S3 S4 SUBJECT CHOICE GUIDE BOOKLET 2011 2012 by CP6oI6v

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									BANCHORY ACADEMY




S3/S4 SUBJECT CHOICE GUIDE
     SESSION 2011 - 2012
                              BANCHORY ACADEMY
                               COURSE CHOICE S3/S4
Our aim at Banchory Academy is to provide all pupils with a high quality learning experience.
This is supported by our commitment to provide an effective and appropriate curriculum for
every pupil.

The S3/S4 course structure aims to provide all pupils with a broad and balanced framework
for learning. The curriculum in S3/4 should enable your child to progress in their knowledge
and achievements, be challenged and engaged in their learning, select a broad range of
learning contexts, be relevant to their life present and future and allow your child to achieve
and attain to their full potential.

In the first two years of secondary education pupils follow a common course encompassing a
wide range of subjects. In S3/4 however, in consultation with parents and staff, they choose
a course of study suited to their abilities, interests and career intentions.

The Banchory Academy Subject Choice Guide has therefore been compiled to assist you
and your child in selecting subjects for study in S3 and S4. Information about each course,
learning and teaching approaches, assessment, homework and possible progression routes
is included to help you to make an informed choice. Also included is information about the
structure of the curriculum, making subject choices, assessments and core skills.

The S3/S4 curriculum is based upon national and regional guidelines. Compulsory courses
in English and Mathematics focus on literacy and numeracy. Other subject choices will allow
your child to learn and develop through a variety of contexts. All the courses followed will
contribute to the development of your child’s core skills such as ICT and problem solving.

The majority of pupils will follow eight courses leading to qualifications certificated by the
Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA). In some subjects, National Qualifications are also
available at Intermediate 1, Intermediate 2 and Access 3 levels. Many pupils will also be
presented for Intermediate 1 or Intermediate 2 units in Religious, Moral and Philosophical
Studies (RMPS). For some pupils, however, 8 Standard Grades or their equivalent may be
too demanding and the curriculum may be modified as appropriate. This is important to
ensure that we include all pupils’ educational needs in accessing and benefiting from an
appropriate curriculum.

In addition, for some pupils, we hope to widen the present curriculum by offering Skills for
Work courses which will be taken at Aberdeen College. These courses are designed to
develop practical vocational skills and widen pupils’ opportunities for progression and
prepare them for further learning and employment. Skills for Work courses lead to
certification, usually at Access 3, Intermediate 1 or 2 level.

SUBJECT CHOICE - SUPPORT FOR PARENTS/GUARDIANS

It is important that the choice of subjects should match the needs and abilities of pupils and
to help parents the S2 report will be issued on Thursday 10 February. A parents' meeting,
which will help to explain factors which affect the choice of course, is to be held on Tuesday
                                              1
1 February and will be followed on Monday 21 February by a further meeting at which you
will have the opportunity of meeting the subject teachers.

Overleaf you are guided through the subject choice for S3/4. This will be explained in more
detail at the first of the parents' meetings mentioned above and again on the course choice
sheet issued with the S2 reports on Thursday 10 February.

Should you have any queries or problems regarding your child's choice subsequent to the
issue of the choice sheet, we would urge you to contact the Guidance Staff and make an
appointment to discuss the matter.

SUBJECT CHOICE – SUPPORT FOR PUPILS
For a number of weeks prior to the completion of the S3 choice form, pupils will follow a
programme in Social Education designed to assist them in making well-considered subject
choices. Pupils will visit the Careers Library and meet with the Careers Adviser as well as
use specialised ICT career programmes.

MAKING YOUR CHOICE OF SUBJECT

All pupils will therefore be required to undertake a two-year programme which includes:

1.    Standard Grade courses in ENGLISH, MATHEMATICS and FRENCH.

2.    There will also be courses in core PE, Social Education and Religious Moral and
      Philosophical (RMPS) as part of a programme of Personal and Social
      Development. These courses will be provided for all pupils but will be in addition to
      any choice subjects.

3.    All pupils must take a course in a SCIENCE (Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Science)
      and a SOCIAL SUBJECT (Geography, History or Modern Studies) as well as
      THREE ADDITIONAL COURSES. Pupils can choose the three additional
      courses from the following list.

Social Subjects (SS)           Science (S)                     Modern Language (ML)
Geography                      Biology                         Spanish
History                        Chemistry
Modern Studies                 Physics (T)*
                               Science
Technological (T)              Creative & Aesthetic (C)
Accounting & Finance           Art & Design (T)*
Administration                 Craft & Design (T)*
Business Management            Drama
Computing Studies              Graphic Communication (T)*
                               Hospitality (T)*
                               Music
                               Physical Education

(* indicates that the course also counts as a subject that would be included in the mode
shown in the brackets)

                                             2
In making the choice of the three additional subjects, pupils should aim to include a course
from the Technological mode and one from the Creative and Aesthetic mode.

Additional Notes

a)    While every attempt will be made to satisfy individual choice not all subject
      combinations may be possible and where there is insufficient uptake a course
      may not run. In addition where there is a particularly high uptake of any subject
      we may not have the subject staff, or in some cases sufficient specialist rooms
      to create classes to accommodate every pupils choice. All pupils will be seen by
      Guidance Staff to discuss course choice and where necessary they will advice on
      alternative choices should any of the above circumstances arise.

b)    There is no Higher course in Science. Depending on the outcome of the examination,
      pupils following Standard Grade Science may be able to progress to an Intermediate
      level course in one of the discrete sciences.

c)    In Standard Grade Biology, Chemistry and Physics pupils will be presented at Credit
      and General levels only. There is no Foundation level in these subjects.

d)    The Hospitality course is a National Qualification offered at Intermediate 1 level
      (equivalent to General level). Pupils will be internally assessed over two years and
      awarded a National Qualification at levels A-C.

e)    The Administration course is a National Qualification offered at Intermediate 1 level
      (equivalent to General level) with progression to Intermediate 2 (equivalent to Credit
      level) being a possibility for appropriate pupils.

f)    The French course is a National Qualification offered at Access 3, Intermediate 1 and
      Intermediate 2 (equivalent to Foundation, General and Credit at Standard Grade)

g)    The Spanish course is a National Qualification offered at Intermediate 2 (equivalent to
      Credit at Standard Grade) and provides an opportunity to study a second modern
      language.

h)    RMPS is a National Qualification offered at Intermediate 1 and Intermediate 2 level.
      Pupils will be internally assessed and will be presented for individual units only and
      not the full course.

i)    Progression to Intermediate 2 or Higher cannot be guaranteed every year for all
      subjects in S5. Where uptake for a subject in S3/4 is low we will try to provide
      progression in either S5 or S6.

j)    Further advice is always available from the school. Please do not hesitate to contact
      us.




                                             3
EXAMINATIONS

Courses begun in S3 will last for two years and will lead to certification by the Scottish
Qualification Authority. Grades are awarded on a seven-point scale which is divided into 3
levels of performance. The certificate shows a "profile" of the grades achieved in different
aspects of the subject and a grade for overall performance. The 3 levels are:


           CREDIT                     GENERAL                    FOUNDATION

           Grade 1                     Grade 3                       Grade 5

           Grade 2                     Grade 4                       Grade 6

      or Intermediate 2           or Intermediate 1                or Access 3

Grade 7 indicates course complete. Failure to complete the requirements in any Element of
Standard Grade results in a no award.

An Access 3 course is approximately the same at Standard Grade Foundation level.
An Intermediate 1 course is approximately the same as Standard Grade General level.
An Intermediate 2 course is approximately the same as Standard Grade Credit level.

