PROYECTO BILING�E MEC-BRITISH COUNCIL I.E.S. PEDRO DE LUNA by OWfghd9M

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									 PROYECTO BILINGÜE
MEC-BRITISH COUNCIL
I.E.S. PEDRO DE LUNA
           DEVELOPMENT OF THE PROJECT IN OUR
                      SCHOOL

       •Background, challenges and achievements.
       •English in the Project.
       •Integrated Curriculum and Literacy.
       •Literacy across the Curriculum. How can teachers
       support Science, Geography and History?
       •Language for learning.
       •Some examples of Literacy in the classroom.
       •LITERACY AND SCIENCE.
       •Supporting thinking processes .Examples.
       •Practical activities. Working together.
       •Sharing good practice with other school.

IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
                     2004-05   1º ESO
                     2005-06   2º ESO
                     2006-07   3º ESO
                     2007-08   4º ESO

    Council of Europe: Students competent
            in 3 European languages


IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
       AREAS TO BE TAUGHT IN
              ENGLISH

•English (Literacy) 5h.
•Science 3h.
•Geography / History 3h.

IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
 ENGLISH IN THE PROJECT
 KS3 YEARS 7, 8, 9. 6ºP 1º-2º ESO.
■ English     is taught through texts. Fiction / Non Fiction.
■ Grammar    scheme runs parallel to Integrate
    Curriculum Objectives.
■ Students       encouraged to read.
■ Students       expected to speak in English always.
■ Students   assessed in reading / writing / speaking +
    listening.
■ Each  class has 5h of Literacy per week with the same
    teacher.


IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
             GETTING READY FOR
                TRANSITION
          Advanced introduction of the bilingual
        experience as “Innovative Project” (2001-
                         2002)


                               ACTION PLAN :

                        •Design of needs
                •Studying Integrated Curriculum
              •Coordination with Primary school
                    • Actions with parents


IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
• Different classroom approach, not only
  focus on learning English as a foreign lang
• New methodology for teaching and
  learning other curricular areas through
  English
• Clear delineation of contents to be taught
• Definition linguistic & scientific skills
• Resources to be used by teachers
IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
              ‘The more
               you link,
               the more
              you learn’                Jeanette Vos
                               international educator & author


IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
LITERACY
       ◦ ´The school sees literacy as the key to improving learning
           and raising standards and has an approach which is
           relevant to all curriculum areas and pupils of all levels of
.          attainment´

       Provides attention on language learning.
       ◦ Language:
       .The main tool for learning
       .Enables thought
       .Every curricular area is dependent on language




    IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
 LITERACY ACROSS THE CURRICULUM
 HOW CAN ENGLISH TEACHERS SUPPORT SCIENCE /
 GEOGRAPHY / HISTORY?


■ Language  support.
■ Regular coordination time.
■ Studying texts with subject teachers -pulling out
   language / vocabulary & structures & functions &
   features of style for written work.
RESOURCES
■ Internet.
■ Websites.
■ Science + geography other non-fiction texts.


IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
 DEVELOPMENT OF WRITING SKILLS +
 STRATEGIES - STYLES OF TEXTS
      ■ writing  in paragraphs
      ■ developing topic sentences into logical paragraphs
      ■ sequence markers and connectives
      ■ classifying and collating information
      ■ writing explanations
      ■ cause and effect
      ■ using bullet points
      ■ writing persuasively
      ■ comparing and contrasting
      ■ discursive writing
      ■ structuring a logical argument
      ■ good introductions and conclusions

IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
 ■ Importance   of incorporation of grammar structures /
    functions / vocabulary / as related to NEEDS from
    reading and writing.


 ■ Not two “separate” approaches. One supports the
    other.


 ■ Timing? Perhaps two hours per week of language
    support.



IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
THE BODY SYSTEMS - STRUCTURE
 Description of processes
 Description of organs and their functions
 Pictorial identification and labelling
 Practice
 Testing
The Digestive System
The human body needs fuel to live. We eat food for fuel. But just
getting the food into the body is only a small part of the process.
The food must be broken down into chemicals that the body can
use. This whole process is called digestion. Some of the organs
involved in digestion are the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small and
large intestines, gallbladder, pancreas and liver. Keep reading to find
out how the body uses the food we eat.
mouth & teeth

The mouth and teeth are the
first step in breaking food
down. During the process of
chewing, food is shredded and
ground.    Powerful    muscles
move the mandible, or lower
jaw, while the food is chewed.
The front teeth cut the food
and the back teeth grind the
food.
There are three main parts to
the tooth: the root, the neck
and the crown. The root is the
part inside the jaw. The neck
is    a   narrow     connection
between the root and the
crown. The crown of the tooth
is above the gum.
First teeth come in between 6
and 8 months. By age 6, baby
teeth are gradually replaced
by permanent teeth. There are
32 permanent teeth.
When food is being chewed,
saliva is squirted into the
mouth. Saliva helps to soften
the food. It contains an
enzyme that helps break down
the starch in the food.
                                        SURPRISING FACTS
                                        The horned toad's main food is
                                        ants. It often sits near an ants' nest
                                        with its mouth wide open.




After chewing, the food is swallowed and passes down the esophagus
to the stomach. The esophagus is about 25 cm long. The tongue helps
push the food to the back of the mouth, and the muscles in the
esophagus move the food down the tube.
                  The stomach is a sac shaped like a "j" and
travelling food   is about 20 cm long. In the stomach, food
                  is mixed with acids. The muscles in the
                  stomach move, which helps break down
                  the food. The stomach is protected from
                  the acid by a lining. From the stomach, the
                  food pulp is sent to the small intestine.
                  Food leaves the stomach a little bit at a
                  time.
                  The small intestine is the final place for
                  digestion. It is about 6 m long, and 2.5 cm
                  in diameter. Digestive juices released in
                  the small intestine finish breaking down
                  the food.
                  The food is moved along the small
                  intestine in a squeezing motion known as
                  peristalsis. This motion is much the same
                  as squeezing a tube of toothpaste. All of
                  this movement causes the noise when we
                  say our stomach is "growling."
Lining the small intestine are millions of fingers called villi. These
absorb the chemicals that we need from the food into the body.
Waste products and food that are not absorbed in the small intestine
pass into the large intestine. This waste material is called feces. The
large intestine is only 1.5 m long but is larger in diameter than the
small intestine. The large intestine includes the colon.
In the large intestine, feces are formed from water, undigested food and
bacteria. Water is absorbed back into the body so the waste material
becomes more solid as it travels through the colon. It may take as long
as twenty hours for food to pass completely through the large intestine.




     Photograph of the large intestine
                                              SURPRISING FACTS
                                              A heavy meal may take up to
                                              three days to pass through
                                              your digestive system. It
                                              spends about three hours in
                                              your stomach.
Gall bladder, pancreas and liver

The     pancreas    is    an
elongated gland that is
below the stomach. It
produces pancreatic juice
that    contains   digestive
enzymes. The pancreas also
secrets insulin into the
blood. Insulin is needed to
allow glucose or sugar from
food to get into the
bloodstream. People who
cannot produce insulin are
diabetics.
The largest gland in the body is the liver. It is on the right side of
the body underneath the ribs. It weighs about 1.4 kg and is 20 cm
long. The liver stores a form of glucose called glycogen. Vitamin A
is manufactured in the liver. Bile which is needed to breakdown fat,
is made in the liver. This organ is also where alcohol, drugs,
bacteria and old blood cells are broken down and removed from
the body. Damage to the liver can be serious because this organ is
extremely necessary to life.
The gallbladder is a small sac on the underside of the right lobe of the
liver. It stores bile that is made by the liver. Bile travels from the liver
through the hepatic ducts to the gallbladder. It holds about 60 ml of
bile. Bile is needed to breakdown the fat that is in food.

                         SURPRISING FACTS
                         In Sri Lanka, people used to
                         believe that a lizard's wisdom
                         was in its tongue. Children
                         ate lizard tongue and banana
                         sandwiches so they would
                         grow up to be clever and
                         well spoken.
GLOSSARY

Acids - substance that helps in the breakdown of food for the digestive process.


