusses the effect
of lawlessness in New Mexico on law enforcement in West
Texas.” Guns 620. Many of the famous feuds of early
Texas, such as the Taylor-Sutton Feud, centered around
cattle, and ownership of same. In his chapter on the
Mason County War, Douglas states: “There was once a time
in Texas when the charge of cattle theft was a weapon
just as handy and just as deadly as the pistol and the
rifle” (p. 147).   $100.00

1693.   DOUGLAS, C. L. Famous Texas Feuds. Dallas:
Turner Co., [1936]. Another copy, variant binding. 8vo,
original half red cloth over black cloth with linen
texture, upper cover with gilt-stamped pistol (placed 5
cm from top edge of binding). Binding lightly flecked,
otherwise fine in near fine d.j. with a bit of minor
chipping. $75.00

1694.   DOUGLAS, C. L. Famous Texas Feuds. Dallas:
Turner Co., [1936]. Another copy, variant binding. 8vo,
original maroon cloth over smooth black cloth, upper
cover with gilt-stamped pistol (placed 10 cm from top
edge of binding). Spine sunned, otherwise fine, d.j. not
present. Bookplate of Western author Helen Giffen.
    $75.00

1695.   DOUGLAS, C. L. Famous Texas Feuds. Dallas:
Turner Co., [1936]. Another copy, variant binding. 8vo,
original terracotta cloth lettered in black. Slight
shelf wear, otherwise fine, d.j. not present.   $50.00

1696.   DOUGLAS, C. L. The Gentlemen in the White Hats:
Dramatic Episodes in the History of the Texas Rangers.
Dallas: South-West Press, [1934]. vii [1] 205 pp.,
frontispiece,    plates   (some    photographic),   text
illustrations (some full-page and/or, photographic).
8vo, original maroon cloth. Mild foxing adjacent to
plates, otherwise fine in the rare d.j. (a few chips and
closed tears).
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:112. Guns 621. Mohr,
The Range Country 685. Many of these gripping Ranger
tales revolve around cattle and horse thieves and border
skirmishes in the cattle country, with the familiar cast
of characters, including John R. Hughes, Bill McDonald,
L. H. McNelly, Dan W. Roberts, Juan Cortina, Quanah
Parker, et al. $125.00

1697.   DOUGLAS, William O. Farewell to Texas: A
Vanishing Wilderness. New York: McGraw-Hill, [1967]. xi
[3]   242   pp.,  color  photographic   frontispiece  of
bluebonnets, text illustrations (line drawings, some
full or double-page, by Pete Parnell). 8vo, original
blue cloth with illustration of longhorns. Very fine in
fine d.j.
    First edition. American Wilderness Series 1 (Justice
Douglas is general editor). Feisty Supreme Court Justice
Douglas, an early environmentalist and ecologist,
passionately discusses Texas’ wilderness areas from the
viewpoint of a concerned environmentalist. When the
author begins by referring to stockmen as “modern
Ahabs,” the reader realizes that a different perspective
on ranching will be offered.
    Douglas notes the effects of various ranching
practices:   eradication  of   predators  (“Dr.   Burton
Warnock...taught me that the stockmen were often the
villains, while the predator they curse was the hero”);
overgrazing (“The truth is that, while [Big Bend] is
good country for light grazing, it is so fragile it
cannot withstand the heavy use which it receives.... The
time may come when the present owners and their bankers
will want to be ‘bailed out.’ It is probably only then
that the land can be put to its highest use—
recreation”); barbed wire (“With fences there was now a
method of rotating cattle so that one pasture could rest
while others were being grazed. But these fences,
although of conservational value, were a matter of
concern to botanists...for they changed radically the
flora native to the region.... Cattle cause a reduction
in species; goats are much more severe; but sheep
practically obliterate flowers, leaving only shrubs and
grass.... Cattle were followed by sheep and goats, and
sheep and goats by desert”); branding (“Branding is
somewhat disappearing due to fencing and the elimination
of the open range, partly because brands reduce the
value of the hide and add an operational cost”); demise
of the rugged, hardy longhorn except as a hobby to keep
the species alive (“The Longhorn is like the buffalo—all
the meat is up front and the public wants the steaks
that come from the rear end”); and more. $50.00

1698.   DOUTHITT, Katherine Christian (ed.). Romance and
Dim Trails: A History of Clay County. Dallas: William T.
Tardy,   1938.   [14]   280   pp.,   frontispiece,  text
illustrations (mostly photographic, many full-page),
cattle brands, endpaper maps. 8vo, original red cloth.
Fine in d.j. (slight wear, a few small chips and tears).
Errata slip tipped onto title page. Very scarce.
    First edition. CBC 952. Guns 616. Herd 718. This
excellent history of Clay County near the Texas-Oklahoma
border contains a wealth of material on ranching
history: firsthand narratives by men and women pioneers,
biographies   (with   photos)  of   early  settlers  and
ranchers, a list of brands and ranches, trail drives to
Indian Territory (most of the beef supplied to the
reservations came from Texas), strong social and women’s
history, and fascinating arcana (such as a photo of “The
Man Who Claims to be The Real Jesse James”).
    The biographical section leads off with William
Susan (“Sude”) Ikard (1847-1934), one of the noteworthy
Texas cattlemen (see Handbook of Texas Online: William
Susan Ikard). After serving in the Confederacy with Sul
Ross, Ikard entered the cattle business in 1865 by
rounding up cattle in Parker County and began to make
trail drives up the Chisholm Trail as early as 1867. In
1871 Ikard secured range rights and moved near the
buffalo hunting center that later became Clay County,
where he built a log cabin with a buffalo-hide roof,
organized Henrietta and Clay County, acquired the first
of his grandiose ranches (the 20,000-acre V Bar Ranch),
and drove immense herds to Indian Territory.
    Other biographies include the exciting lives of Newt
Jones of Archer City (cowboy, trail herder, and Texas
Ranger in the Frontier Battalion) and T. N. Patterson
(“a top cow hand” on various ranches in Texas and Indian
Territory, early trail driver, rustler fighter, and
rancher). Most of the early settlers of Clay County were
stock raisers, and the county seat, Henrietta, was one
of the old cowtowns and a gathering point for buffalo
hunters.
    In a chapter on how Henrietta became county seat,
the author tells a funny story that captures the spirit
of Clay County: “Tradition says that Henrietta received
papers for county organization, but [the neighboring
settlement of] Cambridge spirited them away. Then the
cowboys took a hand in the county’s history. One night
the   ‘Punchers’    [Henrietta   faction]   decided  the
‘Pinheads’ [Cambridge faction] had held the honor of
county seat long enough. Here stories differ somewhat,
but it is agreed that the cowboys roped the safe
containing the county records and files and dragged it
to Henrietta. One version reported that the whole
courthouse was roped and dragged part of the way, but it
became too cumbersome; so they turned it over and cut a
hole in the floor taking only the safe. There had
already been fist-fights between the rivals; but after
this there were pitched battles, and several men were
killed. At last, an election was ordered. The cowboys
again entered the contest spiritedly, rounding up every
man between Fort Worth and the staked Plains, and won
the election. The cattlemen refused to allow the cowboys
such a victory, however, and a horse race was arranged
to decide the issue” (pp. 14-15). $500.00

1699.   DOWNEY, Stephen W[heeler]. The Trans-Missouri
Country: Its Characteristics, Capabilities, and Probable
Destiny. An Address Delivered at Laramie City, Wyoming
Territory.... New York: L. H. Bigelow & Co., 1872. 21
pp. 12mo, original green printed wrappers, sewn.
Wrappers with mild to moderate soiling and slight
marginal chipping at top edge of upper wrapper,
otherwise a fine copy.
    First edition of an early Wyoming promotional. Not
in Eberstadt, Graff, Howes, etc. In the most lofty terms
imaginable, Downey exhorts settlement in the West,
particularly the Trans-Missouri region: “With our gold
and silver mines, our mountains of iron, our vast
deposits of coal, with a million and a half acres of
grass-land in the LARAMIE Plains alone, where countless
herds of cattle and innumerable flocks of sheep may roam
and grow fat, with two noble streams penetrating to our
vast forests of spruce, balsam, and yellow pine, and
which forms a channel of communication by which means
millions of feet of timber can be annually run down to
our great national highway, the Union Pacific Railroad,
you can judge what must be the progress and advancement
of the LARAMIE Plains in the next decade” (p. 13).
    See Annals of Wyoming indices for more on Downey,
who wrote several promotionals touting Wyoming, such as
the rare Prospectus of the Wyoming Central Land and
Improvement   Company   (St.  Louis,   1884),   “written
primarily to induce cattle interests to the state,
especially to Albany and Carbon counties” Herd 723). For
two other Wyoming promotionals by Downey, consult
Stopka, Wyoming Territorial Imprints (1880.4 & 1885.3).
    $375.00

1700.   DRAGO, Harry Sinclair. Great American Cattle
Trails: The Story of the Old Cow Paths of the East and
Longhorn Highways of the Plains. New York: Dodd, Mead, &
Co., [1965]. xii [2] 274 pp., photographic plates, maps,
endpaper illustrations by Lorence F. Bjorklund. 8vo,
original grey cloth. Spine slightly abraded, otherwise
fine in slightly worn but fine d.j. with Bjorklund
illustration.
    First    edition.  Dykes,    Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Bjorklund 32). Guns 624. A history of the
American cattle trail, in all its various forms—from
Spanish introduction of cattle to American Colonial
market paths to the major drives of the 1880s. Drago
(1888-1980), one of the most prolific writers in
American history, authored about a hundred novels under
the pseudonyms of Bliss Lomax, Kirk Deming, Will Ermine,
Stewart Cross, J. Wesley Putnam, Grant Sinclair, and
Peter Field. He also made it big in Hollywood as a film
writer for Tom Mix and Buck Jones. “After 1960 he was a
major contributor to American’s written record of the
West, writing such well-known books as...Great American
Cattle Trails” (Lamar, pp. 320-21).   $35.00

1701.   DRAGO, Harry Sinclair. Outlaws On Horseback: The
History of the Organized Bands of Bank and Train Robbers
Who Terrorized the Prairie Towns of Missouri, Kansas,
Indian Territory, and Oklahoma for Half a Century. New
York: Dodd, Mead & Co., [1964]. xxxiv [1] 320 pp.,
photographic plates, map, endpaper illustrations by
Lorence F. Bjorklund. 8vo, original crimson morocco
stamped in gilt, t.e.g. Very fine in publisher’s
glassine d.j. and black board slipcase with printed
paper label illustrated by Bjorklund.
    First edition, limited edition (#89 of 150 signed
copies).   Dykes,  Fifty   Great   Western  Illustrators
(Bjorklund 32). Guns 626: “I am glad to see more and
more writers, this author among them, correcting some of
the false legends that have been plaguing historians for
many years.” Though this book primarily focuses on
outlaws engaged in robbing banks and trains, there is a
veritable who’s who of western outlaws covered here—Cole
Younger, Frank and Jesse James, Belle Star, and others.
Many of the outlaws on horseback honed their skills
punching cattle before moving to the seemingly greener
pasture of outlawry. Drago does not neglect our distaff
delinquents, including juicy material on the real father
of Belle Starr’s first child and deflating the legend of
the Rose of Cimarron. $100.00

1702.   DRAGO, Harry Sinclair. Wild, Woolly, and Wicked:
The History of the Kansas Cowtowns and the Texas Cattle
Trade. New York: Clarkson N. Potter, [1960]. viii [2]
354 pp., endpaper maps. 8vo, original brown cloth. Very
fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:114. Guns 629: “This
book does much to debunk some of the nonsense written
about the Earps.” This is the story of the cattle boom
towns, dusty villages that sprung up around the cattle
trade—Dodge City, Abilene, Wichita, and others. This
book, which was Drago’s first historical work, won the
Buffalo Award for best Western book of the year. $40.00

1703.   DRAPER, W[illia]m R. Exciting Adventures along
the Indian Frontier: A Reporter’s Experiences in the Red
Man’s Territory and in the Old Cherokee Strip during the
Nineties. Girard, Kansas: Haldeman-Julius Publications,
[1946]. 32 pp. 8vo, original orange printed wrappers.
Text less browned than usually found in the pulpy,
popular offerings of the Haldeman-Julius publishing
factory. Very fine.
    First edition. Guns 632. The author recounts his
experiences as a reporter in the Cherokee Strip, an area
of the Indian Territory that by the treaty of 1866 had
been set aside as the communal property of the Five
Civilized Tribes. The tribes were bullied or brainwashed
into selling the Strip for $1.25 an acre as pressures of
settlers and rancher increased. The author and his
family participated in the September 16, 1893, land race
and settled at Blackwell, where he became a printer’s
devil and friends with Osage “cowboy-printer” Red Eagle.
The two interviewed Quanah Parker, Geronimo, and other
such   tribal  notables.   Draper   includes   peripheral
information on Anglo and tribal stock raising.    $35.00

1704.   DRESDEN, Donald. The Marquis de Mores: Emperor
of the Bad Lands. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press,
[1970]. xi [1] 282 pp., photographic plates. 8vo,
original red cloth. Very fine in fine d.j. with
illustration of the Marquis after an 1886 photograph.
Signed by author.
    First edition. This book records one of the more
exotic episodes in the history of the Western cow
business. Dashing French nobleman Antoine Amédée-Marie-
Vincent Manca de Vallambrosa, the Marquis de Mores
(1858-1896), arrived on the American scene with about
three million dollars in 1883. Among his far-flung
enterprises was a 45,000-acre spread on the Dakota
range, complete with a grand château of almost thirty
rooms and twenty servants, where he roistered with Teddy
Roosevelt and held court over the Badlands social scene
with his bride Medora. However, his three trials for the
murder of a man who ambushed him were the highlight of
his sojourn in the West.
    As a cattle baron, the Marquis was a spectacular
disaster, and by 1889, he retreated back to his native
France, where he got tangled up in the nasty anti-
Semitic politics of the Dreyfus era. The feckless French
entrepreneur    met  his   death   at   the   hands   of
anticolonialist Arab murderers in North Africa. This
complex man left his mark on both the Dakotas and French
politics. $50.00.

1705.   DRIGGS, B. W. History of Teton Valley, Idaho.
Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1926. 227 pp., frontispiece
photo of the Tetons, photographic plates. 8vo, original
grey gilt-lettered boards. A fine copy, signed by noted
Wyoming historian and feminist educator Grace Raymond
Hebard, with a few of her notations in pencil, and her
printed book label.
    First edition. Flake 3010. Guns 635: “Has a chapter
on outlawry.” Herd 725: “Scarce.” Smith 2578. This well-
illustrated regional history contains information on
early ranching in the Valley, biographies of stock
raisers, accounts of rustling by Anglos and Native
Americans (see especially the chapters “Outlawry” and
“Sheep Depredations”), potential of the valley for stock
raising, and some unusual fugitive history (e.g., “When
Wilson, Pratt, and Driggs decided to locate here, they
shipped a half dozen thoroughbred Holstein bulls in, but
they did not survive long, as the old settlers and other
beef-producing stockmen claimed they interfered with
their beef stock, and shot the Holsteins on the range”
(p. 155). Excellent social history, with much on area
women. $300.00

1706.   DRIGGS, B. W. History of Teton Valley, Idaho.
Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1926. Another copy. Slightly
worn at extremities, otherwise fine. $250.00

1707.   DRIGGS, Howard R. The Old West Speaks. Englewood
Cliffs: Prentice-Hall [1956]. 220 pp., 37 color plates
from watercolor paintings by William Henry Jackson,
photographic illustrations by Jackson and others. Small
folio, original brown cloth over tan mottled cloth. Very
fine in fine d.j. with Jackson illustration in color.
    First edition. Herd 726. In the chapter entitled
“Longhorns and Shorthorns” the author discusses the
cattle and sheep trade in the American West (Howard
Egan’s 1855 drive of 1,500 shorthorn cattle from Utah to
the California Gold fields; Antonio José Luna’s 1849
drive of 25,000 sheep from New Mexico to California;
Captain James Cook’s brush-popping longhorns with
Mexican vaqueros for Slaughter; legendary 1866 Oliver-
Loving trail drive; etc.). Among the illustrations is a
color plate of W. H. Jackson’s painting of Texas
longhorns being driven over the Chisholm Trail. $50.00

1708.   DRIGGS, Howard R. The Pony Express Goes Through:
An American Saga Told by Its Heroes. New York: Frederick
A. Stokes Company, 1935. xvi, 208 pp., frontispiece,
maps, illustrations by William H. Jackson (some in
color), endpaper maps. 8vo, original green cloth gilt.
Errata tipped in. Very fine in fine d.j. (price-
clipped), with Jackson illustration in color.
    First edition. Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 3. Paher,
Nevada 508: “There are excerpts from newspapers of the
day and descriptions of pony riders personally known by
the author.” The author includes information on Western
showman Buffalo Bill Cody, who was a Pony Express rider
in his youth. $50.00

1709.   DRIGGS, Howard R. Timpanogos Town: Story of Old
Battle Creek and Pleasant Grove, Utah. [Manchester, New
Hampshire: The Clarke Press, 1948]. [10] 102 pp., color
frontispiece, numerous photographic plates (portraits
and vintage photos), folding plan, text illustrations by
J. Rulon Hales. Fine in d.j. (rubbed and lightly soiled
on back panel).
    First edition. Not in Flake. A history of Old Battle
Creek and Pleasant Grove, Utah. Though the focus of the
book is on the general history of the town and pioneers
(including handcart overlanders), ranching and Ute
rustling are often in the background. The chapter
“Indian Stories” contains an account of “impetuous
cowboys” who chase two peaceful Ute (Curly and Blind
Pete). The latter was named thus because of being
blinded as a result of the cowboys’ attack. $150.00
1710.   DRIGGS,    Howard    R.   Westward   America,   with
Reproductions of Forty Water Color Paintings by William
H.   Jackson.    New    York:   American    Pioneer   Trails
Association, [1942]. [ii] [2, signed limitation leaf]
iii-x   [2]   312    pp.,   40   color   plates   (including
frontispiece) of Jackson’s watercolor paintings with
printed captions on tissue guards. Small folio, original
light grey cloth with embossed gilt seal of the American
Pioneer Trail Association on upper cover, t.e.g.
Pastedowns slightly foxed, else very fine in decorative
board slip case. Laid in is Jackson’s colored map:
Trails of the Old West.
    First edition, “Author’s Autograph Edition,” signed
by Howard R. Driggs and William H. Jackson, printed on
Strathmore all-rag wove paper (#194 of 500 copies).
Campbell, p. 105. Guns 636 (citing the “Trails
Edition”). Herd 727 (citing the “Trails Edition”).
Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 22: “Brief sketches and stories
of places along the Oregon Trail.” Saunders 2869:
“Pictorial history of the development of the West
including material on the Santa Fe Trail.” Smith 2579.
    Presented are outstanding events of Western history
from firsthand sources: old trappers’ rendezvous,
establishment of trading and army posts along pioneer
trails, John Sutter, Gold Rush, handcart companies,
Comstock, Pony Express, overland stage, transcontinental
telegraph and railroad, cattle trails and cowboys, etc.
    One of the color plates is Jackson’s watercolor
painting of Texas longhorns being driven over the
Chisholm Trail. “Jackson (1843-1942), survey artist,
illustrator,    important    pioneer   photographer,   [and]
author, travelled overland by wagon train to California
in 1866.... From 1870-1878 Jackson was the official
photographer for the Hayden Survey of Territories,
making the first photographs of Yellowstone Park in
1871.... From 1879 to 1894 he was in business as
photographer and publisher in Denver, following which he
was on assignment for Harper’s photographing around the
world.... When he was 93 he painted a series of Western
scenes [these paintings are the ones illustrated in the
present work] for the Department of the Interior”
(Samuels, Encyclopedia of Artists of the American West,
pp. 248-49).   $200.00

1711.   DRIGGS,   Howard   R.   Westward   America,   with
Reproductions of Forty Water Color Paintings by William
H.   Jackson.   New   York:    American   Pioneer   Trails
Association, [1942]. x [2] 312 pp., 40 color plates
(including frontispiece), color folding map laid in.
4to, original olive green cloth gilt, top edges stained
orange. Very fine in fine d.j. Signed by Driggs and
Jackson on half sheet tipped in between half-title and
frontispiece. Laid in is Jackson’s colored map Trails of
the Old West.
    First   edition,   “Collectors   Edition,”  with the
autographs of Driggs and Jackson. $150.00

1712.   DRIGGS,   Howard  R.   Westward  America,   with
Reproductions of Forty Water Color Paintings by William
H.   Jackson.   New   York:   American  Pioneer   Trails
Association, [1942]. x [2] 312 pp., 40 color plates
(including frontispiece). Another copy of “Collectors
Edition,” without Jackson’s map laid in, but with the
half sheet bearing autographs of Driggs and Jackson.
Very fine in fine d.j. $150.00

1713.   DRIGGS,   Howard  R.   Westward  America,   with
Reproductions of Forty Water Color Paintings by William
H.   Jackson.   New   York:  American   Pioneer   Trails
Association, [1942]. x [2] 312 pp., 40 color plates
(including frontispiece). Another copy of “Collector’s
Edition,” without Jackson’s map laid in or the half
sheet bearing autographs of Driggs and Jackson. Very
fine in slightly chipped d.j. $60.00

1714.   DRIGGS,  Howard  R.   Westward   America,  with
Reproductions of Forty Water Color Paintings by William
H.   Jackson.   New   York:  American   Pioneer   Trails
Association [G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1942]. x [2] 312 pp.,
40 color plates (including frontispiece). 4to, original
terracotta cloth gilt, top edges stained dark blue. Fine
in d.j. (slightly chipped at extremities). Signed by
author and illustrator.
    First edition, “Pioneers Edition,” with half sheet
bearing autographs of Driggs and Jackson tipped in
between half-title and frontispiece. $125.00

1715.   DRIGGS,  Howard   R.   Westward  America,   with
Reproductions of Forty Water Color Paintings by William
H. Jackson. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, [1942]. x [2]
312 pp., 40 color plates (including frontispiece). Small
folio, original brown cloth, top edges stained orange.
Fine in d.j. (lightly chipped at extremities). Folding
colored map by Jackson laid in. From the library of
scholar Margaret A. Long, signed on front free endpaper
and her notes in back. Laid in are Long’s additional
typed notes and a review of the book from the New York
Herald Tribute citing the book as “the best of all the
picture books about the West” and praising Jackson’s
paintings as revealing “not only a high degree of
artistry but historical fidelity and a feeling for the
West that no other watercolorist of our time possesses.”
    $75.00

1716.   DRIGGS, Howard R. & Sarah S. King. Rise of the
Lone Star: A Story of Texas Told by Its Pioneers. New
York: Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1936. xvii [1] 438
pp., 8 color plates (including frontispiece) and text
line drawings by Edwin W. Deming. 8vo, original blue
cloth. Light outer wear, mild staining to rear
endpapers, otherwise fine. Ownership signature in pencil
on front free endpaper.
    First    edition.   Dykes,   Fifty    Great   Western
Illustrators    (Deming  39).  This    volume   primarily
comprises an account of Anglos who settled Texas, the
road to independence, the Republic era, and early
statehood, along with individual chapters on unusual
Texans, such as captive Buckelew (see Item 686 in Part I
of this catalogue). There is a section on cowboys and
ranchers (Goodnight, King, et al.). The chapter on Big
Foot Wallace relates problems with Apache and other
rustlers. The latter section of the book contains good
material on Roosevelt’s “Rough Riders”: “It was the
proved fighting qualities of Texans that led Theodore
Roosevelt at the outset of the Spanish-American War to
organize his ‘Rough Riders’ in that State. His call
brought together a force of cowboys and rangers and
others trained in the wide open spaces of the whole
West, but in a large measure they were boys from Texas”—
p. 412). Driggs includes a droll story about Roosevelt
and a Uvalde cowboy who joined the Rough Riders and
extols the generous spirit of the first Texas cowboy he
ever met. $35.00

1717.   DRIGGS, Howard R. [& Ezra Meeker]. Covered-Wagon
Centennial and Ox-Team Days. Oregon Trail Memorial
Edition, 29 December 1931 [with]: Ox-Team Days. New
York: World Book Company for Oregon Trail Memorial
Association, [1931?]. x, 156; [4] 318 pp., frontispiece
portrait   of   Ezra  Meeker,   text  illustrations  and
photographs by William H. Jackson, and others. 2 works
in one vol., 8vo, original black pictorial cloth. Light
shelf wear, but generally fine.
    “Oregon Trail Memorial Edition.” Edited by Arthur W.
Procter. Mintz, The Trail 330n (citing second work):
“The first printing was in October, 1916.... The book
was later reprinted with title variations. This is an
account of the author’s trip across the plains in 1906
with an ox team at the age of twenty-two, and of the
retracing of the trail in 1906 with an ox team at the
age of seventy-six.”
    The book includes material on ranches and ranchers
along the Oregon Trail. Of all the overland trails, the
Oregon Trail remained in use the longest, in its latter
years serving as the eastward route to Omaha and Kansas
for cattle and sheep drives. At various stops along the
historical retracing of the trail in 1931, pageants were
held, such as one in North Dakota with a cast of “a
thousand characters, scores of horses, seven bands,
patrols and chanters, Indians, ranchers, cowboys, and
cattle kings, with a caravan of covered wagons.” The
Laramie pageant featuring “a rodeo staged by cowboys,
and cowgirls added to the thrill.” The many wonderful
photos include Oliver Applegate, Ezra Meeker (one shows
ninety-something-year-old ox-team pioneer of 1852 in an
airplane), and William Henry Jackson (the latter with
text describing the pioneer artist-photographer as “a
bullwhacker and a vaquero” who traversed the old Western
trails).   $75.00

1718.   DRISCOLL, R. E. Seventy Years of Banking in the
Black Hills. [Rapid City, South Dakota: Gate City Guide,
1948]. 87 pp., frontispiece (photographic portrait).
8vo, original stiff brown pictorial wrappers. Fine.
    First edition. Guns 637. Herd 728: “Chapter on
livestock in the Black Hills.” Jennewein, Black Hills
Booktrails 161: “An excellent summary in a field in
which not much has been written.” $45.00

1719.   DRURY,  Clifford   Merrill.  Elkanah   and  Mary
Walker: Pioneers among the Spokanes. Caldwell: The
Caxton Printers, 1940. 283 pp., frontispiece portrait,
plates, endpaper maps. 8vo, original blue gilt-pictorial
cloth. Fine in near fine d.j. (a few minor chips, price-
clipped).
    First edition. Smith 2588. See Tweney, Washington
89. Occasional material documenting the Hudson’s Bay
Company monopoly on beef, such as Father Eells’ critical
description of the pioneer Oregon missionaries’ diet:
“The beef neither chewed the cud nor parted the hoof. It
was made out of the Indian pony. Cattle were very
scarce. The Hudson’s Bay Company owned all in the
country, except what the missionaries had brought.
Neither love nor money could procure one from the
company” (p. 122). $50.00

1720.   DRURY, Clifford M[errill]. Marcus and Narcissa
Whitman and the Opening of Old Oregon. Glendale: The
Arthur H. Clark Company, 1973. 476 + 435 pp., color
frontispieces (portrait of Marcus and Narcissa Whitman
after    sketches   by    Paul   Kane), full-page    text
illustrations, maps. 2 vols., 8vo, original blue cloth,
spine gilt. Light shelf wear to spines, otherwise a very
fine set.
    First edition. Northwest Historical Series 10 & 11.
Clark & Brunet 68: “Dr. Drury considered this two-volume
work   his    culminating    study   of the    Protestant
missionaries in Oregon. In comparison with his Marcus
Whitman, M.D. [see next entry] this is a greatly
expanded and entirely new work. A product of 40 years of
study, Drury wove his extensive knowledge of primary
source material into a detailed narrative which is
heavily footnoted and documented.” Smith S176.
    Included is documentation on the formation of the
Willamette Cattle Company, the Hudson’s Bay Company
attempt to hold its monopoly on cattle, and the famous
1837 purchase and drive of 800 head of cattle and forty
horses from California to the Willamette Valley. “The
success of the cattle drive of 1837 opened a new era in
Oregon’s history. It made the settlers, as far as cattle
were concerned, independent of the Company’s strangle-
hold on a basic element in Oregon economy” (p. 283).
    $150.00

1721.   DRURY, Clifford Merrill. Marcus Whitman, M.D.,
Pioneer and Martyr. Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1937. 473
pp., frontispiece, plates, endpaper maps. 8vo, original
full gilt-pictorial padded navy blue leather, t.e.g.
Minor shelf wear, otherwise very fine.
    First edition, limited edition (#12 of 15 signed
copies in full leather, in an edition of 500). Smith
2590. Tweney, Washington 89 #16: “There have been a
number of biographies of Marcus Whitman.... However, the
late Dr. Drury spent almost an entire lifetime in the
study of the Whitmans, their mission, and their
associates. One of Dr. Drury’s better works, and
probably among the best of biographies of Dr. Whitman.”
    Drury gives information on the Hudson’s Bay Company
monopoly on cattle, the missionaries’ vicissitudes with
their attempt to keep their little herd intact, and how
the pioneers were forced to eat “horseflesh” instead of
beef for five years.   $150.00

1722.   DRURY, Clifford Merrill. Marcus Whitman, M.D.,
Pioneer and Martyr. Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1937. 473
pp., frontispiece, plates, endpaper maps. 8vo, original
gilt-pictorial blue cloth. Ink ownership signature on
verso of frontispiece, otherwise fine and bright.
    First edition, limited edition (#80 of 500 signed
copies).    $75.00

1723.   DRURY, Clifford Merrill. Marcus Whitman, M.D.,
Pioneer and Martyr. Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1937. 473
pp., frontispiece, plates, endpaper maps. 8vo, original
gilt-pictorial blue cloth. Fine in chipped d.j.
    First trade edition. $40.00

1724.   DUBOIS, John Van Deusen. Campaigns in the West
1856-1861: The Journal and Letters of Colonel John Van
Deusen DuBois.... Edited by George P. Hammond. Tucson [&
San Francisco: Grabhorn Press for] Arizona Pioneers
Historical Society, 1949. xii [2] 120 [4] pp., 16 plates
of pencil sketches by Joseph Heger, folding map,
decorative chapter-titles, margin notes in red. Folio,
original red leather over red, brown, and white
decorated boards, black leather spine label. Very fine.
    First edition, limited edition (#155 of 300 copies,
signed by editor). Eberstadt 127:161: “Superlative on-
the-spot drawings, including forts and Indian battle
scenes.... One of the most beautiful western books ever
published [and] one of the more important. DuBois
participated in the major campaigns in New Mexico,
Arizona, Colorado, and Utah and his journals and letters
here are published for the first time. The drawings of
artist Heger, made during the course of the campaigns,
are of the first order and add much to the value of the
book.” Heller & Magee 481. Howes D521. Wallace, Arizona
History VI:42.
    Dubois provides some interesting details on the
types of problems that military expeditions sometimes
encountered with the large herds that accompanied their
treks. In relating his participation in the Marcy-Loring
military expedition sent to Utah by President Buchanan
in 1857-1858 to depose Brigham Young, Dubois describes a
devastating blizzard high on the Platte-Arkansas divide,
at Black Squirrel Creek. The 250-foot corral constructed
of tree trunks and brush to hold the large herd
disintegrated in the devastating winds: “All our stock
had stampeded. Nothing was left in camp.... All day it
snowed.... We could not sleep it was so cold. We drank
four quarts of liquor during the day when we were in the
snow without feeling any effect.” The expedition lost
350 sheep, forty mules, twelve cattle, and ten horses
(to say nothing of the two Mexican vaqueros frozen to
death). Of the stampeded livestock, 260 mules and sixty-
three cattle were later found and returned by the
herders.
    The expedition remained in camp for two days to
recuperate the remaining 1,200 animals, then took the
muddy trail north. The expedition made a short side trip
to Rayado in northern New Mexico where rancher Lucien
Maxwell followed the tradition of magnanimous ranch
hospitality, inviting the men to a series of parties
called bailes. “Women were plenty & quite pretty,” wrote
Dubois. “We had a gay enough time in spite of ten inches
of snow which fell yesterday.” The final baile ended
with a typical ranch feast of ox ribs and tortillas. The
dinner lasted until 3 o’clock in the morning. Six hours
later Dubois and his companions were back in the saddle
and en route to Fort Bridger. $550.00
1725.   DUFF, Katharyn. Abilene on Catclaw Creek: A
Profile of a West Texas Town. [Abilene]: The Reporter
Publishing Company, 1970. xi [1] 298 pp., photographic
plates (including Pine Street in the 1880s “when cowboys
were still shooting up the town”). 8vo, original light
brown pictorial cloth. Fore-edges and endpapers foxed,
otherwise fine in d.j.
    First edition, second printing. A history of
Abilene, encompassing its beginnings as a waypoint on
the Texas and Pacific railroad and its role as a cattle
town in the heart of the open-range longhorn country.
Among the early regional ranchers and ranches covered
are Clabe and John Merchant of Callahan with brand “74”;
J. C. McCord of Coleman County; J. W. Carter and Dock
Grounds Y-Y Ranch and Dunn-Gholson of Shackelford County
(by 1874); John Simpson and the Hashknife outfit of
Cedar Creek; and many more.   $30.00

1726.   DUFFUS, Robert Luther. The Santa Fe Trail.
London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1930. ix [3] 283 pp.,
frontispiece plate (from Gregg’s Commerce of the
Prairies), plates, maps, illustrations, endpaper maps.
8vo, original navy decorative cloth gilt. Very fine,
bright copy in very fine d.j. (scarce in d.j.). Signed
by author. Bookplate.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 192. Dobie, pp. 75-76,
78: “Best book of this century on the subject.” Dykes,
Western High Spots, p. 12 (“Western Movement—Its
Literature”). Flake 3027. Rittenhouse 177: “A standard
work about the SFT.... It was the first such major work
to follow that of Inman (1897) and is still used
widely.” Saunders 2871. Tate, Indians of Texas 2216n.
    The primary focus is the pioneer era of the Santa Fe
Trail, when cattle interest was for the most part
limited to the teams hauling the wagons across the
prairies and the lone dairy cow trudging stoically
behind. However, the author includes material on Lucien
Maxwell’s 1,700,000-acre lordly ranch and Maxwell and
Kit Carson’s 1853 sheep drive (over 10,000 head) from
New Mexico to California to supply the California gold
mines. The final chapters include information and some
statistics on the trail drives and the range cattle
industry that transformed the region. $100.00

1727.   DUFFUS, Robert Luther. The Santa Fe      Trail.
London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1930. Another    copy.
Light shelf wear and a few mild stains to        cover,
Otherwise fine and bright. Historian Margaret    Long’s
copy, with her notes in the book and research    papers
laid in.    $50.00

1728.   DUFFUS, Robert Luther. The Santa Fe Trail.
London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1930. Another copy.
Slight shelf wear, generally fine and bright, d.j. not
present.    $40.00

1729.   DUKE, Cordia Sloan & Joe B. Frantz. 6,000 Miles
of Fence: Life on the XIT Ranch of Texas. Austin:
University of Texas Press, [1961]. xxii [4] 231 pp.,
frontispiece (photographic portrait of R. L. “Bob”
Duke), photographic plates (some by E. J. Cameron),
maps. 8vo, original tan pictorial cloth. Very fine in
fine d.j.
    First edition. The M. K. Brown Range Life Series 1.
Basic Texas Books 82n: “An old cowhand told Haley that
his book viewed the XIT through the eyes of its owners,
and that Lewis Nordyke’s Cattle Empire (NY: Morrow,
1949) viewed it through the eyes of the managers and
foremen. This left the story from the viewpoint of the
cowhand still to be told. This gap has been amply filled
by [the present work] which combines the recollections
of some 80 XIT cowhands in order ‘to let the cowboy tell
the story of his workaday world as he saw it, stripped
of the false heroics.’” CBC 121 and 7 additional
entries. King, Women on the Cattle Trail and in the
Roundup, p. 15: “Personal accounts of life on the XIT
Ranch include a few women’s experiences.” Winegarten I,
p. 109.
    Cordia Duke was the wife of the last XIT general
manager to run cattle, and she provides good coverage of
the XIT women and social history. The “E. J. Cameron” to
whom some of the Montana photographs are attributed is
undoubtedly the noted pioneer woman photographer Evelyn
Jephson Cameron (b. England 1868-d. Montana, 1915),
whose photographs and diaries provide one of the most
detailed records extant of life on the Great Plains.
    $50.00

1730.   DUKE, Cordia Sloan & Joe B. Frantz. 6,000 Miles
of Fence: Life on the XIT Ranch of Texas. Austin:
University of Texas Press, [1961]. xxii [4] 231 pp.,
frontispiece portrait of R. L. “Bob” Duke, photographic
plates, maps. 8vo, original tan pictorial cloth. Very
fine in fine d.j. Signed by authors, with University of
Texas Press catalogue of Western Americana title list
(with illustrated wrappers by Tom Lea) laid in.
    Second printing.   $40.00

1731.   DUKE, Cordia Sloan & Joe B. Frantz. 6,000 Miles
of Fence: Life on the XIT Ranch of Texas. Austin:
University of Texas Press, [1961]. Another copy. Fine in
d.j., with presentation inscription by Frantz on front
free endpaper. $30.00

1732.   DUKE, Cordia Sloan & Joe B. Frantz. Printed
broadside with quotation from the authors’ 6,000 Miles
of Fence: Life on the XIT Ranch of Texas, with
illustration by H. D. Bugbee. [Austin]: N. Furqueron at
the Press of W. Thomas Taylor for the Book Club of
Texas, 1994. 43 x 28 cm. Very fine.
    First printing, limited (425 copies). Designed by N.
Furqueron as the annual broadside of the Book Club of
Texas. $35.00

1733.   DUMKE, Glenn S. The Boom of the Eighties in
Southern California. San Marino: [Ward Ritchie Press at
Los Angeles for] Huntington Library, 1944. xi [1] 313
pp.,   frontispiece   portraits,  photographic    plates,
endpaper maps. 8vo, original half light green cloth over
beige boards. Fine in near fine d.j.
    First edition. Huntington Library Publications.
Mohr,   The   Range  Country   666.   Powell,   Land   of
Fact...Southern California 10: “There is no madder
decade in the history of Southern California.... For
nearly half a century Dumke’s book has remained
unchallenged as the classic interpretation of the 1887
Southern California land boom.” Rocq 16241.
    In some ways, this is the opposite of the typical
cattle country book. While many books trace the rise of
the cattle culture, herein lies the tale of the passing
of the California rancho to vineyards, citrus groves,
and     megalopolis    sprawl.    “Despite     successful
establishment    of  settlements   at   El   Monte,   San
Bernardino, and Anaheim, southern California made little
appeal to prospective colonists until drought and
bankruptcy, completing the ruin of the cattle industry,
brought about the subdivision of many of the large
ranchos.... By 1872 Southern California’s transition
from Mexican cattle frontier to American commonwealth
was almost completed” (pp. 8-9). $40.00

1734.   DUNCAN, Bob. Buffalo Country. New York: E. P.
Dutton & Co., 1959. 256 pp., text illustrations by
author. 8vo, original half terracotta cloth over beige
decorative boards. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Before the Indo-European domesticated
cow became one of the enduring symbols of the American
West, the plains were dominated by buffalo. The story of
that shaggy creature is told here, from first contact
with Spanish explorers to the final days of the mass
slaughter. Includes a final chapter on breeding buffalo
with cattle—cattalo.   $25.00

1735.  DUNCAN, C. A. Memories of Early Days in the
Cache la Poudre Valley. Timnath, Colorado: The Columbine
Club of Timnath, [1925]. 57 pp., one photographic
illustration. 16mo, original green and brown mottled
cloth, silver lettering on upper cover. Fine. Scarce.
    First edition. Wynar 337. The author’s family
history in Colorado includes an account of the first
settlers in Timnath and Windsor, early development of
the area (including early cattle enterprises and
ranchers); outlaws like cattle trader Tom Burris who had
a sideline of stealing horses; “Some Horse Stories,”
etc.
    In the account of the first school in the Fort
Collins region (1868), the author comments: “The school
house stood out on the open range and often range cattle
would be in the vicinity. It was dangerous for anyone to
go near them on foot as the cattle were very likely to
attack them. Children who came to school on foot were
obliged to wait at the school if range cattle were
around until someone came for them on horseback or drove
the cattle away. One day my sister wore a red dress to
school and when the closing time came she thought there
were no range cattle among the milk cows which were
nearby and started home. She had only gone a short
distance when one of the cows charged towards her. She
ran back to the school and got to the door just in time
to escape the cow’s horns. The teacher had to take off
his coat and put it on her to cover the dress before it
was safe to take her the half mile to her home.” $150.00

1736.   DUNHAM, Dick & Vivian Dunham. Our Strip of Land:
A History of Daggett County, Utah. N.p., n.d. (ca.
1947). vi, 102 pp. 8vo, original stiff yellow printed
wrappers, stapled (as issued). Very fine.
    First edition. Guns 648: “History of Brown’s Hole
with a great deal of material on the outlaws of that
section and the activities of Butch Cassidy’s Wild Bunch
and others. Also tells about some of the exploits of Tom
Horn.”
    This rambling and often rambunctious account of
early life in northeast Utah contains good information
on local ranches and ranchers. Chapter X (“Robin Hood in
Brown’s Park” [Butch Cassidy]) describes the transition
in the 1890s from semi-nomadic ranching to the more
settled state of ranching-farming and the resulting
conflicts between small ranchers, rustlers, big cattle
outfits, and the sheep ranchers. Butch got his start
stealing horses and rustling cattle, but “he never stole
from the outfit he was working for, and to hire him was
a cheap form of insurance” (p. 56). Modern ranching and
rodeo are well covered, too. $35.00

1737.   DUNHAM, Dick & Vivian Dunham. Our Strip of   Land:
A History of Daggett County, Utah. [Manila,          Utah:
Daggett County Lions Club, 1947]. vi, 102 pp.         8vo,
original stiff yellow printed wrappers, stapled.      Very
fine.
    First edition, second printing.   $25.00

1738.   DUNHAM, N. J. A History of Jerauld County, South
Dakota, from the Earliest Settlement to January 1st,
1909. Wessington Springs, South Dakota, 1910. 441 [1]
[9,   index]   pp.,   frontispiece,    photographic  text
illustrations (many full-page). 8vo, original brown
cloth. Light shelf wear and a few spots to covers,
otherwise fine.
    First edition. This dense chronicle of South Dakota
local   history   contains   much   social   history  and
incidental information on various ranching outfits in
the region: Parkhurst Ranch, Martin Ranch, pioneer
cattlemen L. A. Pinard, Frank and Will Eagle (photograph
accompanies text), and others; 1898 influx of large
steers for grazing on the Alpena range; 1905 dipping and
quarantine program to stamp out an unnamed cattle
disease; introduction of barbed wire (fourteen head of
cattle killed by lightning at one stroke as they walked
along a wire fence during a storm); and more.
    Dunham remarks: “When the author started out to
gather the material for this history, he began to learn
to ride a bicycle” (pp. 349 et seq.). He tells of his
cycling adventures, including how a bridge washed out
and he was forced to lift his bicycle over the fence
into Eagle Ranch pasture: “I...had to spend considerable
time in repeatedly driving off the herd of cattle in the
pasture. The wheel so aroused their curiosity and they
seemed determined to examine it too closely. It was in
that same pasture that Peter Wieland had trouble, in
1885, with a large bunch of curious cattle...” (p. 365).
    $150.00

1739.   DUNIWAY, Abigail Scott. From the West to the
West: Across the Plains to Oregon. Chicago: McClurg,
1905. 311 [6, ads] pp., colored frontispiece. 8vo,
original tan pictorial cloth. Some staining, but
generally very good. Author’s signed presentation copy.
    First edition. Smith 2639. See Mattes, Platte River
Road Narratives 1161 & Plains & Rockies IV:323 for more
on the author. A composite of “memory and imagination,”
this overland-ranching-feminist novel is based on the
author’s own arduous 2,500-mile overland in a train of
covered wagons to Pacific Northwest in 1852. The latter
chapters are set on the idyllic Ranch of the Whispering
Firs in the Oregon country. One of the main characters
is a strong-willed woman physician.
    Duniway    (1834-1915),   Oregon   pioneer,   newspaper
editor, and suffrage leader, was perhaps the most
politically significant woman of her time in the Pacific
Northwest. She became vitally interested in women’s
property rights and woman suffrage, established the
Oregon Equal Rights Society in 1870, and in 1871 managed
Susan B. Anthony’s first lecture tour in the West. In
1887 she relocated to Southern Idaho where her family
ran a livestock operation. When the suffrage amendment
finally passed in Oregon in 1912, Duniway wrote the
suffrage    proclamation    and   became   Oregon’s   first
registered woman voter. See Notable American Women (I,
pp. 531-33) and Myres, Westering Women and the Frontier
Experience (pp. 225-30). $100.00

1740.   DUNLOP,   Richard.   Great   Trails   of   the   West.
Nashville & New York: Abingdon Press, [1971]. 320 pp.,
numerous text illustrations (mostly photographic), maps,
endpaper maps. Large 8vo, original cream linen. Fine in
near fine d.j.
    First edition. Smith S182. Includes chapters on the
trails that cattle drives used (Chisholm, Oregon Trail,
Applegate Road, Mullan Road, etc.).  $15.00

1741.   DUNN, J. B. (Red) John. The Perilous Trails of
Texas. Dallas: Published for the Author by the Southwest
Press, [1932]. ix [1] 163 pp., frontispiece portrait,
plates. 8vo, original green cloth lettered in red. Some
light discoloration to binding, occasional foxing or
browning (particularly adjacent to plates), overall very
good, mostly unopened, in the scarce pictorial d.j.
    First edition. CBC 3545. Dykes, Western High Spots,
p.118 (“Ranger Reading”). Guns 650: “Scarce.... Deals
with lawlessness on the Mexican border.” Herd 732. Howes
D578. Rader 1241. Dunn (1851-1940) gives a spirited
account of driving cattle from Williamson County to
Kansas, working in the packing houses at Rockport during
the Civil War, serving in the Texas Rangers with
Chamberlain (1870) and Wallace (1874), and the violent
Mexican Raid of 1875. The author includes information on
King and Kenedy and a list of cattle trails. $250.00

1742.   DUNN, J[acob] P[iatt], Jr. Massacres of the
Mountains: A History of the Indian Wars of the Far
West.... New York: Harper & Brothers, 1886. [x] 784 pp.,
numerous engraved text illustrations (many full-page,
including Texas Rangers at the Battle of Glorieta,
others from photographs, including D. F. Barry’s
portrait of Sitting Bull), maps and plans (including
engraved foldout map with reservations colored in pink:
Map of the Indian Reservations within the United States
1884, 18.4 x 28 cm). Thick 8vo, original olive green
pictorial cloth stamped in red, gold, and black. Light
wear, generally fine. Seldom found in collector’s
condition.
    First edition. Flake 3046. Graff 1181. Howes D575:
“Best single volume covering the subject.” Larned 3403:
“Compiled from the best sources, including many official
records.” Luther, High Spots of Custer 125. McCracken,
101, p. 26: “Covers most of the major confrontations in
the Indian Wars including Mountain Meadows, Sand Creek,
Little Big Horn and the Nez Percés campaign.” Munk
(Alliot), p. 69. Rader 1239. Saunders 2872. Smith 2648.
Wallace, Arizona History XIV:2n. “Impressive...a valued
standard   in   its   field   ever   since   its  initial
publication. Its remarkable accuracy, thoroughness of
coverage, scope and the sound judgment displayed have
enabled it to retain its place as a cornerstone in the
history of Indian-white conflicts ever since its
original appearance” (Thrapp IV, p. 152).
    Dunn’s meticulous research and his attempt to
separate historical fact from sensational fiction shed
light on the “Indian Wars” in a manner seldom
encountered in nineteenth-century literature on the
subject. Dunn’s book relates to ranching history because
the underlying cause of many of these violent encounters
was Anglo acquisitiveness for Native American pastures
and minerals, both before and after reservations were
established. The book also contains documentation on
Native American stock raising. Finally, we find in
Dunn’s thoughtful work a rich variety of rustlers and
rustling (frequently the trigger for Anglo military
action).
    Here is an example of the author’s discussion on
matters related to ranching and cattle issues: “At Nome
Cult [California in 1858] over 150 Indians were cruelly
murdered by the whites, who had been allowed to settle
on their reservation. No charge of aggression, except
cattle-stealing, was given as an excuse, and this
proved, on investigation, to be false. The real cause
was that the Indians drove away from the reservation the
cattle of the settlers, which had been roaming the
reservation and consuming the acorns, on which the
Indians   depended....   Armed   parties   went  to   the
rancherias in the open day and shot down the wretched
‘Diggers,’ without regard to age or sex” (p. 138).
    Another example comes from Chief Joseph of the Nez
Percés: “`They stole a great many horses from us, and we
could not get them back because we were Indians. The
white men told lies for each other. They drove off a
great many of our cattle. Some white men branded our
young cattle so they could claim them.... On the
reservation, twenty acres of land, and no more were
allotted to each head of a family, out of which he was
to make his living. Stock-raising on twenty acres is
necessarily a limited business’” (pp. 636-42).   $300.00

1743.   DUNNING, Harold Marion. Over Hill and Vale: In
the Evening Shadows of Colorado’s Longs Peak. Boulder:
Johnson Publishing Company, [1956-1962]. [8] 605 + [14]
406    pp.,   numerous   text    illustrations   (mostly
photographic, some full-page). 2 vols. (of 3), 8vo,
original blue cloth. Fine in near fine jackets. Vol. I
signed by author.
    First edition. A third volume was published in 1971,
but each volume is considered complete in itself. See
Wynar 1151. Dunning’s work was favorably reviewed by
LeRoy Hafen: “This fine book is more or less a history
of the northern Colorado region near Loveland, Estes
Park, and Fort Collins, with a vast amount of material
concerning its people—past and present.... This work
came from the many articles [Dunning] wrote for the
Weekly Roundup paper under the title ‘Over Hill &
Vale.’”
    The first volume includes a section on “Rocky
Mountain Jim” (James Nugent), Griff Evans, and the
Dunraven Ranch (including photos). Nugent and Evans were
prominently featured in Isabella’s Bird’s book, A Lady’s
Life in the Rocky Mountains (see item 415 in Part I of
this Catalogue). At pp. 205-224 is a review of Isabella
Bird’s book, with local history filling in some details
not found in the printed book. Between the grasshoppers,
blizzards, “fish that walk,” and a myriad of pioneers,
much on ranching is found: biographies and photos of
old-time cattlemen such as Joel Estes (discovered Estes
Park); Louis Papa;, Frank C. Miller (top hand in Buffalo
Bill’s Wild West Show), etc. Dunning includes excellent
material on mountaineering, such as his own “Hints for
Climbing Longs”; he climbed Longs Peak sixty times and
explored most all of the other mountains in the region.
    The second volume has good coverage of various
incidents and people related to the cattle trade: how
Lord Dunraven came to start his ranch; a chapter on the
Delatour Ranch; Crown Creek Ranch (owned by Lady Maude
Whyte, daughter of Dunraven); more on pioneer cattleman
Louis Papa; etc. For mountaineering enthusiasts, Dunning
continues coverage of the subject, including several
ascents and details of a marriage ceremony on Long’s
Peak.   $150.00

1744.   DUNNING, Harold Marion. Over Hill and Vale Vol.
I.... Boulder: Johnson Publishing Company, [1956].
Another copy of Vol. I, variant binding and on thinner
paper. 8vo, original maroon cloth. Very fine in near
fine d.j. (price-clipped). $75.00

1745.   DURATSCHEK, Sister Mary Claudia. Crusading along
Sioux Trails, a History of the Catholic Indian Missions
of South Dakota. [Yankton, South Dakota: Benedictine of
the Sacred Heart, 1947]. xiii [1] 334 pp., portraits,
text illustrations (mostly vintage and documentary
photographs, some full-page), maps, decorated endpapers.
8vo, original terracotta cloth. Very fine in very fine
d.j.
    First edition. In the chapter on Holy Rosary
Mission, the author explains how a hunting tribe became
stock raisers. Red Cloud (photos) objected to the 1865
act authorizing the Laramie-Bozeman Trail to furnish a
direct route from the Central States to the gold mines
in Idaho and Montana. Red Cloud protested that the Trail
passed through the only remaining buffalo range of the
Sioux. In 1876 under duress the Black Hills Treaty was
signed, and the Pine Ridge Reservation was established
(1878). “Majestic as the scenery was, it had no
practical value for the Indians.... As for wresting a
living from the fantastically weird country, that was
impossible. Here and there the grass on patches of table
land and in the wide gullies furnished grazing for
Indian ponies and, later on, for the cattle.... Because
7,000 natives would have to depend largely upon grazing
for a livelihood, the original size of Pine Ridge
Reservation was quite extensive, [but] subsequent
treaties have reduced it.” Contains details on tribal
use of peyote (photograph of ceremony). $50.00

1746.   DURHAM, George. Taming the Nueces Strip: The
Story of McNelly’s Rangers...As Told to Clyde Wantland.
Austin: University of Texas Press, [1962]. xx, 178 pp.,
photographic plates, text illustrations, map. 8vo,
original tan cloth. Very fine in d.j.
    First edition. Foreword by Walter Prescott Webb.
Adams, Burs I:117. Basic Texas Books 49: “One of the few
accounts of the McNelly Rangers, told by a member of the
force [covering] his service in 1875-1876.” Guns 652:
“Gives one of the best accounts of the life and work of
McNelly and his Rangers and corrects some of the errors
made by N. A. Jennings.”
    McNelly’s Rangers, part of the Frontier Battalion of
Texas Rangers, spent time fighting Native Americans,
trying to recover King Ranch stolen stock, and chasing
Anglo outlaws and rustlers and Juan Nepomuceno Cortinas
(1824-1894). The author tells how Cortinas initially
licensed many of the cattle rustlers who roamed the
Nueces Strip. After the Mexican-American War, Mexican
rancher Cortinas, one time governor of Tamaulipas, was
considered a rogue rustler and murderer by the Rangers
and stockmen of the Nueces Strip; or, alternatively, a
Robin Hood by disenfranchised borderlanders of Mexican
descent.
    Webb describes Captain McNelly as a frail tubercular
man—“a natural partisan fighter if ever there was one”
and “equipped with an iron will and totally unacquainted
with fear.” Author Durham was the youngest Ranger in
McNelly’s band, and later spent many years working for
the King Ranch.    $100.00

1747.   DUSENBERRY, William H. The Mexican Mesta: The
Administration of Ranching in Colonial Mexico. Urbana:
University of Illinois Press, 1963. ix [3] 253 pp.,
brands. 8vo, original yellow and orange cloth. Fine in
lightly worn d.j. Author’s signed presentation copy.
    First edition. Griffin 2364: “Administrative history
of the stockmen’s association from its establishment in
1529 to the end of the colonial period. Relation to
slaughtering and meat supply, viceregal interests,
hacienda, and subsequent institutions. Appendices give
the Mesta ordinances of 1537 and brands of the early
stockmen.” From the introduction: “The Mexican Mesta was
the first stockmen’s association in the New World.
Despite this fact, no adequate study of it has been
made.” The descendants of the livestock from the
sixteenth-century stockmen of Mexico and their methods
are the legacy of today’s ranches in the Southwest and
the Transmississippi West. $50.00

1748.   DUVAL,   John   C.   Early    Times   in   Texas
[continuation with caption title: The Young Explorers;
or, Continuation of the Adventures of Jack Dobell].
Austin: H. P. N. Gammel, 1892. 135 [1] 1-253 pp. 12mo,
original green cloth gilt, gilt-lettered on upper cover
and spine. Paper browned (“printed on the cheapest
possible paper”—Basic Texas Books), a few minor spots to
binding, otherwise very fine and bright.
    First edition. Basic Texas Books 51: “The most
literate of all 19th century Texas memoirs. Unlike the
author’s other writings, it is authentic history, with
only a little exaggeration thrown in here and there.”
Dobie, p. 55: “A Texas classic. Of all personal
adventures of old-time Texas it is perhaps the best
written and the most interesting.” Graff 1188n. Howes
D603. Rader 1248. Raines, p. 74. Tate, Indians of Texas
2365: “Numerous confrontations with Texas Indians
(especially the feared Comanches), as told in an
engaging but not always accurate manner.”
    We include this work because of material in The
Young Explorers; or, Continuation of the Adventures of
Jack Dobell: Cayote Ranch sequence (chapters 2 and 3) on
early Texas ranch hospitality; encountering “a vast
drove of mustangs; hunting wild cattle (one of Dobie’s
sources for The Longhorns); “Where the Wild Cattle
Originally Came From”; equestrian match between Texas
Rangers, Comanches, and rancheros (details on riding
styles and equipage). $350.00

1749.   DUVALL, Laura S. Colorado in Verse and Picture,
1916-1928. [Denver: Welch-Haffner Printing Co., 1928].
206 pp., numerous photographic text illustrations. 8vo,
original tan printed wrappers. Fine.
    First edition. Wilcox, p. 42. Among the poems is one
entitled “The Rodeo.” The author records in verse her
auto journeys through Colorado in the 1920s. The most
interesting feature of the book may be the excellent
documentary photos, including several of the author in
her car or wearing her long duster while standing in
majestic scenery. The poems include “Pikes Peak Auto
Drive,” “The Highest Highway in the World,” “Auto Trip
West of the Pikes Peak,” “Auto Trip to Pikes Peak,” “The
Broadmoor-Cheyenne Mountain Highway,” “The Moffat Road,”
“A Scenic Circle Trip of Colorado,” and more.    $50.00

1750.   DYAL, Donald H. (ed.). A Vanished Landscape.
College Station: Friends of the Sterling C. Evans
Library, 1986. [12] pp., text illustrations. Oblong
12mo, original tan pictorial wrappers. Very fine.
    First printing. Friends of the Sterling C. Evans
Library Keepsake 15. Ernest R. Duke’s “Autobiography of
an Old Rod Sod Plow” relates to the JA Ranch (owned by
John Adair and Charles Goodnight). Duke recalls watching
the filming of an authentic Indian buffalo hunt on the
ranch in 1916. $15.00

1751.   DYER, John L. The Snow-Shoe Itinerant: An
Autobiography of the Rev. John L. Dyer, Familiarly known
as “Father Dyer,” of the Colorado Conference, Methodist
Episcopal Church.... Cincinnati: Published for the
Author by Cranston & Stowe, 1890. 362 pp., plates
(photographic and after drawings by Mrs. Helen H.
Chain), text illustrations. 12mo, original brown cloth,
spine gilt. Front hinge slightly loose, otherwise fine
and bright, exceptionally clean. Contemporary ink
ownership signature on preliminary leaf and one inner
leaf.
    First edition. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the
Plains and the Rockies 149. Graff 1193: “The author’s
experiences in the Rocky Mountains were fascinating.”
Howes D622. Wilcox, p. 42: “One of the best known, and
last of the circuit riders of the Methodist Episcopal
Church.” Wynar 9078.
    Reverend Dyer gives an eye-witness account of the
harsh but scenic paradise of Colorado during the 1860s
and 1870s, with much on skiing and mountaineering. The
author was an unpretentious minister to a motley flock
scattered through a large area of this sparsely settled
mountainous region. He sometimes encountered outlaws and
relates some scenes of mob violence.
    In a section entitled “The Cattle Baron,” Dyer tells
how he bought eight cattle after his first year in
Colorado. “But it was known that Brother Dyer had some
cattle. Soon I heard that he owned a herd of cattle, and
I found that if a preacher in our Church had anything
ahead...it was used to excuse the people for not paying
his salary.” Among the ranches visited by the author
during his extensive wanderings through the Rocky
Mountains was the 1.7 million-acre baronial spread owned
by Lucien Maxwell (Thrapp II, p. 961), where the author
conducted “the first Protestant service ever held on the
now famous Maxwell Land Grant.”   $250.00
1752.   DYKE, Charles L. The Story of Sioux County.
Orange City, Iowa: Charles L. Dyke, 1942. xvi, 567 [1]
[64, section of photographic portraits] [8, index] pp.,
photographic plates, map. Thick 8vo, original blue
cloth. Fine.
    First   edition. Dense   local  history,  including
sections on “Cattle Herds” and “Cattle Rustlers.” Good
social history with many documentary photographs.
    $35.00

1753.   DYKES, J. C. Billy the Kid: The Bibliography of
a Legend. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press,
1952. 186 pp., frontispiece plate by Charles Russell
(Billy the Kid Kills Bill Morton and Frank Baker to
Avenge the Death of J. H. Tunstall, i.e., the Kid Shoots
Down Two Prisoners in Cold Blood). 8vo, original grey
printed wrappers. Slight age-toning to margins of wraps
and fragile wraps a trifle worn, generally fine.
    First edition, limited edition (500 copies, of which
470 were bound in wrappers). University of New Mexico
Publications in Language and Literature 7. Campbell, p.
69: “It is far more than a bibliography. The author’s
annotations present a case history of William H. Bonney.
The 437 items range in time from 1881 to the present,
and include not only printed material, both fact and
fiction, but also records, folk songs, radio scripts,
films,     verse,   unpublished    plays,    and    even
advertisements.” Dobie, pp. 139-40. Dobie & Dykes, 44 &
44 #76n: “Useful guide to the Lincoln County War.”
Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 1 (“Introduction—My
Sport”). Guns 655: “Each entry contains much information
on the content of the book listed, and the author points
out many false and inaccurate statements made by the
various authors.” Yost & Renner, Russell XVI:94. $150.00

1754.  DYKES, Jeff C. Billy the Kid: The Bibliography
of a Legend. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico
Press, 1952. 186 pp., frontispiece by Charles Russell.
8vo, original red pictorial cloth. Upper corner bumped,
otherwise very fine. Laid in is a photographic
reproduction of The Kid from a tintype (1881). Carl
Hertzog’s copy, with his book plate.
    First edition, second printing, with corrections.
Yost & Renner, Russell XVI:94. Thrapp IV, pp. 152-53:
“Jefferson   Chenworth    Dykes   (1900-1989),  writer,
bibliographer, born at Dallas, Texas...graduated from
Texas A & M in 1921.... Meanwhile he had become a book
collector, eventually accumulating some 16,000 volumes;
book appraiser (he appraised the J. Frank Dobie
collection for the University of Texas); book reviewer
and bibliographer. He wrote       Billy the Kid: The
Bibliography of a Legend (1952), which Ramon Adams
judged...`the first complete list of materials on this
young outlaw...’ Dykes was working on a revised edition
at his death.” Jeff was also one of the great
bookdealers, especially for Cow Country books.  $125.00

1755.   DYKES, Jeff C. Billy the Kid: The Bibliography
of a Legend. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico
Press, 1952. 8vo, original red pictorial cloth. Very
fine. Another copy.   $100.00

1756.   DYKES, Jeff C. Fifty Great Western Illustrators:
A Bibliographic Checklist. [Flagstaff]: Northland Press,
[1975]. xiv, 457 [1] pp., numerous text illustrations
(many full-page). 4to, original blue pictorial cloth
stamped in silver. Light shelf wear, otherwise fine in
lightly chipped d.j. From the library of Carl Hertzog,
with his bookplate.
    First edition. See Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 49
(“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #200). A massive
and essential bibliographical tool, listing appearances
in print of Dykes’ favorite Western artists, marred only
by the lack of an index. Artists include Lorence F.
Bjorklund, Edward Borein, José Cisneros, Maynard Dixon,
W. Herbert Dunton, Will James, Tom Lea, Alfred Jacob
Miller, Frederic Remington, Ross Santee, E. Boyd Smith,
N. C. Wyeth, and many others. $100.00
1757.   DYKES, Jeff C. Law on a Wild Frontier: Four
Sheriffs of Lincoln County. Washington: Potomac Corral
of the Westerners, 1969. iv, 25 [2] pp., text
illustrations     (photographic   portraits,   Russell,
Remington), map. 8vo, original yellow pictorial boards
with Russell buffalo head. Fine. Author’s signed
presentation copy to Dudley R. Dobie: “Our printer took
off for Christmas a mite early and his press boy didn’t
bother with proofs—so this is sorter a hand corrected!”
With Jeff’s ink corrections in text.
    First edition, limited edition (#193 of 250 copies,
signed by author). The Great Western Series 5. Dykes
explores the lives of four sheriffs of Lincoln County:
William Brady, Pat Garrett, John Poe, and George Curry.
Though the book is ostensibly about these men, the
overarching theme is Billy the Kid and the Lincoln
County War. $80.00

