Dwyer Intolerance Unit LPs by E7G8pPd

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									                            American Literature (Unit 1)--Thematic
Unit: Intolerance
Essential Questions
     How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
     In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
        it?
     How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

 Power Objectives: 3, 4, 11, 12, 14
Objectives: 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 17, 21, 22
Concept           American Lit. American Lit. II Writing/Project            Musical
                  I                                                         Connection
Intolerance       Crucible         The Laramie        Watch Crash (edited   “The Beauty of
                                   Project            version)              Gray” Live
                  Twain’s “The Japanese internment Emmitt Till              “Your Racist
                  Lowest           –Farewell to Manz. documentary           Friend” They Might
                  Animal”                                                   Be
                  Scarlet Letter Jena 6               Why I Came to         “Intolerance” Tool
                                                      America—Oprah
                                   “Tableau”          Stereotype poem       “Birmingham
                                                                            Sunday” Joan Baez
                                Claude McKay                                “Bury My Heart at
                                “The Lynching”                              Wounded Knee”
                                “America”                                   Indigo Girls
                                The lynching of                             “Empire” Dar
                                James Byrd                                  Williams
                                “AmeriKKKa
                                1998”
                                “Do I Look Like                             “Don’t Drink the
                                Public Enemy                                Water” DM
                                Number One?”                                “Maria” Rage
                                Lorraine Ali                                Against the Machine
                                Countee Cullen’s                            “I Kissed a Girl”
                                “Incident”                                  Katy Perry
                                Maya Angelou                                “Strange Fruit”
                                “Harlem                                     Billie Holliday
                                Hopscotch”
                                Marge Piercy                                “Colorblind”
                                “Barbie Doll”                               Counting Crows
                                “Mending Wall”                              “What’s Going on?”
                                “Resentments Still                          MTV All-stars
                                Run Deep”
                                “We Still Have a
                                Race Problem”
                                “Black Men and
                                Public Spaces”
                                “People Like Us”
                     American Literature Unit 1
Big Idea:
    

Guiding Questions:
    

Learning Targets:
    

Assessment:
    
Unit: Intolerance

Day 1: What do you REALLY think?

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
   

Materials:
   Pencil and pen
   “My America—Unveiling your Perceptions of America” worksheet

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their completion of the “My America—Unveiling
      your Perceptions of America” worksheet.

Opening Structure:
   Get students orientated with QUACK again. Today is day 2. Spend about 5-10 minutes.
   Transition to today’s lesson by talking about how connotation and denotation are at the
      heart of how we’ll discuss the big issues in class. There are acceptable and correct
      “denotations” to our topics and there are hidden assumptions and meanings that we will
      work hard to understand and use appropriately (like the connotation).

Mini Lesson:
    We have lots of beliefs about the way the world works. These are fine things to have.
      What we will be working on this unit is understanding where we come from and learning
      how to peacefully coexist with others that maybe don’t feel the same way. As I’ve said
      before, we can’t explore what others think until we know what we think.
    For the rest of the hour, I’m going to ask you to share your opinions on a variety of
      topics. The trick, though, is that you need to share these opinions in writing only.
    Proceed to give a topic and have them write for several minutes.

Work Time:
   As students are writing, use proximity to monitor talking and to help encourage more
     writing.
   Be sure to give student ideas on how to extend their writing/thinking if stuck.

Debrief:
    Great writing! I will collect these tomorrow. I will hold on to them for the year. If you
      want to add to anything tonight, that would be great!

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
        Tomorrow we’re going to start looking at different ways of listening and speaking. We
         will work diligently on really controlling our words.

Homework:
   Finish writing on worksheet if necessary

                                    REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

            1                        2                     3                         4
       Needs major        OK but not as strong       Overall lesson       Powerful teaching and
        overhaul.          as this needs to be.     concept solid but       learning happened
                                                   some kinks to work             today!
                                                          out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 2: Inner/Outer circle

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
   

Materials:
   Pencil and pen
   Role Assignments
   Reflection worksheet
   Stereotype article

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How can we share and think in a fair and tolerant manner?
    What non-verbal cues do we need to be aware of?
    What kind of listener/speaker am I?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their completion of the “Reflection” worksheet.

Opening Structure:
   Get students orientated with QUACK again. Today is day 3. Spend about 5-10 minutes.
   Transition to today’s lesson by talking about how sometimes actions speak louder than
      words. Just as our quack words can be visual, how we feel can be, too.

Mini Lesson:
    Pass out role assignments
    Explain: Today we are going to get to have a great discussion! But before we can, I need
      fifteen volunteers to go out into the hall while the rest of us talk. You need to be SILENT
      in that hall.
    As students go into the hall, pass out role assignments to everyone and check for
      understanding. Explain: we are going to be observing the discussion as if we’re in a
      museum and they are the artifacts. We will not be jumping in, we will simply be
      collecting data. We’ll report on that data after the discussion goes for fifteen minutes.
    Bring students in from hall and arrange desks in inner/outer circle form. Let the
      discussion begin!

Work Time:
   As students are collecting data, listen carefully and take any reflection notes of your own.
     Make sure to monitor the discussion carefully.

Debrief:
        Great job! We’re just scratching the surface of how we communicate. For some extra
         credit, I’d like you to bring in pictures of people non-verbally communicating both
         positively and negatively.

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we’re going to continue looking at unconscious clues to who we are, what we
     think, and how we believe. We will be doing some computer stuff and working toward
     understanding how we communicate.

Homework:
   Complete the reflection worksheet and read the stereotype article.

                                    REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

            1                        2                     3                        4
       Needs major        OK but not as strong       Overall lesson      Powerful teaching and
        overhaul.          as this needs to be.     concept solid but      learning happened
                                                   some kinks to work            today!
                                                          out.
                                         Role Assignments
For the following activity you are going to take on one of the below assigned roles. Do the best
you can to completely follow the directions. We’re counting on you to make this lesson
successful!
Timers: You and a partner will not just how long each person speaks. You will be paired
timing each speaker. As they speak, on time and the other write. Making a table will help.
Gender Watchers: One of you will be watching the boys and making generalizations on how
they are acting. You are looking for cues they give (do they raise their voices to be heard) or
trends you perceive. The other will watch the girls and do the same.
Turn Marker: It is your job to mark down how many times each person talked. Interuptions
count!
Non-Verbal Cue Observers: It is your job to notice every nonverbal cue that is made. You
need to split up the speakers and really watch their body language. Make assumptions and really
try to see it all!
Interruption Counter: Make a chart and note how many times each person interrupts.
Interruptions can be verbal and nonverbal.
                                        Reflection Sheet

What kind of communicator are you? For the following questions, answer in complete, honest,
and detailed sentences. I want you to really reflect on what you do verbally and nonverbally.

1. How can we share and think in a fair and tolerant manner?




2. What non-verbal cues do we need to be aware of?




3. How do I show I’m listening?




4. How do I show I’m not listening?




5. How do I share something important to me?




6. How do I show I’m upset?




7. What cues do I give that tell others to stop?




8. How can I make others aware of my communication styles?
The Psychology of Stereotypes
Survival of the Fittest: Like Animals, Humans Are Biased
By JOHN STOSSEL and KRISTINA KENDALL
Sept. 15, 2006
In a world of survival of the fittest, it makes sense that animals are hard-wired with a basic instinct that has them making
snap judgments about their predators.




Stossel asked kids who they thought was nicer, the Arab or Chinese man. The children responded, the Chinese man
because he had a smile. But both men were smiling.
(ABC News)

Some chimpanzees attack chimps that are of the same species, but not a part of their group. And some fish attack their
own kind simply because they weren't hatched in the same lake.

But what about human beings?
Psychologists say we categorize -- or stereotype -- by age and race and gender, because our brains are wired to do so
automatically.

"When you're a social animal, you need to be able to distinguish who's a friend and who's a foe. You need to understand
who's a member of your pack, who's a member of a different pack," said John Dovidio, a professor of psychology at the
University of Connecticut.

According to Dovidio, even those of us who believe that we don't stereotype, do. "We categorize people automatically,
unconsciously, immediately, based on a person's race and based on a person's sex."

When Does It Start?
It begins in childhood. "20/20" brought together three groups of kids and showed them pictures of two men -- one Arab,
the other Asian.

When we asked the children which man they liked better, over and over, more kids said they preferred "the Chinese guy."

One child preferred the Chinese man "because he looks nicer and he has a smile on." But both men were smiling.

Several children weighed in on the Arab man's personality, basing their opinions on just seeing his picture. One child said,
"I think he's weird." Another child said, "He's like the scary dude."
Next, "20/20" showed the kids pictures of a black man and white man. This time the pictures were different. Here were
some of the comments the kids made about the photo of the black man.

One said, "He looks mean." Another referred to him as "FBI's Most Wanted." Another commented, "He looks like he's a
basketball player."

When the white man's picture was shown, one child said, "He's nice." Another said, "I think he's nice except he might be
mad about something."

The boy was probably picking up on something. The photo of a white man was of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy
McVeigh. Admittedly, the pictures were a little bit different, but when we asked which man is a criminal, most kids
pointed to the black man. When we asked which man was a teacher, most pointed to McVeigh. This is ironic because the
black man pictured was Harvard University professor Roland Fryer.
Most adults claim they don't have these biases, but psychologists who study stereotypes say they do.

Harvard University's Implicit Association Test is supposed to measure racial bias. The test flashes pictures of white and
black faces and words like "evil" and "nasty," plus words like "joy" and "wonderful," and evaluates whether people
associate different words with certain races.

The test is given quickly, so that test-takers don't have time to think consciously.

The test's designers say it can show whether or not you have a preference for anything -- skirts versus pants, Meg Ryan
versus Julia Roberts.

"20/20" invited a group of Pace University students to take the test. They said they preferred Julia Roberts, and the test
showed they did.

But when we told them the test results revealed other implicit biases, such as one against career women, the elderly,
blacks, Arabs and gays, some students got defensive.

Researchers say the test shows what's really in your subconscious, with sometimes surprising results. Not just young
people but old people, too, showed an overwhelming bias against the elderly.

"You wouldn't expect that old people would think that old is bad. But the elderly are every bit as negative about the idea
of old age as much younger people are," said Anthony Greenwald, a professor of psychology at the University of
Washington.

The researchers also found about half of the black people who took this test showed bias against blacks. Greenwald says
many people discover they have biases that they wish they didn't.

"I certainly don't want to think of myself as a racist. But these things are in my head, they show up on the test," said
Greenwald.

Of course, the biases in our head are only harmful if we act on them.

In 1999, four New York City police officers shot and killed Amadou Diallo, an immigrant from Guinea, while he reached
into his pocket for what the officers feared was a gun but turned out to be his wallet.

Psychologists like Joshua Correll, a professor at the University of Chicago, study how race can affect such real-life
decisions.

He has had thousands of people in America take a test in which different scenes flash across the screen. Then a person
appears holding either something safe like a cell phone, or something lethal like a gun.

The results? "They shoot very quickly when an armed target is black. They take a little bit longer to shoot when the armed
target is white," Correll said.

Even black people are quicker to shoot if the person is black.

"White, black, Latino, Asian, again and again and again, we see this same pattern of effects: bias in the reaction times,
bias in the mistakes that they make," Correll said.

According to Correll, the more a test-taker tries to not appear biased the more bias shows up in the test results.

If we all have these subconscious biases. What can we do about them? Psychologists say we can control our conscious
actions.

"If we're just aware that it exists, it gives us a chance to do something, to be vigilant to not let our unintended biases -- our
implicit biases -- take over our behavior, which can happen unintentionally," Greenwald said.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 3: Do I have hidden preferences? Am I without prejudice?

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    To recognize one’s own levels of tolerance.

Materials:
   Without Prejudice video
   Stereotypes article
   Stereotypes worksheet
   Computers and log in passwords

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    What do my preferences say about me?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their participation with the implicit tests and their
      completion of the stereotypes worksheet.

Opening Structure:
   Get students orientated with QUACK again. Today is day 3. Spend about 5-10 minutes.
   If necessary, debrief inner/outer circle activity.
   Transition to today’s topic by discussing with students the need for continual awareness.
   I am not going to ask you to think or to prefer differently than you do. I am going to ask
      you to be aware and to use a filter when necessary. If I prefer blondes to brunettes, that is
      fine, but I don’t need to degrade every blonde I see. We are working on understanding
      our preferences and on deciding whether or not anything needs to be done about these
      preferences. So let’s get started!

Mini Lesson:
    Debrief Stereotype article and have students respond on the first section of the
      stereotypes worksheet.
    Show the video: http://www.alternet.org/blogs/video/56754/
    Have students respond to questions 1 and 2.
    Go to the computer lab to finish the worksheet.

Work Time:
   In the computer lab, monitor and assist students as they complete the implicit tests.
   Remind students that they need to have their reflection sheets ready to turn in tomorrow.

Debrief:
    Remind students that they need to have the reflection sheet ready to turn in tomorrow.
      Also make sure students know that they need to turn in the stereotype worksheets
       tomorrow. Reitterate to students that no test can tell them they are racist, sexist, etc. All
       today was about was seeing where your preferences might lie and then digging inside
       yourself and discovering what that means and how you feel.

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we’re going to work together to discuss the meaning of the word tolerance.
     What will that look like and be like in our class?

Homework:
   Complete the reflection sheets from yesterday and the stereotypes worksheet from today.

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
         1                      2                       3                               4
   Needs major       OK but not as strong         Overall lesson             Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.        as this needs to be.      concept solid but              learning happened
                                              some kinks to work                     today!
                                                      out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 4: Frayer Model

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    To define tolerance (as well as intolerance)
          o the quality of accepting other people's rights to their own opinions, beliefs, or
              actions; recognizing and respecting the beliefs or practices of others
          o unwillingness to recognize and respect differences in opinions or beliefs
    To identify examples, non-examples, and characteristics of tolerance.

Materials:
   Frayer Model worksheet
   Anchor Chart Paper

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Student Assessment:
    Students will be able to complete the Frayer model worksheet.

Opening Structure:
   Get QUACK completed. Today is day 4. Spend about 5-10 minutes and remind students
      that tomorrow is their quiz.
   Opening: The majority of Americans are tolerant of different beliefs, cultures, and
      opinions. (Agree or disagree)
   Share responses.
   Ask students what they think tolerance is. (Quick-write & share).
   Place student definitions on the board. Then have students look up definition or use
      Internet dictionary and provide definition.

Mini Lesson:
    Distribute the Frayer model. And have students work towards understanding the
      definition of tolerance.
    Discuss the guidelines for Frayer handout:
          o The “Examples” section looks for explanations of when tolerance is used and how
              to describe tolerance. (Tolerance in action).
          o The “Non-Examples” section looks for times tolerance is not being used, ways to
              explain intolerance, and ways you know someone is not being tolerant.

Work Time:
   Give students time to work on the “Examples” and “Non-Examples” part of the handout
     by themselves.
   Put the students in pairs and have them discuss their responses (adding ideas if they
     wish).
      Share whole class.
      Then have students continue to work in pairs to discover some “Characteristics.”
       What are characteristics of people who are tolerant?
           People who are tolerant usually understand that people have differences.
           Tolerant people speak without negative judgment.
           Tolerance can be taught.
      Share “characteristics” whole class. (You may want to have students also create a list of
       characteristics for intolerance).
      Post characteristics in the room and refer to them throughout the unit.


Debrief:
    To end class, share the following with students: # of hate groups in the United States and
      in Missouri. http://www.splcenter.org/intel/map/?source=redirect&url=tolerance-maps-
      hate Hate groups in United States. Click on Missouri (list of 29 hate groups residing in
      our state).
    Reaction? (you may want to have students write quickly—returning to their opening
      writing—do they still agree with their previous response? Were they shocked to see the
      number of hate groups and types in Missouri—throughout the United States?)

