Section 4:Section 1.qxd - DOC by fG7N84h7

VIEWS: 19 PAGES: 3

									                      DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AND VETERANS AFFAIRS
                                                         Building S-O-47, Fort Indiantown Gap
                                                                  Annville, PA 17003

                        JESSICA L. WRIGHT                                                                                       The Adjutant General
                      Jessica L. Wright, born Nov. 2, 1952, in Monessen, daughter of John and Emma Garfola; Bethel Park H.S., 1970; Alderson
                      Broaddus Coll. (B.A.), soc. sci., 1974, hon. doct., 2004; Webster Univ. (M.A.), mgmt., 1993; U.S. Army War Coll. Ctr. for
                      Strategic & Intl. Studies, 1997; frmr. staff officer: HHD, PAARNG; frmr. CH-47 pilot/UH-1 pilot: 228th Aviation Co.; frmr. staff
                      officer: HHC, 28th Aviation Bn.; frmr. flight operations platoon cmdr.: 1028th Trans. Co., Ga. Southern Univ.; frmr. asst.
                      operations & tng. officer/flight operations: E. Army Natl. Aviation Tng, Site; frmr. officer 1160th Trans. Co., GAARNG; frmr.
                      asst. prof. of military sci.: ARNG Readiness Ctr.; frmr. cmdr.: Aviation Brigade, 28th Infantry Div., state army aviation officer,
                      HQ, PANG; frmr. dep. adjutant gen., PAARNG; awds.: Legion of Merit, Meritorious Serv. Medal, Army Commendation
                      Medal, Army Achiev. Medal, Army Reserve Component Achiev. Medal, Natl. Def. Serv. Medal, Armed Forces Reserve
Medal, Army Serv. Ribbon, Sr. Army Aviation Badge, Army Staff ID Badge; apptd. Adjutant General March 2004; married Charles E. Wright; 1 son.

    The Adjutant General’s Office, established by the Act of April 11, 1793, is the headquarters of the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs,
which is an administrative agency under the governor’s jurisdiction.
    The primary duties of the adjutant general are the administration, organizing, equipping, training and commanding of the Pennsylvania National
Guard, the state veterans’ homes, the state’s veterans’ benefits program and Scotland School for Veterans’ Children.
    Serving under the adjutant general are three deputy adjutants general: one each for Army, Air and Veterans Affairs.

                                                     THE PENNSYLVANIA NATIONAL GUARD
      The Guard traces its origins to the “Associators,” a militia company organized by Benjamin Franklin in 1747.
      The militia existed as an informal service until the Revolutionary War made it obvious that a more formal regulation of the militia was needed.
When Governor Thomas Mifflin created the Department of Military Affairs (as it was known until 1996) in 1793, he directed it to provide a “new
system for the regulation of the militia.” The force continued to be called “militia” until the Legislature changed the name in 1870 to “National Guard.”
      As his first adjutant general, Gov. Mifflin chose another Revolutionary War hero, Colonel Josiah Harmar, a Philadelphia native, who was
promoted to brigadier general.
      Throughout the 19th century the Pennsylvania militia was called upon many times to quell domestic disturbances. When the Pennsylvania State
Police was created in 1905, it became the primary force to enforce civil order at home.
      The Guard’s experiences with civil disturbances after the Civil War convinced authorities that the system that had evolved over the years
resulted in too many undermanned divisions, top heavy with officers and unevenly trained and equipped.
      In 1878, the Legislature voted for a new force structure that effectively reorganized the Guard into one division. The following year, the
Pennsylvania Division was organized. It remains the Army’s oldest division and was renamed the 28th Infantry Division in 1917. Today, it is a
mechanized infantry division.
      The Guard’s first aviation unit was created in Reading in 1921. In 1947, the Air Guard became a separate entity within the National Guard.
      Today, the troop list of the Pennsylvania Army National Guard includes all types of units – infantry, armor, cavalry, field artillery, air defense
artillery, engineer, military police, communications, maintenance, transportation, aviation, finance and public affairs. Units assigned to the
Pennsylvania Air National Guard include three flying wings, engineering installation, construction, communications, weather and airspace operations.
      In a time of national emergency or at other periods when authorized by law, the President of the United States orders units of the Pennsylvania
Army and Air National Guard into active military service. Starting with its militia predecessors, elements of the Pennsylvania National Guard have
taken part in every conflict in which the United States has been engaged: the French and Indian Wars; the Revolutionary War; the War of 1812; the
Mexican-American War; the Civil War; the Spanish-American War; both World Wars; the Korean War; the Vietnam War; the Gulf War; Panama,
Haiti, the Balkans, Southwest Asia, Afghanistan; and Iraq.
      When not in the service of the United States, the National Guard is a state force, the command of which is vested in the governor as
commander-in-chief.
      The adjutant general designates area responsibilities in the event the Pennsylvania National Guard, Army or Air, is ordered to state active duty
by the governor for deployment in emergency situations within the Commonwealth. During such periods, the command and employment of National
Guard forces is exercised through the adjutant general.
      In an expansion of its traditional mission, the Pennsylvania National Guard, through its federally funded counterdrug program, provides technical
and logistical support to local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies and community-based, anti-drug coalitions throughout the
Commonwealth. The Guard also has a military-to-military partnership with the Baltic Republic of Lithuania, working to develop its armed forces under
civil authority.

