Helping Veterans Secure Employment

Document Sample
Helping Veterans Secure Employment Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                                       October 2011 
                                                                                                         
 
 
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PARTNERSHIP FOR THE ARRA HIGH GROWTH AND EMERGING INDUSTRY GRANTEES 

                             Helping Veterans Secure Employment 
 
Background 
Veterans as a whole perform well after leaving service, but some groups of veterans confront challenges when 
transitioning from the military to the civilian workforce. These challenges may include a lack of employable skills, 
emotional and physical disabilities, and homelessness. For example, Gulf War II veterans (those who served 
September 2001 to present) experience a higher unemployment rate than non‐veterans, meaning there are 
more Gulf War II veterans looking for work compared to the non‐veteran population.1  This differs from the total 
veteran population, which is more likely to be employed than their civilian counterparts2 and tends to have a 
higher level of educational attainment than the non‐veteran population. The combined resources of several 
agencies and programs can help veterans overcome service‐related barriers to securing and maintaining 
employment after deployment. 
 
Resources 
There are many resources that veterans, training providers, and employers can use to help a veteran 
successfully transition from military to the civilian labor force.  Major government providers of services aimed 
towards helping veterans include: Veterans’ Employment and Training Services (VETS), the U.S. Department of 
Veterans Affairs (VA), Local Veterans’ Employment Representative Program (LVER), Disabled Veterans Outreach 
Program (DVOP), and One‐Stop Career Centers.   
 
New Federal Initiatives Will Help Create Jobs for Veterans  
There are several new federal initiatives grantees should be aware of that have the goal of helping create jobs 
for veterans. These efforts are focused on increasing hiring in the health and logistics fields. For more 
information on these new initiatives from the White House, please visit the following fact sheet:  
http://m.whitehouse.gov/the‐press‐office/2011/10/25/fact‐sheet‐we‐cant‐wait‐obama‐administrations‐new‐
initiatives‐help‐creat  
      Community Health Center Veterans Hiring Challenge: This initiative has a goal of hiring 8,000 veterans 
         over the next three years. The Departments of Health and Human Services, Defense, Labor, and 
         Veterans Affairs, together with the National Association of Community Health Centers, will work to 
         connect veterans to job openings in health clinics. HHS will also implement a new program that will ask 
         health centers to report the number of veterans that they employ.  
      Helping Veterans Become Physician Assistants: This initiative will fast‐track medics into jobs in 
         community health centers and other parts of the health care system. The Health Resources and Services 
         Administration (HRSA) will prioritize physician assistant grants for universities and colleges that help 
         train veterans for careers as physician assistants. To increase the number of training programs that 
         accommodate veterans, the Administration will also identify model programs that offer expedited 
         curricula and specialized recruiting, retention, and mentoring services for veterans.  
      Hiring in the Logistics Field: First Lady Michelle Obama recently announced that the American Logistics 
         Association (ALA) and their 270 affiliate companies are committed to hiring 25,000 veterans and military 
         spouses by the end of 2013. The American Logistics Association (ALA) is a non‐profit trade association 
         dedicated to promoting, protecting and enhancing Total Quality of Life Benefits for active duty, retired, 
         and reserve military personnel and their families.  
 
HELPING VETERANS SECURE EMPLOYMENT – FACT SHEET  –  OCTOBER 2011 


Employment Support Services – General Veteran Population 
       Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVERs) are state employees located in state employment 
        service local offices to provide assistance to veterans. They provide counseling, testing, and identifying 
        training and employment opportunities to veterans. They are funded by VETS through the U.S. 
        Department of Labor (DOL). (http://www.dol.gov/vets/aboutvets/contacts/main.htm)  
       CareerOneStop: Connects veterans and transitioning service members with high quality career planning, 
        training, and job search resources available at local One‐Stop Career Centers. 
        (http://www.careeronestop.org/militarytransition/) 
 