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   We’re going to continue to look at where we are and what we feel with regards to our
     tolerance levels.

Homework:
   None! Enjoy your three day weekend. (I would have had the homework be the opening
     from the next day).

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
         1                      2                       3                             4
   Needs major       OK but not as strong         Overall lesson           Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.        as this needs to be.      concept solid but            learning happened
                                              some kinks to work                   today!
                                                      out.
Name: ___________________________________        Hour: _______                Date:
______
                             Tolerance Frayer Model
Definitions:                                                     Characteristics




                               TOLERANCE

Examples                                                         Non-examples
Unit: Intolerance

Day 5: Do I communicate effectively?

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
   

Materials:
   Frayer Model (to recap and revise)
   PowerPoint slide handouts
   Communication handout

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed on their participation in the presentation by taking notes on the
      slide handouts.

Opening Structure:
   Assignment: Have students write their initial reactions to the following words (Similar to
      first day activity): Honesty is crucial. (Writer’s Notebook)
           o Older people
           o Nerds
           o Blonde females
           o Mexicans
           o African Americans
           o Muslims
   We just had a great three day weekend, and now we’re really settled into the school year.
      So what are we doing? Well, we’re finalizing our readiness for discussion and we’re
      finalizing our understanding of both the idea of tolerance and the awareness of our own
      beliefs and values. Today is a transition day. It is a day where we will be tying up loose
      ends and a day where we will be solidifying our concept of the unit.

Mini Lesson:
    Introduce today’s objectives and emphasize how important conversation and participation
      will be in the class.
    Begin PowerPoint. Have students take notes on their handouts.
    After the PowerPoint, distribute copies of the Communication handout.
    First, it’s important to recognize the pitfalls of Communication (ineffective speaking and
      listening skills) and the effects they can have on a conversation.
    Show the clip between Rosie and Elisabeth. The first time you show it, do it without
      sound. The second time, do it with sound. Have students take notes and complete the
      worksheet. Discuss issues.
Work Time:
   Have pods brainstorm for several minutes to come up with ways in which people with
     totally different beliefs can talk. Discuss whole class and note on our individual frayer
     models (on back). Go back to frayer model at this point and discuss what tolerance really
     means.

Debrief:
    Before we leave today, we need to go to our writer’s notebooks and get it all down. You
      need to answer these questions: What does tolerance mean? How can we effectively
      communicate? What beliefs of mine might be tough to tolerate and how can I share them
      without generating negative conflict?

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we’ll begin discussions! Get ready to start talking productively. Be sure to
     review our communication guidelines.

Homework:
   None

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
         1                      2                       3                          4
   Needs major       OK but not as strong         Overall lesson        Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.        as this needs to be.      concept solid but         learning happened
                                              some kinks to work                today!
                                                      out.
Communication Up-close                              Name: ________________________

American Literature                                 Hr.:   ___________



Part I: As you watch the video clip, record the communication pitfalls that you observe.
(Minimum of 6)

Video Clip: “The View: Elisabeth vs. Rosie”—Non-Verbal Communication Pitfalls




Part II: Record at least 6 communication pitfalls you recognize from the conversation.

Video Clip: “The View: Elisabeth vs. Rosie”—Verbal Communication Pitfalls
Unit: Intolerance

Day 6: Trying our hands at mini-discussions

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    To practice using effective communication skills during small and large group
       discussions.
    To use during reading skills—asking questions, marking the text, etc.
    To write reflectively before and during and after reading.

Materials:
   Materials from yesterday to transition and wrap up
   Articles: “We Still Have a Race Problem” and “Murder Case Forces Jasper…”

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their successful annotations of the two articles.

Opening Structure:
   Opening question (to respond in writer’s notebook): Do you think that racism is
      currently a major problem in the United States? If so, why do you think so? If not, why
      do you think it is no longer a major problem?
   Recap Discussion Do’s and Don’ts. (Remind them of objective #1 above)

Mini Lesson:
    As we read his essay, I’m going to ask you to practice a couple of skills that Good
      readers use to monitor their comprehension and to make meaning of what they’ve read:
          o Good readers mark the text—they circle details that are surprising or grab their
              attention—they ask questions about what they’ve read—they mark spots that they
              disagree/agree with.
          o Good readers stop periodically to reflect about what they’ve read—this helps
              them to monitor and to deepen their comprehension.
    Please read along with me. (Stop periodically and model how to mark a text—how to
      circle details that may surprise you or shock you.) When you reach a stopping point (I’ll
      mark some natural stopping points on the essay), have students record their thoughts—
      what surprised them, what do they agree/disagree, what do they question).
    Continue to read, mark, and reflect throughout the essay.

Work Time:
   Model a pair share using effective speaking and listening skills. (Have a student volunteer
     to be your partner upfront, turn chairs toward each other, and ask your student partner to
     share his/her response with you. As he/she does, model effective communication skills.
       Debrief what you did as a listener—how you demonstrated effective communication
       skills—body language, reaction, verbal responses, etc.).
      Then have students pair share their responses to the opening question. Move about room
       to monitor their interaction.
      Before sharing some of their responses whole class—brag about what you observed them
       doing well in terms of communication skills.
      Our theme this unit is “intolerance”. And for the next several weeks we’re going to
       examine this theme through a variety of lenses. How tolerant are we of African
       Americans? Muslims? People who are overweight? People who are different? People
       who chose a different lifestyle?
      Today, we’re going to take a close look at racial tolerance. Briefly discuss opening
       question whole class (it will be interesting to see how they respond=)
      Introduce Dennis Fritz’s article “We Still Have a Race Problem in the United States.”
       (Dennis is a student at the University of Texas—a member of the International Socialist
       Organization).

Debrief:
    At the end, ask them to revisit the opening question—have students to respond again with
      their newly acquired knowledge.

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will continue to explore some of these issues and move on to our text as
     well.

Homework:
   Assignment: Have students respond to questions and record their reactions to a news
     article titled: “Murder case forces Jasper to revisit horror of slaying in June”.
     (Reinforcing the skills we’ve practiced in class).

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
         1                      2                       3                          4
   Needs major       OK but not as strong         Overall lesson        Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.        as this needs to be.      concept solid but         learning happened
                                              some kinks to work                today!
                                                      out.
We still have a race problem in the U.S.
By Dennis Fritz
Published: Wednesday, January 21, 2004
Updated: Saturday, November 29, 2008
Let me begin by sharing a few tidbits of information:

* A recent study by the University of Chicago found that job applicants with "black sounding" names (e.g.
"LaQuisha" or "Jamal") were only half as likely to be called back for interviews as applicants with "white
sounding" names (e.g. "Emily" or "Brenden"), even when the former had greater experience and superior
qualifications. A subsequent study by Northwestern University found that white job applicants with
criminal records were more likely to be called back for interviews than black applicants with no criminal
history.

* The Harvard Civil Rights Project, in its recent study of the 185 largest school districts in the United
States, found that in all but four districts, levels of segregation had increased significantly between 1986
and 2000. According to the report, school segregation rates in the United States today stand near pre-civil
rights movement levels.

* While African-Americans account for only about 13 percent of all monthly drug users, they account for
35 percent of all arrests for drug possession, 55 percent of all convictions and 74 percent of all prison
sentences.

I cite the studies and statistics above to make a point that we white folks seem to have a hard time getting
our minds around these days, namely that racial discrimination still exists. The entire argument against
affirmative action, for example, rests on the assumption that racism is no longer a significant factor in
American life. For the most part, white people today see racism as a relatively minor phenomenon, largely
confined to isolated, individual acts of bigotry, and capable of being dealt with on a "case by case" basis.

This view is at best naïve and at worst delusional. As the information above makes clear, not only does
racism still exist, but it is severe, systematic and pervades every aspect American life, from education to
employment to the workings of the criminal justice system.

What has changed since the heyday of the civil rights movement is not the degree to which racism
pervades our society, but rather the manner in which that racism is expressed. Prior to the civil rights
movement, open expressions of racism were socially acceptable and therefore commonplace. We have
all seen footage of Strom Thurmond shouting "Segregation now, segregation forever!" to a crowd of
cheering supporters. While these kinds of overt, in-your-face expressions of racism still exist, they have
been largely supplanted - particularly within the public realm - by a more subtle, but no less pernicious,
form of bigotry sociologists call "color-blind racism."
Color-blind racism involves a large degree of what George Orwell called "doublethink", or the ability to
hold two contradictory ideas at once and believe both of them. As sociologist Jennifer L. Pierce has
written, "[white] Americans proclaim the virtues of a color-blind society at the same time as they do
everything possible to be self-conscious about race and racial matters." While staunchly insisting that we
are "color-blind," the vast majority of white Americans "choose to live in predominantly white
neighborhoods, work in racially segregated occupations, and, if given the opportunity, hire white
employees rather than African Americans."

As the old saying goes, talk is cheap. In a recent national survey, only 1 percent of white Americans
admitted they would move if an African-American moved in next door. Yet, the fact is that rates of
residential segregation in the United States have increased, not decreased, since the 1970s. In another
nationwide survey, 92 percent of white Americans claimed that they believed that white and black children
should attend school together. But the fact is that schools today are as segregated as ever and are
becoming increasingly so. Clearly, the vast majority of white Americans, regardless of what they might be
willing to say openly, still believe that "good neighborhoods" mean white neighborhoods, and that "good
schools" mean white schools. Even more telling is the fact that a majority of white Americans still see
affirmative action as a form of "reverse racism" that advances the fortunes of "unqualified" minorities at
the expense of more deserving whites.

Any worthwhile discussion of affirmative action, educational equity, racial profiling or any other issue
related to race must begin with an admission on the part of white Americans that racism is alive and well.
Otherwise, as my father would say, we are just spinning our wheels.

Fritz is a South Austin resident and a member of the International Socialist Organization.
American Literature                             Name: ___________________

Intolerance & racism.



Directions: As you read the news article titled “Murder case forces Jasper to revisit horror of slaying
in June”, practice the following reading skills:

            o   Mark the text—
                     circle (or highlight) details that are surprising or grab your attention
                     ask questions about what you’ve read
                     mark spots that you disagree/agree with.
            o   Stop periodically (stopping points are marked in news article) to reflect about what
                you’ve read—this will help monitor and deepen your comprehension.



Reflection for Stop #1:

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Reflection for Stop #2:

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Reflection for Stop #3:

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In the space provided below, record at least five details/lines that you marked as you
read. (Spend some time looking over your marks—which ones really stand out to you
now that you’ve finished the article?)

1.
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2.
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3.
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4.

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5.

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Murder case forces Jasper to revisit horror of slaying in June
By Richard Stewart, Houston Chronicle East Texas Bureau Staff
March 21, 1999, 10:57 a.m.
(BEGIN MARKING THE TEXT)