                                                        BUREAU FOR VETERANS AFFAIRS
     This bureau is responsible for the administration and management of all veterans’ programs, the state veterans’ homes and Scotland School for
Veterans’ Children within the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs. The Bureau for Veterans Affairs, by legislative mandate, is the official
liaison between federal, state, and local government agencies on all matters concerning veterans’ benefits. The adjutant general administers the
Bureau for Veterans Affairs through the deputy adjutant general-Veterans Affairs.
Pennsylvania Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Home – Located in Erie, authority of the State Legislature P.L. 62 established this home June 3, 1885. The
home’s capacity is 207 beds: 75 nursing care beds, 100 personal care beds, and a dementia unit with 32 beds. Its purpose is to provide
individualized long term health care to Pennsylvania veterans and their spouses. The adjutant general, through the Bureau for Veterans Affairs, is
responsible for management of the home. A 15-member advisory council advises the adjutant general as to the management, operation, and
services at the home.
Hollidaysburg Veterans’ Home – Located in Hollidaysburg, this home was established by authority of the State Legislature P.L. 211 Sept. 28,
1976. The home’s capacity is 514 beds: 270 nursing care beds, 101 personal care beds, 66 domiciliary beds, and a dementia unit with 77 beds. Its
purpose is identical to the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Home described above. It also has an advisory council.
Southeastern Veterans’ Center – Located in Spring City, this home was established by authority of the State Legislature Act 1986-7 Feb. 14, 1986.
Expansion in 1993 raised the home’s bed capacity to 304 beds: 160 nursing care beds, 26 personal care beds, 86 domiciliary beds, and 32 dementia
beds. Its purpose is identical to the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Home described above. It also has an advisory council.
Gino J. Merli Veterans’ Center – This home is located in Scranton. Act 1988-113 authorized it Oct. 21, 1988. Construction was completed in 1993.
The home has 200 beds: 160 nursing care beds, 16 personal care beds, and 24 dementia beds. Its purpose is identical to the Soldiers’ and Sailors’
Home described above. It also has an advisory council.
Southwestern Veterans’ Center – This home is located in Pittsburgh. It was dedicated July 14, 1997. The center provides 236 beds: 160 nursing
care beds, 32 personal care beds, and 44 dementia beds. Its purpose is identical to the other homes discussed above. It also has an advisory
council.
Delaware Valley Veterans’ Home – This home, newest in the state system, is located in northeast Philadelphia. This sixth home for Pennsylvania
veterans opened Nov. 1, 2002. The center provides 170 beds: 100 nursing care beds, 41 personal care beds, and 30 dementia beds. Its purpose is
identical to the other homes discussed above. It also has an advisory council.
Scotland School for Veterans’ Children – Established in 1895, the School was transferred from the Department of Education to the Department of
Military and Veterans Affairs July 1, 1996. Students in grades three through 12 live on its 186-acre campus, located in southern Franklin County,
near Chambersburg. The purpose of the school is to provide opportunities for students of Pennsylvania veterans to develop lifelong learning skills,
challenge students to achieve full potential as responsible citizens with respect for diversity in a growing global society, and to offer a quality
standards-based education within a safe and caring residential community. To be eligible for admission, children must meet the following
qualifications: (1) the natural parent, adoptive parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, must be an honorably discharged veteran from the military or have
died while on active duty; (2) parents or legal guardian must have resided in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for a continuous period of three
years immediately prior to the time of application; (3) children must be within the 8-15 years age range. Further information can be obtained from the
Director of Admissions, Scotland School for Veterans’ Children, Scotland, Pa. 17201; phone (717) 264-7187, ext. 699.

