Settling in West Coast

					Settling In – West Coast
Migrant Community Social Services Report




October 2008
Forewords from the Mayors


New Zealand is a cosmopolitan society and immigration is part
of our country’s history. I personally, as my surname would
indicate, am a product of immigration.


While we are used to the concept of immigration, we do not
always acknowledge that it is a profoundly personal experience
and asks a great deal of immigrants. They leave their cultures
behind and, in most cases, show great courage in embracing
the kiwi culture and lifestyle. This quite often involves a sense
of dislocation or separation and a loss of identity, which is not
helped by unique differences in what we do and know to be
‘the kiwi way’.


It is against this background that I welcome and actively support programmes aimed at
welcoming immigrants into our community. The Grey District Council identified this need
very early on and we have had an immigrant initiation project in place for some time. I
also welcome new residents twice yearly at a morning tea function. This is but the tip of
the iceberg and the initiative by the Ministry of Social Development to undertake and foster
a more holistic, needs-based approach to immigrant induction and integration is an
immensely positive one.


I am proud to be part of this report and encourage Coasters to read it. It speaks of fears, of
courage, of barriers to immigrants settling in, of ambitions and aspirations. As a community
we need to take ownership in assisting new immigrants, thereby allowing them to deploy
their skills and attributes for the betterment of our district.


Let’s all work together!




Tony Kokshoorn
Mayor - Grey District




                                               ii
Forewords from the Mayors -                     Continued


                            The attraction of the West Coast as a beautiful place to live is
                            appealing to a broad range of people from around the world.
                            New Zealand is perceived as a safe and friendly country and the
                            West Coast offers the environmental advantages that appeal to
                            a growing number of immigrants.


                            We are witnessing an increasing number of citizenship
                            ceremonies where immigrants are choosing to formally become
                            New Zealand citizens, completing their integration into New
                            Zealand’s lifestyle and affirming their commitment to staying
                            here.


The mix of nationalities brings diversity to our communities that is well accepted and
enjoyed. International school programmes at Westland High School enable our youth to
interact with a variety of nationalities at a young age, which opens their minds to a general
acceptance of our global community.


In recent years, the local labour market has had to recruit a growing number of skilled
workers from outside New Zealand to fill essential positions.       The attraction of skilled
migrants has provided the opportunity of satisfying the skills shortage while opening up
opportunities for our communities to diversify culturally.


The challenge accompanying the integration of new immigrants is to provide support to
make their transition to New Zealand as smooth as possible, not only for the new workers,
but especially for their families. This report highlights how things can be done better so we
are more sensitive to the needs of new immigrants and provide the necessary support. This
is often just as essential for people relocating here from other parts of the country.




Maureen Pugh
Mayor - Westland District




                                              iii
Forewords from the Mayors -                      Continued


New Zealand is a nation built by immigrants, and the West Coast is no different. From the
early explorers, the Coast attracted people of different nationalities seeking first the gold
and then the coal that was able to be extracted from our rugged landscape. The Buller
goldfields were populated by immigrants and the social history of our district has evolved
from these early settlers who worked, often enduring great hardship, to carve out a life and
home here.


Since these early days, immigrants have been seen as people who will benefit both the
economy and society through their skills and hard work. With our current strong economy,
our unemployment rate is very low and Buller is now seeing a new influx of immigrants
helping to fill the skills shortages that we are unable to fill ourselves.


We know that we have skill gaps in certain areas of our
society and are keen to attract new residents to our
district. However, we are not always good at ensuring they
are supported in carving out their new life and home here.


The skills and expertise that migrants can bring are vital to
enable us to sustain both the economy and the lifestyle that
we value, and to add to the diversity and cultural
foundation of our society.      For that reason, I am very
pleased to welcome this report and its recommendations
about how we can make things easier for newcomers
settling into Buller.




Pat McManus
Mayor - Buller District




                                                iv
Contents

Forewords from the Mayors ............................................................................ ii
Contents.................................................................................................... v
1.    Summary .......................................................................................... 2
2.    Introduction ...................................................................................... 4
      2.1.     Background to the ‘Settling In’ Programme.............................................4
      2.2.     Purpose of the Report ......................................................................4
      2.3.     Key Personnel ................................................................................4
3.    The West Coast Context ....................................................................... 6
      3.1.     Labour Market Trends.......................................................................6
      3.2.     Demographics ................................................................................7
                  3.2.1.   Total Population ............................................................................ 7
                  3.2.2.   Education..................................................................................... 8
                  3.2.3.   Employment on the West Coast .......................................................... 9
                  3.2.4.   Mining........................................................................................ 12
                  3.2.5.   Agriculture/Pastoral....................................................................... 13
                  3.2.6.   Tourism ...................................................................................... 14
4.       Methodology ................................................................................... 17
5.       Findings and Recommendations ........................................................... 18
         5.1.   Access to Services ......................................................................... 19
                  5.1.1.   Issues......................................................................................... 19
                  5.1.2.   Recommendations ......................................................................... 22
         5.2.     Healthy Lifestyle .......................................................................... 23
                  5.2.1.   Issues......................................................................................... 23
                  5.2.2.   Recommendation .......................................................................... 23
         5.3.     Families and children ..................................................................... 24
                  5.3.1.   Issues......................................................................................... 24
                  5.3.2.   Recommendations ......................................................................... 25
         5.4.     Knowledge and skills ...................................................................... 26
                  5.4.1.   Issues......................................................................................... 26
                  5.4.2.   Recommendations ......................................................................... 28
         5.5.     Appreciation of diversity ................................................................. 29
                  5.5.1.   Issues......................................................................................... 29
                  5.5.2.   Recommendations ......................................................................... 30
         5.6.     Economic wellbeing ....................................................................... 31
                  5.6.1.   Issues......................................................................................... 31
                  5.6.2.   Recommendations ......................................................................... 32
         5.7.     Vibrant and optimistic youth ............................................................ 33
                  5.7.1.   Issues......................................................................................... 33
                  5.7.2.   Recommendations ......................................................................... 35
6.    References ..................................................................................... 36
Appendix 1: Population Projections for Greymouth ............................................ 37
Appendix 2: Ethnic Groups in the West Coast Region .......................................... 38
Appendix 3: Benefit Receipt in the Top of the South Island .................................. 39




                                                           v
1.     Summary

This Settling In - West Coast report focuses on the whole of the West Coast and the
challenges and opportunities the region is experiencing as it looks increasingly to
newcomers from overseas and other parts of New Zealand to provide the labour market for
its industries and services. The report also gives a voice to the newcomers and an insight
into their experience of living and working on the West Coast.


The report reflects the courage and optimism of people who have made an extraordinary
commitment to the West Coast, but it also reveals some challenges for us all. The
geography of the West Coast has always made access to health, education and other
services more difficult. People coming new into this environment need to find out quickly
what is available locally and what support can be brought in from outside. Taking too long
to get this information can leave families feeling very isolated and desperate to the extent
that they choose to leave. This is a loss, not only in terms of recruitment and training but
also because we’re missing out on their contribution to our community. It’s in everybody’s
interest to address these barriers so that we can all enjoy the benefits of working and living
together in a productive and supportive community.