1758.   DYKES, Jeff C. Law on a Wild Frontier: Four
Sheriffs of Lincoln County. Washington: Potomac Corral
of the Westerners, 1969. iv, 25 [2] pp., text
illustrations    (photographic     portraits,  Russell,
Remington),   map.   8vo,   original   yellow pictorial
wrappers. Fine, signed by author.
    First trade edition. $25.00

          Dykes Tells How to Collect Range Books
1759.   DYKES, Jeff C. Western High Spots: Reading and
Collecting Guides. N.p.: Northland Press, [1977]. xiii
[3] 192 pp., text illustrations by Bugbee, Elwell and
Rawsom plus some photographic illustrations (some full-
page). 8vo, original blue cloth. Fine in lightly worn
d.j. Carl Hertzog’s copy with his bookplate.
    First edition. This work is a compiled collection of
Dykes’ best articles on collecting and books, including:
“Western    Movement—Its   Literature,”  “My   Ten  Most
Outstanding Books on the West,” “Remington Rarities,”
“Russell Rarities,” “Dobie Rarities,” etc.
    From the chapter entitled “A Range Man’s Library”:
“There should be a balance in a range man’s library.
There should be books about range country, biographies
and autobiographies of cowboys and cowmen, histories of
their associations, accounts of the trails and trail
drivers, ranch histories, studies of the range wars,
books about cows, sheep and range horses, and the
literature of the range including the novels, ballads
and art. These are books that a range man should read
and reread for pleasure and for an understanding and
essential background of his profession.” $75.00

1760.   DYKSTRA, Robert R. The Cattle Towns. New York:
Knopf, 1968. [12] 386, x [2] pp., photographic plates,
maps. 8vo, original brown cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Adams, Burs II:60. Guns 656: “The
author treats the Kansas cowtowns from a different
angle.... He concentrates on their growth, economic
condition, and decline rather than upon the lawlessness
so often emphasized.” Reese, Six Score 35: “A social
history of the Kansas cattle towns written almost
entirely from primary sources. Few books have dealt
seriously with the realities of life in the cattle
trading centers of Abilene, Ellsworth, Wichita, and
Dodge City, and none as well or as completely as this.”
    $50.00

1761.   EAGLETON, N. Ethie. On the Last Frontier: A
History of Upton County, Texas. El Paso: Texas Western
Press, University of Texas at El Paso, 1971. xi [3] 125
[2] pp., photographic plates. 8vo, original green
pictorial cloth. Very fine in d.j.
    First edition. This book was designed by Haywood
Antone, Hertzog’s successor at the Press, and Hertzog’s
strong influence is evident. County and local histories
run the gamut of relevance to ranching history from
marginal (such as scattered biographies of ranchers) to
central and significant. The present county history is
central to ranching history in Texas. Over half the book
relates to ranching, and a good deal of the remainder
segues into the era of oil and gas production, with the
gushing forth of McCamey’s legendary wildcat well in
1926.
    Upton County (established 1887) in southwestern
Texas was part of the open range until the 1890s, when
sheep men crossed the Pecos River to compete with
cattlemen for the range. The author notes: “The
population of Upton County in 1900 numbered forty-eight,
mostly cowboys and ranch hands” (p. 11). In the 1880s
Dr. G. W. Elliott dug the first well in the County,
built the first house, and placed a thousand head of
Stocker cattle on the range (the good doctor also
patented a saddlebag for rural physicians). In the 1890s
cattleman Henry Mayer Halff, a pioneer in irrigation and
breeding, operated on the open range and had holdings in
Upton County. The Halff operation included the Quien
Sabe Ranch & Stock Company, the JM Ranch, and the Circle
Dot outfit (see Handbook of Texas Online: Henry Mayer
Halff and Quien Sabe Ranch).
    This book is excellent for women’s history, relating
that Mrs. Rachel Hart Halff accompanied her husband up
the trail many times. Also, we learn that among the
earliest settlers in the 1880s were three families who
formed a caravan, with three men riding herd on more
than seven hundred cattle while the three women drove
the wagons. $75.00

1762.   EARLE, J. P. History of Clay County and
Northwest Texas. Austin: The Brick Row Book Shop, 1963.
[6] 64 [3] pp., plates and text illustrations (mostly
photographic).   8vo,   original   pale  green   printed
wrappers, stapled (as issued). Fine.
    Limited edition (300 copies); facsimile of the rare
first edition (Henrietta, Texas, 1897). CBC 953n. Guns
658n. Herd 737n. Howes E7n. Vandale 56n. Clay County
(established 1857) is ranching country through and
through. Cattle are a constant element of the background
in this history, which also has information on Cynthia
Ann Parker and Frank and Jesse James.
    Col. H. A. Whaley (1826-1898), the first permanent
settler, arrived in Clay County in 1869, and being the
only Anglo in the region, he was surrounded by hostile
Apache and Comanche (includes material on Ranald
Mackenzie’s campaigns). “Most every light of the moon
the Indians would make raids, kill and scalp a few
settlers and drive off a quantity of stock” (p. 4).
Whaley constructed a stockade and hired about a dozen
men to help him tend the livestock, cultivate crops, and
provide protection against hostiles who frequented the
area.   Whaley’s  principal   buyer   was the   recently
established Fort Sill in Indian Territory. The author
gives accounts of early stockmen: Babe Cobb, Jimmie
Roberts, Allen Parmer (married to James’ brothers
sister), John S. Babb (includes Comanche captivity of
Mrs. Babb, Bianca Babb, and Sarah Luster), et al.
    $50.00

1763.   EASTON, Robert & Mackenzie Brown. Lord of
Beasts: The Saga of Buffalo Jones. Tucson: University of
Arizona Press, [1961]. xiii [3] 287 [1] pp., text
illustrations by Mac Schweitzer. 8vo, original beige
decorative cloth. Very fine in lightly worn and price-
clipped d.j.
    First edition. Foreword by Jack Schaefer. This work
is a biography of Charles Jesse “Buffalo” Jones (1844-
1919),    a    larger-than-life   buffalo   butcher-cum-
conservationist, adventurer, big game hunter, town-
founder, and Yellowstone game warden. Jones slaughtered
thousands of buffalo in the core buffalo-hunting period,
but later became a staunch conservationist. In the
1880s, Jones established a “cattalo ranch” (hybrid
buffalo-cattle) on the Arkansas River and worked to
increase his herd and experiment with breeding.
    Jones made a run in the Cherokee Strip in 1899 and
was the first non-Sooner to reach Perry. He tells a
great story about a female Sooner: “[She and two men]
sneaked in right before the gun, came dashing up out of
a ravine.... Having fresh horses they had advantage of
all others. The lady rode a jet-black charger, and was
one of the most reckless horsewomen I ever saw, and
would have done credit to the ‘Rough Riders.’ I whipped
my horses severely, but could not pass her. It was
humiliating to go into Perry with a lady leading” (p.
81).    $35.00

1764.   EATON, Frank. Pistol Pete: Veteran of the Old
West. Boston: Little, Brown, 1952. x, 278 pp.,
photographic   plates.   8vo,   original   green   cloth.
Occasional slight foxing, else fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 71. Guns 659: “The
writer tells of having a horse race with Belle Starr and
losing his Winchester to her.” Herd 738: “One of the
wildest tales on record of a man’s experiences in the
cattle country.” Eaton (1860-1958) began riding the
range in Indian Territory when fifteen years old and at
age seventeen shot his first rustler (who happened to
have murdered Eaton’s father several years before).
Eaton rode for Hanging Judge Parker; worked for the
Owens Cattle Company, Charles Goodnight, the Texas
Panhandle Stock Association, and other cattlemen’s
associations; trailed herds from Texas to Kansas in the
1880s; met Quanah Parker, Charlie Siringo, Belle Starr,
Pat Garrett, Jesse James, and many other notables.
    One of the interesting aspects of this work is
Eaton’s good coverage of Native American ranchers and
cowboys in Indian Territory (Captain Sixkiller, Charlie
Journeycake, Osage Brown, et al.). Eaton tells how his
good pal Rolla Goodnight (Charles Goodnight’s son) was
warned by his father that he was too reckless and would
die with his boots on. According to Eaton, Rolla always
removed his boots when danger arose, hoping to make his
father a liar. This entertaining book might need to be
taken with two or three cups of salt. $75.00

1765.  EATON BROTHERS. Eatons’ Ranch. [Wolf, Wyoming:
Eaton Brothers, 1913]. 23 pp. Narrow 16mo, original grey
printed wrappers, stapled (as issued). Exceptionally
fine and fresh.
    First edition. Small Series no. 3. Eatons’ Ranch
(founded in 1879 three years after the Battle of Little
Big Horn) has been in operation for over a hundred years
as a working cattle ranch and a “ranch resort.” Eaton
Ranch is located on the old Bozeman Trail, along the
eastern slope of the Big Horn Mountains, twenty miles
west of Sheridan, Wyoming. This little book served as a
guide to early-day guests about what to expect during
their stay, including tips on how to safely ride a
horse. Eatons’ is still in operation and a fine
establishment for soaking up the Western experience. The
rules and suggestions set out in this guide probably
have not changed a great deal since 1913. $100.00

1766.   EAVES, Charles Dudley & C. A. Hutchinson. Post
City, Texas: C. W. Post’s Colonizing Activities in West
Texas. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1952.
xiii [1] 171 pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic
plates, maps. 8vo, original terracotta cloth. Top fore-
edge lightly foxed, overall fine in lightly worn d.j.
    First edition. Foreword by Jesse H. Jones. CBC 1877.
Herd 740. This story of a community planned from its
inception by C. W. Post (1854-1914, founder of Postum
Cereal Company), chronicles the transition of the
Caprock Escarpment of the High Plains from ranching to
farming. “In 1906 he purchased some 225,000 acres of
ranchland...and designated a site near the center of
Garza County as the location of his new town.... In 1907
Post City, as it was called until after the developer’s
death, was platted, farms of 160 acres were laid out,
shade trees were planted, and a machine shop, a hotel, a
school,   churches,   and   a  department   store   were
constructed.... One of his most spectacular experiments
was his rain-making effort through dynamite explosions.
From firing stations along the rim of the Caprock four-
pound dynamite charges were detonated every four minutes
for a period of several hours. Between 1911 and 1914 he
spent thousands of dollars in this endeavor, which met
with little success” (Handbook of Texas Online: Charles
William Post) $45.00

1767.   EBBUTT, Percy G. Emigrant Life in Kansas.
London: Swan Sonnenschein, 1886. viii, 237 pp., engraved
frontispiece, plates, text illustrations. 8vo, original
green cloth pictorial cloth stamped in dark brown, gilt-
lettering on spine and upper cover. Moderate outer wear,
lower hinge and several signatures starting, occasional
light foxing, but generally a very good copy with small
label of Shepard Book Company (SLC) on front pastedown.
Scarce.
    First   edition.  Dary,  Kanzana   229.   Herd  741:
“Scarce.” Rader 1274. Not in Graff or Howes. Ebbutt came
to Kansas in 1871 and returned to England six years
later. Englishmen like Ebbutt provide observations on
emigrant life often not explored by home-grown authors.
Ebbutt’s well-written and often humorous narrative
vividly describes life on the prairie, cattle raising,
farming, and encounters with denizens of the prairie
(especially snakes).
    Ebbutt tells of encountering Wild Bill Hickok in
Junction City: “Wild Bill was a fine-looking fellow,
with long curly hair hanging down his back, and was
dressed in a rather dandified fashion. He was said to
have twenty-seven nicks cut on the handle of his
revolver, each signifying a man whose life had been
taken by him. And yet he walked the streets as free as
any man, and perhaps with more security than a less
desperate criminal would, for he would have to be a
plucky man to arrest ‘Wild Bill.’ He was afterwards
actually elected ‘sheriff’ of Wichita...which was
frequented by the Texas ‘cow-boys,’ and he was killed at
last in some saloon brawl.”
    One of the enterprises Ebbutt undertook was cattle
ranching: “In the spring a herd law was passed, and so
we boys got up a herd. There were forty head of cattle
of our own, and we took in our neighbours’ cattle at a
quarter of a dollar per month per head,         and   thus
mustered quite a respectable number.” $200.00

1768.   ECCLESTON, Robert. Overland to California on the
Southwestern Trail, 1849: Diary of.... Edited by George
P. Hammond and Edward H. Howes. Berkeley & Los Angeles:
[The Westgate Press for] University of California Press,
1950. [6] xvii [1] 256 [1] pp., frontispiece portrait, 2
folding maps. 8vo, original terracotta cloth, spine
gilt. Very fine in d.j.
    First   edition,   limited  edition   (750    copies).
Bancroft Library Publications 2. Edwards, Enduring
Desert, p. 71: “Perhaps the most spirited and colorful
item among the contemporary diaries and journals
prepared by those emigrants of 1849-50 who followed the
Southwest Trail.... The diary devotes itself mainly to
the party’s route through Texas”; Lost Oases, p. 68.
Howes E34. Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 216: “The
party charted new ground by opening wagon travel over
the Tucson Cutoff or Apache Pass Trail. From Tucson,
Eccleston and companions traveled with Texas Ranger
Colonel   Jack   Hays.  Eccleston  recorded    his   daily
experiences with a full chronicle. Etter notes that
‘Eccleston’s diary is the only one that has come to
light describing 1849 travel on the trail.” Powell,
Arizona Gathering II 513. Wallace, Arizona History
VIII:56.
    Eccleston’s diary begins April 3, 1849, when
Eccleston, then nineteen, left New York for Galveston,
Texas, and ends December 28 of the same year in the
desert outside San Diego. Eccleston mentions various
ranches where they stopped during their journey,
including Coon’s Ranch (El Paso area) and the obligatory
Warner’s Ranch.
    Included with this overland is Eccleston’s other
important work, which “serves as the sequel to
Eccleston’s overland narrative” (Kurutz 215): The
Mariposa Indian War, 1850-1851: Diaries of Robert
Eccleston; The California Gold Rush, Yosemite, and the
High Sierra (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press,
1957. [4] vii [1] 168 pp., frontispiece, folding map.
8vo, original terracotta cloth with black leather spine
label. Very fine, unopened. First edition. Edwards,
Enduring Desert, p. 71. Rocq 5103). Eccleston’s journal
of the Mariposa War is the only firsthand account of
that encounter.   $250.00

1769.   ECHEVERRÍA, Esteban. La Cautiva. El Matadero.
Buenos Aires: Ediciones Peuser, [1946]. xxxvi, 175 [6]
pp., portrait of author, color frontispiece and text
illustrations by Eleodoro E. Marenco. 4to, original
white pictorial wrappers with color illustration after a
Marenco    watercolor.   Mild   to    moderate   foxing,
bookseller’s stamp on title page, overall very good.
    Modern scholarly edition of two literary classics of
Argentina, “La Cautiva” [“The Captive”] (first published
in 1837) and “El Matadero” [“The Slaughterhouse”]
(written in the 1830s but unpublished until the 1870s).
From the series “Biblioteca de los Poetas Gauchescos del
Rio de La Plata.” Both of these works influenced gaucho
literature. Echeverría (1805-1851), Argentine romantic
poet, prose writer, and revolutionary propagandist,
introduced romanticism in Argentina upon his return from
Paris and deeply influenced later writers, particularly
through his poetic depiction of the South American
landscape. His most successful work was “La Cautiva,”
which extols the pampas. Artist Marenco is a leading
artist of gaucho life. $175.00

1770.   EDDINS, Roy (ed.). History of Falls County,
Texas. Falls County, Texas: Old Settlers and Veterans
Association,   [1947].   viii,   312  pp.,   portraits,
illustrations (mostly photographic). 8vo, original navy
blue cloth. Fine.
    First edition. CBC 1636. Herd 742. “After the War,
[Falls County’s] natural advantages for stock raising,
including its succulent grasses, abundance of water and
wide-open spaces, continued to stimulate stock raising.
It was one of the earliest crops—with good markets in
Louisiana and ‘up North.’ As early as the 1860s
cattleman had learned that by branding their cattle and
gathering them into herds at some convenient place,
sturdy cowboys and ponies could profitably take them on
‘drives’ to markets” (p. 179). The work includes local
brands and a section on “Early Lawlessness in Cattle
Raising.” $150.00

         Map of Texas Showing the Mustang Prairie
1771.   EDWARD, David B. History of Texas: or, The
Emigrant’s, Farmer’s, and Politician’s Guide to the
Character, Climate, Soil and Productions of That
Country:    Geographically    Arranged    from    Personal
Observation and Experience. Cincinnati: J. A. James &
Co., 1836. 336 [2, ads] pp., foldout engraved map of the
Republic of Texas with grants hand-colored in outline
(Map of Texas Containing the Latest Grants and
Discoveries by E. F. Lee, 31 x 21 cm). 12mo, original
brown cloth, printed yellow spine label. Binding worn
and stained, upper hinge cracked, intermittent foxing,
map with mild foxing and a few minor and very small,
clean splits at folds, overall a good to very good copy,
with contemporary ownership signature of Stephen Titus.
Bookplate of Herbert McLean Evans, noted bibliophile and
discoverer of Vitamin E.
    First edition. Basic Texas Books 53: “One of the
best accounts of Texas on the eve of the Revolution. The
book attempts to be unprejudiced, but the author was
clearly anti-Texan at heart.” Clark, Old South III:35.
Graff 1208. Howes E48: “Conditions just prior to the
Revolution described by an actual observer.” Rader 1279.
Raines, p. 74. Streeter 1199: “One of the essential
Texas books. It gives a good account of the physical
features and towns and products of Texas of 1835.”
Edward reprints many scarce Texas laws and decrees. The
excellent map is based on the Austin-Tanner conformation
(Day, Maps of Texas, p. 24).
    This book contains a section on the advantages of
stock raising in Texas, declaring “the pasture for
cattle both summer and winter is unlimited” and that
“there is not a sober well-thinking man in the province,
who will not aver...that he can do as well as ever he
did in a more northern sphere.... Their live stock
increases   around  them   with   astonishing  rapidity,
producing their young at an earlier period of life, and
having them afterwards more frequently, than those which
live in a colder climate; doubling their numbers...every
two years.... And did not I see a calf only eight months
old! taken from the prairie lands...which weighed three
hundred and ten pounds.... It will cost more to raise a
brood of chickens in Texas, than an equal number of
cattle.”
    The author rhapsodizes at length on the vast herds
of wild mustangs west of the Nueces. The excellent map
of Texas prominently shows the “Drove of Wild Horses”
between the Nueces and Rio Grande. J. Frank Dobie in his
writings on mustangs refers to early maps of Texas
locating these mustang herds. $3,500.00

1772.   EDWARDS, Cas. Cowboy Philosophy. Cynthiana,
Kentucky: Hobson Book Press, 1944. ix [5] 87 pp.,
photographic plates, text illustrations. 12mo, original
brown cloth. Fine in lightly worn d.j. Inscribed and
signed by author.
    First edition. Range verse by a resident of Alpine,
Texas, including “Ridin’ in Range,” “A Cowboy’s Lament,”
etc. Among the photographs are many of Big Bend,
Brewster County, H. L. Kokernot’s O6 Ranch, cowboy
watering his horse, “Queen of the Rodeo,” Pecos River
Bridge, MacDonald Observatory, etc.  $55.00

1773.   EDWARDS, Cas. Cowboy Philosophy. Cynthiana,
Kentucky: Hobson Book Press, 1944. vii [5] 87 pp.,
photographic plates, text illustrations. 12mo, original
brown cloth. Binding slightly abraded. Very good copy in
fine d.j. (price-clipped).
    Second printing with added plates and a new d.j.
design. $25.00

1774.   EDWARDS, Everett E. Middle Western Agricultural
History as a Field of Research. N.p., [1936]. Pp. 315-
328. 8vo, stapled (as issued). Very fine.
    Offprint of a paper presented at a joint session of
the Mississippi Valley Historical Association and the
American Historical Association. The author explores how
introduction of new and improved crops and breeds of
livestock resulted in what he terms “the American
agricultural revolution.” $20.00

1775.   EDWARDS, George (ed.). The Pioneer Work of the
Presbyterian Church in Montana. Helena: Allied Printing
Company,   n.d.     [ca.   1906].     [2]    213    pp.,   text
illustrations (photographic). 8vo, original green cloth
gilt   (text    block    bound    in    upside-down).     Dated
inscription to Walter L. Breckenridge from R. M.
Donaldson. Light shelf wear, very good copy overall.
    Reprinted    from   vol.   6   of    the   Montana    State
Historical    Society    Collections.     This     social   and
religious history in the Montana cattle country includes
firsthand   recollections     of   some    of    the   earliest
Presbyterian    pioneers    (some    with    overlands).    The
contents are considerably more stimulating than the
title would indicate.
    From the account of Rev. George Grantham Smith: “I
reached Bannack in June, 1864. My work in Montana was
confined to Bannack, Virginia City and adjoining
[mining] camps and ranches.... It was hard ‘prospecting’
in those days.... On my arrival at Montana I soon
learned that my $1200 legal tender would secure me but
twelve weeks’ board instead of twelve months.... I
created a storm of applause (or something else) by
unloading an umbrella.... ‘Tenderfoot!’ and ‘Pilgrim!’
were shouted in all directions.... I was assigned to
private apartments in the leading hotel in Bannack City,
in the office, with bar, gambling table, gamblers, and
highwaymen, every man clothed in buckskin and adorned
with a pair of navy revolvers and bowie knife in the
bootleg, and Mexican spurs and dangles on the heel....
This was my introduction to a life of strange
vicissitudes and marvelous experiences.” $50.00

1776.   EDWARDS, J. B. Early Days in Abilene...Edited
and Published by C. W. Wheeler, Printed in the “Abilene
Chronicle” 1896, Reprinted in the “Abilene Daily
Chronicle” 1938 with Added Material from the Papers of
J. B. Edwards. N.p, n.d. [1938]. 16 pp. (printed in
three columns), text illustrations (mostly photographic,
some vintage prints of cattle trade). 4to, original tan
decorated wrappers, stapled (as issued). Very fine.
    First separate printing of material that originally
appeared in the Abilene Chronicle in 1896. Adams, One-
Fifty 50. Campbell, p. 121. CBC 4257. Guns 662. Herd
746: “Scarce.... The author relates some events in early
Abilene. He lived there from its founding and knew its
history firsthand when it was a cowtown.”
    Edwards goes into considerable detail on the early
days of the cattle trade, drawing the connection between
the railroad and the blooming of the livestock trade.
“As a matter of course Abilene became famous as a cattle
market. Every school boy in the far eastern states, when
seeing the long trains of long horned cattle going
through the country on the railroads, knew they were
shipped from Abilene” (p. 2). Included is material on
Joseph G. McCoy (founder of the Abilene cattle trade),
Drovers’ Cottage, Wild Bill Hickok’s reign as Marshall,
“Cost of Moving Cattle from Texas” by Ike T. Pryor, and
more.   $250.00

    “First Recorded Cattle Drive in California”—Reese
1777.   EDWARDS, Philip L[eget]. California in 1837:
Diary of Colonel Philip L. Edwards Containing an Account
of a Trip to the Pacific Coast.... Sacramento: A. J.
Johnston, 1890. 47 pp. 12mo, original tan printed
wrappers, stapled (as issued). Lightly browned as usual
(due to the cheap paper on which it was printed),
fragile spine slightly chipped, otherwise fine.
    First edition, first published in Themis 2 (1860).
The book was published in two formats, cloth and
wrappers. Cowan, p. 192. Dykes, Collecting Range Life
Literature, p. 15; Western High Spots, pp. 13-14
(“Western Movement—Its Literature”). Graff 1216. Herd
747: “Rare.” Holliday 339. Howell, California 50:447:
“His account of the six months spent in the Bay Area is
among the most important early descriptions of pastoral
California.   “   Howes   E66.   Littell   315.    Merrill,
Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 18. Norris 1045.
Reese, Six Score 36: “Narrative of the first recorded
cattle drive in California.... Aside from its cattle
interest, which recounts bringing some 630 head of
cattle from California to Oregon, the book is also a
California and fur item.” Plains & Rockies IV:48n. Rocq
14541. Streeter Sale V:3008.
    The   Willamette   Cattle  Company   was    the   first
cooperative venture among the Oregon settlers from the
United States. In 1835, President Andrew Jackson sent
William Slacum, a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy, to report
on the situation in Oregon. When Slacum discovered the
Hudson’s Bay Company held a monopoly on cattle in
Oregon, he persuaded the American settlers to unite to
buy cattle in California and bring them back to Oregon.
In January 1837 the Willamette Cattle Company was formed
for this purpose. That same year some 600 head of cattle
were herded to Oregon. The success of this venture gave
American settlers a growing sense of independence from
the Hudson’s Bay Company. The author, who served as
Treasurer of the Willamette Cattle Company, originally
came to Oregon in 1833 with Captain Wyeth’s party.
    Edwards arrived in San Francisco on February 29,
1837, and his day-by-day narrative ended on September
18, somewhere near Mount Shasta, as the company
attempted to reach the Willamette Valley. Following is
an   excerpt   from  Edwards’   journal   describing    the
vicissitudes of driving a motley herd of wild, stubborn,
skittish beasts overland and across waterways. In the
genre of trail drive literature, Edwards’ account is
very early, but the sentiments he expressed remained
true to form to the end of the trail-driving days:
    “Horrors! Now we chased the cattle until after the
moon rose, to get them across a little water [San
Joaquin River] not more than knee deep. And then the
state of camp! Shut the book! The last month, what has
it been? Little sleep, much fatigue! Hardly time to eat,
many times! Cattle breaking like so many evil spirits
and scattering to the four winds! Men, ill-natured and
quarreling,   growling  and   cursing!   Have,  however,
recovered the greater part of the lost cattle and
purchased others. Another month like the last, God
avert! Who can describe it?” $1,000.00

1778.   EDWARDS, Philip Leget. The Diary of Philip Leget
Edwards: The Great Cattle Drive from California to
Oregon in 1837. San Francisco: Grabhorn Press, 1932. [6]
47 pp., color frontispiece (San Francisco in 1837, after
a watercolor by Vioget). Small 4to, original half green
cloth over marbled boards, green gilt-lettered paper
label on upper cover. Other than a bit of mild foxing, a
fine copy.
    Limited edition (400 copies). Grabhorn Press Rare
Americana Series 4. Grabhorn 172. Herd 748: “Scarce.”
Rocq 14542.
    In his introduction, Douglas S. Watson, remarks:
“Along the Willamette the first farmer settlers lacked
cattle,   so   necessary  to   the  conquering   of  the
wilderness.... The California that Edwards...saw was
pictured by Richard Henry Dana, Jr., in his Two Years
before the Mast.’ Dana however, was yet to write his
classic tale of the California hide and tallow trade.
The Missions that once flourished from San Diego to
Sonoma had fallen into decay; secularized, they were
being stripped of their herds, and newly created
rancheros waxed rich from their spoils.... Of the 729
head of stock with which the drive started, 630 were to
reach Oregon; a contribution from Mexican California
which helped save Oregon settlements.... Aside from the
historical importance...the story of the great cattle
drive from California to Oregon in 1837 presents a
picture of early far western life, of hardships and
obstacles   overcome,  told  in  forceful   yet  simple
language, which give it a lasting place in the
literature of the American conquest of this continent.”
    $100.00

1779.   EDWARDS, P[hilip] L[eget]. Sketch of the Oregon
Territory; or, Emigrants’ Guide. N.p., [1953?]. 20 pp.
16mo, original beige printed wrappers, stapled (as
issued). Very fine.
    Limited   edition  (#66  of   500   copies);  modern
facsimile of the first edition, published at Liberty,
Missouri in 1842 (Yale owns the only copy extant). Howes
E67n: “First guide to the Pacific coast.” Mintz, The
Trail 139n. “Edwards made the trip in 1834 with Wyeth
and spent four years in the Oregon Territory.” Plains &
Rockies IV:89n. Smith 2745.
    Edwards advises overland parties to start with a
good supply of cattle because it is easier to drive
cattle than to pack other provisions. On the Blue Ridge
and Cascades, Edwards remarks: “This district, which
affords little prospect to the tiller of the soil, is
perhaps one of the finest grazing countries in the
world. It has been much underrated.... The herdsman in
this extensive valley of more than one hundred and fifty
miles in width, could at all times keep his animals in
good grass.... I think this section for producing hides,
tallow and beef, is superior to any part of North
America” (pp. 7-8).
    At pp. 17-18, Edwards recalls the cattle driven from
California to Oregon in 1837: “A joint stock company was
formed for the purpose of procuring cattle from
California.... The cattle were to be driven through the
intervening country usually laid down on our maps as
‘the unexplored region.’ With a company of seventeen
white men and three Indian boys, we started with 800
cattle, and reached the Wallamette with 630. The
expedition was replete with hardships and dangers....
Previous to this, there were but few cattle in the
Territory, except those belonging to the Hudson’s Bay
Company.... Those which we brought to the Wallamette
(sic), were all young cows, with barely a sufficiency of
males for the purposes of procreation.” $75.00

1780.   EDWARDS,  William   B.  The   Story   of  Colt’s
Revolver: The Biography of Col. Samuel Colt. Harrisburg,
Pennsylvania: Stackpole, [1953]. 470 pp., numerous text
illustrations (mostly photographic plus over 80 pages of
facsimiles—original patent and other documents). 4to,
original green cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Contains a chapter on Texas Ranger
Capt. Samuel Hamilton Walker and how he helped
revolutionize the Colt revolver for frontier use. “The
Colt revolver remained preeminent among such arms in
Texas and throughout the West for the remainder of the
nineteenth century. The 1873 Single Action Army model,
known as the Peacemaker or simply six-shooter, became
the standard sidearm of the postwar military, the Texas
Rangers, and the majority of cowboys across the
plains.... Windmills, barbed wire fences, and Colt
revolvers have been credited with settlement of the
Great Plains. The Colt revolver and Texas remain
inextricably associated in history, symbolism, and
romance” (Handbook of Texas Online: Colt Revolvers).
    The Colt revolver is generally considered to have
been the primary weapon of choice of cowboys and
cattleman. Phillip Ashton Rollins pointed out that the
average cowboy did not carry a gun.  $125.00

1781.   EELLS, Myron. Marcus Whitman, Pathfinder and
Patriot. Seattle: The Alice Harriman Company, 1909. 349
pp.,     frontispiece    portrait,    plates    (mostly
photographic), folding map. 8vo, original blue cloth.
Upper cover with two small puncture holes and a few
light stains, lower hinge cracked, interior very fine.
In pictorial d.j. (dusty and chipped). Bookseller Fred
Lockley’s printed label on front pastedown.
    First edition. Smith 2763. “Dr. Whitman received his
first insight into the monopoly which the Hudson’s Bay
Company held. When he inquired about obtaining cattle
from the Company, he was told that he could have them on
the same terms that other settlers obtained them. This
was to take wild oxen, break them, use them until the
Company required them, and then return them...for there
were no cattle in the country at that time except those
owned by the Company and the few that the missionaries
had just brought” (p. 50). This account includes
material on Jesse Applegate and 1843 migration with the
“Cow Column.” $45.00

 Nine Binding Variants of a Great Mormon Pioneer Account
1782.   EGAN, Howard. Pioneering the West, 1846 to 1878:
Major Howard Egan’s Diary; Also Thrilling Experiences of
Pre-Frontier Life among Indians; Their Traits, Civil and
Savage, and Part of Autobiography, Inter-Related to His
Father’s Edited...by Wm. M. Egan.... Richmond, Utah:
Howard R. Egan Estate, 1917. 302 [1] pp., text
illustrations (some full-page, mostly photographic).
12mo, original red pictorial cloth. Very fine.
    First edition. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the
Plains and the Rockies 154. Flake 3121. Graff 1221
(noting a black binding preceded the red). Howes E76.
Jones 1733. Mattes, Platte River Road Narratives 232:
“Egan seems to have been a roving utility man for the
Mormon pioneers, often up ahead to ‘survey the track’
and to hunt buffalo.... [Egan] saw Brigham Young as a
conservationist ahead of his time, admonishing the
brethren not to destroy game wantonly.” Paher, Nevada
542: “Ranks high in importance and accuracy...includes
primary material on trails across both southern and
northern Nevada...travels on the Mormon Trail to
southern California late in 1849, stopping at Las
Vegas...excellent sections on the Pony Express...the
Overland Mail, home life at Deep Creek Station, other
episodes of frontier life among Indians and delightful
peculiarly Western incidents.” Smith 2771.
    Deep Creek Ranch (photo in text), the most westerly
station of the Pony Express within the present
boundaries of Utah, was the home of the Egan family when
Howard Egan worked as division superintendent for
service between Salt Lake City and Roberts Creek (near
Eureka, Nevada). Sir Richard Burton remarked on Deep
Creek: “The Mormons were not wanting in kindness.... The
people, like the Spaniards, apparently disdain any
occupation save that of herding cattle.”
    Howard Egan (1815-1878) was among the advance guard
of 148 Mormon pioneers who began to move West in 1847 in
72 wagons, with a year’s provisions, agricultural
implements, and a large herd of cattle. Egan’s party
pioneered the Mormon Trail and made one of the early
cattle drives west. Egan includes the laws established
for this overland: “Every man is to put as much interest
in taking care of his brother’s cattle, in preserving
them, as he would his own.” Other cattle interest in the
volume: 1849 cattle drive from Fort Utah (Provo) to
California; great freeze of 1857 that killed so many
Mormon cattle; 1862 cattle drive from Salt Lake City to
Ruby Valley, Nevada; stampede; Egan’s cattle trading
(buying cattle in the winter to drive to California in
the summer); ranching operations at Deep Creek, etc.
    In 1855 Egan blazed Egan’s Trail, a more direct
route from Salt Lake City to California that saved
around 200 miles. Egan’s Trail became the route of the
Pony Express, the overland telegraph, and the Overland
Stage Line. “It is appropriate that Egan Canyon and the
Egan Range, north of Ely, should have been named for the
true discoverer.... Egan held many civil offices in
Utah,   and   was  ‘successful  as   a   missionary  and
intermediary among the Indians’” (Thrapp IV, pp. 155-
56).    $150.00

1783.   EGAN, Howard. Pioneering the West, 1846 to
1878.... Richmond, Utah: Howard R. Egan Estate, 1917.
Another copy, variant binding. 12mo, original olive
green pictorial cloth. Lower hinge cracked, generally
fine. Contemporary bookplate of Hugh F. Watts, Assayer,
Boulder, Colorado, on front pastedown.  $125.00

1784.   EGAN, Howard. Pioneering the West, 1846 to
1878.... Richmond, Utah: Howard R. Egan Estate, 1917.
Another copy, variant binding. 12mo, original light
green pictorial cloth. Light outer wear, else fine.
    $125.00

1785.   EGAN, Howard. Pioneering the West, 1846 to
1878.... Richmond, Utah: Howard R. Egan Estate, 1917.
Another copy, variant binding. 12mo, original light
brown pictorial cloth. Light wear and lower hinge
cracked, otherwise fine. $125.00

1786.   EGAN, Howard. Pioneering the West, 1846 to
1878.... Richmond, Utah: Howard R. Egan Estate, 1917.
Another copy, variant binding. 12mo, original grey
pictorial cloth. Pp. 177-208 slightly warbled, otherwise
a fine copy.   $100.00

1787.   EGAN, Howard. Pioneering the West, 1846 to 1878:
Major Howard Egan’s Diary. Richmond, Utah: Howard R.
Egan Estate, 1917. Another copy, variant binding. 12mo,
original tan pictorial cloth. Pp. 49-80 slightly
warbled, otherwise fine. $100.00

1788.   EGAN, Howard. Pioneering the West, 1846 to
1878.... Richmond, Utah: Howard R. Egan Estate, 1917.
Another copy, variant binding. 12mo, original blue
pictorial cloth, spine has more decorative detail and
name of printer (Skelton Publishing Co., Salt Lake
City). Moderate shelf wear, interior fine, overall a
very good copy. Ink ownership signature on title page.
    $100.00

1789.   EGAN,   Howard.   Pioneering   the   West,   1846   to
1878.... Richmond, Utah: Howard R. Egan Estate, 1917.
Another copy, variant binding. 12mo, original plain
gilt-lettered maroon cloth. One small, clean tear to
title page, otherwise a fine copy. $100.00

1790.   EGAN, Howard. Pioneering the West, 1846 to
1878.... Richmond, Utah: Howard R. Egan Estate, 1917.
302 [1] [12, index] pp., text illustrations (some full-
page,   mostly   photographic).   12mo,  original  beige
pictorial cloth. Lower cover lightly soiled, otherwise
fine, with the added 1942 Utah State Historical Society
index.
    First   edition.   Paher,   Nevada  542:  “The  Utah
Historical Society published a long-needed 12-page index
to this book in 1942.” $150.00

1791.   EICKEMEYER, Carl & Lilian Westcott Eickemeyer.
Among the Pueblo Indians. New York: Merriam Co., [1895].
195 pp., frontispiece portrait of authors (standing
before their wagon and with Lilian in full, heavy
Victorian attire), plates (from authors’ photographs).
Small 4to, original green pictorial cloth with silver
lettering on upper cover and spine. Light shelf wear,
otherwise   a   very  fine  copy   with  ink   ownership
inscription on front free endpaper. Laid in is a
bookmark illustrated with silhouettes of a man and woman
who resemble the authors.
    First edition. Saunders 1597. This unpretentious
travel account outlines the New York authors’ journey by
prairie schooner to San Ildefonso, Cochiti, Santo
Domingo, and “Ranches de Taos.” At Cochiti, the
residents staged a spirited game of gallo, involving
wild and reckless horsemanship and an unlucky rooster
(two photos). The authors describe the Pueblo practice
of communal herding (horses, sheep, goats, and burros),
noting that they obtain their horses from Navajo horses
traders (photos of Native American saddle, mesquite
corral, and mounted Navajo horse traders). Lilian
Westcott Eickemeyer was a noted photographer, and her
husband Carl Eickemeyer was the son of German-American
inventor Rudolph Eickemeyer (see next entry).  $175.00

            Presentation Copy Signed by Deming
1792.   EICKEMEYER, Rudolf. Letters from the South-West.
[Astor Place, New York: Press of J. J. Little], 1894.
111 pp., plates and text illustrations (including
frontispiece of author riding a horse) by E. W. Deming.
4to, original three-quarter brown morocco over marbled
boards, paneled spine with raised bands. Joints cracked,
spine worn and chipped, otherwise a very good but
fragile copy. Presentation inscription to “Friend
Butcher” (perhaps photographer Solomon D. Butcher?)
signed by author and artist.
    First    edition.   Dykes,    Fifty   Great  Western
Illustrators (Deming 43). Herd 750: “Scarce.... Letters
written by an educated New Yorker seeking health in the
Southwest, in which he gives some information on the
cowboy.” Howes E84. The author, an electrical engineer
who fled Germany in 1848, invented a hat-curling machine
and designed motors for an elevator company (later to be
known as Otis). Eickemeyer traveled from New York to San
Antonio and on to El Paso and Santa Fe. He quotes a
letter written by his son Carl (see previous entry) at
El Paso in 1893, describing ranches in the El Paso area
and around Hueco Tanks:
    “I have spent a good deal of time with the cow-boys
down in this section, taking trips out to their ranches
and into the mountains with them, and have gotten a fair
insight into the cattle business. There are only a few
losses that the ranchman here has to guard against. He
does not have to worry about cattle being frozen, taken
sick, or straying very far from the ‘cow-camp,’ which is
generally situated near the tanks or springs where they
come to get water.... Now and then a cattle thief will
start at the northern part of the State, with a few head
of cattle, and pick up others from the different ranches
all along the Rio Grande, where he will cross with them
into Mexico. In this way they sometimes collect a herd
of many hundred cattle, which they sell the Mexicans. At
other times the thieves are killed by some of the cow-
boys before they reach their destination.”
    In the latter section of the book, the author
narrates his travels in Santa Fe and New Mexico, where
artist Deming’s horse was stolen by Apache or Navajo.
The author states that most of Deming’s illustrations in
the book were made from life. $350.00

1793.   EL PASO MUSEUM OF ART. The McKee Collection of
Paintings. El Paso: [Designed by Carl Hertzog for] El
Paso Museum of Art, [1968]. 66 [1] pp., frontispiece,
text illustrations (many in color). 4to, original green
cloth with pictorial label. Very fine in publisher’s
glassine d.j.
    First edition, cloth issue. Lowman, Printer at the
Pass 225A: “This book is a thing of exceptional beauty.
One of the printer’s finest achievements in recent
years.” The emphasis of the McKee collection is
Southwestern art. Some of the paintings included are
“Cowboys” by W. Herbert Dunton, “Ranch Wandering” by W.
H. D. Koerner and “Cattle Drive” by Theodore Van Soelen.
    $50.00

1794.   [EL PASO SADDLERY CO.]. Catalogue # 61-B 1980-
81. El Paso: El Paso Saddlery Co., 1980. [1] 44 [1] pp.,
text illustrations. Square 8vo, original beige pictorial
wrappers (stapled, as issued). Other than slight
staining to wraps, fine, with price list and order form
laid in.
    Catalogue   of  stockman   accoutrements,  such   as
saddles, holsters, knives, and belts. $25.00

1795.   ELDER, Paul. The Old Spanish Missions of
California:     An     Historical    and     Descriptive
Sketch...Illustrated Chiefly from Photographs by Western
Artists. San Francisco: [Tomoyé Press for] Paul Elder
and Company, 1913. v [1] 89 [1] pp., printed on thick
grey paper, numerous tipped-in photographs printed on
matte finish paper (by A. C. Vroman and others). 4to,
original grey gilt-lettered boards with photograph of
Mission San Gabriel on cover. Very fine in discolored
d.j. Difficult to find in collector’s condition.
    First edition. Cowan, p. 193. Levin & Morris, Art of
Publishers Bookbindings 88. Weber, The California
Missions, p. 30: “Filled with delightful sketches in
prose, poetry and photography.” For almost five decades,
Paul Elder operated the most significant bookstore in
San Francisco, and from 1898 to 1917, at the height of
the American Arts & Crafts movement, he published and
printed books in his Maybeck-designed bookshop. Elder’s
Tomoyé Press, run by printer John Henry Nash, strove to
create “the book beautiful.” This venture launched
Nash’s career and paved the way for San Francisco’s fine
presses of the 1920s and 1930s.
    This beautifully executed Arts and Crafts book
contains interior and exterior photographs of the
missions and a history of each establishment. Peripheral
mention of sheep and cattle raising is found: “The live
stock of each Mission was an extensive part of the
activities, and as there were large herds of cattle,
sheep and horses, a good number of men and boys were
engaged in their care. They soon became most efficient
as horse-trainers and surpassed their teachers in the
use of riatas which they braided from rawhide. They were
daring riders, and fearless hunters, roping the mountain
lion and even bringing in the dangerous grizzly bears
for their bear and bull fights, with no other weapon
than the riata. As sheep and cattle herders they had an
instinctive ability.... The time of the rodeo, when the
cattle were rounded up for examination and counting, was
set apart as a period of feasting and pleasure and of
visiting from one Mission another.... Neophytes were
frequently granted a vacation of a fortnight, in which
they   could  visit   their  pagan   relatives   in  the
rancherias” (pp. 67-68). $125.00

1796.   ELDER, Paul (comp.). California the Beautiful:
Camera Studies by California Artists with Selections in
Prose and Verse from Western Writers. San Francisco:
Paul Elder and Company, [1911]. [2] v [1] 72 [3] pp.,
printed on thick brown paper, numerous tipped-in
photographs printed on matte finish paper (photographers
include Arnold Genthe, A. C. Mudge, W. E. Dassonville,
et al.). 4to, original half natural burlap over tan
gilt-lettered boards with tipped-on photograph of
Mission San Gabriel on cover. Very fine copy. Difficult
to find in this condition.
    First edition. Cowan, pp. 192-93. A beautiful fine
press collection of photography and writing in homage to
the natural beauty of California. Among the contributors
are John Muir, Ina Coolbrith, Joaquin Miller, Helen Hunt
Jackson, George Sterling, Frank Norris, and Bret Hart.
    Included among the selections is Marshall Ilsley’s
poem “An April Day on the Hope Ranch” in Santa Barbara,
with accompanying photograph taken on the ranch (much of
which is now an upscale real estate development,
although equestrian and bike trails remain). Thomas
Hope, an Irishman who worked as a Texas cowboy,
eventually moved to Southern California and acquired two
former Mexican land grants (over 6,000 acres) that bear
his name today.    $125.00

1797.   ELDREDGE, Zoeth Skinner. The Beginnings of San
Francisco from the Expedition of Anza, 1774, to the City
Charter of April 15, 1850, with Biographical and Other
Notes. San Francisco: Zoeth S. Eldredge, 1912. 433 + [6]
444-837 pp., frontispiece, numerous plates (vintage
prints and photographs, including Turrill and Miller
daguerreotype of Mission San Francisco de Asis in 1849),
maps (some folding). 2 vols., 8vo, original green cloth,
t.e.g. Light shelf wear, spines sunned, otherwise fine,
partially unopened. Attractive contemporary engraved
bookplates of Nancy Campbell on front pastedowns. San
Francisco bookseller Newbegins’ small navy blue printed
label over imprint of Vol. 2.
    First edition. Cowan, p. 193: “Of great historical
value.” Rocq 7963. The author discusses the importance
of the hide and tallow trade to the early development of
San Francisco: “The opening of the ports to foreign
trade was a great stimulus to California development and
the secularization of the missions opened the lands to
settlement. Cattle raising became a great industry and
each year more ships came to the coast for hides and
tallow” (p. 212).
    The reproduction of Duflot de Mofras’ 1840 map of
San Diego is accompanied by a caption pointing out the
location of the hide houses mentioned by Dana. Other
ranching material: Cattle rustling undertaken by the
“Indians of the Tulares” and the resultant vexation and
retribution of the rancheros; biographies of early
rancheros; “The Great Ranchos”; “Private Ranchos in
1830”; land grants; “The Outfit of a Caballero”;
California horsemanship; secularization of missions
(plight of missionized Native Americans, loss of their
herds and pastures, slaughter of thousands of cattle for
hides when secularization orders came); etc. $125.00

1798.   ELIAS, Solomon Phillip. Stories of Stanislaus: A
Collection of Stories on the History and Achievements of
Stanislaus County. Modesto, [1924]. 344 pp. 8vo,
original green and brown embossed cloth gilt. Fine, with
author’s signed presentation inscription.
    First edition. Cowan, p. 193. Rocq 14981. In the
1850s,   Stanislaus   County,  California  secured   its
reputation as a cattle county: “The assessor’s report
for 1857 is particularly full and complete and
demonstrates the advance that the county had made in the
cattle industry” (p. 13). The county’s first industry
was grazing: “The low hills of the eastern part of the
county and the plains were used for pasturage of stock
that roamed at will over the unfenced and unpre-empted
lands of the government. The waters of the rivers were
easily accessible. It was the romantic day of the cowboy
and the vaquero” (p. 17).
    This county history contains information on early
ranchers in the area (Horr, Newman, Elliott, Hall, and
others). Irrigation projects in the 1870s transformed
the county into an agricultural mecca, and many chapters
are devoted to the evolution of irrigation and water
rights.    Other    subjects include   Native   Americans
(treaties, James Carson’s descriptions of Tulare Valley
Natives),        Estanislao     (brigand-rustler,      or
disenfranchised neophyte?), Vigilante era, Hill’s and
Knight’s ferries, pioneer newspapers, mining, political
history, Modesto, LaGrange, Tuolumne City, Turlock, etc.
    $75.00

1799.   ELIAS,    Solomon     Phillip.   Stories      of
Stanislaus.... Modesto, [1924]. Another copy.      Light
wear, but generally fine copy.    $75.00

1800.   ELIEL, Frank. Our Little Old Home Town, Dillon,
Montana: Reflections and Reminiscences Recorded by....
[wrapper title]. N.p., n.d. [33] pp. 8vo, original tan
printed self-wrappers, stapled (as issued). Wrappers
with a few minor marginal chips, otherwise a fine copy.
    First edition. A brief local history, encompassing
the latter part of the 1800s. The author has this to say
about the cowhands of Dillon: “The Independence Day
celebration was a regular annual event, with its
patriotic oration, parade and general hilarity. The
cowboys and horse wranglers enjoyed the day and were a
prominent feature of the festivities. But our cowboys
were not of the type now pictured in the movies. The
ten-gallon hat was unknown. Our cowboys took their work
seriously” (p. 10).    $45.00

1801.   ELKINS, John M. Indian Fighting on the Texas
Frontier.... Written for Captain Elkins by Frank W.
McCarty. [Amarillo: Russell & Cockrell], 1929. 96 pp.,
photographic plates. 8vo, original grey pictorial
wrappers, stapled (as issued). First and last leaves
with small tears at staples (as usual), otherwise fine.
With contemporary ink note “Written by Jess Brown” above
the chapter on “The Mavericks of the Frontier.”
    Some might consider this a “second edition.” (The
very rare first edition was published at Beaumont in
1908 under title Life on the Texas Frontier; see Howes
E90.) McCarty clearly had the original 1908 in hand and
based this work on it, but in doing so, he substantially
rewrote the original text, both embellishing for
personalities and removing some of the boring details
such as troop organization. McCarty made significant
additions from other sources, probably the reminiscences
of Elkins, then aged 88. Especially interesting is that
McCarty identifies a white woman recaptured from the
Indians (unnamed in the 1908 edition) as Cynthia Ann
Parker, and rather than a short comment, he devotes a
whole chapter to her in the present version (pp. 33-36).
Also, three new chapters are added at the end, authored
by Mrs. Ellen Johnson Elkins [Elkin’s wife]: “Old
Phantom Hill and its Tragedies,” “The Story of Old Fort
Chadbourne,” and “Interesting History of Old Camp
Colorado.” Pages 92-96 are an additional new chapter by
W. N. Alexander: “Born under the Lone Star Flag.”
    Campbell, p. 177. Rader 1292. Tate, Indians of Texas
2366: “In addition to recounting his role in Texas
Ranger duties along the northwestern Texas frontier
during the 1860s and early 1870s, Captain Elkins offers
his firsthand description of the recapture of Cynthia
Ann Parker by Rangers.” The author was a cattleman,
Texas Ranger, and first sheriff of Coleman County. In an
unvarnished manner Captain Elkins relates many violent
encounters with Comanche rustlers and raiders who made
ranching highly hazardous in the early days: “Battle of
Marlin’s Ranch” (1860s); “The Fate of a Cruel Band”
(raid of Wallis Brown Ranch, 1873); “The Fate of the
Ranchman” (1864 attack on Mrs. Twiggs’ Ranch and the
Bragg Ranch in which “several women used a gun equally
as well as the men”); “The Courageous Frontier Women”;
“The Shrewd Work of General Sherman” (1874 campaigns of
Ranald Mackenzie).
    “The Theft of a Thousand Cattle” describes one of
the most abortive cattle drives in range history. In
1871 Richard “Uncle Rich” Coffee, whose ranch was forty
miles southwest of Camp Colorado on the Concho River,
rounded up his herd of more than a thousand cattle for a
trail   drive   to   New   Mexico.   Comanches   watched
preparations from their hiding places, and as the trail
drive began, they attacked, killing one cowboy, wounding
Coffee’s son, and stealing the entire cattle herd and
fifty horses. “This left Uncle Rich practically no
property at all. In one day this ranchman lost the
savings of a lifetime” (p. 50).   $125.00

1802.   ELLARD, Harry. Ranch Tales of the Rockies
by...”Poet Lariat of the Ranches.” Cañon City, Colorado,
1899. 103 [1] pp., frontispiece (photographic portrait
of    author   in    fancy   fringed   buckskin),   plates
(photographic    and    humorous  line   drawings),   text
illustrations. Small 4to, original green pictorial
cloth, t.e.g., bevelled edges. Gilt on front cover
slightly dull, otherwise fine.
    First edition, “Author’s edition.” Range verse,
including “The Anglomaniac in the Rockies,” wittily
addressing the “nuisance” of the influx of Englishmen on
the Colorado range. Some of the unattributed photographs
document working cowboys (roundup, branding, herding to
Denver, “Volunteers for the Cowboy Regiment” [Wyoming
Rough Riders]).     $75.00

1803.   ELLENBECKER, John G. The Jayhawkers of Death
Valley. Marysville, Kansas: [Privately printed], 1938.
[2] 130 pp., numerous photographic illustrations, one
foldout. 8vo, original terracotta printed wrappers.
Minor wear to fragile wraps and one small stain on
title, otherwise a fine copy.
    First edition. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the
Plains and the Rockies 155. Edwards, Enduring Desert,
pp. 75-76: “Contained in this remarkable book are
numerous photographs of the Death Valley pioneers and
their descendants.... A thesaurus of information.... An
imperishable personal record of the majority of those
intrepid pioneers who immortalized Death Valley.... Now
hard to come by.” Howes E91. Mintz, The Trail 141: “A
sought-after book that covers material not found in the
Manly   or    Stephens   narratives....   Contains   the
fragmentary diary of Asa Haynes, not found elsewhere.”
Rocq 2301.
    Ranching hospitality to the rescue—almost at the end
of their rope, the Jayhawkers found succor in the Santa
Clara Valley after a perilous journey through San
Francisquito Canyon. At the Del Valle Ranch (also
referred to as the San Francisquito Ranch), a “Spanish”
ranching family living in an adobe house came to the
Jayhawkers’ rescue, using sign language to communicate
with the devastated travellers, giving them oranges,
nursing them back to health, and even killing a steer
for them to feast on (pp. 70-71). The author provides a
short history of the 1840 Del Valle Spanish grant
(54,000 acres), noting the ranch was the home of Helen
Hunt Jackson’s Ramona and the upper portion of the grant
became Newhall’s Ranch. The Jayhawkers sometimes held
their reunions at the Newhall Ranch. $150.00

1804.   ELLENBECKER, John G. Oak Grove Massacre, Oak,
Nebraska, Indian Raids on the Little Blue River in 1864,
As   Printed   in    the   Marysville   Advocate-Democrat.
Marysville, Kansas, n.d. (ca. 1930s?). [4] pp. Folio.
Browned,   otherwise    fine.  Rare   (RLIN  locates   the
University of Minnesota copy; OCLC traces four copies—
University of Minnesota, Denver Public Library, Yale,
and Nebraska Historical Society).
    First edition. Decker 23:305. Not in Howes, Graff,
etc. Privately printed account of Sioux and Cheyenne
depredations between 1860 and 1869, with a chronicle of
losses of life and property, including rustling and
stampeding livestock, e.g.: “In the gigantic raid of
August 7, 1864, practically all the stations and ranches
were burned from Julesberg to Kiowa station with the
exception of Little Blue station; in all about thirty
stations and five times as many ranches.” $450.00

1805.   ELLENBECKER, John G. The Pony Express [wrapper
title]. N.p., n.d. 8 pp., photographic illustration.
Narrow 12mo, original cream printed self-wrappers,
stapled. Lightly worn and age toned, a few ink
notations, overall very good.
    First edition. Includes details on the Pony Express
saddle    and   mochilla,  Pony   Express  Bible,   and
biographical information on perhaps the most famous of
the Pony Express riders, fifteen-year-old Bill Cody of
later Wild West fame. $35.00

1806.   ELLIMAN, SONS & COMPANY. The Uses of Elliman’s
Embrocation for Horses, Dogs, Birds, Cattle. Slough,
England: Elliman, Sons & Company, 1899. 184 [2] pp.,
engraved frontispiece, text illustrations (some full-
page), ads. 8vo, original gilt-lettered purple cloth.
Binding faded, spine damaged, lower hinge cracked and
endpaper torn—fair copy only.
    “Second edition” (according to title; RLIN, OCLC,
and British Museum Catalogue show no earlier edition). A
first-aid manual for animals, with descriptions of
various   cattle   ailments  and  accidents,   including
choking, cramps, delirium, dislocations, glossitis,
warbles, and lightning (no remedy for the latter, alas,
but the author notes that in many cases fire insurance
will cover the loss). Amazingly, many of the maladies
described can be cured or eased by purchasing Elliman’s
Embrocation.    $35.00

1807.   ELLIOT, W. J. The Spurs. [Spur, Texas]: The
Texas    Spur,  1939.   [12]   274   pp.,   frontispiece
(photographic portrait of author) and photographic
plates printed on clay-coated paper (lime green on
rectos, kelly green on versos), text illustrations.
12mo, original green cloth. A few minor spots and nicks
to binding, small, closed tear to lower free endpaper,
very good to fine in original glassine d.j. (much better
condition than usually found).
    First edition. Campbell, My Favorite 101 Books about
the Cattle Industry 32. CBC 1406. Dykes, Collecting
Range Life Literature, p. 15; Western High Spots, p. 102
(“The Texas Ranch Today”). Herd 757: “Scarce.... A
history of this famous ranch by one connected with it.
Privately printed and now quite difficult to come by.”
Howes E100. Reese, Six Score 37: “While this book is
rather crudely printed and written, it gives more of the
flavor of the Spur Ranch than any other book. The author
worked for the Spur outfit, and there are many tales of
personal experiences of himself or his comrades.”
    The author spends more time discussing the fantastic
dinosaurs that roamed the vast prehistoric landscape
that became the Spur Ranch than the Wanderers-Who-Make-
Bad-Camps band of Comanche who dominated the region
before being chased out by Ranald Mackenzie and losing
their life sustenance to Anglo buffalo hunters with
their omnipotent 40-70 Sharps Winchesters. The author
glosses history: “It was only a very few years after the
slaughter of the buffalo began until they were
practically exterminated. Then the cowmen with the
longhorn cattle took the place of the Indian and the
buffalo. So short a time has passed, with such
tremendous changes, and consequences in the evolution of
an empire” (p. 5).
    In 1883 Alfred M. Britton and S. W. Lomax
established Spur (or Espuela) Ranch east of the Southern
High Plains, quickly augmenting their holdings with
242,000 acres in Dickens, Kent, Garza, and Crosby
counties purchased at $515,540 from the New York & Texas
Land Company. The deal was sweetened by the fact that
Britton and Lomax leased at a giveaway rate the blocks
of state-owned land (327,000 additional acres) adjacent
to their holdings (Texas had retained title to alternate
sections in the surveyed block for railroads). The savvy
entrepreneurs purchased most of their cattle from small
ranchers who, no longer having access to the open range,
were forced to sell to the Espuela.
    Aware of keen British speculation in American cattle
and range privileges, Britton scurried to London in 1884
and by 1885 sold the Spur Ranch to British capitalists
(the Espuela Land and Cattle Company), who had twenty-
two long, unprofitable years to regret their decision.
In 1906 the Brits unloaded the ranch for $5 an acre
(including livestock, improvements, and equipment) to E.
P. and S. A. Swenson of New York (Spur Syndicate). The
new goal was not to raise cattle, but to found towns. As
for this venture, some idea of the success of the towns
founded by the Spur Syndicate may be inferred from
statistics on the town of Spur: “Spur had a population
of 1,747 in 1970, 1,690 in 1980, and 1,300 in 1990. It
is the largest town in the county” (Online Handbook of
Texas: Spur, Texas). The present book ably documents the
bright side of life on the Spur Ranch in its hey-day.
    $450.00

      “The State of all States for the Stock Raiser”
1808.   ELLIOTT, John F. All about Texas: A Hand Book of
Information for the Home Seeker, the Capitalist, the
Prospector, the Tourist, the Health Hunter, Containing a
Description     of    the    State...Its    Live     Stock
Industries...Advice to Immigrants, How and When to Come,
etc. Austin: Hutchings Printing House, 1888. [4,
supplement] [2, railroad information] 47 [3] [20, ads]
pp., two engraved portraits (Sul Ross and F. B.
Chilton), ads with engraved illustrations (including
Texas capitol, Driskill Hotel, Travis County Court
House, University of Texas, small area map of North
Texas, etc.), additional ads on inside of upper and
lower wraps. 8vo, original full-color lithographed
pictorial wrappers (by Gast of St. Louis). A few chips
to fragile wrappers, lightly age-toned, upper cover with
original light ink stamp of F. B. Chilton & Co. Real
Estate Agents stamp on front wrapper (Chilton was also
Secretary of the Immigration Bureau of Texas, and his
portrait appears in the supplement). Very good to fine.
Dudley R. Dobie’s laid-in ms. note: “This particular
issue is superior to earlier ones. This is borne out
through ‘Our Supplement’ devoted to Governor Ross and
Secretary Chilton, also the plates...of Ross and
Chilton.”
    First edition, later and best issue (“first twenty
thousand”), with additional material inserted at front
(first issue was same year). Herd 755: “Rare.”
    This   extravagant   promotional  touts    railroads,
mining, cotton, agriculture of all kinds (including
tobacco and grapes), educational institutions, and land,
land, and more land. In the section on “Stock Raising”
there is good period information on cattle, as well as
horses, mules, jacks, sheep, goats, hogs, poultry, and
bees. “The fertile plains where grow perennial grasses
skirted by living streams of good water, and bordered by
storm-sheltering    forests,   make   this    State    of
‘magnificent distances’ and cheapest lands, the State of
all States for the stock raiser” (p. 16).
    A statistical table claims 7,081,976 head of cattle
worth $51,008,550. The attractive lithographed wrappers
show the industries and sacred-cow icons of Texas,
including a cowboy with lasso chasing a herd of steers.
The lithography is the work of the skillful Gast firm in
St. Louis, who executed so many of the Texas General
Land Office and railroad company maps of Texas counties
at the end of the 1870s and through the 1880s. Among the
many ads for real estate firms is that of DeCordova &
Son of Austin. Another ad of interest is T. P. Robinson,
Hides, Austin, Texas. $1,000.00

1809.   ELLIOTT, Richard Smith. Notes Taken in Sixty
Years. St. Louis: R. P. Studley & Co., 1883. [4] 336
pp.,   frontispiece   portrait   of    author  (artotype
photographic process). 8vo, original green cloth stamped
in gilt and blind. Some shelf wear, hinges cracked (but
strong), light marginal browning to text, overall very
good. Ownership ink stamp of Leila C. Elliott of
Coffeyville. Scarce with the portrait.
    First edition, first issue (with the artotype
portrait present). Bradford 1634. Eberstadt 114:291:
“Chapters on old-time mining, railroads of long ago, the
first locomotive in Illinois, Indians, early California,
etc.”; Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains and
the Rockies 156. Garrett, The Mexican-American War, p.
210. Graff 1236. Howes E111: “Port[rait] not in later
issues.” Rittenhouse 186: “Elliott spent many years in
Saint Louis and also went up the Missouri. He describes
his trip over the Santa Fe Trail with Doniphan’s column
during the Mexican War and his return east over the
Trail in 1847.” Saunders 2876. Tutorow 3642.
    Elliott includes a very humorous account of his
aborted attempt to emigrate from Pittsburgh to Texas in
1837 when he encountered the fine and large steamer
Constellation with a Lone Star flag captained by a
German recruiting emigrants (or more likely cannon
fodder). Elliott includes some mention of cattle and
herdsmen, such as “The Herder’s Tale,” a droll poem
written in dialect. “Ride round ’em, eh?—an’ head ’em
back? Head back those Texas steers? Stranger, when you
was made, was stuff a-runnin’ short for ears? But then,
you’ve had no show to l’arn, jest comin’ out this fall;
You’re like them Yankee chaps that gits round here, and
knows it all!”
    Moving on to something more enlightening, the
artotype portrait was made by a process using metal or
glass plates coated with dichromated gelatin to produce
a printing surface. After exposure against a negative,
the plate was washed and treated with glycerin. The
gelatin surface becomes selectively absorbent, and
greasy ink adheres more easily to the parts of the image
containing the least water; the inked plate is then
printed on paper. $150.00