                                                              BENEFITS PROGRAMS:
   Veterans Emergency Assistance – Provides financial aid on an emergency and temporary basis (not to exceed three months in a 12-month
    period) to veterans, their widows, infant children, or dependents who reside in Pennsylvania and have a sudden loss of income within the last
    180 days for the necessities of life under specified conditions.
   Educational Gratuity – Payment of educational gratuities are for children of honorably discharged veterans who have been certified by the U.S.
    Department of Veterans Affairs as having wartime service-connected disabilities rated as total and permanent or children of veterans who have
    died of war service-connected disabilities or died in service during a period of war or armed conflict under specified conditions. Payment will not
    exceed $500 per term or semester per qualified child to each approved educational institution upon submission by that approved educational
    institution of proof of matriculation of the applicant.
   Real Estate Tax Exemption – Any honorably discharged 100 percent service-connected veteran with wartime service who is a resident of the
    Commonwealth shall be exempt from the payment of all real estate taxes levied upon any building, including the land upon which it stands,
    occupied by the veteran as a principal dwelling, under specified conditions providing they demonstrate financial need. Applicants with an annual
    income of $75,000 or less are given rebuttable presumption to have a need for the exemption. The exemption must be renewed every five
    years.
   Blind Veterans Pension – Provides for a pension of $150 per month for a person who served in the military of the United States or women’s
    organization officially connected therewith, who gave the Commonwealth as his/her place of residence when entering the military and while
    performing duties connected with the service suffered an injury or incurred a disease, which resulted in loss of vision under specified conditions.
   Paralyzed Veterans Pension – Provides for a pension of $150 per month for a person who served in the military of the United States or
    women’s organization officially connected therewith, who gave the Commonwealth as his/her place of residence when entering the military and
    while performing duties connected with the service suffered an injury or incurred a disease, which resulted in an injury or disease resulting in the
    loss or loss of use of two or more extremities.
   Persian Gulf Conflict Veteran’s Bonus Program – Eligible Pennsylvania veterans of the Persian Gulf Conflict will receive $75 per month for
    each month (or major fraction) of active service in the Persian Gulf Conflict Theater up to a maximum of $525. Five thousand dollars ($5,000)
    will be paid on behalf of veterans who died in active service in the Persian Gulf Theater or as a result of service-connected wounds, diseases or
    injuries sustained during active service in the Persian Gulf Theater. In addition, $5,000 will be paid to Persian Gulf Conflict prisoners of war.
    DMVA expects to make the first “bonus” payments under the program in December 2007 or early 2008.

    More detailed information can be obtained by contacting the Bureau for Veterans Affairs at the Pennsylvania Department of Military and
Veterans Affairs, Fort Indiantown Gap, Annville, Pa. 17003-5002; phone (717) 861-8901.

