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Cyclone (PowerPoint download)

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					             Cyclone
An area of low pressure, winds move
outward in a counterclockwise
direction.
          Anti-Cyclone
• An area of high pressure with winds
  moving outward in a clockwise
  direction.
             Isotherm
• A line connecting points of equal
  temperatures on a weather map.
               Isobar
• A line connecting points of equal air
  pressure on a weather map.
            Dewpoint
• The temperature at which saturation
  will occur.
       Relative Humidity
• The amount of water vapor in the air
  compared to what the air could hold
  if totally saturated.
           Cloud Burst
• A sudden very heavy fall of rain. (4”
  per hour)
             Blizzard
• A Midwestern storm with cold
  temperatures, high winds, and
  blowing snow.
          Black Blizzard
• A winter dust storm of the Great
  Plains.
              Whiteout
• The most severe Midwestern
  blizzard. (visibility is zero)
               Frost
• Snow like ice formation when
  condensation takes place below
  freezing.
            Cold Front
• The leading edge of a cold air mass.
           Warm Front
• The leading edge of a warm air
  mass.
             Chinook
• A warm dry wind that melts one foot
  of snow an hour. (snow eater)
            Hurricane
• A tropical storm with winds
 exceeding 75 miles an hour.
 (Typhoons in the East)
             Tornado
• A small violent storm that can cause
  great damage due to high winds and
  low pressure. (winds in excess of
  500 mph)
               Cirrus
• High wispy clouds – leading edge of
  a warm front.
         Cumulonimbus
• A storm cloud associated with a cold
  front.
          Nimbostratus
• A storm cloud associated with a
  warm front. (Dangerous)
          Meteorology
• The study of the atmosphere.
  (weather)
                Fog
• A cloud on the ground.
        Indian Summer
• An unusually warm period during the
  fall.
              Climate
• The weather of an area over a long
  period of time.
              Weather
• The current condition of the
  atmosphere.
          Coriolis Effect
• This effect is caused by the rotation
  of the Earth and is responsible for
  the direction of the rotation of large
  cyclones: winds around the center of
  a cyclone rotate counterclockwise on
  the northern hemisphere and
  clockwise on the southern
  hemisphere.

				
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posted:2/9/2012
language:English
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