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					                                   Type
    Curricular Proposal        (Note here if non-
  Course or Program Title          substan-
                                     tive)



NUR 530 Forensic            New Course
Nursing: A
Multidisciplinary
Approach




Generic, 4-year Program-    Program Change
Bachelor of Science in
Nursing Accreditation

CHM 170 General Chemistry II Course Change




CHM 175 General             Course Change
Chemistry Laboratory
Chemisty Minor-Bachelor of     Program Change
Science and Bachelor of Arts




General Education              Program Change




Gender Studies                 Program Change
Native American Studies   Program Change




Law and Society           Program Change




BIO 646 Plant Morphology Course Change
Master of Science in Cell   Program Change
and Molecular Biology




Accelerated Master of       Program Change
Science in Cell and
Molecular Biology
CHM 606 Physical Chemistry 1 Course Change




CHM 607 Physical Chemistry   Course Change
11




CHM 608 Physical Chemistry   Course Change
Laboratory 1




CHM 609 Physical Chemistry   Course Change
Laboratory 11




CFD 702 Community            New Course
Engagement




CIS 748 Principles of        New Course
Information Security
CIS 752 Behavior and          New Course
Leadership in IT




FGB 785 Investment            Course Change
Management




SPE 791 Clinical Practicum for Course Change
Special Needs Populations




COU 757 Elementary Group      New Course
Counseling Through Play




COU 794 Introduction to       New Course
Research in Counseling
Graduate Certificate in Autism Program Change
Spectrum Disorders
Master of Science in            Program Change
Education, Special Education:
Autism Spectrum Disorders
Emphasis
Program Requirements
Master of Science in            Program Change
Education, Special Education:
Mild to Moderate Disabilities
Emphasis
Comprehensive Examination




LIS 728 School Library          Course Change
Administration
MGT 793 Health              Course Change
Administration Internship
Master of Health   Program Change
Administration
Master of Public Health      Program Change
(MPH) Program




NUR 730 Family Practice 1    New Course




NUR 750 Family Practice 11   New Course
NUR 770 Family Practice 111   New Course




NUR 800 DNP Leadership 1:     New Course
Concepts for Evidence Based
Practice




NUR 802 Emerging Science of   New Course
Advanced Practice




NUR 820 Social Justice and    New Course
Disparities in Health and
Healthcare




NUR 824 Health Policy to      New Course
Improve Health Disparities




NUR 830 DNP Leadership 11:    New Course
Impacting Disparities in
Health and Healthcare
NUR 840 Technology for     New Course
Transforming Nursing and
Healthcare Systems




NUR 860 DNP Leadership     New Course
111:Transforming Systems




NUR 991 Transforming       New Course
Practice 1




NUR 992 Transforming       New Course
Practice 11




NUR 993 Transforming       New Course
Practice 111
Accelerated RN of Masters in   Program Change
Nursing Option




RDG 640 Analysis and           Course Change
Correction of Reading
Difficulties




RDG 680 Successful Classroom Course Change
Communities to Enhance
Student Learning
RDG 710 Reading in the        Course Change
Content Fields




RDG 730 Assessment and        Course Change
Instruction of Less Skilled
Readers




Master of Science in          Program Change
Education-Reading (MSEd-
Reading)
BSEd- Technology Education   Program Change




LIS 589 Action Research in the New Course
School Library




THE 541 Theatre History 1    Course Change




THE 542 Theatre History 11   Course Change
CIS 732 Information Systems   Course Change
Planning




CIS 736 Network Planning and Course Change
Administration




CIS 746 Data Modeling and     Course Change
Database Administration




CIS 750 Information System    Course Change
Resource Acquisition




CIS 790 Seminar in Computer   Course Change
Information Systems
                                 Current Catalog Description




Generic, 4-year Program- Bachelor of Science in Nursing Accreditation
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) - all Nursing programs.


CHM 170 General Chemistry II
Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 160. Emphasis on reaction kinetics, chemical
equilibrium, precipitation reactions, acid-base theory and oxidation-reduction reactions.
Concurrent registration in CHM 175 is highly recommended. A grade of "C" or better is
required in this course in order to take CHM 342, 352 or 506. May not be taken
Pass/Not Pass. 3(3-0) F,S
CHM 175 General Chemistry Laboratory
Prerequisite: CHM 170 or concurrent enrollment. An introduction to laboratory chemistry,
including synthesis, physical studies, qualitative and quantitative analysis, and data
manipulation and interpretation. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to
take CHM 302 or 342. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 2(0-4) F,S
Bachelor of Science

 A. CHM 160(4), 170(3), 175(2); CHM 200(5) or CHM 342(5)
 B. Select an emphasis area from the options below:
     1. Analytical: CHM 302(5)
     2. Biochemistry: CHM 352(3) and 353(2); or CHM 452(3) and 453(2)
     3. Environmental: CHM 460(3) and 461(3)
     4. Inorganic: CHM 375(3) and 376(2)
     5. Organic: CHM 343(5) or 344(3); and CHM 505(4) or 506(3); and CHM 542(3)
     6. Physical: CHM 506(3); and CHM 507(3) or 508(2)
     7. Student Option: Select at least 8 hours in CHM courses numbered 302 or higher.




Chemistry:
CHM 105(5) Fundamentals of Chemistry*
CHM 106(4) Fundamentals of Chemistry
CHM 107(4) Chemistry for the Citizen*
CHM 160(4) General Chemistry 1