1810.   ELLIOTT, Richard Smith. Notes Taken in Sixty
Years. St. Louis: R. P. Studley & Co., 1883. Another
copy, variant binding. 8vo, original mustard cloth
stamped in gilt and blind. Light shelf wear, covers
soiled, hinges cracked, interior fine. $150.00
1811.   ELLIOTT, Richard Smith. Notes Taken in Sixty
Years. St. Louis: R. P. Studley & Co., 1883. [4] 336 pp.
8vo, original dark purple cloth stamped in gilt and
blind. Light shelf wear, hinges cracked, internally
fine.
    First edition, second issue (without the portrait
that appeared in the first issue).   $75.00

1812.   ELLIS, Amanda M. The Colorado Springs Story.
[Colorado Springs: Dentan Printing Company, 1954]. 48
pp., text illustrations (mostly photographic). 8vo,
original white printed wrappers, stapled (as issued).
Fine. Ownership label and inscription of Edith Blunk.
    First edition. Wynar 934. The author’s pamphlets are
packed with fascinating material on Colorado history.
Here we find material on early ranchers, noting that
some of the imports from Canada and Europe were a
different breed: “One gay Lothario, so handsome and well
bred the ladies called him ‘Adonis’ recited poetry
instead of studying the market for sheep.... Among the
well born ranchmen, ‘fit models of Remington cowboys,’
who by day urged their ponies to speed around sharp
corners, who insisted on afternoon tea, and who at night
correctly clad in evening clothes played escort to
willing ladies, was young Claude Stanhope.... Young
English sons, land hungry, came equipped with the finest
of saddles, shot guns, rifles, correct riding clothes,
and money enough to buy a sheep or cattle ranch.”
    The author tells of Dirty Woman’s Ranch and
cowpunchers who came to Colorado Springs driving immense
herds of cattle and sheep along Pikes Peak Avenue,
crossing Shook’s Run to the east of town, and letting
their animals graze on the buffalo grass. $40.00

1813.   ELLIS, Amanda M. Legends and Tales of the
Rockies. [Colorado Springs: Dentan Printing Company,
1954]. 60 pp., text illustrations (one by Russell,
mostly photographic). 8vo, original yellow printed
wrappers, stapled (as issued). Fine.
    First edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 8
(“Collecting Modern Western Americana”). Yost & Renner,
Russell XVI:99. Among the legends is one of interest for
ranching history: “The Post Hole Digger” about a young
German from the old country who spoke no English but was
hired to dig post holes on government land by the
Massachusetts Yankee entrepreneurs of the Warren Live
Stock Company in southern Wyoming and northern Colorado.
With a shovel, an eight-foot post bar, and a famous
recipe for cooking jack rabbits, the energetic German
set out digging, pointed toward the setting sun. He was
so efficient that the host of men hired to follow behind
him and fill the lengthy line of holes with posts and
string barbed wire never could catch up with him.
Sometimes Mormons in Utah and Wyoming would see the
German posthole digger, but when they tried to talk to
him, he would vanish. After a while, cattlemen even in
Utah and Nevada reported seeing a ghostly figure digging
a never-ending, imaginary line of fence posts.
    As is sometimes the case with folklore, this
whimsical    and    seemingly  simple    tale   actually
encapsulates a momentous event. The concept of extended
fencing and the invention of barbed wire changed
everything in the cattle country. Open range became
well-defined ranches, big outfits gave way to smaller,
more “democratic” ranches, and the great cattle trails
disappeared.    $50.00

1814.   ELLIS, Amanda M. Pioneers. [Colorado Springs:
Dentan Printing Co., 1955]. 52 pp., plates, portraits,
facsimiles. 8vo, original gold printed wrappers, stapled
(as issued). A few light stains to wraps, else fine.
    First edition. Guns 673. Wynar 128. Another of
Ellis’s historical pamphlets packed with fascinating
meanders into Colorado history, this one excellent for
women’s history. Among the pioneers whose stories are
told is “Mrs. Bowman” (first name lost to history), who
travelled with her infant from Atchinson, Kansas, to
Denver in 1864 to join her husband. At first she
encountered friendly Indians who “crowded about us
begging for whiskey and swearing in pure English. They
had acquired a Billingsgate vocabulary of unrivaled
opulence.”
    Soon, however, her wagon was attacked by a large war
party of Sioux, Cheyenne, and Arapaho committing
depredations against all the area ranches. Mrs. Bowman
took the reins from the driver, who was paralyzed with
fear, and made him hold her baby while she made hell-
for-leather to Thompson’s Ranch. Before arriving she was
met by a guard of sixty soldiers and a worried husband.
“Exhausted, she took her baby and drew the veil that
covered his face, that the father could see his son.
‘Like a piece of rare sculpture, he lay...dead.’ The
attack on the Platte in the spring of ’64 seemed the
climax in a series of tragedies. Almost every ranch from
Fort Morgan to Fort Sedgwick...had been attacked....
Ranches, hay, and stock were burned; men, women, and
children, killed and scalped” (pp. 32-33).   $45.00

1815.   ELLIS, Amanda M. The Strange Uncertain Years: An
Informal Account of Life in Six Colorado Communities.
Hamden, Connecticut: The Shoe String Press, 1959. xv [3]
423 pp., frontispiece, portraits, photographic text
illustrations (including Remington and Russell). 8vo,
original blue cloth. Very fine in price-clipped d.j. Ink
ownership signature.
    First edition. Mohr, The Range Country 668: “Denver,
Central City, Leadville, Colorado Springs, Cripple
Creek, Four Corners.” Wynar 519. Yost & Renner, Russell
XVI:143. Lively local history with a crazy-quilt cast of
characters including Coronado, Zebulon Pike, Oscar
Wilde, Helen Hunt Jackson, Soapy Smith, Eugene Field,
Baby Doe Tabor, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and many others.
Several unusual incidents are told of the 1864 Sioux-
Cheyenne-Arapaho reign of terror against the ranch
country along the Platte between Fort Morgan and Fort
Sedgwick, including Cheyenne Old Two Face’s trade in
captive Anglo women captured from ranches. Old Two Face
had discriminating taste and chose only the most
beautiful ladies, taking them to Fort Laramie where he
would demand 3,000 pounds of flour, large amounts of
coffee and sugar, and twenty beef steers in exchange for
such a captive. Includes a chapter on Buffalo Bill Cody.
    $50.00

1816.   ELLIS, Anne. Plain Anne Ellis: More about the
Life of an Ordinary Woman. Boston, New York & Cambridge:
Houghton Mifflin & The Riverside Press, 1931. [6] 264
[1] pp., frontispiece portrait of author in front of a
tent with a group of men and women. 8vo, original blue
cloth. Fine in lightly chipped and browned d.j. with
portrait of author (price-clipped).
    First   edition.   Dobie,   p.   62:   “Disillusioned
observations, wit, and wisdom by a frank woman.” Herd
758: “Story of life in the cattle country.” Wilcox, p.
42. Wynar 3878. Sequel to Life of an Ordinary Woman by
Ellis.   With  humor   and   candor,  Ellis   (1875-1938)
describes the nitty-gritty of her experiences as a camp
cook among Anglo and Mexico cowboys, sheep shearers, and
construction gangs in Colorado. Because so many accounts
of the American West are by and about men, Ellis’s book
presents a fresh view from a voice seldom heard. Ellis
went on to become treasurer of Saguache County. $40.00

1817.   ELLIS, Edward S. Across Texas. Philadelphia:
Porter & Coates, [1893]. iv, 349 [1] 14 (ads) pp.,
frontispiece, plates. 8vo, original brown pictorial
cloth. Shelf-worn, lower hinge broken, text browned.
‘Wild Wood Series’ on cover and spine. Pencil gift
inscription.
    Texas fiction for boys of all ages by one of the
most prolific of the dime novelists (see Johannsen,
Beadle and Adams II, pp. 93-100). The potboiler includes
young Nick’s sojourn among cattlemen and cowboys in West
Texas. $20.00
1818.   ELLIS, Martha Downer. Bell Ranch, Places and
People. Clarendon: Clarendon Press, 1963. xii, 75 [1]
pp., plates (photographic plates by Martha Ellis), text
illustrations by H. D. Bugbee. 16mo, original red cloth.
Very fine.
    Limited edition (500 copies). Dykes, Fifty Great
Western Illustrators (Bugbee 70). A history of the Bell
Ranch in New Mexico and the Pablo Montoya Grant (1824)
from which it was created. About half of the book is
devoted to range verse written by Martha Downer Ellis,
whose husband George F. Ellis managed the Bell Ranch
until his retirement in 1970. $50.00

1819.   ELLIS, Martha Downer. Bell Ranch Recollections.
Clarendon: Clarendon Press, 1965. xi [3] 95 pp.,
frontispiece, plates (photographic, by L. S. Cross,
Harvey Caplin, et al.), text illustrations by Robert
Lougheed, map (Pablo Montoya Grant and Baca Location No.
2, Property of the Red River Valley Co. Bell Ranch New
Mex.) laid in. 12mo, original green cloth. Very fine.
    First edition. Accounts by Bell Ranch employees and
“alumni,” compiled by the wife of a Bell Ranch manager
George F. Ellis.   $75.00

1820.   ELLIS, Martha Downer. Bell Ranch Sketches.
Clarendon: Clarendon Press, 1964. xvi, 103 pp., plates
(photographs by author and others), text illustrations
by Robert Lougheed, endpaper maps. 12mo, original
turquoise decorated cloth. Very fine.
    First edition, limited edition (500 copies). History
and poetic tribute to the New Mexico ranch focusing on
the “cow camps which were so important when the ranch
covered three-quarters of a million acres.” $70.00

1821.   ELLISON, Glenn R. “Slim.” Cowboys under the
Mogollon Rim. [Tucson]: University of Arizona Press,
[1968]. [10] 274 pp., illustrated title and text
illustrations by author, brands. 8vo, original gilt-
lettered orange cloth. Very fine in fine d.j. with one
small tear.
    First edition. Powell, Arizona Gathering II 532:
“Reminiscences in cowboy vernacular.” The story of an
Arizona cowboy, trail driver, and homestead rancher,
born in 1891. Chapters include “Cowboys at Work,”
“Cowboys at Play,” and “Homesteading.” The latter two
chapters are good on women and social history in the
cattle country.   $50.00

1822.   ELLISON,  Robert   S[purrier].   Fort   Bridger,
Wyoming: A Brief History. N.p.: Historical Landmark
Association of Wyoming, 1938. 79 [2] pp., illustrations,
some by William H. Jackson, maps (1 foldout). 8vo,
original beige wrappers with illustration of the Fort
from a sketch by William Henry Jackson. Fine, with
author’s signed dedication on title. Newspaper clipping
from 1945 regarding author’s death laid in.
    Second printing, revised and enlarged. Introduction
by J. Cecil Alter, preface by Dan W. Greenburg. Malone,
Wyomingiana, p. 3. This little volume has some ranching
material, such as Judge William A. Carter and his Elk
Horn Ranche (including photos). Carter, stockman, post
trader, retail merchant, lumberman, and contractor,
unofficially presided over Fort Bridger in the latter
part of the nineteenth century. Ellison documents the
three distinct periods of the Fort: a privately owned
and operated facility established by mountain man Jim
Bridger; a military post; and a partially restored
museum. $40.00

1823.   ELLSWORTH, H[enry] L. Washington Irving on the
Prairie; or, A Narrative of a Tour of the Southwest in
the Year 1832. New York: American Book Co., 1937. xviii,
152 pp., map, 2 facsimiles. 8vo, original dark blue
cloth gilt. Fine in fine d.j. (price-clipped).
    First edition, first printing (with W.P.I. on
copyright page) of a previously unpublished journal. BAL
V, p. 96 (an important firsthand source on Washington
Irving, with editors’ notes pointing out passages of
Ellsworth’s narrative that parallel Irving’s A Tour on
the Prairies).      Dobie, p. 87. Eberstadt, Modern
Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 157n:
“Washington Irving...accompanied Indian Commissioner
Henry L. Ellsworth and his party on a tour of the
southern Great Plains in the fall of 1832.” Tate,
Indians of Texas 2146. The goal of the mission was to
study the situation in the Southwest after the Indian
Removal Act, mark boundaries, and pacify the Native
Americans. The party travelled to Fort Gibson and almost
as far as the Canadian River. Ellsworth tells us a lot
more about wild horses and buffalo in this book than
Native Americans.      He repeatedly describes Native
Americans and the party’s Rangers chasing and lassoing
mustangs (even including Ellsworth’s map of an encounter
with wild horses; original map at Yale). Ellsworth, who
was keenly interested in natural history, describes an
unusual form of “rustling.” Some the party’s “gallant
steeds” were lured away during the night by wild
mustangs (p. 112). In his studies of mustangs, J. Frank
Dobie refers to this phenomenon and cites Irving’s
account    of  the    expedition.   Ellsworth   comments
extensively on Native horsemanship, particularly Pawnee.
    $50.00

1824.   ELSENSOHN, Sister M[ary] Alfreda (ed.). Pioneer
Days in Idaho County. Cottonwood & Caldwell: Idaho
Corporation of Benedictine Sisters & Caxton Printers,
1951 & 1965. xx [2] 535 + xiv [2] 618 pp., plates
(photographic, some ranch related), endpaper maps. 2
vols., 8vo, original tan cloth and original green cloth.
Fine set in near fine dust jackets (minor wear and
price-clipped). Signed by author.
    First edition (first printing of vol. 2, second
printing of vol. 1, which first issued in 1947); this
two-volume set usually appears in a mixed edition
because of the many years between publication of the
first and second volumes (Vol. 2 is said to be the
difficult one to locate). Herd 761n. Smith S2193. This
work contains good detail on cattle-related events
through the years, e.g. introduction of Herefords from
Iowa; hard winter of 1892-1893 when so many cattle were
lost; virtues of the Camas Prairie as a grazing ground;
spring roundups; sheepherders vs. cattlemen. The author
quotes from an 1890s newspaper accounts, including:
“The sheep and mule men along Salmon River have been
dancing war quadrilles and ghost schottisches since
early winter which culminated in an outbreak a few days
ago. They rolled rocks down the mountains at each other
for two or three days.... A meeting of cattlemen was
held...for the purpose of organizing a cattlemen’s
association to devise ways and means to protect their
property from rustlers and cattle thieves and to prevent
encroachment of sheep on the cattle ranges of the Salmon
and Snake Rivers”—I, p. 382). Included is material such
as August Kopzczynski’s meticulous description of the
old timber rail roundup corral used in the 1880s at
Cottonwood and this understatement: “The cattle roundup
was quite a little slower as cattle don’t drive quite so
fast unless they are on a stampede and then, look out,
for when the cattle stampede, they are hard to handle”
(I, pp. 316-17). Perhaps the most startling animal tale
found within this excellent local history is Harry
Mason’s 1903   roundup of a load of cats sold at $10
apiece in Florence.    Good women’s and social history.
    $150.00

1825.   ELZNER, Jonnie Ross. Lamplights of Lampasas
County, Texas. Austin: Firm Foundation Publishing House,
[1951]. [4] ii [1] 6-219 pp., photographic text
illustrations, maps. 8vo, original green gilt-pictorial
cloth. Fine. Inscribed and signed by author.
    First edition. CBC 2923. Guns 676. Herd 763. There
is quite a bit of detail given on the history of the
cattle industry in Lampasas County, from the earliest
introduction of cattle by vaqueros to biographies of
pioneer cattlemen like Tilford Bean, J. Ringer Kirby,
“Snap” Bean, and others. “The condition of greatest
importance in the development of the cattle kingdom was
the growth of a market for cattle after the Civil War.
Fat steers in Lampasas county which were worth only
$6.00 and $7.00 before the Civil War commanded as high
as $40 to $50 in northern markets” (p. 28). Some
sections of interest:     “Growth of Cattle Industry”;
“Sheep and Wool Industries”; “The Goat Industry”;
“Maverick and His Calves” (origin of the term); “Fence
Cutting in Lampasas County”; “Horrell-Higgins Feud”;
“The Early Cowboy” (“The cowboy of the pioneer
days...was a sort of heroic figure who was dressed in
boots, coarse trousers, bright shirt, chaps, spurs,
sombrero, or ‘ten gallon hat’), bandana, and sometimes
carrying a gun across the saddle or a revolver in his
pocket.    They had good saddles with saddle bags
flapping”—p. 67). $55.00

1826.   EMMETT, Chris. Fort Union and the Winning of the
Southwest. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1965].
xvi, 436 [4] pp., plates (photographic and vintage
prints), maps. 8vo, original blue cloth. Very fine in
fine d.j. (illustrated by Charles Schreyvogel).     From
the library of Carl Hertzog, with his bookplate.
    First    edition.   Dykes,   Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Schreyvogel 58). Rittenhouse 187: “Best
book to date on this famous SFT fort.” Though primarily
concerned with military history, some material on
ranching and cattle is included:    area ranches (Hatch,
Maxwell, and others); U.S. military offer of livestock
as reward to citizens for capturing Navajo who had left
the Bosque Redondo; U.S. reneging on supplying beef to
Ute and other tribes who then rustled stock; etc. Most
important is Emmett’s discussion of the Comanchero,
natives of northern and central New Mexico who conducted
trade with the nomadic plains tribes and headquartered
at Loma Parda near Fort Union. Increased demand for
cattle in New Mexico in the 1870s led to Comanchero
rustling (sometimes with tribal assistance) and trading
in stolen cattle. Emmett quotes an 1871 New Mexico
newspaper report: “This damnable and outrageous traffic
must be stopped, and we cannot sufficiently thank the
military for their laudable efforts in this direction...
Horses and mules from New Mexico are stolen and taken to
the Comanche to trade for cattle. The people on the
Pecos have almost entirely neglected their ranches for
this more profitable traffic... In the last three months
more than 30,000 head of cattle have been brought to
this country from that source alone!” (p. 358). Emmett
describes the resulting army intervention launched from
Fort Union in 1874 and the eventual demise of the
Comancheros.   $65.00

1827.   EMMETT, Chris. Shanghai Pierce: A Fair Likeness.
Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1953]. xiii [1]
326 [2] pp., photographic plates, illustrations by Nick
Eggenhofer, maps. 8vo, original brown cloth. Slight
foxing along hinges, otherwise very fine in fine d.j.
Author’s signed presentation copy: “For Dudley R. Dobie:
Ever my good friend and Texas’ finest bookman. Chris
Emmett.”
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:122. Basic Texas Books
56:   “One   of  the   best  biographies   of  a   Texas
cattleman.... After serving in the Confederate cavalry,
he began to round up wild cattle on the open range and
build a herd of his own.... His company sent untold
thousands of cattle up the northern trails from
Texas.... Material as well on cattlemen such as Ab
Blocker and Ike Pryor.” Campbell, p. 82: “Lively and
authentic biography about Abel Head Pierce, ‘the most
widely known cattleman with the Río Grande and the
British possessions’ as Andy Adams called him—the giant
with the fog-horn voice who described himself as
‘Webster on cattle, by God.’” Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44
#56. Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 15;
Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Eggenhofer 70);
Western High Spots, p. 103 (“The Texas Ranch Today”).
Guns 678. Herd 764. Reese, Six Score 38: “Pierce was a
grand original, the first cattle king of Texas. A well
written biography.”
    “How a penniless boy from New England built a Texas
cattle empire. Pierce was the model for the popular
conception of the cattle baron” (Taylor & Maar, The
American Cowboy, p. 222). $150.00

1828.   EMMITT, Robert. The Last War Trail: The Utes and
the Settlement of Colorado. Norman: University of
Oklahoma   Press,   [1954].  ix,   333  [1]   pp.,  text
illustrations (drawings by Bettina Steinke), maps. 8vo,
original blue cloth. Very fine in fine d.j. Signed by
author.
    First edition. The Civilization of the American
Indian Series 40. Wynar 1802. The Ute trouble arose
because of the tribe’s discontent with their reservation
and controversy between Utes and ranchers over the
desirable grazing lands adjacent to their reservation.
The author relied on original government documents and
manuscripts, along with Ute and Anglo sources.   $75.00

1829.   EMRICH, Duncan. The Cowboy’s Own Brand Book. New
York: Thomas Y. Crowell, [1954]. xiii [1] 75 [7] pp.,
text illustrations and brands by Ava Morgan. Oblong
12mo, original green cloth. Slight foxing to endpapers,
else very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 6
(“Collecting Modern Western Americana”): “Informative
and delightful reading for all boys from seven to
seventy”; p. 85 (“A Range Man’s Library”). Herd 765. The
author instructs the three fundamental rules for reading
brands (read from left to right, top to bottom, and from
the outside to the inside) and shows how to recognize
the variety of letters, figures, numbers, and pictures
in brands. $50.00

1830.   EMRICH, Duncan. It’s an Old Wild West Custom.
New York: Vanguard Press, [1949]. xiv, 313 pp., text
illustrations (including brands). 8vo, original orange
pictorial cloth. Fine in fine d.j. (illustrated with
brands).
    First edition. The American Customs Series. Guns
679. Herd 766. Paher, Nevada 563: “Compendium of Western
customs, names, places and people. Among other things,
the author tells of Virginia City, gambling and women
dealers, drinking, violence, religion, western jargon,
and Virginia City’s Julia Bulette.” This book also
contains extensive information on cowboys, branding, and
the culture of the cattle country.   $45.00

1831.   ENGELHARDT,   Zephyrin.   The   Franciscans    in
California. Harbor Springs, Michigan: Holy Childhood
Indian School, 1897. [4] xvi, 516 [1] pp., text
illustrations (some full-page), map. 8vo, original black
cloth. Spine with two-inch white stain, mild shelf wear,
front free endpaper detached, preliminary and terminal
leafs browned, hinges cracked. Bookplates in front and
back.
    First edition. Blumann & Thomas 4949. Cowan, p. 196.
Graff 1250. Howes E153. Streit III:2929. Wallace,
Arizona History III:7. Weber, The California Missions,
p. 30: “‘The most complete work upon the colonization
and evangelization of California by the Franciscans,’
this volume subsequently served as the ground-plan for
the author’s more elaborate work on The Missions and
Missionaries of California”(see Zamorano 80 #34).
Michael Mathes (Volkmann Zamorano Eighty) points out
that “Englehardt had access to the California Archives
destroyed during the disastrous earthquake-fire in San
Francisco in 1906. This simply means that Englehardt´s
work contains information no longer available to
researchers, and thus makes it an irreplaceable source.”
Engelhardt includes material on the plight of the
missionized    California    Native   Americans     after
secularization of the missions. “They would return to
the wilderness and join the wild Indians in stealing
cattle and horses, in order to sell them to the New
Mexicans and foreigners” (p. 175). Statistics show that
between 1790 and 1800, mission herds of horses, mules,
and horned cattle increased from 22,000 to 67,000,
whereas small stock (sheep and goats) diminished.
Similar statistics are given for other decades. $175.00

1832.   ENGLISH,   Mary   Katharine    Jackson.  Prairie
Sketches; or, Fugitive Recollections of an Army Girl of
1899. [Denver: Privately printed, ca. 1899]. 79 pp.,
photographic text illustrations (some full-page). 8vo,
original green printed wrappers. Very fine. Scarce.
    First edition. Graff 1251. Howes (1954) 3323.
Huntington 292: “An interesting narrative of life and
adventures in the far west, containing details on the
Shoshones, Arapahoes, etc.” The author was a genuine
early western “army brat,” who except for two years in
the East at boarding school, grew up “on an Indian pony”
in remote Western army posts, where her father served as
a major in the 7th Cavalry.         Mary’s high-spirited
account commences in Rawlins, Wyoming, with her arrival
by train from the East and boarding school with her
mother and a female servant. A grizzled peg-legged stage
driver meets the ladies with an army ambulance (photo
included) to drive them overland 150 miles to join
Mary’s father at Fort Washakie. It does not take very
long for Mary to flee the confined ambulance and her
female companions and grab the reins from the driver.
Their stops along the route are Sheep’s Ranch (inhabited
by a lone coyote); Lost Soldier Ranch (“a small pile of
low adobe buildings, unsightly and gray with dust; not a
tree or green thing in sight”); Sweetwater Ranch (“much
of the land being fenced off with the deadly barbed wire
allow no herds of antelope and deer as found in my
girlhood”); and Wind River Ranch (dangerous ascent down
steep Beaver Hill imperiled further by a rattlesnake
that spooked the mules).     Mary hilariously tells of
their overnight sojourn at the rough headquarters of
Lost Soldier Ranch, whose owner Tom proudly relates how
he bought the ranch with savings from working as a
cowpuncher. The ranch had two large rooms, one for
sleeping and the other a bar-kitchen that reeked of beer
(“Think of it! Beer for breakfast, beer for luncheon,
beer for dinner”). The sleeping quarters contained four
enormous beds, each large enough to hold six men. Tom
had thoughtfully partitioned off one bed for the ladies,
making a privacy screen with five-foot, paper-thin
boards (for security there was a big glittery bowie
knife under the bed, and light consisted of a candle in
a broken beer bottle). Mary’s mother and the servant
were so horrified at the immodesty of the sleeping
arrangement that Tom, in a gesture of true ranching
hospitality, graciously agreed that he and his cowboys
would sleep in the other room on the floor. This is a
wonderful account with much more to commend it than
these ranching passages.   This remarkable book written
by a teenager should be reprinted. $350.00

1833.   EPPERSON, Harry A. Colorado As I Saw It.
[Kaysville, Utah: Inland Printing Co., 1944]. [6] 137
pp., photographic plates. 8vo, original black and
burgundy textured cloth gilt. Fine.
    New edition (first edition Buena Vista, 1943). Herd
768. Wilcox, p. 43: “Reminiscences of ranch life in
South Park.” Wynar 6406. A wealth of solid, firsthand
information on ranch life in Colorado by native
Coloradan Epperson (b. 1880). $125.00

1834.   ERDMAN, Loula Grace. The Edge of Time. New York:
Dodd, Mead, [1950]. [8] 275 pp. 8vo, original blue
cloth. A few light spots to binding, endpapers mildly
browned, otherwise fine in very good d.j. (very light
wear). Author’s signed presentation inscription to J.
Frank Dobie; also signed by author on half-title.
    First   edition.   Campbell,  p.   249:  “Story   of
Missourians who pioneer in the panhandle of Texas where
the author makes her home. The background of the novel
is the conflict between the nesters and the cattlemen
with all the hardships of drought, blizzards, wind,
poverty, and loneliness.” See Handbook of Texas Online:
Louise Grace Erdman; Tuska & Piekarski, Encyclopedia of
Frontier & Western Fiction ( pp. 85-86); and WLA,
Literary History of the American West, p. 506. $50.00

1835.   ERLANSON, Charles B. Battle of the Butte:
General Miles’ Fight with the Indians on Tongue River,
January 8, 1877. [Sheridan, Wyoming], 1963. 32 pp.,
photographic text illustrations, maps. 8vo, original red
pictorial    wrappers,   stapled  (as   issued).   Fine.
Privately printed, very scarce.
    First edition. Smith S2633. For fifty years the
author rode the range on the Flying V Ranch which, with
the Circle Three outfit, ran 6,000 head of cattle on the
Cheyenne Reservation. This range was where the Battle of
Butte occurred on January 8, 1877 (Rosebud County,
Montana).   The author meshes together original printed
and manuscript sources with oral histories by tribal
members, including some interviews with survivors of the
Battle.    Only a few days before the Battle, raiding
parties swooped down on a nearby U.S. military
cantonment and drove off the majority of the beef herd
and a good portion of the horses. (Approximately 2,500
people were in the camps of the Cheyenne and Crazy Horse
Ogallala, and it took a large quantity of meat to keep
them supplied since big game was not plentiful, due to
the influx of miners, ranchers, and settlers.) In a
blinding blizzard General Nelson Miles led his forces
against the allied tribesmen. Surrender by the tribes
soon followed. The author carries forward the history of
the Cheyenne:     “When the Indians came in, they were
required to give up their ponies and arms. Later these
ponies were sold and the proceeds used in purchasing a
herd of cattle... Army teams were used by the Indians
for plowing and cultivating the land, [and] when the
Cheyenne finally were given a reservation, they were
almost self-supporting.” At the end is a photograph of
a Cheyenne cowboy with author’s caption: “My old friend
John Stands in Timber. In our youth John and I rode
together on the Cheyenne Reservation Roundup. Photo by
author, taken a number of years ago at the Sheridan
Wyoming rodeo.”    $25.00

1836.   ERSKINE, Gladys Shaw. Broncho Charlie: A Saga of
the Saddle. The Life Story of Broncho Charlie Miller,
the Last of the Pony Express Riders. New York: Thomas Y.
Crowell,   [1934].   xiv   [2]   316   pp.,  frontispiece,
photographic plates, portraits, maps by Broncho Charlie
(1 folding), endpaper maps. 8vo, original tan cloth.
Fine. Bookplate on front pastedown
    First   edition.   Guns   681:   “Scarce....  Contains
information on some Dodge City gunmen.” Herd 769. Howes
E171. Smith 2878. Reminiscences of Broncho Charlie,
written in dialect. “Ridin’ herd at night, you know,
there’s four punchers...one to each side of the cattle,
so that each man covers his territory back and forth, or
sits still on his horse, watchin’ the critters chew
their cud, and careful to keep his eyes and ears open,
so that if any one of ’em gets to movin’ too fast out of
the herd, he can ride up on him and tirn him back in.
Then...another thing...the cattle’ll be lyin’ there, or
millin’ peaceful as anything, and there’ll come thunder
or lightnin’...or a gun shot, closeup...and before you
can say ‘Jack Robinson,’ they’ll all be in a stampede”
(p. 164). Born in a covered wagon moving toward Mount
Shasta, Charlie Miller (1850-1955) was riding for the
Pony Express by age eleven.      He had many jobs in his
exciting life, including bronco busting (which won him
his nickname of “Broncho Charlie”), cow herding,
stagecoach driving, and performing in Cody’s Wild West
show (including his race with cyclist in London).
    $75.00

1837.   ERSKINE, Michael. The Diary of Michael Erskine
Describing His Cattle Drive from Texas to California,
Together with Correspondence from the Gold Fields 1854-
1859. Edited with Notes and Historical Introduction by
J. Evetts Haley. [Midland: Designed by William H. Holman
for] Nita Stewart Haley Memorial Library, [1979]. 173
[1] pp., frontispiece portrait, text illustrations
(mostly full-page, some in color, from vintage prints
such as the Gray and Emory reports). Large 8vo, original
white pictorial linen. Fine copy of a handsomely
realized Holman family imprint, from the library of
Texas printer Carl Hertzog, with his bookplate.
    First edition, limited edition. Wallace, Arizona
History III:63n. Firsthand account of an epic trail
drive, embarked upon in the spring of 1854. Michael
Erskine owned and operated El Capote Ranch in Texas, and
from there set out with a herd of cattle for the
California gold fields with the hopes that his own gold
mine was accompanying him on hoof (clearly a case of
temporary dementia in which Erskine confused his cattle
with the oft-sighted elephant). From the first day’s
entry: “Left Sandies with the herd on Sunday, the 23 or
24. First night stompeded on the Cibolo, lost some
cattle. Stompeded next night, think we lost but few.
Camped next night on the Salado (Seguin crossing).
Cattle quiet.”
    In his introduction Haley remarks on the “rather
unique nature of cowboy records and their importance in
history.... There is precious little material relating
to the experiences of those sun-burnt sons of defiance
who pushed the herds of Longhorns from Texas across half
a hostile continent to feed them. One of the principal
reasons for this scarcity of materials was inherent in
the nature of the trail drivers themselves. In the first
place, as a breed of men rather disciplined in the
school of direct action, cowboys and cowmen were rarely
lush with words, especially when they felt they had
nothing much to say. And in the second, they usually
shied away from writing anything down, especially with
the idea of poppin’ off in print.... Thus original
materials on that period are scant and widely scattered,
and those that have survived assume added significance
and importance.”   $75.00

1838.   ERWIN, Allen A. The Southwest of John H.
Slaughter 1841-1922: Pioneer Cattleman and Trail-Driver
of Texas, the Pecos, and Arizona and Sheriff of
Tombstone. Glendale: The Arthur H. Clark Company, 1965.
368 pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic plates,
maps, facsimiles. 8vo, original red cloth. Very fine in
fine d.j.
    First edition. Western Frontiersman Series 10. Clark
& Brunet 78. Guns 682: “Contains a foreword on the book
by William McLeod Raine (perhaps the last writing he
completed before his death), and a foreword on the
author by Ramon F. Adams. It is the first, and a long-
needed, book on the famous John Slaughter and shows much
research.” Powell, Arizona Gathering II 543.
    Slaughter (1841-1922), sheriff, rancher, and Texas
Ranger, descended from the Slaughter dynasty of pioneer
ranchers of Texas and the Southwest. As a boy, he
ranched with his father and brothers. He learned Spanish
and the art of cowboying from Mexican vaqueros, and many
lessons from Native Americans who still roamed the
frontier of Texas. After the Civil War, he and his
brothers formed the San Antonio Ranch Company in
Atascosa County. Slaughter was one of the first to drive
cattle up the Chisholm Trail. When Texas became too
crowded for him in the 1870s, he moved to Arizona,
eventually establishing San Bernardino Ranch near
Douglas. In 1886 he was elected sheriff of Cochise
County. “He was the inspiration for Walt Disney’s series
of the late 1950s, ‘Texas John Slaughter.’” (Handbook of
Texas Online: John Horton Slaughter). $150.00

1839.   ERWIN, Marie H. Wyoming Historical Blue Book: A
Legal and Political History of Wyoming, 1868-1943.
Denver: Bradford-Robinson Printing, n.d. (ca. 1946).
xxiii [1] 1,471 pp., color plates of Wyoming state flag,
bird, and flower, frontispiece portrait of Governor
Hunt, text illustrations (mostly photographic), maps,
charts. Thick 8vo, original navy blue cloth gilt. Fine.
    First edition. Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 23: “Material
on Wyoming as a territory and as a state.” This mine of
information on Wyoming focuses on legislation and law,
past and present. Early appeals for statehood and
related legal history that are reprinted invariably
refer to stock raising. Senate Bill 2445 (1888): “Much
has been said on the grazing fields of Wyoming. There
are no finer on the continent. The Stock Association of
the Territory estimated there are 2,000,000 head of live
stock, of which about 1,500,000 are neat cattle, owned
and pastured in this Territory.” Inaugural address of
Governor Warren, 1889: “We should deal fairly with...the
stockman who as the pioneer has paid largely of the
taxes and has made later settlement of the country
possible, and who now divides the lands with the
farmer.”    Constitution  of    Wyoming   (1889):   “The
legislature shall pass all necessary laws to provide for
the protection of live stock against the introduction or
spread of pleuro-pneumonia, glanders, splenetic or Texas
fever, and other infectious or contagious diseases.... ”
    Other ranching material includes State Livestock
Boards, statistics, and biographies and photographs of
stockmen who were signers, legislators and/or held
public office, such as Caleb P. Organ (a charter member
of the famous Cheyenne Club), Alexander L. Sutherland,
Jonathan Jones, Hubert E. Teschemacher, Charles W.
Burdick, Robert C. Butler, and many more. We also learn
arcane information, such as the fact that the first
state seal struck in 1891 was never used because it
showed a nude woman. The second seal (1893) depicted a
woman in modest toga, a rancher on the left, a miner on
the right, and inscriptions of LIVESTOCK, MINES, OIL,
GRAIN, and EQUAL RIGHTS.
    Of   Texas   interest  is  a   map   and  historical
information relating to the Republic of Texas owning a
little piece of Wyoming as part of its gigantic
Panhandle based on the Emory map. Of interest for
women’s history is Lester C. Hunt’s “Legislative History
of Woman Suffrage in Wyoming” (Wyoming was progressive
in granting women the right to vote and hold office
thirty years before the feds).    $100.00
1840.  ERWIN, Marie H. Wyoming Historical Blue Book....
Denver: Bradford-Robinson Printing, n.d. (ca. 1946).
Another copy, variant binding. Thick 8vo, original royal
blue cloth gilt. Upper hinge cracked, but otherwise
fine.  $100.00

1841.   ESCALANTE,   Silvestre.     Father    Escalante’s
Journal,   1776-77:   Newly   Translated   with   Related
Documents and Original Maps. Salt Lake City: Utah State
Historical Society, 1943. viii [1] 142 pp., photographic
text illustrations, portraits, maps. 8vo, original brown
textured cloth gilt. Very fine.
    First edition of the first separate printing of
Father Escalante’s journal of the first European
exploration across the Great Basin. Appeared at the same
time as Utah Historical Quarterly 11:1-4 (see below).
Translated, edited, and with introductory remarks by
Herbert S. Auerbach. Farquhar, The Colorado River and
the Grand Canyon 8c.
    As a later Spanish explorer in the West, Escalante’s
journal is interesting for recording the increase in
livestock first brought to the region by the Spanish in
the late 1500s. One of the most significant human-
induced changes affecting the biota of the Colorado
Plateau has been the introduction and proliferation of
domestic livestock. Escalante notes the warlike nature
of Apache in the area adjoining the Gila River and the
lower Colorado River and records their success in
stampeding and stealing many of the Spaniards’ horses
and cattle. Of the Moqui, Escalante notes: “All the
pueblos have many sheep whose wool is usually black.
They also have some cattle. Of these last there are many
more in Araybe. In this one there are also many horses.”
Other such references are found in Escalante’s journal,
as well as the accompanying report by Bernardo de Miera
y Pacheco. $125.00

1842.   ESCALANTE,    Silvestre.    Father    Escalante’s
Journal,   1776-77:   Newly   Translated   with   Related
Documents and Original Maps. Utah Historical Quarterly
11:1-4. Salt Lake City: Utah State Historical Society,
1943. Another copy, in wrappers. 8vo, original grey
printed wrappers. Very fine.
    First edition of the first separate printing.
Appeared at the same time as a separate monograph (see
above). Farquhar, The Colorado River and the Grand
Canyon 8d. $100.00

1843.   ESPINOSA, Aurelio M. The Spanish Language in New
Mexico and Southern Colorado. Santa Fe: New Mexican
Printing Company, 1911. [4] 37 pp. 8vo, original slate
blue printed wrappers. Fine.
    First edition. Historical Society of New Mexico
Publication 16. Saunders 3376. One of the vectors
through which the Spanish language influenced English
was ranching terminology: latigo, lariat, corral,
bronco, vaquero and rancho are just a few familiar terms
attributed to Spanish influence. The author explores the
opposite situation with Hispanicized English terms, such
as son-of-a-gun becoming sanamagón. Náhuatl and other
indigenous linguistic elements are discussed, as well as
special usages in New Mexico and Southern Colorado.
    $75.00

1844.   ESPINOSA, Carmen. Shawls, Crinolines, Filigree:
The Dress and Adornment of the Women of New Mexico, 1739
to 1900. El Paso: [Carl Hertzog for] Texas Western
Press, University of Texas at El Paso, [1970]. xiv [2]
61 pp., text illustrations (mostly full-page, some in
color). 8vo, original half goldenrod cloth over purple
cloth. Very fine in slightly worn d.j. Signed by printer
Carl Hertzog, and Vivian Hertzog’s note paper laid in.
Hertzog bookplate.
    First edition. Lowman, Printer at the Pass 254. This
elegant, scholarly work with introduction and design by
Carl Hertzog contains wills of ten women dated from 1739
to 1831, documenting that New Mexico women owned ranches
and extensive herds.   $50.00
1845.   ESPINOSA,    Carmen.     Shawls,     Crinolines,
Filigree.... El Paso: [Carl Hertzog for] Texas Western
Press, University of Texas at El Paso, [1970]. Another
copy. Very fine in fine d.j. (price-clipped). Extra d.j.
present.    $40.00

1846.   ESPINOSA, Jose E. Saints in the Valleys:
Christian Sacred Images in the History, Life and Folk
Art of Spanish New Mexico. [Albuquerque]: University of
New Mexico Press, 1960. xiii [1] 122 pp., frontispiece,
photographic text illustrations, endpaper map. Folio,
original terracotta cloth. Very fine in d.j. with light
edge wear. Signed by author.
    First edition of a basic book on the subject.
Foreword   by   Angelico  Chavez.  This   work  contains
fascinating information on lesser known consequences
resulting from Spanish introduction of cattle into the
Southwest, particularly the Oñate expedition, which
herded approximately 7,000 cattle into New Mexico in the
early years of the 1600s. Elements of the cow came to be
included in New Mexico sacred art, e.g., braided leather
was fashioned into the Crown of Thorns as a symbol for
bultos representing Christ, and the first protective
coat given to wood for santos consisted of a gelatinous
substance made from cow horns or hoofs. We also learn
that during the great famine of 1670, both Spanish and
Native Americans in New Mexico fought off starvation by
eating roasted hides (p. 12).
    The author comments in general on the use of santos:
“The myriad problems incident to the rugged life of
farmers, sheep men, cattlemen, and horsemen, in short,
the daily concerns of people living close to Mother
Earth, called for special patrons from the long list of
holy men and women whose lives reflected a special
interest in or association with specific situations” (p.
84). John the Baptist was patron saint of shepherds, and
Santa Iñez was invoked for the recovery of strayed
livestock (perhaps Anthony of Padua, finder of lost
articles, might have proven efficacious on those later
trail drives, or even Rita of Cascia, advocate of the
impossible).   $150.00

1847.   ESTILL, Julia. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz: His
Heritage and Training. Fredericksburg: [Fredericksburg
Publishing Company], 1942. [12] pp., photographs. 12mo,
original white pictorial wrappers. Upper wrap slightly
discolored due to acid migration from mailing envelope
(present), else fine.
    Offprint from the Fredericksburg Standard, December
25, 1941. The noted military leader mentions his Uncle
Henke’s   Wolf  Creek   Ranch   between   Kerrville  and
Fredericksburg, where, according to his own statement,
he spent the happiest days of his early teens.   $50.00

1848.   [ESTILL, Julia]. Fredericksburg, in the Texas
Hill    Country   [wrapper    title].   [Fredericksburg:
Fredericksburg Publishing Company, 1946]. [36] pp.,
photographic illustrations, map. 8vo, original full-
color photographic wrappers. Very fine.
    First edition. CBC 1890. Guide and promotional
issued for the Fredericksburg Centennial. Includes
photographs of the Morris Ranch and a section on
ranching in the region.    $40.00

1849.   EVANS, Joe M. Collecting Friends: My Hobby. [El
Paso: Guynes Printing for the author, 1952]. [10] 150
pp., facsimiles. 12mo, original blue pictorial cloth. A
few light stains to binding, interior fine. Author’s
signed and dated inscription, “To Dave Cameron, with my
best wishes, Joe M. Evans, 1962.” Carl Hertzog
bookplate.
    First edition. The author, a Baptist ranchman,
writes brief sketches thanking his friends for their
friendship, including West Texas open-range rancher
Henry “Old Moss” Mayfield. He describes the fellowship
of the Bloys Cowboys camp meetings in the Davis
Mountains attended by cowboys and ranch families (see
Handbook of Texas Online: Bloys Camp Meeting). Evans
regales with platitudes about cowboys and ranch life,
e.g.: “A good start is more than half the battle; that
is the reason the cowboys and ranch people always get up
early, so as to get a good start”; and “A horse is a
cowboy’s first love.” $35.00

1850.   EVANS, Joe M. The Cow: About All I Know I
Learned from a Cow [wrapper title]. [El Paso: Guynes
Printing, 1944]. 71 pp., photographic portrait of author
on   horseback  at   front,  plates   (photographic  and
cartoons). 12mo, original beige pictorial wrappers,
stapled (as issued). Minor wear to fragile wraps,
otherwise a fine copy, signed by author.
    First edition. Herd 775. A humorous homage to the
cow. “The cow is a four legged animal with horns, hide,
teats and tail. She produces beef and milk and calves,
and is surrounded by cowboys and mortgages” (p. 7). Some
of the cartoons are by J. R. Williams, noted comic
artist of range life. $75.00

1851.   EVANS, Joe M. The Cow: About All I Know I
Learned from a Cow [wrapper title]. [El Paso: Guynes
Printing, 1944]. 71 pp., plates, portrait, photographs,
illustrations. 12mo, original beige pictorial wrappers,
stapled. Small tape repair to upper wrapper and short,
clean tear at spine, overall a very good copy. Ink
ownership inscription on title page.
    Second printing.   $10.00

1852.   EVANS, Joe M. (ed.). A Corral Full of Stories.
[El Paso: McMath, 1939]. x, 66 pp., frontispiece plate
(author and J. Frank Dobie looking very much in his
cups), plates (photographic), text illustrations (some
full-page) by Tom Lea, J. R. Williams, and others,
brands. 12mo, original salmon pictorial wrappers with
photographic illustration. Fine in d.j., with four order
forms for the book laid in. Author’s inscribed and
signed presentation copy to Dudley R. Dobie.
    First edition. Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Lea
153). Herd 774. These stories, often humorous, center on
cowboys and range life, with subjects ranging from dogs
to   droughts   and   preaching  to   politicians.   The
documentary photos are excellent. The design and
typography show the influence of Carl Hertzog.   $75.00

1853.   EVANS, Joe M. (ed.). A Corral Full of Stories.
[El Paso: McMath, 1939]. Another copy. Moderate shelf
wear, internally fine. Related newspaper clipping laid
in. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate. $40.00

1854.   EVANS, Max. Long John Dunn of Taos. Los Angeles:
Westernlore Press, 1959. 174 [2] [1, ad] pp., plates
(photographic), text illustrations, facsimile. 8vo,
original red embossed pictorial cloth. Very fine in d.j.
with minor marginal chipping and a few stains on lower
panel (price-clipped. Jacket illustrated by Don Louis
Perceval.
    First edition. Great West and Indian Series 15. Guns
687. Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Perceval 24).
John Dunn (1857-1953), cowboy, gunslinger, stagecoach
driver, saloon and gambling den keeper, became a legend
in Northern New Mexico. The author includes material on
Dunn’s cowboying and trail drives. In the 1860s Dunn
worked as a cowboy on the Halff Brothers’ Ranch (on the
Rio Grande), “owned by several Jews who kept residence
in San Antonio.” One of the enterprises John Dunn
undertook was a trail drive from Texas to Montana in the
1880s with over two thousand cattle. “‘A feller learned
to use a rope,’ John reminisced, ‘for more reasons than
one. Sometimes it would save miles of hard riding after
a steer, and it was always a good convincer when an
ornery old steer wanted to make trouble” (p. 43).
    $60.00

1855.   EVANS, Max & Candy Moulton (eds.). Hot Biscuits:
Eighteen Stories by Women and Men of the Ranching West.
Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, [2002]. [8]
239 pp. 8vo, original light blue cloth. Fine in fine
d.j. Editor Moulton’s signed presentation copy.
    First  edition.   Short   stories   by   cowboys and
cowgirls, all of which are united by the fact that each
includes something about biscuits.    $20.00

1856.   EVANS, Will F. Border Skylines: Fifty Years
“Tallying Out” on the Bloys Round-Up Ground. Dallas:
Baugh for the Bloys Camp Meeting Association, [1940].
xiv [6] 587 [1] pp., text illustrations (mostly
photographic and full-page), brands. 8vo, original brown
pictorial cloth stamped in silver. Light outer wear,
hinges and a few signatures starting, light water
staining to margins of a few leaves, overall good to
very good. Author’s signed presentation inscription to
W. A. Dodson: “A Pioneer who has seen the West in the
making and knows what it is all about.”
    First edition. Dobie, p. 66: “Chronicles of the men
and women—cow people—and cow country responsible for the
best known campmeeting held annually, Texas has ever
had.” Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 103 (“The Texas
Ranch Today”). Herd 777: “Much on cowboys and the Bloys
cowboy camp meetings.” $75.00

1857.   EVANS, Will F. Hunting Grizzlys, Black Bear, and
Lions, “Big-Time” on the Old Ranches. [El Paso: McMath,
1950]. 109 [1] pp., frontispiece, text illustrations.
8vo,   original   beige   wrappers    with   photographic
illustration. Tape stains on endpapers, otherwise very
good. Author’s signed presentation copy.
    First edition. Herd 778. Comprised of reprints from
magazines and newspapers, these are tales of big game
hunting on ranches, interspersed with some ranching
stories.   Inevitably,   the   extermination   of   large
predators such as bears and mountain lions has been
justified in the name of protecting livestock interests.
    $65.00

1858.   EVERETT,   Donald   E.   San   Antonio   Legacy.   San
Antonio: Trinity University Press, [1979]. [10] 121 pp.,
illustrated by José Cisneros. Large 8vo, original green
cloth. Very fine in fine d.j. (illustrated by Cisneros).
José Cisneros’ signed presentation inscription to Vivian
and Carl Hertzog in Cisneros’ beautiful calligraphy.
Hertzog bookplate.
    First edition. These are stories of early San
Antonio, giving a nice overview of the various cultures
that contributed to the city’s cultural mélange. There
is a chapter entitled “Barbed Wire Man” that discusses
Pete P. McManus who “has the record of having sold many
times more barbed wire than any man in the world.”
    $40.00

1859.   EVERETT, George G. The Cavalcade of Railroads in
Central Colorado. Denver: Golden Bell Press, [1966].
[16] 235 pp., photographic illustrations, portraits.
8vo, original turquoise cloth. Very fine in slightly
worn d.j.
    First edition. Wynar 6542. Ranching interest lies in
the chapter entitled “The Rancher and the D & RGW
Railroad” in which the author recalls the impact the
railroad had on his ranch and the surrounding community.
    $75.00

            Rare History of Hood County, Texas
1860.   EWELL, Thomas T. A History of Hood County Texas
from its Earliest Settlement to the Present, Together
with Biographical Sketches of Many Leading Men and Women
among the Early Settlers, As Well As Many Incidents in
the Adjoining Territory. Also a Sketch of the History of
Somervell County. Granbury: Granbury News, 1895. [4] [4,
ads] 64 [4, ads] 65-76 [2, ads] 77-128 [2, ads] 129-160
[1] [1, ad] [6, Supplemental Sketch of Somervell County]
pp., ads on pastedowns. 8vo, original black gilt-
lettered cloth (neatly rebacked with sympathetic cloth).
Light outer wear, text browned (due to the cheap paper
on which it was printed), overall a very good to fine
copy of one of the rarest Texas county histories.
    First edition. CBC 2475. Dykes, Collecting Range
Life Literature, p. 18. Graff 1279. Herd 779: “Rare.”
Howes E239. Vandale 62. In the early years of the 1850s
Anglo stock raisers and farmers began to settle in Hood
County on the north central plains of Texas, and in 1866
the County was established. There is scarcely a page in
this quaintly printed, marvelous county history that
does not in some way touch on ranching history, with a
great deal on early ranchers, cowboys, trail drives,
Comanche and Kiowa rustlers, women’s and social history
in the cattle country, etc. Our favorite passage is the
following account of an 1870s trail drive that is almost
Joycian in flow (original spelling and absence of
paragraph breaks retained):
    “W. H. Kingsbury...often collected up considerable
herds of marketable cattle, which he drove to the
markets beyond the Indian territory. These long drives
to markets having become things of the past, a short
description of one with its difficulties and perils will
scarcely be deemed out of place here. For several weeks
beforehand the numerous cattlemen are negotiated with to
deliver certain grades of steers—usually 2 to 4 years
old—to Kingsbury, who announces that he will start with
a herd on a given date. At the appointed time often one
to two thousand head of such steers, sleek and fat from
the range are put into the herd, driven by some ten or
fifteen cowboys, with three or more ponies to each,
following the herd for reliefs and pack horses. An
experienced man is employed as ‘boss’ and under this
direction they proceed; Kingsbury accompanies the herd
with his wife, who desires to make a trip to the cities.
There are no wire fences or other incidents of
civilization to obstruct their way, and the grass being
abundant they drive from twelve to fifteen miles daily,
only having to take care that water is duly reached at
proper intervals. Finally on a hot, sultry evening they
draw near the bottoms of the Red river. The experienced
eye detects signs of a stormy night and every precaution
is taken, the cattle are carefully ‘rounded-up,’ the
guards   are  placed   at  advantageous   stations,  and
instructed to keep the herd soothed if possible, by song
and refrain. Kingsbury takes his wife to a remote grove
and they go into camp. After they have retired to rest
the storm approaches, the thunder rolls and the
lightnings play through the heavy timber of the bottom
the uneasy herd have been lowing for some time and the
cowboys have grown hoarse with keeping up their constant
refrain as they ride about the outskirts of the herd;
the night is dark and nothing seen save when the glare
of the livid lightning is thrown upon the scene.
Kingsbury is on the watch, his own horse is saddled and
several of his men with him. Presently an ominous
silence prevails in the great herd, instantly followed
by the dreadful tramping of thousands of hoofs and loud
clashing of horns; they have stampeded, in what
direction nobody knows, till the lightnings reveal their
course, then every man in his saddle urges his pony
through the darkness to gain their front, and finally a
few fearless cowboys have placed themselves in the lead
of the onward moving herd, and in the darkness and storm
lead them in the circling movement. Presently it is
discovered by Kingsbury that the herd is now heading
toward the station where he is guarding his family. No
time is lost; with a few of his men they make to the
head of the angry, surging column, which no human power
could check in its irresistible career, and succeed by
their soothing voices to lead them in a circling line
from their direction; so that by the time the camp is
reached, the dashing mass pass it but a few feet to one
side, then to avoid further danger, the herd is led on
far away to the prairies, where after they have been
severed into several bodies, and have finally exhausted
themselves, they are left till the morning light enables
the cowboys to again gather them up for the trail, which
is resumed and accomplished without further serious
adventure. But through the wild uninhabitable plains,
meeting here and there parties of half civilized
Indians, and the many adventures and diverting scenes
passed on the long overland trail, made by short daily
rides, possessed no doubt much to fascinate the spirited
and brave little woman who had chosen to accompany her
husband on this trip, yet it is not likely she again
ventured to share the perils from which, by the cowmen’s
skill, she had such a narrow escape. But though such
stampedes were common, the cowboys’ experience and skill
were usually sufficient for his own protection, however
burdensome and fatiguing the task of night-herding on
stormy nights. When he reached Kansas City or Chicago,
he, with his broad-brimmed sombrero, mounted upon his
bronco, with elaborate trappings dangling from his
saddle, and quirt in hand, was an object of sufficient
attraction to insure him a good time; thus accoutered,
and hailing from Texas, he possessed immunity from
interference by the ‘cops’ enjoyed by few other classes.
And most of the cowboys relished these trips kept up
till railroads and wire fences destroyed their trade.”
    $2,000.00

1861.   EWERS, John C. The Blackfeet, Raiders on the
Northwestern Plains. Norman: University of Oklahoma
Press, [1958]. xviii, 348 [2] pp., photographic plates,
maps. 8vo, original black cloth. One corner very
slightly bumped, otherwise very fine in very fine d.j.
Signed by author.
    First edition. The Civilization of the American
Indian Series 49. Smith S2636. Mentions briefly cattle
raising by both Native Americans and Anglos, and
examines the connection between the wholesale slaughter
of buffalo and the introduction of cattle.  $45.00

1862.   EWERS, John C. Indian Life on the Upper
Missouri. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1968].
xviii, 222 pp., portraits, photographic plates, maps.
8vo, original goldenrod cloth. Very fine in slightly
rubbed d.j. Signed by author.
    First edition. The Civilization of the American
Indian Series 89. Smith S2637. Chapter 12 (“The Last
Bison Drive of the Blackfoot Indians”) discusses the
Native American version of ranching: buffalo jumps at
which entire herds were driven over cliffs, allowing for
large-scale harvest by the tribe. Chapter 13 (“Food
Rationing—From Buffalo to Beef”) discusses the dietary
transition as the Blackfeet lost their buffalo hunting
ground and went to reservations where beef was rationed.
    $75.00

1863.   FAIRFIELD, Ula King. Pioneer Lawyer: A Story of
the Western Slope of Colorado. [Denver: W. H. Kistler
Stationery Co.], 1946. x [2] 156 pp., frontispiece,
plates, portraits, facsimiles. 8vo, original red cloth.
Fine.
    First edition, limited edition (300 copies). Guns
692. Wilcox, p. 43: “Biography of lawyer, Alfred Rufus
King, 1857-1916.” Wynar 7107. Material on ranching in
Delta County, including a documentary photograph of
George McGranahan’s ranch house with caption: “Typical
ranch house in Delta County.” Pioneer attorney Fairfield
quotes from an early promotional for Delta County
published by the Delta County Board of Trade: “In Delta
there are great possibilities for making a living in
poultry-raising, bee-keeping, fruit-growing, and cattle-
raising, and if one has plenty of capital, will find
profitable occupation for it in cattle-raising and
fruit-growing on a large scale.” $75.00

1864.   FALL, Albert B. The Memoirs of Albert B. Fall.
El Paso: University of Texas Press, 1966. 63 [1] pp.,
illustrations. 8vo, original blue pictorial wrappers.
Fine.
    First printing. Southwestern Studies Monograph 15.
Edited and with annotations by David H. Stratton. Born
in Frankfort, Kentucky, in 1861, Fall was an important
New Mexico politician whose involvement in the Teapot
Dome   scandal  brought  about   his   imprisonment  and
downfall. Fall served as Secretary of the Interior from
1921-1923. Included are text and photographs relating to
Fall’s Three River Ranch. Fall employed noted military
man, Henry O. Flipper as authority on land mining law.
    $15.00

1865.   FALLIS, Edwina H. When Denver and I Were Young.
Denver:   Sage   Books,  [1956].  [1]  198   pp.,  text
illustrations by Jeannie Pear, endpaper maps. 8vo,
original maize cloth. Fine copy in fine d.j. (price-
clipped d.j.) Contemporary ownership signature of Edith
Williams Blunk.
    Second edition, revised. Wynar 850n. The author
reminisces about Denver in the 1880s, including a brief
account of her uncle Will’s experiences on the Wilson
Ranch southeast of Denver. $20.00

1866.   FARBER, James. Texans with Guns. San Antonio:
Naylor, [1950]. xi [1] 196 pp., text illustrations by R.
L. McCollister. 8vo, original yellow cloth. Binding
stained at joints and edges, light foxing to endpapers
and prelims, good to very good copy, in near fine d.j.
with one small chip. Signed and inscribed by author on
half-title. Small printed label of O. Henry Book Store
of San Antonio on back pastedown.
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:125. Dykes, Kid 408.
Guns 695: “Covers most of the Texas gunmen.” In this
volume, which explores the role of guns in forming the
society of Texas, the chapter on “Winchester Quarantine”
describes violence due to Texas fever and Texas trail
herds in the early 1880s. The author quotes a letter
written by Charles Goodnight admonishing a neighboring
rancher against driving his cattle through Goodnight’s
land: “I hope you will not treat this as idle talk, for
I mean every word of this. My cattle are now dying of
fever contracted from cattle driven through here and
therefore do not have any hope you can convince me your
cattle will not give mine the fever. This we will not
speak of. I simply say you will not pass through in good
health” (p. 96).   $35.00
1867.  FARBER, James. Texans with Guns. San Antonio:
Naylor, [1950]. Another copy. Very fine in very fine
d.j.   $35.00

1868.   FARBER,   James.  Those   Texans.  San   Antonio:
Naylor,   [1945].    xi  [1]   171    pp.,  frontispiece,
illustrations by John H. McClelland. 8vo, original gold
cloth. Endpapers browned, otherwise fine in fine d.j.
Signed by author on title page. Dudley R. Dobie’s note
laid in book states: “Autographed, special binding.”
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:126. Campbell, p. 105.
Guns 696: “Has a chapter on gunplay in which the author
gives short sketches of many of the outlaws of the
Southwest.... Nearly all of his information on gunmen is
unreliable.” Herd 783: “Has a chapter on the cowboy but
the author knows little of what he writes about.” Over
150 popular-style sketches of Texas and Texans from
Cabeza de Vaca to Belle Starr.     $30.00

1869.   FARISH,  Thomas   Edwin.  History   of  Arizona.
Phoenix: Filmer Brothers Electrotype [for the author],
1915-1918. Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4 & 7, each volume complete,
frontispieces, plates (mostly photographic), maps. 5
vols., 8vo, original maroon cloth. Occasional light
staining to bindings, very faint water staining to a few
leaves of Vols. 2 and 3, overall good to very good. It
is difficult to find the entire 8-volume set together,
but each volume is complete in itself, including index
(vols. 1 & 2 are the most common, and vols. 5-8 are
seldom offered).
    First edition. Flake 3305. Howes F37. Laird, Hopi
771: “Farish was, for a number of years, State Historian
for Arizona. He had access to records not readily
available to others...a general, but detailed, history
of the state.” Mohr, The Range Country 671 (vol. 1); 672
(vol. 2). Wallace, Arizona History 20. There is much on
early Spanish exploration, Native Americans, mining,
pioneer life, opening the Santa Fé Trail, Confederate
occupation of Arizona, politics, etc. The real strength
of this set is found in the many biographies of
pioneers, based on Farish’s actual interviews with old-
timers, such as Thomas Jonathan Jeffords (scout, Indian
agent to the Cochise Apache, and blood brother of
Cochise; includes a great photograph of Jeffords at his
Owls Creek Ranch). Ranching interest: Oñate expedition
that brought large numbers of cattle to the region (“his
[1597] expedition cost him the equivalent of a million
dollars before it stirred a step”); Father Kino (father
of the cattle industry in the Southwest); Navajo stock
raising; Native American rustling skill (especially
Apache); Lucien Maxwell and Kit Carson’s ranching
partnership; early ranches and ranchers (Pete Kitchen,
Woolsey, Peeples, et al.).
    In the chapter on the “Conquest of California,”
Farish     describes    Pastoral     California:     “[The
Californians]    lived   on    horseback.   Horse-racing,
gambling, and dancing were their chief occupations.
Cattle and horses were introduced, the latter said to be
of the Arabian breed, and their flocks and herds
increased   wonderfully   upon   the   rich   grasses   in
California’s most favorable climate, while horses soon
overran the land, and, in 1826, it was common for men to
join together to drive them into great pens prepared for
the purpose, and, when thus confined, after securing of
the finest animals, to slaughter the rest. Trade in
hides and tallow was established in 1816; an annual ship
came from Boston, and...in 1822 near forty thousand
hides and about the same number of arrobas (twenty-five
pounds) of tallow were exported. Hides became known as
California bank notes, of the value of two dollars.”
    $250.00