JASPER, TEXAS - It had been one of the hottest springs in memory in the Piney Woods, with
almost no rain for well over a month, and the lakes were so low that many of the boat ramps no
longer reached the water. The morning of June 7 offered no hope for change.
Local folks heading to work and church that Sunday morning along Huff Creek Road, an old
thoroughfare east of town leading to the Newton County community of Jamestown, made a
horrible discovery - a headless body in the road.
The mutilated mass of what had been living, human flesh was right in the middle of the road,
between the old Huff Creek Cemetery - long the final resting place for African-Americans from
the area - and an old community chapel used now only during cemetery cleanings and other
special events.
Lawmen rushing to the area were soon flagged down by other residents. A head had been found
in a ditch about a mile away. Actually, it was the upper part of the torso, with the head and right
arm attached.
Even after officers found a wallet containing identification for James Byrd Jr. - someone some of
them knew well - they couldn't identify the swollen and disfigured face of the severed head by
the photograph.
It was easy for the officers to find out what had happened. A trail of what affidavits coldly
described as "a brown substance" stained the road - along what must have been a trail of torture -
for almost three miles. The trail led for almost two miles and then along a twisty, sandy logging
trail for almost another mile to a clearing in the woods.
Byrd had been dragged to death - a horribly brutal means of killing that had been suffered by
black men at the hands of whites in the rural South earlier in the century, the horse giving way to
the car or truck. It touched a racial nerve across the country.
Word quickly spread around Jasper and then to surrounding towns and cities. Within a day,
reporters were making their way to the town of 8,000 - first from Houston and Beaumont and
then from other states and countries. The killing was big news in modern America - a country
that thought itself far beyond the kind of racial crime associated with an earlier, much more
violent era.
Jasper thought itself far beyond that kind of problem, too. It's a pleasant, busy little town, at the
intersection of two old trade routes. The rolling, wooded countryside has dozens of tiny
communities. There are big lakes, brimming with fat bass luring fishermen to Jasper's motels,
resorts and restaurants.
Most Jasper residents thought their town was far more tolerant and sophisticated in racial matters
than the smaller surrounding East Texas towns. Some black residents had risen to top positions
in the community. There is a black mayor, a black administrator at the hospital. A black is the
executive director of the regional council of governments and had been the top officer in the
chamber of commerce.
The town that calls itself "The Jewel of the Forest" soon found itself internationally famous as
the place where a black man had been dragged to death.
(STOP AND REFLECT ON YOUR HANDOUT)
(AS YOU RETURN TO READING, CONTINUE MARKING THE TEXT)
By the time the out-of-town reporters began to show up, three white men had been arrested and
were safely behind the locked doors of the Aubrey Cole Law Enforcement Center, which serves
as the sheriff's office and jail.
As the jail's front lawn turned into a village of television satellite trucks, protest groups and
media-hungry politicians, platoons of local, state and federal law officers met inside to try to
figure out just what had happened to James Byrd Jr. out on Huff Creek Road - and why.
Prosecutors now believe they know exactly what happened. Jury selection is set to begin
Monday for the trial of John William "Bill" King, 24, the first of the three defendants to be tried
on a capital murder charge. The other two accused in the crime are Lawrence Russell Brewer Jr.,
31, and Shawn Berry, 23.
Early on, District Attorney Guy James Gray offered Berry, the only defendant to make
statements to investigators, a plea bargain of life in prison in exchange for his testimony against
the other two. He turned down that offer and after further investigation it wasn't made again.
Now Gray is seeking the death penalty for all three. "I'm pretty soft on the death penalty," Gray
said. But when he looks at the album containing photographs from Byrd 's autopsy, he said he
"can't bring myself to seek less than death for anybody who can cause this."
For such a well-publicized case, investigators and prosecutors are playing it close to the vest.
There are many details that won't be revealed before the trial - and some that nobody may ever
know for sure.
There seems to have been little planning in the crime. The three white men were driving around
in Berry's gray primer-painted 1982 Ford pickup that Saturday night and seem to have come
across Byrd randomly. But perhaps trouble was inevitable. For one thing, they all had conviction
records - including Byrd - and all had spent time behind bars.
Berry and King had been buddies since high school. Both had been busted in September 1992 for
burglary. Both were sentenced to three months in a prison boot camp and then were released on
10 years probation.
Both were released on Jan. 14, 1993. King, however, violated terms of his probation and failed to
complete a restitution program. He was sent to prison in June 1995 and was released on parole
two years later.
While in prison, King met Russell Brewer. He had been in and out of prison on burglary and
drug charges since 1987. In September 1993 Brewer's parole on a cocaine conviction was
revoked. He was finally released in September 1997.
Two or three weeks before Byrd 's slaying, Brewer showed up in Jasper.
Nobody in town knew much about Brewer. He was quiet, but seemed jumpy. He had no other
connection to Jasper except for King and Berry and was seldom seen without them.
Jasper is a small town, less than 30 blocks from end to end. If King, Brewer and Berry didn't
travel in the same circles as James Byrd Jr., they had surely seen him around.
At 49, Byrd was practically a fixture in the town. He was a gregarious person who enjoyed
drinking and usually walked wherever he went. He didn't own a car and apparently didn't miss
having one.
He had graduated in 1967, in the last segregated class at Rowe High School before it was
consolidated with Jasper High as part of a desegregation plan. A gifted musician, Byrd played a
sweet trumpet in the school band. He also played the piano and had a singing voice that was
often in demand at parties.
His parents, James Sr. and Stella Byrd , probably would have preferred that he use his fine voice
in the choir at Greater New Bethel Baptist Church, where James Sr. was a deacon.
Byrd told his friends and relatives that he would be famous one day, famous for his singing voice
and entertaining. Instead, his fame would come from the terrible way he died.
Like the men accused of killing him, Byrd had a prison record.
His stints in prison began in February 1969 when he arrived at Madison County's Ferguson Unit
to serve a two-year sentence for a Houston-area theft.
Over the next 26 years, he was returned to prison six more times, to serve sentences for theft,
forgery and violation of parole or mandatory supervision.
Byrd 's last incarceration, for violation of mandatory supervision rules, began at Brazoria
County's Ramsey III Unit in February 1995. With credit for good time and time served in the
county jail, he again was released on mandatory supervision in July 1996.
Former Jasper Police Chief Harlan Alexander said Byrd "wasn't a bad guy," just one of those
people who seems to get into trouble.
(STOP AND REFLECT ON YOUR HANDOUT)
(AS YOU RETURN TO READING, CONTINUE MARKING THE TEXT)
What exactly happened the evening of James Byrd’s death?
Investigators said the trio drove around for much of the evening, drinking beer. Before the night
was over, prosecutors allege, the offer of a ride became a deadly kidnapping.
Berry told investigators that he'd stopped and given Byrd a ride. He said he didn't know Byrd,
but recognized him as somebody who walked around Jasper a lot.
King was upset about giving Byrd a ride, Berry told investigators. He quoted King as cursing and
saying, "You don't need to be picking up a (expletive) nigger."
They drove east out of Jasper, stopping at a closed convenience store. It was a place Berry knew
well. He had lived in that area years before.
There are at least three stories of what happened next. Berry gave investigators two different
versions. King later said in a letter sent to the Dallas Morning News that he and Brewer changed
places with Byrd , getting into the bed of the truck while he got inside with Berry. King said
Berry then drove Brewer and him back to their apartment, where they spent the rest of the night.
But investigators and prosecutors say there is far too much evidence that ties all three men with
what they think really happened next.
They went about a mile and arrived at a small clearing, a place Berry knew well as a safe and
secluded spot for locals to go out under the moonlight and drink beer without having to fear the
law.
King claimed that Berry walked into the clearing to make a deal to buy illegal steroids from Byrd
. Investigators said they have found little evidence that Berry used steroids and none that Byrd
sold them.
Berry said that when they reached the clearing, King said he was "fixin' to scare the (expletive)
out of this nigger."
Whatever happened, investigators believe there was a fight in the clearing. "It was the
investigator's opinion that the upturned grass, disturbed dirt . . . and the broken beer bottle are
consistent with signs of a struggle," they wrote in affidavits.
In the clearing the investigators also found several items that could have fallen out of a truck
while someone was being pulled out, or that could have been left during a struggle.
Of particular interest were the little wrench set and the lighter. The wrench set had the name
"Berry" on it. The lighter was engraved with the word "Possum," which King's girlfriend, Kylie
Greeney, said had been King's prison nickname. It also had a triangular Ku Klux Klan symbol.
Berry said his two companions began to beat Byrd . His lawyer, Joseph "Lum" Hawthorn of
Beaumont, said Berry tried to get between Byrd and the assailants. But prosecutors said blood on
Berry's shoes and other forensic evidence indicate he had more to do with the beating.
After the beating, Berry told investigators, Brewer sprayed Byrd 's face with black spray paint.
And later Berry said he noticed that Brewer, who was wearing sandals, had an injured toe; he
said Brewer told him he hurt it when he kicked Byrd .
In his first account, Berry told police he ran away during the beating and then got back into the
truck as King drove away from the clearing. Smashed brush along the trail indicates that at one
point the truck stopped and backed into the undergrowth before resuming its trip.
Berry said he asked King if he was just going to leave Byrd out in the clearing and King
answered, "We're starting The Turner Diaries early," perhaps alluding to the racial warfare
depicted in that book.
After the truck turned onto the pavement of Huff Creek Road, Berry said, Brewer looked toward
the back and, using an obscenity, said Byrd was "bouncing all over the place." Berry said he then
looked and saw Byrd being dragged behind the truck.
Just when Byrd died is hard to say. Early on, investigators said they thought he had been beaten
unconscious before he was chained by the ankles to the back of the truck. But autopsy reports
indicate he may have tried to support himself on his elbows and forearms before he died.
Investigators found Byrd 's tennis shoes, his wallet, a shirt and other personal items along the dirt
trail. His dentures and keys were on the pavement.
How fast they traveled wasn't revealed, but the trail of blood and flesh weaved from one side of
the road to the other and back again. Then, coming around a curve to the left, Byrd 's body
apparently bounced into the ditch on the right side of the road, hitting the ragged edge of a
concrete culvert just below the right arm.
The impact ripped the arm, shoulder, neck and head from the rest of the body, which continued
to be dragged for another mile.
The once-bright orange and yellow spray-painted circles that marked the places where
investigators found blood, flesh and other evidence along the route of horror have faded almost
to black now. It's impossible to find the outline of the body that once marked the pavement
beside the old cemetery. The stark word "HEAD" with a line pointing to the ditch and culvert has
faded from view.
(STOP AND REFLECT ON YOUR HANDOUT)
Unit: Intolerance

Day 7: Practicing successful communication/discussion

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
      To use during-reading strategies to annotate a poem.
      To collaborate with peers on size bias on America.
      To use concrete details to support answers.

Materials:
   Poetry handout
   Size powerpoint
   Reflection handout

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed on their poetry annotations and their reflections.

Opening Structure:
   Have students begin with a WN entry fueled from the powerpoint. The basic question is
      this: How do you feel about what you’ve just seen?

Mini Lesson:
      Tell the kids you are going to share a poem on America’s obsession with weight. It is written by a
       boy about his girlfriend. Read the poem “Barbie and Ken 101” to the class (I haven taken liberty
       to edit some controversial parts to make them more appropriate). The poem is party of Def Jam
       Poetry—unedited clips are online. You personally may want to watch a clip to see how it is
       read. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8MVhIiy8UQ
      After the reading of the poem and the time to write, have kids share their reactions to the poem
       with the class.


Work Time:
      Next, have kids partner up in class by sex (girl with girl peer/boy with boy peer, etc.). Allow three
       students to a group if need be. Distribute the handout about Weight in America. Walk through
       the handout section be section.
           o Have kids brainstorm what intolerance to obesity/pressure to be thin they have seen in
               schools (on playgrounds, in gym, at lunch, in the classroom, etc.). Have EACH group
               share a finding.
           o Next, have kids brainstorm messages that advertisements and commercials send to
               women (for girl groups) and men (for boy groups). Have them be specific with
               companies and the message. Have it stick to size issues. Have EACH group share a
               finding. Be sure to see what weight messages are being sent to boys and girls.
            o   Third, have kids brainstorm TV characters who are overweight—what are the characters
                like? (Do they make fun of themselves? Do they have low self-esteem? Are they less
                successful than their peers?) Have each group share one answer.
            o Finally, have kids brainstorm tv personalities (actors, actresses, sporting
                stars, etc.) who send an unhealthy body image about thinness. Have students share a
            finding.

       Have kids return to their regular seats. De-brief and summarize that weight issues seem to be
        prevalent in males and females and that we mostly have all been involved in ridiculing others or
        being ridiculed for our weight. It would be great to personally talk about weight as it relates to
        you/those you love.

Debrief:
    If time, have students, in their writer’s notebook, write (a poem/paragraph/lyrics/ or any other
        forma) a “Beauty from the Inside” entry. Describe to me a “beautiful” person you know that has
        NOTHING to do about PHYSICAL appearance. What internal qualities make this person
        beautiful? Be specific. Use concrete details.

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will work on getting some ideas on topics you’d like to discuss. We’ll be
     going to the computer lab and working in mini-groups to come up with justifications and
     literature selections for next unit. Be ready to think!

Homework:
   Finish the reading from yesterday and that worksheet. Make sure you have it to turn in
     tomorrow!

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
         1                      2                       3                                     4
   Needs major       OK but not as strong         Overall lesson                   Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.        as this needs to be.      concept solid but                    learning happened
                                              some kinks to work                           today!
                                                      out.
While listening to the poem, make the following annotations:

         ! to points that you agree with—personally

         ? to points you really question—they may not really reflect America as you know it

          for parts that made you laugh

          for parts that sadden you because they are TOO prevalent in society




“Barbie and Ken 101” by Rafael Casal

sometimes I feel like I'm sittin' in the back row of Barbie and Ken 101
a class we are all in, but never seem to learn from
Some general ed requirement for
Students of American culture
A general ed that convinces even the brightest
of young women that sex is survival of the thinnest
and I'm sick of this education that doesn't serve our best interests


my teacher has no face
she is every Revlon model women have ever chased
her lectures come through magazines in beauty shops & ad campaigns


just turn on your tv
this just in… a skewed perspective for today’s youth “y'al ladies ain’t thin enough, fellas ain’t trim
enough, wanna be sexy?
Y'al don't go to the gym enough”

cut to commercial, come on tune in, tune in to our maintenance team




convinced you're ugly? then we’ll tell you how to fix it with Maybelline
Perpetually started by these dolls marketed in the late 50's named
Barbie and Ken
hence the
class I'm in
Are you following?


This stuff just doesn't end
They keep moldin' Barbie to fit new trends
next maybe they'll have club hoppin' Barbie
With thongs as accessories,
video ho Barbie
abusive boyfriend sold separately,
under-aged Barbie
Kobe Bryant included,
or 9/11 victim Barbie
and Ken is proud to get recruited
problem is all these teachings are women’s decay
and I'm startin' to worry cuz my girl is up front and she's getting an A
this is where I start getting peeved off, ok?
when did it become all about
tuckin' in the gutt I gotta get the bigger chest
I just wanna fit a little better in a dress
so let me get a little skinny; gotta fit into an itty bitty
gotta be a size slimmer


please
teacher, teacher, I wanna give my oral presentation
cuz I have a problem with the class, and matter of fact, I have, a fat grudge with the
whole administration
you're the reason my girl won't eat in front of me in restaurants

the reason that she thinks she's overweight in over ten spots
less gut, less pudge, less lunch, less real

more looks, more love, more Barbie appeal?


to heck with Barbie and Ken
My future daughter will never play with them


you're the reason bleedin' 15 year old girls’ arms are slit
You made 12 year olds think skinny was a compliment
And now it's too late
I can't write my way through this bathroom door
So I raise my hand in class cuz I can't stand it any more
Teacher teacher your lectures all backwards
You got mothers and daughters forgetting what matters
Cuz above butts, lips, legs, and Ugs
The most attractive women are the ones who don't give a _ _ _ _


So screw your teachings your lessons and plans
You skewed sick distant relative of the man
Your plan for brainwashin' my baby I reject
I'm walkin' out of this class, and I will proudly take, my F




Now…give me a detailed reaction…How does this poem pertain to the America that you see (at school, with your
friends, on TV, etc.)? Give me one SOLID paragraph with concrete details.
                            Weight in America—Group Handout

Members: _____________________________________                    Hour: ______

Session #1: Brainstorm what intolerance to obesity/pressure to be thin you have witnessed in
schools (K-12). Think of all aspects of schooling.




Session #2: Girls, what images do advertisements send to women about weight? Give reference
to specific companies and specific messages. Boys, what images do advertisements send to men
about weight? Give reference to specific companies and specific messages.
Session #3: Brainstorm names of TV characters who are overweight? What are the characters
like? Do they make fun of themselves? Do they have low self-esteem? Are they less successful
than their peers?




Session #4: List TV personalities (actors, actresses, sporting stars, etc.) who send an unhealthy
body image about thinness.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 8: Planning Ahead

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    To discover intolerances present in our community
    To support opinions with facts
    To connect with the world and their peers

Materials:
   Topic worksheet
   Computer lab

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Student Assessment:
    Students will complete the topic worksheet in groups.

Opening Structure:
   Collect homework from Wednesday.
   Have students create a quick list in their WNs: what topics would you love to discuss in
      school? List at least fifteen.

Mini Lesson:
    The last two days we were able to do a bit of discussion with controversial topics. This is
      American LITERATURE class, not discussion class. However, a lot of what we will
      read, will spark discussion. A lot of what we will look at, will be in response to
      controversy. For the next couple of weeks, we’re going to look at an anchor text that will
      deal with intolerance. When finished with that, we will move on to our Freedom/Politics/
      and Religion unit. This is where we will definitely be pairing more articles and ideas like
      what we’ve talked about in the last two days.
    On Monday we will make the bridge to The Crucible, but until then, I want to give you
      every opportunity to be heard. Let’s look at your task for the day and get started!
    What you see on your worksheet is a list of tasks. For the rest of the hour you are going
      to follow the directions to get together materials that would be great to use for sharing
      with your classmates. You’ll be looking for websites, articles, or other media that pertain
      to a topic that could be discussed. Let’s look at what the worksheet and the directions are
      asking you.
    What I want you to remember is this: the last two days of mini-discussions, we have had
      a clear focus (racism and weight tolerance). We have had several texts to look at (poems,
      newspaper articles, videos, etc.). We’ve had a theme that the lessons have fit
      (intolerance). We have had opportunities to annotate, to discuss, and do debrief. The
      stuff you find will build similar lessons. Remember that what you collect and put
      together should be transferrable into a lesson!
Work Time:
   Students will work on completing the worksheet and turning it in by the end of the hour.

Debrief:
    That’s it for our mini-discussions for now. I hope you got a taste for what’s to come. Be
      sure to take these ideas and keep on the lookout for anything that pertains to them when
      you’re outside of the classroom. Feel free to bring in those items for future sharing.

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   On Monday we’ll be starting with The Crucible. It will be fun!

Homework:
   None

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
         1                      2                       3                          4
   Needs major       OK but not as strong         Overall lesson        Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.        as this needs to be.      concept solid but         learning happened
                                              some kinks to work                today!
                                                      out.
Creating a lesson for class discussion

Directions: Complete the prompts below with a partner or two (No groups of more than three
and no singletons!). Read all pieces of the prompt, have fun and get some good ideas down!

Step 1: Identify and investigate the topic.

What is your topic?
How does that relate to freedom, politics and
religion?
Explain the layers of your topic and circle the
ideas you want to address with your lesson.

Step 2: Find some great websites to share. Below, list at least three websites that could be
usable for investigating your topic. Complete the prompts in the table.

Website

What’s on it that we should look at (links we
should look at)?

How does this enhance your topic?



Website

What’s on it that we should look at (links we
should look at)?

How does this enhance your topic?



Website

What’s on it that we should look at (links we
should look at)?

How does this enhance your topic?




TURN THE PAPER OVER 
Step 3: Find some great texs to share. Below, list two texts that could be usable for
investigating your topic. Complete the prompts in the table AND ATTACH THE TEXTS!

Text title and genre

What does this text highlight about your topic?


How does this enhance your topic?



Text title and genre

What does this text highlight about your topic?