Central and local government agencies have supported the development of this report and
have signalled a willingness to work together on responses to the challenges it raises.
Family and Community Services at the Ministry of Social Development extended the
‘Settling In’ programme to the West Coast to support that community and the unique
challenges it faces. Geographically isolated and with limited experience of hosting
newcomers from such a variety of countries, the West Coast community has embraced the
opportunity to improve its services and develop general support for newcomers.


This report contains the findings from seven focus groups held in Westport, Hokitika and
Greymouth with a range of ethnic communities. Each focus group had an average of eight
participants and was facilitated by someone familiar with that ethnic community. Critical
to the success of this process was to reach the ethnic communities themselves so they could
talk about their experiences directly, rather than having this conveyed by others. Findings
focus on seven key areas:

       1.      Access to services
       2.      Healthy lifestyle
       3.      Families and children
       4.      Knowledge and skills
       5.      Appreciation of diversity
       6.      Economic wellbeing
       7.      Vibrant and optimistic youth




                                            2
The findings provide both insights into issues for families and sound recommendations for
agencies wanting to improve the situation for new migrants. The report documents some
particular projects or services that can be developed in the short term, e.g. the
establishment of a newcomers group and a service to which people can go for advice and to
access publications and other resources that provide local information. This need was
voiced consistently across the seven focus groups, as was the need to have social networks
for people to meet and feel they are participating in the community. However, there is
much more that needs to be discussed with many sectors of the West Coast community to
ensure the best outcomes for the social and economic wellbeing of this region.




                                           3
2.   Introduction
2.1. Background to the ‘Settling In’ Programme
     In 2004, the Government provided funding to the Ministry of Social Development
     (MSD) for a refugee and migrant community social services initiative. This initiative
     includes:


                    an analysis of key issues and priorities for refugees and migrants
                    the identification of needs and gaps in services
                    the purchase of services to meet those needs
                    the support of capacity and capability building for refugee and
                    migrant communities.

     A literature search undertaken by MSD identified useful information about migrant
     employment issues and the language needs of migrants and refugees in New
     Zealand. However, the literature search also identified a lack of information about
     the wider social issues facing refugees and migrants living in New Zealand.


     In early 2004, MSD ran a series of consultation meetings with migrants and refugees
     in the Auckland region. After receiving positive feedback from participants, MSD
     held similar consultation meetings with refugees and migrants living on the West
     Coast (the focus of this report), and in the Nelson/Tasman region, Marlborough,
     Napier and Hastings, Wellington, Waikato and Christchurch. The aim is to build an
     understanding of the social issues facing migrants and refugees, both within and
     across each region.

2.2. Purpose of the Report
     The principal purpose of the Settling In - West Coast report is to analyse the key
     issues and priorities for migrants and to identify needs and gaps in services.
     However, it is also intended as a tool to give the West Coast community information
     and suggestions for action in the future, to help guide future projects and to
     enhance social services to meet the needs of new migrants in the region.


     Meeting these needs may significantly ease the process of settling in for permanent
     residents, especially those who are coming to work and are bringing their families. A
     large number of other issues have been raised but solutions will be most effectively
     reached through discussions with local agencies on the West Coast, many of which
     have been involved in the development of this report.

2.3. Key Personnel
     The project was managed by Brigid Ryan. A working party supported Brigid and
     provided guidance and information to develop this report. The members of the
     working party were:


                                         4
                          Paul Pretorious, Grey District Council
                          Kylie Ngaamo, Student Services Officer,Tai Poutini Polytechnic
                          Kim Hibbs, Human Resources, West Coast District Health Board
                          Helen Wilson, Development West Coast
                          Cecille Lee, Employment Broker, Work and Income
                          Carolyn Findlay, Department of Internal Affairs
                          Margaret Wetherall, Workplace Support
                          Bernadette Anne, Relationship Manager, Family and Community
                          Services, MSD
                          Wendy Fisher, Career Services.


         The facilitators who met with groups of people from their communities and provided
         the information about the current situation for migrants and refugees coming to live
         on the West Coast was a key element of the project. The facilitators were:


                          Kylie Ngaamo
                          Lyn Taylor
                          Jo Kearns
                          Angela Basher
                          Lyndall Prendergast




Focus Group in Westport




                                           Intercultural Awareness and Communications Training in Greymouth




                                                5
3.       The West Coast Context

Development West Coast’s strategic documents have been used to provide a context for
this report. Their cooperation and support in producing this report is acknowledged
and greatly appreciated.

3.1. Labour Market Trends1
         Employment on the West Coast is expected to increase by 17% between 2005 and
         2016. This is a net increase of over 2500 jobs. The increase in job opportunities on
         the West Coast is largely due to increasing mining activity.


         With declining levels of unemployment and a growing economy, identified skills
         shortages in the region have become critical. The skills shortages are across all the
         main economic drivers. All the main industry sectors have recently voiced their
         growing concern over the recruitment and retention of staff, particularly skilled
         staff. This problem is not unique to the region but it certainly outweighs any
         competitive advantage the region’s industries may have. The mining and dairy
         farming sectors, in particular, are experiencing recruitment and industry training
         difficulties. The tourism sector is experiencing a range of staffing problems brought
         about largely by the seasonal nature of the employment. Retaining skilled staff with
         positive customer service skills from year to year is the largest challenge. The
         population is also ageing at a faster rate than any other region in New Zealand.
         Statistics New Zealand predictions indicate that it will decline but the driver
         industries say otherwise. Clearly, we need a range of approaches to address these
         problems.


         The West Coast Economic Development Strategy includes ways to help address
         issues that relate to recruitment, retention, and the availability of appropriate
         education and training support systems. An objective of education and training from
         a regional development context is having people with the right skills who are
         available at the right time in the right place.


         We must promote the region to potential migrants and ensure that they can access
         quality information about the region. People are being more selective about their
         lifestyle choices and technology makes working remotely easier and easier. A key to
         exploiting current and future opportunities is to attract and retain people who have
         skills and management experience.
         The West Coast economy is primarily land-based and will continue to be. Finding
         new ways to use this resource, add value to its production and look after it,m are
         key parts of the economic development strategy. At the same time, the region



1
    The information in this section largely comes from the West Coast Economic Development
Strategy: Draft for Consultation (Development West Coast 2008).


                                              6
         needs to retain and attract people and assets, including social infrastructure. Skilled
         workers and businesses that add value to their products locally, will drive growth
         and improve the quality of life.


         Predictions for the Grey District are that almost 1000 jobs created over the next
         three years will increase the population by around 2500. This is the impact of
         bringing in families, not just lone workers, which will have a dramatic impact on
         schools, housing, health and other services. (See Appendix 1 for more details.)
         There is some evidence that the housing stock is inadequate, especially of the
         standard that might be considered to be aspirational.