1870.   FARNHAM, Eliza W. California In-Doors and Out;
or, How We Farm, Mine, and Live Generally in the Golden
State. New York: Dix, Edwards & Co., 1856. xiv [2] 508
[8, ads] pp. 12mo, original purple cloth. Binding rubbed
and spine light, interior fine. Contemporary ownership
signature in pencil.
    First edition. Byrd 47. Cowan, p. 203. Hill, p.
418n. Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 232: “Farnham,
the pioneer California feminist and widow of Thomas
Jefferson Farnham [provided] important observations of
California.” Rocq 16835. Wheat, Books of the California
Gold Rush 72. See Notable American Women (pp. 598-600).
    Farnham (1815-1864), feminist, prison reformer,
author, and lecturer has left us “one of the most
important books of the Gold Rush and 1850s” (Gary Kurutz
in Volkmann Sale, Zamorano Eighty 36n). She arrived in
Santa Cruz in 1849 and includes thoughtful descriptions
of subjects relating to ranching (“Setting up on the
Rancho,” “Wild Cattle,” “Night at a Spanish Rancho,”
“Old   Californians...Their  Cattle...Raising   Calves,”
“Practical Equestrianism, “How Beef Is Got,” “Official
Beef-Eating,” etc.).
    Farnham’s El Rancho La Libertad at Santa Cruz was
actually more of a feminist farming venture. This
description of her problems at La Libertad with wild
cattle gives a flavor of this sprightly, intelligent
distaff account: “There were...enemies to our peace and
prosperity: these were the immense herds of huge cattle,
which, now that the grass had lost its freshness, were
intent upon the appropriation of whatever invited their
appetites. The ranch was under my own personal charge
for some three or four weeks of June and July, the men
being absent sawing lumber.... Before they left the
place, a boy, some fourteen or fifteen years of
age...was engaged to ride Jenny about in pursuit of the
intruders.... He departed on the second morning...and
Charlie and I took the field against the besiegers. How
we toiled, raced, watched, and kept up an active
preventive service on the outskirts...this narrative can
never adequately convey.... After several days of this
sort of skirmishing, I willingly resigned my post, let
it not be reckoned dishonorable that my successor was an
Indian.... This gentleman occupied a seat distant from
the ranch about seventy or eighty rods, and as his house
gave him a view of most of the field...after the first
day or two [he] remained at home until the cattle were
fairly into the crop, when he would run lazily up, walk
them out, and set out on his return. Once, and only
once, was I guilty of the rashness of urging him to
quicken his steps, when thirty or forty bullocks were
rushing into a distant part of the field. He laid his
hand upon his heart, and protested, in the blandest
tones, that señora must excuse him; for running made his
heart beat mucho.”
    Farnham in her travels often spent the night at
ranches along her route. The best account of these
sojourns is her long, interesting description of her
stay on the Castro Ranche in the Valley of San Juan, in
which at moments the reader can almost see her Yankee
nose turning up squeamishly. On departure she comments:
“I offered a silent thanksgiving that home was so
near.... This, then, was a Spanish rancho and the manner
of life in it. These people were the owners of a great
estate here, and another up the coast, on which were
hundreds, if not thousands, of horned cattle and horses.
Not a drop of milk nor an ounce of butter could be had
in their house. Their chief articles of food are beef
and beans.... The simplicity of their external lives is
quite in harmony with that of their natures.... They are
a simple-hearted people, whose contentment flowed out in
acts of continual hospitality and kindness to all who
came to them before their peaceful dream of life was
broken in upon by the frightful selfishness of the late
emigration.   It   is  difficult  for   us  to   imagine
contentment in the idle, aimless life of these
rancheros, or cheerfulness in the dark, dirty, naked
houses they inhabit; but they have sufficed for them,
and it must be confessed, that their domestic condition
does not, in most parts of the country, promise any very
rapid improvement from the example of their new
neighbors.” $350.00

1871.  FARNHAM, Thomas Jefferson. Travels in California
with Map. [Oakland]: Biobooks, 1947. xv [1] 166 [1] pp.,
2 maps (one folding), foldout facsimiles. 8vo, original
tan cloth. Fine.
    Limited edition (750 copies, signed by Joseph A.
Sullivan, author of foreword); first published in New
York, 1844. The California Centennial Editions, vol. 10.
Barrett, Baja California 829n. Cowan, p. 203n. Edwards,
Desert Voices, p. 57. Graff 1293n. Howes F49. Plains &
Rockies IV:107n. Wheat, Books of the California Gold
Rush 73n. Zamorano 80 #36. “[Farnham] presented a superb
synopsis of [California’s] geography, climate, cattle,
crops, missions, presidios, harbors, and Indians” (Gary
Kurutz in Volkmann Sale, Zamorano 80).
    In Chapter 7 Farnham delves extensively into
subjects of ranching interest (detailed descriptions of
architecture, clothing, and other material culture):
mission practices with regard to “ranchios” and cattle
tendered as taxes; “los Californios” (“a Californian is
never   the   half    of   himself  unless   he  be   on
horseback...they are excellent horsemen, the very best
in North America”); California horses (“there is no
better animal than the Californian cavallo”); equestrian
equipage (e.g., “his spurs are a curiosity; their weight
is a pound and a half; the part holding the rowel is
five inches long; and the teeth of the rowel wheels are
one and a half inches in length!”); “Rodea” (“the whole
country side is usually assembled to engage in the
sports of the day, unfed except by the joys of brandy
and beef and beans”); hide and tallow gathering on
ranchos   and    missions;    and  the   final  wrap-up:
“Californians are an imbecile, pusillanimous race of
men, and unfit to control the destinies of that
beautiful country.... The ladies, dear creatures, I wish
they were whiter...a pity it is that they have not stay
and corset-makers’ signs among them.” $50.00

1872.  FARNHAM, Thomas Jefferson. Travels in the Great
Western Prairies, the Anahuac and Rocky Mountains, and
in the Oregon Territory [caption and wrapper title]. New
York: Greeley & McElrath, 1843. 112 pp., printed in
double column. 8vo, original brown printed wrappers
within typographical border, sewn. One-inch segment at
foot of spine detached (but present), fragile wraps in
fine condition, occasional very mild foxing to text.
Overall, a fine copy, much better than usually found.
    Second American edition (first edition Poughkeepsie,
1841; British edition published the same year as the
present edition). Campbell, p. 137. Field 525. Flake
3306 (early mention of Mormons). Howes F50. Plains &
Rockies IV:85:3: “Streeter quotes Herschel V. Jones as
saying: ‘This is the first and most interesting of his
several books on the West. It is the best account of the
first overland-to-Oregon migration of settlers.’ The
popularity of the book is attested by three separate
editions in 1843. Farnham was the leader of a group of
Oregon-bound settlers, known as the ‘Peoria Party.’”
Rittenhouse 201n: “Farnham may have been a U.S. agent
bound for Oregon, which would account for his careful
description of the route and comments on Indian tribes
met.” Smith 3001. Tweney, Washington 89 #20. Wynar 217.
    Farnham’s Travels in the Californias (Zamorano 80
#36) is considered the sequel to this work. Farnham’s
early account of Oregon proved potent propaganda for
advocates of U.S. rule in Oregon. Descriptions of the
various regions and settlements in Oregon include
prospects for the hide and tallow trade and stock
raising, occasional statistics for cattle, depredations
of stock by wolves, etc. Discussing the Willammette
settlements, Farnham mentions the herds of California
cattle brought to Oregon earlier and notes that
“although little progress has been made in the
conversion of the Indians to Christianity, yet they have
done much good in reforming some of the vices and
teaching some of the useful arts.... The men now rear
and tend their cattle.”
    In the New Mexico section there is a short account
of an unusual captivity ca. 1780 in which Comanche
warriors stole the daughter of the Governor-General at
Chihuahua, who purchased her ransom. But she refused to
return to her parents, advising that the Comanche had
tattooed her face, given her to a young warrior by whom
she was “enciente,” and that since she was happy in her
new life, she preferred not to return. According to the
story, she lived out her days in the Comanche nation and
raised a family of children (p. 32). $500.00

1873.   FARQUHAR, Francis P. The Books of the Colorado
River and the Grand Canyon: A Selective Bibliography.
Los Angeles: [Ward Ritchie Press for] Glen Dawson, 1953.
xi [1] 75 [1] pp., frontispiece. 12mo, original red
cloth, printed paper label on upper cover. Light shelf
wear, otherwise a fine copy. Ownership signature of
scholar L. R. Hafen (Thrapp II, p. 604).
    First edition. Early California Travels Series 12.
Designed by Ward Ritchie. Clark, Arizona, p. 48: “Spans
the 16th to 20th centuries, and include[s] such special
topics as Mormons on the Colorado, geologic studies,
dams and development, and others.” Edwards, Enduring
Desert, p. 82: “One of my high-ranking favorites.”
Paher, Nevada 579. Powell, Arizona Gathering II 559.
Wallace, Arizona History 56. More than a few notable
range-country books are to be found in this excellent
bibliography. $150.00

1874.   FARRIS, Francis Bramlette. From Rattlesnakes to
Road Agents. Rough Times on the Frio. Fort Worth: TCU,
1985. 137 pp., text illustrations (photographs). 8vo,
original pictorial wrappers (by Barbara Whitehead). A
worn copy with some staining to wraps and first and last
few leaves. Signed by editor Sonnichsen.
    First edition. No. 3 in the Chisholm Trail Series.
Introduction by C. L. Sonnichsen. Farris relates growing
up in Frio County in post-Civil War Texas. She spent
part of that time on a ranch, enduring raids by Native
Americans, neighborhood feuds, drouths and floods, and
challenging times. The book contains good material on
Texas Rangers. Big Foot Wallace lived with the family
for a while, and McNelly’s Rangers visited, too. The
real strength of the work is social history and women’s
history.   $15.00

1875.   FARROW, Marion Humphreys. Troublesome Times in
Texas [1859-1883]. San Antonio: Naylor, 1959. ix [1] 106
pp., photographic plates. 8vo, original red cloth. Light
foxing to endpapers, otherwise fine in fine d.j. with
only slight wear.
    Second edition and best edition, augmented and with
added index (Glegg Company in San Antonio published the
first edition in 1957). Adams, Burs I:127. Guns 699:
“This edition has an added index...and more notes. It
has material on the Texas Rangers and on cattle thieves,
Sam Bass, John Wesley Hardin, the Taylor-Sutton Feud,
the Kingfisher gang, and other lawlessness.”
    The book includes material on and a portrait of Juan
N. Cortinas, mayor of Matamoros and “Prince of Mexican
Cattle Thieves.” “It was estimated that he had three
thousand organized and licensed raiders for stealing
stock. To handle his traffic in stolen cattle, he had
seized in various ways control of twenty large cattle
ranches facing the Rio Grande. Here he pastured his
stock in preparation for the Cuban markets” (p. 71). The
recurring depredations, cattle rustling, and the general
chaotic state of the border leading to the U.S. and
Mexican investigating commissions of the 1870s are
discussed. “The range was in such a condition that any
man could have a cattle iron and possessed the ‘nerve to
use it.’” (p. 59). $35.00

1876.   FAULK, Odie B. Destiny Road: The Gila Trail and
the Opening of the Southwest.        New York: Oxford
University Press, [1973]. [8] 232 pp., numerous text
illustrations from photographs and vintage prints (many
full-page), maps. 8vo, original terracotta cloth. Fine
in fine d.j. (price-clipped).
    First edition. History of the Gila Trail from Texas
to San Diego, covering cattle drives in their two
phases: drives to the California gold fields, and post-
Civil War drives to stock ranches and supply beef to
Native Americans on reservations and soldiers at army
posts. Faulk provides information on and a photograph of
early Arizona cattleman Henry Clay Hooker, who made one
of the more unusual livestock drives. Hooker, a refugee
from the California Gold Rush, earned his nest egg for
entering the cattle business with his 1866 drive of 500
turkeys he had purchased for $750. With one helper and
several dogs, he drove his turkey flock overland from
Placerville to the Nevada mining camps, where he sold
them for $2,500. Other cattle barons discussed are
Slaughter and Chisum. $25.00

1877.   FAULKNER-HORNE, Shirley. Mexican Saddle. London:
H. F. & G. Witherby, [1947]. 182 pp., plates (sketches
by Peter Beigel). 12mo, original magenta cloth. Fore-
edges lightly foxed, endpapers browned. Very good in
lightly worn d.j.
    First edition, second printing (first printing,
1946). D.j. blurb: “A thrilling mystery story centred
round a Mexican saddle which makes its appearance at a
village jumble sale.” $15.00

1878.   FEAGLES, Elizabeth. Talk Like a Cowboy: A
Dictionary of Real Western Lingo for Cowboys and
Cowgirls. San Antonio: Naylor, [1955]. ix [1] 82 pp.,
text illustrations in sepia tone, brands. 12mo, original
yellow cloth. Endpapers lightly foxed, otherwise fine
copy in fine d.j.
    First edition. Herd 795. From d.j. blurb: “Not like
the usual dictionary, Talk Like a Cowboy is written in
an easy flowing narrative that tells the story of a
cowboy’s day along with explaining the real, everyday,
working language of the man on the range.” The author,
who also wrote under the pen name Beth Day, was the wife
of Donald Day. $30.00

1879.   FEDER, Sid. Longhorns and Short Tales of Old
Victoria and the Gulf Coast. Victoria: Victoria Advocate
Publishing   Company,   1958.    128   [1]   pp.,   text
illustrations (portraits, photographs, facsimiles). 8vo,
original green wrappers printed in silver, stapled (as
issued). Very fine. Signed by author.
    First edition. CBC 2993, 4574. Guns 702. An
informal, rambling history of the Gulf Coast of Texas,
with much information on cowboys and cattlemen. Includes
a chapter on the Republic of Texas horse marines (“Meet
the Horse Marines: The Cowboys Who Nabbed a Navy”).
Among those supplying history and folklore is Mrs. Kate
O’Connor. $30.00

1880.   FEHRENBACH, T. R. Seven Keys to Texas. El Paso:
Texas Western Press, 1983. ix [1] 140 pp. 8vo, original
half brown cloth over beige linen. Very fine in very
fine d.j. Carl Hertzog bookplate.
    First edition. Fehrenback attempts to dispel some of
the mythology and stereotypes surrounding Texas history.
The author discusses the cattle industry extensively.
“Texans who owned livestock had previously herded them
on foot in the time-honored British fashion. But on the
frontier, they seized upon the entire Mexican cattle
culture, even its jargon, from lariat (la reata) to
buckaroo (vaquero)” (p. 25). “Texas ‘cattle barons,’ the
men who emerged, sometimes seemingly from nowhere, to
organize big ranches and move thousands of beeves to
market, were never anything like the hacendados or
latifundistas of Mexico, or the aristocratic landowners
on the European continent.... They were a form of
businessmen” (p. 53). $30.00

1881.   FELLOWES,  Georgina   de  Valcourt   Kendall.  A
Biographical Sketch of My Family [cover title]. [San
Antonio]: Privately Printed, 1939. 32 pp. 8vo, original
green printed wrappers, stapled (as issued). A few minor
stains to wraps, otherwise fine. Author’s copy, with
occasional ms. notes and updated information. Typed
family tree and printed notes laid or tipped in.
    First edition. Genealogy of the Kendall family
written by the daughter of George Wilkins Kendall,
founder of the New Orleans Picayune, member of the
Texan-Santa    Fe   Expedition,    first   modern    war
correspondent, and pioneer Texas sheep rancher. Kendall
is considered the father of the sheep industry in Texas.
    $50.00

1882.   FELTON, Harold W. New Tall Tales of Pecos Bill.
Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, [1958]. xvi
[2] 164 pp., comic text illustrations printed in red and
black (some full-page) by William Moyers. 8vo, original
beige pictorial cloth. Light abrasions and foxing to
binding, overall very good.
    First edition. Not in Herd (but see Herd 797 for
Felton’s Pecos Bill, Texas Cowpuncher, New York, 1949).
More tall tales about the cowboy version of Paul Bunyan.
    $20.00

1883.   FENIN, George N. & William K. Everson. The
Western from Silents to the Seventies. New York:
Grossman Publishers, 1973. xviii [2] 396 pp., numerous
photographic text illustrations. Small 4to, original
blue cloth. Very fine in near fine d.j. with a few short
tears.
    Second and best edition, updated and expanded (first
published in 1963). Taylor & Maar, The American Cowboy,
p. 223. A thorough exploration of the cinematic Western,
the medium that helped propel the cowboy to mythological
status, with many excellent photographs. This new
edition has added chapters on Italian and Japanese
Westerns. $30.00

       Florence Fenley’s Canyon Country Histories
1884.   FENLEY, Florence. Grandad and I: A Story of a
Grand Old Man and Other Pioneers in Texas and the
Dakotas As Told by John Leakey to Florence Fenley.
[Leakey, Texas: Privately published by John Leakey,
1951]. 179 pp., text illustrations (mostly full-page &
photographic,    including   portraits    and   ranching
environments). 12mo, original ecru cloth. Fine in fine
d.j. Signed by John Leakey.
    First edition, “first printing” on title verso. Guns
705: “Rare.... Contains a chapter on King Fisher,
relating some of his escapades not found in other
books.” Herd 798. This is an excellent history of the
Uvalde area from the 1850s to the 1890s, as told by John
Leakey. In 1851, his grandfather (also named John
Leakey; 1824-?) arrived in the splendid Sabinal and Frio
Canyon area near Fort Inge, raised crops and cattle, and
struggled with Lipan and other local and nomadic
populace.
    “The first raid into the Canyon occurred in 1856 at
the Richard Ware Ranch.... On this raid the Indians
[Lipans] were evidently after horses, as they struck the
ranch of Uncle Johnny Fenley and stole two head, going
from there to Gid Thompson Ranch and killing his work
oxen. The settlers followed the Indians and recovered
the horses, but the six Indians they had counted
scattered and made a get-away. This seemed to start the
raids. In less than a month, the Indians were back
again, killing a cow belonging to Aaron Anglin and
loading the meat on a horse they brought along for that
purpose. Several horses were stolen, too...” (pp. 28-
29). And so it goes in opening the ranching county,
until “The Last Indian Raid in the Frio Canyon” ca. 1880
(pp. 71-75).
    The narrated history goes forward in time from
Grandfather Leakey to the two next generations. The
grandson and narrator of this account worked as a ranch
hand in the Canyon country and elsewhere, and later
owned his own ranch. This work is filled with most
excellent ranching content: early ranchers and ranching
in southwest Texas; suitability of the brush country and
canyons for cattle thieves; border depredations and
rustling; King Fisher’s compadre Pancho Escuadro (“as
good a vaquero as ever threw his rope over a longhorn
steer”); social history; women in the cattle country
(e.g., “riding sidesaddles [the women] were good riders
no matter whether they were on an easy gallop to a dance
or after the livestock on their father’s ranch”);
education (“In those days, we couldn’t see where an
education would benefit us very much. There was cattle
work to be done as long as a man could ride and rope,
and count his cattle and the money they brought, it
didn’t seem that much more was needed”—p. 78); cattle
drives (e.g., from New Mexico to Charley Dole’s ranch
north of the Yellowstone River); working as a cowboy in
the Dakotas (1893), Wyoming, and Montana (much on “Myles
City”; brands of big outfits Leakey saw; Leakey’s
personal acquaintance with Teddy Roosevelt; passing of
the open range country; financial woes of 1920 with
Wibaux Cattle Loan Company; return to Texas in 1946.
Includes   supplemental   material   on   the   Buckalew
captivity, Billy the Kid; Seminole Scouts at Fort Clark;
much more. $250.00

1885.   FENLEY, Florence. Oldtimers of Southwest Texas.
Uvalde: Hornby Press, 1957. 318 [1] pp., numerous text
illustrations (mostly photographic). 4to, original red
pictorial cloth. Very fine in fine d.j. Author’s signed
presentation inscription on front flyleaf dated 1960.
    First edition. Dobie, p. 51: “Faithful reporting of
realistic details. Southwest Texas, mostly ranch life.”
Adams (Herd) lists Fenley’s earlier works on the
Southwest Texas, but this title may have been a little
late for inclusion. This regional history of Uvalde
County and the surrounding ranch country contains
stories told by the old-timers themselves in their own
language. Included is good material on Ike Pryor and
cowboys who worked for him. In addition to new oral
histories gathered from pioneers, Fenley searched the
files of the Uvalde Leader-News and the Cattleman
magazine for additional biographies.
    This well-illustrated volume is rich not only in
ranching history, but women’s history and social
history. This one is a favorite of ours, because it
contains an interview with Kate Anderson Rogers,
ranching matriarch of Rogers Rafter 7 Ranch on Montell
Creek. Rogers grew up in the saddle looking after stock
in Eastland County and later Big Bend, finally settling
on Montell Creek. An excellent markswoman, Rogers while
still in her teens killed a panther that was preying on
their stock. When Fenley asked Rogers if she rode
sidesaddle when doing dangerous ranch work like breaking
wild horses and hunting, Rogers replied: “Certainly! We
girls wouldn’t have thought of riding astride.” Rogers
concludes: “We like it here, and except for the drought,
there couldn’t be a better place to ranch.... The life
we children led was wholesome, and the knowledge we
gained taught us how to live a great deal closer to the
Creator. You feel that BIGNESS of a land where you are
only a little human being and I know that the years my
eyes look on the beauty I saw everywhere, were years
added to my life.” $300.00

1886.   FENLEY, Florence. Oldtimers of Southwest Texas.
Uvalde: Hornby Press, 1957. Another copy. Very fine in
lightly worn d.j. $250.00

1887.   FENLEY, Florence. Oldtimers: Their Own Stories.
Uvalde: Hornby Press, 1939. 8, 254 pp., frontispiece
map, text illustrations (mostly photographic). 8vo,
original red cloth. Fore-edges lightly foxed and light
marginal browning to text, otherwise fine in near fine
d.j. Author’s signed presentation inscription: “By
special request of Miss Mabel Kincaid, this volume of
Oldtimers is presented to Dudley Dobie, with best wishes
from the author. Florence Fenley June 20, 1949.”
    First edition. Loring Campbell, My Favorite 101
Books about the Cattle Industry 33. CBC 1426 (plus 7
additional entries). Dobie, p. 51: “Southwest Texas,
mostly ranch life.” Herd 799: “True stories of real
cattlemen. Privately printed in a small edition and now
becoming scarce.” See Roach, Cowgirls, pp. 32, 44.
Winegarten, pp. 37, 110.
    Almost half of the oral histories are by Texas women
pioneers. Some owned their own cattle and ranches; some
even went up the cattle trail. In her introduction,
Fenley tells of her youth on the Murlo Ranch in Zavala
County in the early years of the 20th century and her
grandfather, Joel C. Fenley:
    “When a girl I followed him, already an old man,
through mesquite brush and spiney prickly pears, on my
own pony which had been bred on that very range, so in
this work I have been acquiring new love of the smell of
horseflesh and the smoke of campfires fanned by stray
breezes of an unsettled land. He taught me to build
fires in wet weather when nothing dry seemed available—
nothing much, perhaps, to you woodsmen but something of
an accomplishment for a girl at that. He told me of the
habits of range cattle. I heard from him how the
terrified bawling of a cow could bring the herd running
to her. I heard from him of the intelligence of horses
and dogs, deserving to be loved for their valiant and
faithful deeds.”
    In Fenley’s essay of pioneer rancher W. S. Wall
(“When a Wedding Could Take Place in a Cow Camp and a
Boy Could watch a Wild Calf Afoot”), Wall recalls: “Boys
come up wild as mavericks and could take care of
themselves, too. Girls could ride and rope as well as
handle a gun.... I have seen some good women cowpunchers
in my time and I believe I could safely say that Mattie
Leakey and my sister, Mary Lizzie, were two of the best.
Those girls were real riders and they rode wide saddles.
If the girls then had rode a man’s saddle like they do
now, no horse could have throwed ’em. They could stay on
a horse like an Indian and they hooked their knees under
those side saddle horns and it was a pretty hard thing
to unseat them. They wore guns too. Riding out on the
range like they had to do, it was necessary” (p. 156).
    $300.00

1888.   FENLEY, Florence. Oldtimers: Their Own Stories.
Uvalde: Hornby Press, 1939. Another copy, variant
binding. 8vo, original tan cloth. Fine in very good d.j.
(slight wear). $250.00

1889.   FENNER, Phyllis R. (comp.). Cowboys, Cowboys,
Cowboys: Stories of Roundups and Rodeos, Branding and
Bronco-Busting. New York: Franklin Watts, [1950]. 287
pp., text illustrations (some full-page) by Manning DeV.
Lee, illustrated endpapers. 8vo, original terracotta
pictorial cloth. Binding slightly worn, otherwise fine
in lightly worn and price-clipped d.j.
    First edition. Cowboys for the juvenile reader,
including Will James’s “Lone Cowboy,” “Midnight,” and
“His Spurs.”   $20.00

1890.   FERGUSON, Charles D. The Experiences of a Forty-
Niner during Thirty-Four Years’ Residence in California
and Australia. Cleveland: Williams Publishing Company,
1888. xviii, 7-507 pp., frontispiece portrait, engraved
plates, text illustrations. 8vo, original maroon gilt-
stamped decorative cloth. Light shelf wear, a few spots
to edges of text block, otherwise fine.
    First edition. Cowan, p. 206. Eberstadt, Modern
Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 159. Flake
3324. Graff 1305. Guns 707: “Scarce.” Kurutz, The
California Gold Rush 235a. Mattes, Platte River Road
Narratives 443. Mintz, The Trail 148: “Ferguson worked
in such California mining towns as Nevada City, and (on
the Feather River) Gold Run. He describes his overland
sojourn via South Pass and Salt Lake City, which he
actually undertook in 1850.” Rocq 5986. Wheat, Books of
the California Gold Rush 74.
    This standard California Gold Rush book is one of
few works covering both the American and the Australian
gold rushes. It is also contains one of the few
firsthand accounts of the Eureka Stockade Rebellion that
took place in New Zealand in 1850. We have a rather
unusual cattle drive to report: While mining in
Australia, Ferguson and his partner, realizing the
scarcity of cattle in the Beechworth mining district,
decided to purchase cattle in New South Wales and drive
them back to the mines. Because there were no banks on
the 350-mile road to their destination, they took cash.
They were well aware of the presence of robbers on the
road (“The country was full of bush-rangers, and there
was not a week but someone was stuck-up, so it was
necessary for us to be well mounted” p. 340). Ferguson
and his partner encountered fellow cattle-trader and
drover Canadian Dan Sweeney and decided to join forces
for protection and unite the herds they intended to buy
into one drove. At Bombaloo, they purchased five hundred
cattle at $12.75 a head. “We had to be with [the cattle]
night and day, especially at night, in case of a
stampede. We gave them their own time in driving, for
they were all prime beef and we wanted them to hold
their own, for if we rushed them they were sure to
waste” (pp. 342-43).
    In chapter 25 Ferguson tells his experiences in
Australia relating to wild horses and how he took up
horse-taming based on his childhood experiences in Ohio
and by applying the principles found in Rarey’s famous
book (see Herd 1863). The author served as foreman of
the 1860 Victorian Exploring Expedition, the first
transcontinental survey of Australia. The caravan
Ferguson oversaw was exotic, with respect to both men
and animals, including twenty-six camels overseen by two
East Indiamen. “The caravan caused no little commotion
in traversing the settled portion of the country....
Cattle and horses along the route stampeded from terror
at the sight, and even at the smell of the camels,
wafted on the breeze in advance of their appearance. It
was said that some wild horses on the ranches ran thirty
miles before stopping.”
    We’ve handled copies of this book numerous times
without realizing fully what resides within. And we
didn’t even mention Lord Trotter’s sheep empire, the
cattle kings of Australia, lynch law Down Under, or
stock breeding and noted horses in Australia. This
riveting book with amusing illustrations is required
reading for anyone conducting comparative research on
the American West    and   Australia   in   the   nineteenth
century.  $175.00

1891.   FERGUSON, Charles D. California Gold Fields.
Oakland: Biobooks, 1948. xvii [2] 163 [1] pp., chapter
heading illustrations by Victor R. Anderson, folding map
(facsimile of John B. Trask’s 1853 Topographical Map of
Mineral Districts of California). 8vo, original gold
cloth. Very fine.
    Limited   edition  (750   copies),  with  only   the
California portion of Ferguson’s narrative. California
Centennial Editions 14. Foreword by Joseph A. Sullivan.
Kurutz, The California Gold Rush 235c. Rocq 5988. The
first edition is rich with material on ranching and
trail driving Down Under. The California portion of
Ferguson’s book contains occasional references of
ranching interest, such as Adams of Long Bar, who drove
small herds of cattle from the Sacramento flats and was
almost eaten by a grizzly bear when he was counting and
salting down his cattle (pp. 88-89). $40.00

1892.   FERGUSSON, Erna. Albuquerque. Albuquerque: Merle
Armitage Editions, [1947]. [10] 87 [2] pp., text
illustrations from drawings by Li Brown. 8vo, original
black cloth lettered in red. Light shelf wear, otherwise
a fine copy in slightly rubbed d.j.
    First edition. Campbell, pp. 121-22: “History,
description, and memories of old-timers. Interpretive
and anecdotal.” Guns 709: “Some short, but new, stories
about Elfego Baca.”
    Fergusson asserts that Albuquerque is the microcosm
of the Southwest: “Sitting at the crossroads of the
centuries,   Albuquerque   has  seen   every  phase   of
Southwestern life, has participated in most of it, still
has walking up and down its streets people who represent
every period of its long history—Indians, Mexicans,
cattle and sheep men, modern booster, and Easterners in
what they consider Western garb.” Fergusson discusses
Native American cowboys, how the large land grants
created a hacienda life style, and the evolution away
from a rural-centered culture (Chapter 4: “From Rodeo to
Rotary”), etc. $35.00

1893.   FERGUSSON, Erna. Murder and Mystery in New
Mexico. Albuquerque: Merle Armitage Editions, [1948].
192 [4] [8, photographic plates] pp., frontispiece by
Peter Hurd, silhouettes by Al Ewers, endpaper map. 8vo,
original   black   cloth.   Fine  in   d.j.  with   Hurd
illustration (d.j. neatly reinforced with cloth tape on
verso at spine and with one tear). Bookplate of Father
Stanley (Stanley Francis Louis Crocchiola) and author’s
signed letter to Stanley asking a research question
(taped to lower pastedown).
    First edition. Campbell, p. 71 “Billy the Kid, among
others. Very readable”; p. 167: “Nine well-sifted
historically true accounts of killings which took place
in New Mexico...from 1890 to 1935.” Dykes, Fifty Great
Western Illustrators (Hurd 72). Guns 710. In addition to
Lincoln County War and Billy the Kid coverage, included
is a chapter on Albert J. Fountain (served as attorney
for the New Mexico Stock Association following “The Kid”
era), Black Jack Ketchum (discussing his propensity to
seek work as cowhands when laying low from the law),
etc.    $50.00

1894.   FERGUSSON, Erna. Murder and Mystery in New
Mexico. Albuquerque: Merle Armitage Editions, [1948].
Another copy. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate. A
few light stains to fore-edges, otherwise fine in
slightly worn d.j. $35.00

1895.   FERGUSSON, Erna. Murder and Mystery in New
Mexico. Albuquerque: Merle Armitage Editions, [1948].
Another copy. Light shelf wear, bookplate on front
pastedown, fine in worn, soiled and chipped d.j. The
Josey copy, with Dorothy and Clint Josey’s bookplate on
endpaper. $35.00
1896.   FERGUSSON, Erna. New Mexico: A Pageant of Three
Peoples. New York: Knopf, 1951. [1] xii [2] 408, vi [1]
pp., tinted frontispiece map, photographic plates, text
map. 8vo, original pale green pictorial cloth. Spine
slightly darkened and with a few abrasions, otherwise
fine in chipped d.j. Leaf with author’s signature laid
in.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 106. Dobie, p. 19:
“Essayical in form, it treats only of the consequential.
It evaluates from the point of view of good taste, good
sense, and an urbane comprehension of democracy.... A
cultivated mind can take pleasure in this interpretation
of New Mexico—and that marks it as a solitary among
histories of neighboring states.” Herd 801.
    A general history of New Mexico, with particular
emphasis on the cultural dynamics among and between
Native Americans, Hispanics, and Anglos, with cattle and
sheep raising constituting a pervasive background.
Included is material on Oñate’s bringing cattle to New
Mexico, the Bell Ranch, Eusebio Kino (father of cattle
ranching in the southwest), Albert B. Fall, Albert J.
Fountain, John Chisum, Agnes Morley Cleaveland, the
“Rawhiders,” etc. The excellent documentary photographs
include several relating to ranching. $50.00

1897.   FERGUSSON, Erna. New Mexico: A Pageant of Three
Peoples. New York: Knopf, 1951. Another copy. Front
endpapers with some offsetting from a related newspaper
article laid in (book review by J. Frank Dobie),
otherwise fine in slightly worn d.j. Carl Hertzog’s
copy, with his bookplate. $40.00

1898.   FERGUSSON, Erna. New Mexico: A Pageant of Three
Peoples. New York: Knopf, 1951. Another copy. Binding
slightly discolored, otherwise a fine copy in price-
clipped d.j. with a few small voids on rear panel.
    $35.00

1899.   FERGUSSON, Erna. Our Southwest. New York: Knopf,
1952. [13] 376, vi [2] pp., photographic plates (by Ruth
Frank and Laura Gilpin), foldout maps, colored double-
page map by Miguel Covarrubias, endpaper maps. 8vo,
original red cloth. Very fine in fine d.j. illustrated
by Miguel Covarrubias (price-clipped). Carl Hertzog’s
copy, with his bookplate.
    First edition, fourth printing. Campbell, p. 106.
Dobie, p. 14. Guns 711. Herd 802. Saunders 4083n:
“History, description, manners and customs, language,
industries.”   Fergusson   opens    with   that  perennial
question, “What is the Southwest?” Fergusson includes
information on the range cattle business as it evolved
in the Southwest (Charlie Goodnight, Will C. Barnes,
Lincoln County War, John Chisum, Jesse Chisholm, Maxwell
grant, cattle trails, etc.). Some of the excellent
photographic   plates   relate   to    ranching.  Includes
material on Big Bend. $20.00

1900.   FERGUSSON, Harvey. Rio Grande. New York: Knopf,
1936. [3] x, 296, viii [2] pp., photographic plates.
8vo, original tan pictorial burlap. Slight shelf wear,
small spot to upper fore-edge. Otherwise fine in torn
and worn d.j.
    First edition, fourth printing (first printing
1933). Campbell, pp. 106, 167: “History of the valley of
the Rio Grande and the Southwest region, beginning with
the Pueblo builders and continuing to the present day.”
Dobie, p. 40: “Best interpretation yet written of upper
Mexican class.” Guns 712n: “Has quite a bit of material
on Elfego Baca, as well as some on Billy the Kid, Joel
Fowler, and others.” Herd 803n. Saunders 4086n.
    The chapter “Longhorns and Six Shooters” has
information on the cattle industry in the Rio Grande
Valley: “With the buffalo went the Indian and with the
cattle came the cowboy. Created by that northward sweep
of the longhorned herds he was briefly the dominant
figure in the whole southwest as the mountain man had
been before him and the Mexico rico before that” (p.
240).   $10.00
1901.   FERGUSSON, Harvey. Rio Grande. New York: Knopf,
1945. [2] x, 296, viii pp., photographic plates. 8vo,
original dark blue cloth. Light shelf wear, otherwise a
fine copy. Carl Hertzog bookplate. Dallas bookseller
McMurray’s printed label on rear pastedown.
    First edition, fifth printing.    $10.00

1902.   [FERRIL, Will C. (ed.)]. Sketches of Colorado in
Four   Volumes,   Being   an   Analytical  Summary   and
Biographical History of the State of Colorado.... Volume
1 [all published]. Denver: Western Press Bureau Co.,
1911. 419 pp., illustrations, portraits. 4to, original
black gilt-lettered leatherette. Hinges cracked and
slight outer wear, otherwise fine and fresh, much better
than usually found.
    First edition. Wilcox, p. 44. Wynar 33. This mug
book includes biographies and photographs of prominent
Colorado stockmen, such as John Iliff, among the first
of the Colorado ’59ers seeking gold. Realizing that the
vast army of gold-seekers must be fed, Iliff quickly
turned his attention to supplying provisions and within
a year and a half invested all he had in a small herd of
cattle that was the beginning of his vast fortune on the
hoof.
    “[Iliff] made the cattle business a study, giving to
it his almost entire attention and best efforts. He
mastered its every detail, gaining experience as the
business developed. The influence of his life upon the
pastoral interests of Colorado and the West cannot be
overestimated. He blazed the cattle trails for the great
industry from Texas to the ranges of Montana. His
operations were bold and daring. He was a man of
indomitable will and perseverance. Whether facing the
blizzards of the mountains and plains, or sweltering in
the heat of the southern trails, or with courage
checking a stampede of startled or storm-driven herds,
he was quiet and unassuming, but always the man of nerve
and steel. He declined to carry the weapons borne by
many a cowboy of a later period, and at all times
refused to take intoxicating liquors. He lived on
friendly terms with the Indians and they with him. In
business tact, integrity, and good morals his name was a
synonym for all that is best in a business career and
that, too, amid the wild life of the Far West. At the
time of his death, he owned perhaps the best cattle
range in the world, containing 20,000 acres of
pasturage, and some of the finest springs and grazing
valleys of the West” (pp. 282-83).   $350.00

1903.   FERRIS, Benjamin G. Utah and the Mormons: The
History, Government, Doctrines, Customs, and Prospects
of the Latter-Day Saints. From Personal Observation
during a Six Months’ Residence at Great Salt Lake City.
New York: Harper & Brothers, 1854. 347 pp., wood-
engraved frontispiece portrait of Joseph Smith and
numerous text illustrations (7 attributed to Theodore
Rabuske, all engraved by Richardson-Cox). 8vo, original
blue embossed cloth. Shelf-worn, mild to moderate age-
toning to endsheets and first and last few leaves,
hinges loose, internally fine.
    First edition. Flake 3328. Hamilton, Early American
Book Illustrators and Wood Engravers 1174. Howes F98.
Mattes, Platte River Road Narratives 1164. Mintz, The
Trail 149: “The plates include many of the well known
overland scenes such as Chimney Rock and Devil’s Gate,
plus a number of scenes of Mormon life.” Paher, Nevada
589. Plains & Rockies IV:238b:1: “Ferris served in the
Utah    Territorial    government  in    1852-53.    His
wife...accompanied him and also wrote of Utah and the
Mormons.”   Brief   mention   made of   various   cattle
enterprises of the Mormons in Utah, including the
unsuitability of the saltwater basins of northern Utah
for livestock. $250.00

1904.   FERRIS, Benjamin G. Utah and the Mormons.... New
York: Harper and Brothers, 1854. Another copy, variant
binding. 8vo, original purple embossed cloth. Spine
sunned, one spot on upper cover, front endpaper removed,
internally fine.   $225.00

1905.   FERRIS, Mrs. B. G. [Cornelia] . The Mormons at
Home; with Some Incidents of Travel from Missouri to
California, 1852-3. In a Series of Letters. New York &
London: Dix & Edwards, Sampson Low, 1856. viii, 299 [4,
ads] pp. 8vo, original dark brown ribbed embossed cloth,
spine gilt decorated and lettered. Slightly shelf-worn
and slanted, extremities lightly chipped and frayed,
spine a bit faded, intermittent light stains and
spotting to text, small piece missing from upper corner
of front flyleaf and pastedown with four abraded spots
where bookplate was removed, overall a good copy.
Contemporary ink ownership inscription of Lucy Ellsworth
on front free endpaper.
    First book edition (first issued in a series of
letters in Putnam’s Monthly under the title “Female Life
among the Mormons”). Bradford 1652. Cowan, p. 207. Flake
330. Graff 1308. Howes F99. Mattes, Platte River Road
Narratives 1165: “In her cultivated journalistic style,
she dwells on the peculiarities of some of her traveling
companions as well as sharp vignettes from the vantage
point of a non-emigrant.” Mintz, The Trail 150. Plains &
Rockies IV:274. The author, who was the wife of the late
U.S. Secretary for Utah, includes much of interest for
women’s history (“Elder Snow and his Six Wives,” “A
Wife’s Confession,” “Conversation with a Wife of Brigham
Young,” “A Wedding,” “A Woman’s Martyrdom”). Her account
encompasses    several  cattle-related   incidents   and
observations during her overland journey: stampedes,
roundups, presence of imported breeds in Mormon herds,
Capt. Egan’s cattle drives from Utah to California,
corrals constructed in stockade style, white hunter at
Ogden Hole who married a chief’s daughter and gathered a
large herd he drove to California, etc. $200.00

1906.  FETLER, John. The Pikes Peak People: The Story
of America’s Most Popular Mountain.... Caldwell: Caxton
Printers, 1966. [2] 296 pp., frontispiece after an 1879
print,   photographic   plates.   8vo,   original  aqua
decorative cloth. Very fine in very fine d.j.
    First edition. Wynar 549. Introduction by Marshall
Sprague. The section on trail rides from Colorado
Springs to Pikes Peak includes descriptions of area
ranches along the way. Chapter 39 is devoted to the
establishment in 1949 of the riding club known as the
Range Riders. $40.00

1907.   FIELD, Maria Antonia. Where Castilian Roses
Bloom, Memoirs.... [San Francisco: Grabhorn Press]
Privately printed, 1954. [12] 142 [1] pp., frontispiece,
numerous plates. 4to, original beige linen over gilt
decorated blue boards, paper label on spine. Gift
inscription on front free endpaper, otherwise a fine
copy.
    Limited edition (500 copies). Grabhorn 548. Rocq
5685. Memoirs of Maria Antonia Field, a lifelong
resident of Monterey who descended from a family of
rancheros. $60.00

1908.   [FIELD, Matt]. Matt Field on the Santa Fe Trail,
Collected by Clyde and Mae Reed Porter. Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press, [1960]. xxix [1] 322 pp.,
photographic plates (scenes, views, portraits). 8vo,
original green cloth. Very fine in fine d.j. Signed by
editor.
    First edition. Rittenhouse 470: “In 1839 Matt Field
went over the Santa Fe Trail with a caravan.” See Plains
& Rockies IV:104. Tate, Indians of Texas 2240: “Contains
some discussion of Comanches along the Santa Fe Trail
and around Bent’s Fort.” There is a good section on the
Mexican ranchero, including their method of roping
buffalo (pp. 244-247). $65.00

1909.  FIELDING, Loraine Hornaday. French Heels to
Spurs. With an Introduction by Will James. New York &
London: Century Company, [1930]. viii [2] 203 pp.,
numerous text illustrations by Eve Ganson (author of
Desert Mavericks). 12mo, original blue cloth over orange
diced cloth with title and illustrations of bucking
horse and rider, gilt-lettered and illustrated spine.
Binding with a few spots and abrasions, interior fine.
J. Frank Dobie’s signed comment on front flyleaf: “The
girl who wrote this book is much more real and sincere
than   the    one    introducing  it—Will    James.   The
illustrations by Eve Ganson, author & illustrator of
delicious Desert Mavericks, are delightful. J. Frank
Dobie. Aug. 3, 1942.”
    First    edition.    Dykes,  Fifty    Great   Western
Illustrators (Dufault [James] 114). Herd 804. Smith
3053: “Author’s experience on TZ Ranch in Montana.” A
humorous and enthusiastic account of life on a Montana
dude ranch by a seventeen-year-old girl from the East,
including rodeo, roundup, branding, Native American
dances, etc.    $100.00

1910.   FIERMAN, Floyd S. The Impact of the Frontier on
a Jewish Family, the Bibos. [El Paso]: Texas Western
College Press, 1961. 32 pp., photographic plates,
facsimiles. 8vo, original brown wrappers with map by
Cisneros, stapled. Light shelf wear, otherwise fine.
    Limited   edition  (300  copies,   one  of   275  in
wrappers). Lowman, Printer at the Pass 134B. Nathan
Bibo, one of the subjects of this study, owned a herd of
sheep in the Bernalillo area, and the author quotes
Arthur Bibo in discussing a land feud concerning the
Acoma Cattle company. $50.00

1911.   FIERMAN, Floyd S. Peddlers and Merchants—on the
Southwest Frontier 1850-1880 [caption title]. [El Paso:
El Paso County Historical Society, 1963]. 17 [1] pp.,
photographic illustrations. 8vo, original grey printed
wrappers, stapled. Fine. Carl Hertzog’s printed slip on
colophon.
    First   separate  printing,  limited  edition  (150
copies). Lowman, Hertzog 159. Reprint from the Password
of the El Paso County Historical Society 8:2 (ca. 1962),
with   two  appendices,   footnotes,  and   corrections.
Includes brands and brief mention of area cattlemen.
    $30.00

1912.   FIERMAN, Floyd S. Some Early Jewish Settlers on
the Southwestern Frontier. El Paso: Texas Western Press,
1960. [2] 58 [2] pp., text illustrations by Russell
Waterhouse. 8vo, original brown cloth. Very fine in d.j.
with José Cisneros illustration. Second d.j. folded and
laid in. Signed by Fierman and designer Carl Hertzog.
Very scarce.
    Limited edition (250 copies, of which 30 were bound
in cloth and signed by Fierman and Hertzog). Lowman,
Hertzog 120. Powell, Arizona Gathering II 571: “The
Lesinsky, Solomon, and Freudenthal families.” The cattle
industry is always a background feature in any history
of the Southwest. Here that author mentions the change
that occurred in area banks as they transformed from
“cattle banks” to banks dealing with copper and other
mineral wealth.    $200.00

1913.   FIERMAN, Floyd S. “The Spiegelbergs of New
Mexico,    Merchants   and   Bankers,    1844-1893”   in
Southwestern   Studies  1:4   (Winter  1964).   48  pp.,
photographic plates. 8vo, original grey pictorial
wrappers. Very fine.
    First edition. Lowman, Hertzog 173. The entire issue
is devoted to the author’s article discussing trials of
frontier life, the economy of New Mexico Territory,
conflicts with Native Americans, land grants, mining,
hide trade, etc.   $25.00

1914.   FIFE, Austin [E.] & Alta [S.] Fife. Saints of
Sage   and   Saddle:   Folklore   among   the   Mormons.
Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1956. xiv [2] 367
pp., photographic plates, endpaper maps. 8vo, original
blue cloth. Light shelf wear, otherwise a fine copy in
price-clipped d.j. with some wear and short tears.
    First edition. Mormon history, legends, and lore,
including ranching, particularly Native Americans and
their rustling of sheep, cattle, and horses. $45.00

1915.   FIFE, Austin E. & Alta S. Fife (eds.). Cowboy
and Western Songs: A Comprehensive Anthology. New York:
Clarkson N. Potter, [1969]. xii, 372 pp., illustrations
by J. K. Ralston, printed music. 4to, original maize
cloth. Fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Two hundred songs with printed music,
guitar chords, lyrics, commentary, notes, lexicon, and
variants of words and melodies.   $50.00

1916.   FINERTY, John F. War-Path and Bivouac, or the
Conquest of the Sioux, a Narrative of Stirring Personal
Experiences and Adventures in the Big Horn and
Yellowstone Expedition of 1876, and in the Campaign on
the British Border, in 1879. Chicago: [Donohue &
Henneberry, 1890]. 460 pp., frontispiece photogravure in
sepia of Mulvany’s painting of “Custer’s Last Rally,”
plates (portraits), folding map printed in sepia ink:
U.S. Service Map of the Seat of War, 34.2 x 24.5 cm.
8vo, original dark blue gilt-pictorial cloth, designs in
black on upper cover and spine, marbled edges. Moderate
shelf wear (mainly to corners and spinal extremities),
one light spot on spine, hinges starting (but strong),
overall a very good and bright copy.
    First edition. Dustin 105: “Contains much on the
Custer battle; reliable; has lists of killed and
wounded.” Graff 1325: “Copyrighted 1890, apparently
published by the author.” Howes F136. Jennewein, Black
Hills Booktrails 62. Larned 636: “Contains a very good
map of the scene of operations, and several portraits of
notable participants.” Luther, High Spots of Custer 38:
“A newspaper correspondent’s account of expeditions and
campaigns that cannot be overlooked.” Rader 1384. Smith
3064.
    Finerty includes descriptions of good grazing land
and prospects for livestock in Wyoming and Montana, as
well as accounts of Crow depredations and livestock
rustling, firsthand information on Buffalo Bill Cody,
mention of Captain Jack Crawford, Native American
horsemanship, bad women and worse whiskey, etc. $275.00

1917.   FINGER, Charles J. The Distant Prize: A Book
about Rovers, Rangers, and Rascals. New York & London:
D. Appleton-Century Company, 1935. ix [1] 330 pp., text
illustrations by Henry Pitz. 8vo, original gilt-lettered
red cloth. Light foxing to edges of text block,
otherwise fine in lightly worn d.j.
    First edition. Guns 719: “Scarce.... Has some
mention of such outlaws as Billy the Kid, Jesse James,
Bob Ford, and Sam Bass.” Chapter IX includes sections on
the origins of Texas cattle, hide trade, wheat vs. beef,
Mason County War, “Cattle Thief Kings,” “Tremendous
Ranches,” etc. $35.00

1918.   FINGER, Charles J. Foot-Loose in the West: Being
the Account of a Journey to Colorado and California and
Other Western States. New York: William Morrow and
Company, 1932. viii [4] 302 pp., text illustrations and
sketch maps of the route by Helen Finger. 12mo, original
orange blindstamped cloth. Ex-library of the Lotos Club
of New York: presentation label with signature on front
pastedown, library label on front flyleaf, ink stamp on
title and dedication page. Binding moderately soiled and
spine shelf-slanted, edges of text block foxed.
    First edition. Guns 720: “Scarce.... Has material on
Captain Jack, the Modoc outlaw, and some slight mention
of the Jameses and the Daltons, as well as the
California outlaws Vásquez, Murieta, and Black Bart.”
Paher, Nevada 596. Rader 1386. Saunders 4090. The
chapter on California includes the author’s visit with
cowboy-artist Edward Borein. $20.00

1919.   FINGER, Charles J. A Note on Texas. [Austin]:
Privately printed [by John S. Mayfield], 1927. [11] pp.
8vo, original tan pictorial wrappers, purple cord tie.
Except for one short tear to lower wrap, very fine.
Presentation card signed by J. Frank Dobie tipped onto
title page.
    First edition, limited edition (71 copies). Stream-
of-consciousness sketch of Texas in the early days by
this fascinating author, privately issued on his
seventy-first birthday. Pungent vignettes of the social
life and entertainments of a vanished Texas, from the
heyday of the cowboy to the early oil boom and Mollie
Bailey’s circus to Paderewski bravely performing for a
rowdy, rebel-yelling Confederate Reunion in Dallas. See
Major & Smith (The Southwest in Literature) for a short
sketch on the author. $150.00

1920.   FISHER, A. T. Through the Stable and Saddle-
Room. London: Richard Bentley and Son, Publishers in
Ordinary to Her Majesty the Queen, 1890. xx, 302 pp.
8vo, original brown gilt pictorial cloth. Light to
moderate outer wear, spinal extremities with a few short
tears and fraying, front hinge broken, scattered mild
foxing, overall a good copy with contemporary purple ink
stamp on title “Property of the Field” and a few
contemporary pencil notations in margins.
    First edition. Major A. T. Fisher (lat of the 21st
Hussars) gives comprehensive instructions for running a
stable and managing horses. Chapter XIII is devoted to
saddles and spurs. $60.00

1921.   FISHER, H. D. The Gun and the Gospel: Early
Kansas and Chaplain Fisher. Relation of Kansas to
Freedom. John Brown. Jim Lane. Days that Tried Men’s
Souls. Circuit Riding in the Fifties. Quantrell’s Raid.
Army Life in the Southwest. Work among the Contrabands.
Church Life among the Mormons. Congressional Chaplaincy
Canvass.   Chicago:  Kenwood  Press,  1896.   317  pp.,
frontispiece portrait, plates (photographic portraits).
8vo, original navy blue cloth, gilt-lettered spine.
Binding dull, rubbed, and stained on lower cover, text
browned.
    First edition. Dary 2633. Flake 3363. Rader 1393.
Reverend Fisher of the Methodist faith ministered in the
cattle country, and although he does not engage in any
extensive discussions of ranching, his work is an
important background text for developments and events in
the West during that time. According to Dary, the author
was born in Ohio, came to Kansas in 1858 to serve as a
minister at Leavenworth and in 1861 at Lawrence, where
he was chaplain of the Fifth Kansas Cavalry. He
witnessed Quantrill’s raid in August 1863, and later
served churches at various posts in the West.    $125.00

1922.   FISHER, H. D. The Gun and the Gospel...Second
Edition. Chicago & New York: Medical Century Company,
1897. xi, [9]-344 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates
(photographic portraits). 8vo, original navy blue gilt-
pictorial cloth, gilt-lettered spine. Binding faded and
rubbed, interior fine. Contemporary ink ownership
inscription on back of frontispiece. Rubber ink stamp of
Acres of Books on front pastedown.
    Second edition of preceding. $75.00

1923.   FISHER, H. D. The Gun and the Gospel...Fourth
Edition. Kansas City: Hudson-Kimberly Publishing Co.,
1902. xii, [9]-347 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates
(photographic portraits). 8vo, original brown gilt-
pictorial cloth, gilt-lettered spine. Spine a bit light,
otherwise fine and bright.
    Fourth edition of preceding, with some re-writing.
    $75.00

1924.   FISHER,  Harrison.   Untitled   portrait  of   a
romanticized cowgirl measuring 34.7 x 26 cm. The front
cover from The Saturday Evening Post, June 19, 1915.
Very short tear at lower left and faint coffee cup stain
at lower right, not affecting image.
    Profile of a dark-haired, fine-featured woman with
rosy cheeks wearing a red bandana. In her gloved right
hand, she holds her hat and quirt.    $15.00
1925.   FISHER, O. C. It Occurred in Kimble. Houston:
Anson Jones Press, 1937. 237 [3] pp., frontispiece,
full-page text (photographs and illustrations by Lonnie
Rees). 8vo, original tan pictorial cloth. Mild marginal
staining to binding, endpapers browned, text block split
(but strong), mostly unopened. Very scarce.
    First edition, limited edition (500 copies, this
copy not numbered). CBC 2825. Dykes, Western High Spots,
p. 118 (“Ranger Reading”). Guns 722: “Scarce.” Herd 805.
Not in Tate. Includes many chapters on fighting Native
Americans, as well as sections on “The Big Outlaw
Roundup of ’77,” “Outlaws and Trigger-Pulling,” and
“Some Early-Day Killings,” “Creed Taylor.”   $200.00

1926.   FISHER, O. C. The Texas Heritage of the Fishers
and the Clarks. Salado, Texas: Anson Jones Press, 1963.
241 [1] pp., frontispiece, photographic illustrations.
4to, original white pictorial cloth. Fine, partly
unopened, in publisher’s brown slipcase.
    Limited edition. Guns 723: “Has a section on John
King Fisher and gives some new information on his early
life.” Much of the book is devoted to the trail drive
experiences of Fisher’s father, Jobe. $125.00

1927.   FISHER, O. C. & J. C. Dykes. King Fisher: His
Life and Times. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press,
[1966]. xvii [1] 157 [1] pp. 12mo, original red boards,
spine gilt. Top fore-edge lightly foxed, else very fine
in d.j.
    First edition. Guns 724: “One of the few original
publications in the Western Frontier Library Series. Has
material on King Fisher, Ben Thompson, Bat Masterson,
the Taylor-Sutton feud, and the Texas Rangers.” This
account, by a relative of Fisher, insists that the King
had reformed, that the last several charges which he
beat were manufactured by an overzealous Lee Hall, and
that Fisher would have remained a model citizen had he
not been shot soon after his exoneration. Fisher was an
outlaw turned lawman who operated a sprawling ranch in
South Texas near the Rio Grande. $30.00

1928.   FISKE, Frank Bennett. Life and Death of Sitting
Bull. Fort Yates, North Dakota: Pioneer-Arrow Print,
[1933]. [8] 72 pp., photographic text illustrations
(portraits and scenes). 12mo, original orange pictorial
wrappers. Fragile wraps moderately worn, interior fine.
Rare.
    First edition. The author, who is sympathetic to the
“raw deal” meted out to Native Americans by the U.S.
government, mentions cattle raising by the Standing Rock
Sioux, stating that they prospered before the land was
invaded by whites and their own operations subverted.
Against the pervasive backdrop of the Marlboro-man Anglo
cowboy mythos, accounts such as this, of “Indian
cowboys” are uncommon.
    Frank Bennett Fiske (1883-1952), born at Fort
Bennett, Dakota Territory, spent most of his life in the
Fort Yates area, arriving there in 1889 with his father,
who worked as a civilian wagon master with the U.S.
Army. Young Frank learned the photography trade from S.
T. Fansler, operator of the post studio. When Fansler
abandoned the studio in 1900, the teenage Frank Fiske
took over, and continued to operate primarily at Fort
Yates until his death in 1952.
    Fiske, best known for his Indian portraits, won the
North Dakota Art Award in 1950. His portraits appeared
on   postcards  and   calendars  as   well  as   in  art
exhibitions. Fiske’s photographs (about 7,000 extant
images are housed at North Dakota State University)
richly document life in central and southern North
Dakota during the first half of this century, with
particular emphasis on people and everyday life in and
around the Fort Yates area. Although the photographs in
this book are unattributed, it seems likely they are the
work of Fiske. $450.00

1929.   FITCH, Michael Hendrick. Ranch Life and Other
Sketches. Pueblo: Franklin Press Company, 1914. 309 [2]
pp. 8vo, original gilt-lettered dark olive green cloth.
Binding shaken and worn, spine varnished, gilt lettering
dull, front hinge cracked, front endpapers abraded from
bookplate removal, interior very good. Bookplate. The
condition problems are somewhat ameliorated by the
presence of J. Frank Dobie’s signed commentary in ink on
front flyleaf: “Not much ranching, and what there is, is
mostly of sheep. Horses from Texas are mentioned rather
than treated of. This is a range item all right, but
nothing   more.  The   writer  was    educated  and  not
provincial. J. Frank Dobie April 5, 1949.”
    First edition, limited edition (150 copies). Herd
807: “Scarce. Most of this book is comprised of
patriotic speeches and miscellaneous writings, but it
contains a good chapter on ranch life in Colorado.
Privately printed in an edition of 150 copies, 50 of
which were given away by the author, hence its
scarcity.” Howes F157. Wilcox, p. 44. Wynar 6408.
    Michael Fitch rose through the ranks during the
Civil War from First-Sergeant to Lieutenant-Colonel in
the Twenty-First Wisconsin Infantry. Two of Fitch’s
other books deal with that war: Echoes of the Civil War
and The Chattanooga Campaign. $350.00

1930.   FITZHUGH, Bessie Lee. Bells Over Texas. El Paso:
Texas Western Press, 1955. xi [1] 159 [1] pp.,
frontispiece,    photographs,  illustrations   by   José
Cisneros. 8vo, original “brass” pictorial cloth with
illustration of bell in dark green on upper cover, spine
lettered in gilt and with gilt vignette of bell. Very
fine in double dust jackets. Signed by Hertzog. Laid in
are a promotional brochure, a photocopy of a handwritten
document by Hertzog describing production of the book
(“This project had more scholarship than most Ph.D.’s
...so it qualifies for publication”), describing the
overcritical editor who made Bessie Lee Fitzhugh cry,
(“If I had known this...I would have killed him.... ”),
plus acerbic denunciation of the binder whose sloppy
work “probably shortened my life”. Also laid in is a
carbon copy of a 1975 letter to Bess Davis about Mrs.
Fitzhugh and the Alamo Bell (including the statement
that the Haley Library paid $125,000 for the Alamo
Bell).
    First    edition.   Dykes,    Fifty  Great   Western
Illustrators (Cisneros 73). Lowman, Printer at the Pass
94: “The ‘brass-colored’ cloth binding offers an
interesting, refreshing, and appropriate change of pace
for this subject”; (quoting Lon Tinkle): “Everything
here   is    of   masterly   simplicity  and   perfectly
proportioned.” One chapter (“Camel and Cow Bells,” pp.
112-119) deals with the cow bell: “Texas and the cattle
industry have developed concurrently. In the early days,
during the long cattle drives, a bell fastened to a
leather strap around the neck of a lead cow helped to
keep the herd together as all other cattle habitually
followed the tinkling tones of their leader’s bell” (p.
111).   $200.00

1931.   FITZHUGH, Bessie Lee. Bells Over Texas. El Paso:
Texas Western Press, 1955. Another copy. Some stains to
endpapers, otherwise fine in moderately soiled and worn
d.j. Author’s signed presentation copy. $75.00

1932.   FITZPATRICK, George (ed.). Pictorial New Mexico.
Santa Fe: Rydal Press, 1949. 191 pp., numerous
photographic illustrations (some in color). Small folio,
original tan buckram with lettering and vignette in dark
brown. Binding slightly discolored, otherwise a fine
copy.
    First edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 72
(“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #116). There are
some ranching photographs among the many images of the
state. $30.00

1933.   FITZPATRICK, George (ed.). This Is New Mexico.
Santa Fe: Rydal Press, [1948]. x [2] 328 [1] pp., text
illustrations by Wilfred Stedman, endpaper maps. 8vo,
original tan cloth. Light shelf wear, small dent to
first twenty leaves.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 106. Guns 729. Herd 809:
“A collection of stories from the New Mexico Magazine,
among which are some about cowboys.” McVicker B70.
Includes J. Frank Dobie’s “Don Quixote of the Six-
Shooter.” $25.00

1934.   FLAGG, Oscar H. (Jack). A Review of the Cattle
Business in Johnson County, Wyoming, since 1882, and the
Causes That Led to the Recent Invasion. Cheyenne: The
Vic Press, [1967]. 50 pp., 2 full-page illustrations
(photographic). 8vo, original orange pictorial wrappers.
Very fine.
    First book edition, limited edition (#410 of 500
copies).    Guns  2481:   “Scarce....   Articles   which
originally appeared in the Buffalo Bulletin about the
Johnson County War [in 1892], the hanging of Jim Averill
and Cattle Kate and the killing of Nat Champion and Nick
Ray.”   $150.00

1935.   FLANAGAN, Sue. Trailing the Longhorns: A Century
Later. Austin: [Designed by Ward Ritchie for] Madrona
Press, [1974]. xix [1] 209 [3] pp., frontispiece,
numerous photographic illustrations, illustrated maps by
Cisneros. 4to, original dark brown calf over orange
linen, spine gilt-lettered, photographic label of
longhorn drive on upper cover. Mint, with original
packing box. With the book four prints by José Cisneros
to accompany this limited edition (“Trailing the
Longhorns”; “Goodnight-Loving Trail 1866-1886”; “Western
Trail 1876.... ”; and “Chisholm Trail 1867-1884”). Each
print measures 40.0 x 30.5 cm. Very fine. All are
signed. “Trailing the Longhorns” is inscribed: “Para
Vivian y CH [Hertzog device], nuestros buenos amigos.
Vicenta y José.” The suite of plates is seldom found
with the book.
    First edition, limited edition (#131 of 250 copies).
Foreword by Wayne Gard. The author focuses on three
major trails: Goodnight-Loving, Chisholm, and Western.
The history of these trails is enhanced by excellent
contemporary documentary photographs of surviving trail
landmarks. $400.00

1936.   FLANAGAN, Sue. Trailing the Longhorns: A Century
Later. Austin: Madrona Press, [1974]. xix [1] 209 [3]
pp., frontispiece, numerous photographic illustrations,
illustrated maps by Cisneros. 4to, original brown
pictorial cloth, spine gilt-lettered. Very fine in fine
d.j.
    First trade edition of preceding. $50.00

1937.   FLEMING, E. B. Early History of Hopkins County,
Texas: Biographical Sketches and Incidents of the Early
Settled Families. N.p., 1902. 183 pp. 8vo, original blue
cloth. Binding abraded and moderately stained, slightly
shelf-slanted, acidic paper browned. A few contemporary
ink corrections.
    First edition. CBC 249. The author interviewed the
early pioneers of Hopkins County in northeast Texas in
order to compile this history. Included are biographies
of early cattlemen (Lodwick Vaden, J. R. Lindley, John
B. Sparks, B. R. Cargile, et al.), a directory of
businesses in Sulphur Springs and Nelta (including
Warrick France, “the only gin man in the place”), and a
chapter on women and their social activities (washing,
soapmaking, and quilting). These intrepid pioneers
feared the wolves, bears, panthers, and other wild
animals more than the Native Americans. The second
murder in the county occurred when Mr. Crook enclosed
some water holes on White Oak Creek, to the extreme
displeasure of Bushrod Musgrove, who was unable to water
his herd of cattle.   $500.00