 A. GST 170(3) or PSY 355(3) or PSY 356(3) or SOC 290(3)
 B. Complete 15 hours from the following areas with at least three hours from each area and
no more than six hours from each discipline (course prefix):
     1. Arts and Letters: ART 378(3); COM 307(3); ENG 380(3), 580(3)
     2. Humanities and Public Affairs: CRM 410(3); ECO 315(3) or GST 315(3); GST 326(3),
400(3); HST 324(3), 321(3), 323(3); PHI 319(3); PLS 319(3), 517(3); REL 370(3); SOC 290(3),
326(3)
     3. Health and Human Services: FCS 300(3); GER 320(3); NUR 327(3); PED 402(3), 405(3);
PSY 307(3), 355(3), 356(3); SWK 320(3)
 C. Attain a minimum GPA of 2.50 in all courses counted toward the minor.
 The Native American Studies Program is an interdisciplinary minor course of study allowing
students to concentrate on the history, arts, and cultures of native peoples of the Americas.
The minor in Native American Studies offers a multidisciplinary exploration of the history,
arts, and cultures of the first Americans, past and present. It can be an excellent complement
to many majors, including art, history, and anthropology. The knowledge provided will be
valuable if not essential in any career that involves working with Native Americans in business,
social services, public administration, or health and medicine. The minor will also stimulate
awareness and appreciation of the ethnic and cultural diversity of the United States, which is
an increasing concern in the workforce and society today, as well as the importance of
cultural heritage.
A. Complete 18 hours from the following courses and from at least three disciplines (course
prefix), with no more than nine hours from any one discipline: ANT 325(3), ANT 330(3)*, ANT
360(3), ANT 425(3), ANT 451(3)*, ANT 453(3)*, ANT 454(3)*, ANT 490(3)*, ART 273(3), ART
385(3), ART 485(3), ART 496(3)*, ENG 354(3)*, GRY 305(3)*, GRY 597(3)*, HST 397(3)*, HST
509(3), HST 510(3), REL 315(3).
    *when applicable
  B. Other courses (e.g., special topics, transfer) may be applied with the approval of the
Administrator.

Law and Society, The
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science

Administration of the program. Courses must be approved by the faculty of the Law and
Society Committee for inclusion in the minor. The Administrator must approve the course of
study for each student who wishes to complete the Law and Society minor.

The Law and Society Minor is a 21-hour program of study with nine credit hours required in
the core and an additional 12 credit hours of designated electives. No more than two courses
with the same course prefix will count toward the minor.

 A. Core Courses (9 hours): SOC 380(3); PHI 340(3); and PLS 515(3) or 517(3) or HST 565(3)
 B. Complete 12 hours from: AGB 314(3); ECO 435(3); JRN 407(3); LAW 231(3), 537(3); PHI
345(3); PLN 570(3); CRM 210(3) or PLS 451(3) or PSY 320(3)




BIO 646 Plant Morphology
Recommended Prerequisite: general biology I and II courses. A study of the form, structure,
and evolution of plants. May be taught concurrently with BIO 546. Cannot receive credit for
both BIO 546 and BIO 646. 4(2-4), D
Master of Science in Cell and Molecular Biology

Entrance Requirements

Admission to the program requires a strong science and mathematics background identical to
that required of a student completing the undergraduate program in cell and molecular
biology. In addition, admission to the program requires evidence that the applicant will be
able to successfully complete a rigorous graduate program in the sciences at a high level of
performance. Entrance into the program requires completion of the following.

  1. Two semesters of organic chemistry.
  2. Two semesters of physics.
  3. A course in calculus.
  4. A bachelor's degree from a Missouri State University recognized accredited college or
university and a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.00 on a 4.00 scale, overall, or for the
last 60 hours. Students with a GPA of between 2.75 and 3.00 may be admitted conditionally
by completing a minimum of 9 hours of specified graduate courses in the program and
earning a GPA of at least 3.25 in these courses.
  5. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores must be submitted no later than the end of
the first semester. GRE scores must not be older than four years before the semester in
which the student matriculates.
 6. By the end of the first semester, thesis option candidates must be accepted for research
by a member of the graduate faculty who becomes the student’s advisor. Non-thesis option
candidates are advised by the program director in consultation with the graduate faculty, one
of whom may guide the student in the non-thesis project.

Degree Requirements
The programMaster ofcompletionCella minimum of 32 semester hours and includes the
Accelerated requires Science in of and Molecular Biology
Admission Requirements for the Accelerated Master’s Option
1. Junior standing and an overall GPA of 3.40 or better.
2. Completion of BMS 110, 231, 321; CHM 160, 170, 175, 310 with a GPA of 3.40 or better.
3. Undergraduate/graduate laboratory research experience is strongly recommended before
and after acceptance.
4. Preliminary acceptance into the laboratory of a graduate faculty member who agrees to
serve as the student’s graduate research mentor.
5. Acceptance of the applicant by the graduate faculty in cell and molecular biology under the
accelerated master’s option. 

CHM 606 Physical Chemistry I
Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 170; and MTH 280 or MTH 288 or concurrent enrollment in
MTH 280 or MTH 288. Recommended Prerequisite: PHY 124 or PHY 204. Chemical
thermodynamics; kinetic theory of gases. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in
order to take CHM 607. May be taught concurrently with CHM 506. Cannot receive credit for
both CHM 606 and CHM 506. 3(3-0) F


CHM 607 Physical Chemistry II
Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 506 or 606. Continuation of CHM 606. Kinetics,
quantum theory and spectroscopy. May be taught concurrently with CHM 507. Cannot receive
credit for both CHM 607 and CHM 507. 3(3-0) S

CHM 608 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I
Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 302; and "C" or better in CHM 506 or CHM 606 or
concurrent enrollment in CHM 506 or CHM 606. Experiments in physical chemistry employing
principles and techniques reflecting material presented in CHM 506, i. e. Thermodynamics and
chemical kinetics. May be taught concurrently with CHM 508. Cannot receive credit for both
CHM 608 and CHM 508. 2(0-4) F

CHM 609 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II
Prerequisite: CHM 507 or CHM 607 or concurrent enrollment; and CHM 508 or CHM 608.
Experiments in physical chemistry employing principles and techniques reflecting material
presented in CHM 507, i. e. quantum principles and techniques reflecting material presented
in CHM 507. May be taught concurrently with CHM 509. Cannot receive credit for both CHM
609 and CHM 509. 2(0-4) S
FGB 785 Investment Management
Prerequisite: FIN 780. A study of investment theory and practice. Topics include portfolio
theory, equilibrium in capital markets, equity and fixed income security analysis, derivatives
(options, futures, swaps), portfolio management and strategies. 3(3-0) F,S


