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					 STUDENT HANDBOOK

           Master of Arts
                in
            Psychology

       Theoretical Sequence




         Effective Date: October 2011




Division of Psychology and Counseling
         College of Education
      Governors State University
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                       Page 2 of 25




                                         WELCOME
Welcome to the Division of Psychology and Counseling at Governors State University. The
Psychology faculty has designed this handbook to provide an overview of the curriculum and to
answer many of your questions. While we have tried to be as comprehensive as possible, we
know that you may have additional questions or concerns about the curriculum. Should you be
unable to find the answer in this handbook to any question you have, feel free to check with the
Psychology Advisor, Maya Blackwell, the Program Coordinator, Dr. Albert Tuskenis, or the
Division Chairperson, Dr. Shannon Dermer.

A key factor in the successful completion of the degree requirements is planning. Not every
course is offered every semester. Courses may fill before you have the opportunity to register.
Planning is particularly important in completing your thesis. Although you will likely register for
thesis during the last semester in which you are completing coursework, completing the thesis
typically requires a minimum of one academic year. It is your responsibility to plan appropriately
and keep in close touch with the Psychology Advisor and your thesis advisor.

By providing you with a general education in the core psychology courses, this program is
designed to prepare you to continue your studies at the doctoral level. In addition to the
knowledge and skills necessary for you to become an effective researcher, the program
emphasizes the development of critical thinking and writing skills. In some of your courses you
will be asked to write critical evaluations of the existing scholarly literature, in others you will
write proposals for original research. These documents will be evaluated both for mastery of the
course content and for evidence of critical thinking and writing abilities. These critical thinking
and writing skills, in addition to preparing you to continue your graduate studies at the doctoral
level, prepare you for employment in work settings requiring these skills

We would like your graduate psychology experience at GSU to be a satisfying one. Please feel
free to share your thoughts and experiences with us. Again, welcome! We wish you success.



The Graduate Psychology Faculty
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                       Page 3 of 25


                                         INTRODUCTION
The intent of the Student Handbook is to compile policies and procedures that apply to the
Theoretical Sequence of the masters in psychology degree. For general university policies and
procedures, as well as course descriptions and registration information, please consult the
university Catalog and the University Student Handbook. The University Student Handbook is
referred to in the University Catalog and governs facets of your education other than curriculum..
Part of your responsibility as a student is to read this Graduate Psychology Theoretical Sequence
Handbook, the University Student Handbook, and the University Catalog. It will be assumed
that every student has read, and is familiar with, the contents of this Theoretical Sequence
Handbook. This Handbook does not replace the Governors State University Catalog. Graduate
students are expected to be familiar with the information in the Catalog, particularly the section
on General Academic Information. The University Catalog can be found on the Governors State
University web site at www.govst.edu/catalog/

Students are responsible for knowledge of, and adherence to, all university requirements and
regulations. Students are also responsible for knowing the degree requirements for their major
and enrolling in courses that meet those degree requirements. Students are strongly encouraged
to seek information and assistance from appropriate staff should they have any questions
regarding requirements or regulations.

Information about the graduate program, requirements, scheduling, and general advice on
successfully completing the graduate program is also presented each semester at a graduate
student orientation and roundtable discussion session. Students starting the program must attend
an orientation before enrolling in classes for the first time. Students beyond the first semester of
graduate study are also encouraged to attend the orientation and roundtable for updated
information and the chance to ask questions about the graduate program, class scheduling, and
related matters.

                       THEORETICAL PSYCHOLOGY SEQUENCE

The Theoretical Sequence in Psychology is designed to provide students with a strong theoretical
background in the traditional areas of psychology. The program also seeks to engender
sensitivity to cultural and individual differences. Students completing this sequence will be well-
prepared to pursue advanced graduate studies in psychology at the doctoral degree level. They
may find employment in research capacities (e.g., as data managers, research assistants, or
research project managers) in business, social service, and educational settings. Although
teaching opportunities are greater for persons with doctoral degrees in psychology, those with
master’s degrees may find opportunities to teach at the college level, typically as part-time
employees. With the addition of a secondary teaching certificate from another institution or
program, those with an M.A. in Psychology – Theoretical sequence may be eligible to teach in a
high school.

The M.A. in Psychology (Theoretical Sequence) does not provide training, preparation, or
credentials for a career or work in an applied area of psychology (e.g., clinical, counseling, or
school psychology). Students interested in working in an applied area of psychology should
consider applying to other graduate programs, such as the GSU M.A. in Psychology – Clinical
Sequence or graduate programs in related fields such as counseling and social work.
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                    Page 4 of 25



                   GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY IN THE DIVISION OF
                        PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELING

I. PROGRAM ADMISSION

Admission Requirements
In addition to the Governors State University graduate application and criteria, applicants will
submit program-specific materials for the M.A. in Psychology program. Information concerning
all admission criteria is available in the University Catalog and on the University website
www.govst.edu

In addition to meeting university admission criteria, applicants must:

   1. have completed with an overall G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher, no grade below “C’, and no more
      than two grades of “C”; undergraduate courses from a regionally accredited
      college/university that are comparable to Personality Theories (PSYC410), Cognitive
      Psychology (PSYC422), Abnormal Psychology (PSYC430), Social Psychology
      (PSYC445), Developmental Psychology (PSYC412), Research Methodology
      (PSYC560), and Statistics (STAT468). Please note, these courses are prerequisites and
      may not be used to fulfill degree requirements of the M.A. and may be taken at another
      institution;

   2. have earned a grade point average (G.P.A.) of at least 3.0 in the last 60 hours of
      undergraduate course work;

   3. have a combined score (Verbal and Quantitative) of at least 1050 on the Graduate Record
      Exam (GRE) General Test;

   4. demonstrate evidence of satisfactory professional writing and analysis by one of the
      following: a grade of “B” or higher in PSYC 400 (Thinking and Writing in Psychology)
      or its equivalent, or a score of 4.5 or greater on the Analytical Writing section of the
      General Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

   5. provide a statement of the applicant’s purpose in seeking a master’s degree in Psychology
      and long-term career goals (applicants should be aware that the faculty also evaluate this
      statement as a professional writing sample);

   6. provide three letters of recommendation from professionals who can speak to the
      applicant’s capabilities and potential for graduate-level research and academic work

   7. complete a “Statement of Character” Form available on the Admissions Office website at
      http://www.govst.edu/admissions/mapsycapplication.htm.
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                       Page 5 of 25

    Admission to the program is determined by program faculty. Program faculty reserves the
    right to request personal interviews with applicants to the program. Application packets
    must be received by March 15 for fall admission, and by October 15 for spring admission.