         Since 2002, the West Coast has emerged as one of the country’s fastest-growing
         regional economies. The strong, diverse base of the three driver industries – mining,
         agriculture and tourism – gives the regional economy extra confidence to maintain
         growth and development, even if one or more of the industries is subject to adverse
         global market conditions. The outlook for each of these industries remains strong
         for the foreseeable future.

3.2. Demographics2

3.2.1. Total Population
         The West Coast region has:

                 a population of about 31,326 people (an increase of 1026 people, or 3.4%,,
                 since the 2001 census)
                 the smallest population of New Zealand’s 16 regions
                 0.8% of New Zealand's population
                 a median age (half are younger than this age, and half are older) of 40.2
                 years (for New Zealand as a whole, the median age is 35.9 years)
                 an above-average number of people aged 65 years and over – 13.8%,
                 compared with 12.3% for all of New Zealand
                 a below-average number of people aged under 15 years – 20.4%, compared
                 with 21.5% for all of New Zealand.




2
    The information in this section largely comes from the 2006 census (Statistics New Zealand
2007).


                                              7
Figure 1: Total population (age group and sex) of the West Coast region (2006 census)




                                                Source: Statistics New Zealand 2007.



3.2.2. Education
       Recent successful initiatives

       One of the West Coast’s high-level goals is to ensure that it becomes a ‘learning
       region’ that can provide the solutions to the main challenges facing the key driver
       industries. A number of extensive and successful initiatives have been developed
       since 2002.


       Activity in the education sector, including ICT improvement, has brought about
       measurable and positive change over the last five or so years. The Woolf Fisher
       Literacy Project has improved the literacy rates for our primary school children
       above the national average. The ICT strategy, the region’s ongoing broadband
       initiative and the School Network Upgrade Project, have given Coasters, both in
       school and out, improved learning opportunities. The Education for Enterprise (E4E)
       programme currently operating in the majority of our secondary schools has
       facilitated and strengthened the relationships between industry, business,
       community and schools. Further initiatives supported by Education West Coast,
       Minerals West Coast and Tai Poutini Polytechnic are designed to attract and provide
       training for people in the mining and agricultural industries.


       Tai Poutini Polytechnic has been a leader in providing tertiary education to the



                                            8
     region and has an important presence throughout New Zealand. This institution has
     grown rapidly since 2002 and is currently addressing the training needs of the
     industry sectors on the Coast. It has also established competitive programmes in
     ecotourism and outdoor recreation.


     Need to promote the value of education

     The region has a high proportion of school leavers with few qualifications. Past
     generations have found that it has been relatively easy to leave school with few
     formal qualifications and find a job that pays well. Consequently, staying at school
     and earning recognised qualifications is not an approach that many parents
     traditionally value. The reality is quite different now and our youth need to be
     encouraged to achieve the education and skills required to contribute to a
     productive economy and to secure their own future.


     Figure 2: Highest qualification for people aged 15 years and over in the West
     Coast region and New Zealand (2006 census)




                                                             Source: Statistics New Zealand 2007.


3.2.3. Employment on the West Coast
     Over a period of five years leading up to 2007, total industry employment increased
     by 16.3%. ‘Full-time equivalent’ (FTE) positions recorded for 2007 were 13,896, up
     from 11,942 in 2002. Unemployment has fallen rapidly, from 1200 benefits in 2002
     to just 206 in March 2008.


     In the last year, job vacancies for semi-skilled and unskilled workers grew
     particularly fast, up 37% and 18% respectively. Since the year ended December
     2003, total vacancies in the region have surged 80%, including an increase in
     demand of:
        171% for unskilled labour



                                          9
             67% for semi-skilled labour
                                      3
             25% for skilled labour


          Given the expected growth in the region’s driver industries, there are very real
          concerns of a labour shortage in the near future. Employment projections forecast
          labour force requirements that outstrip the population growth for the region.
          Employment in the agriculture sector on the West Coast has declined over the last
          five years and this has had a large impact on the industry.


          Figure 3: Income for people aged 15 years and over in the West Coast region and
          New Zealand (2006 census)




                                                   Source: Statistics New Zealand 2007.




3
    This information comes from BERL’s 2008 report West Coast Indicators 2007, written by David
Norman, Jason Leung-Wai and Dr Ganesh Nana for Development West Coast.


                                              10
Figure 4: Occupation of employed people aged 15 years and over in the West
Coast region and New Zealand (2006 census)




                                       Source: Statistics New Zealand 2007.




                                11
3.2.4. Mining
      Mining production accounts for 70% of the West Coast’s primary sector exports and
      92% of the total sales made in the region. More than 60% of primary production is
      exported from the region. New coal mines, conversion of scrub land to dairy pasture
      and niche market tourism products, are all key future opportunities.

                             Figure 6: West Coast Coal Production




      Mining on the West Coast is dominated by coal production, with a limited amount of
      gold mining. The large reserves of high-quality coal and gold give the West Coast
      industry a competitive advantage. The mining sector relies heavily on human capital
      and a workforce that comprises generations of the same families.


      Coal mining is regarded to be a key contributor to future economic opportunities for
      the region. In 2002, the mining sector was set to expand and there were high
      expectations that the level of productivity (value added per FTE) generated by the
      mining industry would increase
      significantly   from    about    $140
      million to about $270 million in
      2010. Coal production has been
      steadily   increasing     from    1.6
      million tonnes in 2000 to 3.0
      million tonnes in 2006. Pike River
      Coal, the most recent industry
      development,      forecast       coal
      recovery of 1.0 million tonnes per
      year by 2010. Among the West
      Coast’s three driver industries,



                                              12
      mining recorded a 47% increase in employment over the last five years. It is the
      largest single contributor to the region’s GDP and is expected to continue to expand
      over the next 10 years.

      Gold production on the West Coast is set to increase with the operation of the Globe
      Progress Reefton mine, which expects to be mining for at least eight years. At full
      production, GRD Macraes Ltd's Reefton gold mine will produce around 70,000 ounces
      per year.

3.2.5. Agriculture/Pastoral
      Dairy farming leads this sector and has experienced rapid growth over the last 10
      years. In the 2002 West Coast Economic Development Strategic Plan, dairying
      appeared at the end of the growth industries. However, dairy herds have expanded
      faster on the West Coast every year in the last 10 except for 2001, compared with
      other regions in New Zealand.


      The region’s wet, warm climate gives the industry a competitive advantage and the
      establishment of the independent dairy company Westland Milk Products has been
      financially beneficial to the dairy farming community. Westland Milk Products data
      reflects a growth in the industry since 2001, although the average payout (cents/kg)
      decreased. The company was supplied with 467 million litres of milk in 2007, up by
      more than 40% since 2001. The dairy payout from Westland Milk Products is often
      higher than Fonterra’s and is an important economic indicator in itself.