SPE 791 Clinical Practicum for Special Needs Populations
Prerequisite: SPE 625 and SPE 783 and SPE 785; and permission of instructor. This course will
involve experience in a supervised, clinical setting with individuals diagnosed with various
disabilities. Emphasis will be placed on developmental disabilities and challenging behaviors.
Students will conduct assessment specific to their credentials and training to include learning
assessment, autism specific instruments, and communication assessment. Emphasis will be
placed on conducting functional behavioral assessment and utilizing data across domains to
develop research based programs. Students will participate in a multidisciplinary assessment
model to include families and professionals from a variety of disciplines. Preparation and
submission of reports that are research based and that are of a high professional quality will
be a required course outcome. Supplemental course fee. 6(0-12), D
Graduate Certificate In Autism Spectrum Disorders
Program Description
An 18 credit hour Missouri State University Graduate Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorders
(ASD) is available to non-degree seeking individuals or as a component of the Masters degree
in Special Education, Developmental Disabilities emphasis. Students pursuing a program of
study in other areas of education may also complete these courses as electives or in addition
to requirements on the respective program of study. The certificate is also offered to support
professionals in the fields of psychology, communication disorders, social work, medicine, and
other related specialties. The certificate will not lead to teacher certification in autism;
however, it is offered to support educators and other professionals who desire greater
expertise in the area of ASD. Emphasis is placed on supporting individuals with challenging
behavior through positive behavioral supports and supporting communication, learning and
sensory deficits through validated, data-based programming. Required course work for the
ASD Graduate Certificate follows.
Entrance Criteria
To be considered for the program, a student must apply and be admitted to the Graduate
College.
Required Courses
Course Code Course Title Credits
SPE 625 Introduction to Teaching & Assessing
Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders 3 hrs
SPE 626 Applied Behavioral Analysis for
Developmental Disabilities & Autism
Spectrum Disorders 3 hrs
SPE 791 Clinical Practicum for Special Needs
Populations 6 hrs
CSD 732 Speech & Language Assessment &
Treatment for Special Populations 3 hrs
Master of Science in Education, Special Education: Autism Spectrum Disorders Emphasis
Program Requirements
Comprehensive Examination. Degree candidates must pass the comprehensive exam.
Students are encouraged to use the computerized option available when taking the exam.
Confer with department and/or advisor regarding this option.
Core Requirements 9 hrs.
SFR 780* Educational Research Methodologies 3 hrs
SPE 782* Advanced Diagnosis & Remediation of Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
OR
SPE 783* Advanced Assessment to Support Developmental & Sensory Disabilities 3 hrs
SPE 788 Seminar: Special Education Program OR SPE 799 Thesis Option OR SPE 787 Advanced
Applied Behavioral Analysis and Intervention 3 hrs

*Offered via internet or alternative delivery system based on availability

Autism Spectrum Disorders Emphasis
The Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Track is designed for individuals who have teacher
certification in an area of Mild/Moderate disabilities who wish to enhance their skills through
related and advanced coursework in ASD analysis or research-based practices specific to
assessment, identification, and programming are stressed. Course work in addition to the core
follows.

SPE 780* Comtemp. Issues in Special Education        3hrs
SPE 625 Introduction to Teaching and Assessing Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders 3hrs
SPE 791 Clinical Practicum for Special Needs Populations    4hrs
SPE 627 Seminar in development and Sensory Disabilities      3hrs
SPE 626 Applied Behavioral Analysis for Developmental Disabilities and Autism 3hrs
SPE 733 Introduction to Augmentative and Alternative Communication        2hrs
Master of Science in Education, Special Education: Mild to Moderate Disabilities Emphasis
Comprehensive Examination. Degree candidates must pass the comprehensive exam.
Students are encouraged to use the computerized option available when taking the exam.
Confer with faculty advisor regarding this option.
Core Requirements                                   9 hrs
Course Code Course Title Credits
SFR 780* Educational Research Methodologies         3 hrs
SPE 782* Advanced Diagnosis & Remediation of
Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities OR
SPE 783* Advanced Assessment to Support
Developmental & Sensory Disabilities 3 hrs
SPE 788 Seminar: Special Education Program OR
SPE 799 Thesis Option OR
SPE 787 Advanced Applied Behavioral Analysis
and Intervention 3 hrs

* Offered via internet or alternative delivery system based on availability.

Mild to Moderate Disabilities Emphasis
The Mild to Moderate Disability Track is designed for individuals who have teacher
certification in an area of Mild/Moderate Disabilities who wish to enhance their skills through
related and advanced course work. In-depth analysis of research-based practices specific to
assessment, identification, and programming are stressed. Course work in addition to the
core follows.
Course Code Course Title Credits
SPE 780* Contemporary Issues in Special Education 3 hrs
SPE 784 Advanced Procedures in Teaching Students
With Mild to Moderate Disabilities
LIS 728 School Library Administration 3 hrs
Recommended Prerequisite: LIS 600 and two of the following: LIS 604, 606, 608.
Administration of K-12 libraries within school communities. Emphasizes program
development, evaluation, planning cycle; budget process; services for diverse school
constituencies. Examines effects of national, state and district guidelines, standards and
policies on school library programs. Portfolio checkpoint number 2. May be taught
concurrently with LIS 628. Cannot receive credit for both LIS 628 and LIS 728. 3(3-0), D
MGT 793 Health Administration Internship
Prerequisite: permission of MHA Program Director or department head. Supervised field work
in an approved health care organization. Student will work in a health care setting with an
experienced health administrator serving as a preceptor. The preparation of a substantial
management research project for the organization will be required which involves analyzing a
major management challenge facing the organization and offering specific recommendations.
This course satisfies the Graduate College's research requirement. 6(6-0), F,S
Department of Management
Glass Hall, Room 414, Phone: (417) 836-5415, Fax: (417) 836-3004
Email: BarryWisdom@missouristate.edu
Web Site: http://mgt.missouristate.edu
Department Head: Barry L. Wisdom
Faculty
Professor: D. Keith Denton, Corinne M. Karuppan, Robert O. Lunn, Peter Richardson,
Elizabeth J. Rozell, Steven L. Thomas, Barry L. Wisdom
Associate Professor: William J. Donoher, Jr., Vinay K. Garg, Wesley A. Scroggins
Assistant Professor: Dana L. Haggard
Emeritus Professor: Yohannan T. Abraham, Mona J. Casady, Mary K. Coulter, Patricia Feltes,
J. Kenneth Horn, Thomas H. Inman, Arnola C. Ownby, Robert L. Trewatha, Lynn E. Wasson
Programs
Master of Health Administration
D. Michael Leibert Graduate Director
411 Glass Hall, Phone (417) 836-
MichaelLeibert@missouristate.edu
Program Description
The Master of Health Administration (MHA) degree is a College of Business Administration
degree that includes a number of interdisciplinary courses contributed by other colleges on
campus. The program is designed for students holding undergraduate degrees who wish to
further their careers in the administration of health organizations including integrated
systems, hospitals, group practices, long-term care facilities, clinics, managed care
organizations, and other types of health organizations. The program can be completed in as
little as two years. Students with little or no undergraduate work in business are welcome,
and will normally require additional time for completion.
The MHA program is accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance
Collegiate Schools of Business.
Master of Public Health
Physical Therapy Building, Suite 112, Phone: (417) 836-8850
Email: VSanchez@missouristate.edu
Web Site: http://www.missouristate.edu/mph/
Director: Vickie Sanchez
Faculty
Professor: Dalen M. Duitsman
Associate Professor: Vickie L. Sanchez
Assistant Professor: David Claborn, Elizabeth Federman
Programs
Master of Public Health
Vickie Sanchez, Program Director
Physical Therapy Building, room 112
Phone: (417) 836-8850
VSanchez@missouristate.edu; http://www.missouristate.edu/mph/
Program Description
The Master of Public Health (MPH) program offers a generalist MPH degree consisting of 42
credit hours. The program’s mission is to prevent disease, promote health, and protect the
well-being of the public through education, research and service.
Students gain knowledge in each of the five core disciplines of public health: biostatistics,
epidemiology, environmental health sciences, public health administration, and the social and
behavioral sciences. The program prepares students to assess community health needs, plan
effective health education and health intervention programs, implement and evaluate
educational experiences, and conduct public health research.
Graduates of this program will enter public health service as practitioners, administrators,
researchers, educators, and consultants in a wide variety of public health settings. Most will
be employed in local, state, and national public health agencies, while others will work for
non-profit organizations, private agencies, medical facilities, governmental agencies, and
 Accelerated RN to Masters in Nursing Option
Entrance Requirements
Students must apply to the Accelerated RN to MSN Option when they first apply for admission
to the BSN completion program and prior to enrolling in nursing or supporting courses
required in the BSN. Students may not enter the RN-MSN option after they begin taking
courses for the BSN completion program. Upon acceptance to this option, qualified students
will be granted 30 hours of undergraduate credit from previous associate or diploma nursing
courses. After successful completion of BSN requirements, all students in this option will
receive the BSN and may be granted full admission to the Graduate College.