Pupils returning to S5 will be able to choose from a range of courses leading to National
Qualifications at Intermediate 2 and Higher as well as Advanced Higher in S6.

Should you require any further details about any aspect of subject choice or
examinations, please contact the Rector.




                                              4
CORE SKILLS

Core Skills are the broad transferable skills that people need to be full, active and
responsible members of society. Core skills are not new – they have been recognised as
part of school learning for sometime and employers, colleges and universities are giving
more and more weight to them. Attainment in Core Skills is assessed and recorded
automatically as part of Standard Grade Certification. The Core Skills are:


                 Core Skill                                     Components


 Communication                                Oral communication
                                              Written communication


 Numeracy                                     Using graphical information
                                              Using numbers


 IT                                           Using information technology


 Problem Solving                              Critical thinking
                                              Planning & organising
                                              Reviewing & evaluating


 Working With Others                          Working with others


TEACHING & ASSESSMENT OF CORE SKILLS

Core Skills are an integral part of all Standard Grade courses except Modern Languages and
are recognised automatically. All candidates will get a Core Skills profile which will be their
starting point to build on as they progress to Higher Still courses in S5.

Certification
Candidates will gain credit for achieving Core Skills at different levels and this will be
recorded on the Scottish Qualification Certificate along side courses and units.




                                               5
                                     S3/S4 COURSES

         MODE                         SUBJECT         LEVELS OF        PAGE
                                                        STUDY

Language &                 English                        C/G/F         8
Communication              French                    Intermediate 2/    9
                                                     Intermediate 1/
                                                        Access 3

                           Spanish                   Intermediate 2     11


Mathematical Studies       Mathematics                   C/G/F          13


Scientific Studies         Biology                        C/G           16
                           Chemistry                      C/G           17
                           Physics                        C/G           19
                           Science                       C/G/F          21


Social Studies             Geography                     C/G/F          23
                           History                       C/G/F          24
                           Modern Studies                C/G/F          25


Technological Activities   Computing Studies              C/G/F         27
                           Craft & Design                 C/G/F         29
                           Graphic Communication          C/G/F         30
                           Accounting & Finance           C/G/F         31
                           Administration            Intermediate 1     33
                           Business Management            C/G/F         34
                           Hospitality               Intermediate 1     36


Creative & Aesthetic       Art & Design                  C/G/F          38
Activities                 Drama                         C/G/F          39
                           Music                         C/G/F          41
                           Physical Education            C/G/F          42



Personal and Social        Physical Education              Core         44
Development Courses        Religious, Moral &        Intermediate 1/    45
                           Philosophical Studies      Intermediate 2
                           Social Education                 -           46




                                            6
  LANGUAGE

    AND

COMMUNICATION




      7
ENGLISH

AIMS OF THE COURSE
All pupils will follow the Standard Grade Course which aims to develop their skills in Reading,
Writing, Talk and Listening. It may also be possible for some pupils to work towards English
qualifications at Access 3 and Intermediate 1, thereby offering them a more appropriate
pathway towards successful learning and achievement.

COURSE CONTENT
Pupils will study a wide range of the many ways in which we use language and will be given
opportunities to read and respond to a wide range of literature. The skills they gain from the
course should be of value to them throughout life but are also essential for success in many
other school subjects.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
Pupils develop these skills at different rates, and are thus divided into classes according to
their ability as assessed at the end of S2. This allows course work to be tailored more
closely to an individual's needs but as all pupils follow a similar course, does not prevent
any pupil achieving a Credit grade in S4. A variety of teaching methods is used: whole
class teaching, group work, individual tasks etc.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Reading, Writing and Talk (which incorporates Listening) are all assessed at Standard
Grade. The assessment pattern is as follows:

Reading:             3 pieces of coursework (i.e. Folio pieces)
                     + 2 Close Reading Examination papers
Writing:             2 pieces of coursework (i.e. Folio pieces)
                     + 1 Writing Exam paper

The Folio pieces are submitted to the Scottish Qualifications Authority after Christmas in S4
and are worth one third of the final assessment. The Examinations are also worth one third.

Talk, which makes up the final third, is internally assessed by the class teacher but may be
externally moderated by SQA.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Homework is regularly set in English.       It may take the form of reading a class text;
completing work begun in class; preparing for an individual talk or group discussion; or a
specific exercise from a textbook or past paper. Pupils, however, are always expected to go
over work done in class and to do some personal reading of their own choice including
quality newspaper articles on a weekly basis. It should, therefore, never be possible for a
pupil to say that he or she has no homework for English.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
Progression into Higher Still Courses will be determined by the Standard Grade award each
pupil achieves. Those achieving 1 or 2 in Reading and Writing at Standard Grade should
progress to Higher. Those achieving grade 3 in Reading and Writing should follow an
Intermediate 2 course while those achieving Standard Grade 4/5 would be best suited to an
Intermediate 1 course. Class Teachers will, however, provide individual guidance about the
most suitable level for progression.
                                               8
FRENCH


AIMS OF THE COURSE
The aim of the course is to build on the language skills already developed through speaking,
listening, reading and writing in French. The course caters for the whole ability range and
encourages pupils to achieve their full potential.

COURSE CONTENT
The course teaches pupils to communicate in a practical and effective way with the French-
speaking world. The course material is rooted in pupils' own interests and in real life
situations wherever possible, in order to encourage purposeful conversation, personal
involvement and genuine exchanges of information. Pupils are encouraged to communicate
about things which interest them and to learn how to find out information for themselves.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
The course uses a variety of learning and teaching approaches in order to maximise
progress e.g. reading authentic texts, listening and speaking using digital audio, a
systematic programme of grammar/study of language patterns, and writing/word
processing. The textbook used is Métro pour l’Ecosse.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Speaking, listening, reading and writing are all assessed at Access 3, Intermediate 1 or
Intermediate 2 levels. The assessments are as follows:

Access 3

Internal
Personal Language Unit – two tests in speaking, one in listening, one in reading and one
further test in any of the three.
Transactional Language Unit- three tests in speaking, one in listening, one in reading and
one further test in any of the three.
Language in Work Unit – four tests in speaking and two in listening or reading.

External
There is no end of course examination.

Intermediate 1

Internal
Personal and Social Language Unit – 1 test in reading.
Transactional Language Unit – 1 test in listening.
Language in Work Unit – 1 test in writing.
Plus 1 test in speaking taken from any of the above units.

External
Close reading, Listening Comprehension, Speaking and Writing.

                                             9
Intermediate 2

Internal
Language Unit – 3 tests, one each of reading, listening and speaking.
Extended Reading/Viewing Unit – 1 test of writing.

External
Close Reading, Listening Comprehension, Speaking and Writing.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Regular homework will be set including the learning of vocabulary and phrases as well as
preparation for speaking and, where appropriate, writing tasks. Written exercises may also
be set. These will be marked by the teacher and pupils are required to re-draft their work.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTE
Pupils gaining Intermediate 1 may progress to Intermediate 2 and pupils gaining
Intermediate 2 may progress to Higher in S5/S6.




                                            10
SPANISH - INTERMEDIATE 2


AIMS OF THE COURSE
The aim of the course is to develop language skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing
in Spanish. The course builds on the skills pupils have already developed in French and
applies them to the acquisition of a second foreign language.