1938.   FLENNER, John D. Syringa Blossoms. [Caldwell:
Caxton Printers, 1912]. [4] 225 [1] pp., frontispiece
portrait, decorative title page in color, photographic
plates (portraits). 8vo, original green limp suede
wrappers, title in gilt on upper wrapper, dark green
satin moiré wrappers). Fragile binding beginning to
deteriorate and faded, interior fine and bright. Because
of the fragile nature of the binding material, the book
is difficult to find in collector’s condition.
    First edition. Smith 3160. This book is a series of
essays on events and people in early Idaho history, some
of which first appeared in the Idaho Daily Statesman (a
second volume appeared in 1915). There are some
references   to   cowboys    and   ranching,   including
biographies of ranchers such as John Hailey, who
migrated from Oregon to Idaho in 1862 and wrote a
history of Idaho (q.v.). Another biography of note is
that of Walter Edgar Pierce, who was born on a ranch in
Waco in 1860 and went on to be a leading citizen of
Boise.
    This unusual book was published by the Caxton
Printers, who published so many books of interest for
ranching and the West and who continue their good work
to the present time. The book is a fairly early and
ambitious Caxton imprint, founded in 1896 by J. H.
Gipson, who declared: “Books to us never can or will be
primarily articles of merchandise to be produced as
cheaply as possible and to be sold like slabs of bacon
or packages of cereal over the counter. If there is
anything that is really worthwhile in this mad jumble we
call the twentieth century, it should be books.” $100.00

1939.   FLETCHER, Herbert (ed.). Harris County, Republic
of Texas, 1839-45. Houston: Anson Jones Press, 1950. 30
pp. 8vo, original white self-wrappers. Very fine. Signed
by author on front wrapper.
    First edition. CBC 2232. In 1842 farms and ranches
were feeling a shortage of manpower due to on-going
conflicts with Mexico. Advertisements called for sober,
capable, industrious men who knew how to raise cotton or
corn, or handle cattle. Cattle drives to New Orleans
were inaugurated that year, and immigrants poured into
Texas. Cattle were cheap, and even poor men could stake
a claim and work with established cattlemen, receiving
part of their pay in calves. “Many vast heards [sic] of
later days were started in this way by men of scanty
financial resources.” $35.00

1940.   FLETCHER, Robert H. Free Grass to Fences: The
Montana Cattle Range Story. New York: University
Publishers, [1960]. xii [8] 233 [3] pp., photographic
plates,   numerous  text   illustrations  and   endpaper
illustrations by Charles M. Russell, Large 8vo, original
half grey linen over tan boards with blind-stamped
brands. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #67:
“Sponsored by the Montana Stockgrowers Association, this
book is not only a good account of Association activity
over a period of 75 years but of the whole of Montana
cow country history.... Historically, cowmen, beginning
with the roundup, have worked together in solving their
mutual problems. Books about their Associations are a
part of the story of the range.” Mohr, The Range Country
676. Yost & Renner, Russell XVI:146. Smith S2643.
    $75.00

1941.   FLETCHER, Sydney E. The Big Book of Cowboys. New
York:   Grosset   &  Dunlap,   1950.  [26]  pp.,   color
illustrations by the author. 4to, original orange
pictorial boards. Very fine. Difficult to find in
collector’s condition.
    First edition. Colorful juvenile pandering to the
usual stereotypes. $37.50

1942.   FLETCHER, Sydney E. The Cowboy and His Horse.
New York: Grosset & Dunlap, [1951]. 159 [1] pp.,
frontispiece, sepia-tone illustrations by author-artist,
brands, map, printed music, endpaper map of the Chisholm
Trail (with descriptive paragraph on front flyleaf).
4to, original blindstamped brown cloth, gilt-lettered
spine. Very fine in fine d.j. Signed inscription by J.
Frank Dobie on front flyleaf: “Better than most
juveniles on brands, equipment, etc., most of brand
material being swiped from me. J. Frank Dobie 7/5/56.”
    First edition. Herd 813: “An excellent example of
western art illustrating some of the technical points of
the cowboy’s life.”    $75.00

1943.   FLETCHER, Sydney E. The Cowboy and His Horse.
New York: Grosset & Dunlap, [1951]. Another copy. Light
shelf wear, otherwise a fine copy in lightly worn d.j.
    $25.00

1944.   FLINT, Thomas. Diary of Dr. Thomas Flint:
California to Maine and Return, 1851-1855. [Los Angeles:
Historical Society of Southern California, 1923]. 78
pp.,   frontispiece  (portraits),   foldout  map.   8vo,
original grey printed wrappers. Fine.
    Reprinted from the Annual Publications of the
Historical Society of Southern California. Cowan, p.
215. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains and the
Rockies 165. Flake 3378. Kurutz, The California Gold
Rush 245a: “Flint left Maine for California via the
Panama route on May 31, 1851.” Mattes, Platte River Road
Narratives 1370: “A brisk businesslike account of three
men who took sheep to California on speculation. In this
they succeeded, despite inroads by wolves, hawks, icy
rivers, desert mountains, ‘bloodsuckers’ and alkali and
plant poisoning.” Plains & Rockies IV:242n. Rocq 7002n.
    $125.00

1945.   FLINT, Thomas. Diary of Dr. Thomas Flint:
California to Maine and Return, 1851-1855. N.p., [1924].
[4] 49 pp. 8vo, original wrappers bound into blue cloth
gilt. Some buckling and wear to pages, otherwise a fine
copy. Bookplate inside upper cover.
    Reprinted from the Evening Free Lance, Hollister,
California. $100.00

1946.  FLIPPER, Henry O[ssian]. Negro Frontiersman: The
Western Memoirs of Henry O. Flipper, First Negro
Graduate of West Point. El Paso: [Designed by Carl
Hertzog for] Texas Western College Press, 1963. x, 54
pp., frontispiece portrait, illustrations. 8vo, original
beige cloth. Very fine in near fine d.j. with one small
abrasion on upper panel, plus printer’s variant trial
d.j. and two printed review slips laid in.
    First edition, limited issue (125 copies bound in
cloth). Lowman, Printer at the Pass 161A.
    Born into slavery, Henry Flipper (1856-1940) became
the first black graduate of West Point in 1877. He
served on frontier duty in the Southwest. In 1881 he was
accused by his commanding officer of “embezzling funds
and of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman.”
Acquitted of the former, he was convicted of the latter
and dismissed from the Army. Flipper maintained his
innocence until his death (in 1999 President Clinton
pardoned Flipper of all charges). As a civilian Flipper
distinguished himself in governmental and private
engineering positions (including work for two ranchers,
William C. Greene and Albert B. Fall). Flipper became an
authority on Mexican land and mining law, and in 1891
the community of Nogales employed him to prepare the
important Nogales de Elias (Rancho Casita) land grant
case. In 1913 while living in El Paso he supplied
information on conditions in revolutionary Mexico to the
Senate   subcommittee  on   Mexican   internal  affairs;
national media falsely reported that he was in league
with Pancho Villa (to which accusation Flipper wrote a
blistering reply). See Handbook of Texas Online: Henry
Ossian Flipper.
    We include Flipper in this catalogue because he was
an active, influential, and most interesting player in
the cattle country of the Southwest and borderlands
(Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Mexico). Flipper
opens his exceedingly frank, unedited Western Memoirs
relating his very first duties upon joining the Army in
1877. Posted at Fort Sill in Indian Territory, Flipper
was ordered to ride to the Wichita Indian Agency to
inspect and receive cattle for issue to Native
Americans. “I rode 32 miles in four hours with my white
soldier orderly [and] was given the only vacant room in
a combination of frontier saloon and hotel, and my
orderly a place in a grain room in the stable.... It
stormed that night and grew intensely cold.... The
cowboys came in the night with their cattle and were put
in the dining room to sleep on the floor.... They raved
and swore when they knew a ‘nigger officer’ was there to
inspect and receive the cattle and was occupying the
only bed.... I got up, dressed and...brought my orderly
into the room and made him spread his blankets on the
floor alongside of my bed.... I inspected the cattle the
next day and then rode back to Fort Sill in four hours,
in the cold.... My cook, Mrs. Matthews, had to cut my
cowhide boots from my feet.... I was sent again to the
agency for the same purpose, but my shyness and
greenness   had  disappeared  and   my   confidence  had
reasserted itself.” Plenty other references to cowboys,
ranchers, and rustling are found in this incredible
memoir. $375.00

1947.   FLIPPER,  Henry   O.  Negro   Frontiersman: The
Western Memoirs of Henry O. Flipper.... El Paso: Texas
Western College Press, 1963. x, 54 pp., frontispiece
portrait, illustrations. 8vo, original rose pictorial
wrappers. Light wear to wraps, otherwise a fine copy.
Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate.
    First edition, wrappers issue (500 copies in
wrappers). Designed by Carl Hertzog. Edited with an
introduction by Theodore D. Harris.   $150.00

1948.   FLORIN, Lambert. Boot Hill: Historic Graves of
the Old West. Seattle: Superior Publishing Co., [1966].
192 pp., profusely illustrated with photos. 4to,
original slate blue cloth. Very fine in d.j.
    First edition. Western Ghost Town Series 6. Edwards,
Enduring Desert, pp. 85-86: “In Mr. Florin’s books the
ghost town enthusiast can find material abundantly
sufficient to satisfy his most exigent demands. First
and foremost, Mr. Florin is a master-photographer, and
his photographs of historic old ghost town buildings
capture all the flavor and atmosphere of his chosen
subject. A concomitant pleasure...derives from his
editorial and descriptive comment.” Guns 738: “Tells
about the Earp-Clanton fight and the killing of Billy
the Kid.... Many of the outlaws of Arizona and New
Mexico are mentioned.” $50.00

1949.   FLORIN, Lambert. Ghost Town Treasures. Seattle:
Superior Publishing Co., [1965]. 192 pp., numerous
photographic text illustrations. 4to, original green
cloth. Very fine in lightly worn but fine d.j.
    First edition. Western Ghost Town Series 5. Edwards,
Enduring Desert, pp. 85-86. Ghost towns from California,
Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Nevada,
Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, and British Columbia. The
primary focus is mining, but there are some references
to ranching, such as the case of rancher J. B. Dawson of
New Mexico who came into conflict with the Maxwell Land
Grant Company, but whose land eventually ended up as a
large cattle operation run by Phelps Dodge (pp. 136-
139).   $35.00

1950.   FLORIN, Lambert. Tales the Western Tombstones
Tell. Seattle: Superior Publishing Co., n.d. 191 [1]
pp., numerous photographic text illustrations. 4to,
original light green cloth. Fine in near fine d.j.
    Bonanza reprint (first edition published by Superior
Publishing). Western Ghost Town Series 7. Adams, One-
Fifty 55n: “Material on some western characters, outlaws
and gunmen. There is some information on Calamity Jane,
Pearl Hart and Joe Boot, Jack Gallaher, George Ives,
Boone Helm, Club-Foot George Lane, Haze Lyons and the
hanging of the Plummer outlaws at Virginia City by the
vigilantes.” Chapter on the Pleasant Valley War between
the Grahams and Tewksberrys. $20.00

1951.   FLORY,   J.   S.   Thrilling   Echoes   from   the   Wild
Frontier:   Interesting    Personal   Reminiscences   of
Author.... Chicago: Rhodes & McClure Publishing Company,
1893. [6] 17-248 [2, ads] pp., woodcut frontispiece and
plates. 12mo, original red cloth gilt. Light shelf wear,
covers soiled, lower hinge cracked, front free endpaper
separating, interior age-toned and quite brittle.
Overall a very good copy.
    First edition. Graff 1365. Herd 814: “Scarce.” Howes
F216. Wynar 340. The work includes descriptions of
cowboys in Wyoming (pp. 60-62) and comments about a
sheep ranch (pp. 237-240). $100.00

1952.   FOGHT, H. W. The Trail of the Loup: Being a
History of the Loup River Region with Some Chapters on
the State. N.p., 1906. 296 pp., frontispiece portrait,
photographic    illustrations    (including   2    foldout
panoramas of Ord, Nebraska), maps. 8vo, original red
gilt-lettered cloth. Binding slightly abraded, stained,
and worn, occasional inoffensive pencil notes to text,
otherwise   a   very  good   copy   of   a  scarce   book.
Contemporary ownership inscription of Harry E. Weaver on
front pastedown.
    First edition. Guns 741: “Scarce.... Has some
information on cattle stealing; I. P. Olive and his feud
with   Mitchell   and   Ketchum.”   Herd   816.   Includes
information on Native Americans of Nebraska (Sioux War
of 1862-69, the Creek Massacre, Custer’s last stand,
Sioux War of 1890-91), grasshopper problems of the
1870s, development of Loup County, as well as a chapter
on the “cowboy regime.”    $350.00

1953.    FOHLIN, E. V. Salt Lake City, Past and Present:
A Narrative of Its History and Romance, Its People and
Cultures, Its Industry and Commerce.... Salt Lake City:
E.    V.    Fohlin,   [1908].   208    pp.,   frontispiece,
photographic     text   illustrations,    portraits.   8vo,
original blue cloth. Shelf-worn, upper hinge cracked,
lacks front endpaper.
    First edition. Flake 3384. Local history and guide,
including a small section on the livestock industry.
    $50.00

1954.   FOLEY, Thaddeus J. Memories of the Old West.
N.p., n.d. [ca. 1927-1928]. 54 pp. 12mo, original grey
printed wrappers, stapled. Very fine in original mailing
envelope. Scarce.
    First edition. Graff 1369. Herd 817: “Scarce.... A
chapter on the cattle industry in Nebraska.” Around 1870
the author traveled from New York to Omaha. He includes
comments on cattle drives in which he participated, such
as an 1874 drive of 400 head from Ogalalla (“at the end
of the Texas trail [and] the biggest and last market for
the sale of Texas cattle”) to the Red Cloud and Spotted
Tail Agencies on a previously untraversed route via
North Platte River, South Loup, Dismal, and Foley Lake
(named for the author), where the cattle stampeded. The
trip was so rough that it was decided to seek a
different route in the future. Foley laments the demise
of the cattle industry in Nebraska because of the rise
of farming (pp. 30-31, “The First Irrigation Ditch in
Nebraska and the Passing of Range Cattle”). He also
gives a dramatic account of how an 1869 surveying party
of which he was a member fought off a determined
attacked by Native Americans. The obligatory buffalo
hunt is included in a chapter entitled “A Buffalo Hunt
on the South Platte.” $275.00

1955.   FOOTE, Stella Adelyne. Letters from Buffalo
Bill, Taken from the Originals Now on Exhibit at the
Wonderland Museum, Billings, Montana. Billings: Foote
Publishing   Co.,  1954.   80  pp.,   photographic  text
illustrations, portraits, facsimiles. 8vo, original
white wrappers with photograph portrait of Cody. Fine.
    First printing, “Museum Edition.” Guns 742: “Has
some mention of Wild Bill Hickok.” This interesting
series of letters from Buffalo Bill to his sister from
1873 until his death in 1917 includes commentary on
Annie Oakley, the TE Ranch, Buffalo Hunting, Wild West
Show, Custer, etc. $75.00

1956.   FORBES, Mrs. A. S. C. [Harrie Rebecca Piper
Smith]. Mission Tales in the Days of the Dons. Chicago:
A. C. McClurg & Co., 1909. [12] 343 [1] pp.,
frontispiece portrait, illustrations by Langdon Smith
(nine plates and marginal illustrations in green on
every page). 8vo, original dark green pictorial cloth.
Light shelf wear, hinges loose, interior fine.
    First edition. Cowan, p. 217. Weber, California
Missions, p. 39: “The initial ninety-three pages of this
work   are   devoted   to   foundations  in    Peninsular
California.” For more on the author, who energetically
worked to preserve the missions, see Walker, A Literary
History of Southern California (p. 172). Historical
fiction set in Pastoral California. The chapter on “The
Penance Bell of Los Angeles” includes descriptions of
ranching activities and the hide trade in and around
Mission San Gabriel.   $40.00

1957.   FORBES, Alexander. California: A History of
Upper and Lower California from Their First Discovery to
the Present Time; Comprising an Account of the Climate,
Soil, Natural Productions, Agriculture, Commerce &c.; A
Full View of the Missionary Establishments and Condition
of the Free and Domesticated Indians. With an Appendix
Relating to Steam Navigation in the Pacific. Illustrated
with a New Map, Plans of the Harbours, and Numerous
Engravings. London: Smith, Elder and Co., 1839. xvi, 352
pp. (printed errata slip at p. 339), lithographic
frontispiece of Father Antonio Peyri, 9 lithographic
plates, text illustrations, folding lithographic map of
California on thin paper with original outline coloring
in red, green, and yellow: The Coasts of Guatimala [sic]
and Mexico, from Panama to Cape Mendocino; with the
Principal Harbours in California. London, Smith Elder &
Co. 1839. John Arrowsmith (37 x 50 cm; 14-1/2 x 19-3/4
inches), with insets: (1) Harbour of San Francisco, by
Captn. Beechey R.N.; (2) Sketch of Puerto de S. Diego by
Captn. John Hall; (3) Sketch of Monterrey Harbour, by
Captn. John Hall; (4) Sketch of St. Barbara Harbour by
Captn. John Hall; (5) Sketch of Port S. Gabriel, or S.
Pedro by Captn. John Hall. 8vo, early twentieth-century
three-quarter tan sheep over brown cloth, spine with
raised bands and gilt-lettered maroon leather labels,
edges sprinkled. Binding rubbed, frontispiece with mild
to moderate foxing, otherwise fine. Overall a very good
copy, with engraved armorial bookplate of the Bodleian
Library (with ink deacession stamp).
    First edition. Barrett 866. Cowan, p. 217. Graff
1377. Hill, p. 107. Howell 50, California 83. Howes
F242. LC, California 42. Van Nostrand & Coulter,
California Pictorial, pp. 22-27 (illustrating one
lithograph and watercolors on which two other plates
were based). Zamorano 80 #38: “The book is of value as
being the first one printed in English to relate
exclusively to California.”
    This classic book contains a section on California
cattle,    and  interspersed   comments   on   livestock
throughout, sometimes including quotations from earlier
visitors’ accounts, such as Langsdorff: “Numerous herds
of horses and cattle were running wild here, without any
attention being paid to them; the horned cattle even
render the country not very safe for foot passengers”
(p. 174). Chapter 5 with a section on missionary
establishments discusses presidial soldiers’ “ranchios”
(“depositories of tithes to be collected in cattle and
grain by the government”); land grants to soldiers “to
commence their new occupation of husbandry...with the
aid of the natives”; arrangement of mission grounds with
“part left in its natural condition and occupied as
grazing ground”; virtual slavery of the missionized
indigenous population; etc. Chapter 6 contains a section
on livestock, including statistical table enumerating
numbers of cattle, horses, sheep, and other livestock at
each mission followed by the statement: “In addition to
the above there are a great number running wild,
particularly mares, which they hunt and kill in order to
prevent their eating up the pasture from the useful
[domesticated] cattle.”
    Forbes goes on to discuss cattle management,
mentioning cattle drives of around a thousand head to
Mexico City (for use in bullfights!). Forbes describes
the wild cattle and the California method of using the
lasso to capture them: “Although it is in general a
useful and necessary occupation to secure cattle in this
way, yet it is by the lookers-on, and even by those
engaged in it considered as an amusement, and to which
they are passionately attached.” The “rodea” (roundups),
horsemanship, and equipage are explained, and the author
provides   details   on   the   accompanying  lithograph
(“Californian Mode of Catching Cattle with a Distant
View of the Mission of St. Joseph”) after the famous
painting by William Smyth. $2,000.00

1958.   FORBES, J. Alexander. The Golden West Souvenir:
Primitive Years in California. [Los Angeles?: J.
Alexander Forbes and I. C. Funetes, 1919]. 103 pp.,
frontispiece portrait, photographic text illustrations.
12mo, original grey pictorial wrappers, stapled. Light
wear to cover, text block detached from binding,
otherwise a fine copy.
    First edition. Cowan, p. 217. Rocq 16849. Weber, The
California Missions, p. 39: “Historical memoir concerned
predominantly with the missions.” Included is discussion
of the vast mission herds of such livestock as cattle
and sheep and the fact that many of the missions
slaughtered all their livestock when secularization
occurred. $25.00

1959.   FORD, Gus L. (ed.). Texas Cattle Brands: A
Catalogue of the Texas Centennial Exposition Exhibit
1936. Dallas: Clyde C. Cockrell Company, [1936]. xx, 240
pp., 4 plates (historical       maps of Texas), text
illustrations (hundreds of brands), endpaper maps of
cattle trails with descriptive text. 8vo, original gilt-
lettered red cloth with navy blue vignette of cow on
upper cover, navy ruling on spine and upper cover. Very
fine and bright, signed by author on title page.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 130. Loring Campbell, My
Favorite 101 Books about the Cattle Industry 34. CBC
4962. Dobie, p. 102. Herd 818. History of brands and
brand law, with brief discussion of cattle breeds and
the cattle trade. A “Hall of Cattle Kings” gives
biographies of fifty-three ranchers, including Gail
Borden, Oliver Loving, Richard King, Robert J. Kleberg,
et al. $425.00

1960.   FORD, Gus L. (ed.). Texas Cattle Brands....
Dallas: Clyde C. Cockrell Company, [1936]. Another copy,
variant binding, original maroon cloth with gilt
lettering, ruling and vignette in orange. Binding
slightly abraded, otherwise fine. $350.00

1961.   FORD, Thomas W. A. B. Guthrie, Jr. Austin:
Steck-Vaughn, [1968]. ii [2] 44 pp. 12mo, original beige
printed wrappers, stapled. Very fine.
    First edition. Southwest Writers Series 15. Review
and analysis writings. $15.00

1962.   FORD, Tirey L. Dawn and the Dons: The Romance of
Monterey. San Francisco: A. M. Robertson, 1926. xiii [3]
236 pp., text vignettes and sketches by Jo Mora,
endpaper maps. 8vo, original half black cloth over tan
pictorial boards, paper spine label. Slight shelf wear,
upper margin of pages 79-80 torn (no losses), otherwise
fine.
    First edition. Cowan, p. 218. Dykes, Fifty Great
Western Illustrators (Mora 9). Guns 743: “Scarce.” Herd
819: “Chapter on cattle raising in California.” Rocq
5693.   $75.00

1963.   FOREMAN, Carolyn Thomas. The Cross Timbers.
[Muskogee, Oklahoma: The Star Printery], 1947. 123 [9,
index] pp., folding map of the Cross Timbers. 8vo,
original green cloth. Binding lightly worn, otherwise
fine, signed by author.
    First edition. History of the exploration and
settlement of the Cross Timbers region of north-central
Texas and south-central Oklahoma, with descriptions of
cattle rustling by Kiowa and Comanche and details on
early trail drives through the Cross Timbers. “During
the winter of 1865-1866 large herds of cattle were
assembled at points in Texas to be driven north in late
March or early April when the grass should be high
enough for feed. These herds numbered from one to three
thousand steers and each herd was in charge of a ‘boss’
and from eight to fourteen cowboys; a cook drove the
chuck wagon containing the food and bedding. The usual
route from central Texas passed west of Fort Worth, and
crossed the strip of prairie between the Upper and Lower
Cross Timbers, via Denton and Sherman, and the Red
River. North of that stream the road crossed Indian
Territory, past Fort Gibson and on to the Kansas line
south of Baxter Springs” (p. 110).   $60.00

1964.   FOREMAN, Carolyn Thomas. Oklahoma Imprints 1835-
1907: A History of Printing in Oklahoma before
Statehood. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1936.
xxiv [2] 499 [1] pp., frontispiece, plates (some
foldout), foldout maps, facsimiles. 8vo, original black
patterned cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 187. Mohr, The Range
Country   677:   “An  excellent   bibliography.”  Books,
newspapers, pamphlets, and periodicals dealing with the
various Native American tribes (Cherokee, Chickasaw,
Choctaw, Creek, Osage, Peoria, Seminole) of the Oklahoma
Territories, Legislative journals, statutes, Supreme
Court decisions, and various religious presses. Inroads
to research on ranching. $100.00

1965.   FOREMAN, Carolyn Thomas. Park Hill. [Muskogee,
Oklahoma: The Star Printery, 1948]. 186 [7, index] pp.,
frontispiece, photographic text illustrations. 8vo,
original tan cloth. Light shelf wear, otherwise fine in
lightly worn and foxed d.j. Signed by author.
    First edition. Heavy emphasis on printing   and social
history, but with scattered references to       livestock,
especially to depredations during the Civil     War. Also,
has some references to trade in hides and        to cattle
being fed on the prairies (p. 156).   $75.00

1966.   FOREMAN, Grant. Advancing the Frontier, 1830-
1860. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1933. 363
pp., frontispiece, photographic plates, maps (some
folding    and   foldout),  plans,   photographic   text
illustrations. 8vo, original red cloth. Very fine in
price-clipped d.j. Signed by author, and with related
news clipping laid in.
    First edition. The Civilization of the American
Indian Series 4. Dobie, p. 29: “Grant Foreman is prime
authority on the so-called ‘Civilized Tribes.’” Saunders
2900. Tate, Indians of Texas 220: “Includes a chapter on
the Five Civilized Tribes and their efforts to negotiate
with...other tribes of East Central Texas during the
1840s. Other chapters outline the problems that the
Comanches created for these ‘emigrant tribes.’” Account
of the resettlement of Eastern tribes into the
Transmississippi West after their removal by Jackson,
examining clashes between various tribes and impacts of
the extirpation of bison and transition to stock
raising.    $150.00

1967.   FOREMAN, Grant. Down the Texas Road: Historic
Places along Highway 69 through Oklahoma. Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press, 1936. 46 [2] pp., maps.
12mo, original yellow printed wrappers, stapled. Light
wear, but generally fine.
    First edition. Historic Oklahoma Series 2. Campbell,
p. 102. Classic account of this highway that was a major
thoroughfare through Oklahoma cattle country, with
reference to the hundreds of thousands of cattle passing
from Texas to the Pikes Peaks Rush.  $50.00
1968.   FOREMAN, Grant. The Five Civilized Tribes.
Norman: University of Oklahoma, 1934. 455 [1] pp., 13
photographic plates (including frontispiece), folding
map. 8vo, original red cloth. Very fine in d.j.
    First edition. The Civilization of the American
Indian Series 8; introductory note by John R. Swanton.
Rader 1432. To Grant Foreman, above any other writer,
credit is due for developing, through intensive study
and research, the engrossing story of these tribes, the
first   permanent   citizens   of  Oklahoma.    Foreman’s
sympathetic discussions of the Five Civilized Tribes
include material on their activities as livestock
herders and growers and on cattle drives to California.
    $75.00

1969.   FOREMAN, Grant. Lore and Lure of Eastern
Oklahoma. Muskogee, Oklahoma: Muskogee Chamber of
Commerce, n.d. (ca. 1947). 78 pp., photographic text
illustrations, folding map. 8vo, original orange and
white wrappers with map. Fine. Signed by author.
    First edition. Cover title is Muskogee and Eastern
Oklahoma. Contains references to the introduction of
cattle into Eastern Oklahoma and discussion of the great
herds of cattle that went down the Texas trail (pp. 57-
58) before the construction of the railroads. Prior to
that, Muskogee was the terminus of the cattle drives
from Texas. At pp. 47-49 is an account of the
devastating Confederate raid on Fort Davis in 1863, in
which a thousand Union horses and mules were rustled and
twenty herdsmen murdered. $60.00

1970.   FOREMAN, Grant. Lore and Lure of Eastern
Oklahoma. Muskogee, Oklahoma: Muskogee Chamber of
Commerce, n.d. (ca. 1947). Another copy. Wrappers
lightly worn, otherwise fine. $45.00

1971.   FOREMAN, Grant. Lore and Lure of Eastern
Oklahoma. [Muskogee, Oklahoma: Muskogee Chamber of
Commerce], n.d. (ca. 1947) 78 pp., photographic text
illustrations, map. 8vo, original green and white
wrappers with map. Very fine.
    First edition, variant issue, with cover title:
Muskogee and Eastern Oklahoma and The Battle of Honey
Springs, the map being a reduced version reproducing
only a portion of the map in the issue above. $25.00

1972.   FOREMAN, Grant. Pioneer Days in the Early
Southwest. Cleveland: The Arthur H. Clark Company, 1926.
349 pp., 4 photographic plates (including frontispiece),
foldout map. 8vo, original red cloth, t.e.g. Spine
sunned, very light water damage and wear to covers.
    First edition. Campbell, pp. 177-89: “One of the
best books ever written about the Southwest. Much on
Texas Indian warfare before the Texas Revolution.” Clark
& Brunet 86: “Study of the early exploration and
development of Oklahoma, Texas, Missouri, Arkansas, New
Mexico, Colorado, and Kansas. It is based primarily on
original   research  of   unpublished   manuscripts  and
contemporary newspapers dealing with the period between
the Louisiana Purchase and the Mexican War.” Howes F260.
Rader 1436. Saunders 2904. Tate, Indians of Texas 222:
“Excellent source of information on Indian relations in
Indian Territory and northern Texas between 1800 and
1848. Special emphasis is given to Comanches and
Cherokees, especially Sam Houston’s close relationship
with the latter.” Wallace, Arizona History IV:28.
    Occasional forays into subjects of interest for
ranching. The chapter on “Border Warfare” documents
Seminole removal from Florida to the junction of
Canadian and North Fork Rivers. “Some of them removed to
that location, but a thousand of them under their
leader, Alligator, remained on the bottom lands near the
post, unwilling to leave; destitute, they fed themselves
by killing the live-stock of the Cherokee, until they
became a serious menace to the peace” (p. 292). $125.00

1973.   FOREMAN, Grant (ed.). Marcy and the Gold
Seekers: The Journal of Captain R. B. Marcy, with an
Account of the Gold Rush over the Southern Route.
Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1939. xiv, 433 [1]
pp., plates, folding map. 8vo, original terracotta
cloth. Very fine in price-clipped d.j.
    First edition. The American Exploration and Travel
Series 2. Campbell, pp. 66, 192. Edwards, Enduring
Desert, pp. 87-88: “A fundamental work.” Saunders 2903.
Tate, Indians of Texas 2166: “Grant Foreman’s excellent
editing and the added index make this much easier to use
than Marcy’s original document. Frequent comments on
Comanches and their threat to the expedition fill
Marcy’s report, and with good reason—Comanches attacked
the civilian party that was traveling with the army
escort.” Wallace, Arizona History IV:52. Includes a long
footnote on p. 96 about Captain Forrest’s large trail
drive of “thousands of sheep and cattle” from Indian
Territory to California in 1850, and other drives of
that era to supply California miners with food (pp. 96-
97).    $85.00

1974.   FORREST, Earle R. Arizona’s Dark and Bloody
Ground. Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1936. 370 pp., 23
photographic plates (including frontispiece), endpaper
maps. 12mo, original red cloth gilt. Fine in fine d.j.
Author’s signed and dated presentation copy to William
MacLeod Raine “in appreciation for the introduction so
generously    contributed   and   suggestions  made   in
preparation of the manuscript.... ”
    First edition. Introduction by William MacLeod
Raine. Dobie, p. 141. Dykes, Kid 224. Dykes, Western
High   Spots,   p.   80   (“A   Range  Man’s  Library”):
“Entertaining account of the Pleasant Valley War in
Arizona.” Guns 747: “Perhaps the best and most complete
history of the Graham-Tewksbury feud, this book reveals
intelligent research. It has some accounts of the Apache
Kid, Billy the Kid, Tom Pickett, and the killing of Andy
Copper by Commodore Owens.” Herd 823. Howes F265.
Powell, Arizona Gathering II 596n. Wallace, Arizona
History X:27. $250.00
1975.   FORREST, Earle R. Arizona’s Dark and Bloody
Ground. Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1936. Another copy.
Fine in d.j. with one short tear (no losses).
Publisher’s bookmark with instructions on how to open a
book laid in. Signed by author.  $175.00

1976.   FORREST, Earle R. Arizona’s Dark and Bloody
Ground. Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1936. Another copy,
review copy. Fine in fine d.j. Review copy label with
stamped publication date tipped onto front pastedown.
    $150.00

1977.   FORREST, Earle R. Arizona’s Dark and Bloody
Ground. Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1936. Another copy,
not a review copy. Moderate shelf wear, internally fine,
in price-clipped d.j. with a 7-cm tear and minor
chipping. $100.00

1978.   FORREST, Earle R. Arizona’s Dark and Bloody
Ground. Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1950. 382 pp., 23
photographic plates (including frontispiece), endpaper
maps. 8vo, original red cloth gilt. Very fine in fine
d.j. Author’s signed and dated presentation inscription
“To my friend and fellow Westerner (Britz) Homer E.
Britzman, With the best wishes.... ”
    Second edition, revised and enlarged. $85.00

1979.   FORREST, Earle R. Missions and Pueblos of the
Old Southwest: Their Myths, Legends, Fiestas, and
Ceremonies, with Some Accounts of the Indian Tribes and
Their Dances; and of the Penitentes. Cleveland: The
Arthur H. Clark Company, 1929. 386 pp., frontispiece,
plates. 8vo, original blue cloth, gilt-lettered spine,
t.e.g. Very fine, mostly unopened.
    First trade edition (Clark published a 2-vol.
limited issue of 100 copies in 1928; the second volume
was an atlas). Campbell, p. 102. Clark & Brunet 87:
“Forrest spent twenty-five years researching this work.
He   traveled  extensively   throughout  the   Southwest
visiting historic ruins, pueblos, and tribes. Much
information of an ethnographic nature is contained in
the work. Forrest gathered together an important
collection of photographs of the missions and pueblos
before modern changes were made.” Laird, Hopi 920: “Much
of Forrest’s Hopi material is firsthand from his visits
to the mesas soon after the turn of the century but he
has also done his homework. This is a good readable
survey of the Indians and churches of the Southwest.”
Powell, Arizona Gathering II 597n. Saunders 2172.
Wallace, Arizona History III:19.
    This work contains valuable information on Father
Kino and his work (Kino is considered to be the Father
of Ranching in the Southwest). Information on cattle
ranches is provided, including San Bernardino Ranch, C O
Bar, and the Gandara Ranch, the latter one of the most
famous of the old Spanish ranches in the entire
Southwest in the 1830s and 1840s: “From his great adobe
mansion, surrounded by an army of peons and vaqueros,
Don Manuel ruled like a feudal baron of old while his
cattle grazed on a thousand hills, until a change in
political fortunes forced him to flee from Mexico to
California” (pp. 259-61). $200.00

1980.   FORREST, Earle R. & Edwin B. Hill. Lone War
Trail of Apache Kid. Pasadena: Trail’s End Publishing
Co., [1947]. 143 [1] pp., 8 photographic plates (1 in
color by Charles M. Russell), endpaper maps by Clarence
Ellsworth. 8vo, original gilt-lettered tan calf gilt
with a gilt reproduction of an illustration by Charles
M. Russell on back cover. Other than minor shelf wear, a
very fine copy.
    Limited deluxe edition (#23 of 250 copies, signed by
authors). Guns 748: “A well-written history, and up to
the time of its publication the most nearly complete
work on this notorious Arizona Indian outlaw.” Wallace,
Arizona History X:39. Yost & Renner, Russell I:50.
    A trusted Indian scout for Al Sieber and General
Crook during the 1880s, the Apache Kid murdered another
Indian in 1887. When he attempted surrender, an excited
melee occurred and Al Sieber was shot in the foot. The
Apache Kid fled but again returned and surrendered. He
and three other Apaches were charged and convicted of
attempted murder in the incident. While transporting the
Apache Kid and four other prisoners, the guards were
overpowered, and with two guards dead and the other
severely   wounded,  the  Apache   Kid  fled.   Although
suspected of other murders, the remainder of the Apache
Kid’s life remains a mystery. Some of the action takes
place on Milt Hall’s Ranch in Cochise County and other
area ranches. $200.00

1981.   FORREST, Earle R. & Edwin B. Hill. Lone War
Trail of Apache Kid. Pasadena: Trail’s End Publishing
Co., [1947]. Another copy, variant binding. 8vo,
original maroon cloth gilt. Very fine in fine bright,
bright d.j. with a few little nicks (no losses).
    Limited deluxe edition (#25 of 250 copies), signed
by both authors. The binding is often described as
morocco or leather, but it is cloth impregnated to
resemble those substances. $125.00

1982.   FORREST, Earle R. & Edwin B. Hill. Lone War
Trail of Apache Kid. Pasadena: Trail’s End Publishing
Co., [1947]. 143 [1] pp., 8 plates (mostly photographic,
1 in color after Charles M. Russell), endpaper maps by
Clarence Ellsworth. 8vo, original blue cloth. Very fine
in slightly chipped d.j.
    First trade edition. $40.00

1983.   FOSSETT,   Frank.   Colorado:   A   Historical,
Descriptive and Statistical Work on the Rocky Mountain
Gold and Silver Mining Region. Denver: Daily Tribune
Steam Printing House, 1876. [2] 470 [ix, appendix] [8,
ads] pp., frontispiece, wood-engraved plates (scenes,
views, equipment), maps. 8vo, original dark green gilt-
lettered cloth. Moderate shelf wear, lightly shaken,
overall a very good copy, contemporary ownership
inscription on front free endpaper. Printed on various
stocks of paper and not bound well, this work is
difficult to find in collector’s condition.
    First edition. Bradford 1743. Herd 826: “Rare.”
Howes F281. Wilcox, p. 45. Wynar 3336. Important early
guide to Colorado, with a heavy emphasis on mining.
    $150.00

1984.   FOSSETT,  Frank.    Colorado:  A   Historical,
Descriptive and Statistical Work on the Rocky Mountain
Gold and Silver Mining Region. Denver, 1876. Another
copy, variant binding. 8vo, original brown cloth.
Binding worn, hinge broken, intermittent browning.
    $100.00

1985.   FOSTER, C[larence] D[elmer]. Foster’s Comic
History of Oklahoma. Oklahoma City: Publishers Press,
[1916]. 138 [5] pp., cartoon illustrations by Merle St.
Leon. 12mo, original beige pictorial wrappers. Wrappers
worn at spine, back wrapper stained, ink stamp on title
page causing stain to verso of front wrapper, back
wrapper loose at hinge, overall a good copy in original
mailing envelope. J. Frank Dobie’s copy, with his ink
note on upper wrapper: “Trails & Ranches - 118-119.”
    First edition. This quasi-serious history, somewhat
in the vein of Texas History Movies, includes chapters
on ranches and cowboys.   $75.00

1986.   FOSTER, James S. Outlines of History of the
Territory of Dakota and Emigrant’s Guide to the Free
Lands of the Northwest, Containing a Description of
Towns, Climate, Soil...Stage Routes, Railroads. And a
Complete Business Directory of the Upper Missouri
Valley...Accompanied with a New Sectional Map. By James
S. Foster, Commissioner of Immigration for Dakota
Territory. [Colophon: Pierre: Hipple Printing Company],
1928. 110 [1] pp. 8vo, original blue printed wrappers.
Wrappers slightly worn (one small chip from one corner)
and a bit discolored along one edge, overall a very good
copy.
    Reprint of the rare Yankton, Dakota Territory,
edition of 1870, a genuine Northwest rarity (the last
copy of the 1870 edition at auction was the Streeter
copy in 1968 which fetched $950.00). Bradford 1748n.
Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 18n. Graff
1389n. Herd 829n. Howes F289. Includes sections on
fencing, stock raising, and wool growing. $50.00

1987.   FOSTER-HARRIS. The Look of the Old West. New
York: Viking Press, 1955. x, 316 pp., profusely
illustrated by Evelyn Curro. 4to, original half beige
pictorial cloth over brown marbled boards. Very fine in
very fine d.j. A common book, but not in collector’s
condition and with the d.j.
    First edition, first printing, without notice of
Viking participation on verso of title, and sheets to
bulking to 2.8 cm. Guns 751: “Has some information on
many of the outlaws of the West, such as Billy the Kid,
Butch Cassidy, Bill Carver, Jim Courtright, King Fisher,
John Wesley Hardin, the James boys...and such gunmen as
Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, Luke Short, and Dallas
Stoudenmire.” Herd 828. Extensive discussions of the
material culture of ranching, trail drives, cowboys,
horses and equestrian equipage, cattle breeds, managing
herds, barbed wire and fencing, architecture, etc.
    $40.00

1988.   FOSTER-HARRIS. The Look of the Old West. New
York: Viking Press, 1955. x, 316 pp., profusely
illustrated   by   Evelyn  Curro.   4to,   original  tan
illustrated cloth. Very fine in very fine d.j.
    First edition, later printing, with notice of Viking
participation on verso of title, and sheets to bulking
to 1.9 cm. $20.00

1989.  FOWLER, M. V. B. The California Journal of M. V.
B. Fowler, 1851. Los Angeles: The Historical Society of
Southern California, 1968. [2] 113-265 pp. 8vo, original
goldenrod cloth. Fine.
    First separate printing, limited (125 copies),
reprinted from The Southern California Quarterly (June &
September 1968). Edited and with introduction by Mary
Joan Elliott. Includes detailed views of ranchos and
missions in the area. $40.00

1990.   FOX, Lawrence K. (ed.). Fox’s Who’s Who among
South Dakotans, Vol. 1, 1924-1925. Pierre, South Dakota:
Statewide Service Company, 1924. xxix [1] 238 pp. 8vo,
original green cloth gilt. Light shelf wear, hinges
cracked, text browned, ownership inscription of Walter
A. Simmons (who has an entry in the book). Overall a
good copy.
    First edition. Quite a few ranchers among the many
entries.    $20.00

1991.   FRACKELTON, Will. Sagebrush Dentist, As Told by
Dr. Will Frackelton to Herman Gastrell Seely. Pasadena:
Trail’s End, [1947]. 258 pp., portrait. 8vo, original
gilt-lettered red leather. Very fine. Frackelton’s
signature and inscription tipped in at half-title,
Seely’s signature on verso of title page.
    Revised   and   enlarged  edition,    with  Sheridan
Stationery Company notation on verso of title. Guns
755n: “The author spins an interesting yarn, and among
other things tells of his experiences with Butch
Cassidy, Harry Longabaugh, Tom O’Day, and the rest of
the Wild Bunch in their own lair. He gives some new
material on both Calamity Jane and Soapy Smith.” Herd
834n. Luther, High Spots of Custer 138: “Frackelton
relates of what he learned from the Crows concerning the
fight.” Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 25n: “In the 1890s a
young Wisconsin dentist set up business first in
Sundance and shortly in Sheridan, Wyoming. Whimsical
reminiscences of his life in the Sheridan community
among the early ranchers and the Indians on the nearby
Crow reservation.” $100.00
1992.   FRACKELTON,    Will.    Sagebrush    Dentist....
Pasadena: Trail’s End, [1947]. Another copy, variant
binding. 8vo, original gilt-lettered tan sheep with gilt
illustration by Charles Russell on back cover. Light
edge wear, otherwise a fine copy.
    Revised and enlarged edition, without Sheridan
Stationery Company notation on verso of title. The
Russell illustration is the same that appeared on the
limited edition of Forrest & Hill’s Lone War Trail of
Apache Kid (q.v.). $100.00

1993.   FRACKELTON,    Will.    Sagebrush     Dentist....
Pasadena: Trail’s End, [1947]. Another copy, variant
binding. 8vo, original red cloth with black lettering.
Very fine in very fine illustrated d.j.
    Revised   and   enlarged  edition,    with   Sheridan
Stationery Company notation on verso of title.    $75.00

1994.   [FRANCE, Lewis B.]. With Rod and Line in
Colorado Waters. Denver: Chain, Hardy & Co., 1884. 151
pp., frontispiece map, text vignettes. 8vo, original
brown cloth decorated in gilt and black, bevelled edges.
Light shelf wear mainly to corners and extremities,
otherwise a fine copy of a scarce book. Contemporary
ownership inscription of Henry E. Breman of Greeley in
ink on front free endpaper.
    First edition of a classic of Rocky Mountain
angling. Wynar 8835. The author, a judge in Denver who
wrote under the pseudonym “Bourgeois,” describes in an
amusing fashion his experiences angling in Grand Lake
and Grand River and its tributaries in northwestern
Colorado. Some of his angling took place on the “old
Brown and Stuart’s ranches.” He includes a tale of being
rudely awakened one morning by a trail drive that he
describes as consisting of 300 cattle and 600 cowboys.
    $450.00

1995.   FRANK, Herman W. Scrapbook of a Western Pioneer.
Los Angeles: Times-Mirror Press, [1934]. [14] 256 [8]
pp., 37 photographic plates (including frontispiece) of
portraits, scenes, architecture. 4to, original gilt-
lettered blue cloth. Minor shelf wear, overall a fine,
bright copy. Author’s signed and dated presentation
copy: “It is my pleasure to present this book of which I
am the Author to my good neighbor Mrs. Clarence—my
friend I hope for all time—Her real name is Mrs.
Clarence Smith.... ”
    First edition. Rocq 3827. Smith 3248. The author was
a Jewish retail merchant in Los Angeles for fifty years
and owner of the Harris & Frank Department Store. His
memoirs give good early local history (such as an
account of the first automobiles in Los Angeles), along
with details on his travels drumming up business in
Idaho and the West. In the section entitled “Cowboy
Days” (pp. 12-15), Frank describes how as a young man he
worked in Walla Walla for George Guthridge, a butcher,
helping him round up cattle and other livestock for
slaughter. Many of the photographs document early Los
Angeles.   $60.00

1996.   [FRANKLIN, William Suddards]. A Tramp Trip in
the Rockies of Colorado and Wyoming by S. [Lancaster,
Pennsylvania: New Era Print Co. for] the author, 1903.
56 pp., hand-colored plates. 12mo, original grey
pictorial cloth, gilt-lettered burgundy leather spine
label. Fine and bright. Bookplate of Rt. Rev. Nathaniel
S. Thomas.
    First edition. Wynar 2112. Privately printed in a
small edition for family and friends, this scarce
account covers a trip from Iowa to Laramie via Denver
and Loveland, with details on the Unitas, Long’s Peak,
Estes Park, Grand Lake, Michigan Fork, and the Medicine
Bow Mountains. Includes information the author’s stay at
Sprague’s Ranch in Estes Park.    $450.00

1997. FRANKS, J. M. Seventy Years in Texas: Memories
of the Pioneer Days, Indian Depredations, and the
Northwest Cattle Trail. Gatesville, Texas, 1924. 133 [1]
pp., photograph of author on verso of title page. 8vo,
original beige printed wrappers, stapled. Discoloration
to upper wrap, wrappers browned, generally very good,
signed by J. Frank Dobie on title page.
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:137. Campbell, p. 97.
CBC 233 and 6 additional entries. Graff 1408. Guns 759.
Herd 839: “Scarce.” Howes F339. Parrish, Civil War
Texana 31. Rader 1466. Tate, Indians of Texas 2370:
“Memoirs of life in North Central Texas from the 1850s
through the end of the frontier era.... Pioneer
families, their hardships, and their constant problems
with Comanche and Kiowa raiders. Most of these
personalized stories are not found in any other
sources.” Authentic account of early life in Texas and
the heyday of the cattle drives and ranching.    $200.00

1998.   FRANKS, J. M. Seventy Years in Texas....
Gatesville, Texas, 1924. Another copy. Edges sunned,
small tears on lower cover and blank margin of last four
leaves, otherwise fine.   $175.00

1999.   FRANKS, J. M. Seventy Years in           Texas....
Gatesville, Texas, 1924. Another copy, variant   wrappers.
8vo, original brown printed wrappers, stapled.   Preserved
in yellow cloth chemise. Very fine, signed by    Dudley R.
Dobie. $200.00

2000.   FRANKS, J. M. Seventy Years in Texas....
Gatesville, Texas, 1924. Another copy, variant wrappers.
8vo, original green printed wrappers, stapled. Text
detaching from cover, small snag at head of spine,
interior fine. $150.00

2001.  FRANKS, J. M. Seventy Years in Texas....
Gatesville, Texas, 1924. Another copy. Top corner of
upper wrapper bent, title page foxed, otherwise a fine
copy. Contemporary ownership signature of George W.
Tyler of Belton, Texas, dated April 1924 on cover and
title page. Tyler (1851-1927) was a prominent historian,
lawyer, and politician who pursued a career as a
legislator and educator. (see Handbook of Texas Online:
George W. Belton). $150.00

2002.   FRANTZ, Joe B. Gail Borden: Dairyman to a
Nation. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1951].
xiii [1] 310 [2] pp., plates, map. 8vo, original light
blue cloth. Very fine in d.j.
    First edition. Basic Texas Books 65: “One of the
most interesting of all Texas biographies.... A man
who...founded an industry,...who played a large behind-
the-scenes part in the birth of free Texas.... He later
pioneered the packing and other industries in Texas, and
in fact could justly be called the father of Texas
industry. Frantz’s biography never lags, imbued as it is
with a splendid understanding of his subject.” Campbell,
p. 90. Dobie, p. 51: “This biography of a newspaperman
and inventor brings out sides of pioneer life that
emphasis on fighting, farming, and ranching generally
overlooks.”
    In his early days, Borden was a stock raiser and
later pioneered the beef biscuit intended for California
’49ers and travelers in distress, such as the Donner
party (opposite p. 94 is a facsimile of a broadside
touting Borden’s beef biscuit). Borden’s most important
invention was the process of condensing milk, and, yes,
Gail Borden is the Borden of Borden’s milk. See Handbook
of Texas Online: Gail Borden, Jr. $125.00

2003.   FRANTZ, Joe B. Texas: A Bicentennial History.
New York & Nashville: W. W. Norton & Company and
American Association for State and Local History,
[1976]. xiv, 222 pp., photographic plates by A. Y. Owen,
maps by Harold Faye. 8vo, original grey cloth. Very fine
in d.j. Ownership label on back pastedown.
    First edition. The book is part of a series on “The
States and the Nation,” published for the national
Bicentennial of the American Revolution. Frantz attempts
to dispel some of the myths and stereotypes about Texas,
and covers facets ranging from the Texas Revolution to
cattle drives, and notable characters such as LaSalle,
Sam Houston, the Texas Rangers, and L.B.J.   $20.00

2004.   FRANTZ, Joe B. & Julian Ernest Choate, Jr. The
American Cowboy: The Myth and the Reality. Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press, [1955]. xiii [1] 232 pp.,
photographic plates (by noted photographer Erwin E.
Smith). 8vo, original tan cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:138. Guns 760. Herd
840. The authors state that “we have sought here to
issue a sort of short handbook which will depict the
cowboy as a part of the whole Western panorama, instead
of looking at him, as most previous works have done, in
isolation from his larger environment.” A chapter on
“The Lawless” discusses the mythic role of the cowboy in
the West, pointing out that Billy the Kid “was a product
of the range war and may furnish an extreme example of a
fourth-rate cowboy becoming a first-rate killer.” The
second part of the book “concerns itself with critical
interpretations of the earlier literature of the cowboy
and   with   his  later   critics.”   “Still  the   most
comprehensive treatment of the subject” (Taylor & Maar,
The American Cowboy, p. 223). $50.00

2005.   FRASER, Chelsea. Heroes of the Wilds. New York:
Thomas Y. Crowell Company, [1923]. x [2] 372 pp.,
photographic plates. 8vo, original green pictorial
cloth. Light shelf wear, fore-edges and endpapers
lightly foxed, small ownership label on front pastedown,
overall very good.
    First edition. Popular history dedicated “to the
red-blooded men who, menaced daily by danger, earn an
honest living under the wide roof of the sky,” with
chapters on cowboys, Texas Rangers, loggers, etc. The
chapter on cowboys has a vintage photo of a cowboy
twirling his lariat (by Underwood & Underwood). $20.00
2006.   FRASER, James. Cattle Brands in Arizona: A
Bibliography of Published Territorial and State Brand
Registration Books. Flagstaff: Northland Press, 1968. 45
[1] pp., facsimiles, brands. Tall narrow 8vo, original
brown boards, printed paper label of brands on upper
cover. Very fine.
    First edition. Introduction by Don Perceval. Dykes,
Fifty   Great  Western   Illustrators   (Perceval  25a):
“[Perceval] drew, researched and described the brands
used on the title label and in the text.” Powell,
Arizona Gathering II 609: “Unusually handsome.” $75.00

2007.   FREDERICK, J. V. Ben Holladay: The Stagecoach
King; A Chapter in the Development of Transcontinental
Transportation. Glendale: The Arthur H. Clark Company,
1940.   334   pp.,   frontispiece,  photographic  plates
(counted as part of pagination), folded map. 8vo,
original green cloth, t.e.g. Very fine, unopened.
    First   edition.   Western  Frontiersman  Series  2.
Campbell, pp. 90-91: “Holladay, Mark Twain declared,
would have got the Hebrew children through the
wilderness in forty hours.” Dobie, p. 79. Clark & Brunet
99. Guns 762: “Tells of some of the early stagecoach
robberies, and has material on Joseph Slade and Broncho
Jack.” Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 25: “Not so much a
biography of Ben Holladay as a history of the freighting
and stagecoach business he owned.” Rocq 15813.
    Holladay holds a permanent place in history as the
man who maintained the steady movement of freight, mail,
and passengers between the Missouri Valley and Pacific
Coast during the Civil War. Contains information on the
livestock trade, feats of horsemanship, Buffalo Bill
Cody, etc. $225.00

2008.   FREEMAN, Charles J. Early History of Central
Nebraska and Old Plum Creek, Now Lexington. [Lexington,
Nebraska: Lexington Clipper, 1956]. 16 pp., printed in
double column on rectos only. Large oblong 8vo, original
cream printed wrappers, stapled at top. Text and
wrappers lightly browned, one corner bumped, overall a
fine copy. An amazing survival.
    First edition. Not in standard bibliographical
sources. RLIN locates two copies (Museum of American
West and Yale); OCLC (Denver Public Library). This
little rarity, apparently reprinted from standing
newspaper type, tells in part of Texas cattlemen moving
stock into Custer and Dawson Counties in the 1870s.
    $400.00

2009.   FREEMAN, Dan A. Four Years with the Utes: The
Letters of Dan A. Freeman. Waco: W. M. Morrison, 1962.
[5] 7 [2] pp., illustrated title (by author), text
illustrations. 8vo, original charcoal boards with
pictorial paper label on upper cover by Joan Lanham.
Very fine.
    Limited edition (#36 of 125 copies), edited by W. M.
Morrison. Wynar 1804. Freeman was adopted by the Utes
after the Meeker Massacre. Includes information on the
controversy over grazing rights between Utes and Anglo
settlers that led to the Ute War. $75.00

2010.   FREEMAN, G. D. Midnight and Noonday; or, The
Incidental History of Southern Kansas and the Indian
Territory, Giving Twenty Years Experience on the
Frontier; also the Murder of Pat. Hennesey, and the
Hanging of Tom. Smith, at Ryland’s Ford, and Facts
Concerning the Talbot Raid on Caldwell. Also the Death
Dealing Career of McCarty and Incidents Happening in and
around Caldwell, Kansas, from 1871 until 1890. Caldwell,
Kansas: G. D. Freeman, 1892. 406 pp., 16 plates
(photographs,    a   few  from  engravings),   including
frontispiece    portrait   of  author.   8vo,   original
blindstamped red cloth, spine gilt-lettered (neatly
rebacked, original spine preserved). Binding soiled and
darkened, overall a good copy. The Library of Congress
deposit copy, with their purple ink library stamp with
their accession and deaccession stamps on title verso
and date stamp on rear free endpaper.
    Second edition, first issue, with caption on plate
at p. 40 incorrectly reading “First White Child Born in
Caldwell” corrected by printed pasteover to read: “First
White Child Born in the Cherokee Strip” (the first
edition published at Caldwell, Kansas, in 1890 is
exceedingly rare and has only 4 plates).
    Adams, One-Fifty 56 (citing the 1890 first edition):
“Reprinted in 1892...with the addition of a certificate
signed by seven old-time pioneers attesting to the truth
of the narrative.... The first [edition] is so rare that
many collectors think that the 1892 edition was the only
one published.... I was fortunate enough...to pick up a
copy of the first edition...the only one I have ever
seen.” Campbell, p. 166. Dobie, p. 121. Dykes, Kid 21:
“Very rare”; Rare Western Outlaw Books, p. 11. Eberstadt
114:316: “The period of outlawry, lynch law, and Indian
warfare.” Graff 1411. Guns 763n. Herd 843n. Howes F353.
Rader 1472. Reese, Six Score 39n: “History of Caldwell
during this vital period, when it was an important
cattle town, and a firsthand account of one of the
roughest of the shipping terminals.... All editions are
rare.”
    Two of the photographs document ranching and
cowboys: “Cattlemen at Dinner” (opposite p. 128) and
“Ranch in Indian Territory” (opposite p. 288).   $250.00

2011.   FREEMAN,   G.    D.    Midnight   and    Noonday....
Caldwell, Kansas: G. D. Freeman, 1892. 406 pp., 16
plates (photographs, a few from engravings), including
frontispiece    portrait    of    author.   8vo,    original
blindstamped red cloth, spine gilt-lettered. Mild
staining to fore-edges, otherwise fine, tight, and
bright.
    Second edition, second issue, with caption on plate
at p. 40 correctly reading “First White Child Born in
the Cherokee Strip.”   $300.00

2012.   FREEMAN, Harry C. A Brief History of Butte,
Montana: The World’s Greatest Mining Camp. Chicago:
Henry O. Shepard Company, 1900. 123 [5, ads] pp.,
frontispiece (tinted photogravure of miners), numerous
text illustrations (numerous photos and 4 half-tones by
Charles Russell). 4to, original terracotta pictorial
cloth. Light shelf wear, top corner bumped, a few spots
to covers, internally fine and bright.
    First edition of an early Charles Russell item.
Eberstadt 136:446. Yost & Renner, Russell I:12. Smith
3285. Scarce local history profusely illustrated with
early photographs, mainly focused on mining, but also
covering early businesses, churches, city and county
institutions,   railroads,   and    prominent   citizens,
including Granville Stuart, one of the great cattle
barons   of   the   Northwest.   One   of   the   Russell
illustrations shows cowboys shooting up the town, with
chickens and a Chinese man on the run.    $125.00

                    One of the Big Four
2013.   FREEMAN, James W. (ed.). Prose and Poetry of the
Live Stock Industry of the United States. With Outlines
of the Original and Ancient History of our Live Stock
Animals. Volume I [all published]. Issued in Three
Volumes. Illustrated. Prepared by Authority of the
National Live Stock Association. Denver & Kansas City:
National   Live    Stock   Historical   [Franklin   Hudson
Publishing Co., 1905]. Association. [2] 757 pp., 10
engraved plates (mostly portraits), hundreds of text
illustrations.    4to,   original    blind-stamped   black
morocco, gilt lettered, t.e.g. Binding worn, restored,
and recased, occasional mild to moderate foxing and
staining to interior, overall a very good copy of a rare
book. This copy does not have the certificate of
ownership (“Most copies were issued to members of the
association, with their name stamped in gold on the
front cover and a certificate giving the number of their
set and their name bound in. However, I have seen a
copy,   apparently   in   original   binding,  which   had
neither”—Reese, Six Score).
    First edition. Loring Campbell, My Favorite 101
Books about the Cattle Industry 35. Dobie, p. 114.
Dykes, Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 12; Kid 41:
“Contains a chapter on ‘The Range Rustler’ in which the
Lincoln County War is called ‘the most famous of the
troubles of the cattlemen in the Southern country’”;
Western High Spots, p. 27 (“My Ten Most Outstanding
Books on the West”); pp. 86-87 (“A Range Man’s
Library”): “An exceedingly rare book.” Graff 1412. Guns
764. Herd 844: “One of the most important and most
sought-after books on the cattle industry.” Howell
40:37: Howes P636 (“c”). McCracken, 101, p. 28. Merrill,
Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 18. One Hundred Head
Cut Out of the Jeff Dykes Herd 53. Streeter Sale 2391:
“One of the rarest, most important, and thorough books
on the American cattle industry.” Vandale 136.
    Reese, Six Score 41: “The most desired and desirable
book on the range cattle industry. This book contains an
incredible collection of information on men and events
concerned with cattle. This volume is the only one of
the three projected that was ever published, since its
publication bankrupted the printing company and nearly
broke the association.”   $15,000.00

2014.   FREEMAN, James W. (ed.). Prose and Poetry of the
Live Stock Industry of the United States.... With a New
Introduction by Ramon Adams, Illustrated. Prepared by
Authority of the National Live Stock Association. New
York: Antiquarian Press, 1959. [2] 757 pp., plates
(mostly portraits), numerous text illustrations. Small
folio, original half dark brown calf (blindstamped with
brands) over brown buckram, upper cover with gilt
vignette of cow, gilt-lettered spine, t.e.g. Very fine
in mylar d.j., cardboard edge protector, and publisher’s
green cloth slipcase. Original prospectus laid in.
    Second edition, limited edition (#232 of 500
numbered copies in an edition of 550 copies); facsimile
of the extremely rare 1905 first edition, with a new
introduction by Ramon F. Adams.   $350.00
2015.   FREEMAN, James W. (ed.). Prose and Poetry of the
Live Stock Industry of the United States.... New York:
Antiquarian Press, Prepared by Authority of the National
Live   Stock   Association,   1959.   Another   copy,   not
numbered. Mild foxing to fore-edges, otherwise very
fine. Slipcase not present.
    Second   edition,    limited   edition    (550   copies
produced, with 500 numbered). $200.00

2016.   FRÉMONT, Jessie Benton. Mother Lode Narratives.
Ashland: Lewis Osborne, 1970. 156 [1] [2, index] [1]
pp., text illustrations (mostly full-page), pages with
excerpts from author’s letters are printed on blue
paper, endpaper maps. 12mo, original half navy cloth
over gilt-stamped decorative boards. Very fine in d.j.
    Limited edition (“Printer’s Edition” of 650 copies);
edited and annotated by Shirley Sargent. Cowan, p. 222n.
Flake 3450n. Rocq 5105n. Smith 3341n. Sketches from
magazine articles (also published in the author’s 1890
book, Far West Sketches) and previously unpublished
letters from the period 1858-1860, documenting the
Frémont family’s life on their 45,000-acre Las Mariposas
rancho near the mining community of Bear Valley. This
edition incorporates important new material on early
settlements in Oregon. $50.00

2017.   FRÉMONT, Jessie Benton. A Year of American
Travel: Narrative of Personal Experience.... Voyage to
California   in   1848:   Impressions  of   Panama,   San
Francisco, Monterey, San José &c., and a Letter from
Colonel John Charles Frémont, Describing His Expedition
to the Rocky Mountains Made during the Winter of 1848-
49. San Francisco [& Los Angeles]: [Saul and Lillian
Marks, the Plantin Press for] The Book Club of
California, 1960. xi [5] 121 [1] pp., woodcuts by Ernest
Freed. 8vo, half terracotta cloth over decorative linen
boards, printed paper spine label. Fine in plain d.j.
    Limited   edition   (450  copies).  Introduction   by
Patrice Manahan. Graff 1427n. Howell 50, California
1338. Howes F363n. Kurutz, The California Gold Rush
255b: “Jessie Benton Fremont, the illustrious wife of
John, traveled to California via the Isthmus of Panama
in April 1849 to meet her husband. The coincidental
events of the California gold discovery combined with
her own travel adventures make her recollections doubly
interesting.” Rader 1477n. Rocq 15815. Shortly after her
arrival in San Francisco, Mrs. Frémont notes that in the
year since gold had been discovered nearly all the
foodstuffs had been consumed and there was none to
replace it because all the cattle had been bought and
the vaqueros and other flocks and herds had all
disappeared (p. 69).
    During her stay at San José, Mrs. Frémont witnessed
a grandiose three-day California wedding among vaquero
families and gives a wonderful description of the
splendor, skill, and vivacity of the event, including a
cavalcade with about five hundred horses and even more
riders, followed by spirited rivalries in feats of
horsemanship. Equipage, clothing, and material culture
of the vaqueros are described in minute detail. One of
the engravings in the book illustrates the cavalcade.
    $125.00