                                             PENNSYLVANIA ARMY NATIONAL GUARD (PAARNG)
    Playing an important role in the nation’s defense and supporting the Commonwealth in times of need, the Pennsylvania Army National Guard
has approximately 15,000 members assigned. Pennsylvania National Guard members have participated in every conflict America has faced, from
the Revolutionary War through Iraqi Freedom, as well as supporting ongoing peacekeeping operations in Bosnia and Kosovo. Since 1875, the
Pennsylvania Army National Guard has responded to 122 state active duty calls in response to natural disasters and other state emergencies. The
Pennsylvania Army National Guard has two major units – the 28th Infantry Division and the 213th Area Support Group.
    The 28th Division, headquartered in Harrisburg, is a modular force. The division has units throughout the Commonwealth and has the only
Stryker Brigade in the entire National Guard. The major 28th Division organizations and locations are: 2nd Brigade, Washington; 55th Brigade,
Scranton; 56th Brigade, Philadelphia; 28th Combat Aviation Brigade, Fort Indiantown Gap; 28th Division Special Troops Battalion, Harrisburg.
    The 213th Area Support Group, headquartered in Allentown, carries out a number of combat support missions including transportation,
administration, aviation and finance.

                                                              THE PENNSYLVANIA AIR NATIONAL GUARD (PAANG)
      The Pennsylvania Air National Guard consists of approximately 4,000 members in units under the command and operational control of the Joint
Force Headquarters located at Fort Indiantown Gap. The force structure consists of 61 units, including a State Headquarters and three major flying
units: the 171st Air Refueling Wing, 111th Fighter Wing, and 193rd Special Operations Wing. The wings are each comprised of aircraft maintenance,
operations, and mission support functions including engineering, communications, logistics, personnel, security, services, and medical as necessary
to meet assigned missions. Additional units are assigned providing support in the areas of engineering and construction of base infrastructure,
weather observation and forecasting, ground control of air attacks, airport air traffic control, and operating an air operations center. The 553rd Air
National Guard Band of the Mid-Atlantic is assigned to Pennsylvania. These units are assigned at six different locations within the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania – Willow Grove Air National Guard Base, Greater Pittsburgh International Airport, Harrisburg International Airport, Fort Indiantown
Gap, Johnstown, and State College.
      To be immediately responsible to its two-fold mission to the Federal and State governments, the Pennsylvania Air National Guard must maintain
its forces and equipment in a constant state of high readiness to provide the capability necessary to fulfill all assigned tasks, while at the same time
providing continual training for personnel to maintain peak proficiency in their assigned tasks.

                                                                       TRAINING SITE, FORT INDIANTOWN GAP
     On October 1, 1998, management of Fort Indiantown Gap was transferred from the active Army to the Pennsylvania Army National Guard. Fort
Indiantown Gap is home of the headquarters of the Pennsylvania National Guard which includes the headquarters for the Department of Military and
Veterans Affairs, and the joint headquarters of both the Pennsylvania Army and Air National Guard.
     Fort Indiantown Gap is one of the busiest National Guard training sites in the country, and is the primary training site for the Pennsylvania Army
and Air National Guard. It includes numerous small and heavy caliber firing ranges and maneuver areas, and an Air-to-Ground Bombing and Strafing
complex in the 12,000 acre training corridor nestled between Blue and Second Mountains. The 5,000 acre Garrison Area south of Blue Mountain is a
mixture of World War II vintage and more modern buildings that are the home of active duty, National Guard, and Army Reserve units,
schoolhouses, and support facilities. Also located in the Garrison Area is Muir Army Airfield – the sixth busiest airport in Pennsylvania in terms of
takeoffs and landings on a daily basis. The airfield primarily supports rotary wing operations, but also supports limited fixed wing aircraft. A new
Battle Command Training Center is being constructed which will be the focus of a new Army Digital Center of Excellence that will provide virtual and
constructive simulation training capability from the individual soldier to the division staff level. It will be one of three National Guard digital training
hubs in the country.
     The Army National Guard military schoolhouses include the 166th Regiment (part of the Total Army School System), the Eastern Army Aviation
Training Site (the second largest helicopter training facility in the United States), and the Medical Company Training Site. The Army Reserve has a
Regional Training Site Maintenance School. The Air National Guard has the Regional Equipment Operator Training Site (heavy equipment operator)
and the Lightning Force Academy (Information Technology) schoolhouses on the installation. In addition, the Northeast Counterdrug Training Center,
which trains local, state, and federal police and security forces, is located here. In total, these schoolhouses graduate nearly 10,000 students a year.
     Fort Indiantown Gap is in the midst of the largest military construction and modernization program since the post was constructed between 1931
and 1941. Combining this new modernization with the tremendous training capabilities will ensure Fort Indiantown Gap’s viability as a world class
training site well into the future.