COURSE CONTENT
The course teaches pupils to communicate in a practical and effective way with the Spanish-
speaking world. The course material is rooted in pupils' own interests and in real life
situations wherever possible, in order to encourage purposeful conversation, personal
involvement and genuine exchanges of information. Pupils are encouraged to communicate
about things which interest them and to learn how to find out information for themselves.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
The course uses a variety of learning and teaching approaches in order to maximise
progress eg reading authentic texts, listening and speaking using digital audio, a systematic
programme of grammar and writing/word processing.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Speaking, listening, reading and writing are all assessed at Intermediate 1 or 2 levels. The
assessments are as follows:

Internal
Language Unit – 3 tests, one each of reading, listening and speaking.
Extended Reading/Viewing Unit – 1 test of writing.

External
Close Reading, Listening Comprehension, Speaking and Writing.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Regular homework will be set including the learning of vocabulary and phrases as well as
preparation for speaking and writing tasks. Regular written exercises will also be set.
These will be marked by the teacher and pupils are required to re-draft their work.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
Pupils with Intermediate 1 may progress to Intermediate 2, and pupils with Intermediate 2
may progress to Higher in S 5/6




                                              11
MATHEMATICAL

  STUDIES




     12
 MATHEMATICS

AIMS OF THE COURSE
The emphasis of the Standard Grade course is to show, as far as is possible, the use of
Mathematics in relevant contexts.

COURSE CONTENT
All courses integrate the three traditional branches of Mathematics: number, money,
measure (arithmetic), algebra and shape, position, movement (geometry) - the Algebraic
content being emphasised more at Credit level, the number, money and measure content
more at Foundation.
Some statistical content is included at all levels and investigating skills are covered by the
provision of coursework tasks and extended response questions in the external examination.

Elements of Mathematics which will be assessed during the course and in a final examination
are: Knowledge and Understanding & Reasoning and Enquiry

LEARNING AND TEACHING
Each pupil is provided with a textbook for the appropriate level of course, Credit, General or
Foundation. In addition to this teachers may use a variety of worksheets, supplementary
textbooks and practical tasks. Most topics are taught by direct class teaching. Some topics
are introduced by short games or investigative tasks. This might involve the use of drawing
on graphing software or graphic calculators. A lot of the work requires individual focus and
when it is appropriate pupils work in groups or pairs.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Pupils are allocated to classes according to the grades they achieve in all aspects of the work
in S2. This ensures pupils follow a course that best suits their level of ability. In most years
the top 3 classes follow a Credit/General Course with the remaining classes following the
General/Foundation Course. In S3 the courses follow a similar assessment pattern. In
some years it is appropriate for some pupils to complete the Access 3 course in S3 and then
move on to a Foundation/General course in S4. On the basis of assessment, if necessary,
pupils will be moved to a more appropriate class. Pace and course content mean that it is
not possible to continue this pattern into the S4 course. Study of Maths at credit level in S4
requires mastery of much of the S3 credit course. For this reason movement of pupils will
only take place between classes following the two different levels Credit/General and
General/Foundation up to the beginning of S4. In the final exam pupils will be presented at
two levels, either Credit/General or General/Foundation. Courses at all levels are more
difficult in S4 and often it is necessary for some pupils in middle classes to be presented at
Foundation/General level. For some pupils it is appropriate to sit only one exam either
Credit, General or Foundation.

These arrangements are to ensure that all pupils have every chance of achieving an award
and at the same time of reaching their maximum potential.

                                              13
HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Homework is an integral part of Standard Grade courses. All pupils will be given small
amounts of homework regularly - often by way of completion of class exercises. Lengthier
homework exercises will also be given with a longer completion time.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
Anyone wishing to progress to Higher mathematics in S5 must achieve at least a grade 2 at
Credit. Similarly anyone wishing to study Intermediate 2 must have a grade 4 at General.




                                           14
SCIENTIFIC

 STUDIES




    15
    BIOLOGY

AIMS OF THE COURSE
The aim of the course is to develop a knowledge and understanding of Biology as an
investigative science.

COURSE CONTENT
There are 7 topics: Investigating Cells; Body in Action; World of Plants; Animal Survival;
Inheritance; Biotechnology; The Biosphere: These follow 3 broad themes:

    Ecology and Man's impact on environments.
    Anatomy, physiology and biochemistry, stressing particularly the processes all living
     things have in common, and human body systems.
    Applications of biology; food and materials; disease and health; sport and fitness;
     biotechnology; microbes and genetic engineering.

Skills developed by the course fit into 2 categories. Practical skills where pupils establish the
techniques and approach needed for biological investigations and problem solving skills
where they evaluate and use information in new contexts.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
A variety of methods is used, including class teaching, project work, practical activities of
different types, problem solving exercises, tutorials in small groups, videos and discussion.
There will be an increasing emphasis on the use of information technology – on-line
research, CD ROMS, word processing and statistical packages.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
There are 3 assessment elements: Knowledge and Understanding, Problem Solving &
Practical Abilities. The grade for Practical Abilities is decided by continuous assessment in
school over two years and it is worth one fifth of the overall grade. Problem Solving and
Knowledge and Understanding are assessed by external examination in S4. There will be 2
examination papers, one at Credit level (Grades 1 and 2) and one at General level (Grades 3
and 4). Pupils generally sit both examinations.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Pupils should expect to work at home on a regular basis. Without prompting, they should
look back each week and summarise what they have covered. In addition, they can expect
to be doing either a written exercise or preparation for assessments. Assessments are
carried out every three weeks or so. How long pupils spend on homework will depend on
how effective their study skills are. They should not be spending less than an hour a week
on Biology. As exams approach they should automatically increase this allocation.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
Pupils who gain a Grade 1 or 2 at Standard Grade can progress to Higher Grade. Those
who gain a grade 3 or 4 at Standard Grade should consider the Intermediate 2 option in S5.

Biology courses lead to many careers where biology is applied: medicine, dentistry,
physiotherapy, nursing, speech and occupational therapy, psychology, veterinary sciences,
agriculture, plant and animal breeding, food science, dietetics, microbiology, ecology,
conservation, pharmacology and biochemistry.

                                               16
    CHEMISTRY

AIMS OF THE COURSE
We aim to show how Chemistry contributes to the quality of everyday life. Food, clothes and
the environment are the results of Chemistry in action. Chemists search for better fuels, fight
corrosion, develop and improve substances to help crops grow and produce plastics and
other useful materials. Chemistry is about what things are made of and how we can change
them.

Why do some changes result in new substances? Where do these materials come from?
When you study Chemistry you will find out the answers to these questions.

COURSE CONTENT
15 topics are studied each lasting between 3 and 5 weeks. Subjects covered include:

    Rate of Reactions                             Metals and non-metals
    Acids and Alkalis                             North Sea Oil and Gas
    Atoms, Molecules and Ions                     Electricity
    Carbohydrates                                 Corrosion
    Fertilisers                                   Plastics
    Elements, Compounds & Mixtures

LEARNING AND TEACHING
A variety of learning and teaching methods will be used but the emphasis will be on direct
teaching. Pupils are provided with a basic set of notes for each topic and build in
experimental results and conclusions along with data from a variety of sources.

Pupils monitor their own progress on an almost daily basis with short “self checks”. There
are 13 tests over two years, usually at the end of a topic.

Pupils work in pairs when doing practical activities. A range of skills is developed in the
Chemistry course, with particular emphasis on practical work.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Three elements are assessed and weighted as follows:-

Knowledge and Understanding               40%
Problem Solving                           40%
Practical Abilities                       20%

The first 2 elements are assessed in a 1½ hour written exam. Pupils may sit either Credit or
General or do both. Practical Abilities are internally assessed with set practical techniques
and 2 investigations.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Homework is set on a regular basis.        It includes consolidation, practice problems and
research activities.