Conditional Admission
Applicants not meeting one of the above noted admission criteria are eligible to petition for
conditional admission to the program. Applicants choosing to petition should include a letter
with the supplementary admission materials. Faculty recommends the letter include discussion
of the factors contributing to the academic achievement and why those factors could be judged
by the faculty as successfully remediated. Faculty reserves the right to require additional
prerequisite coursework (for example, PSYC 400 or other undergraduate psychology courses) as
a condition of admission.



II. COLLEGE OF EDUCATION REGULATIONS
In addition to university regulations, the following regulations are in force in the College of
Education and Division of Psychology and Counseling.

A. Student Study Plan

Student study plans are developed with the Psychology Advisor before the end of the first
semester of enrollment. The Advisor will explain the degree program and, with the student,
develop a study plan that will lead to degree completion of the selected major and sequence. The
student study plan will detail the degree requirements for the major selected in effect at the time
of admission as a degree-seeking student. It will specify the maximum amount of transfer credit,
the total credit-hour requirement for the degree, the required and elective courses, and the
maximum number of credit hours and/or courses that can be completed through another
institution and applied toward the degree.

An administrative hold will prevent you from registering until you have developed a study plan.
The hold will be removed by the Psychology Advisor upon completion of the study plan. One
copy will be kept on file by the Psychology Advisor; the other copy will be delivered to the
student. Changes in the student study plan must be handled by the Psychology Advisor. You
should bring a copy of your study plan to all meetings with the Advisor. Students choosing to
take a course not specified in their study plan may find that such credit may not apply toward the
degree requirements. Students are encouraged to contact faculty members in specific discipline
areas in which they have interests for additional academic advisement.

The study plan must be reviewed and updated whenever a student:

       1. applies for acceptance of transfer credit earned from another institution after
          enrollment at Governors State University;

       2. wishes to substitute course work specified on the plan;

       3. is readmitted.
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                       Page 6 of 25

B. Independent Study

Independent study enables a student to pursue individual research and reading in a field of
special interest under the guidance of a faculty member. A written proposal for an independent
study, planned and developed by the student, must be approved by the Division Chairperson in
consultation with the faculty sponsor prior to listing the independent study in the registration
system. Independent study credit may be used to meet elective credit only, and shall not be used
as a substitute for courses specified in the student study plan except in unusual circumstances. A
maximum of six graduate credit-hours of independent study may be applied to degree
requirements. A student may enroll for a maximum of three credit-hours of independent study in
any one semester.

III. DIVISION PROCEDURES FOR TRANSFER OF CREDIT OR WAIVER OF
REQUIREMENTS
You must apply for transfer credit through the Psychology Advisor at the time you develop your
initial study plan. To obtain transfer credit, you must produce an official transcript indicating the
institution you attended, the course, and the grade earned. In addition, you must provide a
detailed description of the course content (e.g., the syllabus). The Advisor and the faculty
member who usually teaches the course at GSU must approve the request. The dean of the
college or an appointed designee will make the final decision. Transfer credits will only be
awarded for courses in which you earned a grade of “B” or better. Please refer to the University
Catalog for additional rules regarding transfer of prior credits. The transfer credit will appear in
your Study Plan. You may also request a waiver of a particular requirement based upon previous
graduate work. A waiver does not reduce the number of credit hours you need to obtain the
degree. It may allow you to substitute an elective for a required course. You must initiate the
request for a waiver with the Psychology Advisor. The waiver will be granted if the advisor, the
professor who usually teaches the course in question, and the chairperson approve the request.

IV. GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES
Occasionally you may have a complaint about a faculty member serious enough to invoke either
a college or university grievance procedure. Often such complaints result from a failure of
communication on one or both sides or from a simple misunderstanding. The faculty in the
Division of Psychology and Counseling urge you first to attempt to resolve your grievances
informally by talking with the faculty member in question. If informal resolution proves
impossible, you should follow the appropriate formal grievance procedures.

If you file a grievance, normal university procedures as published in the university Catalog or
the University Student Handbook will be followed. A disagreement between a faculty member
and student regarding a grade is not grounds for a grievance unless it can be shown by the
student that:
    A. Written criteria were not consistently followed by the professor;
    B. Criteria were applied by the professor that were not previously stated;
    C. Criteria stated by the professor were not applied; or
    D. Bias in evaluation based on gender, race, age, ethnicity, religion, or other inappropriate
        factors was present.
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                    Page 7 of 25

V. ASSISTANTSHIPS
A limited number of assistantships and work/study opportunities may be available in the
Division of Psychology and Counseling or the College of Education Dean’s Office. Applications
are available in the dean’s office.




                      THE GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM

I. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

A. CORE OBJECTIVES (THEORETICAL AND CLINICAL SEQUENCES):
   1. Describe etiology, diagnosis, and intervention constructs related to psychological
       disorders.
   2. Demonstrate awareness of current issues, controversies, and research that are appropriate
       to the student’s area of study within the field of psychology.
   3. Categorize the basic psychological concepts, principles, and theories relating to human
       functioning and development.
   4. Explain the impact of contextual factors such as culture, socioeconomic status, family,
       society, and government policy on the human psyche (including its development,
       pathology, and functioning).
   5. Critique current psychological research, including critical evaluation and synthesis of the
       literature, development of appropriate and defensible research methods and procedures,
       and address the validity and reliability issues.
   6. Interpret appropriate statistical analyses and communicate these results in a professional
       manner.
   7. Exhibit dispositions and behaviors indicating a professional level of sensitivity to
       diversity (including subjective and objective perceptions of ethnic groups and the role
       they play in human and social behavior).
   8. Identify and challenge traditional psychological theories limited to Western Culture.
   9. Express, in written and oral communication, beginning professional levels of knowledge,
       critical evaluation, ethical judgment, and reasoning skills as appropriate to the student’s
       area of study within the field of psychology.
   10. Describe the ethical and legal issues relevant to the science and practice of psychology
       (including relevant codes of conduct such as those published by the American
       Psychological Association).
   11. Explain the purposes of psychological testing (including its limitations and the ethical
       considerations related to the use of such measures).
   12. Exhibit a level of technological sophistication appropriate to a beginning professional in
       the field of psychology; including the ability to send and receive e-mail attachments, to
       use a word processing program to format a document in APA style, to use a software
       program (e.g., PowerPoint) to create an electronic presentation and to use software (e.g.,
       Excel) to create an electronic database.
   13. Demonstrate dispositions and behaviors viewed as fitting with the field of professional
       psychology. These include (but are not limited to) written skills, verbal skills, ethical
       behavior, emotional maturity, personal stability, and promise as a practicing professional.
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                    Page 8 of 25