                                                                            Appointed         Maj. Gen. William J. Gallagher ...............................             May 18, 1972
ADJUTANTS GENERAL                                                           Since 1955        Harold Wells............................................................   Aug. 25, 1972
  Maj. Gen. A.J. Drexel Biddle Jr...............................           Apr. 19, 1955      Brig. Gen. Robert M. Carroll ...................................           July 7, 1977
  Maj. Gen. Malcolm Hay ..........................................         Apr. 11, 1961      Maj. Gen. Frank H. Smoker Jr. ...............................              April 30, 1979
  Maj. Gen. Thomas R. White Jr. ..............................             Jan. 15, 1963      Brig. Gen. Francis E. Jones Jr. ...............................            May 13, 1980
  Maj. Gen. Richard Snyder ......................................          May 6, 1968        Maj. Gen. Robert E. Harris .....................................           Sept. 1, 1984
  Maj. Gen. Harry J. Mier Jr. .....................................        Apr. 19, 1972      Brig. Gen. Pasquale J. Macrone .............................               Nov. 14, 1984
  Maj. Gen. Nicholas P. Kafkalas ..............................            Apr. 28, 1977      Brig. Gen. (PA Ret.) Kenneth R. Craig ...................                  May 18, 1987
  Maj. Gen. Richard M. Scott.....................................          Feb. 16, 1979      Brig. Gen. (PA Ret.) Elton D. Reep ........................                Feb. 27, 1989
  Maj. Gen. Gerald T. Sajer .......................................        Jan. 20, 1987      Col. James R. Buggy ..............................................         Jan. 2, 1990
  Maj. Gen. James W. Mac Vay ...............................               Apr. 15, 1995      Maj. Gen. Robert G. Chrisjohn Jr. ..........................               Jan. 11, 1993
  Maj. Gen. William B. Lynch.....................................          Mar. 23, 1999      Joseph R. Clelan.....................................................      Jan. 25, 1993
* Maj. Gen. Jessica L. Wright ...................................          Mar. 5, 2004       Brig. Gen. James W. Mac Vay................................                Dec. 1, 1993
                                                                                              Maj. Gen. William B. Lynch.....................................            May 31, 1995
                                                                                              Maj. Gen. Eugene P. Klynoot .................................              May 31, 1995
                                                                                              Brig. Gen. (PA) John L. Patten ...............................             June 12, 1995
                                                                            Appointed
                                                                                              Maj. Gen. James M. Skiff........................................           June 12, 1999
Deputy Adjutants General                                                    Since 1952
                                                                                              Maj. Gen. Jessica L. Wright ....................................           May 1, 2000
 Brig. Gen. Richard Snyder ......................................          Jan. 22, 1952    * Brig. Gen. (PA) Cecil B. Hengeveld........................                 May 29, 2001
 Col. Robert C. Boden..............................................        Jan. 22, 1952      Maj. Gen. Robert P. French ....................................            Jan. 2, 2004
 Col. William B. Freeland ........................................         Feb. 1, 1955     * Maj. Gen. Stephen M. Sischo .................................              Nov. 9, 2006
 Brig. Gen. Richard B. Posey ...................................           June 7, 1956     * Col. Joseph G. De Paul ..........................................          Aug. 13, 2007
 Lt. Col. Anthony R. Flores.......................................         May 1, 1963
 Daniel Shaub ..........................................................   Sept. 5, 1965    * Incumbent
 Maj. Gen. Nicholas P. Kafkalas ..............................             July 8, 1968

								
To top