                                              17
POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
Pupils who gain a Grade 1 or 2 at Standard Grade can progress to Higher Grade. A
qualification in Chemistry can lead to careers in the oil industry, food production and
processing, forestry, medical and veterinary work and the environment.




                                          18
 PHYSICS

AIMS OF THE COURSE
The aim of the subject at Standard Grade is to help pupils make sense of the physical
environment through scientific enquiry. The essence of such enquiry is problem solving and
this therefore forms the first major element of the course. It is impossible to do this
meaningfully without knowledge of a specific nature and hence the acquisition of such
knowledge is the second major element of the course. The third element of the course is
ability in practical work.

COURSE CONTENT
The course pays special attention to the applications of physics in society which appeal to
young people. It is taught in seven units:

   Telecommunications
   Using Electricity
   Health Physics
   Electronics
   Transport
   Energy Matters
   Space Physics

The range of applications covered can be judged from these titles, e.g. radio and television,
physics used in medicine, electronic devices, sources of energy, space probes etc. For the
more able pupils the essential concepts underlying the applications are sufficiently
established to provide a basis for further study of the subject. There is a major test at the end
of each unit, and occasional mini-tests when thought appropriate.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
Physics is a mathematical subject, the more so as the level of study increases. At Standard
Grade it is essential that a relatively few mathematical techniques are mastered thoroughly
since they are used throughout the course. They are:

   using a calculator
   arranging and solving equations
   being able to plot and interpret line graphs

These techniques will be reinforced by the physics teacher throughout the course.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
S4 pupils are normally entered for both the General and Credit Level Papers. These papers
assess the two elements (i) Knowledge and Understanding; (ii) Problem-solving. The third
element, (iii) Practical Abilities, is assessed internally by the class teacher. These abilities
comprise eight Practical Techniques and two Physics Investigations, all of which are carried
out individually. The grade awarded by the Physics department for Practical Abilities appears
on the final certificate and counts for one-fifth of the overall grade.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Regular and frequent reading over of the notes is an on-going homework commitment for
every pupil. In addition, written homework is set on a regular basis, its primary aim being to
                                               19
consolidate the work done in class. An average total time of approximately 1 hour each week
is expected. Written homework usually involves numerical calculations and pupils are
expected to refer to their notes to help them. The accurate completion of the notes is the
responsibility of the individual pupil, including catching up after periods of short absence.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
Successful completion of the Standard Grade courses in both Physics and Mathematics at
Credit level entitles the pupil to take Higher Physics in S5.

Successful completion in both subjects at General level entitles the pupils to take
Intermediate 2 Physics in S5. A high standard of pass in Intermediate 2 Physics can them
lead on to Higher Physics in S6.




                                             20
SCIENCE


AIMS OF THE COURSE
This is a wide-ranging course intended to meet the needs of pupils of all abilities who want to
continue the study of Science but who do not want to specialise.

COURSE CONTENT
The course consists of five topics. Four of these, listed below, are compulsory and a fifth is
chosen by the teacher leading the course, from a list of options.

   Health & Safe Living
   An Introduction to Materials
   Energy and its Uses
   A Study of Environment

Topics in the course are deliberately broad. They set out to stress the impact and relevance
of scientific activities in society and to increase the scientific awareness of individuals.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
A variety of methods is used including direct teaching, project work, group and whole class
discussions as well as use of audio visual material and IT for research and presentation
purposes. The emphasis of the course is on the acquisition of knowledge, practical work and
problem solving.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
There are 3 assessment elements: Knowledge and Understanding, Problem Solving &
Practical Abilities. The grade for practical abilities is decided by continuous assessment in
school over two years and it is worth one fifth of the overall grade. Science is offered at
Foundation, General and Credit levels. All pupils will be able to attempt Credit work if their
progress at the other levels is satisfactory.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Homework is set regularly, roughly every week depending on the topic and when
assessments are due. When no set written work is required pupils should be familiarising
themselves with the work covered in class. Standards expected in Science are the same as
in the other individual sciences.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
In S5 there is no Higher course in Science. Intermediate courses may be offered in Biology,
Chemistry and Physics as a progression from Standard Grade Science. In general, pupils
who want to progress to Intermediate 2 level should have a Grade 1 in Standard Grade
Science.




                                              21
SOCIAL

STUDIES




   22
 GEOGRAPHY

AIMS OF THE COURSE
The aim of the course is to introduce Geography as the study of the earth, its systems,
human and physical, their interaction and their interdependence.

COURSE CONTENT
Geography draws on information and knowledge from a variety of disciplines and uses this in
its approach to study.

Pupils will be involved in three areas of study:

   The Physical Environment – Weather, World Climates, Glaciation, Rivers, Map Skills.

   The Human Environment – Settlement, Industry, Farming & the Countryside.

   International Issues – Population, Development & Aid.

In each of the units of study pupils will, in addition to developing their knowledge and
understanding of that subject, develop skills of Geographical enquiry and analysis.
Throughout each unit of study pupils are encouraged to relate their studies to recent topical
events so as to give their work some additional relevance.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
As well as classroom based activities pupils will participate in a number of local fieldwork
exercises. The department has an Interactive Whiteboard and Data Projector which
combines computer technology and advanced display capabilities to enhance Learning and
Teaching. The department’s network of computers has direct access to the Internet and
extensive use is made of IT for research.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Pupils will, depending on their level of performance during the course, be presented at
Foundation, General or Credit levels. To allow staff and pupils to monitor performance there
will be an assessment at the end of each unit of study.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Homework is an integral part of the course and pupils can expect some to be given each
week. This may take the form of a set exercise, a piece of research, the completion of class
work or revision for unit tests.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
Students can progress to Intermediate 1 Geology, Intermediate 2 Higher Geography and
Advanced Higher Geography.

Geography provides pupils with a breadth of experiences and learning opportunities. It is
accepted as an entrance qualification for a large number of University courses in both arts
and science and is sound preparation for a wide range of jobs and professions.

The Geography department encourages pupils who are enthusiastic about the environment
and who are keen to learn through hard work, application and enjoyment.

                                               23
 HISTORY

AIMS OF THE COURSE
The course is designed to stimulate an interest in History through a study of the recent past in
a variety of contexts. Pupils will develop an understanding of heritage, change and continuity
and cause and effect. The course places a heavy emphasis on active enquiry and on the
use of primary and secondary sources. Pupils will be asked to use evidence to make
hypotheses draw conclusions about the past and reconstruct past situations.

COURSE CONTENT
The course is divided into three units.

Changing Life in Scotland and Britain 1830's - 1930's.
This unit traces the main social, economic and political developments that affected Scotland
and Britain during this period.

International Co-operation and Conflict 1890's - 1920's
This unit deals with the origins, course and long term consequences of World War 1.

People and Power: Russia 1914 - 1941
This unit will deal with the struggle for political and cultural dominance of Lenin and Stalin
during this period.