Admission requirements include:
 1. Junior standing (pending acceptance of 30 hours of basic nursing credit);
  2. Licensure as a registered nurse (RN) in good standing and eligible for licensure in Missouri;
  3. Meet all admission requirements for the BSN completion program;
  4. A pre-admission interview;
  5. Submission of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) combined test scores for verbal,
quantitative, and writing sections, with a section score of at least 400 on verbal and 400 on
quantitative. The analytical writing section of the GRE will be evaluated on an individual basis;
  6. 2 letters of recommendation (faculty or employer preferred);
  7. A written statement of goals;
  8. The equivalent of at least one (1) year of full-time experience in direct patient care as a
registered nurse;
  9. An overall GPA of 3.25 or higher;
 10. Current infant, child and adult CPR certification.


RDG 640 Analysis and Correction of Reading Difficulties
Prerequisite: RDG 318 or both RDG 420 and RDG 421, or equivalent; and admitted to Teacher
Education Program. Techniques of analysis and correction of reading difficulties for
elementary, secondary, special education and reading teachers. Trends in dealing with
diagnostic procedures, instructional techniques, special materials, and evaluative devices.
Students concentrate study within their level of training. May be taught concurrently with
RDG 574. Cannot receive credit for both RDG 640 and RDG 574. 3(3-0) F,S


RDG 680 Successful Classroom Communities to Enhance Student Learning
Prerequisite: instructor recommendation and demonstrated proficiency in reading education.
Integration of areas supporting student learning including pro-active classroom management
and productive interactions with families. Concentrated modules on literacy learning of
regular education students, struggling readers, and exceptional students. Basic principles in
effective communication with parents and other professionals to reinforce appropriate
classroom learning. May not be substituted for any course required for Special Education
degrees or certificates. May be taught concurrently with RDG 580. Cannot receive credit for
both RDG 680 and RDG 580. 3(3-0) D
RDG 710 Reading in the Content Fields
Teaching subject matter in content areas in ways for utilizing and further developing
fundamental reading; effective reading skills, vocabulary development in specific areas, study
skills, utilization of cognitive processes. 3(3-0), F,S,Su


RDG 730 Assessment and Instruction of Less Skilled Readers
Prerequisite: RDG 318; or both RDG 420 and RDG 421, or equivalent. Supervised small group
practice in a clinical setting assessing and instructing students who are experiencing difficulty
learning to read. Planned with and directed by a graduate faculty member. Less intensive and
more generalized clinical experience for those not intending to pursue remedial reading
certification. May not be substituted for any course required for special reading certification
(RDG 574/640, 780, 781, or 782). Reading majors must enroll for 6 credit hours, other majors
may enroll for 3 credit hours. 3(2-2) or 6(2-8), F,S


 Master of Science in Education, Reading
Deanne Camp, Program Coordinator
Hill Hall, Room 102; Phone (417) 836-6983
DeanneCamp@missouristate.edu
Program Description
The purpose of the degree is to furnish students with the necessary knowledge and skills to be
competent teachers of reading from preschool through college. Also, persons completing the
program will be qualified to supervise reading programs and may qualify as reading clinicians
with additional required courses. A research component is required.
 Entrance Requirements
Admission decisions and assignment of an advisor will not be made until all required materials
are submitted. A student may take up to nine hours as a non-degree seeking student before
being accepted into the program.
1. To be considered for admission to the program, a student must first apply to the Graduate
College.
  2. The requirements and application form for the Graduate College can be found at the back
of the Graduate Catalog or online. In addition to the application form and application fee,
official transcripts must be submitted to the Graduate College.
  3. The following materials must be submitted to the Director of the reading program before
the application will be considered:
a. a letter of intent, which includes the candidate’s teaching and professional goals, future
plans, background and teaching experience; and
b. three letters of recommendation from professionals familiar with the candidate’s
academic abilities and teaching potential.
4. Admission to the program requires the following minimum criteria:
a. appropriate teacher certificate or eligibility for certification by a state or national board;
and
b. a minimum GPA of 3.00 for courses taken in undergraduate area of study. Students who
Technology Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades 9-12)
A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
    Specific General Education Requirements: BIO 102(4); PSY 121(3); ENG 110(3) and ENG
310(3) or ENG 321(3) or AGR 320(3); Recommend MTH 135(3) or MTH 138(5)
B. Major Requirements (45 hours)
      1. Technical Core (36 hours)
          a. Courses to be taken at Ozarks Technical College:
              1. Communications: PRT 101(4), DDT 100(4)
              2. Energy/Power: IMT 130(4) or ELT 102(4); and AUM 110(4) or AUM 121(4)
              3. Materials/Processes: DDT 115(4), MMT 125(4)
          b. Courses to be taken at Missouri State University:
              1. Energy/Power: AGR 357(3)
              2. Materials/Processes: AGE 337(3), AGR 377(3)
              3. Safety: TCM 455(3)
      2. Technical Education (9 hours): AGT 416(3), AGT 420(3); AGT 521(3) or AGV 521(3)
C. Professional Education Courses: AGT 493(6); AGT 494(6); and the Professional Education
Required Core and Competencies - see Teacher Certification, Teacher Education Program and
Secondary Education Requirements section of catalog
D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog
E. In order to meet Missouri state teacher certification requirements, candidates for the