How does this enhance your topic?
Alternate lesson for 5th hour (no computer lab available)

Unit: Intolerance

Day 8 (alternate lesson): What do statistics and studies tell us?

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    To discover intolerances present in our community
    To support opinions with facts
    To connect with the world and their peers

Materials:
   Fact sheet
   Annotation Key
   List of question stem ideas
   Article “Is Your Baby Racist” for reference

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their active participation in a classroom discussion.

Opening Structure:
   Collect homework from Wednesday.
   I know we’re doing something different from the other classes today, but that is going to
      fun, not bad  Yesterday I showed you the title of the article “Is Your Baby Racist” and
      teased our activity. Right now, I want you to take a look at the facts and concepts I
      pulled from the article. As we read these ideas, remember to annotate them. Use the key
      on the screen.

Mini Lesson:
    So now we’re going to have a real discussion. I want you to do this by pair sharing.
      Your job is to share with each member of the class, but individually. First, prepare what
      you want to say. Model on document camera.
    Now it’s time to do a variation of pair sharing. Model pair share. Take a volunteer and
      read them your prepared statement. Let them ask you two questions. Answer the
      questions. Now let them go and repeat the process. Solicit questions from the class of
      observers and check for understanding.

Work Time:
   Get started with the mass pair-sharing. Time each interaction. Students should meet and
     share for two minutes and then switch as I ring a bell or something.
   Signal debriefing and stopping time and take some whole class responses.
   Ask students to do a quick reflect in their WNs if time.
Debrief:
    How did you like this activity? We may try this again as time goes on. Any last
      thoughts? Be sure to turn in your prepared “speech” as an exit pass upon leaving!

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   On Monday we will begin to get into the Crucible. Bring your books. We may not use
     them, but I want you to get in the practice. We will be bringing them everyday for
     awhile.

Homework: None!
  

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
         1                      2                       3                          4
   Needs major       OK but not as strong         Overall lesson        Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.        as this needs to be.      concept solid but         learning happened
                                              some kinks to work                today!
                                                      out.
              Annotation Key
      If you agree with a statistic/note
If you question the validity of a statistic/note
  ? If you are confused by a statistic/note ?
   If you disagree with a statistic/note 
                    Question Help
Use any of the stems below to help formulate a good
question:
   Why do you think…
   What did you mean by…
   Where did you get that (insert idea here)?
   Has (insert idea here) affected you personally?
   Has (insert idea here) affected someone you know?
   Has (insert idea here) affected our world in some way
    that you can quantify?
   How do you think this is important to…
   Who has this applied to?
   When do you think this issue will matter most?
Fact/Note Sheet from “Is Your Baby Racist” by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman, Newsweek,
September 14, 2009 issue, pages 53-60.

   
Unit: Intolerance

Day 9: Transitioning into the Crucible

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    Students will pre-read and make connections and predictions with the text.

Materials:
   Jigsaw worksheet
   Seven articles relating to The Crucible
   Vocab worksheets

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their thorough completion of the jigsaw worksheet.

Opening Structure:
   Get students orientated with QUACK again. Today is day 1 of the next five words.
      Spend about 5-10 minutes.
   Answer any questions.

Mini Lesson:
    Today you are all going to teach each other. The thing about The Crucible is that it has a
      lot of artifacts that go with it. It also has a lot of history and layers. What we need to do
      is number off by fives. Now, let’s get the groups to meet and I’ll give you some articles
      to read.
    Pass out articles to each group and have the groups read their article. As the groups come
      to finishing their reading, they need to pick out the seven key points.
    Each group picks a leader and that leader will teach the next group of interested people
      about that group’s information.
    Then the groups will re-form and share the information they gained.

Work Time:
   Have students jigsaw and discuss.

Debrief:
    So what were you surprised by? Not surprised by?
    In your WN, react to the information you just got. Do you see anything like this going on
      right now? What kinds of social issues are at the forefront of controversy today?

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will get more involved into the Crucible so get excited!
Homework:
   None.

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
         1                      2                       3                      4
   Needs major       OK but not as strong         Overall lesson    Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.        as this needs to be.      concept solid but     learning happened
                                              some kinks to work            today!
                                                      out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 10: Pre-reading, Predicting, and Getting Ready to Read

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    Students will pre-read and make connections and predictions with the text.

Materials:
   Pre-reading Jigsaw Quiz
   Textbooks
   Crucible Anticipation Guide
   Annotation Bookmarks

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their completion of the jigsaw quiz and anticipation
      guide.

Opening Structure:
   Complete the jigsaw activity. Allow no more than 10 minutes. Field any questions from
      students
   Issue the jigsaw quiz (5-10 minutes).
   Get students orientated with QUACK again. Today is day 2. Spend about 5 minutes.
   Explain to students that for the next two weeks or so we will be reading The Crucible.
      This is an emotionally and politically charged play. It is also pretty intense and difficult
      to follow. To get orientated into it and hopefully make it easier, we’re going to look at an
      anticipation guide to see where our beliefs lie before the text. Have students complete the
      activity and place in their WNs (5 minutes or so).
   Have students draw a part out of the hat. Allow one minute for switching.

Mini Lesson:
    Today we’re going to get started with the play. This is a pretty difficult first act as far as
      plays go so we’ll start off a little slow. As we read act one, you have one job: to
      annotate using these annotation bookmarks. Let’s look at them.
    First let’s note the two types of questions. We know there are two types of questions and
      the bookmark reminds us. As you read act one, I want you to track your questions and
      label them. You should have at least ten questions on your annotation bookmark by the
      end of the act. As we begin reading, I’ll stop us periodically to check our progress.
    The other thing you will be tracking is the action and characters of the play. Every time
      an event occurs, I want you to note it on the annotation bookmark. Bullet the event and
      note the page number. This will come in handy as we continue our study. Every time we
      get character details, I want you to note that, too.
      Let’s get started!

Work Time:
   Read pages 1216 and begin completing annotation bookmarks.

Debrief:
    Questions? How did it go? Whew! We cruised today! Keep up the good work 

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will be continuing our annotation and study. We will work to answer
     some of the questions and keep pushing through act one.

Homework:
   None.

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
         1                      2                       3                      4
   Needs major       OK but not as strong         Overall lesson    Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.        as this needs to be.      concept solid but     learning happened
                                              some kinks to work            today!
                                                      out.
Name: _______________________________________________                      Hr: _____

                                  Pre-Reading Jigsaw Quiz

Directions: Use ONE COMPLETE sentence to answer each of the following questions.

   1. Describe one way of uncovering a witch.


   2. Define McCarthyism.


   3. What was one reason that Miller wrote The Crucible?


   4. Why were most witches women?


   5. Explain how the witch trials were unfair.




Name: _______________________________________________                      Hr: _____

                                  Pre-Reading Jigsaw Quiz

Directions: Use ONE COMPLETE sentence to answer each of the following questions.

   1. Describe one way of uncovering a witch.


   2. Define McCarthyism.


   3. What was one reason that Miller wrote The Crucible?


   4. Why were most witches women?


   5. Explain how the witch trials were unfair.
                                   The Crucible Anticipation Guide

Carefully read and consider each of the following statements. Then mark whether you agree or disagree
with each statement.

Agree     Disagree   Statement

                     1. Age does not matter in a relationship between a man and a woman.



                     2. “All is fair in love and war.”



                     3. Adultery is acceptable in today’s society.



                     4. It is okay to lie or cheat as long as you don’t get caught.



                     5. Withholding the truth is the same thing as telling a lie.



                     6. There are times in life when you should lie.



                     7. Gossiping is a harmless but fun way to pass time.



                     8. If the majority of people believe a statement is true, then it must be true.

                     9. In the American judicial system, the accused is innocent until proven guilty.

                     10. I am willing to accept the consequences of my actions.



                     11. Going to church helps to make you a good person.



                     12. Most people have certain fundamental beliefs that they are not willing to
                     compromise.



Now choose one of the above statements with which you strongly agree or disagree. Explain your
feelings about this statement in a brief paragraph that you write in the space below.
Name: ___________________________                  Name: ___________________________
Hour: _____                                        Hour: _____


    Annotation Bookmark for The Crucible               Annotation Bookmark for The Crucible
Thin Questions are those questions you ask that    Thin Questions are those questions you ask that
have definite answers. When we are confused or     have definite answers. When we are confused or
just need some clarification, we ask thin          just need some clarification, we ask thin
questions. For example: Mrs. Dwyer, how            questions. For example: Mrs. Dwyer, how
many questions do we need to ask? This             many questions do we need to ask? This
question has a definite answer and is asked to     question has a definite answer and is asked to
help the reader understand better.                 help the reader understand better.

Thick Questions are those questions you ask that   Thick Questions are those questions you ask that
don’t have definite answers. These are the         don’t have definite answers. These are the
nagging or haunting questions that lend            nagging or haunting questions that lend
themselves well to discussion. For example:        themselves well to discussion. For example:
Why did you become a teacher, Mrs. Dwyer?          Why did you become a teacher, Mrs. Dwyer?
This question has more than one answer and lots    This question has more than one answer and lots
of layers of answers.                              of layers of answers.

Below, make note of at least ten questions you     Below, make note of at least ten questions you
have over Act One. When you ask the question,      have over Act One. When you ask the question,
label the type and leave space for an answer.      label the type and leave space for an answer.

1.                                                 1.


2.                                                 2.


3.                                                 3.


4.                                                 4.


5.                                                 5.


6.                                                 6.


7.                                                 7.


8.                                                 8.


9.                                                 9.


10.                                                10.
Action Tracking                                      Action Tracking
In the table below, note the events that happen in   In the table below, note the events that happen in
act one.                                             act one.

Event                                    Page #      Event                                    Page #




Characters                                           Characters
List details about the characters in the table       List details about the characters in the table
below.                                               below.

Character     Traits Discovered                      Character     Traits Discovered
Reverend                                             Reverend
Parris                                               Parris


Tituba                                               Tituba



Abigail                                              Abigail
Williams                                             Williams


John                                                 John
Proctor                                              Proctor


Rebecca                                              Rebecca
Nurse                                                Nurse


Reverend                                             Reverend
John Hale                                            John Hale
                  Picking Parts out of the hat!
Cut and place in a hat for drawing out parts. Pass around an
uncut sheet for students to put their names on.
Reverend Parris
Betty Parris
Tituba
Abigail Williams
Susanna Walcott
Mrs. Ann Putnam
Thomas Putnam
Mercy Lewis
Mary Warren
John Proctor
Rebecca Nurse
Giles Corey
Reverend John Hale
Elizabeth Proctor
Francis Nurse
Ezekiel Cheever
Marshal Herrick
Judge Hathorne
Deputy Governor Danforth
Sarah Good
Hopkins
Unit: Intolerance

Day 11: Getting into Act 1 and Annotating

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    Students will utilize during reading strategies to question and interact with the text.

Materials:
   Annotation Book Marks
   Textbooks

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    What is going on in The Crucible?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their successful completion of the bookmarks.

Opening Structure:
   Have students work on day three of quack and complete their daily lionbook.
   Remind students of what we were doing yesterday and field questions. Every day with
      The Crucible will begin this way: with questions and clarifications.

Mini Lesson:
    Today’s mini-lesson will focus on how to interact with the text. As we read today, we
      will be using our annotation bookmark to question. Now, I know you’ve done this before
      and that you really do “get” it, but I am going to model it as I read. Bear in mind, that
      though I’m the teacher, I haven’t read The Crucible since I taught it three or four years
      ago and even then, I didn’t read it because my school just showed the movie. So…I think
      I will have tons of questions just like you!
    As we read, stop and model questioning, both thick and thin.

Work Time:
   Read pages 1217-wherever you get and complete the annotation bookmarks. Goal today:
     1225.

Debrief:
    So, what is going on with the crucible? Let’s look at the events so far and mark our
      bookmark. Any questions? Comments?

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will read some more and get into the meat of Act 1.

Homework:
   None unless you need to support your learning by going to outside sources.
                                  REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                        2                    3                       4
    Needs major        OK but not as strong      Overall lesson     Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.          as this needs to be.    concept solid but     learning happened
                                               some kinks to work           today!
                                                      out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 12: Continuing our Act 1 Reading

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    Students will utilize during reading strategies to question and interact with the text.

Materials:
   Annotation Book Marks
   Textbooks

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    What is going on in The Crucible?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their successful completion of the bookmarks.

Opening Structure:
   Remind students of what we were doing yesterday and field questions. Every day with
      The Crucible will begin this way: with questions and clarifications.
   Today I’m not going to read the narration. I wasn’t very happy with the way class ran
      yesterday. The narration interfered with meaning. So I want you to take these post-its
      and mark the following pages: 1221, 1224, 1226, 1229, 1230, 1232. On each of these
      pages mark them with two post-its that should be put in like tabs.
   Now, each of these post-it pairs are marking a large chunk of narration. As we read and
      get to these chunks, I will expect you to read them for homework and annotate them.
   So what goes on the post-its? There are two post-its in each section. One post-it is for
      summarizing and one post-it is for questioning. You CANNOT write more than three
      sentences for each summary. There are six sections so you’ll, at max, have a total of 18
      sentences. For each question post-it you will be marking down one thin question and one
      thick question.

Mini Lesson:
    Today’s mini-lesson will focus on how to interact with the text. As we read today, we
      will be using our annotation bookmark to question. Now, I know you’ve done this before
      and that you really do “get” it, but I am going to model it as I read
    As we read, stop and model questioning, both thick and thin.

Work Time:
   Read pages 1217-wherever you get and complete the annotation bookmarks. Goal today:
     1224.
   Have students work on day four of quack. Remind about the quiz tomorrow!

Debrief:
        So, what is going on with the crucible? Let’s look at the events so far and mark our
         bookmark. Any questions? Comments?

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will read and finish Act 1! 

Homework:
   None unless you need to support your learning by going to outside sources.

                                       REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

            1                         2                      3                         4
       Needs major         OK but not as strong        Overall lesson       Powerful teaching and
        overhaul.           as this needs to be.      concept solid but       learning happened
                                                     some kinks to work             today!
                                                            out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 13: Continuing our Act 1 Reading

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    Students will utilize during reading strategies to question and interact with the text.

Materials:
   Annotation Book Marks
   Textbooks
   Post-its

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    What is going on in The Crucible?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their successful completion of the bookmarks.

Opening Structure:
   Quack quiz
   Remind students of what we were doing yesterday and field questions. Every day with
      The Crucible will begin this way: with questions and clarifications.
   Last night you read the narration and completed some questions and summaries. I want
      you to turn in those post-its to me. Put your name on the post-its and staple them
      together. Make sure they’re clearly labeled! Turn them in!

Mini Lesson:
    Today’s mini-lesson will focus on how to interact with the text. As we read today, we
      will be using our annotation bookmark to question. I am going to model it as I read
    As we read, stop and model questioning, both thick and thin.

Work Time:
   Read pages 1224-wherever you get and complete the annotation bookmarks. Goal today:
     1230.

Debrief:
    So, what is going on with the crucible? Let’s look at the events so far and mark our
      bookmark. Any questions? Comments?

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will read and finish Act 1! 

Homework:
   None unless you need to support your learning by going to outside sources.
                                  REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                        2                    3                       4
    Needs major        OK but not as strong      Overall lesson     Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.          as this needs to be.    concept solid but     learning happened
                                               some kinks to work           today!
                                                      out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 14: Continuing our Act 1 Reading

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    Students will utilize during reading strategies to question and interact with the text.

Materials:
   Annotation Book Marks
   Textbooks
   Post-its

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    What is going on in The Crucible?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their successful completion of the bookmarks.

Opening Structure:
   Remind students of what we were doing yesterday and field questions. Every day with
      The Crucible will begin this way: with questions and clarifications.