B. THEORETICAL SEQUENCE OBJECTIVES:
   1. Appraise current issues, theories and research in the field of psychology.
   2. Explain how factors such as culture, socioeconomic status, family, society, and
      government policy affect areas in the field of psychology.
   3. Analyze important issues in the field and express those ideas both orally and in writing.
   4. Select a researchable topic and formulate specific hypotheses or project idea.
   5. Review relevant literature germane to the research/project topic
           a. Conduct searches from appropriate databases for germane literature
           b. Outline an acceptable review of the literature
           c. Use the literature to develop the theoretical and/or practical significance of the
               hypotheses and design appropriate methods.
   6. Prepare for the approval (or exemption if applicable) of the study for Institutional Review
      knowledge and skills to frame their future thesis/project and the process for successfully
      for the Protection of Subjects if necessary.
   7. Conduct and write up the thesis/project in the approved program format in a professional
      and cohesive manner.
   8. Conduct all of the above in a timely fashion while demonstrating the ability to take
      initiative and work independently.

II. GRADUATE PROGRAM PREREQUISITES
Students should have completed the following, with grades of “B” or higher, undergraduate
courses from a regionally accredited college or university that are equivalent to:

      Personality Theories (PSYC 410)
      Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 422)
      Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 430)
      Social Psychology (PSYC 445)
      Developmental Psychology (PSYC 412)
      Research Methodology (PSYC 560)
      Statistics (STAT 468)

Please note: These courses are prerequisites and may not be used to fulfill degree requirements
of the M.A. and may be taken at another institution.

III. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Because students may begin their program of study in any semester, they have some flexibility in
planning the sequence of their course work, although factors such as prerequisites, candidacy
requirements, and scheduling conflicts will produce some constraints. Annual psychology course
schedules are planned in advance by the psychology faculty and are distributed to graduate
students during twice-yearly orientation sessions. Students can view these schedules to see which
courses will be taught during each semester of the academic year and plan their class schedules
accordingly. Students should be aware that each graduate course is not taught in every semester
and that the psychology course schedule is designed to facilitate student progress through the
graduate program. Thus, not taking a required course when it is offered or taking courses in a
different sequence than recommended can delay a student’s progress through the program if a
needed course is not offered during a particular semester. All students are required to meet with
the Psychology Advisor to plan their sequence of courses and commit this sequence to writing in
the form of a Student Study Plan It is strongly recommended that students take the core
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                      Page 9 of 25

candidacy courses (PSYC610, PSYC760, PSYC821, and PSYC829) as early in the program of
study as possible. Students are required to have a grade of “B” or higher in the four core
candidacy courses and to submit core course candidacy evaluation forms for each course to the
faculty member teaching the course. See below for additional candidacy information.

All students in the program must maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average [on a four point
scale]. Regardless of the student’s grade point average, no student may earn more than two “C’s”
in required non-candidacy courses. All courses accepted for credit toward the degree must have
been passed with grades of “C” or better.

A. Required Core Courses (Clinical and Theoretical M.A. Psychology Sequences) (21
hours)

       PSYC 610       Measurements and Evaluation (3)
       PSYC 740       Topics in Multicultural Psychology (3)
       PSYC 760       Ethical and Legal Issues in Psychology (3)
       PSYC 821       Psychopathology (3)
       PSYC 829       Seminar in Human Development (3)
       PSYC 849       Advanced Research Seminar (3)
       STAT 860       Advanced Statistics in Behavioral Science (3)



B. Theoretical Psychology Sequence (13 hours):

       PSYC 630       Topics in Psychology: … (3)
       PSYC 890       Graduate Thesis/Project: . . . (4)
       6 hours of electives selected with advisor (6)

Theoretical Psychology Sequence Total = 34 Hours

C. Theoretical Psychology Sequence Courses and Thesis Project
1. Topics in Psychology
Topics in Psychology (PSYC 630) are special topics courses that usually run concurrently with
and are co-listed as Issues in Counseling (COUN 609). The course content differs each time the
course is offered, providing students with a variety of study options ranging from the practical to
the theoretic. Two or more different Topics courses are usually offered annually. See the annual
class schedule for upcoming topics and offerings.

2. Electives
The elective course work (6 hours required) in the theoretical sequence must be 500 level or
higher. Students should choose electives with career goals and individual interests in mind.
Electives must be approved by the Psychology Advisor prior to enrollment in the elective. This
approval should be initialed by the Advisor on your study plan as being approved. It is your only
assurance that the course you have selected is to be applied to the degree requirements. No
prerequisite courses can be used for elective credit for the degree (i.e., PSYC 560).
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                     Page 10 of 25

3. Thesis
a. Overview. A thesis is a work of original research written in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for a master's degree. The rationale is to demonstrate the student’s skill in
conducting independent research that makes a contribution to knowledge in the field. This
rationale is related to expecting students in the program to display proficiency in the related
program objectives. These include being able to analyze important issues in the field, select a
researchable topic and formulate specific hypotheses, review relevant literature germane to the
research topic, use that literature to develop the theoretical or practical significance of the
hypotheses and design appropriate methods, prepare a written proposal that will be approved by
both the Institutional Review Board and the student’s thesis committee, conduct and write up the
thesis project in the approved program format in a professional and cohesive manner, and
conduct all of the above in a timely fashion while demonstrating the ability to take initiative and
work independently. The guidelines and requirements for a graduate thesis in psychology are
outlined in detail below and include suggestions to follow on the journey to graduation.

b. Thesis Proposal and Committee Proposal Meeting (For more information about the process of
producing a thesis proposal, see Thesis Guidelines below)

The student will submit four copies of the thesis proposal to the thesis chairperson. The thesis
chairperson will distribute the copies of the proposal to the remaining committee members and
call a meeting of the committee and the student. All materials related to the proposal must be
submitted to the committee a minimum of one week before the scheduled proposal meeting. The
thesis committee will read the proposal for form, content, scope of the research or problem, and
overall contribution to the field. A Thesis Evaluation Checklist will be used by the faculty to
evaluate proposals (some of the items, e.g., #19-28, are relevant only to the completed thesis).