THE 541 Theatre History I
This course traces the important periods in the development of theatre from its beginning
through the English Restoration, including an analysis of period plays illustrating the use of
dramatic literature of those time periods. May be taught concurrently with THE 631. Cannot
receive credit for both THE 631 and THE 541. 3(3-0) F




THE 542 Theatre History II
This course traces the important periods in the development of theatre from the 18th century
through present day, including an analysis of period plays illustrating the use of dramatic
literature of those time periods. May be taught concurrently with THE 632. Cannot receive
credit for both THE 632 and THE 542. 3(3-0) S
CIS 732 Information Systems Planning
Prerequisite: acceptance in the M.S. in CIS program. Introduction to fundamental issues of
information system (IS) planning. Current theory and specific IS planning practices are studied.
Emphasis on strategic implications of information technology, IS planning vis-à-vis strategic
planning, development and maintenance of IS plans, analysis of organization information
requirements, and prioritizing IS projects. Implications for business and technology trends and
application of planning concepts to IS planning projects are examined. 3(3-0), D


CIS 736 Network Planning and Administration
Prerequisite: acceptance in the M.S. in CIS program. Computer network planning, including
physical layout, resource requirements, and budgeting. Administration of computer networks,
including managing user accounts; selecting and loading applications software; managing
upgrades and enhancements; monitoring and optimizing system performance; ensuring
physical and logical system security. 3(3-0), D


CIS 746 Data Modeling and Database Administration
Prerequisite: acceptance in the M.S. in CIS program. Study of data modeling using tools such
as Entity-Relationship and Semantic Object Models. Examination of the Database
Administrator's responsibilities including monitoring and tuning of the database,
establishment of database reliability, and security. A case project will include the
development of a data model and a database administration plan for a client/server database
system. 3(3-0), D

CIS 750 Information System Resource Acquisition
Prerequisite: acceptance in the M.S. in CIS program. In-depth study of key factors and issues
associated with hardware/software selection, acquisition and implementation. Emphasis on
problem definition and analysis, comparative methodologies for evaluation and selection,
identifying and qualifying vendors, and developing/evaluating request for proposals (RFP's).
Management implications of enterprise-wide software solutions including software
distribution, version and release management, and software standards and practices are
discussed. Completion of an acquisition project will be included. 3(3-0), D




CIS 790 Seminar in Computer Information Systems
Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours in business administration and economics and permission of
the coordinator of graduate studies. Critical evaluation and interpretation of research and
literature in information systems. 3(3-0), D
                          Complete NEW Catalog Description




NUR 530 Forensic Nursing: A Multidisciplinary
 Approach
Prerequisite: Instructor permission. This course will explore the professional, ethical, and
legal aspects of forensic nursing including the multidisciplinary approach to the care of the
sexual assault victim and other victims of violent crime, the collection of forensic evidence
and documentation of findings, and testifying in court. This course meets the educational
component to take the certification exam as a Sexual Assault Nurse Examinator (SANE)
nurse.




Generic, 4-year Program- Bachelor of Science in Nursing Accreditation
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) - all Nursing programs. The generic 4-
year nursing program leading to a Bachelor of Science in Nursing meets full approval of
the Missouri State Board of Nursing.
CHM 170 General Chemistry II
Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 160. Emphasis on reaction kinetics, chemical
equilibrium, precipitation reactions, acid-base theory and oxidation-reduction reactions.
Concurrent registration in CHM 171 is highly recommended. A grade of "C" or better is
required in this course in order to take CHM 342, 352 or 506. May not be taken Pass/Not
Pass. 3(3-0) F,S
CHM 171 General Chemistry Laboratory
Prerequisite: CHM 170 or concurrent enrollment and a “C” or better in CHM 160 and CHM
161. An introduction to laboratory chemistry employing principles and techniques that
reflect material presented in CHM 170, e.g., physical studies or kinetics and equilibria of
aqueous systems, qualitative and quantitative analysis, and data manipulation and
interpretation. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to take CHM 302
or 342. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 1(0-3) F,S
Bachelor of Science

 A. CHM 160(4), 170(3), 175(2); CHM 200(5) or CHM 342(5)
 B. Select an emphasis area from the options below:
     1. Analytical: CHM 302(5)
     2. Biochemistry: CHM 352(3) and 353(2); or CHM 452(3) and 453(2)
     3. Environmental: CHM 460(3) and 461(3)
     4. Inorganic: CHM 375(3) and 376(2)
     5. Organic: CHM 343(5) or 344(3); and CHM 542(3)or CHM 514(3)
     6. Physical: CHM 506(3); and CHM 507(3) or 508(2)
     7. Student Option: Select at least 8 hours in CHM courses numbered 302 or higher.