Mini Lesson:
    Today’s mini-lesson will focus on how to interact with the text. As we read today, we
      will be using our annotation bookmark to question. I am going to model it as I read
    As we read, stop and model questioning, both thick and thin.

Work Time:
   Read the rest of act 1

Debrief:
    So, what is going on with the crucible? Let’s look at the events so far and mark our
      bookmark. Any questions? Comments?

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will quiz over act one and make sure we’re experts. Make sure you’ve
     completed all of your post-its.

Homework:
   Finish your post-its.

                                      REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
     1                   2                    3                       4
Needs major   OK but not as strong      Overall lesson     Powerful teaching and
 overhaul.     as this needs to be.    concept solid but     learning happened
                                      some kinks to work           today!
                                             out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 15: Continuing our Act 1 Reading

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    Students will utilize during reading strategies to question and interact with the text.

Materials:
   Annotation Book Marks
   Textbooks
   Post-its
   Act 1 quiz

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    What is going on in The Crucible?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed based on their successful completion of the bookmarks.

Opening Structure:
   Remind students of what we were doing yesterday and field questions. Every day with
      The Crucible will begin this way: with questions and clarifications.
   Last night you read the narration and completed some questions and summaries. I want
      you to turn in those post-its to me. Put your name on the post-its and staple them
      together. Make sure they’re clearly labeled! Turn them in!

Mini Lesson:
    Today I just want to take some time to check for understanding. Our reading of act one
      was purely about “getting it” so let’s see how you’re doing. Do you get it? Do you need
      anything from me?

Work Time:
   Complete act 1 quiz and the annotation bookmarks.

Debrief:
    Any questions? Comments?

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will read begin the deeper work with act 2! We will build upon our
     content knowledge and start working on our reading skills.

Homework:
   None unless you need to support your learning by going to outside sources.
                                  REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                        2                    3                       4
    Needs major        OK but not as strong      Overall lesson     Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.          as this needs to be.    concept solid but     learning happened
                                               some kinks to work           today!
                                                      out.
Name: ________________________________________                                             Hr: _____
                                       The Crucible Act 1 Quiz
Answer the following questions using COMPLETE sentences unless otherwise specified. Follow ALL
directions carefully!
    1. Summarize the act so far using no more than FIVE sentences.




   2. LIST three acts of intolerance you have witnessed so far (in the play, not in the world).



   3. Pose ONE thick question you have about the people of Salem and then answering it using one
      example from the text (summarize the example, no need for quotes).




   4. Tell me three things about Abigail Williams.



   5. Tell me three things about Reverend Parris.



Name: ________________________________________                                             Hr: _____
                                       The Crucible Act 1 Quiz
Answer the following questions using COMPLETE sentences unless otherwise specified. Follow ALL
directions carefully!
    1. Summarize the act so far using no more than FIVE sentences.




   2. LIST three acts of intolerance you have witnessed so far (in the play, not in the world).



   3. Pose ONE thick question you have about the people of Salem and then answering it using one
      example from the text (summarize the example, no need for quotes).




   4. Tell me three things about Abigail Williams.



   5. Tell me three things about Reverend Parris.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 16: Beginning our character studies

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply pre-reading strategies to aid comprehension by previewing text and setting a
       purpose for my reading.
    I can apply during reading strategies to infer, question, and summarize.
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Character Study Packets
   Why are we doing this big idea sheet
   Character Signs

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How do I create deep/thick questions?
    How do I answer deep/thick questions?
    How do I relate to a character?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their participation.

Opening Structure:
   So we’ve read and understood Act 1, now it’s time to set a purpose for reading Act 2 and
      the rest of the play. We’re going to pretend to be doctors. In today’s society, if we
      thought someone was a witch or just in general disturbed, we wouldn’t stone them or
      hang them as Ebay has pointed out, we would treat them. Today and for the rest of our
      time with The Crucible, we are going to look at the characters as psychiatric patients in
      need of treatment.
   Issue Character packets
   Preview Packets and talk clarifying questions

Mini Lesson:
    So let’s get started! When you came into class, you were given a character sign to wear.
      A good doctor uses empathy to aid in the treatment of a patient. You can’t treat what you
      don’t know and understand. So, as we work on these character analyses, it will be your
      job to wear this sign daily, to get inside the shoes and heads of these characters. The first
      step to this is to complete the character observation sheet in your character packet. Go
      ahead and really think about who this person is. Write quickly and write well!
    Now that you’ve begun to think about studying this character, it is time to review one of
      the skills we’ve taken for granted: questioning. Let’s review (thick/deep and
      thin/clarifying).
        So what does this look like? Solicit response and clarify/enhance.
        This questioning is starting to come naturally for you, but as you may have noticed with
         Act 1, it can go all over the place. Though good readers ask questions, good readers also
         set and narrow a purpose for reading. We have set and narrowed our purpose and it is to
         discover and understand our character. This means our questions will need to be focused
         only on character. What does this look like?
        Have students review Therapeutic Question and Answer sheet in packet and ask them to
         create just two of the questions for homework.

Work Time:
   Prepare to read Act 2 by chunking the reading.
   Have students create two thick questions for the Therapeutic Question and Answer sheet
     in their packet.
   Make sure students have completed the Preliminary Patient Observation form in their
     packets.

Debrief:
    How does this feel? Any questions?

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will be working on chunks one and two and furthering our understanding
     of our patient.

Homework:
   Complete two questions on the Therapeutic Question and Answer sheet.

                                       REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

            1                         2                     3                          4
       Needs major         OK but not as strong       Overall lesson        Powerful teaching and
        overhaul.           as this needs to be.     concept solid but        learning happened
                                                    some kinks to work              today!
                                                           out.
Reverend
 Parris
Tituba
Abigail
Williams
Mary Warren
The Putnams
John Proctor
Rebecca Nurse
Reverend John
    Hale
Elizabeth
 Proctor
                              Why are we doing this?
                  Unit 2 Essential Questions and Learning Targets
Below you will find the “big ideas” of what we have been and are doing. This sheet should serve
as a “man behind the curtain” piece for you. What we do in class is just “what we do in class” if
you don’t know why we’re doing it. Below is my list of whys (learning targets) and my list of
questions you should be continuously thinking on as we work (essential questions).

Essential Questions:
     How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
     In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
        it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Learning Targets:
    I can apply pre-reading strategies to aid comprehension by previewing text and setting a
      purpose for my reading.
    I can apply during reading strategies to infer, question, and summarize.
    I can apply post-reading skills to comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate text (draw
      conclusions, question to clarify, and summarize).
    I can use details from text to analyze a theme across genres.
    I can use details from texts to analyze and evaluate an author’s tone, diction, and purpose
      on the overall meaning of the work.
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.
    I can use details from text to analyze conflict and setting and their impact on character
      and mood.
    I can apply the Six Traits of Writing and the steps of the writing process to compose a
      multi-paragraph reflection.
    I can evaluate my written work for voice.
    I can apply effective listening skills during whole group and small group discussions.

Assessment of Learning:
    I will be able to show my mastery of the above reading skill-based learning targets
      through a completed character study.
    I will be able to show my mastery of the above writing skill-based learning targets
      through a completed character analysis piece.
Patient Chart for: _________________________________________
Compiled by Dr. __________________________________




Contents of Chart:

                                             Included—Y/N   Reviewed—Y/N

      Preliminary Patient Observations

      Therapeutic Questions and Answers

      Patient Motivation Study

      Environmental Study

      Observation of Subject in Action

      Pattern Study of Patient Intolerance

      Observational Connections

      Character Analysis Report


Comments:
                              Preliminary Patient Observations

The patient was observed as looking…




The patient was observed as saying…




The patient was observed as doing…




Other observations I have made about this patient:




Based on the above observations, I have come to the below conclusions and beliefs:
  Note to student: This worksheet should have be completed as if you were actually a doctor
  interviewing your character/patient. I am expecting that you create quotes, not draw them from
  the text. However, your created quotes should be based on what you know of the character.

                                Therapeutic Questions and Answers

  The following questions were posed to the subject and answered. What follows are direct quotes
  from the character recorded for the purpose of observation.

  Question #1 (about character’s thoughts):____________________________________________________________

Patient response to question:



Doctor evaluation (why you think the patient answered this way):


  Question #2 (about character’s actions):____________________________________________________________

Patient response to question:



Doctor evaluation (why you think the patient answered this way):



  Question #3 9about character’s words):____________________________________________________________

Patient response to question:



Doctor evaluation (why you think the patient answered this way):


  Question #4 (about character’s emotions):___________________________________________________________

Patient response to question:



Doctor evaluation (why you think the patient answered this way):



  Question #5 (about something of concern):___________________________________________________________

Patient response to question:



Doctor evaluation (why you think the patient answered this way):
                                  Patient Motivation Study

The below observations were recorded. These observations seek to deduce the patient’s
motivations for their actions.

 The patient did (text says)         As a doctor I know               So I deduce/infer
                                     Environmental Study

The patient was observed in his/her native environment. Notes on their patient’s environment
were taken with a focus on deduction. The doctor was looking for clues as to the rationale for
the patient’s behavior.

Describe the patient’s native environment: ___________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________



How does the environment affect the patient: _________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________



Is the patient a product of their environment? Yes/No

Reasons for doctor’s findings: _____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________
                              Observation of Subject in Action

The patient’s actions were observed. Notes on their patient’s behavior were taken with a focus
on deduction. The doctor was looking for clues as to the rationale for the patient’s behavior.

Describe the patient’s behavior: ___________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________



How does the behavior affect the patient and those around him/her: _______________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________



What is going on to cause this behavior: _____________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________



Is the patient a product of what has happened to them or around them? Yes/No

Reasons for doctor’s findings: _____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________
                             Pattern Study of Patient Intolerance

The following observations were made based on the doctor’s interpretation of intolerances the
patient was either a victim of or perpetuated.

List intolerances observed to be perpetuated by the patient: _____________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

What proof exists of this: ________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

How could the patient have changed this: ____________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________



List the intolerances in which the patient was a victim: _________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

What proof exists of this: ________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

How could the patient have changed this: ___________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________
                                  Observational Connections

In an attempt to better serve the patient, the doctor has worked on connecting to the patient.
Below follows a serious of doctor to patient connections, patient to patient connections, and
patient to world connections in the hopes that gathering data will prove useful to assessing the
patient.




       Doctor to Patient Connection:




       Patient to Patient Connection:




        Patient to World Connection:




       Doctor to Patient Connection:




       Patient to Patient Connection:




        Patient to World Connection:
Unit: Intolerance

Day 17: Beginning Act 2 for real

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply during reading strategies to infer, question, and summarize.
    I can apply post-reading skills to comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate text (draw
       conclusions, question to clarify, and summarize).
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Exit Slips
   Patient Chart

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How do I make solid connections?
    How do I relate to a character?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their work on annotation slips.

Opening Structure:
   As students enter, give them their sign and pride points cards
   Review why we are doing this
   Make sure they have completed their lionbook work.

Mini Lesson:
    Today we are going to tackle act 2. Remember, we are digging deeper. We are not just
      figuring out what is going on, we are acting as doctors observing our patients.
    As we read today, we are setting our purpose: to understand, but to also understand our
      patient.
    As part of this, I want you to begin annotating. This act we will have another annotation
      strip bookmark, but it will revolve around character. We will be marking it as we go.
      You should be using this as you read. At the end of each chunk, we will stop and I will
      model what I want you to do.
    Be sure to explain the bookmark after reading chunk one and model it’s completion for
      the character of Betty Parris (since no one has her) on the document camera.

Work Time:
   Students will read Chunk 1 together as a class and they will work with me on their
     annotation strip for that chunk.
   Students will then read Chunk 2 and annotate silently on their own.
Debrief:
    Now is the time for questions. Today we accomplished a lot and we pushed hard. This is
      what the rest of the play will feel like. What do you need from me?

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will continue to tackle act 2! Keep putting yourself in your patient’s
     shoes!

Homework:
   Finish Chunk 2 if necessary.

                                   REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                         2                    3                        4
    Needs major         OK but not as strong      Overall lesson      Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.           as this needs to be.    concept solid but      learning happened
                                                some kinks to work            today!
                                                       out.
Betty
Parris
Name: ___________________________                   Name: ___________________________
Hour: _____                                         Hour: _____


          Annotation Bookmark for Act 2                       Annotation Bookmark for Act 2
We don’t live in a vacuum. So when we read,         We don’t live in a vacuum. So when we read,
we shouldn’t assume that our characters do. As      we shouldn’t assume that our characters do. As
you read this act, you will be making               you read this act, you will be making
connections between your patient/character, and     connections between your patient/character, and
the other characters in the story. Any time that    the other characters in the story. Any time that
you see a connection, write it down! I don’t care   you see a connection, write it down! I don’t care
if it is a deep or surface connection, the more     if it is a deep or surface connection, the more
you get, the better. I expect to see at least 10    you get, the better. I expect to see at least 10
connections. Number your connections.               connections. Number your connections.

1.                                                  1.


2.                                                  2.


3.                                                  3.


4.                                                  4.


5.                                                  5.


6.                                                  6.


7.                                                  7.


8.                                                  8.


9.                                                  9.


10.                                                 10.
Action Tracking                                      Action Tracking
In the table below, note the events that happen in   In the table below, note the events that happen in
act two.                                             act two.

Event                                  Page #        Event                                  Page #




Your Patient                                         Your Patient
Keep empathizing with your patient! As you           Keep empathizing with your patient! As you
read, make note of the following with regards to     read, make note of the following with regards to
your patient.                                        your patient.

Data to       Observation                            Data to       Observation
Look for                                             Look for
How are                                              How are
you like                                             you like
your                                                 your
character?                                           character?
What has                                             What has
your                                                 your
character                                            character
done that                                            done that
surprised                                            surprised
you?                                                 you?
What has                                             What has
your                                                 your
character                                            character
done that                                            done that
shows                                                shows
who they                                             who they
really are?                                          really are?
How                                                  How
likable is                                           likable is
your                                                 your
character?                                           character?
Explain.                                             Explain.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 18: Finishing Act 2

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply during reading strategies to infer, question, and summarize.
    I can apply post-reading skills to comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate text (draw
       conclusions, question to clarify, and summarize).
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Annotation Strips

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How do I make solid connections?
    How do I relate to a character?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their work on annotation slips.

Opening Structure:
   As students enter, give them their sign.
   Review why we are doing this
   Make sure they have completed their lionbook work.

Mini Lesson:
    Today we are going to finish act 2. Let’s remember our purpose!
    We will not have a specific mini-lesson today. We are continuing from yesterday. But if
      necessary, let’s talk about fixing-up our reading from yesterday. Let’s also recap by
      asking and answering some of our questions.

Work Time:
   Students will read Chunk 3 and 4 together as a class and they will work on their
     annotation strip for that chunk.

Debrief:
    What do you need from me? On Monday we will take the Act 2 quiz. Make sure you
      “get” what’s going on and that you can make sure to get your questions ready for the start
      of class.

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Monday we will quiz over act 2 and get moving on our patient charts!
Homework:
   Finish Chunk 4 if necessary.

                                   REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                        2                    3                       4
    Needs major        OK but not as strong      Overall lesson     Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.          as this needs to be.    concept solid but     learning happened
                                               some kinks to work           today!
                                                      out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 19: Making Observations on our Patient Charts

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply post-reading skills to comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate text (draw
       conclusions, question to clarify, and summarize).
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.
    I can use details from text to analyze conflict and setting and their impact on character
       and mood.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Quack for 3.3
   Act 2 Quiz
   Patient Charts

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How do I create deep/thick questions?
    How can I relate to my patient

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their completion of an exit pass.