The purpose of the proposal meeting is reach agreement among all parties concerning the
proposed research. The thesis committee can advise the student on how to conduct the research,
including possible changes to the research plan to improve its quality or feasibility. Proposals for
research that is not practical or realistic for the student to carry out will not be approved. The
proposal that the committee approves represents a contract between the student and the
committee members. This contract specifies the research plan. If the student completes the
research project as proposed, the research, regardless of its results, will be approved. In most
cases, however, the thesis document itself will require revisions before final approval (see
below). Before beginning or completing the research as approved by the committee, if the
student discovers that the research cannot be conducted as proposed, he or she must apply for
committee approval of any changes in the research procedure. This may require a second thesis
proposal committee meeting. Changes in the research procedure will also require approval by the
GSU Institutional Review Board (IRB).
c. Oral Defense of the Thesis
The thesis will be submitted to the thesis chairperson and committee at least two weeks before
the scheduled date of the oral defense. The thesis committee will evaluate the thesis according to
criteria listed in The Thesis Evaluation and provide the student with the completed evaluation at
the oral defense meeting. The purpose of the oral thesis defense is to present and discuss the
research and findings. In consultation with the thesis advisor, the student usually prepares a
presentation (e.g., with Powerpoint slides) summarizing the thesis research project. The thesis
defense is an open meeting; all faculty members and students in the Division of Psychology and
Counseling are invited to attend. Students can expect to be asked questions about the research
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                      Page 11 of 25

and its implications. For the thesis to be accepted by the committee, it must earn a minimum of
six points from the three committee members using the following scale (if a student has more
than 3 committee members, a minimum of two additional points are required for each additional
committee member):

                          3   = excellent 2 = good 1 = fair 0 = unacceptable

       Note that evaluation with this scale includes rating of the oral defense and is not the same
       as evaluation with the scale on the Thesis Evaluation Checklist (though the two ratings
       will likely be highly related).
d. Final Thesis Approval
As stated above, revisions to the final thesis are typically necessary for final thesis approval. The
committee may require revisions regarding the written text, compliance with APA style and
format, further data analyses, or additional material to include. The committee will not, however,
at this point, call for the student to redo the entire research project. The committee will also
decide whether the revisions will need to be reviewed and approved by the entire committee or
only by the thesis chairperson. Based on the nature and extent of the required revisions, the
committee may also require a second oral defense. If the thesis receives a conditional acceptance
pending revisions, the committee will set a time limit for completion of the revisions. The thesis
will not be approved unless this time line is adhered to.

An important purpose of thesis revision time limits is to ensure that the final thesis will be
approved in time for a PSYC-890 grade of “Pass” (“P”) to be submitted for the current semester
and to qualify the student for graduation in the current semester. If the thesis revisions are not
completed and approved in time a grade of “Continued Registration” (“CO”) will be assigned for
PSYC-890 and the student will register for PSYC-898 (Directed Scholarship) for the following
semester (see below).The minimum amount of time before the final grade is due for the final
revisions to be submitted to the thesis chairperson or committee is two weeks. In many cases the
minimum amount of time will be longer than two weeks, based on the time required for the
student to do the revisions and for the final revised thesis to be reviewed and approved by the
thesis chairperson or committee.

If a grade of “CO” is assigned for PSYC-890, to complete the thesis the student must register for
PSYC-898 (Directed Scholarship) under the name of the thesis chairperson. Based on the
chairperson’s judgment of the amount of work remaining to complete revisions, PSYC 898
registration will be for either one or two credit hours. The student must register for PSYC-898 in
the following semester after a grade of “CO” has been assigned for PSYC-890. If, however, the
“CO” grade is assigned in the Spring semester, registration for PSYC-898 can be delayed until
the following Fall semester. In other words, registering for PSYC-898 in summer is not required
– and may not be possible if the faculty member serving as thesis chairperson is unavailable in
the summer term. Once the thesis revisions have been satisfactorily completed, reviewed, and
approved by all required parties, the thesis chairperson will assign a grade of “P” (Pass) for Psyc
898 and convert the original PSYC 890 grade from “CO” to “P” indicating a passing grade for
the thesis.

If the thesis is not completed in the first semester of PSYC-898 (Directed Scholarship)
registration, the student may continue to register for PSYC 898 (Directed Scholarship) for up to
six consecutive academic terms, including summer term, or four semesters if not registering
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                  Page 12 of 25

during Summer terms. Thus, students receiving a grade of “CO” in PSYC-890 must complete the
thesis within two years (6 academic terms; 4 if not registering in summer).

A student registering for PSYC-898 for more than one additional academic term will receive a
grade of “P” (Pass) in each semester of PSYC-898 registration if, according to the thesis
committee chairperson’s evaluation, there is satisfactory progress toward thesis completion. If
progress toward thesis completion while registered for PSYC-898 is not satisfactory, a grade of
“NC” (No Credit) will be assigned for PSYC-898.

If the thesis is not satisfactorily completed within the two-year maximum period of PSYC-898
registration, then 1) a “No Credit” (“NC”) grade will be issued for PSYC 898; 2) the original
PSYC-890 grade will be changed to “No Credit” (NC); and 3) the student must re-register for
PSYC 890 to continue to pursue thesis research (if approved to do so by a thesis chairperson and
the Division of Psychology and Counseling Chairperson).
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                   Page 13 of 25



IV. STUDENT ORIENTATION AND ROUNDTABLE

Information about the graduate program, requirements, scheduling, and general advice on
successfully completing the graduate program is presented at graduate student orientation
sessions. Orientations take place one or two weeks before the start of Fall and Spring semesters.
New students entering the MA in psychology degree program are required to attend before they
start their first semester in the graduate program. New students who do not attend the orientation
will be delayed from enrolling in classes until the following semester. Continuing students are
not required but are encouraged to attend the orientation to receive updated information about the
program and schedules of upcoming graduate psychology classes. The session is attended by
graduate program faculty and the psychology advisor, and provides opportunities for students to
ask questions and engage in roundtable discussion about the program as well as related academic
and professional issues.