The elements covered in the course are:
Knowledge and Understanding: Pupils will be required to display a knowledge and
understanding of events, actions and attitudes from the past. They will also have to
explain why such events, actions and attitudes are important.
Enquiry Skills: These skills are divided into two general types.   Skills used to evaluate
sources such as documents from the past and skills used to investigate controversial issues
in recent history.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
A wide range of teaching methods are used including whole class teaching, group work and
individual study. Learning experiences involve document work, historical research, debates,
video work etc.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Pupils are assessed at the end of each teaching unit. The exam weighting is Knowledge and
Understanding       40% and Enquiry Skills 60%.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Throughout the course pupils will be given regular homework to enhance their study skills
and prepare them for the final exams. Homework tasks would include completion of course
units, glossary pages and home exercises together with preparation work for class
assessments and investigative work.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
For progression to Higher it is recommended that pupils attain grades 1 or 2 at Standard
Grade. History is an approved subject for university entry and for further education courses
and is valuable for such careers as journalism, civil service, law, librarianship, management
and teaching.
                                              24
MODERN STUDIES

AIMS OF THE COURSE
The main aim of Modern Studies is to create in pupils an awareness and understanding of
the society - local, national and international - in which they live.

By studying important aspects of local, national and international society it is hoped pupils will
leave school with the ability to form objective, rational and tolerant opinions about the world
and its peoples, as well as enable them to participate fully in the society in which they live.

COURSE CONTENT
The course is divided into 4 units of study:

   Living in a Democracy
   Changing Society
   Ideology (USA)
   International Relations

Within each of the above units a wide range of concepts, themes and issues will be
examined.

Throughout the two year course pupils will undertake activities linked to the two elements of
Knowledge and Understanding and Enquiry Skills. Pupils will thus gain a knowledge of the
world they live in and acquire skills which will enable them to interpret, evaluate and analyse
social, political and economic data.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
A wide range of teaching strategies will be employed including resource-based learning,
problem solving, group discussion and role play. Where appropriate the department will
make use of local and other environmental resources.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
At the end of the course pupils will be presented at either General and Credit or Foundation
and General. Such a flexible structure allows each pupil’s potential to be realised. Regular
class assessments as well as formal examinations form part of the overall assessment
procedures.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
In addition to their work in class, pupils are expected to complete a set amount of homework
each week. In S3/4 pupils may be given up to one hour of homework. Homework can take a
number of different formats, for example, completing coursework, revising for class
assessments or completing a piece of investigative work.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
Pupils who gain a grade 1 or 2 at Standard Grade can progress to Higher Grade.

Modern Studies is a useful course of study for pupils who wish to follow careers in banking
journalism, law and many others.



                                               25
TECHNOLOGICAL

  ACTIVITIES




      26
COMPUTING STUDIES

AIMS OF THE COURSE
This course looks in some detail at the uses of computers and information technology in
commerce, industry and in the home. The implications of these uses for the individual and
society in general, are also examined.

COURSE CONTENT
There are 3 broad areas of study:

Computer applications:
General Purpose Packages - word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation,
graphics and web design.
Industrial and Commercial Applications - robotics, CAD/CAM, computers in banks, stock
control and simulations.
Commercial Data Processing – computers in shops, banks and offices, government
legislation
Modern Technologies – Virtual Reality, The Internet, World Wide Web, E-Mail etc and
Communication Systems.

Computer Systems:
Systems software, operating and filing systems, computer hardware and peripherals.

Computer Programming:
This section of the course is concerned with the development of practical abilities of problem
analysis and the design of solutions, practical implementation and evaluation of solutions.
The programming language used is Comal.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
A variety of teaching approaches will be employed throughout the course depending on
which is deemed most suitable to the topic being taught. In general however, a student-
centered, resource-based learning approach will be followed. It is envisaged that each
student will spend at least 60% of their time working on the computer.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Throughout the course the pupils will undertake several projects of a practical nature in both
programming and non-programming contexts. Some of these will be used as evidence of
attainment in the Practical Activities element of the course which is assessed by the Scottish
Qualifications Authority.

HOMEWORK PATTERN
Homework will be given regularly when appropriate to the part of the course being followed at
that time. It should be noted that homework is not given when pupils are engaged in
practical activities requiring the use of a computer.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
The course serves as an excellent knowledge base for those who wish to continue with
computing in S5 where Information Systems is offered at Higher and Intermediate 2 levels
and thence to S6 where Advanced Higher Information Systems is offered.


                                             27
Those gaining a Credit pass (grades 1 & 2) at Standard Grade could progress to the
Higher Information Systems class, while those gaining a General pass (grades 3 & 4)
could progress to the Intermediate 2 Information Systems class.

A Credit level pass will also result in the award of the core skill “Using Information
Technology” at Intermediate 2 level.




                                         28
 CRAFT AND DESIGN

AIMS OF THE COURSE
This course aims to give pupils the opportunity to develop their creative skills through
designing and making projects in wood, metal and plastics.

COURSE CONTENT
There is a coursework section during which pupils develop their skills in Designing and
Practical Abilities. This is followed by a Final Project, for which a design task will be set.

There will be three coursework projects. One mainly made from wood, one mainly metal and
one mainly plastic.

Since this is a creative course, pupils use a variety of materials and they will be expected to
pay towards this cost. For coursework this is expected to be about £10.00. The cost of the
final project varies depending on the nature and design of the object produced.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
For Knowledge and Understanding, a lesson is spent each week on whole class study of
tools, processes, materials and the design process. In Designing, the amount of design input
expected from pupils is gradually increased with each subsequent coursework project. For
Practical Abilities, pupils experience working with a range of materials and processes.

For each new process, whole class lessons are used to explain how to carry out the process
safely and accurately. Individual help is then given, as pupils require it.

During the Final Project, teaching staff work with individual pupils. However, when a small
group of pupils is working on projects that involve similar processes, direct teaching and
demonstration to the group, is common.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Work is assessed at the end of S4 in three elements. Knowledge and Understanding is
assessed by a written exam. Designing and Practical Abilities are graded by the class
teacher and moderated by the SQA based on work completed for the final project. The
course is presented at Credit, General and Foundation levels.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Homework exercises will be issued, to be completed each week, to help pupils prepare for
Knowledge and Understanding assessments.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
This course would be useful for pupils entering employment in the design field or craft based
industry. Higher and Intermediate 2 courses in product design are available for further study
in S5/S6. The Higher is accepted as an entry qualification by most universities.




                                              29
    GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION

AIMS OF THE COURSE
In recent years, society has become more dependent on rapid clear transfer of information, a
trend that has placed increasing emphasis on graphics. This course is designed to help
pupils convey ideas and present information in a variety of graphical forms.

COURSE CONTENT
Pupils develop their graphic skills through practical activities involving drawing, use of colour
and computer aided drawing.

    Orthographics - Traditional technical drawing, producing elevations and plans of
     everyday objects.
    Pictorials - Various methods of producing three-dimensional drawings.
    Computer Aided Graphics - Using Inventor, CorelDRAW and MS Publisher.
    Rendering - Application of colour to drawings to enhance the Presentation.
    Graphs and Charts - Various methods of displaying statistical information.
    Modelling - Producing three-dimensional models in card.
    Display - Producing a graphic display.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
Much of the work involves pupils using a drawing board or a computer. New topics are
introduced through whole class lessons. Thereafter pupils work at their own pace with
individual assistance from the class teacher as required.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Pupils performance is assessed in three elements:

        Knowledge and Interpretation (written exam at the end of the course).
        Drawing Abilities (drawing exam at the end of the course).
        Illustration and Presentation (a portfolio of the pupil’s best work produced throughout
        the course, graded by the class teacher and moderated by the SQA).

The course is presented at Credit, General and Foundation levels.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Homework exercises are given each week to reinforce class work and help prepare pupils for
assessments.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
The ability to communicate clearly is a useful asset in any future employment. There is a
Higher Graphic Communication course available in S5 for pupils who gain a Credit at
Standard Grade.