Opening Structure:
   Have students ask questions about Act 2 and clarify.
   Make sure students know that Lionbook will pick up again tomorrow.
   Take Act 2 Quiz
   Watch Quack 3.3 and do the definition portion of quack worksheet.
   Get patient signs

Mini Lesson:
    Let’s talk about our patients again!
    So we’ve made observations on our patient chart, but now we need to move further.
      We’re 2/5 of the way through this story and we need to start evaluating our patients
      further. I want to talk to you about the Therapeutic Question and Answer sheet.
    Discuss with students how to fill it out. Model using Betty.

Work Time:
   Students need to complete the Therapeutic Question and Answer sheet.

Debrief:
    So how are you doing? Any questions? Comments? We’ll keep at it!
Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will take a break from the play in order to take a district assessment.
     Don’t worry, we’ll pick up again on Wednesday!

Homework:
   Finish Therapeutic Question and Answer sheet in chart.

                                    REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                         2                     3                        4
    Needs major         OK but not as strong       Overall lesson      Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.           as this needs to be.     concept solid but      learning happened
                                                 some kinks to work            today!
                                                        out.
Name: ______________________________                Hour: ________         Date: __________

                                           Act 2 Quiz

Complete the following questions being sure to follow directions carefully. Unless otherwise
stated, you should use COMPLETE sentences.

1. Tell me three things about the character of John Proctor. Offer text proof of each.




2. Tell me three things about the character of Elizabeth Proctor. Offer text proof of each.




3. List five events from Act 2 using no more than five words per bullet.


   a.


   b.


   c.


   d.


   e.


4. What is one connection you have made between your patient and someone or something in
   act 2?




5. What are three instances of intolerance witnessed in act 2?
Name: ______________________________               Hour: ________        Date: __________

                                          Exit Slip

In the space below, note one impression you have of your character. Explain how this
impression has been made.




Name: ______________________________               Hour: ________        Date: __________

                                          Exit Slip

In the space below, note one impression you have of your character. Explain how this
impression has been made.




Name: ______________________________               Hour: ________        Date: __________

                                          Exit Slip

In the space below, note one impression you have of your character. Explain how this
impression has been made.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 20: District Writing Assessment

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    None

Materials:
   Pen or pencil
   District Writing Prompt and draft paper sheets

Essential Question(s):
    N/A

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their completion of the district writing prompt.

Opening Structure:
   Have students complete their quack work.
   Make sure students also finish with lionbook.

Mini Lesson:
    None

Work Time:
   Students will complete the district writing prompt.

Debrief:
    None

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   We’ll get back into the play. Be ready to watch!

Homework:
   None.

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                          2                     3                         4
    Needs major          OK but not as strong       Overall lesson       Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.            as this needs to be.     concept solid but       learning happened
                                                  some kinks to work             today!
                                                         out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 21: Beginning Act 3

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply pre-reading strategies to aid comprehension by previewing text and setting a
       purpose for my reading.
    I can apply during reading strategies to infer, question, and summarize.
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Movie
   Act 3 Annotation Bookmarks

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How do I make successful inferences?
    How do characters come to life in film?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their completion of their bookmarks.

Opening Structure:
   Students need to continue their quack study. Today is day 3, but we are also completing
      day 2.
   Students need to do their lionbook.

Mini Lesson:
    Today we are finally watching the movie! Of course, you need bookmarks to annotate
      what you watch as well! Let’s look at these and make sure you know how to complete
      them.
    Now, I’m going to be stopping as we “read” this text. I will stop periodically so you can
      annotate your text. We’ll also take some time to discuss what we’re seeing that is similar
      or different from our text.
    Any questions?
    As we watch the opening of the movie, show the witch scene and pause and talk. Then
      make sure to show/pause/introduce each of the main characters. Start “act 3” with the
      arrests scene and then skip the part with John, Mary, and Elizabeth to continue. Explain
      how act 3 is an amalgamation of acts 1-4. Be sure to do 2 inferences with students. Use
      the Mr. Jacobs scene for that.

Work Time:
   Students should be viewing and annotating the movie.
Debrief:
    So what do you think? Was it worth the wait?

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   We’ll continue on in our study tomorrow!

Homework:
   None unless they need to catch up!

                                  REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                        2                    3                       4
    Needs major        OK but not as strong      Overall lesson     Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.          as this needs to be.    concept solid but     learning happened
                                               some kinks to work           today!
                                                      out.
Name: ___________________________                   Name: ___________________________
Hour: _____                                         Hour: _____


        Annotation Bookmark for Act 3                       Annotation Bookmark for Act 3
Finally, we get to watch the movie! The good        Finally, we get to watch the movie! The good
news, no reading, the bad news, still annotating!   news, no reading, the bad news, still annotating!
As you “read” the movie text, I want you to         As you “read” the movie text, I want you to
follow along with the captions and action. As       follow along with the captions and action. As
we watch, really track your thinking. For this      we watch, really track your thinking. For this
act, I want you to note inferences. Remember,       act, I want you to note inferences. Remember,
to make an inference you need to tell me what       to make an inference you need to tell me what
the text says, then what your schema/BK is, then    the text says, then what your schema/BK is, then
your inference. We will practice 2 together and     your inference. We will practice 2 together and
you’ll get the rest!                                you’ll get the rest!

1.                                                  1.



2.                                                  2.



3.                                                  3.



4.                                                  4.



5.                                                  5.



6.                                                  6.



7.                                                  7.



8.                                                  8.



9.                                                  9.



10.                                                 10.
Action Tracking                                      Action Tracking
In the table below, note the events that happen in   In the table below, note the events that happen in
“act 3.”                                             “act 3.”

Event                                                Event




Your Patient                                         Your Patient
Keep empathizing with your patient! As you           Keep empathizing with your patient! As you
watch, make notes about your character. How          watch, make notes about your character. How
do they look? How do they act? What do you           do they look? How do they act? What do you
notice?                                              notice?

Observations                                         Observations
Unit: Intolerance

Day 22: Continuing the viewing of act 3

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply during reading strategies to infer, question, and summarize.
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.
    I can use details from text to analyze conflict and setting and their impact on character
       and mood.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Annotation bookmarks for act 3

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How do I create solid inferences?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their completion of annotation bookmarks.

Opening Structure:
   Have students complete lionbook and their vocab sheet. Remind about the vocab quiz
      tomorrow!

Mini Lesson:
    Today we are continuing with inferring and viewing our text. Let’s jump right in. I’ll
      stop at times to question and allow you time to infer!
Work Time:
    Continue viewing act 3 and annotating.
Debrief:
    So what do you think? Do you like the movie? Is it helping with understanding?
Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
    Tomorrow we will finish our viewing of Act 3. Keep working on your bookmarks!
Homework:
    Review bookmarks so far and study for quack quiz.
                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

          1                         2                      3                          4
     Needs major         OK but not as strong        Overall lesson        Powerful teaching and
      overhaul.           as this needs to be.      concept solid but        learning happened
                                                   some kinks to work              today!
                                                          out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 23: Finishing our viewing of Act 3

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply during reading strategies to infer, question, and summarize.
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.
    I can use details from text to analyze conflict and setting and their impact on character
       and mood.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Quack Quiz
   DVD of The Crucible
   Exit Slips

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How is the reality of the play different than that of the movie?
    What is going on in the story?
    What am I learning about my patient/character?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their completion of an exit pass.

Opening Structure:
   Students should participate in lionbook activity.
   Students should review and ready for the quack quiz.
   Students should take quack quiz and turn in quacktrice.

Mini Lesson:
    Today we are going to push through the rest of act 3. There is a lot of action and
      heartbreak. I will NOT be talking about it until Monday. Instead, I will stop throughout
      and pause for your annotations.

Work Time:
   View act three and annotate. We should finish it today.

Debrief:
    Wow. What a story!       Before you leave today, you need to complete and exit pass for
      me.

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   We will begin again on Monday by discussing what we saw in act three. We will take an
     act 3 quiz and then we will work on our patient charts!
Homework:
   None.

                                  REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                        2                    3                       4
    Needs major        OK but not as strong      Overall lesson     Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.          as this needs to be.    concept solid but     learning happened
                                               some kinks to work           today!
                                                      out.
Name: ______________________________               Hour: ________     Date: __________

                                           Exit Slip

In the space below, note TEN events that have happened in the play.
    1.                                                6.

   2.                                                  7.

   3.                                                  8.

   4.                                                  9.

   5.                                                  10.




Name: ______________________________               Hour: ________     Date: __________

                                           Exit Slip

In the space below, note TEN events that have happened in the play.
    1.                                                6.

   2.                                                  7.

   3.                                                  8.

   4.                                                  9.

   5.                                                  10.




Name: ______________________________               Hour: ________     Date: __________

                                           Exit Slip

In the space below, note TEN events that have happened in the play.
    1.                                                6.

   2.                                                  7.

   3.                                                  8.

   4.                                                  9.

   5.                                                  10.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 24: Studying our patients some more

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply post-reading skills to comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate text (draw
       conclusions, question to clarify, and summarize).
    I can use details from texts to analyze and evaluate an author’s tone, diction, and purpose
       on the overall meaning of the work.
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.
    I can use details from text to analyze conflict and setting and their impact on character
       and mood.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Act 3 Quiz
   Patient Chart Packet (we’ll work on the Patient Motivation Study, the Environmental
      Study, and the Observation of Subject in Action)

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    What am I learning about my patient/character?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their completion of an exit pass.

Opening Structure:
   Students should complete their daily lionbook.
   Students should review their act 3 bookmark and prepare for the quiz.
   Students should take the quiz.
   Distribute patient signs.

Mini Lesson:
    Model the completion of the Patient Motivation Study, the Environmental Study, and the
      Observation of Subject in Action parts of the patient chart. Discuss what we’re doing
      again and within each piece address the specific skills of inferring and questioning.

Work Time:
   Students should work on their packets and ask questions.

Debrief:
    We’re almost there! What kinds of questions do you have for me? Catch if needed
      whole class.

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
        Tomorrow we get back into the text! We will be reading act 4.

Homework:
   Finish Patient Motivation Study, the Environmental Study, and the Observation of
     Subject in Action sheets.

                                      REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

            1                        2                     3                        4
       Needs major        OK but not as strong       Overall lesson      Powerful teaching and
        overhaul.          as this needs to be.     concept solid but      learning happened
                                                   some kinks to work            today!
                                                          out.
Name: ______________________________                Hour: ________         Date: __________

                                  Act 3 Quiz—Making Inferences

Complete the following items being sure to follow the inference-making process. You will be
making inferences based on ACT THREE and what you SAW. Remember to be specific and
make detailed inferences.
  The video showed (this is        I know (this is where you         So…(this is where your
      like “the text said”)            BK/Schema goes)                    inference goes)
                                I know that when you are
                                lieing, you might delay to act   So I think the girls are big fat
                                and hedge a bit. I also know     liars! I think they were
The girls delay before saying
                                that when you are trying to      coordinating their efforts and
that they see a “black man”
                                pull off a prank you             so sometimes it took a minute
talking to Mr. Jacobs.
                                sometimes delay because          before they’d “see” the same
                                you’re coordinating with your things.
                                partner.

Judge Danforth tells Reverend
Parris to sit down and be quiet
when Reverend Parris says
he’d like to question Mary.



We hear from Judge Danforth
that Elizabeth Proctor is
pregnant and John Proctor
says, well it must be true
because she will never lie.


Elizabeth hesitates for quite a
bit and makes extra comments
before telling the judge that
her husband did not have an
affair.



Abby’s face in shock as Mary
hugged her and said, “I’m
sorry, Abby!”




Reverend Hale denounces the
court proceedings and says
he’s “quit the court.”
Unit: Intolerance

Day 25: Beginning Act 4

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply pre-reading strategies to aid comprehension by previewing text and setting a
       purpose for my reading.
    I can apply during reading strategies to infer, question, and summarize.
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.
    I can use details from text to analyze conflict and setting and their impact on character
       and mood.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Act 4 Annotation Bookmarks
   Exit passes

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How do I create deep/thick questions?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their completion of annotation using their bookmarks.

Opening Structure:
   Students will complete their lionbook activity.
   Field and answer questions about the text and remind where we are.
   Chunk the text of act 4 (mark at page 1266, 1268, 1270, 1271)

Mini Lesson:
    Today we will be focusing on digging deep. As we read we will continue to annotate as
      we always do using our bookmarks, but today we will focus on questioning and on really
      looking beyond the text for answers. Let’s read act 4, chunk 1 and then I’ll model for
      you what I’m talking about.
    Read chunk 1 aloud together and then model the questioning and fill in the other pieces
      of the bookmark.

Work Time:
   Complete the bookmark and reading through chunk 2.

Debrief:
    Can you believe these people? Tomorrow we will finish! Any predictions? Before you
      leave, give me an exit pass prediction with reason. Use only one sentence! See the
      model for your example.
Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   We’ll finish the play and make some predictions!

Homework:
   None unless chunk 2 wasn’t finished, then finish that on your own.

                                   REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                         2                    3                           4
    Needs major         OK but not as strong      Overall lesson         Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.           as this needs to be.    concept solid but         learning happened
                                                some kinks to work               today!
                                                       out.
Name: ___________________________                       Name: ___________________________
Hour: _____                                             Hour: _____
           Annotation Bookmark for Act 4                           Annotation Bookmark for Act 4
We’ve read and inferred a lot about the characters in   We’ve read and inferred a lot about the characters in
our texts and now we’re to the end. For this act, I     our texts and now we’re to the end. For this act, I
want you to create four SUPER-THICK questions           want you to create four SUPER-THICK questions
and then answer them using your inferences from the     and then answer them using your inferences from the
text. Create one thick question after reading each      text. Create one thick question after reading each
chunk of the text.                                      chunk of the text.
Thick Question After Reading Chunk 1:                   Thick Question After Reading Chunk 1:




Answer to Thick Question from Chunk 1:                  Answer to Thick Question from Chunk 1:




Thick Question After Reading Chunk 2:                   Thick Question After Reading Chunk 2:




Answer to Thick Question from Chunk 2:                  Answer to Thick Question from Chunk 2:




Thick Question After Reading Chunk 3:                   Thick Question After Reading Chunk 3:




Answer to Thick Question from Chunk 3:                  Answer to Thick Question from Chunk 3:




Thick Question After Reading Chunk 4:                   Thick Question After Reading Chunk 4:




Answer to Thick Question from Chunk 4:                  Answer to Thick Question from Chunk 4:




Thick Question After Reading Chunk 5:                   Thick Question After Reading Chunk 5:




Answer to Thick Question from Chunk 5:                  Answer to Thick Question from Chunk 5:
                 Action Tracking                                      Action Tracking
In the table below, note the events that happen in   In the table below, note the events that happen in
act two.                                             act two.

Event                                   Page #       Event                                   Page #




                   Connecting                                           Connecting
As you read, make connections to your                As you read, make connections to your
character/patient and the events of the play.        character/patient and the events of the play.
Text-to-Self Connections:                            Text-to-Self Connections:
__                                                   __

__                                                   __

__                                                   __


Text-to-Text Connections:                            Text-to-Text Connections:
__                                                   __

__                                                   __

__                                                   __


Text-to-World Connections:                           Text-to-World Connections:
__                                                   __

__                                                   __

__                                                   __
Name: ______________________________              Hour: ________        Date: __________

                                          Exit Slip

In the space below give me one prediction and reason behind the prediction. Use only ONE
sentence! See the example for a model to follow.

EXAMPLE PREDICTION: I believe that Reverend Parris will leave town because after
Abigail left his credibility was completely shot and no one will ever believe he knows right
from wrong if his kids are any indication of his teaching.