2018.   FRÉMONT, John C. Geographical Memoir upon Upper
California...Addressed to the Senate of the United
States. Washington: Wendell and Van Benthuysen, Printers
(30th Congress, First Session, Senate Miscellaneous
Document No. 148), 1848. 67 pp. (wants map). 8vo,
original blue printed wrappers, stitched. Wrappers with
moderate marginal chipping, old tape repair to spine,
moderate water staining to lower right of text, overall
a good copy.
    First edition, with appendix that did not appear in
the House edition. Munk (Alliot), p. 83. Cowan, p. 223.
Flake 3451. Graff 1429. Howes F366. Kurutz, The
California Gold Rush 256: “Provided Gold seekers with a
reliable summary of the terrain they were about to
encounter.” LC, California 102. Plains & Rockies IV:150.
Wheat, Books of the California Gold Rush 78; Mapping the
Transmississippi West III:559. “The only detailed
reports ever made by Frémont on his expedition of 1845-
1846; his journals subsequently were burned.”
    Frémont in this brief but significant report on his
third expedition describes the natural characteristics
of California, including the stock of the prospering
Mormon settlements, wild cattle at Cow Creek which are
hunted for game, plants that could be used to graze
cattle, Cordua’s ranch on the Yuba River and other
ranchos between the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys,
the beautiful herds in the Sacramento Valley, and the
horses and cattle around San Pablo.  $300.00

2019.   FRÉMONT, John C. Geographical Memoir upon Upper
California.... San Francisco: Book Club of California,
1964. xxxi [1] 65 [2] pp., frontispiece portrait,
folding map in grey paper pocket at rear. 8vo, original
grey boards illustrating the map. Very fine in plain
d.j. with title written in pencil on spine.
    Limited edition (425 copies); reprint from the 1848
edition, with introductions by Allan Nevins and Dale L.
Morgan. Schwartz & Ehrenberg, plate 171, p. 278:
“Frémont’s    epochal    map    of    Oregon   and    Upper
California...added    many   new   place   names   to   the
geographical nomenclature of the West, including the
Humboldt   River,   Lake,    and   Range   in  present-day
Nevada...San    Francisco’s    ‘Chrysopylae    or    Golden
Gate’...and the phrase ‘El Dorado or Gold Regions,’ one
of the earliest graphic announcements of the discovery
of gold in California.”     $100.00

2020.   FRÉMONT, John Charles & Jessie Benton Frémont.
Memoirs of My Life...Including in the Narrative Five
Journeys of Western Exploration, during the Years 1842,
1843-4, 1845-6-7, 1848-9, 1853-4.... Vol. 1 [all
published]. Chicago & New York: Belford, Clarke &
Company, 1887. xx, 655 pp., 84 plates, including steel
and   wood   engravings  (some   on   tinted  grounds),
photogravures, 1 chromolithograph, and 6 (of 7) maps.
This copy lacks the map titled Country Explored by John
C.   Frémont.  4to,   original  brown   pictorial  cloth
decorated in gold, silver, and colors, bevelled edges.
Light wear and staining to binding, interior mostly fine
(save for scattered light foxing and a few minor stains
on blank corners of a few plates).
    First edition. Cowan, p. 224. Eberstadt, Modern
Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 171. Edwards,
Enduring Desert, pp. 45-46 (citing Frémont’s 1845 Report
and giving a good synopsis of desert content): “A great
book and an important one. An early narrative of
overland adventure [which] infused tremendous enthusiasm
into the hearts of men everywhere to consort with
excitement and danger by venturing out upon the vast
surge of westbound migration.” Flake 3456. Fritz,
California Coast Redwood 304. Howes F367: “Embraces his
first 3 exploring expeditions and the part played by him
in the conquest of California.” Paher, Nevada 638.
Plains & Rockies IV:115:1n. Rittenhouse 228. Smith 3350.
Tweney, Washington 89 #22n. Wynar 199. Zamorano 80 #39.
Co-authored by “The Pathfinder” and his wife, Jessie, to
whom we owe the literary style of the famous accounts of
exploration published under her husband’s name. Included
is a biographical sketch of Jessie’s father, Senator
Benton, noted champion of westward expansion. Excellent
illustrations by Darley, Hamilton, and other leading
artists. Includes references to ranching, cattle, and
grazing grounds.   $250.00

2021.   FRENCH, C. C. “A Long Winding Trail: Some
Chapters from the Autobiography of One Who Remembers the
Open Range in Texas” in The Texas Monthly 2:5, 3:1, and
3:3 (December 1928; January 1929; March 1929). Pp. 583-
596 + 117-125 + 361-374. 3 issues, 8vo, original orange
printed wrappers. Light wear to wrappers, otherwise
fine.
    First printing. Texas trail driver C. C. French
gives a valuable firsthand account of the development of
the cattle trade and drives in post-Civil War Texas.
Included in the January 1929 issue is A. H. Norris’s
“The   Texas  Pony:   Something   of   the  Origin  and
Characteristics of the Monarch of the Plains.”  $60.00

2022.   [FRENCH, G. H. (ed.)]. Indianola Scrap Book:
Fiftieth Anniversary of the Storm of August 20, 1886.
History of a City That Once was the Gateway of Commerce
for This Entire Section. Victoria, Texas: The Victoria
Advocate, 1936. 198 pp., photographic plates, map. 8vo,
original grey cloth. Binding lightly worn and faded at
spine,   slightly   shelf-slanted,  endpapers   browned,
otherwise very good. Contemporary ink gift inscription
on front free endpaper.
    First edition. CBC 779. Guns 767: “Scarce.... Has
some material on the Taylor-Sutton feud and the killing
of Bill Sutton by Jim Taylor.” Herd 846. Mohr, The Range
Country 688. Includes H. E. Bolton’s “Location of La
Salle’s colony on the Gulf of Mexico.” Camels in Texas,
cattle industry, German colonization, Civil War, etc.
For many years Indianola was a major port for importing
supplies for ranching and farming, and for exporting
products, such as hides. At pp. 88 is a section “Cattle
Stealing Common.” $150.00

2023.   FRENCH, Giles. Cattle Country of Peter French.
Portland, Oregon: Binfords & Mort, 1964. 167 [1] pp.,
many photographic text illustrations (some full-page),
endpaper maps, large folding map (same as endpaper maps)
laid in. 8vo, original rose lettered and with cowboy
vignette in black. Very fine in d.j.
    First edition. Smith S3139. The eastern two-thirds
of Oregon comprise a vast, arid region with (until
recently) a sparse population and a history peopled with
hardy, self-sufficient ranch families, among whom Peter
French was one of the earliest. Born on a ranch near Red
Bluff, California, in 1849, he ran away from home at a
fairly young age and ended up in the employ of Chico
wheat and cattle baron Dr. Hugh Glenn, one of the
largest landowners in the Sacramento area. After
marrying Dr. Glenn’s daughter, he was sent by his land-
hungry father-in-law to scout the rumored prime grazing
land in eastern Oregon. French eventually amassed
200,000 acres in the Steens Mountain region. $50.00

2024.   FRENCH, Hiram T. History of Idaho: A Narrative
Account of Its Historical Progress, Its People and Its
Principle   Interests.  Chicago   &   New   York:  Lewis
Publishing Co., 1914. xxviii, 579 + [2] 585-904 + [2]
905-1,320 pp., frontispiece portrait (photographic),
photographic and steel-engraved plates, photographic
text illustrations. 3 vols., original three-quarter
brown roan over black textured cloth, t.e.g., marbled
edges. Bindings rubbed, upper hinge of vol. 2 weak,
mostly structurally sound, interiors fine. A scarce set.
    First edition. Flake 3460: “Mormon colonization and
activities in Idaho.” Smith 3366. Volume 1 is a history
covering early exploration and settlement, Native
Americans, Territorial government, cities and towns,
gold discovery, religious history, climate, agricultural
resources, dairy industry, etc. Volumes 2 and 3 comprise
a mug book, with biographies of numerous ranchers and
cattlemen. $375.00

2025.   FRENCH, Joseph Lewis (ed.). A Gallery of Old
Rogues. New York: Alfred H. King, [1931]. 285 pp. 8vo,
original red cloth. Light shelf wear, mild foxing to
fore-edges and endpapers, overall fine.
    First edition. Dykes, Kid 166. Guns 768: “An
anthology concerning outlaws, some from the American
West, such as Billy the Kid, Al Jennings, and Joseph
Slade.” Contributors include Mark Twain (on Slade), Owen
White, Walter Noble Burns, and William Jennings. $30.00

                 Early Cowboy Biography
2026.  FRENCH, W. J. Wild Jim...Texas Ranger. The Texas
Cowboy and Saddle King [wrapper title]. [Chicago: M. A.
Donohue & Company], n.d. (ca. 1890). 15 pp. 8vo,
original tan wrappers with photographic illustrations of
Wild Jim, stapled. Vertical crease where formerly
folded, wrappers lightly worn, otherwise fine.
    First   edition.   Dykes,  Collecting   Range   Life
Literature, p. 18. Guns 771: “Rare.... This little
pamphlet is a sampling of the larger book that followed
(Guns 772) and was distributed to help the sale of the
latter.” Herd 848 and Howes F374 cite the later book
version. French wrote one of the early biographies of a
cowboy, published five years after Siringo’s first work;
in this case, however, it seems likely that at least
part of the tale is fiction written to pander to the
mania for Wild West shows of the time. Standard
biographies of Texas Rangers, such as Webb, do not list
French, nor is he found on the official rolls of the
Texas Rangers. Dykes does not list the book in “Ranger
Reading” or Rare Western Outlaw Books. The West of the
Imagination? $750.00

2027.   FRENCH, William. Some Recollections of a Western
Ranchman: New Mexico, 1883-1899. London: Methuen &
Company, [1927]. vi [2] 283 [1] 8 (publisher’s ads) pp.
8vo, original red cloth, lettered in blind on upper
cover and in gilt on spine. Light outer wear, otherwise
fine in the rare d.j.
    First edition (ads coded 5270). Adams, One-Fifty 57:
“[Contains] information previously unknown about many of
the western outlaws.... Most of these outlaws worked for
the author on the WS Ranch. Since he was a participant,
he gives a good account of the fight at Frisco, New
Mexico, between the cowboys and Elfego Baca.” Loring
Campbell, My Favorite 101 Books about the Cattle
Industry 36. Dobie, p. 102: “A civilized Englishman
remembers.” See Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #10 & #49. Dykes,
Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 15; Western High
Spots, p. 85 (“A Range Man’s Library”). Graff 1441. Guns
773. Herd 847: “Scarce.... This is one of the really
good but little-known books on ranch life.” Howes F375.
Rader 1485. Reese, Six Score 42: “One of the best
personal accounts of Western ranching. French was an
Englishman who owned the WS ranch in western New
Mexico.” Saunders 2906: “Silver City region.”
    Streeter Sale 2397: “This by an Irish younger son,
who came to the United States in 1883 on a year’s leave
from the army and stayed in New Mexico until 1899, makes
good reading. It appears from a reference at the top of
p. 280 that the book was written ‘after the lapse of a
quarter of a century.’ Capt. French’s ranch was not far
from Alma, a town on the San Francisco River, in
southern New Mexico near the Arizona line.—TSW.” $600.00

2028.   FRENCH, William. Some Recollections of a Western
Ranchman: New Mexico, 1883-1899. London: Methuen &
Company, [1927]. 8vo, original light grey cloth lettered
in black. Edges of text block and first few leaves light
foxed, otherwise fine.
    First edition (ads coded 930).    $400.00

2029.   FREWEN,  Moreton.   Melton  Mowbray   and  Other
Memories. London: Herbert Jenkins, Limited, 1924. viii
[4] 311 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates (mostly
photographic). 8vo, original green cloth lettered and
ruled in black. Fine, contemporary gift inscription in
ink on front free endpaper (dated Christmas 1923).
    First edition. Athearn, Westward the Briton, p. 192.
Graff 1442. Herd 850: “Scarce.... About ten chapters on
cattle ranching, plus reminiscences of an Englishman who
tried his hand, unsuccessfully, at ranching on the
Powder River in Wyoming.” Howes F380. Reese, Six Score
43: “To read Frewen is to look at a lost world—the
aristocracy of late Victorian England in full flower.
This, transplanted to the Far West, makes a most
entertaining narrative.” Near the site of the Custer
massacre, the author met Sitting Bull, who gave him a
tour of the battlefield in 1884. Includes material on
Teddy Roosevelt, including a portrait.   $375.00

2030.   FRIDGE, Ike. History of the Chisum War; or, Life
of Ike Fridge: Stirring Events of Cowboy Life on the
Frontier. Electra, Texas: [J. D.] Smith, n.d. [1927].
[2] 70 [1] pp., photographic frontispiece portrait of
Fridge, text illustrations. 8vo, original stiff grey
printed wrappers. Except for minor flaw at head of
spine, very fine.
    First edition. As told to Jodie D. Smith. Adams,
One-Fifty 58: “Rare.... This book was indirectly the
cause of the author’s death. After it was printed for
him...the author, an old man, left with two large
suitcases filled with copies to sell his friends in
Seymour, Texas. He had to change trains at Wichita Falls
and carry two heavy cases of books from one train to
another to make connections. The effort tore loose some
adhesions from an old bullet wound [and] he died a few
days later in a Wichita Falls hospital.” Dobie, p. 125:
“As   compact   as  jerked  beef   and  as   laconic  as
conversation in alkali dust.” Dykes, Kid 120: “Fridge
states that he became a Chisum cowboy at the age of
fourteen. He worked on the Chisum ranches in Denton
County, Texas, on the Concho in Texas, and finally on
the Pecos in New Mexico.... Very scarce to rare”; Rare
Western Outlaw Books, pp. 7-9. Guns 775. Herd 851. Howes
F384. Reese, Six Score 44.
    J. Frank Dobie claimed the book to be “unprocurable”
in 1943, an assertion Ramon Adams perceived as a
challenge. Dykes notes in Rare Western Outlaw Books,
“[Adams] bought a ‘boxful’ (he never would tell me how
many) and sold them to his collecting friends at a
fairly reasonable price, that is, reasonable for an
‘unprocurable item.’ That cache has been gone for thirty
years, and now the book is certainly rare and expensive
once more.” $1,000.00

2031.   FRINK, Maurice. Cow County Cavalcade: Eighty
Tears of the Wyoming Stock Exchange. Denver: The Old
West Publishing Company, 1954. xvi, 243 pp., sketches,
brands, and map by Paul A. Rossi, photographic plates,
facsimiles. 8vo, original light blue cloth. Spine
slightly darkened, otherwise a very fine copy in d.j.
(price-clipped, but otherwise fine). Author’s signed and
dated presentation copy to his friend Scott Broome.
    First edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 6
(“Collecting Modern Western Americana”): “Story of
eighty years of the Wyoming Stock Growers Association”;
p. 79 (“A Range Man’s Library”). Guns 776: “Has a long
chapter on the Johnson County War.” Herd 852: “This is
the most recent of a series of histories which have been
written on the Wyoming Stock Growers’ Association every
ten years for the past thirty years.” Includes a
photograph of distaff rustler Cattle Kate. For the other
two histories in this series, see listings under
Greenburg and Gress in this catalogue.   $75.00

2032.   FRINK, Maurice. Cow County Cavalcade. Denver:
The Old West Publishing Company, 1954. Another copy.
Spine darkened, otherwise fine in moderately chipped
d.j. with small tears. $50.00

2033.   FRINK, Maurice, W. Turrentine Jackson & Agnes
Wright Spring. When Grass Was King: Contributions to the
Western Range Cattle Industry Study. Boulder: University
of   Colorado  Press,   1956.  xv   [1]   465   [1]   pp.,
photographic plates, text illustrations (sketches by
Nick Eggenhofer), tables, endpaper maps by Hugh T. Glen.
8vo, original green pictorial cloth gilt. Very fine in
very fine d.j. Signed by Maurice Frink and Agnes Wright
Spring.
    First edition, limited edition (#37 of 1,500
copies).   Dykes,  Fifty   Great   Western    Illustrators
(Eggenhofer 75). Guns 777: “Has material on both the
Johnson County and the Lincoln County wars.” Herd 853.
Jennewein, Black Hills Booktrails 160: “Details in the
formation and operation of the Haft-Bayless ranch in
Pennington County in 1882.... Around 1,100 head of
cattle were trailed from Washington Territory.” Reese,
Six Score 45.
    The authors tell the story of the cattle industry on
the plains north of Texas 1865-1895, when the industry
blossomed into big business in New Mexico, Colorado,
Wyoming, and Montana. The book also contains an economic
study of the British cattle companies that operated in
the U.S. and an analysis of the career of one of the
more successful early cattlemen, John W. Iliff of
Colorado. $200.00

2034.   FRINK, Maurice, W. Turrentine Jackson & Agnes
Wright   Spring.  When  Grass  Was  King....  Boulder:
University of Colorado Press, 1956. Another copy,
numbered (#1,479 of 1,500 copies). Endpapers lightly
foxed, otherwise very fine in d.j. Signed by Agnes
Wright Spring. $175.00

2035.   FRINK, Maurice, W. Turrentine Jackson & Agnes
Wright Spring. When Grass Was King: Contributions to the
Western Range Cattle Industry Study. Boulder: University
of Colorado Press, 1956. Another copy, #1,127 of 1,500
copies). Fine in lightly worn d.j. with a few short
tears (no losses). $150.00

2036.   FRINK, Maurice, W. Turrentine Jackson & Agnes
Wright Spring. When Grass Was King: Contributions to the
Western Range Cattle Industry Study. Boulder: University
of Colorado Press, 1956. Another copy, unnumbered copy
of the limited edition (1,500 copies). Very fine, d.j.
not present.   $75.00

2037.   FROST, H. Gordon & John H. Jenkins. “I’m Frank
Hamer”: The Life of a Texas Peace Officer. Austin & New
York: Pemberton Press, 1968. [10] 305 [3, blank] [1,
colophon] pp., text illustrations (mostly photographic
and full-page). 8vo, original dark green leather
lettered in silver, with miniature metal Texas Ranger
badge on spine. Very fine in publisher’s green board
slipcase. Signed on colophon by both authors, Mrs. Frank
A. Hamer, Sr., and Frank A. Hamer, Jr.
    First edition, limited edition (300 copies signed by
authors and members of Hamer’s family). Basic Texas
Books 181: “This biography of the famous Texas Ranger
captain gives for the first and only time the authentic
and documented details of the Clyde Barrow-Bonnie Parker
rampage. In addition, it tells of Hamer’s fifty years as
a Ranger and peace officer.”
    Handbook of Texas Online: Francis A. Hamer: “Hamer
was born in Fairview, Texas, on March 17, 1884. Known
commonly as Frank or Pancho, he grew up on the Welch
Ranch in San Saba County. In 1894 the family moved to
Oxford in Llano County, where Hamer worked at his
father’s blacksmith shop. In 1901 he and his brother
hired out as wranglers on the Pecos County ranch of
Barry Ketchum, brother of outlaw Tom ‘Black Jack’
Ketchum. In 1905 Hamer was a cowboy on the Carr Ranch,
between Sheffield and Fort Stockton, where, after
capturing a horse thief, he was recommended by Sheriff
D. S. Barker for a position with the Texas Rangers. On
April 21, 1906, Hamer enlisted as a Texas Ranger in
Capt. John H. Rogers’ Company C.” $500.00

2038.   FROST, H. Gordon & John H. Jenkins. “I’m Frank
Hamer”: The Life of a Texas Peace Officer. Austin & New
York: Pemberton Press, 1968. Another copy of the limited
edition, this one numbered (#98 of 300 copies, signed).
Lacking Texas Ranger badge on spine, otherwise fine.
    $350.00

2039.   FROST, H. Gordon & John H. Jenkins. “I’m Frank
Hamer”.... Austin & New York: Pemberton Press, 1968.
[10] 305 pp., text illustrations (mostly photographic).
8vo, original maize cloth. Light foxing to fore-edges
and half-title, otherwise very fine in slightly worn and
foxed d.j. Signed presentation inscription from H.
Gordon Frost: “To E. R. Wyatt, whose interest in the
true history of Texas and the southwest is sincerely
appreciated.”
    First edition, trade issue.   $150.00
2040.   FROST, H. Gordon & John H. Jenkins. “I’m Frank
Hamer”.... Austin & New York: Pemberton Press, 1968.
Another copy. Very fine in d.j. with a few small tears.
Signed by both authors.   $175.00

2041.   FROST, H. Gordon & John H. Jenkins. “I’m Frank
Hamer”.... Austin & New York: Pemberton Press, 1968.
Another copy. Very fine in torn, chipped, slightly
soiled, and price-clipped d.j.   $100.00

2042.   FROST, Max (ed.). New Mexico: Its Resources,
Climate, Geography, and Geological Condition. Santa Fe:
New Mexican Printing Company, 1890. 216 pp., 2
lithographed folding maps: (1) Official Map of New
Mexico 1890. Prepared under the Direction of the Bureau
of Immigration, 82 x 64.8 cm; (2) Map of the Santa Fé
Route and Connections. Chicago Rand McNally & Co. [with
inset of Mexico], 38.7 x 99.2 cm. 8vo, original tan
lithograph    pictorial     wrappers    illustrating  the
prosperity and products of New Mexico, stitched.
Wrappers and text water-stained at right side (heavier
to upper wrapper and first few signatures), title page
reattached. Maps and wrappers expertly restored (no
losses). Rare.
    First   edition.    Eberstadt    105:235.   Herd 857.
Compendium and promotional on New Mexico towns, Native
Americans, history, quality of life, railroads, mining,
stock raising and agricultural resources (touting
potential for grazing). The first map shows New Mexico
in large scale with each county delineated and locates
boundaries and grantees of all the numerous early
Spanish and Mexican land grants. The second map shows
railroad routes through the Western United States.
    $1,000.00

2043.   FROTHINGHAM,  Robert.  Songs   of   Horses:  An
Anthology Selected and Arranged by Robert Frothingham.
Cambridge: Houghton Mifflin Company & Riverside Press,
1920. xiv, 231 pp. 16mo, original half black cloth over
orange pictorial boards, printed paper spine label.
Binding moderately stained and shelf-worn, small nick on
spine label, internally fine.
    First edition. Anthology of poetry devoted to the
horse—in war, sport, recreation, and, of course, the
Wild West, including such gems as “The Range Rider,”
“The Pony Express,” “When You’re Throwed,” and “Riding
Song.” $20.00

2044.   FRY, Norman Walter. Cache la Poudre: “The River”
As Seen from 1889 to 1954. N.p.: n.d. (ca. 1954). 52
pp., photographic text illustrations (some full-page),
map. 8vo, original metallic green pictorial wrappers,
stapled. Worn at spine, slight warp at bottom, otherwise
a fine copy. Edith Williams Blunk’s signature and date
on title page.
    First edition. Wynar 1191. The author relates his
experiences on the Lynmar Ranch. The section entitled
“Beef Market” includes herding and slaughtering beef for
a crew at Chambers Lake who were building a dam. Finally
there is a glance at the early days of the cattle
business (p. 42). $10.00

2045.   FUDGE, G. R. (“Bob”). Typescript entitled “An
Old Cattleman’s Story.” N.p., n.d. (ca. 1960?). [1] 95
leaves (versos blank). 4to, thin typing paper, unbound.
Title leaf states: “Property of Mrs. Charlotte Wilbur,
Broaddus, Biddle, Montana. Powder River Co.” Rust-
stained at top left corner (where formerly paper-
clipped), final leaf torn at upper left (no loss of
text), detached piece present, light edge wear due to
the fragile nature of the paper.
    This typescript is an autobiographical account as
told to Jim Russell, who is responsible for putting it
in its present form. Russell published this typescript,
with minor changes and a few additions, as a book on Bob
Fudge (see next entry). G. R. “Bob” Fudge was born 1862
in Lampasas County, Texas. When he was ten, his extended
family set off with a thousand steers and two-hundred
horses for California. In New Mexico, Comanche rustled
their cattle and all but four horses; between the
Comanche and the subsequent outbreak of smallpox, the
family was reduced to his mother, three small children,
and one aunt, who returned to Texas. As a teenager, Bob
started breaking horses in Burnet County. In 1881, he
helped trail a herd to Colorado, and the following
spring, at age twenty, he went with a Blocker herd to
Little Big Horn River in Montana. Many trail drives
followed and for eighteen years he worked for the XIT
Ranch on its Montana range. Fudge died in Wyoming in
1933.   $350.00

2046.   FUDGE, G. R. (“Bob”). Bob Fudge, Texas Trail
Driver, Montana-Wyoming Cowboy, 1862-1933, by Jim
Russell. Denver: Big Mountain Press, [1962]. 135 pp.,
text illustrations (full-page photographic and line
drawings by Genie Fulmer). 8vo, original green cloth.
Fine in lightly worn d.j.
    First edition. Smith S2889. Russell recorded Fudge’s
life history and prepared it for publication. This book
includes material not in the preceding typescript.
    $250.00

2047.   FUDGE, G. R. (“Bob”). “Long Trail from Texas:
Bob   Fudge,    King-Sized    Cowboy,   Recalls    Rawhide
Adventures, Trailherding in the 1880’s” in Montana, the
Magazine of Western History 12:3 (July 1962). Pp. 43-55,
photographic text illustrations. 4to, original yellow
pictorial wrappers. Fine.
    First   printing.    Contains   excerpts    from   the
manuscript   of   Fudge’s   autobiography   that   Russell
prepared (see preceding). $25.00

2048.   FUGATE, Francis. The Spanish Heritage of the
Southwest. Drawings by José Cisneros. Text by Francis
Fugate. El Paso: Carl Hertzog [and] Texas Western Press,
1952. [35] pp., 12 full-page illustrations and map by
José Cisneros. Small folio, original red cloth over
“adobe” boards. Very fine in slipcase. Signed by
Cisneros and Hertzog and with announcement laid in.
    First edition, limited deluxe edition (525 copies;
#8 of 50 copies printed on tan Ticonderoga paper, and
one of 24 copies with first drawing hand colored by
Cisneros). Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators
(Cisneros 76). Lowman, Printing Arts in Texas, pp. 19,
53; Printer at the Pass 78A: “This book was the first
publication of the Texas Western Press at what is now
The University of Texas at El Paso. The text was printed
at the college press from Centaur and Arrighi type
handset by students under Hertzog’s direction.... The
cover paper of this particular volume was obtained by
making prints from an adobe—the native building material
of the Southwest. The mud, straw, and pebbles created a
texture reflecting the Spanish influence.” Includes a
chapter and Cisneros illustration on “The Coming of the
Cattle.”   $1,250.00

2049.   FUGATE, Francis. The Spanish Heritage of the
Southwest.... El Paso: Carl Hertzog [and] Texas Western
Press, 1952. [35] pp., 12 full-page illustrations and
map by José Cisneros. Small folio, original red cloth
over “adobe” boards. Very fine in fine d.j. Signed by
Hertzog.
    First edition, limited deluxe edition (525 copies,
#452 of 475 copies printed on white Andorra Text paper).
    $350.00

2050.   FUGATE, Francis. The Spanish Heritage of the
Southwest.... El Paso: Carl Hertzog [and] Texas Western
Press, 1952. [35] pp., 12 full-page illustrations and
map by José Cisneros on green paper. Small folio,
original   rose  pictorial  wrappers,   stapled.  Light
marginal wear to fragile wraps, otherwise very fine.
Signed by Cisneros.
    First edition, limited edition, wrappers issue (925
copies in wrappers). Lowman, Printer at the Pass 78B.
    $175.00
2051.   FUGATE, Francis. The Spanish Heritage of the
Southwest.... El Paso: Carl Hertzog [and] Texas Western
Press, 1952. Another copy. Wrappers lightly worn at
edges with a few short tears (no losses), otherwise a
very fine copy.   $100.00

2052.   FUGATE, Francis. The Spanish Heritage of the
Southwest.... El Paso: Carl Hertzog [and] Texas Western
Press, 1952. Another copy, variant wrappers. Folio,
original tan pictorial wrappers, stapled. Minor tears to
edges of wrappers (no losses), otherwise a fine copy.
    $100.00

2053.   FULCHER, Walter. The Way I Heard It: Tales of
the Big Bend. Austin: University of Texas Press, [1959].
xxvii    [1]   87  [2]   pp.,   frontispiece    portrait,
photographic plates. 8vo, original terracotta cloth.
Light shelf wear, edges browned, otherwise a fine copy
in worn and chipped d.j. Ink ownership and gift
inscriptions.
    First edition. Guns 780: “A chapter entitled
‘Outlaws and Bandidos’ deals with members of the Black
Jack Ketchum gang...[and] some of the Mexican bandits of
the Big Bend country.” Locals from both sides of the
border, including ranch hands, give insight into the
life and lore of this fascinating region. $25.00

2054.   FULLER, Anna. Peak and Prairie: From a Colorado
Sketch-Book. New York & London: Putnam, 1894. [1, ad] v
[3] 391 pp., half-tone frontispiece portrait. 16mo,
original tan cloth stamped and decorated in green and
gilt. Light shelf wear, frontispiece detached, generally
very good.
    First edition, first issue. Wilcox, p. 46. Wright
III:2067. Short sketches of mining and ranch life in
Colorado including “At the Keith Ranch” and “Jake
Stanwood’s Gal,” about the daughter of a failed rancher.
From preface: “‘Sketches of Colorado Life’ in fictional
form, centering around the Pike’s Peak region.”   $30.00

2055.   FULLER, Anna. Peak and Prairie: From a Colorado
Sketch-Book. New York & London: Putnam, 1894. [1, ad]
[2] v [1] 391 pp., frontispiece portrait. 16mo, original
light green cloth stamped and decorated in green and
gilt. Small stain on cover, very light shelf wear, light
soiling to first few leaves, address label on front
pastedown, two contemporary ownership inscriptions in
ink, overall very good.
    First edition, second issue. $20.00

2056.   FULLER, George W. A History of the Pacific
Northwest. New York: Knopf, 1931. xvi, 383 [16, index]
[1] pp., frontispiece, plates (mostly photographic),
portraits, maps (one folding). 8vo, original bright blue
cloth with lettering and vignette in silver. Fine in
moderately worn d.j.
    First edition. Guns 781: “Scarce.” Herd 862. Smith
3395.   $25.00

2057.   FULLER, Henry C. A Texas Sheriff: A Vivid and
Accurate Account of Some of the Most Notorious Murder
Cases and Feuds in the History of East Texas, and the
Officers Who Relentlessly Pursued the Criminals till
They Were Brought to Justice and Paid the Full Penalty
of the Law.... Nacogdoches: Baker Printing Company,
1931.    80   pp.,   photographic   text   illustrations
(photographic portraits, some full-page). 8vo, original
orange printed wrappers, stapled, with photographic
illustration of Sheriff Spradley and his hound. Very
fine.
    First edition. Guns 784: “Scarce.... Tells about
many Texas murders, including the one by Bill Mitchell
of James Truitt, the result of one of Texas’ many feuds.
The author also touches upon the Border-Wall-Broocks
feud.” Rader 1505. Features a short biography of
sheriff-rancher A. J. Spradley (see Handbook of Texas
Online: Andrew Jackson Spradley). $125.00
2058.   FULTON,    Maurice   Garland.    Maurice     Garland
Fulton’s History of the Lincoln County War. Edited by
Robert N. Mullin. Tucson: University of Arizona Press,
[1968]. [6] 433 pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic
text illustrations (some full-page), maps, endpaper
maps. 8vo, original grey cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First   edition.   Adams,   One-Fifty   59:    “A   well
illustrated text.... This long awaited book represents a
lifetime of research by a meticulous historian whose
tireless pursuit of detail prevented him from finishing
the book before his death. His personal friend and
fellow historian, Robert N. Mullin, completed the
task.... The last word on the history of this turbulent
section of the West.... Includes many newspaper excerpts
never before reprinted.... Well documented and a
definite contribution to western history.” Dykes, Rare
Western Outlaw Books, p. 37. Guns 786. Reese, Six Score
64n. The Lincoln County War was an attempt to break up a
Santa   Fe   clique’s   monopoly   of   government    supply
contracts   and   split   Lincoln   County   ranchers    and
merchants into two opposing factions. $100.00

2059.   FULTON, Maurice Garland & Paul Horgan (eds.).
New Mexico’s Own Chronicle: Three Races in the Writings
of Four Hundred Years. Dallas: Banks Upshaw and Co.,
[1937].    xxviii,  372    pp.,   plates,   photographs,
illustrations, facsimiles, maps. 8vo, original black
cloth, gilt-lettered spine. Text lightly browned, else
very fine in price-clipped d.j.
    First edition. Campbell, pp. 167-68. Dobie, pp. 25,
40: “Anthology strong on the historical side.” Dykes,
Kid 243. Guns 788. Herd 865: “Scarce.... Consists of
excerpts from books on New Mexico history, some of which
concern cattle.” Saunders 4114: “Material taken from
original sources to illustrate the development of New
Mexico.”    $100.00

2060.   FULTON, Maurice Garland & Paul Horgan (eds.).
New Mexico’s Own Chronicle.... Dallas: Banks Upshaw and
Co., [1937]. 8vo, original maroon buckram. Light shelf
wear, lower hinge cracked, text lightly age-toned,
overall a good copy. Presentation copy to Carl Hertzog,
signed by Fulton and Horgan. $100.00

2061.   FULTON, Robert Lardin. Epic of the Overland. San
Francisco: A. M. Robertson, 1924. xiii [1] 109 pp.,
frontispiece, plates (mostly photographic), folding map.
Small 8vo, original dark blue cloth. Extremities worn,
hinges loose, some flecking to cover, interior mostly
fine, overall a very good copy.
    First edition. Cowan, p. 227: “Many interesting
original sketches and photographs.” Paher, Nevada 646:
“Fulton emigrated to Carson Valley in the 1850s, when it
was still part of Utah Territory.... This is his account
of the building of the transcontinental railroad; in it
are a number of passing references to Nevada, including
an excellent profile of Mark Twain and his Nevada
influence.” Well-illustrated railroad history with good
information on Grenville Dodge, Pony Express, Mark
Twain, and conflicts with Native Americans, particularly
the attack on Julesburg. Includes a biographical sketch
of the author by Herbert Wynford Hill. Includes
references to problems that were encountered trying to
provide food, including beef, to the builders and train
crews. On p. 95 is a brief biography of John Sparks, a
Texas Ranger employed on a cattle ranch, and discussion
of the ranching firm of Sparks and Tinnin.   $75.00

2062.   FULTON, Robert Lardin. Epic of the Overland: An
Account of the Building of the Central and Union Pacific
Railroad. Los Angeles: N. A. Kovach, 1954. xiii [1] 109
pp.,   frontispiece,   plates   (mostly   photographic),
portraits, map. Small 8vo, original blue cloth. Very
fine in rubbed, lightly faded, and smudged d.j.
    First edition, second issue, limited edition (#69 of
275 copies). The untimely deaths of both the author and
publisher curtailed the distribution of the first
edition of the book (see preceding entry). Only a few
copies were bound and distributed. The original sheets
and illustrations were stored in the California State
Library for three decades. In 1954, N. A. Kovach
received permission to publish them. This is the 1954
binding of the original 1924 edition with Kovach’s
additional title page and explanation page, both on blue
paper, inserted between the frontispiece photo and
original 1924 title page. $45.00

2063.   FURLONG, Charles Wellington. Let ’er Buck: A
Story of the Passing of the Old West...With Fifty
Illustrations Taken from Life by the Author and Others.
New York & London: G. P. Putnam’s Sons & Knickerbocker
Press, 1921. xxxviii, 242 [2, blank], [3, ads] pp.,
photographic   frontispiece  and   plates,  photographic
plates, text illustrations, brands, printed music. 8vo,
original gilt-lettered navy blue cloth with photograph
of a rider on a bucking bronco on upper cover. Fine,
with contemporary ink ownership inscription of J. E.
Martin of Portland, Oregon, on half-title.
    First edition. Herd 866. Smith 3412. History and
anecdotes about rodeos in general, but particularly the
Pendleton Roundup in its heyday, 1914-1920, enhanced by
the many excellent photographs by the author, W. S.
Bowman, Lee Moorhouse, and others. Included is a
dramatic 1915 photograph of the legendary distaff rodeo
star Bonnie McCarroll mid-air being thrown from a horse.
McCarroll’s fatal trampling by the bucking horse
“Silver” at the Pendleton Roundup in 1929 led to
temporary suspension of the women’s sport.   $85.00

2064.   FURMAN, Necah Stewart. Walter Prescott Webb: His
Life and Impact. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico
Press, [1976]. xiv [2] 222 pp., photographic text
illustrations. 8vo, original goldenrod cloth. Very fine
in d.j. with minor chips and tears. Signed and dated by
author. Related newsclipping laid in.
    First edition. The scope of Webb’s tremendous
scholarship on the American West, and particularly the
Great Plains, extended into and illuminated many facets
of the cattle industry. His Great Plains thesis proposed
that westward expansion stalled at the 98 th meridian,
gateway   to   the   arid  west,   until   technological
innovations such as barbed-wire, six-shooters, and the
windmill allowed further inroads. See Handbook of Texas
Online: Walter Prescott Webb. $35.00

2065.   FURNAS, Robert W. Nebraska: Her Resources, and
Advantages, Advancements and Promises. New Orleans: E.
A. Brandao & Co., 1885. 32 pp., tables. 8vo, original
blue printed wrappers. Text browned and lightly soiled,
otherwise a good copy.
    Early Nebraska guide and promotional, “prepared...by
Robert W. Furnas, State Commissioner for the World’s
Industrial & Cotton Centennial Exposition...1884-85.”
Imprint differs from Graff 1466 and Herd 867 (“Rare”).
    $75.00

2066.   FURNAS,  Robert   W.   (ed.).   Transactions   and
Reports of the Nebraska State Historical Society, Vol.
1. Lincoln: State Journal Co., 1885. 233 [1] pp. 8vo,
original   black  cloth   gilt.   Moderate   shelf   wear,
otherwise fine.
    First edition. Interesting articles on Nebraska
history include a piece on the first Anglo child born in
Nebraska, the first women’s suffrage movement in
Nebraska,   pioneer   recollections,   and    biographies,
including several stockmen.   $35.00

2067.   FURNISS, Norman F. The Mormon Conflict, 1850-
1859. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1960. viii [4]
311 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates, map. 8vo,
original dark grey cloth. Fine in lightly worn d.j.
    First   edition.   Yale   Historical   Publications,
Miscellany, vol. 72. The primary focus is on conflicts
between the U.S. government and Mormons, but there are
good sidelights on the early years of ranching in Utah.
   $75.00

2068.   FURSTNOW SADDLERY COMPANY. Illustrated Catalogue
and Price List No. 27...Wholesale and Retail Saddlery,
Montana Art Leather Work, Fancy Bits and Spurs, Fine
Saddles and Harness, Tents, Paulins, Slickers, Horse
Furnishing Goods. Miles City [St. Paul: McGill-Warner,
after 1913]. 147 pp., profusely illustrated (photographs
and engravings of saddles and other riding and ranging
equipment). 8vo, original red pictorial wrappers. Wraps
with a few ink stains and water staining with bleed-
through onto endpapers and title, hinges strengthened
with cloth tape. Related ephemera laid in. Preserved in
a maroon cloth box with red leather label. Uncommon
ephemera.
    First edition. This trade catalogue contains a
wealth of solid documentation on saddles and gear
offered by the prominent Montana firm of Al Furstnow,
which specialized in rodeo and stock saddles, popular
with working cowboys, rodeo stars, and celebrity
cowboys, such as Tom Mix. Today Furstnow saddles and
equipage are avidly collected.
Among the photographs is a portrait of proprietor Al
Furstnow. The date 1913 is mentioned in the catalogue,
and Furstnow moved to California about 1922. Miles City
was a legendary cattle town in Eastern Montana and “the
end of the cattle trail” for many longhorn cattle trails
in the 1890s. $550.00

2069.   GAGE, Jack. Tensleep and No Rest: A Historical
Account of the Range War of the Big Horns in Wyoming.
Casper: Prairie Publishing Company, [1958]. [6] 222 [4]
pp., photographic plates, map, facsimiles. 8vo, original
red cloth gilt. Very fine in price-clipped d.j., chipped
and worn at edges.
    First edition. Guns 792: “Account of the war between
the sheepmen and the cattlemen in Wyoming.” Not in Herd.
    $65.00
What Life Has Taught Me

2070.   GALLATIN, E. L. What Life Has Taught Me. Denver:
Jno. Frederic, [1900]. [2] 215 pp., photographic
frontispiece portrait of author. 8vo, original black
cloth. Upper hinge cracked, front flyleaf loose and wear
to edges, overall very good. Author’s signed, dated, and
inscribed copy.
    First edition. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the
Plains and the Rockies 175. Graff 1490. Howes G32. Howes
Catalogue 53:068: “Privately printed autobiography of a
prominent Colorado pioneer, describing his trip across
the plains in 1860 to the Pikes Peak gold region, early
Placerville and Denver, criminals and vigilantes, the
founding of Cheyenne and Laramie City, Wyoming, etc. The
Gallatin stockman’s saddle was in widespread use in the
West, all leading towns having warehouses for their
distribution. This is the only copy I have ever heard
of.” Wilcox, p. 47: “Chiefly an account of the author’s
connection with the Colorado Co-operative Colony, Nucla,
Colorado.” Wynar 1262.
    About half the book is devoted to the Colorado Co-
operative Colony, and Gallatin’s involvement with it.
The Colony was a direct descendant of Brook Farm and
continues in existence to this day as the Colorado Ditch
Company, named after its most celebrated public work.
Much has been written on Gallatin, one of the giants of
the Plains style saddle, centered in the Cheyenne,
Wyoming area. See James R. Laird, The Cheyenne Saddle: A
Study of Stock Saddles of E. L. Gallatin, Frank A.
Meanea and the Collins Brothers (Cheyenne: Frontier
Printing, Inc., 1983.).   $1,250.00

      Land & Water Laws of Mexico & California—1844
     Signed by a Pioneer of Santa Barbara & Monterey
2071.   GALVÁN [RIVERA], Mariano. Ordenanzas de tierras
y aguas, ó sea: formulario geométrico-judicial para la
designacion, establecimiento, mensura, amojonamiento y
deslinde de las poblaciones y todas suertes de tierras,
sitios, caballerias y criaderos de ganados mayores y
menores y mercedes de aguas: Recopiladas a beneficio y
obsequio de los pobladores, ganaderos, labradores,
dueños, arrendatarios y administradores de haciendas, y
toda clase de predios rústicos, de las muchas y
dispersas resoluciones dictadas sobre la materia, y
vigentes hasta el dia en la república Mexicana....
Segunda edicion, corregida y aumentada. Mexico: [Leandro
J. Valdes, 1844.] [2] iv, 3-184 pp., 2 lithographic
plates, numerous text illustrations (geometrical and
technical), tables, plans. 8vo, full contemporary
mottled green and brown Mexican calf, spine gilt-
decorated and with original black gilt-lettered label.
Light shelf wear (especially at edges and corners), mild
marginal staining to blank outer edge of leaves, overall
a very good to fine copy in a handsome nineteenth-
century Mexican binding. From the library of an
important Franco-Mexican-Californian, signed on title by
José María Covarrubias, a Frenchman who became a Mexican
citizen and came to California in 1834 with the Híjar
and Padrés Colony to be a schoolteacher (see Bancroft,
Pioneer Register, p. 110). Provenance: Miss Rosario
Curletti, who helped endow the Santa Barbara Mission
Archive-Library, the oldest library in the State of
California that still remains in the hands of its
founders, the Franciscans.
    Second edition, corrected and enlarged, of a volume
of vital interest to both the pastoral era of the
Spanish and Mexican ranchos of California and the period
after Anglo occupation (the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
intended to respect all Mexican land titles as granted
under these laws, but the Halleck report of 1851 upheld
the rights of U.S. settlers or squatters). Not in Palau.
Sabin 26466 (lists only the fourth and subsequent
editions).
    This work is a compilation of formulas, regulations,
and   laws   regarding  land   surveys,  water   rights,
boundaries, and related matters. Land law from the
earliest years of Spanish occupation in America up to
Mexico’s colonization laws are analyzed, including those
pertinent to California and Texas. Colonization laws of
interest for Coahuila y Tejas are included for the years
1824, 1828, 1834, and 1837. This would have been an
essential volume for a settler or rancher wishing to
obtain a Mexican land grant.
    This volume has exceptional association interest:
Covarrubias   was   adaptable,   holding   several    key
government posts in Monterey and Santa Barbara both
before and after the shift of power to the U.S. In the
early 1840s Covarrubias was busy arresting Anglo
foreigners. At the time of this imprint, he served as
alcalde at Santa Barbara. By 1849 Covarrubias was a
member of the California constitutional convention and
served with the first legislature (four times re-
elected). In 1843 Covarrubias applied for a 26,000-acre
land grant in Santa Inéz Valley, which was granted to
him and his kinsman Joaquín Carrillo by the last Mexican
governor   of  California.   Covarrubias  hired    Native
American laborers to work the property as a cattle
ranch, the Castac (or Castaic Rancho), a portion of
which is now Fort Tejón, a California state historic
park near the Grapevine. $750.00

2072.   GAMBRELL, J[ames] B[urton]. Ten Years in Texas
[half-title]. [Dallas: The Baptist Standard, 1909]. 313
pp., frontispiece portrait of author (photographic),
text illustrations (line drawings and cartoons). 8vo,
original navy blue cloth lettered in white and gilt.
Slight shelf wear, light foxing to edges of book block
and endpapers, otherwise fine, with dealer’s ink stamp
on front free endpaper. Contemporary ink ownership
signature. J. Frank Dobie’s ownership inscription and
signed comment on front free endpaper: “One book I have
not read thoroughly; I know it thoroughly however
without having read it.”
    First edition of these articles first published in
The Baptist Standard. Campbell, p. 97: “Splendid account
of early life in Texas.” Reverend Gambrell (1840-1921),
a prominent Baptist minister, teacher, and editor,
served as a scout for General Lee and fought in the
Battle of Gettysburg (see Handbook of Texas Online:
James Bruton Gambrell). In the chapter “Evangelizing the
Far West,” the author describes the annual Madera camp-
meeting in the Davis Mountains which began because the
ranches of the region were widely separated by vast,
uninhabited areas making it virtually impossible for
frontier families to worship with their neighbors and
friends:
    “Up in the deep canyon in these mountains is the
spot where the cowboys’ camp-meeting is held.... The
mountain stream comes down to supply water for cowman
use, and an excellent place for baptizing.... The
cowboys were there in great force, manly, respectful and
reverent. The great ranch men and women were there with
their full forces.... These ranch people are great. The
average person from the East must revise his judgment of
the ranch people.... They have cut out the rowdy and the
scrub” (pp. 154-58).  $50.00

2073.   [GAMEL, Thomas W.]. The Life of Thomas W. Gamel.
N.p., n.d. (ca. 1932). 32 pp. 8vo, original brown
printed wrappers. Other than light marginal browning to
text, fine.
    First edition. Guns 793: “Rare. A little-known book
containing some material on the Mason County War and
Scott Cooley.” Includes an eyewitness account of “The
Hoodoo War,” which occurred in Mason County in 1872
after cattle belonging to German stock raisers were
stolen or killed. A mob took the accused rustlers from
jail, and five men were hanged. The Texas Rangers had to
be called in, and not until after 1876 did the county
settle down to peace, law, and order. Gamel (b. 1846)
came to Texas from Alabama with his family in 1850 and
settled in Mason County in 1860. He joined the Minute
Men during the Civil War and remained active in law
enforcement.   $200.00
2074.   GANN, Walter. Tread of the Longhorns. San
Antonio: Naylor, [1949]. ix [1] 188 pp., illustrations
by R. L. McCollister. 8vo, original red cloth with black
lettering. Fine copy in a slightly foxed and worn d.j.
Author’s signed and dated presentation copy to E. Bell
and Joseph Emerson Smith “...with best wishes and in
gratitude for the privilege of knowing such excellent
people. November 27, 1952.”
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:143: “Chapter on the
early cowtowns.” Dykes, Kid 299: “Gann [was] an old
cowboy turned peace-officer and Western novelist.” Guns
794: “Contains a chapter on cattle thieves and range
wars, including the Lincoln County and Johnson County
Wars.” Herd 870. History of the cattle trade, from the
coming of the Spanish to the time of publication.
Foreword by William MacLeod Raine.   $50.00

2075.   GANN, Walter. Tread of the Longhorns. San
Antonio: Naylor, [1949]. Another copy, variant binding.
8vo, original orange cloth lettered in black. Cloth
lightly wrinkled, front endpaper browned where review
was laid in, otherwise very good in d.j. that is a
little worn and chipped. Author’s signed and dated
presentation copy to W. S. Broome: “To my friend..., an
old   time   Texas  cowhand  from   another.... Denver,
Colorado.” Bookplate of Marie and Scott Broome. $40.00

2076.   GANN, Walter. Tread of the Longhorns. San
Antonio: Naylor, [1949]. Another copy. 8vo, original
orange cloth lettered in black. Slight foxing to upper
edge of text block and endpapers, otherwise fine in
foxed, worn, smudged, and price-clipped d.j. J. Frank
Dobie’s signed note on front free endpaper: “Walter Gann
did better in putting his range knowledge into his one
novel, The Trail Boss, which has no more plan than The
Log of a Cowboy, and which is stuffed with episodes out
of real range life. He does not know enough to write a
history. J. Frank Dobie. Austin, Tx. Oct. 28, 1949.”
    $35.00
2077.   GANN, Walter. Tread of the Longhorns. San
Antonio: Naylor, [1949]. Another copy. Light shelf wear,
corners bumped, internally fine in very good d.j. Signed
by author. $35.00

2078.   GANN, Walter. Tread of the Longhorns. San
Antonio: Naylor, [1949]. Another copy. 8vo, original red
cloth. Very fine in a somewhat tattered and chipped d.j.
    $25.00

2079.   GANNON, Clell Goebel. Songs of the Bunch-Grass
Acres. Boston: [The Gorham Press for] Richard G. Badger,
[1924].   96   pp.,   photographic  frontispiece,   text
illustrations by author. 12mo, original grey pictorial
boards lettered and illustrated in black. Fragile
binding moderately worn and chipped at spine, otherwise
a fine copy. Contemporary ink gift inscription and ink
stamp on front free endpaper.
    First edition. Range verse by Great Plains author-
artist Gannon (1900-1962), who spent most of his life in
North Dakota. Poems include “The Law of Dakota,” “The
Red River Valley,” “A Westerner’s Prayer,” “The Coyote,”
“The Girl from Montana,” “A Song of the Badlands,” and
“The Prairie Rose.”    $50.00

                       Wayne Gard
2080.   GARD, Wayne. Cattle Brands of Texas. [Dallas:
First National Bank], n.d. (ca. 1956). [36] pp., text
illustrations and photographs (some in color and/or
full-page), brands. Oblong 12mo, original wrappers
illustrating several brands. Mint in original mailing
envelope.
    First printing. Herd 874: “Cattle brands taken from
Texas Cattle Brands edited by Gus Ford (1936).” Newsman
and historical writer Sanford Wayne Gard (1899-1986), a
native of Illinois, received his master’s degree from
Northwestern   University   and   studied  at   Columbia
University. After working as a wire editor for the AP at
Chicago (1925-1925), he became an editorial writer for
the Chicago Daily and other newspapers, including the
Dallas Morning News. “Gard’s principal literary interest
was in the southwest, his subjects honestly researched
and carefully written, his prose revealing the courage,
daring, and enterprise of Southwestern pioneers, and
preserving their place in the heroic phase of western
expansion. He died in Dallas” (Thrapp, Encyclopedia of
Frontier History II, pp. 534-535).   $25.00

2081.   GARD,  Wayne.   The   Chisholm  Trail.   Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press, [1954]. xi [1] 296 pp.,
plates (mostly photographic), text illustrations by Nick
Eggenhofer, map. 8vo, original grey cloth. Very fine
copy in fine d.j. Signed by author.
    First edition. Basic Texas Books 70: “Entertaining
and scholarly, this is the best book on the Chisholm
Trail.... A large number of fellow historians provided
assistance, including J. Frank Dobie, Carl Coke Rister,
Edward Everett Dale, Ralph Bieber, and Ramon Adams. It
would be difficult to imagine a more solidly researched
book.” Campbell, p. 192: “The Chisholm Trail carried the
greatest migration of domestic animals in world history,
helped Texas recover from poverty that followed the
Civil War, spurred railroad construction, and opened a
vast new American export business. Actually the trail’s
beginning was near the southern tip of Texas and led
through or passed San Antonio, Austin, and Fort Worth,
across the Indian Territory...and then into Kansas,
where the original terminus was Abilene.” Campbell, My
Favorite 101 Books about the Cattle Industry 37. Dykes,
Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Eggenhofer 77);
Western High Spots, p. 15 (“Western Movement: Its
Literature”): “Tops on the most important of the
trails”; p. 78 (“A Range Man’s Library”); p.103 (“The
Texas Ranch Today”). Guns 797: “Has material on many of
the outlaws and gunmen of the trail-driving days.” Herd
875. Much on women and the cowtowns. $100.00
2082.   GARD,  Wayne.   The   Chisholm  Trail.   Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press, [1954]. Another copy. Fine
in lightly worn and price-clipped d.j.   $75.00

2083.   GARD, Wayne. Fabulous Quarter Horse, Steel Dust:
The True Account of the Most Celebrated Texas Stallion.
New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, [1958]. 64 pp.,
illustrations    by   Nick   Eggenhofer. 4to,   original
terracotta pictorial cloth gilt. Endpapers lightly
browned, otherwise fine in very fine d.j. Carl Hertzog’s
copy, with his bookplate.
    First    edition.    Dykes,   Fifty  Great   Western
Illustrators (Eggenhofer 78); Western High Spots, p. 83
(“A Range Man’s Library”): “Story of one of the famous
sires of this purely American breed so popular as cow
horses.” Guns 798: “Has some material on Sam Bass,
mostly about his race horse, the Denton Mare.”   $60.00

2084.   GARD, Wayne. “The Fence-Cutters” in Southwestern
Historical Quarterly 51:1 (July 1947). Pp. 1-15. 8vo,
original green printed wrappers. Very fine.
    First separate printing. Guns 876: “A chapter from
the author’s Frontier Justice read as a paper before the
Southwestern Historical Society. This reprint deals with
the lawlessness of wire cutting in the range country.”
Herd 876 lists the separate offprint. $30.00

2085.   GARD,   Wayne.     Frontier    Justice.  Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press, 1949. xi [1] 324 pp.,
plates    (many   photographic),    map.   8vo, original
terracotta cloth. Fine copy in slightly sun faded and
lightly worn d.j.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 163: “Comprehensive
account of the broad lines of the development of justice
in the West, of the sudden and swiftly advancing steps
in the process of civilizing the frontier. There are
chapters on Indian atrocities, early feuds, vigilantes,
range wars, cattle and sheep wars, strife with fence
cutters, and the Johnson County War.... Well documented,
handsomely illustrated, and readable.” Dobie, p. 103:
“Useful bibliography of range books.” Dobie & Dykes, 44
& 44 #77. Dykes, Kid 401. Guns 800: “Deals with...cattle
rustlers, such outlaws and gunmen as Sam Bass, Billy the
Kid, the Earps, John Wesley Hardin, Wild Bill Hickok,
and Ben Thompson, and the Lincoln County and Johnson
County wars.” Herd 877.   $65.00

2086.   GARD,   Wayne.    Frontier    Justice.   Norman:
University of Oklahoma Press, 1949. xi [1] 324 pp.,
plates (many photographic), map. Endpapers a bit dark,
otherwise fine in lightly worn d.j. Carl Hertzog’s copy,
with his bookplate on front pastedown.
    First edition, second printing, with correct d.j.
(“second large printing” on front flap). $35.00

2087.   GARD, Wayne. The Great Buffalo Hunt. New York:
Alfred A. Knopf, 1959. xii, 324, xii [2] pp., text
illustrations and plates by Nick Eggenhofer (one double-
page). 8vo, original beige pictorial cloth. Very fine
copy in fine d.j. Signed by author.
    First    edition.  Dykes,    Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Eggenhofer 79). Guns 801: “Has some
mention of Wild Bill Hickok, Bat Masterson, William
Tilghman, and John Poe.” Tate, Indians of Texas 3127:
“Best-written and most thorough account of Comanche and
Kiowa warfare against the destructive buffalo hunters
during the entire 1870s including much detail on events
after the Red River War.” Gard explores the important
role of buffalo extirpation in opening the American West
to cattlemen, farmers, and settlers. From 1871 to the
early 1880s buffalo numbers were reduced from an
estimated 70 million to less than 1,000; over 40 million
were slaughtered in 1871 alone.   $50.00

2088.   GARD, Wayne. The Great Buffalo Hunt. New York:
Alfred A. Knopf, 1959. Another copy. Not signed. Light
shelf wear, otherwise a fine copy in lightly worn d.j.
    $35.00
2089.   GARD, Wayne. Rawhide Texas. Norman: University
of Oklahoma Press, [1965]. xi [1] 236 pp., plates
(mostly photographic). 8vo, original orange cloth. Light
foxing to edges of text block and endpapers, otherwise
fine in d.j. (illustrated by Tom Lea). Rosengren of San
Antonio book label on lower pastedown.
    First    edition.  Dykes,    Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Lea 158). Guns 802: “Tells about the
lawmen and Texas Rangers.” Northouse, First Printings of
Texas Authors, p. 18. The people of Texas are portrayed
in a series of informal sketches depicting pioneer life
on the Texas frontier and illuminating the still-
emerging Texas character. Social history with chapters
on Comanches, plantations, cattle, sheep, sodbusters,
schools, newspapers, oil, etc.    $45.00

2090.   GARD, Wayne. Sam Bass. Boston, New York &
Cambridge: Houghton Mifflin Company & Riverside Press,
1936. vi [4] 262 pp., frontispiece, photographic plates,
endpaper maps. 8vo, original tan cloth lettered and
ruled in red. Endpapers very lightly browned, top edge
of text block moderately foxed, otherwise fine in
lightly worn d.j.
    First edition. Adams, One-Fifty 60: “Scarce.... The
most complete and reliable work on Sam Bass to date. The
author is the only biographer to trace Bass’s ancestry.”
Basic Texas Books 71. Campbell, p. 72. Dobie, p. 141.
Greene, The Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 23: “In Denton
County, his Texas home, there are still plenty of people
who hold Sam Bass to have been a frontier Robin Hood....
What Texans like about Sam Bass was the fact he wasn’t
mean. He was a good-natured, careless, likeable young
fellow, who died of Texas Ranger gunshot wounds on his
twenty-seventh birthday in 1878.” Guns 803.
    After finding that life as a cowboy did not measure
up to his youthful dreams, Bass turned to outlawry; his
first major caper was a swindle involving a long trail
drive and large herd for which he never reimbursed the
investors. See   Handbook   of   Texas   Online:   Sam   Bass.
    $125.00

2091.   GARD, Wayne, Dean Krakel, Joe B. Frantz, Dorman
Winfrey, H. Gordon Frost & Donald Bubar. Along the Early
Trails of the Southwest. Austin & New York: Pemberton
Press, 1969. 175 [1] pp., color plates (including
frontispiece) and text illustrations by Melvin Warren.
4to, original half brown leather over tan boards, spine
gilt-lettered. Very fine in publisher’s slipcase.
    First edition, limited edition (#117 of 250 copies,
with suite of additional color plates; autographed by
the six authors, the illustrator, and author of the
introduction). Northouse, First Printings of Texas
Authors, p. 18. Introduction by John H. Jenkins. Noted
Southwestern   authors   writing   about  six   of   the
Southwest’s most famous trails from early Spanish
exploration to the heyday of the great cattle drives.
    $150.00

2092.   GARD, Wayne, et al. Along the Early Trails of
the Southwest. Austin & New York: Pemberton Press, 1969.
175 pp., color plates, text illustrations by Melvin
Warren. 4to, original brown buckram over beige buckram,
spine gilt-lettered. Very fine in very fine d.j.
    First trade edition. $65.00

2093.   GARDINER, Charles Fox. Doctor at Timberline.
Caldwell: Caxton Printers, 1946. 315 pp., frontispiece
and text illustrations (mostly full-page) by R. H. (Bob)
Hall. 8vo, original beige and brown cloth gilt. One bump
to edge of upper cover, otherwise a fine copy in lightly
worn, price-clipped d.j. with a bit of minor chipping at
edges and corners.
    Fifth printing. Guns 804n. Herd 879n: “Reminiscences
of frontier days in Colorado; cattle ranches and
cowtowns.” Wilcox, p. 47n. Wynar 8511n. $15.00

   “Them are Spanish cattle, they don’t sabe English”
2094.   GARDINER, Howard C. In Pursuit of the Golden
Dream: Reminiscences of San Francisco and the Northern
and Southern Mines, 1849-1857. Stoughton: [Designed and
Printed by Lawton and Alfred Kennedy for] Western
Hemisphere, [1970]. [1] lxv [1] 390 pp., frontispiece,
plates, text illustrations, map, large folding map.
Large 4to, brown morocco over tan cloth linen, spine
panels decorated in blind & gilt, raised bands. Very
fine. Slipcase not present.
    First edition, limited edition (#81 of 100 copies
signed by editor Dale L. Morgan). Kurutz, The California
Gold Rush 262n: “Gardiner left New York City on the
steamer Crescent City in March 1849, crossed the Isthmus
of Panama, took the brig Sylph to San Francisco. A
monumental   edition   of   an   important  and  eloquent
reminiscence.” Mintz, The Trail 551. Rocq S2506.
    The   Argonaut    gives    fascinating  glimpses   of
California rancho life and vaqueros, e.g.: “August
1849.... There was a herd of cattle grazing near our
tent owned by the city butcher, and we one day watched a
cowboy   as   he   proceeded    to   rope  one  for   the
slaughterhouse. Mounted on a wiry mustang, with his
riata hanging to the horn of his saddle, he rode into
the herd...and having made choice of a big steer,
pursued him for a while before he had a chance to make a
cast, but eventually the coil was swung above his head
and flew out, lighting on the bullock’s neck, at which
the animal gave a bellow and set off at tremendous
speed, the horseman being unable to pull him up, as
unfortunately the folds of the riata had encircled a
calf beside the steer, and the latter was towing it
along at a breakneck gait. It was here that the
marvelous expertness of the rider came in play, as he so
manipulated the rope that he succeeded in releasing the
calf while the steer was still retained in custody,
thrown down, secured, and dragged to the slaughterhouse.
The poor calf was a dejected-looking specimen after its
disengagement from the toils” (p. 79).
    Deciding he might make more money being a cattle-
trader than a miner, the author made a trip to Mission
Dolores to gather cattle to take to the mines: “The
fathers had departed, and their former quarters were
occupied by a semi-civilized community of Greasers and
half-breeds.... It was impossible to get near the
cattle, which were wild as hawks and the only way to
catch them was with a riata.... Though we wanted oxen
badly we did not care to experiment with those wild,
long-horned Mexican steers, and concluded to ask the
advice of an expert before purchasing.... When the
cattle were duly inspected by the expert, [he] shook his
head and ruled against them. ‘The fact is...them are
Spanish cattle, they don’t sabe English, it takes two
Greasers to drive ’em and a half-dozen to yoke ’em. They
are wild as zebras and you couldn’t do anything with
’em. What you want is American cattle that a white man
can manage.... They ain’t worth a d—n for any purpose
whatever except beef’” (pp. 122-25).
    After a few more failed attempts, Gardiner “resolved
to abandon the cattle project and resume work in the
gold fields” (p. 176). $400.00