                                                       The farming sector, like mining,
                                                       faces increasing pressure to clean
                                                       up   their   act   in   the   face    of
                                                       environmental       concerns.        The
                                                       nationally   coined       term    ‘dirty
                                                       dairying’    has   created       largely
                                                       unwarranted negative perceptions
                                                       of the industry in regions like the
                                                       West Coast. To try to address some
                                                       of these concerns, the West Coast
      Regional Council and Westland Milk Products have developed a working agreement
      to achieve an economic and environmentally sustainable dairy industry on the West
      Coast.


      The sustainable development of the aquaculture industry represents a significant
      opportunity for the economic growth of our region. Globally, aquaculture is the
      fastest expanding primary food production industry. In New Zealand, the
      aquaculture industry has been the fastest growing rural industry for the past
      decade. Plans for further research into this industry will be included in the updated
      West Coast Economic Development Strategic Plan 2008.


                                         13
3.2.6. Tourism
      Over the last decade to 2007, tourism growth on the West Coast has been strong.
      The tourism sector and its related industries play an increasingly important role in
      the West Coast economy, in terms of employment, value-added GDP and business
      units. The economic growth in tourism is difficult to quantify as it is an amalgam of
      parts of a wide range of economic activities.


      The tourism industry on the West Coast benefits from a competitive advantage
      increasingly sought by both international and national visitors. Access to relative
      wilderness areas combined with the dramatic natural scenery within the large public
      conservation estate has an appeal that bodes well for the future prospects of the
      industry. Ecotourism sits well in the region’s landscape. Many operators are focusing
      renewed efforts on the ‘heritage’ tourism experience. West Coast mining and
      forestry history should be an important ingredient in this.


      The West Coast’s employment in tourism bettered the national growth over the last
      10 years to 2007. Employment has risen by over 400 FTEs, while GDP is up over $20
      million per year. The number of businesses directly attributable to tourism has
      increased by 65 units, or 2.2% per year (BERL 2008).


      Tourism research for the West Coast region forecasts that, by 2012, total visits to
      the West Coast will increase by 15.8%, visitor nights by 18.1% and visitor spend by
      36.5%. The current implementation of the Major Regional Incentive in Tourism
      represents a large development commitment within this sector, with 13 separate
      tourism projects involving Development West Coast, New Zealand Trade and
      Enterprise, the Department of Conservation, Ngai Tahu, a number of local
      authorities and the tourism industry.


      Tourism, however, has a lot of work to do to capture the international market, in
      particular. Key issues are quality accommodation and consistently good service
      (which is compounded by shortages of well-trained and long-term staff).




                                          14
Figure 6: Types of tourism businesses on the West Coast


                                     Information
                                           &
                                        I-Sites        Attractions
                                       15, (3%)         11, (2%)

                   Retail
                  61, (11%)




                 Activities                                                 Accomodation
                     &                                                       268, (48%)
                Adventures
                72, (13%)




                          Food
                             &
                         Beverage
                        125, (23%)



       Source: Rhodda, S. 2006. A snapshot of the tourism industry on the West Coast. Tai Poutini
       Polytechnic. http://www.tppweb.ac.nz/pdf/resreports/snapshot%20report.pdf




                                            15
The West Coast Economic Development Strategy: Draft for Consultation (Development West
Coast 2008) lists three priorities areas: the economy, the environment and the people. ‘The
People’ is divided into two sections.


       Building Strong Communities and Workforce Development
       Education

   Build strong communities                       Workforce development


   •   Promote work/life balance.                 Gain
   •   Enhance lifestyle advantage.
   •   Improve the delivery and perception        Attract skilled workforce by:
       of health and education services.          •   regional promotion
   •   Improve infrastructure and                 •   regional information
       connectivity.                              •   domestic and international
   •   Enhance recreation and sports                  recruitment strategies.
       facilities.
                                                  Retain

   Train                                          Settle migrants by providing:
   •   Increase focus on the importance of        •   community support initiatives
       education.                                 •   settlement programmes
   •   Investigate initiatives designed to        •   employer support
       increase the levels of achievement.        •   ESOL support.
   •   Advance employer training.
   •   Support career pathways education.
   •   Develop industry and education
       partnerships.
   •   Continue advocacy for government
       resources.

   Upskill the workforce
   •   Support literacy and numeracy
       programmes.
   •   Progress adult education
       programmes.

   Promote lifelong education                     ‘My argument was that by investing in
   •   Improve attitudes to education.            literacy we would be making a huge
   •   Improve participation in education.        investment in our children and their
   •   Strengthen career pathway                  futures and the economic future of the
       education.                                 West Coast region.’
   •   Foster industry/education links.           Martin Sawyers 2007
   •   Support apprenticeship and industry        (Martin was the initiator of what was to become

       training.                                  the highly successful West Coast Literacy Project.)




                                             16
4.        Methodology

The aim of the West Coast focus groups was to get a wide range of participants from different
ethnic backgrounds to identify the key issues and priorities from their perspective.


The focus groups were set up by “Settling In”, Family and Community Services with the
assistance of people from the Working Party and community agencies such as Literacy Westland
as well as key people from the ethnic communities. This was a considerable challenge as there
was no one agency that had a particular focus on migrants and refugees.


It was felt that participants would be more open about sharing their issues with someone from
their own ethnic group or a community representative with whom they had already developed a
level of rapport and trust. Thus the groups were facilitated by migrant community members, or
individuals nominated by community representatives.


Members of the West Coast Working Party helped to identify these people and encourage them
to become involved. Once people had heard the outline of the Settling In project, they were
invited to be facilitators for focus groups with their communities. They were provided with set
questions and guided through the process for getting the information in the required format.
Settling In covered any costs incurred for running the focus groups, which on average ran for 2–3
hours.


A total of seven consultation meetings were held with school students and working-age people.
Focus groups were held in Greymouth, Westport and Hokitika while attempts to hold groups in
more isolated communities such as Karamea and Reefton were not successful.


Countries represented included Argentina, Peru, Japan, Philippines, Honduras, Tibet, Thailand,
China, Switzerland, South Africa, Germany, Netherlands, British, American and Korea. Each
focus group was facilitated by someone familiar with that ethnic community. Critical to the
success of this process was to reach the ethnic communities themselves so they could talk about
their experiences directly, rather than having this conveyed by others.


At each of the meetings, participants were asked:

     1.   What are the issues/priorities that face you?
     2.   What is working well for you?
     3.   What is not working well for you?
     4.   If you could change things – what things would you do tomorrow?
     5.   What can you do differently for yourself?
     6.   Do you know where to go to for help and advice?

Notes taken at each of the meetings were collated and the issues raised by participants were
sorted into “key issues”. The data collected does not allow for quantifying the size or
prioritisation of issues. Rather, this report describes the range of issues facing migrants living on
West Coast.


                                               17
5.   Findings and Recommendations

     The findings from the seven focus groups provide both insights into issues for
     families and sound recommendations for agencies wanting to improve the situation
     for new migrants.