Chemistry:
CHM 105(5) Fundamentals of Chemistry*
CHM 106(4) Fundamentals of Chemistry
CHM 107(4) Chemistry for the Citizen*
CHM 160(4) General Chemistry 1
CHM 160(4) General Chemistry 1 and CHM 161(1) General Chemistry 1 Laboratory

 A. GST 170(3) or PSY 355(3) or PSY 356(3) or SOC 290(3)
 B. Complete 15 hours from the following areas with at least three hours from each area
and no more than six hours from each discipline (course prefix):
     1. Arts and Letters: ART 378(3); COM 307(3); ENG 380(3), 580(3)
     2. Humanities and Public Affairs: CRM 410(3); ECO 315(3) or GST 315(3), 400(3); HST
324(3), 321(3), 323(3); PHI 319(3); PLS 319(3), 517(3); REL 370(3); SOC 290(3), 326(3)
     3. Health and Human Services: FCS 300(3); GER 320(3); NUR 327(3); PED 402(3),
405(3); PSY 307(3), 355(3), 356(3); SWK 320(3)
 C. Attain a minimum GPA of 2.50 in all courses counted toward the minor.
 The Native American Studies Program is an interdisciplinary minor course of study
allowing students to concentrate on the history, arts, and cultures of native peoples of the
Americas. The minor in Native American Studies offers a multidisciplinary exploration of
the history, arts, and cultures of the first Americans, past and present. It can be an
excellent complement to many majors, including art, history, and anthropology. The
knowledge provided will be valuable if not essential in any career that involves working
with Native Americans in business, social services, public administration, or health and
medicine. The minor will also stimulate awareness and appreciation of the ethnic and
cultural diversity of the United States, which is an increasing concern in the workforce and
society today, as well as the importance of cultural heritage.
A. Complete 18 hours from the following courses and from at least three disciplines
(course prefix), with no more than nine hours from any one discipline: ANT 325(3), ANT
330(3)*, ANT 360(3), ANT 451(3)*, ANT 453(3)*, ANT 454(3)*, ANT 490(3)*, ART 273(3),
ART 385(3), ART 485(3), ART 496(3)*, ENG 354(3)*, GRY 305(3)*, GRY 597(3)*, HST
397(3)*, HST 509(3), HST 510(3), REL 315(3).
    *when applicable
  B. Other courses (e.g., special topics, transfer) may be applied with the approval of the
Administrator.

Law and Society, The
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science

Administration of the program. Courses must be approved by the faculty of the Law and
Society Committee for inclusion in the minor. The Administrator must approve the course
of study for each student who wishes to complete the Law and Society minor.

The Law and Society Minor is a 21-hour program of study with nine credit hours required
in the core and an additional 12 credit hours of designated electives. No more than two
courses with the same course prefix will count toward the minor.

 A. Core Courses (9 hours): SOC 380(3); PHI 340(3) or PHI 341; and PLS 515(3) or 517(3)
or HST 565(3)
 B. Complete 12 hours from: AGB 314(3); ECO 435(3); JRN 407(3); LAW 231(3), 537(3);
PHI 345(3); PLN 570(3); CRM 210(3) or PLS 451(3) or PSY 320(3)
Master of Science in Cell and Molecular Biology

Entrance Requirements

Admission to the program requires a strong science and mathematics background
identical to that required of a student completing the undergraduate program in cell and
molecular biology. In addition, admission to the program requires evidence that the
applicant will be able to successfully complete a rigorous graduate program in the sciences
at a high level of performance. Entrance into the program requires completion of the
following.

  1. Two semesters of organic chemistry.
  2. Two semesters of physics.
  3. A course in calculus.
  4. A bachelor's degree from a Missouri State University recognized accredited college or
university and a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.00 on a 4.00 scale, overall, or for
the last 60 hours. Students with a GPA of between 2.75 and 3.00 may be admitted
conditionally by completing a minimum of 9 hours of specified graduate courses in the
program and earning a GPA of at least 3.25 in these courses.
  5. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores must be submitted no later than the end
of the first semester. GRE scores must not be older than four years before the semester in
which the student matriculates.
 6. By the end of the first semester, thesis option candidates must be accepted for
research by a member of the graduate faculty who becomes the student’s advisor. Non-
thesis option candidates are advised by the program director in consultation with the
graduate faculty, one of whom may guide the student in the non-thesis project.

Degree Requirements Science in Cell and Molecular Biology
Accelerated Master of
Admission Requirements for the Accelerated Master’s Option
1. Junior standing and an overall GPA of 3.40 or better.
2. Completion of BMS 110, 231, 321; CHM 160, 170, 175, 310 with a GPA of 3.40 or better.

3. Undergraduate laboratory research experience is strongly recommended before
applying.
4. GRE scores must be submitted and a combined score of 1,000 or above is expected for
the verbal and quantitative parts of the general GRE exam.
5. Completed application and a separate statement of professional goals.
6. Three letters of recommendation are required to address the applicant’s academic
potential and dedication to graduate studies. One must be from the future graduate
advisor who formally accepts the student into his or her research laboratory.
7. Acceptance of the applicant by the Graduate Faculty in Cell and Molecular Biology
under the Accelerated Master’s Option. 

CHM 606 Physical Chemistry I
Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 170; and MTH 280 or MTH 288 or concurrent
enrollment in MTH 280 or MTH 288. Recommended Prerequisite: PHY 124 or PHY 204.
First semester of a two-semester series covering aspects of quantum mechanics, classical
and statistical thermodynamics, spectroscopy, kinetic theory of gases, and chemical
kinetics. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to take CHM 607. May
be taught concurrently with CHM 506. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 606 and CHM
506. 3(3-0) F
CHM 607 Physical Chemistry II
Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 506 or 606. Second semester of a two-semester
series that builds upon and completes the topics introduced in CHM 606. May be taught
concurrently with CHM 507. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 607 and CHM 507. 3(3-0)
S
CHM 608 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I
Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 302; and "C" or better in CHM 506 or CHM 606 or
concurrent enrollment in CHM 506 or CHM 606. Experiments in physical chemistry
employing principles and techniques reflecting material presented in CHM 506 or 606.
May be taught concurrently with CHM 508. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 608 and
CHM 508. 2(0-4) F

CHM 609 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II
Prerequisite: CHM 507 or CHM 607 or concurrent enrollment; and CHM 508 or CHM 608.
Experiments in physical chemistry employing principles and techniques reflecting material
presented in CHM 507 or 607. May be taught concurrently with CHM 509. Cannot receive
credit for both CHM 609 and CHM 509. 2(0-4) S


CFD 702 Community Engagement
Analysis of service-learning/community engagement. The main tenets of community
engagement/service-learning are analyed, the community need, the academic
enhancement, and reflection. The roles of all involved in community engagement/service-
learning, the teachers, the students, and the community partners are studied. Ethical,
moral, and civic implications of community engagement/service-learning are also
explored. 2(2-0) D
CIS 748 Principles of Information Security
This course provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with
protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to
security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security systems,
with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features. The students will learn a
balance introduction to both security management and technical components of
information security; they will be exposed to the spectrum of security activities, methods,
methodologies, and procedures. This spectrum includes inspection and protection of
information assets, detection of and reaction to threats to information assets, and
examination of pre- and post- incident procedures, technical and managerial responses
and an overview of the information security planning functions. 3(3-0) D
CIS 752 Behavior and Leadership in IT
This course is designed to provide an understanding and appreciation of organizational
behavior issues facing senior and mid-level IT managers. Topics to be examined include:
organizational behavior from an individual behavior from an individual, group and
structural perspective, organizational culture, leadership, perception and decision-making
values and attitudes, and emotional intelligence. The material should be of interest and
benefit to IT professionals, irrespective of technical specialty, who are currently in or
aspire to IT management. 3(3-0) D