There is also an Intermediate 2 course in Graphic Communication available for pupils who
gain a General in Standard Grade. Places may be limited due to timetable restrictions.

The Higher can be counted as an entry qualification to most universities.



                                               30
    ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE

AIMS OF THE COURSE
Accounting and Finance is concerned with the keeping of financial records. During this
course the main aims are:

-      to develop in pupils an appreciation and understanding of accounting and its
       importance in business and also in personal and social areas;

-      to develop a systematic approach to the solving of problems and an appreciation of
       neatness and organisation when presenting information.

COURSE CONTENT
The course of study follows a theme. Pupils are introduced to Jean, a school pupil with an
interest in photography and follow her development through setting up in business on her
own, becoming Treasurer of her Camera Club, going into a partnership and eventually
forming a Limited Company. Study is divided into 5 main units:

Unit Title                        Unit Content

A Lot to Learn                    Balance Sheets and Cash flow Budgets at a personal
                                  level; Receipts and Payments Accounts of Not-for-Profit
                                  organisations.
Going Solo                        Introduction to Sole Traders; Ledger Accounting; Final
                                  Accounts; Break-even Analysis.
My Club                           Income and Expenditure Accounts and Balance Sheets of
                                  a Club; Bank Reconciliation Statements.
Partners                          Ratio and Performance Analysis; Partnership Accounts;
                                  Correction of Errors; Petty Cash.
Into the Big Time                 Limited companies - sources of finance, Revenue
                                  Accounts and Balance Sheets, Ratio and forecast
                                  statements.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
The introduction of new topics in the course will be teacher-led. A pupil-centred approach
to learning will allow individuals the opportunity to achieve at the level (F, G or C)
appropriate to them. Throughout the units, computer applications are used in the form of
spreadsheets.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Pupils will be assessed in Accounting and Finance in 3 areas;

Knowledge and Understanding: - This is concerned with the acquisition of a knowledge and
understanding of the principles of accounting procedure.

Handling Information - This is concerned with the development of the skills and techniques
required to process, analyse and present financial information.

Practical Abilities - The practical application of knowledge, understanding, skills and
techniques.

                                            31
Assessment timetable:

S3    November      End of Unit 1 Assessment (test)
      May           Handling Information and Knowledge and Understanding (exam)

S4    November      Handling Information and Knowledge and Understanding (prelim exam)
      December      Practise Practical Abilities project

Handling Information and Knowledge and Understanding are assessed by external
examination at the end of S4. Practical Abilities is assessed by a project done in
January/February during class time. The project is produced by the SQA, assessed by class
teachers and the marks are forwarded to the SQA for inclusion on pupils’ final certificates.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Each unit of work will be allocated a block of time and each pupil will be responsible for
completing the work of the unit to the best of his/her ability. Most homework given in
Accounting and Finance will be to complete an exercise started in class for the next lesson.
At the end of topics, a formal piece of homework will be given and pupils will be given
adequate time to prepare it.

PROGRESSION ROUTES
Students achieving a Credit grade may progress to Higher Accounting and Finance and
those achieving a General grade can progress to Intermediate 2 Accounting and Finance.
The course will also be beneficial to those considering Higher Business Management as an
option in S6.




                                            32
 ADMINISTRATION - INTERMEDIATE 1


AIMS OF THE COURSE
Administration is crucial to the effective and efficient delivery of business and administration
skills are now an essential tool for work in any business environment. This course aims to
equip students with the level of competence required for using a range of software packages
in an office environment and will also enable them to apply their use to various business
functions.

COURSE CONTENT
The course content is set out in 3 units:

ADMINSTRATIVE SERVICES – covers the knowledge and understanding required of a
junior administrator, including knowledge of administrative tasks and uses of the Internet
and office technologies. Topics include communication, health and safety, the work of
functional departments and business travel and accommodation.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADMINISTRATORS – concentrates on the use of
ICT required for administrative tasks and develops students capabilities in the use of
spreadsheets, databases and word processing software.

PRESENTING AND COMMUNICATING INFORMATION – concentrates on the use of ICT
to present and communicate information. Students are required to use the Internet to
search for and extract information, use e-diary, e-mail and word processing documents to
present information and to use presentation software effectively.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
Learning and teaching of the 3 units of the course will be integrated to emphasise the links
and relationships between them. A range of teaching approaches will be used including
resource-based learning, problem solving and research. The course content will remain
focused on current business practices and emerging technologies.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
The 3 units are assessed internally over the 2 years of the course. All internal
assessments are marked by the class teacher and moderated by the SQA. At the end of
the course pupils will sit the external SQA exam at Intermediate 1 level.

HOMEWORK
Pupils should expect regular homework for the Administrative Services unit.

PROGRESSION ROUTES
Pupils who are successful in achieving Administration Intermediate 1 can progress to
Intermediate 2 and then Higher level. The course also allows pupils to consider further
study of Administration through a college course or using their skills in the world of work.




                                              33
    BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

AIMS OF THE COURSE
Business Management offers students the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills
necessary to access and understand the business world, including:
 The process of business formation and the importance of business activity
 The management of business resources and how individuals can contribute to
   business
 The importance of teamwork in business
 The use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in business decision-
   making

COURSE CONTENT
During the course, students will acquire the knowledge and understanding to answer the
following questions:
 What is business?
 How do businesses develop and perform?
 What resources do businesses use?
 How are businesses managed?

The areas of study covered to help answer these questions include:

    An Introduction to Business Activity       Operations Management
    Business Organisition                      Decisions Making in Business
    Location                                   Communications
    Marketing                                  Finance
    Human Resources                            The Changing Business Environment

LEARNING AND TEACHING
A student-centred active learning approach is required allow pupils to develop the
decision-making and practical skills that the course requires. This will include students
working as part of the whole class, in groups, in teams and as individuals. There will be
active learning using appropriate ICT, audio-visual equipment and business simulations.
Where possible, active links with businesses outside school will be used in conjunction
with class activities.




                                            34
ASSESSMENT
Students will be assessed in 3 elements for Business Management – Knowledge and
Understanding (KU), Decision Making (DM) and Practical Abilities (PA).

S3      Ongoing class assessment
        May – examination to assess KU and DM

S4      November – prelim to assess KU and DM
        January/February – PA project supplied by SQA completed in class time at
        the appropriate level (F, G or C). The project is graded internally and grades
        submitted to the SQA.

HOMEWORK
Students may be asked to complete activities at home during the teaching of a topic.
Formal homework in the form of exam-standard questions will also be issued at regular
intervals.


PROGRESSION ROUTES
The skills and knowledge acquired through the study of Business Management will be an
excellent base for anyone leaving school at the end of S4 and going into the business
world. It is also recommended for students wishing to pursue college courses focusing on,
or containing elements of, Business Studies or Management Studies. For those
continuing their school studies, students can progress to the Int 2/Higher class - those who
pass at General level would study Int 2 and those who pass at Credit level would study at
Higher level.




                                            35
 HOSPITALITY – INTERMEDIATE 1 PRACTICAL COOKERY


AIMS OF THE COURSE
Intermediate 1 Hospitality is the introductory qualification to the vocational courses in
Practical Cookery within the food industry. The course builds on the knowledge and skills
developed in S1/2 with relevance to practical skills, health and safety, problem solving and
organisational skills. The primary focus of the course is the development of effective,
accurate practical skills.