     The findings focus on seven key areas:




                                    Healthy
                                   Lifestyles

         Vibrant
           and                                           Knowledge
        Optimistic                                        and Skills
          Youth



                                  SETTLING
                                        IN
     Families                     West Coast                   Appreciation
       and
     Children                                                   of Diversity




                    Access to                   Economic
                     Services                   Wellbeing




                                        18
5.1. Access to Services
      Quotes from focus group participants

      ‘At first, migrants don’t know what they don’t know! For example, migrants don’t understand
      ACC or how NZ hospitals work or how to open bank accounts or what withholding tax is, however,
      Immigration Dept sometimes sends out information packs to some migrants about these things,
      and including NZ social customs (eg ‘bring a plate’) and how social services etc work – quite
      useful for those who received it.’

      ‘I used to go to nightclubs and go dancing and other cultural activities where I could meet people
      who became friends – whereas in a small place you don’t have the same opportunity to meet
      people.’


5.1.1. Issues
          How to access information
          New Zealand Qualifications Authority
          Immigration
          Communication
          Interpreters
          Housing
          Transport
          General issues


      How to Access              Give immigrants as much information as possible about
      Information                various groups they can contact.
                                 Citizens Advice Bureau is helpful, gave information about
                                 where to find local art group contacts.
                                 You do have to be proactive, go out and find things, you
                                 can’t find things on the internet that are happening in
                                 Hokitika! Have to look in the local newspaper.
                                 Newcomers Centre, which would include information on:
                                 jobs,     where        to   go     for   …   advocacy,   references,
                                 accommodation, buddy system/contacts availability, Citizens
                                 Advice Bureau, NZ laws, WINZ or Government applications,
                                 accommodation supplements.
                                 No Citizens Advice Bureau in Greymouth.
                                 No Newcomers Centre; need to establish one so be one-stop
                                 shop for advice and help for newcomers.
      New Zealand                NZQA process is slow and they are not helpful.
      Qualifications             It would help if every migrant was given an NZQA number as
      Authority                  they arrived.
                                 Accessibility     to    tertiary    education   to   improve,    more


                                                 19
                allowances for cross-crediting of attained qualifications.
                In industries where there are job shortages NZ could make
                more of an effort to recognise overseas degrees.
                NZ experience is valued by employers but if newcomers try
                to apply for lower level jobs then they are told they are
                overqualified.
Immigration     Issues with Immigration, eg Visa approval for families to
                visit. One example was the huge cost for a medical and
                maybe declined with no reimbursement, this adds to cost of
                NZ visits even when healthy.
                Country of origin may have no NZ Embassy for information
                and Visa processing.
                Visa Bond reimbursement process is unclear and timeframes
                aren’t stipulated.
                The replication of documents is time consuming and
                frustrating.
                Family members of NZ resident’s policy could do with
                revision to reduce red tape and replication.
                Visa conditions; have trouble with family coming to visit.
                Visa policy: Immigration Dept; Consultation groups made up
                from immigrants.
                Introduce a Visa bonus system for family members visiting
                newcomers who have NZ citizenship.
                Family stream of Immigration seemed easier to apply under
                than the skilled migrant scheme.
Communication   Communication links are difficult, eg cost of phone calls,
                computer access – only 6 people in this group (Greymouth)
                had access.
                Parents with little or no resources, eg third world countries
                no computer access or don’t know how to use a computer,
                parents can’t afford phone calls.
                Access to community news, events and information; need
                more comprehensive advertising and communication for the
                local area.
                NZ should invest more in technology – it would make NZ an
                even better place. Good internet would be a huge advantage
                for business and home use.
Interpreters    No translators available in many areas, comments made
                suggested that hospital, health, education and government
                departments could provide a better service.
Housing         Housing is expensive, ie rental or purchase.
                Options are limited.
                Quality can be substandard and appalling.
                Housing shortage; the potential for exploitation of expense


                               20
                 and quality.
                 Getting harder to rent a house in Westport because of large
                 projects on the go at the moment, eg sewerage and Solid
                 Energy. Buying is easier.
                 Sometimes you need someone to vouch for you if a first-time
                 renter in NZ, referee.
                 House prices/rents in Auckland prohibitive. That is one of
                 the attractions of Hokitika.
                 House prices in cities far too high relative to wages.
                 Poor standard of housing in NZ – very cold in winter, no
                 central heating.
                 Really expensive (5 x more expensive than in South Africa).
                 Housing is different in that they are not brick so the houses
                 are colder.
                 The houses here are small with limited options.
                 40% deposit required for a mortgage if not a New Zealand
                 resident.
Transport        No public transport; have to rely on private transport.
                 Drivers licence test required (can take a long time to get
                 this).
                 Transport difficulties; have to rely on private transport or, if
                 don’t have a car or licence, other people for help.
                 No internal transport. Limited if you don’t have own
                 transport.
                 It’s expensive to fly to other countries from NZ.
                 Lack of public transport an issue – taxis are expensive.
General Issues   Churches – knowing about the different churches would be
                 helpful. It’s difficult to find one similar to your own
                 denomination. Perhaps an information sheet would be
                 useful.
                 Difficulty understanding – EFTPOS, Flybuys, coupons, taxes,
                 laws, voting, consent processes.
                 Church; it is the first step if you have no friends and you can
                 meet people who have been in the community for a long
                 time.
                 Limited childcare provision.
                 The weather; can rain a lot.
                 More visibility and accessibility to local council.
                 Banking system in NZ is much better and easier than in UK.
                 Not many class divisions in NZ – egalitarian people – not
                 recognised as a class of person or by what job you do but by
                 what ‘sort of person’ you are.
                 The infrastructure in NZ is terrible, public transport and no
                 decent internet.


                                21
                              Banks – offer good support, easy to open accounts etc.


5.1.2. Recommendations
        Participants agreed that their names and contact details can be distributed
        as a list to the I-site (Information Centre) for Newcomers/Settlers from other
        language countries as an information help and support group.
        Call a gathering at the Literacy Westland Adult Learning Centre in three
        months’ time to assess interest in regular gatherings organised by the group,
        e.g. explore setting up a Newcomers Centre.
        Set up a newcomers group with some locals. (Need help with this –
        promotion, venue, funding, contacts list, information centre.)
        Set up a buddy system to help newcomers.
        Help to find more appropriate housing and more help with the process. Make
        it more affordable.
        Develop a local information pack.
        Hold six-monthly (?) new migrant meetings covering relevant topics, e.g law,
        voting, New Zealand curriculum, guest speakers from health, education, law,
        etc.
        Provide a place to go to get information.
        Set up a local interpreter pool.
        Ensure monthly access to the immigration adviser in Greymouth.
        Take a regional approach to dealing with housing.




                                           22
5.2. Healthy Lifestyle
      Quotes from focus group participants


      ‘You have to know 4 weeks in advance in Westport if you are going to be sick.’

      ‘I was not confident with the Doctors in xxxxxx – not confident of walking away with the right
      diagnosis.’

      ‘Give children priority in the health system.’