Employment Support Services in Limited Locations 
       Transition Assistance Program (TAP) is provided by the U.S. Departments of Labor, Defense, Homeland 
        Security, and Veterans Affairs to assist veterans during their transition to the civilian labor market. TAP 
        consists of comprehensive three‐day workshops at selected military installations nationwide. Workshop 
        attendees learn about job searches, career decision‐making, current occupational and labor market 
        conditions, and resume and cover letter preparation and interviewing techniques. Participants also are 
        provided with an evaluation of their employability relative to the job market and receive information on 
        the most current veterans’ benefits. (http://www.dol.gov/vets/programs/tap/main.htm) 
       Job Corps Demonstration Project: Provides career development services for 20‐24 year old veterans 
        transitioning from military to civilian careers. The program is provided by DOL VETS. It is a one‐year 
        demonstration project in three locations. Job Corps teaches academic, vocational, employability skills 
        and social competencies through a combination of classroom, practical and on‐base learning 
        experiences. At the end of the program participants will obtain a credential or certificate certifying them 
        in a trade. Job Corps provides post‐graduate support including assistance with job searching, resume 
        drafting, and job interviewing skills. In addition, Job Corps will provide transition services for up to 21 
        months after graduation, including assistance with housing, transportation and other support services. 
        (http://www.dol.gov/vets/jc‐info.htm) 
 
Employment Support Services – Wounded, Injured or Disabled Veterans 
       REALifelines is a program sponsored by DOL VETS to provide one‐on‐one assistance to wounded and 
        injured veterans that will lead to their economic recovery and reemployment. Services are offered at 
        DOL One‐Stop locations nationwide. (http://www.dol.gov/vets/REALifelines/index.htm) 
       Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists develop job and training opportunities for 
        veterans, with special emphasis on veterans with service‐connected disabilities. They provide outreach 
        and offer assistance to disabled and other veterans by promoting community and employer support for 
        employment and training opportunities, including apprenticeship and on‐the‐job training. DVOP 
        specialists serve as case managers for veterans enrolled in federally‐funded job training programs and 
        other veterans with serious disadvantages in the job market. DVOP specialists are generally located in 
        state employment service offices. They are funded by VETS through DOL. 
        (http://www.dol.gov/vets/aboutvets/contacts/main.htm)  
 
Online Resources – For Veterans 
       U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA): Provides benefits and services to veterans of the United 
        States armed forces (depending on eligibility) and their families, including health care, financial 
        assistance (compensation, pension, survivor benefits, home loan guarantees, and life insurance 
        coverage), rehabilitation assistance, education assistance, and burial benefits. (http://www.va.gov/) 
       Veterans’ Employment & Training Service (VETS), part of the Department of Labor (DOL). The VETS 
        website provides information on transition services, employment services, and various programs 

                                                                                                           Page | 2 
HELPING VETERANS SECURE EMPLOYMENT – FACT SHEET  –  OCTOBER 2011 

        provided through this organization and others, and includes a list of VETS offices nationwide. 
        (http://www.dol.gov/vets/)  
       VetSuccess: The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) offers employment support for veterans 
        through VetSuccess. On the website, veterans are able to search for jobs; receive application, resume, 
        and interview tips; find resources in their local community; and explore other resources. 
        (http://vetsuccess.gov/home)  
       Military Occupational Classification (MOC) Crosswalk: The MOC crosswalk helps transitioning military 
        personnel locate equivalent civilian jobs. Veterans can enter their MOC into the search function to 
        locate civilian occupations requiring the same or similar skills as their previous job in the military. The 
        site allows matching of the MOC to the O*NET Standard Occupational Classification (O*NET‐SOC), as 
        well as review tasks, skills, activities, abilities, and wages associated with job titles. 
        (http://www.onetonline.org/crosswalk/MOC/) 
       Center for Veterans Enterprise: The VA supports veterans seeking entrepreneurship by implementing 
        and coordinating programs for veteran‐owned small businesses. (http://www.vetbiz.gov/)  
 
Online Resources – For Employers 
       Hiring Veterans Toolkit: In October 2010, DOL VETS released a toolkit to help employers hire veterans. 
        The America’s Heroes at Work: Hiring Veterans Toolkit is designed to simplify the hiring process and 
        provide resources, information and tools to employers and the workforce development community to 
        assist in hiring veterans living with Traumatic Brain Injury and Post‐Traumatic Stress Disorder. 
        (http://www.dol.gov/vets/documents/VeteransHiringToolkit.Presentation.pdf) 
 