2095.   GARDINER, Howard C. In Pursuit of the Golden
Dream....   Stoughton,   Massachusetts:  [Designed   and
Printed by Lawton and Alfred Kennedy for] Western
Hemisphere, [1970]. lxv [1] 390 pp., frontispiece,
plates, text illustrations, map, large folding map. 4to,
original red gilt-lettered and decorated cloth. One
corner bumped, otherwise a very fine, unopened copy.
    First trade edition. Howell 50:1340. Kurutz notes
that copies in red cloth preceded those in blue. $75.00

2096.  GARDNER, Hamilton & Lehi Centennial Committee.
Lehi Centennial History, 1850-1950 (A History of Lehi
for One Hundred Years). Printed in Two Parts. Part I:
Reprint of First Publication of “History of Lehi” 1850-
1913. Part II: History of Lehi Including Biographical
Section up to 1950. [Lehi, Utah: Free Press Publishing
Co., 1950]. [14] 928 [8, illustration lists and indexes]
pp.,    text   illustrations    (mostly   photographic),
portraits. 8vo, original black embossed pictorial cloth,
spine gilt. Fine.
    Second edition of the first part (originally
published in 1913; first edition of second part,
augmenting the work up to 1950, including biographical
section up to 1950. Flake 3507 (listing the original
edition). The work contains material on cattle and sheep
ranching, including a thumbnail sketch entitled “Cattle
Industry” by Junior Evans. $90.00

2097.   GARDNER, Raymond Hatfield & B. H. Monroe. The
Old Wild West: Adventures of Arizona Bill. San Antonio:
Naylor, 1944. [8] 315 pp., photographic frontispiece of
“Arizona Bill,” text illustrations. 8vo, original teal
cloth. Light shelf wear, slight discoloration to spine,
otherwise fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:145. Dykes, Kid 344n.
Guns 805: “Occasionally we find an author who claims
personal acquaintance with all the old outlaws of the
West, as Gardner does in this book. He says that he
often met Wild Bill Hickok in Tombstone, Arizona, but
Hickok was never in Arizona.... There are mistakes on
every page, and it would take many pages to point them
out, as illustrated in my Burs under the Saddle (item
7).” Wallace, Arizona History X:35. Raymond Gardner,
a.k.a. “Arizona Bill” was at turns a cowboy, rancher,
Pony Express rider, Indian scout, deputy marshal, and
Arizona Ranger. There is much incidental ranching
interest in his rambling recollections. $45.00

2098.   GARLAND, Hamlin. The Book of the American
Indian. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1923. [10] 274 pp.,
35 plates (3 in color) by Frederic Remington. Folio,
original black cloth over brown boards with sepia-tone
plate by Remington mounted on upper cover, top edges
orange. Corners bumped, otherwise a fine copy in corner-
clipped d.j. (with color plate tipped on). Jacket is
slightly   chipped  and   with  a   few   closed  tears.
Contemporary ink gift inscription.
    First edition (title verso with A-X, i.e., January
1923 and “First Edition”). Campbell, p. 115. Dykes,
Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Remington 599);
Western High Spots, p. 47 (“High Spots of Western
Illustrating”   #45):   “Beautifully    illustrated   with
carefully selected Remington drawings and oils. It is
interesting to note that Garland was not particularly
fond of Remington, a one-time fellow member of a New
York City club. He thought Remington drank too much and
found him surly in his cups. When his publisher
suggested the use of Remington’s illustrations he
objected but was told firmly by the publisher that they
were the best available. Garland was fair, later he
admitted that the publisher was right—the book was
reprinted several times, and he gave the Remington
illustrations much of the credit.” Howes G66. McCracken,
101, p. 28: “Many of the illustrations originally
appeared in Harper’s Magazine and are accompanied by
extended captions. The color plates are from A Bunch of
Buckskins.” Rader 1536.
    Included  among   the   plates   is   Remington’s   “A
Cowpuncher Visiting an Indian Village,” with caption:
“Far in advance of settlers, in those early days when
every man had to fight for his right of way, the
American cow-puncher used to journey along the waste
through hundreds of miles of the then far Western
country. Like a true soldier of fortune, he adventured
with bold carelessness, ever ready for war, but not
love; for in the Indian villages he visited there was no
woman that such a man as he was could take to his
heart.” This print first appeared in Harper’s Magazine
(September 1895) as an illustration to accompany Owen
Wister’s “The Evolution of the Cow-Puncher.” $250.00

2099.   GARLAND, Hamlin. The Book of the American
Indian. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1923. [10] 274 pp.,
35 plates (3 in color) by Frederic Remington. Folio,
original black cloth over brown boards with sepia-tone
plate by Remington mounted on upper cover, top edges
yellow. Moderate shelf wear, slight spotting to covers,
interior fine, overall a very good copy, with Brentano
label on lower pastedown. Author’s signed, dated, and
inscribed copy: “Inscribed for Adessa F. Vars Jr. on
request of Col. Lindsley by the Author. Hamlin Garland
New York 1923.”
    First edition, later printing (title verso with L-X,
i.e., November 1923, no edition statement). $200.00

2100.   GARLAND, Hamlin. The Book of the American
Indian. New York & London: Harper & Brothers, [1940].
[10] 274 pp., 35 plates (3 in color) by Frederic
Remington. Folio, original black cloth over tan boards
with sepia-tone plate by Remington mounted on upper
cover, top edges orange. Fine copy in d.j. with color
plate tipped on (minor wrinkling and a few small tears,
but no losses).
    “Fifth edition,” F-P, i.e., June 1940, on title
verso. $100.00

2101.   GARNIER,     Pierre.    Medical    Journey    in
California.... Los Angeles: [Printed by Grant Dahlstrom
for] Zeitlin & Ver Brugge, 1967. xii, 93 pp., text
illustrations (full-page, facsimiles of manuscripts,
ads, etc.). 8vo, original beige and orange decorated
cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    Second   edition,   limited  edition  (500  copies);
original edition, Paris, 1854. Cowan, p. 230n. Kurutz,
The California Gold Rush 264b: “In particular, he wrote
of medical conditions and services in the cities, towns,
and mining camps.” Howes G68. Rocq S1836. Introduction
and annotations by Doyce B. Nunis, translation by L. Jay
Oliva. Includes passing references to cattle and the
hide and tallow trade in California. $45.00

2102.   GARRARD, Lewis H. Wah-To-Yah and the Taos Trail.
Edited for Schools and Libraries by Walter S. Campbell.
Oklahoma City: Harlow Publishing, 1927. [10] vii [3] 320
pp.,   frontispiece  map,   text  illustrations.   12mo,
original dark green pictorial cloth. Slightly shelf-
slanted, but overall very good.
    Reprint (first edition Cincinnati, 1850), this
textbook was edited by Walter S. Campbell. The Western
Series of English and American Classics. Campbell, pp.
46, 192. Dobie, p. 72. Flake 3509n. Howes G70n. Plains &
Rockies IV:182n. Rader 1540n. Rittenhouse 236n: “One of
the great classics not only on the Trail but of the
entire Southwest.” Saunders 2915 (this edition). Wynar
2037. Includes a chapter entitled, “El Rancho” detailing
the author’s experiences on a cattle ranch in northern
New Mexico. $10.00

2103.   GARRARD, Lewis H. Wah-To-Yah and the Taos Trail:
Prairie Travel and Scalp Dances, with a Look at Los
Rancheros from Muleback and Rocky Mountain Campfire. San
Francisco: Grabhorn Press, 1936. [18] 289 [1] pp., title
within decorated border with Native American theme
printed in black, brown, and gray, text ornamentation in
colors, 25 colored woodcut illustrations by Mallette
Dean, foldout map and Grabhorn broadside to reader
regarding Americana Series laid in. 8vo, original cream
cloth over decorated boards in grey and tan, printed tan
paper spine label.
    Limited edition (550 copies). Grabhorn Press Third
Series of Rare Americana 3; new introduction by Carl I.
Wheat. Grabhorn 245. One of the Fifty Books of the Year.
Sherwood “Bill” Grover reported to the Roxburghe Club in
1963 that this book was selected by Edwin Grabhorn as
one of the top “ten” books printed by Grabhorn Press.
    $175.00

2104.   GARRARD, Lewis H. Wah-to-Yah and the Taos Trail.
Palo Alto: American West, 1968. [20] 289 pp., woodcut
illustrations by Mallette Dean, endpaper maps. 8vo,
original brown pictorial cloth. Very fine in tape-
repaired d.j.
    Facsimile of the Grabhorn Press limited edition
(1936). $40.00

2105.   GARRARD, Lewis H. Wah-To-Yah and the Taos Trail.
Glendale: The Arthur H. Clark Company, 1938. 377 [1]
pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic plates, foldout
map. 8vo, original red cloth, t.e.g. Very fine,
unopened.
    Best edition of this classic. Southwest Historical
Series 6; edited by Ralph P. Bieber. Clark & Brunet
19:VI. Howes S791. $75.00

2106.   GARRETSON, Martin S. The American Bison: The
Story of Its Extermination As a Wild Species and Its
Restoration under Federal Protection. New York: New York
Zoological    Society,  [1938].   xii   [2]   254   pp.,
photographic frontispiece, plates (mostly photographic,
some in color), portraits, text illustrations. 8vo,
original olive cloth gilt. Fine in very good d.j.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 127. Dobie, p. 159. Herd
882. Includes a chapter on cattlemen and buffalo.
    $75.00

2107.   GARRETT, Pat F. Pat F. Garrett’s Authentic Life
of Billy the Kid. Edited by Maurice Garland Fulton. New
York: Macmillan Company, 1927. xxviii [2] 233 pp., color
frontispiece,   photographic  plates,   facsimile.  8vo,
original blue cloth, printed paper labels on spine and
upper cover. Minor nick to spine label, mild to moderate
foxing, overall a good to very good copy in chipped d.j.
The jacket is rare.
    Second edition, extensively revised, with added
photographs and new information (first edition Santa Fe,
1882). Adams, Burs I:146n; One Fifty 61: “Best edition.”
Campbell, p. 70. Dobie, p. 140. Dykes, Kid 116: “By far
the best single Billy the Kid publication to date
(1952)”; Western High Spots, p. 119 (“Ranger Reading”):
“Best single book about [the Lincoln County] war.
Colonel Maurice G. Fulton’s serious research and
historical footnotes added to Pat’s (and Ash Upton’s)
original version makes this book the foundation on which
to start your reading or collecting on this subject.”
Graff 1515. Guns 808: “Scarce.... Annotated by an editor
who made a thorough study of Billy the Kid.... Much more
valuable historically than the original edition.” Howes
G73:   “First  genuine   biography  of   America’s  most
spectacular example of juvenile delinquency.” Jones
1621. Rader 1542. Saunders 2916. $175.00

2108.   GARRETT, Pat F. Pat F. Garrett’s Authentic Life
of Billy the Kid. Edited by Maurice Garland Fulton. New
York: Macmillan Company, 1927. Another copy. Moderate
foxing to title and some text (mostly marginal),
otherwise a fine copy, d.j. not present. $100.00

2109.   GARRETT, Pat F. Authentic Story of Billy the
Kid. Foreword by John M. Scanland and Eyewitness Reports
Edited by J. Brussel. New York: Atomic Books, 1946. 128
pp. 12mo, original pictorial wrappers. Wrappers worn,
abrasion to top corner of upper wrapper affecting spine,
text browned and fragile, overall good.
    A cheap reprint of the first edition (1882) with
some new material, such as analysis of the Kid’s
handwriting. Dykes, Kid 361. Guns 809.   $25.00

2110.   GARRETT, Pat F. The Authentic Life of Billy the
Kid.... Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1954].
xxviii, 156 [2] pp., frontispiece, illustrations. 12mo,
original grey boards. Very fine in slightly rubbed but
otherwise fine d.j. Jeff Dykes’ signed and inscribed
copy to Carl Hertzog: “For Carl—just a small payment ‘on
account’, with the kindest regards of the ‘introducer.’”
    New edition, with an added introduction by Jeff
Dykes. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 86 (“A Range Man’s
Library”): “A major Lincoln County War item with an
introduction by this writer which shows it isn’t so
authentic.” $50.00

2111.   GARRETT, Pat F. The Authentic Life of Billy the
Kid.... Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, [1954].
Another copy. Light shelf wear, otherwise fine, d.j. not
present. Bookseller’s ink stamp on back pastedown.
    $15.00

2112.   GARRISON,  George   P.  Texas:   A  Contest   of
Civilizations. Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton
Mifflin & Riverside Press, 1903. v [3] 320 [4] pp., maps
(1 in color), folding facsimile of Travis’s letter from
the Alamo. 12mo, original red decorative cloth gilt,
t.e.g. Very fine.
    First edition. American Commonwealths Series. Basic
Texas Books 73. Rader 1546. Scholarly work based on
original sources by the noted University of Texas
professor who rescued the Bexar Archives and the Austin
Papers (see Handbook of Texas Online: George Pierce
Garrison). Brief mention is made of the Texas livestock
industry. $35.00

2113.   GAY, Beatrice Grady. Into the Setting Sun: A
History of Coleman County. [Santa Anna, Texas], n.d.
(ca. 1939). x, 193 pp., text illustrations (some
photographic), maps. 12mo, original tan pictorial cloth.
Top edge foxed, endpapers lightly browned, otherwise
fine. “Criticism” by Col. M. L. Crimmins tipped onto
front free endpaper. Signed and dated by author on
dedication   page   and    with   scattered   manuscript
corrections in her hand (e.g., p. 75).
    First edition. CBC 987. Dobie, p. 59: “Coleman
County scenes and characters, dominated by ranger
characters.” Dykes, Kid 226: “John Chisum and his store
at Trickham in Coleman County are well covered.” Greene
and His Library: “This history of Coleman County is what
might best be called vernacular history, but Beatrice
Gay includes some good stories about places that time
has long since forgot. But the [pen & ink] illustrations
are unbelievable; they are the crudest attempts I
believe I have ever seen in a published document.” Guns
817. Herd 887: “Scarce.”
    Mrs. Gay accompanied her husband to the range in an
old stagecoach that was later sold to Buffalo Bill
Cody’s Wild West Show. The author, who “grew up steeped
in the lore of the Ranger Camp, cowboy tales, and
pioneer experiences,” includes good material on women in
the range country. $150.00

2114.   GAY,  Felix   M.  History   of  Nowata   County.
Stillwater, Oklahoma: Redlands Press, 1957. 36 pp. 8vo,
original grey printed wrappers, stapled. Light spotting
to wrappers, interior fine.
    First edition. Guns 818: “Has a section on the
Dalton gang.” Brief mention is made of grazing and dairy
enterprises.   $30.00

2115.   GAY, Theressa. James W. Marshall, the Discoverer
of California Gold: A Biography. Georgetown, California:
Talisman Press, 1967. 558 [1] pp., color frontispiece
portrait, pictorial title page, photographic plates,
maps, 5 facsimiles (4 in rear pocket). 8vo, original
half black leather over marbled boards. Very fine,
signed by author. In publisher’s chemise and slipcase.
    First edition, limited edition (#125 of 250 copies).
Rocq S300. Has peripheral material on the early cattle
trade, especially in relation to the Gold Rush. $150.00

2116.   GAY, Theressa. James W. Marshall, the Discoverer
of California Gold: A Biography. Georgetown, California:
Talisman Press, 1967. 558 [1] pp., color frontispiece
portrait, photographic plates, maps. 4to, original
mustard cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition, trade issue.   $75.00

2117.   GEFFS, Mary L. Under Ten Flags: A History of
Weld County, Colorado. Greeley: [McVey Printery], 1938.
318 pp., plans, maps. 8vo, original terracotta cloth
lettered in black. Very fine.
    First edition. Herd 889. Wilcox, p. 49. Wynar 1450.
Local history with statistics on the cattle trade in the
county. $50.00

2118.   GEHLBACH, Frederick R. Mountain Islands and
Desert Seas: A Natural History of the U.S.-Mexican
Borderlands. College Station: Texas A&M University
Press, [1981]. xvi, 298 pp., color photographic plates,
maps, illustrations. 8vo, original brown cloth. Very
fine in very good price-clipped d.j. Carl Hertzog’s
copy, with his bookplate.
    First edition. Extensive information on cattle
ranching, including a discussion of overgrazing in this
mostly arid and fragile region.  $25.00

2119.   GENTRY, Diane Koos. Enduring Women. College
Station: Texas A&M University Press, [1988]. xvii [1]
244 [1] pp., photographic illustrations. Oblong 8vo,
original brown wrappers with photographic illustrations.
Some   wear,   but   generally   very   good,   with  gift
inscription on front free endpaper, otherwise fine.
Signed by author.
    First   edition.   Among   the   women   profiled  and
photographed is Harriet Johnson, who left her job as an
Ivy League professor to marry a cowboy and become a
rancher in Montana.     $15.00

2120.   GEORGE, Floy Watters. History of Webster County,
1855 to 1955. [Springfield, Missouri: Roberts & Sutter,
Printers,    1955].    264   pp.,    photographic   text
illustrations. 8vo, original blue cloth. Text browned
due to quality of paper, otherwise fine.
    First edition. The chapter entitled “Agriculture—
Yesterday and Today” discusses the role of cattle
ranching through the years in this Missouri county.
    $50.00

2121.   GETLEIN, Frank. Harry Jackson, Kennedy Galleries
Monograph-Catalogue. New York: Kennedy Galleries, Inc.,
1969. 98 pp., color frontispiece, photographic text
illustrations (some foldout, most full-page and in
color). Oblong 4to, original tan printed wrappers. Fine
in fine d.j., with errata slip laid in.
    First edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 62
(“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #151). Exhibition
catalogue of artist Harry Jackson who created cowboy and
ranch-themed sculptures. $30.00

2122.   GHENT, W. J. The Road to Oregon: A Chronicle of
the Great Emigrant Trail. London: Longmans, Green & Co.,
1929. xvi [2] 274 pp., frontispiece, photographic
plates, maps, endpaper maps. 8vo, original dark green
cloth lettered in gilt. Very fine in lightly worn d.j.
with a few chips and tears.
    First edition. Flake 3548: “Mormon movement to Utah;
Mountain Meadows Massacre, Johnston’s Army.” Smith 3528.
Chapters on path makers, missionaries, the first
caravans, heyday of the trail, Gold Rush, stagecoaches,
Native Americans, details on the route, and markers and
monuments. Includes material on Jesse Applegate and 1843
migration with the “Cow Column.” $50.00

2123.   GIBBONS, J. J. In the San Juan. Chicago: Press
of Calumet Book & Engraving Co., [1898]. 194 pp.,
photographic plates lettered and with seal of Colorado
in silver. 12mo, original orange cloth. Very good copy
with some outer wear and darkening at top edges.
    First edition. Guns 824: “Scarce. Also published
under the title ‘Notes of a Missionary Priest in the
Rocky Mountains,’ New York, by the Christian Press
Association Publishing Co., 1898.” Wilcox, p. 49. Wynar
8963. Though primarily an account of pioneer life and
mining camps, there is a sketch about a cowboy and a
bronco (pp. 28-31).    $60.00

2124.   GIBBS, Josiah. Kawich’s Gold Mine: An Historical
Narrative of Mining in the Grand Canyon of the Colorado
and of Love and Adventure among the Polygamous Mormons
of Southern Utah. Salt Lake City: Century Printing
Company, 1913. 228 pp., photographic text illustrations
(full-page), map. 8vo, original red printed wrappers,
stapled. Wrappers moderately worn and with a few small
voids on spine and along upper joint, interior fine.
    First edition. Flake 3551: “Fiction with a Mormon
setting.” Includes in episode 6 (“Unfortunately Cattle
Deal”) the description of the hazardous delivery of a
herd of a thousand cows to St. George.   $100.00

2125.   GIBBS,   Josiah    F.   Lights   and   Shadows   of
Mormonism. Salt Lake City: Salt Lake Tribune Publishing
Co.,    [1909].    535    pp.,    frontispiece    portrait,
photographic text illustrations, portraits, maps. 8vo,
original dark blue cloth. Light shelf wear, especially
to spinal extremities, overall fine.
    First   edition.   Flake   3552.   Chapter   21   is a
discussion of early settlement at Salt Lake City,
including the role of early cattle and sheep ranching in
assuring the colony’s survival. In general the work is
an anti-Mormon political and religious indictment.
    $50.00

2126.   GIBBS,    Josiah   F.   The    Mountain    Meadows
Massacre...Illustrated by Nine Full-Page and Five Half-
Page Engravings from Photographs Taken on the Ground.
Salt Lake City: Salt Lake Tribune Publishing Co., 1910.
59   pp.,   illustrations,  map.   8vo,   original   green
pictorial wrappers, stapled. Marginal browning to wraps
and title, otherwise fine, with Shepard Book Company
contemporary purple ink stamp on lower wrap.
    Second and best edition, with correction regarding
Isaac Laney on title verso: “The above explanation has
been given for purpose of disarming Mormon critics who
are ever alert to even the slightest discrepancies that
may find their way into the writings of those who
presume to criticize the conduct and motives of the
Mormon leaders.” Flake 3354. Guns 825: “Scarce.”
    It is fairly obvious in which direction the author
is heading regarding the lamentable Mountain Meadows
Massacre on the Hamblin, Holt, and Burgess ranches when
early on, he states: “With malice toward none, least of
all toward the misguided assassins, and in a spirit of
even-handed justice, the attempt will be made to
assemble the fragments of causation and history and join
them together in a consecutive narrative.” Like some
later writers (e.g., David L. Bigler in Forgotten
Kingdom), the author contends that part of the
motivation for the first attack on the Baker-Fancher
wagon train seems to have been an effort to steal their
cattle (the overland party was one of the wealthiest
trains to come through Utah territory). An aside
relating to the Massacre in general: “Nine cowhands
hired to drive cattle also were murdered, along with at
least 35 other unknown victims. In all, 120 people,
mostly women and children, were slain” (Salt Lake
Tribune, March 14, 2000, p. A-4). $150.00

2127.   GIBSON, A[rrell] M[organ]. The Life and Death of
Colonel Albert Jennings Fountain. Norman: University of
Oklahoma Press, [1965]. xi [1] 301 [7] pp., photographic
plates. 8vo, original navy cloth. Very fine in slightly
chipped d.j. (illustrated by Joe Beeler). Carl Hertzog’s
copy with his bookplate.
    First    edition.   Dykes,   Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Beeler 40). Guns 826: “A well-written and
long-needed book about one of the leading characters in
New Mexico. It contains much on the lawlessness of that
state and tells about Oliver Lee, Jim Gilliland, Pat
Garrett, and others, with a mention of Billy the Kid.”
Though at its core this volume is about outlaws,
ranching is a constant backdrop to the story, and there
is content on the Lincoln County War. $45.00

2128.  GIBSON, Arrell Morgan (ed.). Ranching in the
West: Journal of the West 14:3, July 1975. viii, 160
pp., illustration by H. Jordan Rollins on p. 1, ads.
8vo, original grey-and-white printed wrappers. Light
wear and foxing, otherwise fine. Ink signature of Donald
D. Brand on upper wrapper; laid in are two letters
between Brand and Terry G. Jordan discussing the
latter’s article in this issue of the journal.
    First printing. This issue of the Journal includes
“Texan Influence in Nineteenth-Century Arizona Cattle
Ranching” by Terry Jordan; “Western Livestock Policy
during the 1950s” by Edward L. and Frederick Shapsmeier;
and “Cattlemen’s Association in New Mexico Territory.”
    $50.00

2129.   GIBSON, George Rutledge. Journal of a Soldier
under Kearny and Doniphan, 1846-1847.... Edited by Ralph
Bieber. Glendale: The Arthur H. Clark Company, 1935. 371
pp., frontispiece portrait, plates, foldout map. 8vo,
original maroon cloth, spine gilt, t.e.g. Spine slightly
faded, otherwise fine. Ink ownership signature on title
(C. W. & N. M. Wiegel).
    First edition. Southwest Historical Series 3. Clark
& Brunet 19:III. Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the
Plains and the Rockies 180. Garrett, Mexican-American
War, p. 216. Howes S791. Rittenhouse 240: “In 1846
[Gibson] enlisted in the Army of the West under Kearny
and marched over the SFT. In Santa Fe he was editor of
the Santa Fe Republican in 1847 and returned east over
the Trail in 1848. The length of his journal and
[editor] Bieber’s careful notes make this a valuable
work.” Saunders 2918.
    Includes material on ranchos along the route,
fandango in El Paso, Apache, Comanche, Pawnee, and Ute
depredations against stock, procuring beef cattle to
replace stolen stock, and general tips for getting
around Mexico in the mid-nineteenth century: “When you
arrive at a place in Mexico and wish anything, by all
means call on the alcalde first, tell him your wants,
give him a dollar or two, and if to be had, he will
procure it” (p. 330). $100.00

                  Merrill Aristocrat
2130.   GIBSON, J. W. (Watt). Recollections of a
Pioneer. [St. Joseph, Missouri: Nelson-Hanne Printing,
1912]. 216 pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original
dark red cloth lettered in black on spine and upper
cover. Binding slightly faded along edges, interior very
fine. Difficult to find in collector’s condition.
    First edition. Anderson 1686:487. Braislin 824.
Loring Campbell. Cowan, p. 235. Dobie, p. 103: “Like
many another book concerned only incidentally with range
life, this contains essential information on the
subject. Here it is trailing cattle from Missouri to
California in the 1840s and 1850s.” Dykes, Collecting
Range   Life  Literature,   p.  15.   Eberstadt,  Modern
Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 181. Flake
3558. Graff 1546. Herd 891: “Scarce.... Chapters on
driving cattle across the plains.” Howes G154.
    Kurutz, California Gold Rush 272: “Gibson had the
distinction of making three overland trips, the first in
1849. The author set out from Buchanan County, Missouri,
with brothers William and James. They followed the
California Trail and crossed the Sierra via Carson Pass.
The brothers first mined for gold on Weaver Creek in
August. Gibson then wandered from Sacramento to Shasta
City before joining up with fellow Missourians at Salmon
Falls. With his brothers, he started ranching but
returned overland to home to bring cattle back to
California. In May 1850, Gibson led 550 head back to the
ranch. The rancher made two more trips in 1853 and 1854.
According to Dale Morgan, ‘His original return trip was
one of the rare West to East trips that year.’” Merrill,
Aristocrats of the Cow Country, p. 18. Mattes, Platte
River Road Narratives 455. Mintz, The Trail 176: “Gibson
made his first of three overland trips in 1849 and here
relates experiences and adventures in the land of gold
mining. He returned to Missouri in 1851, and then
returned to California in 1852, driving cattle along the
way. Gibson made another cattle driving trip in 1854....
Quite an adventurer and quite engaging reading.” Norris
1220. Rader 1578. Smith 3539.
    Gardiner (In Pursuit of the Golden Dream) discusses
this book on p. xxxiv. Gibson includes several chapters
on his participation in the Civil War, in both Missouri
and Arkansas, in Musser’s 8th and 9th Missouri Infantry.
In 1861 he joined Elijah Gates’ company just after the
Battle of Wilson’s Creek, went on to fight at Lexington
and Pea Ridge, then joined the Confederate army in John
B. Clark’s division. One particularly grim event he
relates is how a company of artillery was overrun by a
company of African-Americans who promptly killed the
survivors (pp. 154-155). $1,500.00

2131.   GIBSON, J. W. (Watt). Recollections of a
Pioneer. N.p.: Practical Personal Planning, n.d. 216
pp., photographic frontispiece portrait. 12mo, original
red printed wrappers, stapled. Very fine.
    Facsimile reprint of the rare original edition.
    $125.00

2132.   GIDEON, Samuel E[ward]. (ed.) A Group of Themes
on the Architecture and Culture of Early Texas. Austin:
The University of Texas, n.d. 110 pp. (mimeographed),
text illustrations (line drawings of architecture). 4to,
original blue paper wrappers, stapled. Very good. Pencil
notes indicate this copy was a gift from J. Frank Dobie
to Dudley R. Dobie, and the scattered manuscript
corrections appear to be in the hand of JFD.
    First edition. This work consists of students’
research essays prepared for a university course on the
evolution of Texas architecture, with some material of
interest for ranching (such as adaptation of the dog-run
style to later ranch houses; see p. 27). Dr. Gideon
(1875-1945), also known for his wonderful paintings,
taught at Texas A&M, MIT, and UT after studying at MIT,
Harvard, and the School of Fine Arts at Fontainebleau,
France (Handbook of Texas Online: Samuel Edward Gideon).
    $50.00

2133.   GIESE, Henry. Farm Fence Handbook. Chicago:
Agricultural   Extension  Bureau,  Republic   Steel
Corporation, 1938. 63 [1] pp., text illustrations
(mostly photographic), tables. 4to, original blue
pictorial wrappers. Small abrasion on back wrapper, else
very fine.
    First printing. An in-depth survey of fencing meant
for the use of agricultural college students. One of the
illustrations (p. 33) shows a barbed wire machine in
action with a note explaining how it operates.   $25.00

2134.   GIESECKE, Walter. Reminiscences and Adventures
of Walter Giesecke As He Told Them to His Children and
Grandchildren. N.p., n.d. (ca. 1925). 60 leaves,
typewritten, double-spaced carbon copy. 4to, secured in
stiff green paper covers. Other than occasional mild
rust staining from metal clasps, fine. A few of J. Frank
Dobie’s rough pencil notes.
    Unpublished, original account by a cowboy-rancher,
who was born on a sheep farm in Washington County,
Texas, in 1856 and moved to Burnet County after the
Civil War. He worked mostly at home until 1882, when he
“decided for the ‘cowtrail’” and “hired to Major Zeth
Mabry, a prominent cattle trader and dealer, who sent
thousands of cattle ‘up the trail’ every spring, to help
drive a herd of steers to Ogallala, Nebraska.” His
account of this trail drive is informative and exciting.
From Ogallala he accepted a job of accompanying a cattle
train consisting of ten cars of stock bound for Chicago.
    $500.00

2135.   GIFFEN, Helen S. Casas and Courtyards: Historic
Adobe Houses of California. Oakland: Biobooks, 1955. [6]
153 [1] pp., color frontispiece, photographic text
illustrations (full-page) by Guy J. Giffen. 8vo,
original half black cloth over tan linen, spine lettered
in gilt. Very fine.
    First   edition,  limited   edition  (600   copies).
California Relations, no. 40. Foreword by W. W.
Robinson. Rocq 16878. Many of the buildings included are
ranch houses. $85.00
2136.   GIFFEN, Helen S. Trail-Blazing Pioneer, Colonel
Joseph Ballinger Chiles. San Francisco: [Lawton and
Alfred Kennedy for] John Howell-Books, 1969. [6] 100
pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic plates. 8vo,
original red cloth. Very fine, unopened, in very fine
d.j.
    First edition, limited edition (750 copies). Kane,
Howell 73. Rocq S1228. This biography of one of the 1841
Bartleson-Bidwell overlanders has two chapters on “The
Rancho Catacula,” a rancho grant in present-day Napa
Valley wine county, made to Joseph B. Chiles in 1844.
    $75.00

2137.   GILBERT, Hila, George Harris & Bernice Pourier
Harris. Big Bat Pourier, Guide and Interpreter, Fort
Laramie 1870-1880 [wrapper title]. Sheridan, Wyoming:
The Mills Company, 1968. [6] 82 pp., photographic text
illustrations (some full-page). 8vo, original yellow
pictorial wrappers, stapled. Very fine.
    First edition. Big Bat Pourier, a Frenchman who
married Lakotan Josephine Richards, negotiated the Fort
Laramie Treaty of 1868. His ability to speak French,
English, and Lakota, and his empathy for the plight of
Native Americans helped him obtain a favorable treaty.
The book includes a chapter on Horsehead Ranch, where
Bat settled and near which the massacre of Wounded Knee
occurred. $50.00

2138.   GILBEY, Walter. Ponies Past and Present. London:
Vinton & Co., 1900. [8] 112 pp., frontispiece, plates
(photographic, some from engravings or woodcuts). 8vo,
original orange cloth with lettering and illustration of
pony and dog in gilt, a.e.g. Binding moderately stained
and worn with some abrading at spine and corners, foxing
to first and last few leaves, overall a very good copy.
Modern bookplate on front pastedown. Printed list of
“Works by Sir Walter Gilbey, Bart” on lower pastedown.
    First edition. The emphasis of the work is the
possibilities of breeding, with a history of various
breeds and types, including New Forest, Welsh, Exmoor,
Darmoor, Cumberland, Westmoreland, Connemara, Scotland,
and Shetland. In one chapter the author comments
extensively on the relative superiority of the pony to
the horse, remarking that ponies have more endurance and
need less care. Gilbey regrets that England must import
ponies to meet the demand. Finally, he points out that
ponies are essential for work in mines because horses
are too large. $75.00

2139.   GILCREASE INSTITUTE OF AMERICAN HISTORY AND ART.
“Titans of Western Art: Frederic Remington, Charles
Russell” in American Scene 5:4 [Tulsa: Thomas Gilcrease
Institute of American History and Art, 1964]. [2] 64 [4]
pp., text illustrations (some in color, most full-page).
4to, original stiff brown embossed wrappers. Very fine.
    First   printing.   Dykes,   Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Remington 45). McVicker Yost & Renner,
Russell, p. 74. Includes articles by J. Frank Dobie (not
in McVicker), Harold McCracken, Lola Shelton, N. Orwin
Rush, Ramon Adams, Will Rogers, Jr., Helen Card, and
Dean Krakel.    $25.00

2140.   GILFILLAN, Archer B. Sheep. Boston: Little,
Brown, and Company, 1929. xix [3] 272 pp., frontispiece,
illustrations by Kurt Wiese. 8vo, original green
pictorial cloth. Fine in very worn, browned, and chipped
d.j. with significant losses (price-clipped). Author’s
signed inscription on front free endpaper to Mr. Himler.
    First edition. Campbell, p. 130. Dobie, pp. 93, 104:
“With humor and grace, this sheepherder, who collected
books on Samuel Pepys, tells more about sheep dogs,
sheep nature, and sheepherder life than any other writer
I know.” Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #68n. Dykes, Western
High Spots, p. 83 (“A Range Man’s Library”): “Despite
the importance of sheep in our range economy, they have
been practically ignored in range literature. A range
man’s library, to maintain balance, should include some
books on sheep. Fortunately there are some very good
ones. The best of all is [Archer B. Gilfillan’s Sheep],
truly a western classic.” Herd 893: “Scarce.... A
chapter on the sheepherder and the cowboy.” Malone,
Wyomingiana, p. 4. Reese, Six Score 46: “One of the most
pleasant and readable range books. There is some mention
of cattle and cattlemen.... Even the most stubborn
cowman will feel some sympathy for shepherds after
reading this book.”
    The author’s sheep ranch was in South Dakota.
    $125.00

2141.   GILLESPIE, A. S. (Bud) & R. H. (Bob) Burns.
Steamboat:    Symbol  of   Wyoming   Spirit.   Cheyenne:
University of Wyoming, [1952]. 20 pp., photographic text
illustrations. 8vo, original brown pictorial wrappers,
stapled. Very fine.
    First edition. Herd 894: “About another famous
bucking horse.” Steamboat, the famous rodeo horse in
action at Cheyenne’s Frontier Days early in the
twentieth century, appeared on the Wyoming license plate
in 1935 (Wyoming was the first state to include a
picture of any kind on license plates). $25.00

2142.   GILLETT, James B. Six Years with the Texas
Rangers, 1875 to 1881. Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones,
[1921]. 332 pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic
plates. 12mo, original gilt-lettered dark green cloth.
Other than light outer wear, an exceptionally fine,
bright copy. Signed by author. Part of a printed
promotional leaf on the book tipped in.
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:148; One-Fifty 62:
“Published in a small edition by the author and sold
personally by him.... Very scarce.” Basic Texas Books
76. Campbell, p. 78. Clark, New South I:83A: “Gillett’s
service with the Rangers was in the western and
northwestern part of Texas, an area that was real
frontier in the 1870s.... An excellent account of
frontier lawless society.” Dobie, Big Bend Bibliography,
p. 9. Dobie, pp. 55, 59-60. Dykes, Western High Spots,
p. 20 (“My Ten Most Outstanding Books on the West” #3);
p. 116 (“Ranger Reading”). Graff 1553. Greene, The Fifty
Best Books on Texas, p. 73. A. C. Greene & His Library:
“What can I say about this wonderful piece of Texana and
the man who wrote it? James B. Gillett’s Six Years With
the Texas Rangers is well written, well researched, and
one of my `50 Best.’ I used it often in writing 900
Miles on the Butterfield Trail. If you wish to know the
history of West Texas beyond the Pecos, you must include
this book.” Guns 829. Howes G177. Rader 1591.
    “Gillett (1856-1937), Texas Ranger, author, and
rancher.... [His] family moved to Lampasas in 1872. This
was cattle country, and in 1873 he left home to work for
nearby cattlemen.... On June 1, 1875, Gillett joined the
Texas Rangers, Daniel Webster Roberts’ Company D,
Frontier Battalion. He spent six years with the rangers
on the frontier,...the bloodiest period of the Texas
Indian wars. Gillett fought Kiowa, Comanche, and Lipan
Apache   Indians,  as   well  as   cattle   thieves  and
outlaws.... In December 1881 Gillett resigned from the
Texas Rangers and was appointed assistant city marshal
of El Paso. In June 1882 he was appointed marshal.... On
April 1, 1885, after having clubbed a city councilman
with a six-shooter, he left the El Paso marshal’s office
and became manager of the Estado Land and Cattle
Company. He held this position for almost six years,
then resigned to ranch for himself.... Gillett ranched
south of Alpine on the O6 and Altuda ranches.... In
April 1907.... He bought the Barrell Springs Ranch, made
improvements, and began building a herd of registered
Hereford cattle, which became well known for quality and
brought premium prices.... He helped organize the West
Texas Historical Association [and] was instrumental in
organizing the Highland Hereford Breeders Association”
(Handbook of Texas Online: James Buchanan Gillett).
    $500.00

2143.   GILLETT, James B. Six Years     with the Texas
Rangers, 1875 to 1881. Austin: Von      Boeckmann-Jones,
[1921]. Another copy, not autographed. Light shelf wear,
upper hinge broken, otherwise very fine and bright.
    $300.00

2144.   GILLETT, James B. Six Years with the Texas
Rangers, 1875-1881. New Haven: Yale University Press,
1925. xvi, 259 pp., photographic plates, maps. 8vo,
original navy blue cloth. Very fine in slightly rubbed
and soiled pictorial d.j. The jacket is rare. Laid in is
author’s autograph letter signed, dated at Marfa, Texas,
April 1926, 1 p., to R. S. Ellison (see content in next
paragraph).
    Second edition, edited and with an introduction by
Milo Milton Quaife. Basic Texas Books 76A. In his letter
Gillett apologizes that he cannot send Ellison an
autographed copy of his book because his contract with
Yale prohibits his doing so: “They seem pretty hard
boiled to me. I would have been delighted to have sent
you an autographed copy at the publisher’s price. They
would have lost nothing and I would have made about 50
cents.” $400.00

2145.   GILLETT, James B. Six Years with the Texas
Rangers, 1875-1881. New Haven: Yale University Press,
1925. Another copy. Light shelf wear and endpapers
browned, overall very good, d.j. not present. Bookplates
of Edward R. Sargent and Carl Hertzog, and ownership
signature of Sargent, partially abraded. $75.00

2146.   GILLETT, James B. & Howard R. Driggs. The Texas
Ranger: A Story of the Southwestern Frontier....
Yonkers-on-Hudson: World Book Company, 1927. xv [1] 223
pp., frontispiece, text illustrations by Herbert M.
Stoops, map. 12mo, original tan pictorial cloth. Light
shelf wear, front endpapers browned, otherwise fine and
fresh, newsclipping laid in. This edition is difficult
to find, especially in fine condition like this copy.
    Pioneer Life Series. Basic Texas Books 76B (quoting
Dobie): “Delightfully illustrated, and the illustrations
are   true  to   life.”  Dykes,    Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Stoops 27). $35.00

2147.   GILLETT, James B. Six Years with the Texas
Rangers, 1875 to 1881. Chicago: The Lakeside Press and
R. R. Donnelley & Sons Co., 1943. xxxii, 364 pp.,
frontispiece portrait, foldout map. 12mo, original
maroon decorative cloth gilt, t.e.g. Very fine.
    Lakeside Classics reprint. Basic Texas Books 76C.
The sepia-tone photogravure portrait of Gillett does not
appear in the previous editions. The preface contains
publisher’s interesting remarks about the problems of
producing a book during World War II. $40.00

2148.   GILLETTE, Edward. Locating the Iron Trail.
Boston: Christopher Publishing House, [1925]. 172 pp.,
photographic plates. Small 8vo, original blue cloth
lettered in gilt. Very fine and bright. Author’s signed
presentation copy to “Dr. Hubert Work, Secretary of the
Interior who put our Reclamation Service on its feet....
”
    First edition. Firsthand account by a surveyor who
assisted in locating railroads in New Mexico, Arizona,
Colorado, Utah, the Sand Hills of Nebraska, the
Northwest, Big Horn Canyon, Yellowstone (where he met
Theodore Roosevelt), and Alaska. The engineer-author
includes material on area ranches and Native Americans.
Following p. 88 is a photographic plate of “Indians
herding cattle across Big Horn River, near Fort Custer.”
Gillette describes the reaction of cowboys to the
arrival of his survey party in New Mexico: “The cowboys
regarded the surveyors in silence and with feelings of
apprehension, no doubt influenced by the remarks of the
cattle owners that ‘if the railroad comes it will bring
such a horde of settlers that the cattle business would
be ruined.’”    $125.00

2149.  GILLETTE, Edward. Locating the Iron Trail.
Boston: Christopher Publishing House, [1925]. Another
copy. Minor bumping to edges, otherwise a very fine
copy. Author’s signed presentation copy to Mr. D. W.
Greenburg. $100.00

2150.   GILLETTE, Martha Hill. Overland to Oregon, and
in the Indian Wars of 1853, with an Account of Earlier
Life in Rural Tennessee. Ashland: Lewis Osburne, 1971.
77 [3] pp., illustrations, large folded map laid in.
8vo, original green pictorial buckram. Very fine in
moderately soiled plain dust wrapper.
    First edition, limited edition (#59 of 650 copies).
Mattes, Platte River Road Narratives 1178: “Martha Hill
was eighteen when her father decided to leave the poor
red soil of the Cumberlands.” Mintz, The Trail 178: “The
family began their long trip to Oregon in Tennessee and
actually made the crossing in 1852. Martha’s journal
includes...Rogue River Indian wars, and the special
attention given her and her sister as the only unmarried
females in Rogue River Valley.... Many detailed facets
of early pioneer life.” Smith S3151.
    The author’s family went overland in 1852 and drove
stock with them. There are references and discussions in
the text to problems with driving stock across the
country, the primary management problem being finding
sufficient feed for the stock. They hired Native
Americans along the way to assist with driving the
stock. $50.00

2151.   GILLILAND, Maude T. Horsebackers of the Brush
Country: A Story of the Texas Rangers and Mexican Liquor
Smugglers. N.p., 1968. 175 pp., illustrations (many
photographic), map. 8vo, original blue cloth. Very fine
in very fine pictorial d.j. Signed by author on front
free endpaper.
    First edition. The first part of the book is taken
up with various accounts of law enforcement activities
to prevent liquor smuggling across South Texas by the
“tequileros” during Prohibition, including numerous
details about violent encounters with the smugglers and
daily life of Texas Rangers involved in this duty. The
second part of the book though often described as being
biographies of Texas Rangers also includes other law
enforcement officers, such as Border Patrol personnel
and Customs inspectors. Much of the smuggling occurred
across the various sprawling south Texas cattle ranches.
    Author Gilliland (1904-1989), whose grandfather,
father, and husband were Texas Rangers, was born on the
Capisallo Ranch in Hidalgo County, Texas, and grew up on
Rincón Ranch, a large ranch in Starr and Hidalgo
counties where her father worked as foreman and manager.
“Ranching and law enforcement-and their overlapping
interests-were important influences in Maude Gilliland’s
life. The Texas Rangers used Rincón as a scouting
headquarters in the South Texas area, and numerous other
law-enforcement officers stopped at the ranch regularly.
Maude Gilliland’s family had close ties to these groups”
(Handbook of Texas: Maude Truitt Gilliland). $300.00

2152.   GILLILAND, Maude T. Rincon (Remote Dwelling
Place): A Story of Life on a South Texas Ranch at the
Turn of the Century. [Brownsville: Springman-King
Lithograph    Company,   1964].  xvi,   105   [2]   pp.,
illustrations by the author (many photographs), maps.
8vo, original green cloth. Tape stains on endpapers,
otherwise fine in d.j. with some foxing on lower panel.
Author’s presentation inscription to Dudley R. Dobie on
front free endpaper: “To Dudley Dobie, with the
compliments of E. R. Wyatt and the best wishes of the
author, Maude T. Gilliland, Jan. 22, 1965.”
    First edition. Guns 830: “Has a chapter on the
bandit raids of southwestern Texas, mostly by Mexican
outlaws.” King, Women on the Cattle Trail and in the
Roundup, p. 15: “Interesting and amusing accounts of the
author’s girlhood on the vast Wells Ranch in Starr and
Hidalgo Counties in South Texas.” Gilliland includes
some in-depth information on the vaquero way of life,
which, unlike that of the isolated American cowboys,
included their families.
    “After raising her family, Maude Gilliland turned to
chronicling her experiences in South Texas. Her first
book, which she both wrote and illustrated, was Rincón
(Remote Dwelling Place)-A Story of Life on a South Texas
Ranch at the Turn of the Century (1964). It was praised
for its accurate portrayal of the Rio Grande valley and
ranch life in South Texas” (Handbook of Texas: Maude
Truitt Gilliland). $200.00

2153.   GILLILAND, Maude T. Rincon.... [Brownsville:
Springman-King Lithograph Company, 1964]. Another copy.
Lower cover, endsheets, and d.j. moderately foxed,
otherwise fine. Author’s presentation inscription to
Dudley R. Dobie on front free endpaper: “To Dudley R.
Dobie, with the compliments of Sterling Dobie and the
best wishes of the author. Maude T. Gilliland Jan. 30,
1965.” $200.00

2154.   GILLMOR,  Frances   &  Louisa   Wade  Wetherill.
Traders to the Navajos. Boston, New York & Cambridge:
Houghton Mifflin & Riverside Press, 1934. [6] 265 pp.,
frontispiece, photographic plates. 8vo, original orange
cloth lettered in green. Fine copy in scarce d.j. (a few
chips and one short tear). Color postcard from Colorado
laid in.
    First edition. Dobie, p. 29: “Account not only of
the trading post Wetherills but of the Navajos as human
beings, with emphasis on their spiritual qualities.”
Saunders 953. One of the plates shows a Navajo sheep
herd. The Wetherill family, ranchers in southwestern
Colorado, discovered the nearby cliff dwellings at Mesa
Verde and were the first Anglos to excavate and explore
the ruins. $60.00

2155.   GILPIN, William. Mission of the North American
People, Geographical, Social, and Political. Illustrated
by Six Charts Delineating the Physical Architecture and
Thermal Laws of All the Continents. Philadelphia: J. B.
Lippincott & Co., 1873. 217 pp., 6 folding colored
lithographic maps: (1) Map of the World.... (30.5 x 96.5
cm); (2) Map of North America in which are delineated
the Mountain System as a Unit.... (60.3 x 56.5 cm); (3)
Map of North America Delineating the Mountain System and
Its Details.... (60.5 x 56.2 cm); (4) Map Illustrating
the System of Parcs, the Domestic Relations of the Great
Plains.... (54 x 58.4 cm) (5) Map of Colorado Territory,
and Northern Portion of New Mexico Showing the System of
Parcs (51.7 x 53.5 cm); (6) Thermal Map of North
America,   Delineating   the   Isothermal   Zodiac   the
Isothermal Axis of Intensity and its Expansions up and
down the Plateau (60.5 x 56 cm). 8vo, original gilt-
lettered purple cloth, covers ruled in blind, bevelled
edges. Moderate outer wear, corners slightly bumped,
spine shelf slated, interior very good, maps excellent
and fresh with only a few short tears at juncture with
text block (no losses).
    Second edition, with additions and rearrangements,
of Gilpin’s The Central Gold Region (1860); for
citations to the 1860 edition, see: Munk (Alliot), p.
87; Plains & Rockies (IV:358), Smith (3594); Wheat,
Transmississippi West (1010 & 1011). Citations to the
present edition: Anderson 1686:149. Eberstadt, Modern
Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 184. Howes
G192. Plains & Rockies II:358 (discussing this 1873
edition): “A unique feature in American literature”;
IV:358n: “Gilpin first crossed the plains to Oregon in
1843 with the Frémont expedition [and] remained involved
with the Rocky Mountain West.... He was an early
advocate of the Pacific Railway...and later became
governor of Colorado Territory.” Sabin 27469. Tutorow
4069: “Gilpin was a major in the Missouri Mounted
Volunteers during the Mexican War.”
    Building on themes began in his Central Gold Region
(1860), Gilpin here expands his concept of United
States’ greatness to create a ringing endorsement of
Manifest Destiny. First exposed to the Western landscape
as part of Frémont’s expedition and later with Doniphan
during the Mexican-American War, Gilpin has little
doubts about the lush prospects of the area or of the
ability of U.S. citizens to render the area profitable
and abundant. Although sometimes criticized as an
eccentric, he nevertheless, at least as clearly as his
contemporary Jane Maria Eliza McManus Storm Cazneau,
here calls for the U.S. to develop the area that has,
according to him, rightly fallen into their possession.
Leroy R. Hafen in Pike’s Peak Gold Rush Guidebooks of
1859 (Glendale: Arthur H. Clark, 1941) remarks, “Gilpin
has been called the Prophet of the West” (p. 241).
    In his comments he includes discussion of the herds
of   cattle  that   can  be   raised   and  records   his
astonishment that the Great Plains, considered by some
to be the Great American Desert, actually support one
hundred million wild cattle. Despite whatever charges of
eccentricity might be laid at Gilpin’s feet, in many
ways he assuredly saw the agricultural and ranching
empire that eventually grew in the regions he describes.
The book is also important because of Gilpin’s remarks
on building a transnational railroad. Finally, Appendix
I contains the text of a speech Gilpin gave in 1847
concerning the Mexican-American War and his experiences.
    The excellent thematic maps of North America are
highly   original,   aesthetically   appealing,   and   a
complement to the author’s accompanying geo-political
essay. In addition to the world and North American maps
(some with dramatic concentric circles radiating from
the Great Plains), included are a very detailed map of
Colorado Territory and a superb map of the Great Plains.
    Speaking of the prescient nature of Gilpin’s maps,
Paul E. Cohen in his Mapping the West: America’s
Westward Movement 1524-1890 (New York: Rizzoli, 2002)
comments: “The ideas that continents have centers and
peripheries and that the physical disposition of
mountains, plains, and rivers create geographical
pressures, with long-term impacts on populations and the
wealth of nations, were very new in Gilpin’s day. It was
not until the early twentieth century, in the work of
the geographer Sir Halford Mackinder, that such notions
were given academic stature and a name: geopolitics” (p.
146).
    See also the excellent commentary of William H.
Goetzmann in Exploration and Empire (Austin: Texas State
Historical Association, 1991, p. 88). $1,500.00

2156.   GILPIN, William. Mission of the North American
People.... Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1873.
Another copy. Defective. 2 (of 6) folding colored
lithographic maps: (1) Map of North America (57 x 60
cm); (2) Thermal Map of North America, Delineating the
Isothermal Zodiac the Isothermal Axis of Intensity and
its Expansions up and down the Plateau (57 x 60 cm).
8vo, original brown flexible cloth. Moderate shelf wear,
fraying, and rubbing to cloth; light water staining in
lower blank margins, overall very good, with ms.
manuscript ownership slip laid in.   $200.00

2157.   GILPIN, William. Mission of the North American
People, Geographical, Social, and Political. Illustrated
by Six Charts Delineating the Physical Architecture and
Thermal Laws of All the Continents. Philadelphia &
London: J. B. Lippincott and Trübner & Co., 1874. 223
pp., 6 folding colored lithographic maps: (1) Map of the
World.... (30.5 x 96.5 cm); (2) Map of North America in
which are delineated the Mountain System as a Unit....
(60.3 x 56.5 cm); (3) Map of North America Delineating
the Mountain System and Its Details.... (60.5 x 56.2
cm); (4) Map Illustrating the System of Parcs, the
Domestic Relations of the Great Plains.... (54 x 58.4
cm) (5) Map of Colorado Territory, and Northern Portion
of New Mexico Showing the System of Parcs (51.7 x 53.5
cm); (6) Thermal Map of North America, Delineating the
Isothermal Zodiac the Isothermal Axis of Intensity and
its Expansions up and down the Plateau (60.5 x 56 cm).
8vo, original gilt-lettered green cloth, covers ruled in
blind, bevelled edges. Other than light shelf wear, a
very fine, fresh copy, the maps excellent. Contemporary
ownership signature in ink at front (Albert Smith).
    Third edition, text reset; first British edition.
The maps are from the same plates as the second edition,
but here in some cases, the colors are much more vivid.
    $1,250.00

2158.   GIPSON, Fred. The Cow Killers with the Aftosa
Commission in Mexico. Austin: University of Texas Press,
1956. x, 130 [1] pp., frontispiece and illustrations by
Bill Leftwich (caricatures, sometimes humorous and
sometimes grim). 4to, original orange cloth, spine gilt-
lettered, vignette of cow on upper cover. Light foxing
to endpapers, else very fine in lightly rubbed but fine
d.j. Signed by author and illustrator on front free
endpaper.
    First edition. Not in Guns or Herd. The “cow
killers” were the gringos of the Aftosa Commission who
invaded rural Mexico in 1949 armed with six-shooters and
hypodermic syringes, in an attempt to stamp out the
spread of hoof-and-mouth disease. At its peak the
Commission employed 1,166 U.S. and 7,938 Mexicans,
including Leftwich, a cowboy with the Commission, who
sketched scenes he encountered in the course of his
work. Lack of adequate explanation and campesino
suspicion of authority led to many episodes of
misunderstanding. $65.00

2159.   GIPSON, Fred. The “Cow Killers”.... Austin:
University of Texas Press, 1956. Another copy. Endpapers
with light browning, otherwise fine in d.j. with a few
short tears reinforced on verso. $45.00

2160.   GIPSON, Fred. Cowhand: The Story of a Working
Cowboy. New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, [1953].
[142] pp. (numbered 1A to 71B, versos only). Narrow
folio, original red wrappers, publisher’s printed paper
label and printed title label on upper wrapper. Light
wear, otherwise fine.
    Publisher’s uncorrected proofs. Campbell, p. 85:
“Contemporary cowhands at work. Accurate and genial.”
Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 79 (“A Range Man’s
Library”): “Matter-of-fact on the day-to-day jobs of a
working cowboy.” Herd 897. True story of Ed “Fat” Alford
(b. 1901), a West Texas cowhand who worked on the
Elsinore Ranch and in and around the Ozona area.
    “One of the most popular of the southwestern writers
in the 1940s and 1950s, if not necessarily the best, was
Fred Gipson [who] had the rare ability to appeal
simultaneously to many different levels of intelligence;
pre-teen children and sophisticated literary critics can
read his novels apparently with equal pleasures and
appreciation” (WLA, Literary History of the American
West, p. 508). $125.00

2161.   GIPSON, Fred. Cowhand: The Story of a Working
Cowboy. New York: Harper & Brothers, [1953]. vi [2] 216
pp. 8vo, original half beige cloth over green cloth.
Light foxing to top edge of book block and endpapers,
otherwise fine in lightly worn but fine d.j.
    First edition. $35.00

2162.   GIPSON, Fred. Fabulous Empire: Colonel Zack
Miller’s Story. Boston, New York & Cambridge: Houghton
Mifflin Company & Riverside Press, 1946. ix [3] 411 pp.
8vo, original tan cloth. Light shelf wear, otherwise
fine in very good d.j. (chipped and worn at edges).
    First edition. Introduction by Donald Day. Campbell,
p. 82: “The 101 Ranch in Oklahoma was famous. It grossed
more than a million dollars a year until World War I and
the depression brought that Western empire down.”
Campbell, My Favorite 101 Books about the Cattle
Industry 39. Dobie, p. 104: “Biography of Zack Miller of
the 101 Ranch and 101 Wild West Show.” Guns 835:
“Contains some information on Henry Starr.” Herd 898.
    $50.00

2163.  GLASSCOCK, C. B. Gold in Them Hills: The Story
of the West’s Last Wild Mining Days. Indianapolis:
Bobbs-Merrill,   [1932].   330   pp.,    frontispiece,
photographic plates, endpaper maps. 8vo, original green
cloth. Some edge wear, otherwise a fine copy in the
scarce d.j. (lightly rubbed and chipped, a few small
closed tears).
    First edition. Edwards, Enduring Desert, pp. 93-94:
“Choice material on the early mining fields surrounding
Death Valley.” Guns 839: “Contains some new information
on Wyatt Earp.” Paher, Nevada 691: “Probably no
newspaperman captured the frenzied [mining] era better
than Glasscock, and this is the finest of his six
Western books.... Written informally and with an eye
toward human interest, the book will surely be enjoyed
by all who love old Nevada.” Rocq 15832.
    History of the colorful mining camps at Tonopah,
Goldfield, Rhyolite, Rawhide, Greenwater, etc. Chapter
20 (“Profits vs. Romance”) relates the story of the rise
and fall of the town of Goldfield and the Goldfield
Consolidated Mines Company under the direction of George
Wingfield, a former cowboy turned capitalist.    $35.00

2164.   GLASSCOCK, C. B. Lucky Baldwin: The Story of an
Unconventional   Success.   Indianapolis:   Bobbs-Merrill
Company,   [1933].   308  pp.,   frontispiece   portrait,
photographic plates. 8vo, original orange cloth. Mild
shelf wear, otherwise a fine copy in very worn and torn
d.j. Bookplate on front pastedown.
    First edition. Paher, Nevada 693: “While Baldwin was
famous as a southern California land developer and
racing enthusiast, he was also a principle developer of
Lake Tahoe. This book is a record of his business
undertakings.... The volume is typical of the author’s
vivacious style which mixes history with yarns about
people and places.” Rocq 9546.
    In addition to running with fast women and faster
horses, Baldwin was a hotelier, vaudevillian, and
participant in the Klondike gold rush. Among Elias
Jackson (“Lucky”) Baldwin’s real estate developments was
the Santa Anita Rancho in San Gabriel Valley, with
vineyards and the largest racing stable in the U.S.
   $25.00

2165.   GLISAN, Rodney. Journal of Army Life. San
Francisco: A. L. Bancroft and Company, 1874. xii, 511
pp., 21 wood-engraved plates, 1 folding table. 8vo,
original brown decorative cloth gilt with black ruling.
Binding worn (especially along joints, spine, and
corners) and with a few light spots, endpapers lightly
browned, interior very good.
    First   edition.   Braislin   837.   Cowan,  p.   239.
Eberstadt, Modern Narratives of the Plains and the
Rockies 188. Flake (supp.) 3599a. Graff 1575: “Glisan
served in Oklahoma, Washington, and Oregon among other
areas.” Howell 32, Oregon 118. Howes G209. Littell 405.
Matthews 325. Munk (Alliot), p. 88. Norris 1233. Rader
1609. Sloan, Auction 9 (quoting Pingenot): “An important
contemporary account of the Indian wars in the Pacific
Northwest. The author joined the army as a surgeon in
1850. He visited California in 1855.” Smith 3611.
    Glisan (1827-1890), after practicing medicine in
Baltimore became a surgeon in the U.S. Army, an office
he filled for the next decade, before moving to San
Francisco and eventually Portland. He was a prominent
physician known for several unusual operations and for
his medical expertise on midwifery. Glisan’s account
contains material on Native American stock rustling
(especially in Texas and Indian Territory) and much on
mustangs    and     Comanche    horsemanship    (including
engravings).    $200.00

2166.   GLOVER, Jack. “Bobbed” Wire: An Illustrated
Guide to the Identification and Classification of Barbed
Wire. Wichita Falls, Texas: Terry Bros., 1966. [10] 49
[1] pp. (versos blank), text illustrations throughout.
8vo,   original  beige   pictorial  textured   wrappers,
stapled. Mint.
    First edition. Illustrated guide with identification
of types and patent dates. Barbed wire examples and some
patent dates, plus illustrations of fencing tools.
   $50.00

2167.   GLOVER, Jack. The “Bobbed” Wire II Bible.
[Sunset, Texas], 1971. [176] pp., text illustrations
throughout. 8vo, original beige pictorial wrappers.
Slight tear to wrappers, else very fine. Signed and
inscribed by author on title page. Original mailing
envelope
    Augmented edition of preceding, much enlarged.
    $25.00

2168.   GLOVER, Jack. The “Bobbed” Wire III Bible.
Centennial Edition. Sunset, Texas: Cow Puddle Press,
1972. [208] pp., illustrations. 8vo, original beige
pictorial wrappers. Fine. Signed and inscribed by author
on title page.
    Another augmented edition, the “Centennial Edition.”
    $30.00

2169.   GOETH, Ralph. One Hundred Years of Tips in Texas
[wrapper title]. N.p., n.d. [ca. 1960]. 16 pp. 8vo,
original beige printed wrappers, stapled. Very good.
    First edition. Story of the Tips family, who arrived
in 1849 at Indianola from Elberfeld, Germany, and
immediately bought land and began to ranch before
setting up in business in Austin. Later generations of
the family also engaged in ranching. $15.00

2170.   GOFF, Richard, Robert H. McCaffree & Doris
Sterbenz. Century in the Saddle [with]: Centennial Brand
Book of the Colorado Cattlemen’s Commission. [Denver:
Colorado Cattlemen’s Centennial Association, 1967]. x
[2] 365 + x, 196 pp., photographic plates, text
illustrations (some photographic and some full-page, a
few by Remington), facsimiles of documents and an 1886
brand book). 2 vols., 8vo, original green pictorial
cloth gilt. Very fine, unopened, in lightly worn but
fine jackets (one of which is price-clipped).
    First    edition.  Dykes,    Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Remington 610 & 611). Reese, Six Score 47:
“Detailed and well-written history of the first one
hundred years of the Colorado Cattleman’s Association.
The book is well-balanced, giving equal space to earlier
and later history.” Wynar 6284 & 6285. The second volume
contains a facsimile of Brands Belonging to the Colorado
Cattle Growers Association (1886), the first Colorado
statewide brand book. $200.00

2171.   GOFF, Richard & Robert H. McCaffree. Century in
the Saddle. [Denver: Colorado Cattlemen’s Centennial
Commission, 1967]. Another copy of first title in
preceding entry. Light foxing to fore-edges and gutters,
front free endpaper stained (from d.j.), else very fine
in d.j. $70.00

2172.   GOFF, Richard & Robert H. McCaffree. Century in
the Saddle. [Denver: Colorado Cattlemen’s Centennial
Commission,   1967].   x  [2]   365   pp.,  plates   and
illustrations. 8vo, original green pictorial cloth gilt.
Very fine, unopened copy in fine d.j. Signed by authors
on title page. Forrest and Edith Blunk’s anniversary
copy, with Edith’s note re same on front free endpaper.
    $100.00