V. ACADEMIC HONESTY AND PLAGIARISM
Students are expected to fulfill academic requirements in an ethical and honest manner. This
expectation pertains to the following: use and acknowledgment of the ideas and work of others,
submission of work to fulfill course requirements, sharing of work with other students, and
appropriate behavior during examinations. These ethical considerations are not intended to
discourage students from studying together or from engaging in group projects. The university
policy on academic honesty appears in the catalog appendix, which can be found on the website
at http://www.govst.edu/uploadedFiles/catalog/catback.pdf#page=1.

Plagiarism violates the principle of academic honesty and includes the following: a) submitting
work as one’s own that was a) written by another person; or b) that is copied, paraphrased from,
or inspired by or based on another author or source without proper citation. Secondary citations
that are presented as primary citations also constitute plagiarism. All sources must be cited,
including not only published authors, but also Internet or other media sources, other students,
even a student’s own work that was submitted for another course or purpose. Students unsure of
how to adhere to academic honesty requirements and citation guidelines should consult with
faculty members on how to do so.

Following American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines for APA Style and APA
Format (including citations) for writing is an important aspect of preparing papers that meet
academic, ethical, and professional requirements (see the APA Publication Manual, 6th edition).
Students are required to write all papers in APA Style and Format. This requirement applies
even if not stated in individual course syllabi.

VI. STUDENT PROGRESS EVALUATION
Students in the M.A. in Psychology Program Theoretical Sequence will be evaluated based on
academic achievement, professional behavior, and their ability to be effective researchers. In
addition to course work evaluations, students are evaluated yearly through an annual review
process as well as four (4) major evaluation points during the program. These are admission to
candidacy, the comprehensive examination, admission to thesis, and completion of the thesis.

A. Annual Review of Students
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                    Page 14 of 25


Each student’s academic progress will be annually reviewed during the Spring semester by the
program faculty. The final meeting of psychology faculty of the academic year (usually held in
late April or early May) will be primarily devoted to a review of graduate students. At this
meeting, each theoretical sequence student will be evaluated on overall academic performance,
communication skills (oral and written), thinking skills, academic integrity and honesty, cultural
awareness and sensitivity, and potential for success in research and thesis completion. A
summary of evaluation conclusions, with any recommendations or concerns noted, will be
provided to each student. Students may meet with the Psychology Program Coordinator to
review the feedback. This meeting provides an opportunity to identify any competencies that
have not yet been achieved and to develop plans for remediation. The Psychology Program
Coordinator can then use information from this review to consult with the rest of the faculty
about any problems that a given student has that merit the attention of the entire program. In
addition, this provides a mechanism whereby the program can identify any systemic problems in
attaining specified competencies. This could lead to modifications in the theoretical sequence
curriculum or to the re-examination of a specific competency requirement.


B. Admission to Candidacy

After completing all candidacy courses, students apply for degree candidacy. Approval for
degree candidacy allows students to continue in the program. Application forms are available
from the Advisor and online on the M.A. in psychology web page on the GSU web site at
http://www.govst.edu/coe/t_coe.pgm_mapsy.aspx?id=130. Application for candidacy should be
made within four weeks of the start of the semester in which degree candidacy is sought. No
student will be permitted to sit for the comprehensive examination less than one semester after
being approved for candidacy. (For example, if a student achieves degree candidacy in the fall
semester, that student cannot sit for his/her comprehensive examination any earlier than the
following spring semester).

To qualify for candidacy, a student must:
1. Have completed all prerequisite courses (PSYC 410, PSYC 422, PSYC 430, PSYC 445,
PSYC 412, PSYC 560, and STAT 468) with a grade of “B” or better;

2. Complete all candidacy courses (PSYC 610: Measurements and Evaluation; PSYC 760:
Ethical and Legal Issues in Psychology; PSYC 821: Psychopathology; and PSYC 829: Seminar
in Human Development) with a grade of “B” or better; and

3. Complete Core Course Evaluations Forms for each candidacy course listed in #2 above.
For each of these four courses, students give the course instructor a Student Evaluation for Core
Courses form. These forms are online on the M.A. in psychology web page on the GSU web site
at http://www.govst.edu/uploadedFiles/CoreCourseEvalForm_april09.pdf . The student should
complete items 1-5 on the course evaluation form and then submit the form to the instructor of
each core course at its completion. The faculty member will complete the remaining items and
return the completed form to the Psychology Advisor to be filed as part of the student's record.
These evaluations are to be completed immediately following completion of the relevant courses.
Completed evaluation forms must be on file for all of the core candidacy courses before students
can apply for candidacy.
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                   Page 15 of 25

Upon receipt of the Application for Candidacy, the program faculty will review the student’s
academic record (paying particularly close attention to the evaluations on file of performance in
the candidacy courses), and any additional faculty assessments and then either award or deny
degree candidacy status. A grade of “C” or lower in any candidacy (or pre-requisite) course will
result in a negative decision. A grade of “D” or lower in any required course will result in a
negative decision. The decision is not only based on grades. The student's professional
demeanor and aptitude for theoretical psychology are also evaluated. The candidacy committee
will inform students of their candidacy status within six weeks of application. The candidacy
committee may make recommendations based upon the student’s potential for successful work or
further graduate study in psychology. Students who are denied candidacy and who have earned
the minimum grades required for candidacy may appeal the decision with the Division of
Psychology and Counseling Chairperson. Students may apply no more than twice for candidacy.
The second application must take place within twelve months of the first refusal. Once candidacy
has been granted, the student will be permitted to continue to take courses and, when appropriate,
to sit for the comprehensive examination.

C. Comprehensive Examination

The Comprehensive Examination is required for graduation from the M.A. in Psychology
program. Students are eligible to take the Comprehensive Exam after successfully completing
the seven core courses listed below and being awarded candidacy. Students in the Theoretical
Sequence may take the Comprehensive Exam before applying for PSYC 890 (Thesis) but are not
required to do so. The Comprehensive Exam allows students to demonstrate competence in
various substantive areas of psychology. The exam consists of 90 multiple-choice questions that
cover the required courses in both MA Psychology sequences:

PSYC 610      Measurements and Evaluation
PSYC 740      Topics in Multicultural Psychology
PSYC 760      Ethical and Legal Issues in Psychology
PSYC 821      Psychopathology
PSYC 829      Seminar in Human Development
PSYC 849      Advanced Research Seminar
STAT 860      Advanced Statistics in Behavioral Science

The comprehensive exam will be scored on a “pass” or “fail” basis. Students who do not achieve
a passing score must retake and pass the exam within the following two semesters to continue in
the program. If the exam is failed a second time, remedial coursework may be required before
any third and final exam attempt. Students who are unable to pass the comprehensive exam in
three attempts will be dismissed from the program.