5.2.1. Issues
          How to access the health system
          Cost
          What we like!
          General issues


      How to                  Unaware        of    General   Practitioners    Registration   System
      access the              requirements for medical care.
      health                  No continuation of appointments with the same doctors was
      system                  one of the major problems and also the time to get an
                              appointment.
                              Health system is very slow, some migrants don’t know you have
                              the option to go private if you want quick medical attention.
                              Specialist healthcare; having to travel to Christchurch or
                              further to get specialist care.
                              Waiting lists for surgical procedures mean you cannot plan
                              ahead.
                              Able to find GPs but the registering system is difficult to begin
                              with, as is choosing a doctor.
      Cost                    Accident and Emergency attendance has high fees for
                              tourists/visitors and must be paid before being seen.
                              There is a feeling you need medical insurance in NZ, almost a
                              necessity.
                              Really expensive for adults
      What we                 It’s great it’s free for under 5’s – vaccinations great.
      like!                   Great dental service for children.
      General                 Use of medicines is very conservative over here.
      issues                  Some competition between GPs would improve things.



5.2.2. Recommendation
          Provide information on how to access services.



                                                  23
5.3. Families and children
      Quotes from focus group participants

      ‘I have never been a parent in Germany. I could be facing the same problems back home. It’s
      amazing with the services, e.g Plunket and Early Childhood Care, so I don’t get isolated as a new
      Mum.‘

      ‘Communication with family at home difficult as we have excellent internet availability but they
      do not. Phone bills are expensive.’


5.3.1. Issues
          Family support
          Community support
          Retaining own culture


      Family                 Long distances between family, e.g especially difficult during
      support                anniversary dates, Xmas, birthdays, Thanksgiving etc.
                             Family is far away, I miss the unconditional support of wider
                             family.
                             There is a cultural problem. The children not have any cousins
                             here. There are more African families coming to Westport,
                             which is getting better.
                             Children fitted in well, blended in.
                             Difficult to meet people if you don’t have children.
                             No support as families and friends so far away. Especially hard
                             for those with a little one.
                             No people to work in your house (maids) so now have to juggle
                             all household tasks with childcare.
                             Babysitters are an issue as in New Zealand babysitters as young
                             as 15–16 are acceptable but we still see them as children – trust
                             is an issue.
      Community              For people coming to Westport when they are young, there is
      support                not much happening. Found it hard before her daughter came
                             along. The positives of living in Westport for family life are
                             great. Kids and coffee, music, playcentre etc. Best social life in
                             the world now.
                             Good      child   services   –   Plunket,    Playcentre,     Healthline,
                             Plunketline, sports clubs.
                             Hard to find childcare in NZ, no place to leave your child for a
                             couple of hours. Playcentre means you have to stay and be
                             present all the time and the child has to be a certain age to
                             attend kindy. No one to ask about how it’s done in NZ. Was hard
                             to find out about Plunket, or a Plunket group when you bring a


                                               24
                                 child from overseas.
                                 Easier when you have your child here in NZ as your midwife can
                                 refer you to Barnardos or other childcare.
         Retaining               Eldest daughter is now settled in xxxxxxx and has become a
         own culture             ‘Kiwi’. She is unable to speak Chinese. Youngest daughter is
                                 living in China and is being brought up in the Chinese culture.



5.3.2. Recommendations
             Change to be more available and accepting.
             Provide more support for isolated mothers and children.
             Establish playgroups where children and parents can support the retention of
             their own culture.
             Provide opportunities for locals and newcomers to socialise together with
             their children.



Mothers and girls at Newcomers Group, Greymouth




                                                                  Children at Newcomers Group, Greymouth




                                                  25
5.4. Knowledge and skills
      Quotes from focus group participants

      ‘Where do you (I) fit in the school? Not enough English to be in my learning level but embarrassing
      to be placed with the little kids.’

      ‘Loss of/change in status here; at my school before, I was a Prefect – this is not recognised here.’

      ‘If Korean people can learn English better, they can understand more. This would make life
      easier.’

      ‘It is going to be a challenge when the children go to school.’


5.4.1. Issues
          Recognition of overseas qualifications
          Language
          Schooling for children
          General issues


      Recognition             I found it easier to ignore NZQA and my qualifications from
      of overseas             Germany (Bachelors degree) and go straight to university to do
      qualifications          a postgraduate diploma, which was easier to get recognised by
                              immigration and employers.
                              People overseas are willing to drop income to get a better
                              lifestyle, such as NZ offers, but are put off by the strenuous
                              process of getting qualifications and experience recognised.
                              People from non-English speaking countries face difficulties in
                              getting qualifications recognised.
                              Immigration policy is incorrect because they are giving migrants
                              residency on the grounds of their qualifications but then not
                              letting them work in their fields.
                              More advice is needed around what cross-over training or
                              familiarisation training is needed to get a job.
                              Expensive to pay the university or polytechnic to assess their
                              overseas qualifications.
                              Very expensive to get overseas qualifications translated into
                              English.
                              Cross-crediting     of    qualifications    –   improve     the    process.
                              Acknowledgement of a degree or diploma can take 18 months.
                              It’s difficult trying to access documentation from home.
                              It’s difficult trying to get qualifications acknowledged at a
                              distance. You need facilities where we can show and talk
                              through our experience and documentation with them.
                              New Zealand missing out because qualified women are put off


                                                26
                by the process so just don’t work.
                Need to simplify process and make it cheaper and shorter.
                Need more information before coming to New Zealand about
                what documents to bring.
                Not just happy checking out university qualifications, wanted to
                find out ALL places worked and check some of them which don’t
                exist anymore. The language barrier makes this difficult as their
                documentation is not in English. Qualifications not necessarily
                recognised as equivalent to NZ qualifications.
                NZQA could have given more advice as to what degree is closest
                to migrant’s degree or what study she should do to complete a
                NZ degree – not helpful.
Language        Language … can be a barrier initially; however, some schools
                offer extra support when they know the child is ESOL.
                Difficult as a parent of school children with language barrier for
                teacher/parent interactions. No ESOL courses available as yet
                (Literacy Westland offers one to one tutorials for students at
                present). Polytechnic has adult education courses that don’t
                require a high level of English to attend.
                Literacy Westland Adult Learning Centre; help with improving
                our English through one to one tuition. Meet new friendly
                people.
                Further education; qualifications
                One woman found it difficult as she could not speak any English
                when she came to xxxxx. Unable to speak English, she couldn’t
                get employment. She learnt English from contact with people in
                her work as owner of a cafe and being a small town this had an
                advantage compared to a large city.
Schooling for   Pre-primary facilities – understanding the different early
children        childhood options – deciding where to go when have no
                knowledge is an issue. Same with primary/secondary school
                choices.
                Difficult understanding New Zealand curriculum.
                Also can only use their translator.
                Jobs often not what expected.
                Stated that children in Australia and New Zealand do not have
                the general knowledge as the children in Holland do.
                The standard of education in South Africa was a lot higher than
                in NZ.
                New residents were not confident that if they stayed long term
                in Westport what their education for their children would be
                like.
                Likes the way Kiwis do sports with everyone getting involved.
                Social side is good. Academic wise she is not confident.