FIN 785 Investment Management
Prerequisite: FIN 780. A study of investment theory and practice. Topics include portfolio
theory, equilibrium in capital markets, equity and fixed income security analysis,
derivatives (options, futures, swaps), portfolio management and strategies. 3(3-0) S


SPE 791 Clinical Practicum for Special Needs Populations
Prerequisite: SPE 625 and SPE 783 and SPE 785; and permission of instructor. This course
will involve experience in a supervised, clinical setting with individuals diagnosed with
various disabilities. Emphasis will be placed on developmental disabilities and challenging
behaviors. Students will conduct assessment specific to their credentials and training to
include learning assessment, autism specific instruments, and communication assessment.
Emphasis will be placed on conducting functional behavioral assessment and utilizing data
across domains to develop research based programs. Students will participate in a
multidisciplinary assessment model to include families and professionals from a variety of
disciplines. Preparation and submission of reports that are research based and that are of
a high professional quality will be a required course outcome. Supplemental course fee. 1-
6(0-12), D

COU 757 Elementary Group Counseling Through Play
Prerequisite: Admission to Counseling programs or permission of instructor; successful
completion of 705, 710, 711, 708, and 782. Introduction to group therapy methods and
techniques appropriate to an elementary school setting. Emphasis is placed upon
foundational group therapy skills in general, and on play therapy modalities in particular,
that are appropriate for elementary-age children. Groups in an elementary setting,
utilizing Missouri Comprehensive Guidance and play therapy and applications to diverse
populations, will be emphasized. 3(3-0) D

COU 794 Introduction to Research in Counseling
Prerequisite: Admission to Counseling program. Introduction to research methods in
counseling, including quantitative and qualitative methods, action research, and program
evaluation approaches, particularly in service-delivery settings. An emphasis is placed on
developing an understanding of foundational research methods that will allow students to
be effective critical consumers of research in counseling and prepare them to design and
implement sound program evaluations.
Graduate Certificate In Autism Spectrum Disorders
Program Description
An 18 credit hour Missouri State University Graduate Certificate in Autism Spectrum
Disorders (ASD) is available to non-degree seeking individuals or as a component of the
Masters degree in Special Education, ASD emphasis. Students pursuing a program of
study in other areas of education may also complete these courses as electives or in
addition to requirements on the respective program of study. The certificate is also
offered to support professionals in the fields of psychology, communication disorders,
social work, medicine, and other related specialties. The certificate will not lead to
teacher certification in autism; however, it is offered to support educators and other
professionals who desire greater expertise in the area of ASD. Emphasis is placed on
supporting individuals with challenging behavior through positive behavioral supports and
supporting communication, learning and sensory deficits through validated, data-based
programming. Required course work for the ASD Graduate Certificate follows.
Entrance Criteria
To be considered for the program, a student must apply and be admitted to the Graduate
College.
Required Courses
Course Code Course Title Credits
SPE 625 Introduction to Teaching & Assessing
Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders 3 hrs
SPT 616 Foundations of Applied Behavior Analysis
And Interventions for Teachers in Applied Settings 3 hrs
SPE 626 Applied Behavioral Analysis for
Developmental Disabilities & Autism
Spectrum Disorders 3 hrs
SPE 791 Clinical Practicum for Special Needs
Populations 4 hrs
Master of Science in Education, Special Education: Autism Spectrum Disorders Emphasis
Program Requirements
Comprehensive Examination. Degree candidates must pass the comprehensive exam.
Students are encouraged to use the computerized option available when taking the exam.
Confer with department and/or advisor regarding this option.
Core Requirements 9 hrs.
SFR 780* Educational Research Methodologies 3 hrs
SPE 782* Advanced Diagnosis & Remediation of Students with Mild to Moderate
Disabilities
OR
SPE 783* Advanced Assessment to Support Developmental & Sensory Disabilities 3 hrs
SPE 788 Seminar: Special Education Program OR SPE 799 Thesis Option OR SPE 787
Advanced Applied Behavioral Analysis and Intervention 3 hrs

*Offered via internet or alternative delivery system based on availability

Autism Spectrum Disorders Emphasis
The Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Track is designed for individuals who have teacher
certification in an area of Mild/Moderate disabilities who wish to enhance their skills
through related and advanced coursework in ASD analysis or research-based practices
specific to assessment, identification, and programming are stressed. Course work in
addition to the core follows.

SPE 780* Comtemp. Issues in Special Education        3hrs
SPE 625 Introduction to Teaching and Assessing Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
3hrs
SPE 791 Clinical Practicum for Special Needs Populations    4hrs
SPE 627 Seminar in development and Sensory Disabilities      3hrs
Master of Science in Education, Special Education: Mild to Moderate Disabilities Emphasis
Comprehensive Examination. Degree candidates must pass the comprehensive exam.
Students are encouraged to use the computerized option available when taking the exam.
Confer with faculty advisor regarding this option.
Core Requirements                                   9 hrs
Course Code Course Title Credits
SFR 780* Educational Research Methodologies         3 hrs
SPE 782* Advanced Diagnosis & Remediation of
Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities OR
SPE 783* Advanced Assessment to Support
Developmental & Sensory Disabilities 3 hrs
SPE 788 Seminar: Special Education Program OR
SPE 799 Thesis Option OR
SPE 787 Advanced Applied Behavioral Analysis
and Intervention 3 hrs

* Offered via internet or alternative delivery system based on availability.