COURSE CONTENT
The course consists of 4 units:
Food Hygiene for the Hospitality Industry – examines and develops understanding of
the cause and effects of food contamination. This includes risk assessment, health and
safety requirements and hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP).
Food Preparation Techniques: An Introduction – develops knowledge and skills in food
handling techniques recognising the need to use specialist equipment safely and
efficiently.
Cookery Processes: An Introduction – develops knowledge and competence in cookery
processes/methods using a variety of foodstuffs and cooking mediums.
Hospitality: Organisation of Practical Skills – develops the skills required to carry out
food ordering, time management and executing a chosen task to a rigid deadline.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
A variety of teaching methods are used including direct teaching, group work, industry
visits, external speakers/demonstration, peer assessment etc. The course work is pupil
centred with a heavy emphasis on learning through experiences.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
The 4 units are internally assessed and externally moderated by SQA over the 2 year
course. Assessment is built into class work to allow pupils reach the required competence
in the skills and processes. The pupils undertake an 80 minute practical exam towards the
end of their course (March/April) which sets their final grading. There is no Hospitality
exam during the May exam diet.

HOMEWORK
Pupils are expected to come to class each day fully prepared with required foodstuffs,
dishes/box, hair bobbles, no nail varnish etc. Failure to meet these expectations is
regarded as a failure to carry out homework and is detrimental to their learning.
Pupils are also encouraged to watch food programmes and practise their cookery skills at
home.

PROGRESSION ROUTES
Successful completion of this leads into the Intermediate 2 Practical Cookery course in
school or professional Cookery courses at college. Intermediate 1 Practical cookery is
advantageous for careers in the food industry, nursery nursing, beauty therapy, sports and
leisure management, primary teaching and tourism.
                                             36
CREATIVE

   AND

AESTHETIC

ACTIVITIES




    37
 ART & DESIGN

AIMS OF THE COURSE
The aims of the course are:
 to develop visual awareness and an adequate means of self-expression along with the
   ability to communicate ideas, attitudes, feelings and moods with originality and
   imagination.

   to engage pupils in open-ended problem solving activities, primarily of a visual nature
    although not exclusively so. These two aims are met by Expressive Activities such as
    Garden and Portraiture and Design Activities such as 3D Mask Design and stained Glass
    Window Design. These areas are linked by the pupils continual engagement in a third
    discipline, namely work of a critical or judgemental nature. This is referred to as Critical
    Activity.

COURSE CONTENT
The course is broken into units of work covering both expressive and design activity. Pupils
will be engaged in related critical activity in all units in third and fourth years.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
Pupils are encouraged to evaluate their own work. The assessment structure, which the
teaching staff adopts, facilitates this. The staff assess work using grade related criteria which
is set nationally by the Scottish Qualifications Authority.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
All course work is internally assessed over the two years to monitor and assist pupil
progress. To gain the Standard Grade Certificate pupils must satisfy the following three
requirements:

Pupils must submit one unit of Design work for teacher assessment and external moderation.
Pupils must submit two pieces of Critical Activity work for external assessment; one piece
related to Design work and one piece related to Expressive work.
Pupils must sit a final exam (in S4) in Expressive Activity.

Each of the above is equally weighted in the final course award. Failure to complete any one
of the above three requirements will result in a no-award.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Pupils are expected to conduct research and investigation at home in both the practical and
critical elements of all units. Although not always formally set, it would be true to say that
pupils always have some homework to do throughout the two-year course. Examples of the
various types of homework which S3 and S4 pupils will be given are as follows:- drawing;
collecting visual information in the form of photographs and other printed material;
completing written survey sheets; reading. Due to the nature of the course there will be very
few occasions when S4 pupils do not have written critical activity work to do at home.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
It would be anticipated that only those pupils gaining 1 to 4 in Standard Grade would continue
with the study of Art & Design in S5 /S6. Pupils gaining a Credit pass at 1/2 would follow
the Higher course and pupils gaining a General pass at 3/ 4 would follow the Intermediate 2
course.
                                               38
DRAMA

AIMS OF THE COURSE
This course seeks to provide opportunities for pupils to:
    Experience theatrical performance including theatre visits
    Use co-operation and negotiation skills to work with others
    Experience role play
    Gain experience in presenting skills
    Develop characterisation skills including voice and movement
    Experience the use of drama forms (mime, comedy, movement, musical,
       pantomime, tragedy, script, improvisation, docu-drama, dance drama)
    Experience the use of conventions (for example: narrator, slow motion, tableau,
       flashback, flash-forward)
    Experience the use of theatre arts (lighting, sound, costume, set, staging, make up,
       special effects)

COURSE CONTENT
The course splits into three distinct areas of study:

Creating
Practical work in developing pieces of drama from initial stimulus to presentation is
assessed by teacher observation. Improvisation is the process by which the drama
material is produced. The creation of this material is central to Standard Grade Drama.

Presenting
Practical work in Presentation skills is assessed by teacher observation. Within the
Presentation element there is also the component of evaluation. Pupils evaluate a piece of
drama they have created and presented and a theatre performance they have attended.

Knowledge and Understanding
Working from the Standard Grade Body of Knowledge pupils experience practical and
theory work to gain an understanding of the drama process and how to apply this process
to the production of theatre.
All pupils sit the 45 minute General paper. Then either 45 minutes for the Foundation or
1hour for the Credit paper.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
Pupils are given the opportunity to experience different drama forms and conventions to
create presentations.
This happens through practical workshops using individual, pair, group and whole class
work.
Theory for the course is taught through practical and theory lessons.




                                              39
ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Pupils are assessed through continual assessment for the practical Creating and
Presenting elements of the course. Knowledge and Understanding is assessed by written
exams in April of S3 and November of S4.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
Pupils gaining a Credit Grade can progress to Higher and then to Advanced Higher Drama
in S5/6




                                          40
 MUSIC

AIMS OF THE COURSE
To develop musical skills in performing, inventing and listening at a general level and to allow
pupil to specialise in their chosen optional area.

COURSE CONTENT
The course divides the study of music into 3 distinct but inter-related areas:
Performing : Pupils will practise solo performance on one instrument or voice to attain their
highest possible standard. The SQA specifies acceptable instruments and these include all
orchestral and brass band instruments, drum kit, recorder, acoustic, electric and bass guitars,
piano, Scottish fiddle, clarsach and bagpipes. Although school tuition is available on most
instruments, places are limited. Private tuition is equally acceptable.

The standard required to achieve Credit 1 is equivalent to approximately Associated Board
Grade 3. A general pass would be roughly equivalent to Grade 2 Associated Board. Pupils
will perform in solo and in groups on a second instrument – this must be in a different
category from their first instrument.

Inventing: This includes composing and arranging with the emphasis depending largely on
pupils' interests and abilities. Pupils will use music computer software for their compositions.

Listening: Pupils are exposed to music of a wide variety of styles so as to develop
awareness and perception of basic musical concepts related to melody, rhythm, harmony,
instrumentation, style and structure among others.

Part of the listening concentrates on developments in music of the twentieth century and the
indigenous music of Scotland. All 3 areas of study should combine to give pupils a wider
musical insight and encourage the development of practical skills.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
Performing is generally taught through individual lessons. School staff will guide pupils not
receiving instruction if possible. Inventing will be taught through set tasks then tutorials and
individual consultations. Listening is generally taught through whole class teaching.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Since units run concurrently, most of the assessment will take place towards the end of the
course.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Little homework is given out since pupils should be practising about half an hour each night
on their solo-performing instrument and slightly less on their second instrument.        On
occasions it may be necessary to work on inventions at home or read over listening concept
work.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
The Standard Grade course lead into a National Qualification at Intermediate 2, Higher and
Advanced Higher level. The pupils will be able to build on particular areas of interest and
expertise.