D. Admission to Thesis (Eligibility to Register for PSYC-890)
Admission to Thesis (PSYC-890) is restricted to those students who have:
    1. Achieved degree candidacy
2. Completed the PSYC-890 Thesis Course Registration Form (which includes approval from
the Division of Psychology and Counseling Chairperson and the Psychology Faculty member
who will serve as the student’s thesis advisor and supervise the thesis).
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                    Page 16 of 25

VI.THESIS GUIDELINES
This portion of the handbook is intended to help you understand the process of preparing for and
completing a master's thesis. Some of the material below appears above as well. Frequent referral
to this section will facilitate the development of a thesis that both you and the Division of
Psychology and Counseling can be proud of.
A. The time to start thinking about your thesis is the day you enter GSU as a graduate
student.
1. As you complete your course work, you need to determine what area of psychology, e.g.,
    social, cognitive, abnormal, etc., most interests you. This will become the topic area for your
    thesis.
2. In every course that you take, you should be asking yourself, "What is there about this
    material that I would like to understand more thoroughly?" It would help if you started a
    notebook in which you keep track of these questions. One of these questions could form the
    basis of your thesis.
3. Getting involved in research projects that faculty or other students are conducting will help
    you to understand the process of conducting research and may help you find a question for
    your own research. You can talk with faculty about their research interests and projects (also
    see list of faculty and interests below)

B. Once you have decided on a topic area (e.g., social psychology) for your thesis, it would
be in your best interest to contact one of the faculty members who is interested in that area
of psychology and to complete a course or possibly an independent study with that faculty
member.
1. This might allow you to explore more thoroughly the area you have chosen and allow you to
    be certain that you're really interested in the topic.
2. It is an opportunity to determine whether you want this faculty member to be your thesis
    advisor/chairperson.

C. A minimum of three semesters prior to the semester in which you intend to collect the
thesis data, you should:
1. Begin to read theses by other students to help you get an idea of the scope of a master's
   project. (These are available from the GSU Library.)
2. Obtain a copy of Cone, J. D., & Foster, S. L. (2006). Dissertations and theses from start to
   finish: Psychology and related fields (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: APA.

D. A minimum of one to two semesters prior to the semester in which you intend to conduct
the research project (i.e., conduct the experiment, survey, etc.), you should:
1. Choose a thesis chairperson.
2. Develop a thesis prospectus. A prospectus is not a full thesis proposal, but a short (e.g., 4-5
    page) paper describing your idea for your thesis project. The purpose of the prospectus is to
    help you find committee members who are interested in your topic and to get feedback on
    whether your proposed research can realistically be carried out in a single semester. The
    prospectus should
    a. Briefly review the relevant literature (1-2 pages).
    b. Narrowly define your research area, e.g., "the effects of group size on cooperative
        learning" (as opposed to "learning").
    c. Describe your methodology and the sample you expect to use, e.g., observational
        research using GSU students as participants (1-2 pages).
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                    Page 17 of 25

E. In the semester before the semester in which you intend to register for PSYC-890
(Graduate Thesis/Project), you should
1. With guidance from your thesis advisor, choose two additional thesis committee members. If
    you cannot find two additional committee members, the department chairperson, upon
    reviewing your research idea or prospectus, will appoint these additional committee
    members.
2. Make sure you have completed (by the end of the semester before the one in which you
    intend to register for PSYC-890) all of the candidacy courses (PSYC 821, PSYC 826, PSYC
    828, and STAT 860) with grades of "B" or better.
3. With your thesis advisor, submit an application form to be approved for PSYC-890
    registration for the following semester.
4. To the extent possible, work on developing your research idea or prospectus into the full
    thesis proposal that should be completed as soon as possible in the following semester (see
    next section below).

F. The thesis semester (while registered for PSYC-890):
Part One: Thesis Proposal Completion, Committee Approval, and IRB Approval
1. Complete the Thesis Proposal. The process of completing the proposal should prepare you to
    conduct the actual research. The proposal should contain
    a. A thorough review of the literature related to your topic so that both you and your
        committee members can be sure of what's already been done in the area (which you can
        replicate or build on). This part of the proposal should be 10-20 pages in length.
    b. Clearly stated hypotheses.
    c. A detailed methodology section which describes the subjects, instruments
        (questionnaires, etc.), other materials, etc., that you intend to use and how you intend to
        use them (i.e., the “procedure”).If you choose to use any existing instruments
        (questionnaires, measures), they must be approved by your thesis advisor prior to being
        included in the proposal.
    d. A proposed data analysis section in which you describe the statistical tests and any other
        means of data analysis such as qualitative analyses (e.g., content analysis of interview
        responses) that will be used to assess each hypothesis. (You should consult with someone
        skilled in statistics about issues of sample size and appropriate statistical tests.)
2. Be aware that you may need to write several drafts of the proposal before your thesis advisor
    feels that it is ready for a proposal committee meeting
3. When the proposal is completed, your thesis advisor will call a meeting with you and the
    thesis committee. The purpose of this meeting is to arrive at an agreement among all of the
    parties involved concerning the proposed research. The proposal that the committee approves
    represents a contract between your and the committee. This contract specifies the research
    that will be conducted. If you do what you propose, the research, regardless of its statistical
    outcome(s), will be approved. (note: this does not guarantee that your written report will be
    automatically approved.) If you discover, for any reason, that you cannot conduct the
    research as proposed, you must apply to your committee for approval of any and all changes
    in the research design or procedure. (This may mean convening a second proposal meeting.)
    All materials related to the proposal must be in the committee's hands a minimum of one (1)
    week before the proposal meeting. You should be aware that revisions (and a possible second
    meeting) may be necessary before the committee is willing to approve the proposal. You
    should also be aware that the possibility exists that your thesis proposal will never be
    approved.
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                    Page 18 of 25