Name: ______________________________              Hour: ________        Date: __________

                                          Exit Slip

In the space below give me one prediction and reason behind the prediction. Use only ONE
sentence! See the example for a model to follow.

EXAMPLE PREDICTION: I believe that Reverend Parris will leave town because after
Abigail left his credibility was completely shot and no one will ever believe he knows right
from wrong if his kids are any indication of his teaching.




Name: ______________________________              Hour: ________        Date: __________

                                          Exit Slip

In the space below give me one prediction and reason behind the prediction. Use only ONE
sentence! See the example for a model to follow.

EXAMPLE PREDICTION: I believe that Reverend Parris will leave town because after
Abigail left his credibility was completely shot and no one will ever believe he knows right
from wrong if his kids are any indication of his teaching.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 26: Finishing Act 4

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply during reading strategies to infer, question, and summarize.
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.
    I can use details from text to analyze conflict and setting and their impact on character
       and mood.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Act 4 Annotation Bookmarks

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How do I create deep/thick questions?
    How do I make connections?

Student Assessment:
    Students will be assessed through their completion of annotation using their bookmarks.

Opening Structure:
   Students will complete their lionbook activity.
   Field and answer questions about the text and remind where we are.
   Check for understanding of the bookmark process.

Mini Lesson:
    Today we will be focusing on digging deep. As we read we will continue to annotate as
      we always do using our bookmarks, but today we will focus on connecting and on really
      looking beyond the text for answers. Let’s read act 4, chunk 3 and then I’ll model for
      you what I’m talking about.
    Read chunk 4 aloud together and then model the connecting.

Work Time:
   Complete the bookmark and reading through chunks 3-5.

Debrief:
    Wow, this is pretty intense! Any questions? How can I help? Remember, I’m collecting
      ALL bookmarks tomorrow. If you need any more copies of one, come and get it!

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow we will begin to wrap it all up. We will view the end of the crucible, finish up
     our bookmarks, and get ready to finish our packets and complete an assessment! Whew!
Homework:
   None unless chunk 5 wasn’t finished, then finish that on your own.

                                   REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                         2                    3                           4
    Needs major         OK but not as strong      Overall lesson         Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.           as this needs to be.    concept solid but         learning happened
                                                some kinks to work               today!
                                                       out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 27: Finishing the video and more of the chart

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply post-reading skills to comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate text (draw
       conclusions, question to clarify, and summarize).
    I can use details from text to analyze a theme across genres.
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.
    I can use details from text to analyze conflict and setting and their impact on character
       and mood.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Video
   Patient Chart Packet (we’ll work on the Patient Motivation Study, the Environmental
      Study, and the Observation of Subject in Action)

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How can I study my patient when they aren’t always present?

Opening Structure:
   Students will complete their lionbook activity.

Work Time:
   Watch the video and then work on the patient chart pages.

Mini Lesson:
    Today we’re going to look some more at the patient charting now that we’ve read it all
      and seen so much.
    On document camera model the packet completion using Betty. Work on the Patient
      Motivation Study, the Environmental Study, and the Observation of Subject in Action
      pages.

Debrief:
    Remember this is due on October 13th. You will need to keep working on this!

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow is a shortened schedule due to homecoming. You can count on taking your
     act four quiz and completing another page of your packet.

Homework:
   packet
                                  REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                        2                    3                       4
    Needs major        OK but not as strong      Overall lesson     Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.          as this needs to be.    concept solid but     learning happened
                                               some kinks to work           today!
                                                      out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 28: More of the chart and an act 4 quiz

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply post-reading skills to comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate text (draw
       conclusions, question to clarify, and summarize).
    I can use details from text to analyze a theme across genres.
    I can use details from text to analyze character motivation, type, and characterization.
    I can use details from text to analyze conflict and setting and their impact on character
       and mood.

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Act 4 quiz
   Patient Chart Packet (we’ll work on the Pattern Study of Patient Intolerance)

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How can I study my patient when they aren’t always present?

Opening Structure:
   Students will complete their lionbook activity.

Work Time:
   Complete the Act 4 quiz and then work on the patient chart page.

Mini Lesson:
    Today we’re going to look some more at the patient charting now that we’ve read it all
      and seen so much.
    On document camera model the packet completion using Betty. Work on the Pattern
      Study of Patient Intolerance page.

Debrief:
    Remember this is due on October 13th. You will need to keep working on this!

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   With the time left you should work on your packet and be good. Enjoy the assembly and
     homecoming. We’ll pick up on Monday!

Homework:
   packet

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?
     1                   2                    3                       4
Needs major   OK but not as strong      Overall lesson     Powerful teaching and
 overhaul.     as this needs to be.    concept solid but     learning happened
                                      some kinks to work           today!
                                             out.
Name: ______________________________                    Hour: ________          Date: __________

                                Act 4 Quiz—Putting it all together

Complete the following items being sure to use COMPLETE sentences when needed.
Remember to be specific and detailed.


1. Why does Reverend Hale try to get the condemned prisoners to confess? (1 pt)




2. Several months have passed since the events of Act III. Name two specific negative things that are
   happening in the town due to the many people who have been imprisoned or executed? (2 pts)




3. Why are Danforth and Hathorne so set upon trying to get Rebecca Nurse or John Proctor to confess?
   (2 pts)




4. What happens to Abigail and what does Reverend Parris say is missing? (2 pts)




5. How does Giles die? Why does he choose to die this way? Make a connection to your life. (3 pts)




6. After Proctor confesses and signs his confession, he rips it up. Why does he tear it up and what
   results from this act? (5 pts)




7. Extra Credit: What does Reverend Parris say he found in his door? (+1 pt)
Unit: Intolerance

Day 29: Finishing the packet, working on quack, celebrating Columbus Day

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply post-reading skills to comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate text (draw
       conclusions, question to clarify, and summarize).

Materials:
   Textbooks
   Patient Chart Packet (we’ll work on the final page—connections)

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    How can I study my patient when they aren’t always present?

Opening Structure:
   Students will complete their lionbook activity.
   Students will work on Quack 3.4.

Mini Lesson:
    Today we’re going to look some more at the patient charting now that we’ve read it all
      and seen so much.
    On document camera model the packet completion using Betty. Work on the final page.

Work Time:
   It’s Columbus day! Time to enjoy. Play a word game with a group and turn in your
     score sheet for easy participation points. Make sure your quack is done and you’re ready
     for your big Crucible test tomorrow.

Debrief:
    Remember the packet is due tomorrow! Make sure it’s completed!

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Tomorrow you will be taking your Crucible test so make sure you’re ready!

Homework:
   packet

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                          2                     3                         4
    Needs major          OK but not as strong       Overall lesson       Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.            as this needs to be.     concept solid but       learning happened
some kinks to work   today!
       out.
Unit: Intolerance

Day 30: Completing the assessment

Unit Specific Objectives Met:
    I can apply post-reading skills to comprehend, interpret, analyze, and evaluate text (draw
       conclusions, question to clarify, and summarize).

Materials:
   Test for The Crucible

Essential Question(s):
    How do our intolerances affect our relationships with one another?
    In what ways is today’s society more accepting/less intolerant than early America? Or is
       it?
    How has intolerance changed your behavior or your perception of self?

Topical Question(s):
    N/A

Opening Structure:
   Students will complete their lionbook activity.
   Students will complete their daily Quack.

Mini Lesson:
    None today

Work Time:
   Students will complete the assessment.

Debrief:
    Time to collect the packets! Make sure your name is on it and you’re ready for turn-in.
      Whew! The Crucible is finished!

Tomorrow’s Preview/Purpose:
   Be ready to start our new unit tomorrow!

Homework:
   none

                                     REFLECTION
How did it go? What would I do differently next time?

         1                          2                     3                         4
    Needs major          OK but not as strong       Overall lesson       Powerful teaching and
     overhaul.            as this needs to be.     concept solid but       learning happened
                                                  some kinks to work             today!
                                                         out.
Crucible Final Assessment

Multiple Choice
Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

            Comprehension
            The questions below refer to the selection "The Crucible, Act One."

____    1. The best definition of the word “crucible” as it applies to the play is
           a. the hollow at the bottom of an ore furnace where molten lead collects
           b. a container made of a substance that can resist great heat
           c. a lamp burning before a cross
           d. a severe test or trial
____    2. In the Overture, Salem is described as all of the following except a
           a. place inhabited by fanatics
           b. few dark houses
           c. prosperous village
           d. location that ships out products of increasing value
____    3. Before the action of the play begins, Betty Parris and her friends
           a. have been chasing boys and flirting with them
           b. have had affairs with some of the men in town
           c. have been caught dancing in the woods
           d. have been guilty of blasphemy and witchcraft themselves
____    4. Which of the following statements best describes Tituba?
           a. She leads the girls astray.
           b. She is from Boston, and Reverend Parris distrusts her.
           c. She commonly performs minor acts of witchcraft.
           d. She is a slave from Barbados who is devoted to Betty.
____    5. Who is Reverend Parris’s niece?
           a. Susanna Walcott                                c. Mary Warren
           b. Abigail Williams                               d. Mercy Lewis
____    6. What is Ann Putnam’s greatest grief?
           a. Her daughter Ruth is about to die.
           b. Seven of her children died in infancy.
           c. She is worried about Ruth’s bad behavior.
           d. She knows her husband is unfaithful.
____    7. Why is the Reverend John Hale summoned?
           a. He is to settle the dispute between Parris and Parris’s parishioners.
           b. The parishioners want him to come and preach instead of Parris.
           c. He has legal training and will help with the disputes over property.
           d. He is an expert on witchcraft and can help Salem.
____    8. The setting of the play is
           a. Salem, Massachusetts, 1692                     c. Boston, Massachusetts, 1692
           b. Salem, Massachusetts, 1630                     d. Beverly, Massachusetts, 1630
____    9. In the Overture of Act One, Miller says that Salem was run as a
           a. monarchy                                       c. oligarchy
           b. theocracy                                      d. autocracy
____   10. Which of the following best describes John Proctor?
           a. intelligent and independent                    c. meek and shy
           b. pious and religious                            d. jovial and light-hearted
____   11. According to Miller, the reason the Massachusetts Colony survived was that the Puritans were
           a. well-educated and ambitious                    c. motivated mainly by desire for profit
           b. rugged individualists                          d. a tightly controlled, communal society
____   12. The Salem witch trials were probably motivated by all of the these except
           a. lust for neighbors’ land                        c. religious superstition
           b. fear of Indian attacks                          d. jealousy and meanness
____ 13.   At the beginning of the play when his daughter, Betty, falls ill, Reverend Parris appears to be most
           concerned about
           a. Betty’s health                                  c. Mrs. Putnam’s opinions
           b. Tituba’s honesty                                d. his own reputation
____ 14.   Betty is likely to be in a trancelike state because
           a. she fears punishment for being caught dancing in the woods
           b. she has been spoiled by her father and is trying to get his attention
           c. she feels upset about losing her mother
           d. she does not like Tituba and wants to get her in trouble
____ 15.   When Abigail threatens Betty, Abigail is motivated by her
           a. jealousy of Betty’s pampered life as the daughter of a minister
           b. need for attention in the village because she is an orphan
           c. fear of the villagers knowing everything they did in the woods
           d. fear that Tituba will be accused of witchcraft
____ 16.   Abigail accuses Goody Good and Goody Osburn of witchcraft because
           a. she is angry with John Proctor for rejecting her
           b. the accusations seem to be a way to cause Parris trouble
           c. something evil happened to the girls in the forest
           d. she can persuade Mrs. Putnam and not be punished

           Comprehension
           The questions below refer to the selection "The Crucible, Act Two."

____ 17. Mary Warren
         a. accuses Elizabeth Proctor of being a witch
         b. claims that she is an official of the court trying witches
         c. lies to Reverend Hale
         d. does not like either Elizabeth or John Proctor
____ 18. Elizabeth is afraid that her husband
         a. thinks that she is a witch                      c. is drawn to Mary Warren
         b. is still interested in Abigail Williams         d. is too harsh with Abigail Williams
____ 19. The people who have been accused of being witches by the court may save themselves from hanging by
         a. praying and saying the Lord’s Prayer
         b. accusing other people of being witches
         c. confessing to being witches
         d. denying that they are witches and reciting Biblical passages
____ 20. What reason does John Proctor give Reverend Hale for his absence from church?
         a. He does not think Reverend Parris is godly.
         b. He needs the time to work his farm.
         c. His children have been frequently ill.
         d. God does not require constant church attendance.
____ 21. Hale comes to the Proctors’ house
         a. to get John’s help to stop the witch trials
         b. to find out why Elizabeth has not been at church
         c. to ask the Proctors some questions
         d. because he knows that the girls are all lying about seeing witches
____ 22. Which commandment does John forget when Hale asks him to recite the Ten Commandments?
         a. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s goods.
         b. Thou shalt not bear false witness.
         c. Thou shalt not steal.
         d. Thou shalt not commit adultery.
____ 23. What is Hale’s advice to the Proctors as he prepares to leave their house?
           a. He tells both of them to stay away from Abigail Williams.
           b. He tells them to go to church and baptize their youngest child.
           c. He counsels them to stay away from Salem.
           d. He urges Elizabeth to discharge Mary Warren from their service.
____ 24.   What is unusual about the doll that Mary Warren makes for Elizabeth?
           a. It has a needle stuck in its stomach.
           b. It looks like Abigail.
           c. Mary made it from corn shucks and shells.
           d. It looks like Elizabeth.
____ 25.   As Elizabeth is led away to jail, what does John demand of Mary Warren?
           a. that she stay away from the witch trials in the town
           b. that she inform the court that Abigail is lying
           c. that she take care of the Proctor children until Elizabeth returns
           d. that she stop lying and accusing people of being witches
____ 26.   Why does Proctor say he is reluctant to go to Salem and tell what Abigail said to him?
           a. He thinks it will be difficult to prove Abigail is lying.
           b. He does not want to side with Giles Corey.
           c. He is afraid of losing his farm.
           d. He is afraid Mary Warren will no longer work for them.
____ 27.   During this act, Mary Warren has become
           a. meeker                                        c. bolder
           b. honest                                        d. independent
____ 28.   Hale tests the Proctors by questioning them about all of the following except
           a. their relationship                            c. their church attendance
           b. the Ten Commandments                          d. their belief in witchcraft
____ 29.   Who is the leader of the accusers in court?
           a. Tituba                                        c. John Proctor
           b. The Deputy Governor                           d. Abigail Williams
____ 30.   What does Proctor say when Hale questions him about not going to church (mark all that apply)?
           a. He does not like the Reverend Parris.
           b. He has necessary farm work to do.
           c. His wife Elizabeth has been ill.
           d. His conduct is not Mr. Hale’s business.
____ 31.   Which becomes apparent during the course of Act Two?
           a. Most people in Salem find the accusers uncreditable.
           b. More and more women are being arrested for witchcraft.
           c. Hale will realize the error of his way.
           d. Elizabeth will be set free after the hearing.
____ 32.   What does Elizabeth ask Proctor to do?
           a. fire Mary Warren                              c. speak to Abigail for her sake
           b. go to church more regularly                   d. grant her a divorce
____ 33.   What is the most probable cause of the accusation of witchcraft?
           a. a desire for vengeance and power
           b. a real belief in sorcery
           c. a desire to overthrow the government
           d. a belief in the triumph of the rational mind
____ 34.   Marshal Herrick is shamefaced when he appears at the Proctors’ house because he
           a. is drunk
           b. has accused Rebecca Nurse and Martha Corey of witchcraft
           c. comes to take away Elizabeth
           d. comes to ask John for money
____ 35.   Mary Warren’s motivation for joining the girls in their accusations of witchcraft is
           a. her hatred of John and Elizabeth Proctor
           b. that she has been mistreated by some of the women in the village
         c. that she is a lonely girl who craves friends and attention
         d. that she wants power over others
____ 36. Elizabeth says that Abigail accuses her of being a witch because Abigail
         a. is bored and the witchcraft trials are fun for her
         b. is still angry at Elizabeth because she made her work so hard
         c. is afraid that she herself will be accused of being a witch
         d. wants to get rid of Elizabeth so she can have John

           Comprehension
           The questions below refer to the selection "The Crucible, Act Three."