                                              41
 PHYSICAL EDUCATION

AIMS OF THE COURSE
This course gives pupils the opportunity to develop their potential through a 2-year specialist
course in Physical Education. The aims of the course are to enable pupils:
 To improve the pupil’s practical performance through practising and refining techniques
   and then developing these further within the games.
 To develop and improve the pupil’s knowledge and understanding of the relevant facts
   and principles through both practical and written work.
 To develop the pupil’s ability to evaluate practical performance and suggest
   improvements.
 To enhance the pupil’s affective development by adopting different roles, sharing their
   ideas, communicating decisions and responding to various types of challenge.

COURSE CONTENT
The course aims will be delivered through the following activities: gymnastics, swimming,
hockey, badminton, basketball and fitness. This is a reflection of the variety of
experiences and different challenges provided by this course.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
In Standard Grade PE students will be taught in various different ways. In striving towards
personal performance improvements students will often be taught in quite direct ways. At
other times students will work individually and in small groups when analysing
performances in their various forms.

This form of teaching will be more geared towards students discovering, through guidance,
the different requirements of various tasks.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
The assessment for the course is made up in the following ways. Practical Performance is
assessed continuously and accounts for 50% of the final mark; the remaining 50% will be
assessed by an external exam at the end of the course. This exam will look at both
Knowledge & Understanding 25% and Evaluating 25%. There also will be regular class tests
within these two areas to monitor the pupil’s progress.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Homework is an integral and valuable feature of the course and as such all pupils will be
expected to complete approximately 1/2 hour per week. Homework will centre on completing
tasks and studying course notes from their various Standard Grade activity booklets. S4
pupils will be issued with a past paper exam question on a weekly basis.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
From Standard Grade, pupils can progress with their study of physical education in Higher or
Intermediate 2 PE, dependent on the level of award achieved at Standard Grade.

Students will also have the option to undertake the Community Sports Leadership Award or
Practical Performance Units in various activities at a range of different levels.




                                              42
 PERSONAL

   AND

  SOCIAL

DEVELOPMENT

 COURSES




     43
 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES

Essential to every pupil's development is a number of key elements, which are part of the
climate in which learning takes place. They will appear in all subjects and activities in the
school but in addition pupils will follow a distinct programme, which will continue and extend
the work begun in the first two years. This programme will encompass Physical, Social and
Religious, Moral and Philosophical Education and will be taken by all pupils.




 PHYSICAL EDUCATION (CORE)

AIMS OF THE COURSE AND COURSE CONTENT

In S3 the range of activities practised in S1/2 is further developed and provision is made for
the introduction of new topics such as lacrosse, handball, volleyball, football, orienteering and
lifesaving.

In S4 pupil follow a compulsory programme. Activities include unihoc, ultimate frisbee,
aquatics, climbing, mountain biking, athletics and softball. Pupils will also be given an
element of choice.

In designing a PE programme for themselves pupils are encouraged to be selective and
discerning in their choice, selecting topics which will stimulate their sporting and leisure
interest in later life. Throughout our programme we discuss the merits of regular exercise for
good health and the value of participation in various chosen sporting topics. Attention is also
placed on developing the skills learned in earlier years so that each pupil can work towards
and reach his or her full potential in each activity.

In S3 and S4 the assessment procedure which forms the comment on the pupils' report
sheets is evaluated on a continuous basis, after each activity block. Pupils' practical ability
and any supporting written work undertaken in an activity is assessed as is the more
subjective areas of pupils' effort, attitude and behaviour, participation rate and preparedness
for lesson.




                                               44
 RELIGIOUS, MORAL & PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES

AIMS OF THE UNITS
There is now a new format for Core RMPS. A large number of pupils will be following
National Qualification units for Intermediate 2, which will be awarded at the end of 4th year.
Others will be doing the Units for Intermediate 1 over the 2 years.

These units offer some stimulating material which aims to help pupils understand the beliefs,
moral codes and way of life of different people throughout the world. In addition it also
develops key skills of analysis, evaluation and reasoned debate.

COURSE CONTENT
There are three broad areas of study:

    Making Moral Decisions - within this pupils will either study topics related to Human
     Rights or Medical Ethics. This allows pupils to gain insight and reflect on how people
     make decisions on difficult issues that arise throughout life.

    The Nature of Belief - issues range from the existence of God to the problem of
     suffering and evil. This enables pupils to draw conclusions after evaluating criticisms
     and religious responses.

    Buddhism - Intermediate 2 pupils complete a unit on Buddhism. Intermediate 1 pupils
     will either complete a unit on Buddhism or a unit on Religion and The Social World.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
A variety of teaching methods will be used including whole class teaching, group
presentations, paired work and individual tasks.

Resources are also varied. Pupils have the opportunity to use textbooks, videos/DVDs
information sheets, library resources and Internet provisions.

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Pupils have a written assessments at the end of each unit, for which, if successfully
completed they receive SQA certification.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Homework will be related to the course work. Preparation for the unit assessments is the
main focus of homework.

POSSIBLE PROGRESSION ROUTES
To advance to Higher and Advanced Higher Religious, Moral and Philosophical Studies.




                                             45
SOCIAL EDUCATION

AIMS OF THE COURSE
The primary focus of the programme is to promote self-awareness, awareness of effective
interpersonal skills in addition to problem-solving and decision-making skills.

COURSE CONTENT
The topics covered fall broadly into four categories.
 Self-awareness and review of progress; this includes regular review of skills and areas
   where improvement could be made. This is done by means of their school planner which
   is designed to help pupils take a greater responsibility in planning their school career and
   their future as well as recording achievements.
 Interpersonal skills and relationships; consideration is given to the range and nature of
   relationship situations facing young people.       Strategies to cope with all aspects of
   relationships are discussed.
 Health education; a review of the benefits of a healthy lifestyle leads on to discussion of
   the pressures and health dangers pupils may encounter.
 Career education: Pupils use websites including Careers Scotland and Plan It Plus which
   are designed to help them think realistically about their interests and abilities in a career
   context. The library is used extensively to give pupils the opportunity to familiarise
   themselves with careers literature and use careers websites to broaden their thinking.

Specific topics covered in S3 are: Health Education – decision making, what is health,
smoking, alcohol, other drugs, eating disorders, mental health, relationships, sexual
health, boyfriends/girlfriends, contraception, study skills. There is also input from
Grampian Police.

Specific topics covered in S4 are: Bereavement, World of Work (Health and Safety,
application forms, CVs and interviews), sex education including relationships and
contraception, study skills and exam survival. Much work is also done in preparation for
our annual S4 careers evening. Guidance staff monitor progress in Standard Grade
subjects and there is input from Grampian Police (including traffic unit). Work experience
is offered to all pupils in S4 and preparation is done to ensure that, where possible, pupils
are matched up with suitable placements.

LEARNING AND TEACHING
At each stage themes have been identified which are appropriate to the pupils’ stage of
development. The methodology and approach used are as varied as possible including
group work, discussion and, where appropriate, outside speakers are involved. From S4,
pupils will have the opportunity for an individual interview with the School Careers Adviser as
well as receive whole class career information

ASSESSMENT PATTERN
There is no formal assessment of this course.

HOMEWORK REQUIREMENTS
Homework will occasionally be given to prepare for or evaluate the work done in the Social
Education class. Any parent wishing to discuss more sensitive issues being discussed as
part of the health Education topics should contact their child’s Guidance teacher.

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