                               27
                        Sent her daughter to boarding school because there is more
                        opportunity academic wise in a city whereas schools in Westport
                        focus more on sport.
                        There are lots of opportunities to study in NZ but some of the
                        young people from Westport she sees are not ambitious, they
                        just want to drop out of school.
                        It stems from the family background. If the children are not
                        educated they cannot get a job, which makes travelling
                        overseas very difficult.
                        One family had done some research on education in Westport
                        before they immigrated to NZ. The education standard in NZ is
                        a little lower than South Africa. They had lots of discussions
                        with the teachers at the children’s school to try and fit them
                        into the right year.
                        For teachers, the method of teaching is different in NZ.
     General            It’s a good feeling to discover NZ’s egalitarian society – it’s one
     issues             of NZ’s best selling points – it’s a shock when you go home to
                        England for example and discover the class system still in
                        effect. But this also has a negative effect on the children – they
                        are not ambitious or taught to pursue high-quality education
                        and to aspire.



5.4.2. Recommendations
        Set up a place to get support with recognition of qualifications.
        Provide introduction seminars on school system in New Zealand.
        Provide more flexible ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages)
        services.




                                         28
5.5. Appreciation of diversity
      Quotes from focus group participants

      ‘All for one and one for all! – Unity and Respect.’

      ‘Organise music and food events and try to get newcomers and kiwis mixing together.’

      ‘Meeting people is hard – people are not friendly.’

      ‘There used to be every 6 months a welcome to Westport afternoon … held at Club Buller. This
      needs to be resurrected. It helps new people to town to meet one another.’


5.5.1. Issues
          How to meet people and enjoy each others language and food


      How to meet             People in Westport like long-term relationships, they don’t like
      people                  to get involved with new immigrants because they form
                              friendships and then the new residents move.
                              I have lived in four different countries but this is like nothing on
                              earth!
                              Found it quite difficult coming to Westport from Zimbabwe. Not
                              only is there a culture difference, there is a colour difference.
                              Language is also a barrier. Some children will stare.
                              Get more people in this area to make it more multicultural,
                              provide more information about the place they live in and
                              welcome new immigrants because it is a very nice place to live,
                              celebrate your own culture and share your culture with other
                              people.
                              I would like to see a kiwi night or multicultural night planned
                              for the future.
                              How do we find out when new people come to town?
                              Looking forward to a welcoming group being revived.
                              Kiwis are pretty friendly and outgoing – easy to find people and
                              find out about community groups of interest – just talk to
                              people.
                              You must be open to meeting people – cannot be shy.
                              As soon as you meet some people, you meet other people.
                              In Hokitika, society is more open, Hokitika is a special town.




                                                29
5.5.2. Recommendations
        Form a newcomers’ group.
        Set up social English classes.
        Have shared food at social events.
        Talk to supermarkets about stocking particular food items.
        Hold festivals and events that feature the food and music of the new
        migrants. This could be incorporated into existing events, as well as being
        part of a multicultural festival.




                                            30
5.6. Economic wellbeing
      Direct quotes from focus group participants

      ‘It’s difficult to manage a household and budget on a New Zealand income.’

      ‘I like not having to be forced to work. Being able to spend time with my children.’

      ‘There is a limited supply of jobs in Westport. The job I had in Germany is non-existent in
      Westport.’


5.6.1. Issues
          Limited job opportunities and issues in the workplace


      Issues in the          Advised there is a reluctance to employ some immigrants
      workplace              because the accent is difficult for NZers to understand.
                             Coming here as a young single worker.
                             Found it very difficult. Small place where people are a close-
                             knit community. Isolated from the rest of her … colleagues.
                             … that the general thing that happened on Friday night was the
                             boys used to go out and the women stayed at home. She made
                             an effort to go with the boys to the pub and play pool and have
                             drinks. For a single person coming to Westport, it would be hard
                             to fit in, especially if they were not employed.
                             NZ people are very polite compared with other nationalities,
                             not necessarily tolerant though. Very friendly to your face, but
                             a reluctance to confront issues, especially in the workplace. A
                             fear of conflict, a lack of accountability or a willingness to
                             apportion blame, ie people prefer to keep problems on a
                             systemic level.
                             NZers want to ‘nice their way’ around problems. This relates to
                             the lack of a competitive workplace in NZ. Some of this may be
                             self-protection by kiwis who are used to foreigners leaving
                             again.
                             Getting the first job in NZ is very difficult. NZ job market is not
                             as competitive as overseas, and not such a big part of people’s
                             lives, people are not expected to work as hard as overseas.
                             If people qualified as a lawyer overseas, they are expected to
                             practise as a lawyer all their lives, no freedom to try something
                             else, whereas in NZ seems you can try anything.




                                               31
5.6.2. Recommendations
        Provide support with CVs and job interview skills.
        Give migrants realistic information prior to moving to New Zealand.
        Train staff and management about intercultural issues in the workplace.
        Encourage local employers to be more receptive to employees with accents
        and different backgrounds.




                                        32
5.7. Vibrant and optimistic youth
This focus group was held with a group of Buller High School students and is presented
as reported by the facilitator. Special thanks to this group for insight into issues for
youth who are new arrivals to West Coast community.

5.7.1. Issues
          Issues facing youth
          What works well and what doesn’t
          Things to change
          Things youth can do


       Q1 – What          Racist comments and a lack of understanding around individual
       are the            cultures. For example, the males found New Zealand males
       issues that        were far less respectful toward females than they were used to
       face you?          in their home country, and far less respectful towards teachers.
                          All students had come from schools where education was highly
                          revered and they were very surprised by the lack of interest
                          shown by some New Zealand students and the lack of
                          importance that they placed on receiving a good education.
                          Each of the students reported that, in their home countries,
                          education was highly valued, especially as many young people
                          could not afford to attend school.
                          Different gender expectations. For example, in the Philippines,
                          there was an expectation that women/females ran the home
                          and were in charge of child rearing, while the male is the
                          ‘bread-winner’. One felt that women in New Zealand were
                          denigrated if they chose to take on this role and were seen as
                          subservient, rather than being valued for making choices that
                          work for them.
                          Financial difficulties were faced by all families on arrival in New
                          Zealand as they all had to pay large sums of money for
                          citizenship in New Zealand. This was a long drawn-out process
                          that often made the families feel very stressed.Buller High
                          School has some discretionary funding available to students for
                          uniforms if there is financial hardship in the family but often
                          the burden of school-related costs was very challenging.
                          Each of the students I spoke with moved to New Zealand
                          (Westport) because their fathers gained employment here. Part
                          of each job package was to be provided with accommodation on
                          arrival, so sourcing accommodation did not prove to be too big a
                          burden. However, waiting for furniture/family possessions to
                          arrive from overseas often took a long time and the families had