4. When the proposal is approved, you must submit it to GSU Institutional Review Board for
   ethical approval. The minimum amount of time this approval will take is one (1) week
   (expect it to take longer). If you have not yet done so, complete the online research ethics
   training. This training, as well as information about the GSU IRB and application forms for
   ethical review of research, is at http://www.govst.edu/irb

Part Two: Data Collection and Thesis Completion
1.     With your thesis advisor's supervision, you should carry out the proposed research [this
       includes data collection, coding and/or scoring (if necessary), and statistical analyses.]
2.     Once the research is completed, you will write your results in the form of a thesis.
3.     The thesis must:
           a. Conform to APA format as described in the current version of the APA
               Publication Manual.
           b. Contain a 150-200 word Abstract, and Introduction, Hypothesis, Methodology,
               Results, and Discussion sections. (It is a good idea to write these sections one at a
               time and get feedback from your advisor on each section before you try to finalize
               the written text.)
4.     Be aware that you will probably have to write multiple drafts of the thesis before your
       thesis advisor feels that it is ready for the oral defense.
5.     When the thesis is completed, your thesis advisor will hold a meeting with you and the
       thesis committee. (This meeting is called the "oral defense.")
           a. The purpose of this meeting is to present your research and findings. You can
               expect to be asked questions about the research itself and about any implications
               of your findings.
           b. All materials related to the thesis must be in the committee's hands a minimum of
               two weeks before the oral defense.
           c. For the thesis to be accepted by the committee, it must earn a minimum of six
               points from the three committee members using the following scale:
                               3 = excellent 2 = good 1 = fair 0 = poor
               Note that evaluation with this scale includes rating of the oral defense and is not
               the same as evaluation with the scale on the Thesis Evaluation Checklist (though
               the two ratings will likely be highly related).
           d. You should be aware that revisions may be necessary before the committee is
               willing to approve the thesis. The committee may make suggestions regarding the
               write-up, further analyses, and/or additional information to include. They will not,
               at this point, ask you to redo the study.
6.     Your thesis must be in the hands of your committee a minimum of four weeks prior to the
       end of the semester in which you intend to graduate.
           a. If your thesis receives a conditional acceptance, you will have two weeks to make
               the requested changes and call a second committee meeting. If you do not do so,
               graduation will be postponed until the next semester (or until the changes are
               made --whichever comes first).
           b. If significant revisions are required, you will have to make the required changes
               and schedule a second committee meeting. Graduation will be postponed until (at
               the earliest) the following semester.

PLEASE SEE STUDENT HANDBOOK SECTION ON “THESIS” FOR MORE
INFORMATION ON GRADING AND REGISTRATION POLICIES RELATED TO THE
THESIS PROJECT AND COMPLETION
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                        Page 19 of 25

VIII. Thesis Proposal and Final Evaluation Checklists


                             Thesis Proposal Evaluation Checklist1

                For each criterion, the following five-point scale is to be applied:

                               5 - Excellent (A model of good practice.)
                               4 - Good (A few minor defects.)
                               3 - Average (Not good, not bad.)
                               2 - Poor (Some serious defects.)
                               1 - Completely incompetent (A horrible example.)

                                                                        5       4                2     1
CRITERION                                                                                3

TITLE
1. Title is well related to content of proposal

PROBLEM
2. Problem is clearly stated
3. Hypotheses are clearly stated
4. Problem is significant
5. Important terms are operationally defined

REVIEW OF LITERATURE
6. Coverage of the literature is adequate
7. Review of the literature is well organized
8. Studies are examined critically
9. Relationship of the problem to previous research is made clear

PROCEDURES
10. Research is fully described
11. Research design is appropriate to solution of problem
12. Research design is free of specific weaknesses
13. Population and sample are described
14. Method of sampling is appropriate
15. Data gathering methods or procedures are described
16. Data gathering methods or procedures are appropriate to the
    solution of the problem
17. Validity and reliability of data gathering methods are
    established

PROPOSED DATA ANALYSIS
18. Appropriate methods are selected to analyze data

1
  This checklist is a modification of one by
       Ward, A.W., Hall, B., & Schramm, C.F. (1975). Evaluation of published educational
research: A national survey. American Educational Research Journal, 12, 109-188.
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook             Page 20 of 25


FORM AND STYLE
19. Proposal is clearly written
20. Proposal is logically organized
21. Tone of the proposal displays an unbiased, impartial,
    scientific attitude
22. APA style followed
23. Grammar and punctuation are used properly
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                        Page 21 of 25

                           Completed Thesis Evaluation Checklist1

                For each criterion, the following five-point scale is to be applied:
                              5 - Excellent (A model of good practice.)
                              4 - Good (A few minor defects.)
                              3 - Average (Not good, not bad.)
                              2 - Poor (Some serious defects.)
                              1 - Completely incompetent (A horrible example.)

                                                                        5       4                2     1
CRITERION                                                                               3

TITLE
1. Title is well related to content of thesis
PROBLEM
2. Problem is clearly stated
3. Hypotheses are clearly stated
4. Problem is significant
5. Important terms are operationally defined

REVIEW OF LITERATURE
6. Coverage of the literature is adequate
7. Review of the literature is well organized
8. Studies are examined critically
9. Relationship of the problem to previous research is made clear

PROCEDURES
10. Research is fully described
11. Research design is appropriate to solution of problem
12. Research design is free of specific weaknesses
13. Population and sample are described
14. Method of sampling is appropriate
15. Data gathering methods or procedures are described
16. Data gathering methods or procedures are appropriate to the
    solution of the problem
17. Data gathering methods are used correctly
18. Validity and reliability of data gathering methods are
    established

DATA ANALYSIS
19. Appropriate methods are selected to analyze data
20. Methods used in analyzing data are applied correctly
21. Results of the analysis are clearly presented

1
  This checklist is a modification of one by
        Ward, A.W., Hall, B., & Schramm, C.F. (1975). Evaluation of published educational
research: A national survey. American Educational Research Journal, 12, 109-188.
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                   Page 22 of 25

22. Tables and figures are used effectively
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
23. Conclusions are clearly stated
24. Conclusions are substantiated by evidence presented
25. Conclusions are relevant to the problem
26. Generalizations are confined to the population from which
    the sample was drawn
27. Limitations of the study are stated
28. Future directions for the research area are discussed

FORM AND STYLE
29. Thesis is clearly written
30. Report is logically organized
31. Tone of the report displays an unbiased, impartial, scientific
    attitude
32. APA style followed
33. Grammar and punctuation are used properly




IX. PSYCHOLOGY ORGANIZATIONS, ASSOCIATIONS AND CONFERENCES
Students are encouraged to join and become active in psychology associations at the local,
regional, and national levels. It is your (and our) responsibility to keep informed of the current
state of knowledge and professional issues in psychology. Student membership fees typically are
substantially discounted. Membership in these organizations and participation in conferences
provide excellent venues for maintaining contact with other students and professionals in the
field, which can lead to opportunities for future doctoral level graduate study or employment
(e.g., part-time teaching positions).

