World War I poem by 5wuVvO

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									World War I poem

   Futility
      By
Wilfred Owen
    Make
 predictions


• The title ‘Futility’ means?

• Connections to war might be?
                  Key Vocabulary
a.   fatuous
b.   sonnet
c.   imperative
d.   personification
                             Make sure
e.   repetition              you know the
f.   rhyme                   meaning of
g.   rhetorical question     each word.
h.   metaphor                Add new ones
i.   parallel construction   to your
j.   antithesis              glossary.
k.   caesura
l.   enjambement
            Listen
1. Listen to the text.
2. Jot down THREE key words you
   remember.
3. State one key idea or message
   you understood.
4. Give your evidence/ reason.
Futility                                       Read the text
Move him into the sun—
Gently its touch awoke him once,
At home, whispering of fields unsown.
Always it awoke him, even in France,           1.Make a link
Until this morning and this snow.
If anything might rouse him now
                                                 between the
The kind old sun will know.                      title and
                                                 something in
Think how it wakes the seeds—                    the poem.
Woke, once, the clays of a cold star.
Are limbs so dear-achieved, are sides
Full-nerved,- still warm,- too hard to stir?
Was it for this the clay grew tall?
- O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
To break earth's sleep at all?
Futility                                       2. Copy the poem.
Move him into the sun—                         3. Find an example of each
Gently its touch awoke him once,               of these 10 language
At home, whispering of fields unsown.          features and label:
Always it awoke him, even in France,
                                               a. imperative
Until this morning and this snow.
If anything might rouse him now                b. personification
The kind old sun will know.                    c. repetition
                                               d. rhyme
Think how it wakes the seeds—                  e. rhetorical question
Woke, once, the clays of a cold star.
                                               f. metaphor
Are limbs so dear-achieved, are sides
Full-nerved,- still warm,- too hard to stir?   g. parallel
Was it for this the clay grew tall?               construction
- O what made fatuous sunbeams toil            h. antithesis
To break earth's sleep at all?                 i. caesura
                                               j. enjambement
By Wilfred Owen
Futility

Move him into the sun—
Gently its touch awoke him once,               4. It is a
At home, whispering of fields unsown.
Always it awoke him, even in France,
                                                sonnet.
Until this morning and this snow.
If anything might rouse him now
                                                How does
The kind old sun will know.                     this poetic
Think how it wakes the seeds—                   form
Woke, once, the clays of a cold star.
Are limbs so dear-achieved, are sides
                                                influence
Full-nerved,- still warm,- too hard to stir?    the way it is
Was it for this the clay grew tall?
- O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
                                                written?
To break earth's sleep at all?
The Text Analysis
   Paragraph




  Feature of the text
e.g. first person voice;
  flashback; irony…



     Evaluate
        the
 Purpose and Effect
Futility

Move him into the sun—                         Model
Gently its touch awoke him once,               Analysis Paragraph
At home, whispering of fields unsown.
Always it awoke him, even in France,
                                               •Idea expressed in
Until this morning and this snow.
If anything might rouse him now
                                               poem through
The kind old sun will know.                    rhetorical questions.
                                               •Quote example(s) of
Think how it wakes the seeds—                  rhetorical questions.
Woke, once, the clays of a cold star.          •Explain and evaluate
Are limbs so dear-achieved, are sides          the purpose and effect
Full-nerved,- still warm,- too hard to stir?   of the use of
Was it for this the clay grew tall?            rhetorical questions
- O what made fatuous sunbeams toil            in this poem.
To break earth's sleep at all?
              Model Analysis Paragraph
Wilfred Owen’s intention in using a sequence of three
rhetorical questions in the final 6 lines of his WWI
sonnet ‘Futility’ is to challenge his readers to find any
natural or rational justification for war. Having
described the miracle of human life he asks why we
would want to destroy it, especially young life, so
completely: “Was it for this the clay grew tall?” and his
final question wonders, almost bitterly, why we were given
life since we have wasted it : “- O what made fatuous
sunbeams toil/ To break earth's sleep at all?” The modern
reader would agree with Owen but in 1918, when the poem
was written, these sentiments would have been seen an
unpatriotic. The power of the questions is that they
demand an answer – but there is no rational answer that
could be given.                            137 words
                                                  Now you try…
Move him into the sun—
Gently its touch awoke him once,
At home, whispering of fields unsown.          Analysis Paragraph
Always it awoke him, even in France,
Until this morning and this snow.
                                               •Idea expressed in
If anything might rouse him now
The kind old sun will know.
                                               poem through
                                               personification.
Think how it wakes the seeds—                  •Quote example(s) of
Woke, once, the clays of a cold star.          personification.
Are limbs so dear-achieved, are sides          •Explain and evaluate
Full-nerved,- still warm,- too hard to stir?   the purpose and effect
Was it for this the clay grew tall?            of the use of
- O what made fatuous sunbeams toil            personification
To break earth's sleep at all?                 in this poem.
Futility
                                               Interpret the text
Move him into the sun—                         in a new way.
Gently its touch awoke him once,
At home, whispering of fields unsown.          Without changing the
Always it awoke him, even in France,
Until this morning and this snow.
                                               words,
If anything might rouse him now                how would you bring
The kind old sun will know.                    this poem into the
Think how it wakes the seeds—
                                               modern world in a
Woke, once, the clays of a cold star.          brochure format?
Are limbs so dear-achieved, are sides          First, decide on the
Full-nerved,- still warm,- too hard to stir?
                                               purpose of the
Was it for this the clay grew tall?
- O what made fatuous sunbeams toil            brochure.
To break earth's sleep at all?                 Then, brainstorm ideas
                                               for visual images and
                                               effects on the panels.

								
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