____ 37. Deputy Governor Danforth
         a. seems proud and does not like his authority challenged
         b. is eager to hear Giles Corey’s defense of his wife
         c. believes that the girls accusing the women of witchcraft are frauds
         d. is an ignorant, humorless man who refuses to listen to evidence
____ 38. In Act Three the person who begins to have doubts about the rightness of the witch trials is
         a. Ezekiel Cheever                                c. Thomas Putnam
         b. Judge Hathorne                                 d. Reverend John Hale
____ 39. Who is the richest man in the village who can afford to buy the land forfeited by George Jacobs if Jacobs
         hangs as a witch?
         a. Deputy Governor Danforth                       c. Thomas Putnam
         b. Giles Corey                                    d. Ezekiel Cheever
____ 40. What does Judge Hathorne ask Mary Warren to do in court that she cannot do?
         a. pray                                           c. send out her spirit
         b. faint                                          d. recite the Ten Commandments
____ 41. What does Abigail Williams do as soon as Danforth begins to question her?
         a. She begins to cry and behave hysterically.
         b. She says that Elizabeth Proctor sent her spirit out.
         c. She says that they must all beware of the Devil.
         d. She threatens Danforth.
____ 42. What secret does John Proctor reveal to prove the girls are lying?
         a. He says that Abigail seeks vengeance.
         b. He confesses that he does not like Reverend Parris or the church.
         c. He says that Abigail told him that she was going to accuse Elizabeth.
         d. He says that he promised to marry Abigail if anything happened to Elizabeth.
____ 43. What does John tell the court about his wife?
         a. She is about to confess.                       c. She will not lie.
         b. She will charge Abigail with murder.           d. She is pregnant.
____ 44. How do the girls in the courtroom terrorize Mary Warren?
         a. They give her a poppet that looks like her.
         b. They repeat everything that she says.
         c. They tell the court that she has cast a spell on John.
         d. They say that they see the Devil talking to her.
____ 45. Who is taken to jail at the end of Act Three?
         a. Martha Corey and John Proctor                  c. Giles Corey and John Proctor
         b. Mary Warren and Martha Corey                   d. Elizabeth Proctor and Mary Warren
____ 46. Why does Danforth dismiss Giles’ deposition?
         a. Putnam denies what Giles reports.
         b. The court does not believe Giles’ word.
         c. Giles will not reveal the name of his source.
         d. Giles’ deposition was not written by a lawyer.
____ 47. The climax of Act Three occurs when
         a. Mary Warren renounces her deposition
           b. Abigail says she is innocent
           c. Danforth threatens John Proctor
           d. John Proctor accuses Abigail
____ 48.   At the end of Act Three, Hale is disgusted with
           a. Mary Warren                                    c. the court proceedings
           b. Proctor                                        d. his role in the problem
____ 49.   Danforth has signed many death warrants, and so has
           a. Parris                                         c. Herrick
           b. Hale                                           d. Putnam
____ 50.   Giles believes that Putnam’s motivation for accusing people of witchcraft is
           a. revenge                                        c. lust
           b. fear                                           d. greed
____ 51.   What does Abigail succeed in doing in this act?
           a. She regains Proctor's affection.
           b. She convinces Hale that she is trustworthy.
           c. She wins Mary Warren back to her side.
           d. She proves that Proctor is a lecher.
____ 52.   Why does Mary seem to change her mind about telling the truth?
           a. She is scared of Abigail and the others.
           b. She has seen a vision.
           c. Proctor tells her all is lost.
           d. Hale bullies her into capitulating.
____ 53.   Abigail and the girls say they see
           a. a five-legged dragon                           c. two monarch butterflies
           b. a yellow bird                                  d. a goat
____ 54.   Abigail triumphs for all of the following reasons except
           a. Danforth believes her and not John             c. Elizabeth lies to save her husband
           b. Mary Warren rejoins the girls                  d. Hale denounces the trials
____ 55.   Danforth does not want to find out that the girls’ accusations are false because he
           a. will not be able to acquire the victims’ land
           b. will be blamed for the deaths of innocent people
           c. is afraid people will think him ignorant of the law
           d. does not want his involvement with Abigail revealed
____ 56.   Elizabeth’s motivation for lying about John’s affair with Abigail is that
           a. she is embarrassed and does not want anyone to know
           b. the villagers will think she has been a bad wife
           c. she is afraid that John will be arrested as a witch
           d. she loves John and wants to protect him

           Comprehension
           The questions below refer to the selection "The Crucible, Act Four."

____ 57. What news does Reverend Parris reveal at the beginning of Act Four?
         a. The women accused of witchcraft are about to confess.
         b. Mercy Lewis and Abigail Williams have stolen Parris’s money and disappeared.
         c. Tituba and Sarah Good have cast a spell on Marshal Herrick.
         d. None of the accused have conversed or associated with the Devil.
____ 58. Which two men urge Deputy Governor Danforth to postpone the witch trials because a rebellion in the
         town seems possible?
         a. Ezekiel Cheever and John Hale              c. John Hale and Reverend Parris
         b. John Proctor and John Hale                 d. Reverend Parris and Judge Hathorne
____ 59. What does John Hale urge Elizabeth Proctor to do?
         a. persuade her husband to confess to witchcraft
         b. admit that she lied about Abigail and John
           c. promise to get the other women to confess
           d. plead her own case because she is pregnant
____ 60.   How does Giles Corey die?
           a. He refuses to confess, and finally he is hanged as a witch.
           b. He dies of a broken heart when he hears that his wife is dead.
           c. He dies of guilt because he accused his wife of reading strange books.
           d. He is not hanged, but instead is crushed with stones.
____ 61.   John tells Elizabeth that he has not confessed to being a witch because
           a. he says that he has confessed to too many lies
           b. Danforth and Parris want to use him as an example
           c. he does not want to confess a lie to contemptible people
           d. he is afraid that Danforth will hang Elizabeth for spite
____ 62.   Elizabeth blames herself
           a. for Mary Warren’s lies                        c. for John’s reluctance to confess
           b. for John’s affair with Abigail                d. for John’s imprisonment
____ 63.   Elizabeth tells John that she “kept a cold house.” Keeping “a cold house” means that she
           a. never invited anyone to visit them
           b. frequently let the fire go out
           c. was not a loving or proper wife
           d. refused to keep flowers or pretty things in the house
____ 64.   What does John want from Elizabeth?
           a. her approval for his confession to witchcraft
           b. her assurance that she loves him
           c. her promise to trust him
           d. her own confession to witchcraft
____ 65.   What is one thing that John cannot do?
           a. get Martha Corey and Rebecca Nurse to confess
           b. sign his name to a lie
           c. allow his lie to be made public
           d. let Elizabeth lie for him
____ 66.   In his confession John admits to
           a. thinking evil thoughts about Parris
           b. seeing Goody Osburn with the Devil
           c. sending out his spirit on Abigail Williams
           d. seeing the Devil
____ 67.   Which of these does not occur in Act Four?
           a. The cows need milking.
           b. The people argue over ownership of the cows.
           c. The townspeople stop going to church.
           d. Children wander from house to house.
____ 68.   Which reason does Herrick give for drinking?
           a. It keeps him warm.                            c. He is thirsty.
           b. He is upset about the hangings.               d. He is afraid he will be condemned.
____ 69.   What are Giles Corey’s last words?
           a. He asks for God’s mercy.
           b. He forgives his accusers.
           c. He calls for more weight.
           d. He asks God to forgive the people of Salem.
____ 70.   The Reverend Parris is worried about all of the following except
           a. the trial’s causing a riot                    c. having no money
           b. being killed                                  d. being accused of witchcraft
____ 71.   The final scene between Elizabeth and John shows their
           a. despair                                       c. reconciliation
           b. corruption                                    d. victory
____ 72. Elizabeth asks John to forgive her for
         a. denying his confession
         b. discharging Abigail Williams
         c. being suspicious and keeping a “cold house”
         d. failing to recognize his kindness as a father
____ 73. What does Hale do in Act Four?
         a. He confesses his lack of education.
         b. He goes to Andover to join the rioters.
         c. He says that he himself should be arrested.
         d. He begs the accused to save their lives.
____ 74. Proctor’s struggle is mainly with
         a. his own conscience                            c. Elizabeth
         b. Parris                                        d. Danforth
____ 75. What does Abigail do during this act?
         a. She flees Salem.                              c. She begs for Proctor’s life.
         b. She confesses to lying.                       d. She refuses to testify.
____ 76. Danforth does not want to postpone the hangings because
         a. he does not want the people convicted of witchcraft to confess
         b. the townspeople are looking forward to the hangings
         c. the townspeople have put pressure on him to hang those convicted of witchcraft
         d. people will think Danforth doubts the validity of the trials
____ 77. Why does Elizabeth refuse to influence John’s decision whether to confess?
         a. She feels he must face his own conscience and make his own decision.
         b. She cannot feel guilty if he refuses to confess.
         c. She cannot feel guilty if he does confess.
         d. She feels that he cannot blame anyone but himself if he does not confess.
____ 78. Which of the following is a strong motivation for John to tear up his confession?
         a. His fear of eternal damnation if he swears to a lie.
         b. He wants to be courageous like Rebecca Nurse and Martha Corey.
         c. He believes that he has to pay for his sin of adultery with Abigail.
         d. He believes that if he does not confess, he will save Elizabeth’s life.

Matching
For the following characters, match the trait that best fits

     __79.    John Proctor                  a. She is pregnant with her fourth child.
     __80.    Abigail Williams              b. He complains about his wife’s reading habits.
     __81.    Reverend John Hale            c. A young girl who fakes illness to avoid her father’s wrath.
     __82.    Reverend Parris               d. A stubborn and proud man responsible for the court.
     __83.    Elizabeth Proctor             e. He at first believes the trials will uncover evil, but changes his mind.
     __84.    Giles Corey                  ab. A young girl who accuses people of witchcraft for her father.
     __85.    Martha Corey                 ac. A pious old woman and midwife.
     __86.    Mary Warren                  ad. A lonely girl who likes to watch more than join.
     __87.    Mercy Lewis                  ae. He preaches with golden candlesticks.
     __88.    Tituba                       bc. He doesn’t want to give up his name.
     __89.    Betty Parris                 bd. A rich man greedy for land.
     __90.    Mrs. Ann Putnam              be. A slave from Barbados
     __91.    Thomas Putnam                cd. She reads books other than the bible, sometimes even late at night.
     __92.    Rebecca Nurse                ce. A loving husband and pillar of the community.
     __93.    Judge Danforth               de. A girl who dances naked in the woods. She flees Salem.
     __94.    Francis Nurse                abc. A bitter woman who has lost seven babies.
     __95.    Ruth Putnam                  abd. She drank blood.
Crucible Final Assessment
Answer Section
MULTIPLE CHOICE

      1. ANS: D                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.3.6 (literal meanings of words and their usage) | 11.3.3 (context clues)
      2. ANS: C                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.1.2 (setting and mood/atmosphere) | 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension)
      3. ANS: C                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.1.1 (plot) | 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension)
      4. ANS: D                PTS: 1                OBJ: 11.1.3.1 (characterization)
      5. ANS: B                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.1.3.1 (characterization) | 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension)
      6. ANS: B                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions) | 11.2.1.8 (making inferences)
      7. ANS: D                PTS: 1                OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
         comprehension)
      8. ANS: A                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.1.2 (setting and mood/atmosphere) | 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension)
      9. ANS: B                PTS: 1                OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
         comprehension)
     10. ANS: A                PTS: 1                OBJ: 11.1.3.1 (characterization) | 11.2.1.8 (making
         inferences)
     11. ANS: D                PTS: 1                OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
         comprehension)
     12. ANS: B                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.8 (making inferences) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     13. ANS: D                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     14. ANS: A                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.8 (making inferences) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     15. ANS: C                PTS: 1                OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     16. ANS: D                PTS: 1                OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     17. ANS: B                PTS: 1                OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
         comprehension)
     18. ANS: B                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     19. ANS: C                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.1 (plot)
     20. ANS: A                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     21. ANS: C                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     22. ANS: D                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.1 (plot)
     23. ANS: B                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     24. ANS: A                PTS: 1                OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
         comprehension)
     25. ANS: B                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     26. ANS: A                PTS: 1
         OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
     27. ANS: C                PTS: 1                OBJ: 11.1.3.1 (characterization)
28. ANS: A              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.5 (reading for details)
29. ANS: D              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
    comprehension)
30. ANS: A              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
    comprehension)
31. ANS: B              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.8 (making inferences)
32. ANS: C              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
33. ANS: A              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.1 (analyzing cause and effect)
34. ANS: C              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.8 (making inferences) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
35. ANS: C              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions) | 11.2.1.8 (making inferences)
36. ANS: D              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
37. ANS: A              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions) | 11.2.1.8 (making inferences)
38. ANS: D              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.5 (reading for details)
39. ANS: C              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.5 (reading for details) | 11.1.3.1
    (characterization)
40. ANS: B              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
    comprehension)
41. ANS: D              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
42. ANS: A              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
43. ANS: C              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.1 (characterization)
44. ANS: B              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
45. ANS: C              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.1 (plot)
46. ANS: C              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
47. ANS: A              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.1.1 (plot)
48. ANS: C              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.1.1 (plot)
49. ANS: B              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
    comprehension)
50. ANS: D              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
51. ANS: C              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.1.1 (plot)
52. ANS: A              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.8 (making inferences) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
53. ANS: B              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
    comprehension)
54. ANS: D              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.8 (making inferences) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
55. ANS: B              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
56. ANS: D              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
57. ANS: B              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.1 (plot)
58. ANS: C              PTS: 1
    OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
59. ANS: A              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
60.   ANS: D              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
      comprehension)
61.   ANS: C              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
62.   ANS: B              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
63.   ANS: C              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.3.4 (denotation and connotation)
64.   ANS: A              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
65.   ANS: C              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
66.   ANS: D              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
67.   ANS: C              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.5 (reading for details)
68.   ANS: A              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
      comprehension)
69.   ANS: C              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or
      comprehension)
70.   ANS: C              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.2.1.5 (reading for details)
71.   ANS: C              PTS: 1                  OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
72.   ANS: C              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.2.1.5 (reading for details)
73.   ANS: D              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.1 (plot)
74.   ANS: A              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions) | 11.2.1.8 (making inferences)
75.   ANS: A              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.1 (plot)
76.   ANS: D              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.2.1.10 (monitoring your reading or comprehension) | 11.1.3.2 (character interactions)
77.   ANS: A              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions) | 11.2.1.8 (making inferences)
78.   ANS: B              PTS: 1
      OBJ: 11.1.3.2 (character interactions) | 11.2.1.8 (making inferences)
         __79.            BC
         __80.            ABD
         __81.            E
         __82.            AE
         __83.            A
         __84.            B
         __85.            CD
         __86.            AD
         __87.            DE
         __88.            BE
         __89.            C
         __90.            ABC
         __91.            BD
         __92.            AC
         __93.            D
         __94.            CE
         __95.            AB

								
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