American Psychological Association
APA is one of the largest general membership, national professional associations. APA has an
applied focus. APA benefits include:
1. Subscriptions to their bimonthly newsletter, the APA Monitor, and their monthly journal,
American Psychologist
2. Professional development opportunities via annual convention
3. Discounts on APA published resources including books and journals
4. Job search assistance
5. Liability insurance
6. APA offers membership in numerous divisions representing various interests and employment
settings. Membership information and application is available at: http://www.apa.org/
7. Student membership is at a discounted level and includes subscription to GradPsych, a
publication emphasizing advice on successfully completing graduate studies and beginning a
career in psychology.

Association for Psychological Science
APS is another large, general membership, national professional association. APS has a basic
science approach. APS benefits include:
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                     Page 23 of 25

1. Subscriptions to the bimonthly journals, Psychological Science and Current Directions in
Psychological Science, and the bimonthly newsletter, the Observer which alternates months with
the APS Employment Bulletin
2. Professional development opportunities via annual convention and membership in the APS
Student Caucus which hosts guest speakers and regional conferences and produces career
development workshops
3. Discounts on APS published resources including books and journals
4. Job search assistance
5. Eligibility for travel grants to attend the annual convention
6. Mentoring program
Membership applications and information is available at: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/

Midwestern Psychological Association
MPA is a regional professional association. Like the APA and APS, MPA’s membership is
general, spanning all areas of psychology. Luckily for us, MPA hosts their annual convention in
downtown Chicago at the Palmer House hotel each May. The MPA convention includes teaching
and student-related programs (e.g., student research poster sessions). MPA membership is
inexpensive and benefits include:1. Professional development opportunities via annual
convention and 2. Job search assistance
Membership forms are available at http://www.midwesternpsych.org/. Dr. Johnson is the
department representative for the MPA. Either she or Dr. Tuskenis would need to sign your
application for student membership. Students in the Theoretical Sequence are strongly
encouraged to participate in the MPA annual convention as attendees and, if possible, as
presenters of their research (e.g., thesis project).

GSU Annual Student Research Conference
The GSU Student Research Conference is held each year during late spring or early summer.
Students are encouraged to attend the conference and to submit their thesis research (or other
research projects) for presentation.

Midwest Institute for Students and Teachers of Psychology (MISTOP).
This regional teaching-oriented conference is held yearly in February or March at the College of
DuPage in Glen Ellyn, IL. This conference has a strong student focus with opportunities for
students to make presentations, attend sessions on the teaching of psychology, and meet
psychology graduate students and faculty from other universities. Similarly to the MPA
convention, the MISTOP conference is affordable and accessible. Students are encouraged to
attend, particularly those interested in pursuing a teaching career in psychology.

Funding for Conference Participation and Travel
GSU students participating in conferences (such as those described above) are eligible to apply
through the GSU Student Affairs office for funds to cover expenses related to conference
participation and travel. Interested students should consult with their thesis advisors or research
supervisors. More information is at http://www.govst.edu/saslt_sl.aspx?id=1683
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                 Page 24 of 25

X. GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM FACULTY - THEORETICAL SEQUENCE

          Name                 Degree & Date           Institution             Clinical/Research
                                                                                   Interests

Linda S. Buyer, Ph.D.       Experimental           University of           Metacognition, problem
                            Cognitive              Illinois at Chicago     solving, comprehension
                            Psychology, 1989
Christopher Dyslin, Ph.D.   Clinical Psychology,   Northern Illinois       Anxiety disorders, mood
                            1997                   University              disorders, addictions,
                                                                           integration of psychology
                                                                           and spirituality, religious
                                                                           beliefs and behaviors

Barbara Gormley, Ph.D.      Counseling             Michigan State          Trauma therapy, family
                            Psychology, 2002       University              violence, adult attachment
                                                                           theory, mentoring
Jean Johnson, Ph.D.         Educational            Loyola University       Curriculum and the
                            Psychology, 2002       Chicago                 teaching of psychology,
                                                                           plagiarism, teacher
                                                                           consultation, and diversity
                                                                           training, cognition, child
                                                                           development, curriculum
                                                                           development and
                                                                           assessment, research and
                                                                           statistics, behavior therapy,
                                                                           the teaching of psychology,
                                                                           and diversity education

Timothy Pedigo, Ph.D.       Clinical/Community     Illinois Institute of   Attachment approach to
                            Psychology,            Technology              personality disorders,
                            1987                                           integration of psychology
                                                                           and spirituality, trauma and
                                                                           dissociation

Elizabeth Ruiz, Ph.D.       Clinical Psychology,   Northwestern            Child abuse, trauma,
                            1995                   University              domestic violence, cultural
                                                   Medical School,         issues, Latino families,
                                                   Chicago, IL             children and adolescents,
                                                                           play therapy, individual
                                                                           therapy, family therapy

Albert Tuskenis, Ph.D.      Clinical Psychology,   University of           Attachment theory and
                            1996                   Illinois at Chicago     adult relationships,
                                                                           attachment and spirituality,
                                                                           emotion-focused therapy,
                                                                           ethics in psychology,
                                                                           teaching and assessment of
M.A. Psychology – Theoretical Sequence Handbook                                Page 25 of 25

                                                                          learning in psychology

Darlene Wright, Ph.D.     Clinical Psychology,    Illinois Institute of   Children and adolescents,
                          1993                    Technology              grief and loss issues for
                                                                          children, behavioral health
                                                                          issues for children,
                                                                          parenting skills training,
                                                                          adults and children with
                                                                          developmental disabilities,
                                                                          and rehabilitation
                                                                          psychology

				
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