Employers Hiring Veterans 
       Feds Hire Vets: The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) developed a government‐wide veteran 
        employment website to assist in the recruitment and employment of veterans. The site offers 
        information on how to apply for a Federal job plus veteran’s preference in job placement. The site also 
        provides key information for Federal employers when hiring a veteran. 
        (http://www.fedshirevets.gov/Index.aspx) 
       Veterans Enterprise: Provides an online database with links to employers that actively recruit veterans. 
        (http://www.veteransenterprise.com/careers.html) 
       Top 100 Military Friendly Employers in 2011: List of the top companies with a commitment to recruiting 
        and hiring veterans. (http://www.gijobs.com/2011Top100‐FullList.aspx) 
       DirectEmployers Association: A nonprofit association of global employers formed to provide an 
        employment network and resources on best practices and research. In April 2011, DirectEmployers 
        Association announced an online program for helping transitioning veterans and their families to locate 
        civilian employment opportunities. (http://www.directemployers.org/2011/04/05/americas‐top‐
        employers‐launch‐initiative‐to‐help‐match‐jobs‐with‐the‐unique‐skills‐veterans‐bring‐to‐the‐
        marketplace/) 
       Helmets to Hardhats: This program helps veterans transition into careers in the construction industry. 
        Helmets to Hardhats is a web‐based program that allows participants to create a profile and view 
        available career and training opportunities. In addition, regional directors and volunteers work with 
        veterans to identify which areas of trade are a good fit with their experiences and help connect veterans 
        with available opportunities. (http://helmetstohardhats.org/)  
       VetSuccess Jobs: A job search function within the VetSuccess website. (https://va‐
        csm.symplicity.com/students/index.php?signin_tab=0&js_disabled=0) 
       CareerOneStop Job Search: The website features links to a number of online job search engines 
        specifically for veterans. (http://www.careeronestop.org/militarytransition/findajob.aspx) 

                                                                                                             Page | 3 
HELPING VETERANS SECURE EMPLOYMENT – FACT SHEET  –  OCTOBER 2011 


Programs and Resources for Veterans with Special Needs 
        Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program (HVRP): Provides services to help homeless veterans 
         reintegrate into meaningful employment within the labor force. Available services include job 
         placement, training, job development, career counseling, and resume preparation. Additional 
         supportive services include referral to temporary, transitional, and permanent housing; referral to 
         medical and substance abuse treatment; and transportation assistance. 
         (http://www.dol.gov/vets/programs/fact/Homeless_veterans_fs04.htm)  
        Veterans Workforce Investment Program (VWIP): Provides workforce‐related services to support 
         veterans with service‐connected disabilities, veterans who have significant barriers to employment, 
         veterans who served on active duty in the armed forces during a war or in a campaign or expedition for 
         which a campaign badge has been authorized, and recently separated veterans. Services may include 
         formal classroom or on‐the‐job training, retraining, job placement assistance, and support services 
         including testing and counseling. (http://www.dol.gov/vets/programs/fact/vwip_fs05.htm)  
        Support for Incarcerated Veterans: The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans released a document 
         called “Planning For your Release: A Guide for Incarcerated Veterans,” through a grant from DOL VETS. 
         The guide outlines a variety of supportive services available to incarcerated veterans upon their release. 
         (http://www.dol.gov/vets/programs/hvrp/IncarceratedVeteransGuide6thedition.pdf)  
 
 
End Notes 
1
   Unemployment Rates of Veterans: 2000 to 2009. The National Center for Veterans Analysis and Statistics at the U.S. Department of 
           Veterans Affairs, October 2010. Web. 11 April 2011, 
           http://www.va.gov/vetdata/docs/SpecialReports/Unemployment_Rates_FINAL.pdf
2
   Black, Dan, Amer Hasan, Parvati Krishnamurty, and Julia Lane. “The Labor Market Outcomes of Young Veterans.” Page 1. NORC at the 
           University of Chicago, September 2008. Web. 11 April 2011, 
           http://www.dol.gov/vets/research/NORCIII_Final_September%202008%20(2).pdf 




                                                                                                                            Page | 4 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:2/12/2012
language:
pages:4