2173.   GOFF, Richard & Robert H. McCaffree. Century in
the Saddle. [Denver: Colorado Cattlemen’s Centennial
Commission, 1967]. Another copy. Fine in lightly chipped
and price-clipped d.j. Signed by author McCaffree.
Promotional laid in.   $100.00

2174.   GOOD, Donnie D. “The Longhorn” in American Scene
11:3. Tulsa: Thomas Gilcrease Institute of American
History and Art, 1970. [20] pp., text illustrations
(some full-page) by Frederic Remington, Edward Borein,
Frank Reaugh, Will James, and others. 4to, original
stiff brown printed wrappers, stapled. Mint.
    First   printing.   Dykes,   Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Borein 68). Entire issue of American Scene
devoted to the      longhorn;   special   design   by   Bill
Patterson. $20.00

2175.   GOODMAN, David Michael. A Western Panorama,
1849-1875: The Travels, Writing, and Influence of J.
Ross Browne on the Pacific Coast, and in Texas, Nevada,
Arizona, and Baja California, As the First Mining
Commissioner.... Glendale: The Arthur H. Clark Company,
1966. 328 pp., frontispiece portrait, text illustrations
(many full-page, including some by Browne), maps. 8vo,
original red cloth, spine gilt. Light shelf wear,
otherwise a fine copy.
    First edition. Western Frontiersmen Series 13. Clark
& Brunet 99. Paher, Nevada 705: “Without a doubt, Browne
was among the most widely traveled observant and truly
versatile men of his era. His work, reports and writings
concern all of the Southwest. The author successfully
develops many little known facets of Browne’s varied
career which included travel and investigations into
Nevada in the early 1860’s. Excellent two-color maps are
an aid in following these movements.” Powell, Arizona
Gathering II 683.
    Browne includes information on ranching in the
Southwest and cattle smuggling from Mexico. “Browne
spent twenty-five years in the West, about twice as long
as Bret Harte, Mark Twain, Francis Parkman, Richard
Dana,   and   Bayard   Taylor   combined.   He  traveled
extensively throughout California, Nevada, Arizona,
Texas,   Oregon,  and   Washington;   and  his  letters,
journals, articles, and reports constitute the fullest
and most reliable account of life in the West left by a
single person in the third quarter of the nineteenth
century.... His cartoons portray as no words can the
ironic view he had of himself and the turbulent life of
the West he experienced so fully.” (WLA, Literary
History of the American West, p. 90). $50.00

2176.   GOODNIGHT, Charles, et al. Pioneer Days in the
Southwest from 1850 to 1879: Thrilling Descriptions of
Buffalo Hunting, Indian Fighting and Massacres, Cowboy
Life and Home Building. Contributions by Charles
Goodnight, Emanuel Dubbs, John A. Hart and Others.
Guthrie, Oklahoma: State Capital Company, 1909. 320 pp.,
16 plates (mostly photographic portraits and scenes, one
from   a  line   drawing);  not   present   are  colored
frontispiece of the Adobe Walls fight, plates opposite
p. 33 (“Presto...”), p. 45 (“Huha!...”), p. 55 (“Firing
at Them...”). 12mo, original green cloth, spine gilt
lettered, upper cover stamped with pictorial design in
black and gilt-lettered. Poor condition, cloth worn,
first and last few leaves detached, text block partially
sprung. With this copy is another issue of the index
leaf (see next paragraph). Preserved in acid-free cloth
clamshell box.
    Second edition, first issue. The second edition was
enlarged and plates added (the first edition, under
authorship of John A. Hart, was published in Guthrie,
ca. 1906 and is very rare). In this issue the first
letter of the title is damaged, there is no edition
statement on title verso, the distance between the rules
and the copyright statement is .05 cm, the first word of
page iii is “Introductory,” page v contains only one
full paragraph, the index leaf (present in both states)
has Chapters 2 and 4 misspelled “Chauter,” and the plate
at p. 107 is oriented portrait. The cover stamping lacks
the device on the spine, and the bars at the
extremities. On the front board, the stamp, which would
be corrected, has the “h” printing into the circle. The
frontispiece is not present, and there is no indication
that it was ever there.
    Dobie, p. 105: “Good on the way frontier ranch
families lived. The writers show no sense of humor and
no idea of being literary.” Graff 1802. Herd 903:
“Scarce.... An enlarged reprint with the additions of
History of Pioneer Days, by John A. Hart, and thus
considered a second edition.” Howes H258. Saunders 2921.
Tate, Indians of Texas 2363: “Personal stories of
thirteen pioneers...who lived in north central and
northwestern Texas during the mid-nineteenth century.
Their accounts are filled with stories of ‘savage’
Comanche and Kiowa raids and pursuits by civilian
defense groups and Texas Rangers. Despite the one-sided
nature of these stories, they contain much useful
information on frontier hardship and adventure.”
    Pioneers contributing to the book were Charles
Goodnight, Emanuel Dubbs, F. R. McCracken, John A. Hart,
James D. Newberry, Mary A. Nunley, Tilatha Wilson
English, George B. Ely, S. P. Elkins, John A. Lafferty,
Mary A. Blackburn, Ermine Redwine, and T. J. Vantine.
The book contains much original information on Molly
Goodnight and other pioneer women. Commenting on the odd
reversal of roles when there was too much work to go
around, John A. Hart observes: “Sometime I almost wished
I were a girl so I could have a good time, but I had no
sister large enough to work so I had to churn, wash
dishes, use the battling stick on wash days, make bats
for quilts, quit and hand the thread through the harness
of the loom and then I was glad that I was not a girl so
I could get out of such work. I never could believe that
I was cut out for a boy and a girl too and such work now
would hurt my feelings terribly, but there were lots of
girls that did a boy’s and girl’s work too, and lots of
women that did men’s work in war time” (p. 153). $450.00

2177.   GOODNIGHT, Charles, et al. Pioneer Days in the
Southwest from 1850 to 1879.... Guthrie, Oklahoma: State
Capital Company, 1909. 320 pp., 20 plates, including
color frontispiece of Adobe Walls Fight by “Tivizey”
(mostly photographic portraits and scenes, a few from
line drawings). 8vo, original green cloth, spine gilt
lettered and decorated in black, upper cover stamped
with pictorial design in black and gilt-lettered. Except
for light rubbing to binding and uniform age-toning due
to the cheap paper on which the book was printed, very
good and tight, much better than usually found. Front
pastedown with printed postal label of Frontier Times to
Mr. W. E. Sherrill.
    Second edition, second issue. In this issue the
first letter of the title is undamaged, there is an
edition statement (“Second Edition”) on title verso, the
distance between the rules and the copyright statement
is .02 cm, the first word of page iii is “Introduction,”
page v contains two full paragraphs, the index leaf is
the same as in the first issue, and the plate at p. 107
is oriented landscape. The cover stamping has the device
on the spine and the bars at the extremities. On the
front board, the stamp has the “h” printing just above
the circle. The frontispiece is present.
    In the second issue, the added paragraph at the end
of the introduction is a virulent denunciation of Native
Americans concentrating on their supposed atrocities
when on the warpath: “They would, and did to my own
personal knowledge, take the babe from its mother’s arms
and beat out its brains against the door frame, and then
work their pleasure on the mother and cruelly mutilate
and kill her afterwards, sparing no one, young or old,
male or female.”   $300.00

2178.   GOODNIGHT, Charles, et al. Pioneer Days in the
Southwest from 1850 to 1879.... Guthrie, Oklahoma: State
Capital Company, 1909. Another copy, variant binding.
8vo, original tan cloth, spine gilt lettered and
decorated in black, upper cover stamped with pictorial
design in black and gilt-lettered. Moderate shelf wear
and abrading, “Second edition” erased from title verso,
text uniformly age-toned. Gammel’s printed book label on
upper pastedown. A very good, tight copy. $250.00

2179.   GOODWIN, C[harles] C[arroll]. As I Remember
Them. Salt Lake City: Salt Lake Commercial Club, 1913.
360 pp., frontispiece portrait. 8vo, original burgundy
cloth gilt, t.e.g. Mild shelf wear, front endpaper
removed, otherwise a fine copy.
    First trade edition. Cowan, p. 242. Flake (supp.)
3618n. Graff 1587. Paher 710. Presented are short
biographies of over seventy prominent pioneers of
California. Includes John Sutter, Leland Stanford,
Clarence King, Samuel Clemens, Joaquin Miller, Adolph
Sutro, John Bidwell, David Broderick, and Collis
Huntington. Some of the biographies relate to ranching,
such as J. E. “Lucky” Baldwin and his development of the
Santa Anita Ranch (pp. 86-89). Another biography of
interest is George C. Gorham, a former Texas Ranger and
friend of Jack Hays (pp. 107-111).   $85.00

2180.   GOODWIN, Joseph. A New System of Shoeing Horses:
With an Account of the Various Modes Practised by
Different Nationals...Second Edition. London: Longman,
Hurst, etc., 1824. ix, 383 pp., 12 copper-engraved
plates, including frontispiece (types of horseshoes,
methods, and equipment). 8vo, full contemporary navy
blue polished calf, spine gilt with raised bands and
brown calf label, marbled edges and endpapers (binder’s
ticket J. Martin & Son). Binding scuffed and slightly
faded, plates and some leaves moderately foxed (heavier
on title), overall very good. Dudley R. Dobie’s copy,
with his ink note laid describing the work as “rare.”
    Second English edition. The work was published by
the same publishers in 1820; the Boston edition came out
in 1821.    $150.00

2181.   GOODWYN, Frank. The Black Bull. Garden City:
Doubleday, 1958. 264 pp., text illustrations. 8vo,
original terracotta cloth. Light shelf wear, small burn
to cover and d.j., otherwise very good in chipped and
browned d.j. From Carl Hertzog’s library, with his
bookplate.
    First edition. Novel set in the ranch country of
South Texas.    $15.00

2182.   GOODWYN, Frank. Life on the King Ranch. New
York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company, [1951]. [10] 293 pp.,
frontispiece, photographic plates, text illustrations,
endpaper maps. 8vo, original half yellow cloth over
brown pictorial buckram gilt. Fine in lightly chipped
d.j.
    First edition. Campbell, pp. 130, 187. Dobie, p.
104: “The author was reared on the King Ranch. He is
especially refreshing on the vaqueros, their techniques
and tales.” Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 79 (“A Range
Man’s Library”): “Good on the life and legends of the
Mexican vaqueros who make up the working force on the
ranch”; p. 102 (“The Texas Ranch Today”). Herd 905.
Goodwyn’s father was ranch boss of the Norias section of
the King Ranch. Goodwyn grew up on the ranch and relates
his experiences, as well as folklore and little-known
facts about the ranch. $60.00

2183.   GOODWYN,   Frank.   Lone-Star  Land:    Twentieth-
Century Texas in Perspective. New York: Knopf, 1955. xii
[2] 352, x [2] pp., photographic plates, maps. 8vo,
original blindstamped blue cloth. Slight fading along
lower edges of binding, otherwise a fine copy in lightly
worn d.j.
    First edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p. 6:
(“Collecting    Modern   Western   Americana”):    “Vivid,
balanced word picture of present-day Texas.... Chapters
on ‘The Longhorns,’ ‘The Cowboy,’ and ‘New Horizons on
the Range’”; p. 90 (“The Texas Ranch Today”). Herd 906.
    $25.00

2184.   GOPLEN, Arnold O. The Career of Marquis de Mores
in the Bad Lands of North Dakota. [North Dakota: State
Historical Society of North Dakota, 1946]. 70 pp.,
frontispiece portrait, photographic plates, portrait,
double-page map. 8vo, original blue printed wrappers,
stapled. Wrappers faded at edges, otherwise very fine.
    First separate issue, reprinted from North Dakota
History 13:1-2. Herd 907. The Marquis de Mores had a
brief but colorful career as a cattle baron in North
Dakota in the mid-1880s. $35.00

      Rare Firsthand Source on Montana Vigilantes
2185.  GORDON, Samuel. Recollections of Old Milestown.
Miles City, Montana: [Independent Printing Co.], 1918.
42 [4] pp., sepia-tone photographic plates of people and
scenes by Huffman, including frontispiece portrait of
author. 8vo, original brown flexible cloth, gilt
lettered on upper cover. Light shelf wear and corners
bumped, hinges starting, otherwise a very fine copy of
an ephemeral publication.
    First edition. Guns 849: “Scarce book containing
material on the vigilantes of Miles City.” Howes G255
(“aa”). Smith 3688.
    Growing from a military fort established after
Custer’s defeat, Milestown (modern-day Miles City)
rapidly grew into an extremely important cattle and
ranching center, especially after the railroad arrived.
Gordon, for over three decades the local paper editor,
here reviews the growth of the town based on his own
personal    knowledge.    Interestingly,   in   Gordon’s
descriptions it is obvious that in the town’s early days
such things as ranches, corrals, supply businesses, and
other such ranching related industries were literally
right in the center of the present town. Particularly on
pages 16 and 17 he reviews the decline of cowboy culture
as the town became more settled. As an example of the
early town he relates that one section of the main
street “now so handsomely improved” was actually an
“always dirty and foul-smelling” corral.
    This work, the earliest history of Miles City, is a
very rare source on the Vigilantes of Montana and the
Code of the West. Gordon has an entire chapter on “The
Vigilante Days,” especially the first hanging that
occurred in 1883.
    The documentary photographs are the work of L. A.
Huffman, “the premier photographer of the northern
range” (Reese, Six). “The Huffman pictures constitute
one of the finest pictorial records of life on the
western frontier” (Thrapp II, pp. 688-89). In his
introduction, Gordon comments on the genesis of his
history and its illustrations: “At the inception of the
original plan there was no thought of `getting into
print’ and consequently no thought of illustrations but
once it was decided to put the story between covers the
matter of illustration became an essential feature, and
this principally because Mr. L. A. Huffman—himself one
of the original committee—had in his possession an
abundance of material for this work; `shots’ snapped on
the spot and at the time written of, having an intrinsic
merit that cannot attach to `fake’ pictures, no matter
how skillfully posed. Thus the story told in the text is
illustrated by pictures practically `taken on the spot.’
And so, this book and its pictures, is in a way the
accomplishment of the task undertaken by the committee
of long ago, and while it appeals almost entirely to the
sentimental side of the old-timers, it is hoped that it
will prove to be of interest to those who will in time
become `old-timers’ and who will feel the same pride in
‘Old Milestown’ that its founders now have.” $3,500.00

2186.   GOTTFREDSON, Peterson. Indian Depredations in
Utah. [Salt Lake City: Skelton, 1919]. 352 pp., plates
(mostly photographic, first plate bound opposite title).
8vo, original blue decorated in white and red. Fair
copy, upper board and first half is lightly water-
stained on right side.
    First edition, some copies issued with a 17 pp.
supplement (Ute vocabulary), which was never present in
this copy. Anderson 1686:496: “Privately issued in a
small edition. A mine of material on the Indian
Campaigns and Massacres, much of which is nowhere else
to be found. The author draws his materials from a
lifetime experience in the Utah Country, from pioneer
diaries and other original sources, the bringing
together of which occupied him for upwards of 20 years.”
Flake 3649. Graff 1599. Includes numerous chapters on
Ute raids on cattle and other stock. $100.00

2187.   GOUGH, L[ysius]. Spur Jingles and Saddle Songs:
Rhymes and Miscellany of Cow Camp and Cattle Trails in
the   Early   Eighties.  Amarillo:  Russell  Stationery
Company, 1935. [2] 110 pp., plates (including full-page
illustrations by Ben Carlton Mead from his Prairie
Series; some photographic). Narrow 8vo, original gilt-
lettered tan cloth. Except for light cover spotting,
very fine.
    Revised edition, from the author’s first book,
Western Travels and Other Rhymes (1886; Vandale 74).
This edition also came out in wrappers, but the cloth is
more scarce. The author was born in Lamar County, Texas,
in 1862, and was a working cowboy all his life. $50.00

2188.   GOULD, Lewis L. Wyoming: A Political History,
1868-1896. New Haven & London: Yale University Press,
1968. xiii [1] 298 pp., frontispiece portrait, endpaper
maps. 8vo, original green cloth. Very fine in lightly
rubbed but fine d.j. (price-clipped).
    First edition. Yale Western Americana Series 20. The
author contrasts the influence of politicians with that
of the railroad and cattle industries in determining
Wyoming’s fortunes.    $30.00

2189.   GRACY, David B. Littlefield Lands: Colonization
on the Texas Plains, 1912-1920. Austin & London:
University of Texas Press, [1968]. x [4] 161 pp.,
photographic plates, maps, tables. 8vo, original dark
green cloth. Very fine in d.j.
    First edition. No. 8 in the M. K. Brown Range Life
Series. This is a study of the recolonization of the
Texas plains, as the large land holdings of the stockmen
were broken up to make way for farmers and towns.
    $35.00

2190.   GRAND, W. Jo[e]s[ph]. Illustrated History of the
Union Stockyards: Sketch-Book of Familiar Faces and
Places at the Yards. Chicago: Published by author,
[1901]. [1, ad] 362 [7, ads] pp., illustrations (many
photographic, two by Charles Russell). 8vo, original
blue cloth with gilt-lettering on upper board and
lettered in black on spine. Moderate shelf wear, some
loss to gilt-letter, text block slightly split at pp.
64-65, overall fine.
    Second edition, revised and enlarged (first edition,
Chicago, 1896). Herd 915n. Reese, Six Score 48n: “An
early account of the yards, describing the practices and
characters of the locale. An interesting look at the
stockyards in this period.” Yost & Renner, Russell I:4.
Includes   a   chapter  on   Gallagher,  the   Stockyard
detective. $125.00

2191.   GRANT, Bruce. The Cowboy Encyclopedia: The Old
and the New West from the Open Range to the Dude Ranch.
New York, Chicago & San Francisco: Rand McNally &
Company, [1951]. 160 [2] pp., color frontispiece and
plates, text illustrations, maps. Large 8vo, original
grey pictorial cloth. Light shelf wear, otherwise very
fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:155. Guns 856. Herd
916.    $30.00

2192.   GRANT, Bruce. How to Make Cowboy Horse Gear.
Cambridge, Maryland: Cornell Maritime Press, [1953]. xii
[2] 108 pp., frontispiece, text illustrations (some
photographic and full-page). 8vo, original green cloth.
Slight browning to endpapers, overall very fine in
lightly foxed d.j. with small hole at upper spine.
    First edition. Pictures and instructions for the
crafting of authentic cowboy gear from contemporary
rawhide. From the preface: “In this book are to be found
the necessary braids for making all types of cowboy gear
- rawhide lariats, headstalls, hackamores, bosals,
reins, romals, quirts, hobbles, etc., as well as the
general types of utility articles such as dog leashes,
collars, belts, hatbands, wrist-watch straps, etc.
    $30.00

2193.   GRANT, Bruce. How to Make Cowboy Horse Gear.
Cambridge, Maryland: Cornell Maritime Press, [1953].
Another copy, variant binding. 8vo, original beige
pictorial wrappers. Wrappers worn at spine and foxed,
otherwise fine.   $25.00

2194.   GRANT,  Bruce.   Leather   Braiding.   Cambridge,
Maryland: Cornell Maritime Press, [1950]. xviii, 173
pp.,    frontispiece,    text    illustrations    (mostly
photographic, some full-page). 8vo, original red cloth,
spine gilt-lettered. Upper edge of text block mildly
foxed, endpapers lightly browned, otherwise fine in very
good d.j.
    First edition. This definitive guide explores all
forms of leather braiding in detail. The author
dedicates the book “To my mother who was thoughtful
enough to see that I was born in Texas.” $15.00

2195.   Graphic Account of an Indian Raid at Sabinal,
Texas October 28, 1859 and the Pursuit of the Indians by
Citizens and Soldiers. N.p., n.d. [Sabinal: Sabinal
Sentinel, ca. 1930]. [20] pp. 16mo, original white
printed wrappers, stapled. Old rust stain from paperclip
on upper wrapper, last page very browned, otherwise
fine, with J. Frank Dobie’s signed ink note on upper
wrapper: “See publisher’s notice last page. Probably
printed around 1930. Reprinted in Frontier Times, April,
1932, with an additional account by Captain W. R.
Russell. J. Frank Dobie.”
    First book edition (originally appeared in several
issues of the Sabinal Sentinel). Not in Howes, Rader,
Tate, etc. This rare little pamphlet contains an account
of a bloody massacre in 1859 prompting an historic
punitive expedition covering over 200 miles in the
Sabinal-Uvalde country of Texas, one of the longest
running fights with Native Americans on record. The work
is unattributed, but the last leaf states that the copy
was provided to the Sabinal Sentinel by J. W. Davenport,
son of John Davenport, a victim of the massacre.
    Pioneer rancher Davenport settled in Sabinal Canyon
on the heels of Capt. William Ware’s 1852 penetration of
Comanche lands. Also killed in the massacre was rancher
John Bowles, who prospected for gold in California and
moved to the Uvalde area where he assisted in the
organization of that county and later relocated to the
Sabinal area. Bowles was ambushed while moving stock to
a new pasture. He was shot with three arrows, lanced,
and scalped. His son Doke (or Doak) Bowles retrieved
from a warrior his father’s scalp, saddle-rope, bridles,
and the scalps of four children.
    A large party of settlers and U.S. soldiers under
Lieutenant Hazen of Fort Inge pursued the tribesmen in a
wild melee described thus: “Never was there such a
running fight on the frontier. It was twenty miles back
to where the fight commenced. The men were scattered all
the way and there were dead Indians and wounded white
men. Some of the soldier stopped with Lieutenant Hazen.
The heavy cavalry horses of those who came on soon
failed and none but the toughest of the cow ponies of
the Texas prairies endured to the end.” Hazen was
wounded during the campaign, but he stayed in command of
his men until the tribesmen had been defeated and went
on to serve as a general in the Union Army. $950.00

2196.   GRAVES, J. A. My Seventy Years in California,
1857-1927. Los Angeles: Times-Mirror Press, 1927. xvii
[1] 478 pp., frontispiece portrait, 17 photographic
plates. 8vo, original gilt-lettered blue cloth. Moderate
shelf wear, front flyleaf missing, text lightly water-
stained at blank margins, old tape repair to torn,
stained d.j. that has adhered to binding.
    First edition. Cowan, p. 247. Howell 50, California
498: “The author came to California in 1857 by ship, and
after eighteen years in Marysville and San Francisco
moved to Los Angeles, where he lived until the
publication of this book. He describes turn-of-the-
century life in Los Angeles, commenting on hunting
clubs, the legal profession, the Chinese, the political
bosses, and the Oil Boom.” Rocq 3857.
    Graves was president of the Farmers & Merchants
National Bank for many years. Along with Harris
Newmark’s Sixty Years in California, Graves’ memoir is
one of the two most important works on Southern
California on the period. Chapters relating to ranching
include “Spanish and Mexican Land Grants in Los Angeles,
San   Fernando   Ranch  Litigation...”,   “Stockgrowers’
Customs,” and chapters on horses. $40.00

2197.   GRAVES, J. A. My Seventy Years in California,
1857-1927. Los Angeles: Times-Mirror Press, 1927.
Another copy. Light shelf wear, mild foxing to endpapers
and preliminary pages, otherwise a fine copy, d.j. not
present.    $30.00

2198.   GRAVES, J. A. My Seventy Years in California,
1857-1927. Los Angeles: Times-Mirror Press, 1929. xvii
[1] 478 pp., frontispiece portrait, 17 photographic
plates. 8vo, original blue cloth gilt. Mild shelf wear
and spotting to cloth, otherwise a fine copy.
    Third printing.    $15.00

2199.   GRAVES, John. Blue & Some Other Dogs. Austin:
Encino Press, [1981]. [4] 29 [2] pp., toned photographic
illustrations. 4to, original navy blue cloth over slate
blue boards, printed paper label on upper cover, spine
lettered in silver. Fine. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his
bookplate.
    First edition (appeared in Texas Monthly in a
different form). Whaley, Wittliff 159: “Tells of a love
affair between the author and his crossbred sheep dog,
whose special personality, loyalty, and courage made him
an unforgettable companion.” Graves writes of dogs and
their use in herding sheep, cattle, and goats and his
own beloved Blue’s sometimes amusing work in Graves’
“rather miniature and unstrenuous livestock operations,”
such as “when a chuted cow turned fighty and [Blue]
loaded him into the trailer instead of her.” $40.00

2200.  GRAVES, John. From a     Limestone Ledge: Some
Essays and Other Ruminations    about Country Life in
Texas. New York: Knopf, 1980. xv [1] 228 [3] pp.,
frontispiece, full-page text illustrations by Glenn
Wolff. 8vo, original white cloth over white boards,
title blind-embossed within panel on upper cover, spine
gilt lettered. Very fine in mildly chipped d.j. Neat
association copy. Laid in is a Christmas card with
author’s signed inscription, as well as a copy of a
review of the book by Carl Hertzog. Hertzog’s copy, with
his bookplate.
    First edition (most of the material appeared
previously in articles in Texas Monthly). This book is a
sequel of sorts to Graves’ Hard Scrabble. Like that
earlier work, it is a treatise on the pleasures and
hardships of doing things for oneself and a nostalgic
meditation on country ways. Graves considers every
creature and aspect of country life that has lured, or
demanded, his attention during two decades of living on
and working a battered and recalcitrant ranch in the
cedar-covered limestone hills of north-central Texas.
    $85.00

2201.   GRAVES, John. Goodbye to a River. New York:
Knopf, 1964. [10] 306 [2] pp., text illustrations by
Russell Waterhouse, map. 8vo, original greyish green
pictorial cloth. Very fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. CBC 2477n, and three others. Greene,
The Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 86n: “Contains the
essential humor, the rawness and earthy wisdom of an
old,    rural   Texas   society    without   sacrificing
intelligence and historical accuracy. There have been
only a handful of books that achieved this plateau.... I
rank it the finest piece of Texas writing ever done.”
Lowman, Printer at the Pass 121n: “The production
requirements of the giant presses were such that this
book had to be printed in exactly 320 pages. Hertzog
spent days reworking these pages in order that the final
brief chapter—the finale—would end the story precisely
at page 301.” Tate, Indians of Texas 3737: “Moving
account of the Brazos River and the events which have
transpired in its vicinity. Graves writes not as an
historian, but as an environmentally and culturally
conscious observer who laments the passing of an earlier
era.”   $125.00

2202.   GRAVES, John. Goodbye to a River. New York:
[Designed by Carl Hertzog for] Knopf, 1964. [10] 306 [2]
pp., text illustrations by Russell Waterhouse, map. 8vo,
original light green pictorial cloth. Very fine in
lightly worn d.j. with a few small tears. Association
copy. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate.
    Fifth printing.    $35.00

2203.   GRAVES, John. Goodbye to a River. Austin: [W.
Thomas Taylor for the Book Club of Texas], 1988. 237
pp., photographs (prints made by William Wittliff from
the originals taken by Graves during his trip down the
Brazos River). 4to, original half brown cloth over
boards. Mint.
    Limited edition (550 copies), new introduction by
John Graves. A. C. Green & His Library: “Although this
is not the first edition of Goodbye to a River it is the
most beautiful. It contains several photos of John on
the river which were taken by his wife Jane. Bill
Wittliff and W. Thomas Taylor, both of whom have had so
much to do with beautiful Texas books, added their
skills.”    $350.00

2204.   GRAVES, John. Hard Scrabble: Observations on a
Patch of Land. New York: Knopf, 1974. [1] xi [1] 267 [5]
pp., map. 8vo, original orange cloth. Very fine in fine
d.j. Publisher’s card laid in with “at the suggestion of
the author” written in ink. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with
his bookplate.
    First edition. Hard Scrabble” was the name this
excellent author gave to his 400-acre ranch in the
Central Texas Hill Country. In this, his second book, he
ruminates on the pleasures and challenges of living in
close association with the land.
    A. C. Green & His Library: “I have said many times,
in private and in print, that I think John Graves is the
finest writer to come out of Texas since WWII—or, who
knows, maybe long before that. I first met John when he
was giving a talk to the West Texas Historical
Association in Abilene. I was sent out to cover the
meeting—not because John was speaking, he was relatively
unknown, but because it was happening in our town. John
told about his trip down the Brazos that eventually
became his famous Goodbye to a River. Not long after
that, his classic story, `The Last Running’ appeared in
Atlantic Monthly and was the subject of the first
pictorial cover that magazine ever used. Some people
have criticized John for not writing more. But I say
that quality is reason enough for his smallish output. I
have never read a sentence by John Graves that did not
measure up to the best he’d done. (Am I saying I am
satisfied with his output? No. But that is merely to
wish he’d done more for me to enjoy).”   $75.00

2205.   GRAVES, John. The Last Running. Austin: Encino
Press, 1974. [4] 47 [1] pp., text illustrations by John
Groth (some full-page). Oblong 4to, original black cloth
over burnt orange boards, illustrated paper label on
upper cover, gilt lettering on spine. Very fine in
acetate wrapper. Carl Hertzog’s copy with his bookplate.
    First edition. Appeared in Atlantic Monthly in 1959.
A. C. Greene, Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 86:
“Incidentally, if The Last Running were a bit longer
than a story, I would list it among the best books, it’s
worthy.” A. C. Greene & His Library: “When this story
appeared in The Atlantic Monthly back in the 1950s, I
knew immediately that Texas had added another name to
its literary honor roll.” Whaley, Wittliff 116. Tale of
a group of eight Comanche who traveled from Oklahoma to
Texas to demand they be given rancher Tom Bird’s largest
buffalo, who had been given to Bird by Charles
Goodnight. $40.00
2206.   GRAVES, John & Jim Bones. Texas Heartland: A
Hill Country Year. College Station: [Design by William
Wittliff for] Texas A&M University Press, [1975]. 40
[64] pp., color frontispiece and 82 color photographic
plates by Jim Bones. Folio, original brown cloth. Fine
copy in d.j. (lightly chipped and rubbed). Carl
Hertzog’s copy with his bookplate.
    First edition. Whaley, Wittliff 134: “Jim Bones
provides an exceptional photographic record of a year in
the Texas Hill Country. Most of the pictures were taken
while Bones was a resident at Paisano, a 254-acre ranch
that belonged to J. Frank Dobie. John Graves’ essay on
the region tells the history of the land and those who
lived on it.” A most harmonious collaboration between
writer, photographer, and designer.  $40.00

2207.   GRAVES, Richard S. Oklahoma Outlaws: A Graphic
History of the Early Days in Oklahoma; the Bandits Who
Terrorized the First Settlers and the Marshals Who
Fought Them to Extinction; Covering a Period of Twenty-
Five Years. [Oklahoma City: State Printing & Publishing
Company,   1915].   [4]   131  [1]   pp.,   photographic
illustrations. 12mo, original red pictorial wrappers
with photographic back wrap, stapled. Tiny nick at tail
of spine, otherwise very fine.
    First edition. Adams, Burs I:156. Anderson 1642:524:
“The four Daltons; Bill Bowers; Dick Broadwell; Bill
Doolin; Tulsa Jack, and many others.” Campbell, pp. 68-
69. Graff 1620: “Prepared as publicity for the motion
picture The Passing of the Oklahoma Outlaws.” Guns 859:
“Scarce.... Touches upon most of the better-known
Oklahoma outlaws and marshals.” Howes G322. Rader 1650.
Streeter Sale 4293 (one of the few lots to pass!).
    This lurid little pulp contains material on the
Miller Ranch and several notorious distaff outlaws
(including Rose of the Cimarron, Cattle Annie, Little
Breeches, et al.). Some of the brigands are cowboys gone
bad. Many of the illustrations are grisly postmortem
shots of outlaws. The 1915 silent movie featured many of
the surviving lawmen playing themselves, such as E. D.
Nix, Bud Ledbetter, and William Tilghman. $500.00

2208.   GRAVES, W. W. Life and Letters of Rev. Father
John Schoenmakers S. J., Apostle to the Osages. Parsons,
Kansas: Commercial Publishers, [1928]. 144 [4, index]
pp., frontispiece portrait, photographic plates. 12mo,
original green cloth. Binding stained and abraded,
interior fine.
    First edition. Guns 861: “Scarce.... Has some
mention of Wild Bill Hickok.” Presented are pioneer
Jesuit missionary Schoenmakers’ recollections of his
work among the Osage in Kansas in 1847-1876, including
sections on “Horse Thieves Troublesome” (rustling by
Kickapoo and other tribes in 1862) and “Cattle Thieves
Flourished”): “The territory around the mission and
southward, being the border line between the contending
forces in the [Civil] war, was often in the hands of one
party, then the other, and sometimes it was open
territory with renegades and thieves as its chief
occupants. The cattle belonging to the Indians in the
armies were turned loose on the range along with other
cattle that belonged to the tribe collectively. The
renegades   would   steal   cattle   without   regard   to
ownership, and often managed to place the blame on an
enemy of the real owners.”
    Father Schoenmakers’ account is a relatively obscure
source for Civil War history. Father Schoenmakers was
intensely loyal to the Union and tried to persuade the
Osages for the North, or at least to have them be
neutral. Many of the Osage warriors who lived near the
mission enlisted in the Union army. During the Civil War
raids, the Indian missions existing between Osage
Mission   and  Texas   were   destroyed,   except   Father
Schoenmakers’ village was spared. By the treaty which
the Osages made with the government in 1865 they gave up
a large portion of their lands in Kansas and agreed to
move to a new reservation in the Indian territory,
where, according to Gaves, the tribe became “the richest
nation or tribe in the world.”   $250.00

2209.   GRAVES, W. W. Life and Letters of Rev. Father
John Schoenmakers S. J., Apostle to the Osages. Parsons,
Kansas: Commercial Publishers, [1928]. Another copy,
rebound in dark green cloth. Fine condition. $250.00

2210.   GRAY, Frank S. Pioneer Adventures. [Cherokee,
Texas: Privately published, 1948]. 384 pp., photographic
illustrations. 8vo, original maroon cloth lettered in
black. Upper edge of text block and endpapers lightly
browned, otherwise very fine in very good d.j. Signed by
author.
    First edition. CBC lists two titles by this author,
but not the present work, the focus of which is local
history of southern San Saba County, Texas. Dobie, p.
104: “Integrates home life on frontier ranches with
range work.” Herd 919: “Much on the Chisholm Trail.”
Gray, who followed in the steps of his father and uncle
who were early ranchers in the area, gives a faithful
account with many cattle drives recalled, as well as
much history of Central Texas. Chapters include “The
Trail Drivers Appear,” “John Chisum and Jesse Chisholm,”
“Trail Herd across the Staked Plains to Fort Sumner, New
Mexico,” “Horse Hunt at the Haunted Ranch,” “Trouble
between Cowmen and Sheepmen in San Saba County,” “A Cow
Outfit from Cherokee Making a Drive on Wallace Creek,”
“Ranching in the Panhandle,” etc. $250.00

2211.   GRAY, Frank S. Pioneering in Southwest Texas:
True Stories of Early Day Experiences in Edwards and
Adjoining Counties. [Austin: Steck, 1949]. vii [1] 247
pp., photographic illustrations, endpaper map. 8vo,
original brown cloth. Fine in slightly foxed d.j. Signed
by author.
    First edition. Edited by J. Marvin Hunter. CBC 1488.
Dobie, p. 104: “The author has the perspective of a
civilized gentleman and integrates home life on frontier
ranches with ranch work.” Guns 863. Herd 920. True
stories of early day experiences in Edwards and
adjoining counties, with chapters on “The First Fence in
Edwards County,” “The First Angora Goats in Edwards
County,” “Fencing a Pasture in Edwards County,” “A Big
Trail Herd,” and “Trailing a Herd to New Mexico.”
    $125.00

2212.   GRAY, W. B. D. The Cowboy’s Prayer, Used by Rev.
W. B. Gray, Superintendent of Congregational Missions in
Wyoming, in His Illustrated Missionary Address “Cowboy
Life on the Range”. N.p., n.d. (early 1900s). [4] pp.,
first page with photograph of cowboy on horseback. 16mo,
leaflet. Fine.
    First edition. According to Waltz & Engle’s Ballad
Index, this rhymed verse was written by Charles Badger
Clark, and the earliest recorded date is 1920. They note
there is no evidence that this song has ever circulated
in tradition. $30.00

2213.   GRAY, W. B. D. The Hold-Up in Jericho Canyon, by
Rev. Superintendent Congregational Missions in Wyoming,
and Used in His Illustrated Missionary Address “Cowboy
Life on the Range.” N.p., n.d. [4] pp. 16mo, leaflet.
Fine.
    First edition. A version of the Biblical Good
Samaritan story set in the West with a cowboy as the
hero.   $30.00

2214.   GRAY, W. B. D. How Bill and the Preacher Got in
Their Work: A Frontier Mission Study.... [wrapper
title]. N.p., n.d. [early 1900s]. [11] pp., full-page
photographic text illustrations. 12mo, original brown
printed wrappers, stapled. Slightly darkened along front
edges of wrapper, otherwise a fine copy.
    First edition. This little pamphlet is another in
Gray’s ephemeral series relating to incidents in early
mission work in Wyoming, in this case the story of the
founding of the Congregational Church in Black Canyon
City. One of the photos shows Babcock Ranch. $125.00
2215.   GRAY, W. H. A History of Oregon, 1792-1849,
Drawn    from    Personal    Observation    and    Authentic
Information.... Published by the Author for Subscribers.
Portland: Harris & Holman; San Francisco: H. H. Bancroft
& Co.; New York: American News Company, 1870. 624 pp.,
wood-engraved frontispiece of Astoria in 1811. 8vo,
contemporary three-quarter dark green sheep over marbled
boards, spine gilt with raised bands, marbled endpapers,
t.e.g.. Binding lightly rubbed (especially at corners),
overall a fine copy, with yellow errata slip after page
624.
    First edition, first issue, with one errata slip.
Bradford    1965.    Braislin   487.    Eberstadt,     Modern
Narratives of the Plains and the Rockies 194. Graff
1630. Howell 32, Oregon 119. Howes G342: “Undependable
and biased, but, as the product of a pioneer of 1838,
cannot be ignored.”
    Mattes, Platte River Road Narratives 29: “Gray was
the ‘secular agent’ for the Oregon-bound party of
Presbyterian missionaries comprised of Marcus Whitman
and H. H. Spalding, with their wives Narcissa and Eliza,
who   were   the   ‘first   white   women   to  cross     the
continent.’.... At the annual trappers’ rendezvous on
Green River the missionaries were alarmed, but not
harmed by the noisy antics of Indians and trappers....
With nobility, white and dark ruffians, red savages,
preachers, and refined white women, this 1836 expedition
was surely one of the strangest juxtapositions in
American history.” Norris 2940. Sabin 28416. Smith 3756.
Tweney, Washington 89 #24.
    Gray includes a chapter on the 1837 cattle drive
from California to Oregon, Hudson’s Bay cattle monopoly,
and Jesse Applegate and other early ranchers.        $250.00

2216.   GRAY, W. H. A History of Oregon.... Portland,
Oregon: Harris & Holman, etc. 1870. 624 pp., wood-
engraved frontispiece of Astoria in 1811. 8vo, original
black textured cloth. Tips rubbed and spine ends lightly
chipped, cover lightly discolored, lower hinge a bit
weak, otherwise a fine copy, contemporary ink ownership
inscription of D. R. Campbell of Astoria, Oregon. Errata
slip at page 624 removed.
    First    edition,    issue   undetermined,    errors
uncorrected. Howes states the black cloth copies were
second issue. $200.00

2217.   [GRAZING RIGHTS]. How Not to Be Cowed. Livestock
Grazing on the Public Lands: An Owner’s Manual. [Salt
Lake City: Natural Resources Defense Council & Southern
Utah Wilderness Alliance, 1991]. [6] 70 pp. 8vo,
original brown pictorial wrappers. Light wear, but
generally fine.
    First edition. The first of a series of four manuals
intended to inform environmentalists and other users on
the process by which the Bureau of Land Management makes
decisions on the use of public lands and how to
influence those decisions. This pamphlet covers the
subject of the impact posed by cattle grazing on public
lands. $15.00

2218.   GREATOREX, Eliza. Summer Etchings in Colorado.
New York: G. P. Putnam, [1873]. [2] 4 [3] 6-96 pp., 21
plates of Colorado scenery after author’s etchings
(including frontispiece), tissue guards. 4to, original
brown pebble cloth, upper cover with title in black and
gilt pictorial illustrations, bevelled edges, a.e.g.
Binding slightly rubbed and worn, front hinge starting,
otherwise fine. Contemporary ink gift inscription to
Mrs. J. Milton Turner, October 5, 1875.
    First edition. Henkle 1156. Wilcox, p. 51. Wynar
2039. The author describes her excursion from Omaha to
Colorado, where she spent the summer interviewing
pioneers and etching. She was one of the first artists
to paint in Colorado Springs. The last few chapters
include information on ranching in Colorado and the
author’s visits to Thornton’s Ranch, Bergun Park, and
Col. Kittredge’s Ranch. Greatorex interviewed Holt,
whose ranch in Gunnison County was one of the largest
ranches in the territory. Essayist and poet Grace
Greenwood (pseudonym of Sara Jane Lippincott) wrote the
introduction.
    Greatorex (1819-1897), an Irish native who moved to
New York in 1840, turned to supporting herself by
teaching art and selling her own art work, at which she
was highly successful. Although she traveled widely in
the United States and Europe, this is apparently the
product of her only trip to the United States. See
Notable American Women.   $150.00

2219.   GREATOREX, Eliza. Summer Etchings in Colorado.
New York: G. P. Putnam, [1873]. Another copy, variant
binding. 4to, original green pebble cloth, upper cover
with title in black and gilt pictorial illustrations,
bevelled edges, a.e.g. Cover lightly worn and stained,
text lightly water-stained at lower blank margins,
overall a good copy. Contemporary ownership signature of
William Bremen dated at Greely, Colorado, in 1907.
    $75.00

                      Ben K. Green
“Ben King (Doc) Green (1912-1974), writer, rancher, and
veterinarian, son of David Hugh and Bird (King) Green,
was born on March 5, 1912, in Cumby, Hopkins County,
Texas. He moved with his family to Weatherford and
attended high school there. He ran for a seat in the
Texas legislature when he was about twenty-three years
old, led the ticket in the primary, but lost in the
runoff. As a boy Green fell in love with horses, and the
love affair never ended. He bred horses and lived the
life of a cowboy for most of his life, although he
traveled widely outside Texas and the United States. At
one time or another he both claimed and denied that he
attended Texas A&M, Cornell University, and the Royal
College of Veterinary Medicine in England, but most of
his expert knowledge about animals came from experience.
He began writing rather late in life, and it was a
memorable moment when he met Alfred A. Knopf, the New
York publisher, and told the international sophisticate
more than he wanted to know about horses and cows and
people. The result was that Knopf published Horse
Tradin’ (1967), Wild Cow Tales (1969), The Village Horse
Doctor (1971), and Some More Horse Tradin’ (1972), each
a strong seller. The books were immediately hailed by
critics, and Horse Tradin’ has been cited as a classic
of Western Americana. In 1973 Green received the Writers
Award for contributions to Western literature from the
Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City. He also received a
career award from the Texas Institute of Letters for his
unique contribution to Texas literature.
    “Green wrote all of his books the way he operated
best. He talked them, telling stories to a tape recorder
and to his secretary. He wrote from his own experiences
as a rancher, horse and steer trader, wild horse hunter,
and horse doctor. He owned the only registered herd of
Devon cattle in Texas and supported it on his farm in
Cumby, where he also raised Percheron and quarter
horses. He was in high demand on the lecture circuit.
    “He published eleven books between 1967 and 1974.
His last, The Color of Horses (1974), was the product of
his arduous research through the years on the hide and
hair of horses to determine what made color. Although
the book is controversial in content, Green considered
it his most worthwhile contribution, and he saw it come
off the presses shortly before he died of heart failure
while sitting in his car on a roadside in northwest
Kansas on October 5, 1974. Green was buried in a 100-
square-foot knoll in the cemetery at Cumby. He thus made
good his oft-repeated saying, “`I never let myself be
crowded in life, and by God, ain’t nobody gonna close in
on me when I’m dead!’”—Joe B. Frantz (Handbook of Texas
Online: Ben King Green)

2220.   GREEN, Ben K. Ben Green Tales. Flagstaff:
Northland Press, 1974. [10] 57 + [6] 79 + [6] 59 + [6]
51 pp., text illustrations by Joe Beeler, James Boren,
John Hampton, and William Moyers. 4 vols., narrow 8vo,
original green, yellow, blue, and orange cloth, gilt-
lettered spines and upper covers. Publisher’s black
cloth slipcase with printed label. Mint, signed by
Green, Moyers, Hampton, and Boren.
    First edition, limited edition (#598 of 1,250 sets
signed by author). Four tales by the great storyteller
Ben Green. 1. When I Was Just a Colt: Illustrated by
William   Moyers.   2.   Up   Fool’s  Hill    Ahorseback:
Illustrated by John Hampton. 3. Beauty: Illustrated by
Joe Beeler. 4. How Come I Wrote a Book: Illustrated by
James Boren. Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators
(Beeler 47). Wilson 22.
    Rancher, writer, and erstwhile veterinarian Green in
this series of stories touches on several interesting
incidents in his own life, including his experiences
with a schoolmate named Trouble and with his favorite
horse named Beauty, which often came to his rescue in
various cowboy adventures. Volume 4, however, is of more
intellectual interest, in the history of Texas letters
because it covers Green’s famous on-air run-in with
Barbara Walters over his reference to Blacks.     $500.00

2221.   GREEN,  Ben.   Ben   Green   Tales.  Flagstaff:
Northland Press, 1974. Another set (#96 of 1,250 sets),
not signed by Moyers, Hampton, and Boren. Very fine in
publisher’s slipcase. $250.00

2222.   GREEN,  Ben  K.   The   Color  of   Horses:  The
Scientific and Authoritative Identification of the Color
of the Horse. [Flagstaff]: Northland Press, [1974]. vi
[2] 127 pp., color illustrations by Darol Dickinson.
4to, original green cloth gilt lettered on spine and
Green’s gilt logo in gilt on upper right corner of upper
cover. Fine copy in d.j. with two tears (no losses) and
light chipping to spine extremities. Carl Hertzog’s copy
with his bookplate.
    First trade edition. Dykes, Western High Spots, p.
64 (“High Spots of Western Illustrating” #175): “A
serious study handsomely illustrated with thirty-four
full-color plates by Darol Dickinson.” Wilson 24. The
first   definitive  work  on   the identification and
formation of horse color. $300.00

2223.   GREEN,  Ben   K.   Horse   Conformation   as  to
Soundness-Performance-Ability,   and   Hoss   Trades  of
Yesteryear [cover title]. Cumby: Published by author,
1963. [2] 141 pp., text illustrations (photographs and
sketches). (No title page, as issued.) 8vo, original
black cloth. Very fine in d.j. Carl Hertzog’s bookplate.
Ink note on front flyleaf.
    First edition of author’s first book. Wilson 3:
“Green stored the unsold copies of his jewel in the
chicken house of his ‘batchin’ shack’ in Cumby, where,
like the unsold copies of The Tally Book, they lay
watersoaked and moulding for several years. Thus, copies
in good to fine condition, with dust jackets, are very
scarce.” This book includes a collected edition of
Green’s articles on the structure and function of the
horse. The articles were published serially in The Tally
Book from 1960-62. Also included is Hoss Trades.
    A. C. Greene & His Library: “Some indication of what
Ben thought about his bibliographical future can be
noted on the spine of this little volume—which Ben
presented to me with great assurances of its present and
future value. Even in 1963, before Horse Tradin’ had
made him famous, he had printed on the spine: `First
edition.’” $600.00

2224.   GREEN, Ben K. Horse Conformation. [Greenville:
Published by the author], 1969. 72 pp., numerous
illustrations. 8vo, original white wrappers printed in
black and blue, reproduction of Tom Lea illustration on
upper wrap and photograph of Green on back wrap. Very
fine. Signed by author and with his manuscript
corrections to illustration captions on p. 5.
    First edition, wrappers issue. Wilson 9A. The
articles were published serially in The Tally Book from
1960-62. This   edition   does   not   include   Hoss   Trades.
    $175.00

2225.   GREEN, Ben K. Horse Conformation. [Greenville:
Published by the author], 1969 [i.e., 1972]. 74 pp.,
illustrations. 8vo, original grey wrappers printed in
black and blue, reproduction of Tom Lea illustration on
upper wrap and photograph of Green on back wrap. Very
fine. Carl Hertzog’s copy, with his bookplate.
    Third printing, with a few corrections and an added
leaf end. Wilson 9B.   $40.00

2226.   GREEN, Ben K. Horse Tradin’. New York: Knopf,
1967. xiv, 304 [2] pp., frontispiece and illustrations
by Lorence Bjorklund. 8vo, original cream pictorial
cloth over blindstamped black cloth. Binding moderately
foxed along spine, otherwise fine in very fine d.j.
    First    edition.  Dykes,    Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Bjorklund 53). Greene, The Fifty Best
Books on Texas, p. 85. Wilson 7. Authentic stories of
the range and the chicanery of western horse trading.
    A. C. Greene & His Library: “This was Ben Green’s
great first national publication. Neither Ben nor the
publisher ever looked back after this. And the stories
are superb. Frank Dobie, whom Ben despised, and I’m
told, vice versa (possibly both attitudes tainted a bit
with jealousy)—a not unusual Texas-writer reaction to
Dobie—never could quite capture the realism Ben Green
seemed inherently to possess. Dobie, if, indeed, this
was his feeling for Ben, was not alone.”
    “There was a deviousness about Ben that shone
through. One West Texas rancher told me, `It was his
beady eyes.’ Another ranch story involved Ben and a
young rancher who bought a stud horse together but Ben
took over completely and the young rancher found out
little if anything about their mutual investment. One
day Ben was driving along and saw the young rancher
pulling a horse trailer with ‘their’ stud aboard. Ben
turned around his pickup and stopped his partner, asking
where he was going with `our’ horse. The young man said,
`Well, he’s pretty worthless to me, so I going to shoot
my half and sell it for dog food.’”  $75.00

2227.   GREEN, Ben K. Horse Tradin’. New York: Knopf,
1968. xiv, 304 [2] pp., frontispiece and illustrations
by Lorence Bjorklund. 8vo, original cream pictorial
cloth over blindstamped black cloth. Endpapers lightly
foxed, otherwise very fine in very fine d.j. Signed by
author on front free endpaper.
    Fourth printing.   $35.00

2228.   GREEN, Ben K. The Last Trail Drive through
Downtown Dallas. Flagstaff: Northland Press, [1971]. [6]
73 [1] pp., text illustrations by Joe Beeler. Oblong
4to, original half red linen over brown buckram. Very
fine in fine d.j.
    First edition. Dobie & Dykes, 44 & 44 #50. Dykes,
Collecting Range Life Literature, p. 15; Fifty Great
Western Illustrators (Beeler 41); Western High Spots, p.
64   (“High   Spots  of  Western   Illustrating”  #174):
“Delightful tale.” Reese, Six Score 49: “The story of
the author’s early venture as a horse trader, driving a
herd of horses from West Texas to Bossier City, La.,
selling along the way.” Wilson 16A.   $100.00

2229.   GREEN, Ben K. The Shield Mares. Austin: Encino
Press, 1967. vii [1] 47 [1] pp., brands. 8vo, original
ecru decorative boards with shield on upper cover and
Green’s logo on lower cover. Very fine in publisher’s
slipcase.
    Limited edition (#373 of 750 copies, signed by
author). A. C. Greene & His Library: “Shield Mares—I’ve
always considered this Ben Green’s best story. Bill
Wittliff in 1967 asked me if I would write the
introduction to this. He did it as a small book. I was
more than happy to write the introduction, even though I
had only met Ben Green recently. I had met Bill and
Sally Wittliff only once. I sat beside the Clear Fork
River near the old town of Eliasville while my children
played while the water rushed over the dam. I sat in the
car and read my notes for the introduction. This was the
beginning of long association with Bill Wittliff and the
Encino Press.” Whaley, Wittliff 22. Wilson 8.    $400.00

2230.   GREEN, Ben K. Some More Horse Tradin’. New York:
Knopf, 1972. [6] 255 [4] pp., frontispiece and text
illustrations by Joe Beeler. 8vo, original green
pictorial cloth gilt. One corner bumped, otherwise very
fine in very lightly worn but fine d.j.
    First edition, first issue (green cloth and misprint
on 11th line from bottom p. 11 “wouln’t” instead of
“wouldn’t”), first issue d.j. (dated 9/72 on back flap).
Dykes, Fifty Great Western Illustrators (Beeler 46).
Wilson 18: “I confess that should I be forced, under
duress of gunpoint or hurricane, to choose only one of
Green’s books to be marooned with on a deserted island,
I should select Some More Horse Tradin’. Besides
containing a reprinting of The Shield Mares, which many
critics and readers consider his masterpiece, [it
contains several] close runner-ups.” $50.00

2231.   GREEN, Ben K. A Thousand Miles of Mustangin’.
Flagstaff: Northland Press, [1972]. [6] 145 [1] pp.,
frontispiece and illustrations by Joe Beeler. Large 8vo,
original light brown pictorial cloth gilt. Very fine in
very fine d.j. Signed by author.
    First edition, trade issue, with the reading “if I
he” on page 130, line 11. Dykes, Fifty Great Western
Illustrators (Beeler 44). Wilson 17A: “Many Green
aficionados, including myself, regard Mustangin’ as his
most entertaining book, and in some respects his most
self-revealing. Green recounts his adventures as a solo
hunter of wild mustangs in what was at that time (the
1930s) the wilderness country of the Texas Big Bend and
the mountains of northern Mexico.”
    A. C. Greene & His Library: “I met Ben Green when
Angus Cameron, the Knopf editor who became editor for
both Ben Green and A. C. Greene, called me to ask if Ben
and I were kin. I never did know if we were, although I
doubt it; Ben’s Green branch was in Texas much earlier
than mine. The town of Greenville in North Texas was
named for his people. Ben, as devious and tricky as he
could be, was always straightforward with me and I think
I got to know him, as far as Ben Green, the writer, was
concerned, as well as anybody. I loved his brashness and
respected the experiences that entitled him to be brash.
Ben was a conservative man with a buck and with his
work. One night he called me from Cumby, his first and
last home, and said, ‘Greenie (he never tolerated the E
on the end of my name), you got a contract with K-nopp
(his pronunciation of the publishing company); when it
says 85,000 words, does that include the Introduction?’
I said I supposed it did, if he wanted to take the
trouble to do a word count. ‘Damn right, I do. I ain’t
givin’ them one more word than they’ve contracted for.
There’s 1,295 words in my Introduction so I’m cuttin’
out that many in the text.’” $200.00

2232.   GREEN, Ben K. A Thousand Miles of Mustangin’.
Flagstaff: Northland Press, [1972]. Another copy. Not
signed by author. Very fine in very fine d.j. $100.00

2233.   GREEN, Ben K. The Village Horse Doctor West of
the Pecos. New York: Knopf, 1971. [8] 306 [2] pp.,
frontispiece and full-page text illustrations by Lorence
Bjorklund. 8vo, original beige pictorial linen. Very
fine in d.j. Signed by author.
    First    edition.  Dykes,    Fifty   Great   Western
Illustrators (Bjorklund 58). Wilson 84.
    A. C. Greene & His Library: “During World War II,
when all the younger veterinarians were called into
service, Ben was given a U.S. government certificate to
practice veterinary medicine and this book is the result
of those years west of the Pecos. (Incidentally, Ben
once told me he hated what he called ‘small animals.’ I
don’t think he hated the small animals so much as their
owners. He worked only with large animals, he said.)”
    $150.00

2234.   GREEN, Ben K. The Village Horse Doctor.... New
York: Knopf, 1971. Another copy. Light shelf wear,
otherwise a fine copy, d.j. not present. $25.00

2235.   GREEN, Ben K. Wild Cow Tales. New York: Knopf,
1969. [6] 306 [2] pp., frontispiece and illustrations by
Lorence Bjorklund. 8vo, original blindstamped brown
cloth, spine gilt-lettered. Very fine in price-clipped
d.j. Signed by author. Typed index card laid in: “4-11-
69—10:25 am Mr. D: Just in case you did not get one of
the enclosed signed copies accept this one with my
compliments for your personal library. ERW.”
    First trade edition. Dykes, Fifty Great Western
Illustrators (Bjorklund 55). Reese, Six Score 50: “Dr.
Green mostly wrote about horses, but could do just as
well with cows, as this book proves.” Wilson 11A: “Green
demonstrates   an   encyclopedic   and   very  practical
knowledge of cow psychology, which he puts to good use
in a number of difficult situations.” $125.00

2236.   [GREEN, BEN K.]. WILSON, Robert A. (comp.). Ben
K. Green: A Descriptive Bibliography of Writings by and
about Him. Flagstaff: Northland Press, 1977. [8] xix [1]
151 [1] pp., illustrations. 8vo, original black cloth
over grey cloth. Very fine in publisher’s red board
slipcase. Author’s inscribed presentation inscription to
Carl   Hertzog   and   with   his   bookplate.   Related
newsclipping laid in.
    First edition, limited edition (#15 of 100 signed
copies). The limited edition includes a previously
unpublished story by Green.   $250.00

2237.   [GREEN, BEN K.]. WILSON, Robert A. (comp.). Ben
K. Green: A Descriptive Bibliography.... Flagstaff:
Northland Press, 1977. xix [1] 158 [1] pp., frontispiece
portrait, photographs. 8vo, original grey cloth. Very
fine in d.j. Author’s signed presentation copy to Carl
Hertzog, with his inscription indicating that this copy
was sent to Hertzog practically straight from the
bindery. Hertzog bookplate.
    First edition, trade issue.  $100.00

2238.   GREEN, Paul. Texas: A Musical Romance of
Panhandle History. Palo Duro Canyon State Park: The
Texas Panhandle Heritage Foundation & The West Texas
State University, 1970. [54] pp., color photographic
text illustrations by Ben Carlton Mead. 4to, original
multicolor illustrated wrappers by Mead. Very fine, with
related program laid in.
    First   printing.   Souvenir  program   of   musical
performed outdoors yearly at Palo Duro Canyon State
Park, naturally including depictions of range and cowboy
life at the time of the story. This dramatic spectacle
work is the work of Pulitzer-Prize winner Paul Green.
The play is now the Official Play of the State of Texas.
    $30.00

2239.   GREEN, Rena Maverick. “Mavericks”: Authentic
Account of the Term “Maverick” As Applied to Unbranded
Cattle. [San Antonio: Artes Graficas, 1937]. 13 [1] pp.
12mo, original brown printed wrappers with brand,
stapled. Very fine. Scarce.
    First separate issue. Herd 921: “Scarce.... These
articles originally appeared in the St. Louis Republic,
November, 1889.” Authentic account of the origin of the
word “maverick” as applied to unbranded cattle, along
with a short biographical sketch of Samuel A. Maverick
(see Handbook of Texas: Samuel Augustus Maverick).
    $100.00

2240.   GREEN, Rena Maverick (ed.). Samuel Maverick,
Texan, 1803-1870: A Collection of Letters, Journals, and
Memoirs. San Antonio: [Privately printed], 1952. xix [1]
430 pp., frontispiece portrait, plates. 8vo, original
navy blue cloth. Very fine in sunned fine d.j. Signed by
editor Rena Maverick Green.
    First edition. Basic Texas Books 140B (citing the
Memoirs of Mary A. Maverick). Herd 922: “Through Mr.
Maverick’s   correspondence  we   learn   of  his  brief
experience as a cattleman and the true origin of
‘maverick’ as a cattle term.” Tate, Indians of Texas
2090: “Includes several descriptions of Texas Ranger
activities (especially by Jack Hays) against Indian
raiding    parties   during  the    1840s.”   This  work
incorporates the memoirs of Mary Maverick and much
correspondence between Mary and Samuel, including
accounts of the Tilton Ranch purchase.    $75.00

2241.   GREEN, Rena Maverick (ed.). Samuel Maverick,
Texan, 1803-1870.... San Antonio: [Privately printed],
1952. Another copy. Very fine in near fine d.j. (spine
slightly sunned). $75.00

2242.   GREENBURG, D[an] W. (ed. and comp.). Greenburg’s
Gazeteer 1:1 (June, 1928). Casper, Wyoming: Western
Recreations Company, 1928. 64 pp., text illustrations
(mostly photographic), map, ads. 12mo, original orange
pictorial wrappers, stapled Other than light foxing,
very fine.
    First edition. Typical tourist flackery with some
information on ranching possibilities.   $150.00

2243.   GREENBURG, Dan W. Sixty Years: A Brief Review.
The Cattle Industry in Wyoming. Its Organization and
Present Status and Data Concerning the Wyoming Stock
Growers Association.... Cheyenne: Wyoming Stock Growers
Association, 1932. 73 pp., text illustrations (mostly
photographic, some full-page), facsimile. 8vo, original
beige and brown pictorial wrappers, stapled, with
illustration by Will James. Light shelf wear, otherwise
fine.
    First edition. Herd 923: “Scarce.... This is the
first of three histories written about the Wyoming Stock
Growers’ Association. Others have followed every ten
years.” Howes G375. Malone, Wyomingiana, p. 4. For the
other two histories in this series, see listings under
Frink and Gress in this catalogue.  $500.00

2244.   GREENBURG, Dan W. Sixty Years.... Cheyenne:
Wyoming Stock Growers Association, 1932. Another copy.
Ink stamp of publisher noting copyright of 1933,
otherwise very fine.  $500.00

2245.   GREENBURG, Dan W. Sixty Years.... Cheyenne:
Wyoming Stock Growers Association, 1932. Another copy.
Wrappers soiled and worn with some chipping, text
separated from wrappers, rust stains where formerly
stapled, some ink underlining in text, overall pretty
rough, with J. Frank Dobie’s ink ownership inscription.
    $400.00

2246.   GREENE, A. C. The Fifty Best Books on Texas.
Dallas: Pressworks Publishing, 1981. [10] 90 [1] pp.,
full-page text illustrations. 8vo, original cream cloth
over beige printed boards. Very fine. Carl Hertzog’s
copy, with his bookplate.
    First edition, limited edition (226 copies, this
being Copy “A”—one of the 26 copies not for sale).
Designed and printed by David Holman at the Wind River
Press. Some of the titles relate to Ranching, and A. C.
Greene’s notes are always enlightening. $300.00

2247.   GREENE, A. C. The Fifty Best Books on Texas.
Dallas: Pressworks, 1982. [8] 90 [1] pp., full-page text
illustrations. 8vo, original dark yellow pictorial
wrappers. Spine sunned.
    Second edition.    $20.00

2248.   GREENE, A. C. A Personal Country. New York:
Knopf, 1969. [12] 328 [5] pp., illustrated by Ancel
Nunn. 8vo, original beige pictorial cloth. Fine in
slightly worn but very good d.j. Carl Hertzog’s copy,
with his bookplate.
    First edition of author’s first book. Greene, The
Fifty Best Books on Texas, p. 89 (from afterword by Bill
Porterfield): “This odyssey of West Texas is a
classic.... If the list of best Texas books were reduced
to but ten, [it] would still make the cut.” In this
great book of recollections of growing up in West Texas
in the 1920s and 1930s, the noted Texas essayist, book
critic, and newspaperman, notes of his subject, “This is
ranching country.” $35.00

2249.   GREENE, Max. The Kanzas Region: Forest, Prairie,
Desert, Mountain, Vale, and River. Incidents of Travel
on the Western Plains and in the Rocky Mountains, with a
History of the Santa Fe Trade. New York: Fowler & Wells,
1856. 192 [12, ads] pp., 2 maps. 12mo, original dark
green embossed cloth, spine gilt lettered. Spine
extremities mildly worn and chipped, cloth lightly worn
and faded, front and rear free endpapers missing,
overall very good, contem