                                           33
               to rely on strangers to provide basic living equipment, which
               they often found embarrassing.
               Church has been important for all their families, and the
               students felt that their families’ support networks and
               friendship groups grew mostly out of their contacts at church.
               Within the local Filipino community, information was passed on
               when a new family arrived in town and the family was
               welcomed by other members of their cultural community.
Q2 – What is   All the students felt that school was generally a positive place
working well   to be, as it enabled them to develop relationships with people
for you and    of their own age group. They felt that, in general, the school
what isn’t?    worked well to ensure they were ‘buddied up’ with students
               who would support them in their transition to a new educational
               environment.
               As mentioned in Q1, the students felt that church and other
               members of their cultural community played a vital role in
               supporting the family’s integration into the community. All the
               students felt that there was, in general, a lack of understanding
               in the community around ethnic minority groups and there was
               no specific network agency in town to provide information on
               how local council works, on New Zealand driving conditions or
               about Māori culture.
Q3 – If you    Students would be offered an opportunity to discuss their
could change   culture with other students at a time that felt both suitable and
things, what   safe.
three things   Teachers would teach more about cultural differences and
would you do   racial harmony.
tomorrow?      There would be a central network agency that could maybe visit
               families that are new to the West Coast. They could provide
               information on how the local community is structured and how
               it works.
Q4 – What      We could try and learn about New Zealand before we arrive.
can you do     We can also learn to be tolerant of others too. Racism works
differently    two ways and we have to remember that we are not living in
for            our country anymore. But it would be nice if people valued our
yourselves?    difference and weren’t scared by it or didn’t ridicule it.




                              34
5.7.2. Recommendations
        Promote intercultural awareness and education in schools.
        Provide a place to get information about the local community and support to
        settle into the community.




                                  A Walk in the Forest




                                        35
6.     References

Development West Coast (2008) West Coast Economic Development Strategy: Draft for
Consultation, Development West Coast, Greymouth.
www.dwc.org.nz/index.cfm/3,67,376/wcredsp_2008_draft.pdf


Statistics New Zealand (2007) 2006 Census Data, Statistics New Zealand, Wellington.
www.stats.govt.nz/census/census-
outputs/quickstats/snapshotplace2.htm?id=1000012&type=region&ParentID=




                                                         Mining Tool Sculptures
                                                              in Greymouth




     Newcomers Group in Greymouth




                                                             Coal Creek Falls




          Margaret Wetherall
      with staff at Pike River Coal



                                        36
Appendix 1: Population Projections for Greymouth

Table 1: Population projections for Greymouth up to 2010


                                    2007                 2008                 2009                  2010
                                                                                                                    Total
                              Jan–Jun   Jul–Dec    Jan–Jun   Jul–Dec    Jan–Jun   Jul–Dec     Jan–Jun   Jul–Dec

NEW JOBS TO BE CREATED AND EXPECTED POPULATION DISTRIBUTION

Total New Jobs                   136        176       144        126       234        102          92       (70)      940

New population

North and east of Greymouth   170.79    252.41     191.52    194.70     311.22    162.75      122.38       –65.97   1,340

Greater Greymouth             170.79    252.41     191.52    194.70     311.22    162.75      122.38       –65.97   1,340

South of Greymouth             37.98       56.16    42.63       43.26    69.22       36.17      27.22      –14.66     298

Moana                               –          –         –          –         –          –          –           –           –

                              379.55    560.99     425.67    432.66     691.66    361.66      271.98    –146.60     2,978
EXPECTED IMPACT ON SCHOOLS IN THE DISTRICT (additional school demands)

Pre-Primary

North and east of Greymouth    14.69       22.56    16.53       16.82    26.86       14.07      10.56      – 5.67     116

Greater Greymouth              14.69       22.56    16.53       16.82    26.86       14.07      10.56      – 5.67     116

South of Greymouth              3.27        5.02     3.68        3.74     5.97        3.13       2.35      – 1.26      26

Moana                               –          –         –          –         –          –          –           –           –
                               32.65       50.14    36.73       37.39    59.69       31.26      23.47      –12.60     259

Primary

North and east of Greymouth    18.36       28.20    20.66       21.03    33.57       17.58      13.20      – 7.09     146

Greater Greymouth              18.36       28.20    20.66       21.03    33.57       17.58      13.20      – 7.09     146

South of Greymouth              4.08        6.27     4.60        4.67     7.47        3.91       2.94      – 1.58      32

Moana                               –          –         –          –         –          –          –           –           –

                               40.81       62.67    45.92       46.73    74.61       39.08      29.34      –15.75     323

Secondary

North and east of Greymouth    11.02       16.92    12.40       12.62    20.14       10.55       7.92      – 4.25      87

Greater Greymouth              11.02       16.92    12.40       12.62    20.14       10.55       7.92      – 4.25      87

South of Greymouth              2.45        3.76     2.76        2.80     4.48        2.34       1.76      – 0.95      19

Moana                               –          –         –          –         –          –          –           –           –

                               24.49       37.60    27.55       28.04    44.76       23.45      17.60      – 9.45     194


                                                                                             Source: Grey District Council




                                                      37
Appendix 2: Ethnic Groups in the West Coast Region

   79.6% of people in the West Coast region belong to the European ethnic group,
   compared with 67.6% for New Zealand as a whole.

   9.7% of people in the West Coast region belong to the Māori ethnic group, compared
   with 14.6% for all of New Zealand.



Table 2: Ethnic groups in the West Coast region (2006 census)


                                                          Male       Female
                                                           (%)          (%)
         European                                          78.9         80.3

         Māori                                              9.4          9.6

         Pacific peoples                                    1.0          0.9

         Asian                                              1.0          1.5

         Middle Eastern/Latin American/African              0.2          0.2

         Other ethnicity                                   17.3         16.1

         •   New Zealander                                 17.2         16.1

         •   Other ethnicity – other                        0.0          0.0


                                                      Source: Statistics New Zealand 2007




                                        38
Appendix 3: Benefit Receipt in the Top of the South Island


Table 3: Migrants receiving benefits in the top of the South Island (30 March 2008)




                                                                               Centre




                                                         Greymouth




                                                                                          Richmond




                                                                                                             Westport
                                              Blenheim




                                                                     Motueka
Benefit                                                                                                                 Total




                                                                                 Nelson




                                                                                                     Stoke
Domestic Purposes Benefit /Special Benefit     5         1           3           5                   2       1           17

Emergency Benefit                              1                     2          12         2                             17

Emergency Maintenance Allowance                                                  1                           1           2

Invalids Benefits                                        1                       3         1                             5

Independent Youth Benefit                                                                  1                             1

Sickness Benefit                               2         1           1           3         3         2                   12

Sickness Benefit (Hardship)                                          1           2                   1                   4

Unemployment Benefit (Hardship)                                                  9                                       9

Unemployment Benefit (Training)                                                 21                                       21

Total                                          8         3           7          56         7         5       2           68


                                                                                 Source: Work and Income 2008.




                                         39

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:3
posted:2/10/2012
language:English
pages:43