Bile - a fluid that is secreted by the liver and stored in the gallbladder; used in the digestion and absorption of fat.


Digestion - process by which food is changed into substances that can be absorbed and used by the body.


Esophagus - muscular tube for the passage of food from the mouth to the stomach.


Enzyme - chemical that helps to break down and digest food.


Hepatic - relating to the liver.


Mandible - lower bone in the jaw.


Pancreas - long, irregularly shaped gland that produces enzymes and hormones that aid in digestion.


Peristalsis - wavelike muscular contractions that help to move food down the digestive system.


Saliva - watery mixture of secretions from the salivary glands that lubricates the mouth and starts to digest food.


Starch - naturally abundant nutrient found chiefly in seeds, fruits, roots, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice.


Villus/Villi - tiny projections in the intestines from which digested food is absorbed into the blood.
Bone - the hard supportive tissue in which the tooth's root is anchored.
Crown - the visible part of a tooth.
Dentin - the hard but porous tissue located under both the enamel (and cementum) of the tooth. Dentin is harder than bone.
Enamel - the tough, shiny, white outer surface of the tooth.
Gum - the soft tissue that surrounds the base of the teeth.
Nerves and Blood Vessels - nerves transmit signals, and blood vessels carry nutrients to the tooth - they run through the tooth's root within the pulp.
Pulp - the soft center of the tooth. The pulp contains blood vessels and nerves; it nourishes the dentin.
Root - the anchor of a tooth that extends into the bone of the jaw. The number of human tooth roots ranges from one to four.
ACHIEVEMENTS

■ Students  show:
    ◦ Greater competence in English mainly in
       understanding and fluency.
    ◦ Greater motivation for learning English language
       and English culture.
■ Confidence.
■ Creativity.
■ Cognition.
■ Cooperation.
■ Better social image of the school.
■ General satisfaction (students, teachers, parents
   involved in the experience).

IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
CHALLENGES
Points to rise / issues to be addressed:
■ Improve   students accuracy when speaking and writing.
■ Keeping up their spontaneity / creativity as they grow
   older.
■ Improving their working habits.
■ Going on with the right approach.
■ Develop thinking skills.
■ Collaborative learning. Mix-ability groups.
■ Get the teaching staff involved into the project.
■ Improving formative assessment methods (assessment
   for learning).

IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
 AN EXAMPLE OF
 LITERACY IN THE
 CLASSROOM
A Pirate Adventure




IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
OBJECTIVES

Word level: word meaning in context.
Sentence level: starting paragraphs.
Reading: characters, settings and mood.
Writing: story structure. Drafting process: plan,
revise and present a text.
Speaking & Listening: collaborative oral/writing.
Plan and write a script.
Geography language support: find the treasure.
Giving directions on a map.



IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
WORK STRUCTURE

A. Whole class shared reading
B. Whole class modelled / shared writing
C. Independent work
D. Reflecting
E. Plenary
F. Geography Language Support: giving directions on a map
G. Learning for CLIL: Strategies and skills used




 IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
A. Whole class shared reading
   ■ What we know about pirates/ adventure stories.
      Questions, brainstorming.
   ■ How a book is organized: Chapters, different story
      openings …
   ■ Introduction of the book´The Treasure Island´.
      Author, cover…
   ■ Shared reading activities. Characters: feelings,
      behaviours and relationships… settings and moods.
      Discussion. (two weeks).
   ■ Grammar point: Adjectives, comparatives,
      superlatives.



IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
B. Whole class modelled / shared writing

  ■ Key  features of an adventure story: Character alone,
      remote setting… Discussion.

  ■ How  to structure a story: Arresting opening /
      developing plot / resolution.

  ■ Create     characters and settings.




  IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
                                    pirates
                 hero                            shipwrecked people



     slaves                                             natives

                                   characters

         cannibals                                      cabin boy



                         baddies                witch




IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
                               big waves
           cannibal village                 shark boy

      shipwreck                                  dangerous rocks

   pirate ship                                     ruined city

                                settings
  quick sand                                            mountains

                                                        beach
man-eating plants


                  forest                    dangerous animals
                                whirlpool




IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
C. Independent work
■   Pair work. They choose
    some characters / settings
    to write and draw on a
    given map of an island and
    for their story.
■   Listening / Speaking /
     Summarizing             /
     making scripts. Share
     characters          and
     settings in groups of       CHARACTERS
     fours and make up a         1                 2                3

     script collaboratively.     NAME:__________   NAME:_________   NAME:______
                                 Description:      Description:     Description:
                                 _________         _________        ________

IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
D. Reflecting
Each group prepares
the performance /
slide show for the
rest of the class
and/or to other
groups of students.


                       Example 1




IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
D. Reflecting

     Example 2




IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
     E. Plenary
     Comments and discussion about the tasks.
     Añadir si encuentro, una foto del teatro




IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
F. Geography Language Support:
giving directions on a map.
FIND THE TREASURE
 1.-You have been given a map and
   instructions to help you find some
   hidden treasure. Follow the
   instructions to find out where it is.
Check the exact spot by sorting the
   jumbled words in the treasure
   chest and choosing the correct
   answer.




IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
2.- The ship has landed some of the treasure at port A.
   It must do to port B to leave the rest of the treasure.
   The course the ship must follow is shown by the
   dotted line on the map. Give the captain compass
   directions to follow between each numbered point.
   Start like this: Leave port A. Go East to port 1. Go
    south-east…




IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
G. Learning for CLIL: Strategies and skills used
Strategies: Brainstorming - Asking questions -
    Discussion - Reading - Sequencing narrative process
    - self evaluation.

Skills: Questioning - Organising - Sharing ideas -
    Listening - Talking - Planning - Summarising – Asking
    - Questions - Reading - Collaborating - Making
    decisions and choices - Time management -
    Presenting ideas - Writing - Drawing - Reporting -
    Inventing.



IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
ORAL WORK IS ESSENTIAL TO LANGUAGE ACQUISITION
 Recent research has revealed that as learners we retain:
                               10%
                          Of what we read
                               20%
                          Of what we hear
                               30%
                          Of what we see
                               50%
                      Of what we see and hear
                               70%
                     Of what we ourselves say


IES PEDRO DE LUNA - ZARAGOZA
                     Objective
The objective of our project is to investigate games and nursery
rhymes that our grandparents used to play when they were
children.
Apart from grammar and vocabulary we have dealt with values
such a as cooperation, respect and curiosity for our grandparents’
lifes. We have discovered many facts about our past and have
enjoyed ourselves investigating.
Finally two classmates travelled to Birmingham and shared this
project with our penfriends at King Norton Girl´s School.
               Process: step1

- First we spoke about our grandparents, their way of
   life and the games they played when they were young
  (Brainstorming activity)
                 Process: step 2
Then, we prepared a questionaire to ask our grandparents about the
games they played. These are some of the questions:
 1.- What games did you play when you were children?
 2.- Did the boys ad girls play the same games?
 3.- Where did you play?
 4.- Did you play the same games in the country and in the city?
             Process: step 3
We got information about the topic and shared the
answers in groups of four.
            Process: step 4
Then we described our game and wrote the rules in
English to explain them to our classmates.
Later we prepared a summary for this powerpoint
presentation.
1.- Form a wide circle forming “parcels” (one player in front of the other)
2.- By raffle, a pair is designated. One is the “catcher” and the other is the
“runner”.
3.- The catcher chases the “runner”. The “runner” can stop in front of any other
player.
4.- Then, this player becomes the “runner”.
1.- Form two teams. A referee gives a secret number to each member.
2.- Each team stands behind one line and the referee stands between both of
them. He holds the scarf ad shouts one number.
3.- One player of each team tries to grab the scarf and return “home”.
4. The chaser has to catch the player with the scarf before he reaches home
1.- Draw a chart with chalk on the floor and find a small stone.
2.- Throw the stone to the first square of the chart. Jump over the chart where the
stone is. Don´t touch the lines.
3. Jump on one foot from chart to chart.
4. Finally pick up the stone without falling.
Angela and Patricia went to Birmingham to explain
                    our project

								
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