Autism Spectrum Disorders Emphasis
The Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Track is designed for individuals who have teacher
certification in an area of Mild/Moderate Disabilities who wish to enhance their skills
through related and advanced course work in ASD. In-depth analysis of research-based
practices specific to assessment, identification, and programming for students with ASD
are stressed. Course work in addition to the core follows.
Course Code Course Title Credits
SPE 780* Contemporary Issues in Special Education 3 hrs
SPE 625 Introduction to Teaching and Assessing
Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
LIS 628 School Library Administration             3 hrs
Recommended Prerequisite: LIS 600 and two of the following: LIS 604, 606, 608.
Administration of K-12 libraries within school communities. Emphasizes program
development, evaluation, planning cycle; budget process; services for diverse school
constituencies. Examines effects of national, state and district guidelines, standards and
policies on school library programs. Portfolio checkpoint number 2. 3(3-0), D
N/A
Department of Management
Glass Hall, Room 414, Phone: (417) 836-5415, Fax: (417) 836-3004
Email: BarryWisdom@missouristate.edu
Web Site: http://mgt.missouristate.edu
Department Head: Barry L. Wisdom
Faculty
Professor: D. Keith Denton, Corinne M. Karuppan, Robert O. Lunn, Peter Richardson,
Elizabeth J. Rozell, Steven L. Thomas, Barry L. Wisdom
Associate Professor: William J. Donoher, Jr., Vinay K. Garg, Wesley A. Scroggins
Assistant Professor: Dana L. Haggard
Emeritus Professor: Yohannan T. Abraham, Mona J. Casady, Mary K. Coulter, Patricia
Feltes, J. Kenneth Horn, Thomas H. Inman, Arnola C. Ownby, Robert L. Trewatha, Lynn E.
Wasson
Programs
Master of Health Administration
D. Michael Leibert Graduate Director
411 Glass Hall, Phone (417) 836-
MichaelLeibert@missouristate.edu
Program Description
The Master of Health Administration (MHA) degree is a College of Business Administration
degree that includes a number of interdisciplinary courses contributed by other colleges
on campus. The program is designed for students holding undergraduate degrees who
wish to further their careers in the administration of health organizations including
integrated systems, hospitals, group practices, long-term care facilities, clinics, managed
care organizations, and other types of health organizations. The program can be
completed in as little as two years. Students with little or no undergraduate work in
business are welcome, and will normally require additional time for completion.
The MHA program is accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance
Master of Public Health
Physical Therapy Building, Suite 112, Phone: (417) 836-8850
Email: VSanchez@missouristate.edu
Web Site: http://www.missouristate.edu/mph/
Director: Vickie Sanchez
Faculty
Professor: Dalen M. Duitsman
Associate Professor: Vickie L. Sanchez
Assistant Professor: David Claborn, Elizabeth Federman
Programs
Master of Public Health
Vickie Sanchez, Program Director
Physical Therapy Building, room 112
Phone: (417) 836-8850
VSanchez@missouristate.edu; http://www.missouristate.edu/mph/
Program Description
The Master of Public Health (MPH) program offers a generalist MPH degree consisting of
42 credit hours. The program’s mission is to prevent disease, promote health, and protect
the well-being of the public through education, research and service.
Students gain knowledge in each of the five core disciplines of public health: biostatistics,
epidemiology, environmental health sciences, public health administration, and the social
and behavioral sciences. The program prepares students to assess community health
needs, plan effective health education and health intervention programs, implement and
evaluate educational experiences, and conduct public health research.
Graduates of this program will enter public health service as practitioners, administrators,
researchers, educators, and consultants in a wide variety of public health settings. Most
will be employed in local, state, and national public health agencies, while others will work
for non-profit organizations, private agencies, medical facilities, governmental agencies,
NUR 730 Family Practice 1
Prerequisite: admission to the BSN-DNP Program. Emphasis on evidence based clinical
practice to promote health and prevent chronic disease. Didactic and clinical experiences
include assessment, diagnosis and management of acute health problems in the geriatric,
adult and pediatric population. Includes clinical experiences of not less than 96 hours. 6(4-
6) F

NUR 750 Family Practice 11
Prerequisite: admission to the BSN-DNP Program. Emphasis on evidence based clinical
practice to promote health and prevent chronic disease. Didactic and clinical experiences
include assessment, diagnosis and management of acute health problems in the geriatric,
adult and pediatric population. Includes clinical experiences of not less than 96 hours. 6(4-
6) S
NUR 770 Family Practice 111
Prerequisite: Admission to the BSN-DNP Program. This course covers special clinical topics
in nurse practitioner practice including, but not exclusive to procedures,
emergencies/trauma, wilderness medicine, pain management, and genetic disorders.
Includes clinical experiences of not less than 96 hours. 6(4-6) F

NUR 800 DNP Leadership 1: Concepts for Evidence Based Practice
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. This course builds on previous DNP
Leadership courses and concepts, with an emphasis on DNP Leadership for transforming
health and healthcare delivery at the systems level to address health and health care
disparities. Concepts addressed include strategic planning; resource management; leading
and managing change and innovation in traditional and community environments;
entrepreneurship, healthcare economics; influencing organizational culture and behavior;
program/impact evaluation; and advanced leadership roles, such as consultant,
entrepreneur, and mentor. 3(2-3) Su


NUR 802 Emerging Science of Advanced Practice
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP program. In this course, concepts, theories, and
philosophical perspectives relevant to nursing science, research, and advanced nursing
practice are examined. Emphasis is placed on exploring, analyzing, and applying concepts,
theories, philosophies, and research applicable to the discipline of nursing in general, and
to the student’s area of advanced practice and research. 2(2-0) Su.


NUR 820 Social Justice and Disparities in Health and Healthcare
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. This course fosters development of
advanced knowledge of epidemiology, biostatisical methods, cutural competence, health
and healthcare disparity, and social justice concepts. The role of the advanced practice
nurse in relation to cultural competence, health and healthcare disparity, and population
health is analyzed. 3(3-0) F
NUR 824 Health Policy to Improve Health Disparities
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. This course will analyze the development
and implementation of health care policy and promote the role of the advance practice
nurse in policy making as an advocate for issues related to social justice, vulnerable
populations, and health disparities. 2(2-0) F
NUR 830 DNP Leadership 11: Impacting Disparities in Health and Healthcare
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. This course builds upon the foundations in
the introductory leadership course, NUR 800 DNP Leadership 1: Concepts for Evidence-
based practice. The focus of this course includes the topics of leadership theory, change,
problem solving, decision making, translational reserach, quality improvement, budgeting,
to address disparities in health and healthcare. 3(3-0) F
NUR 840 Technology for Transforming Nursing and Healthcare Systems
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. This course is designed to provide an
overview of nursing and healthcare information technology for the advanced practice
nurse. The purpose of this course is to explore information systems concepts and leverage
technologies that can be used to improve quality, enhance patient safety, and transform
the health of individuals, families, communities and populations. 2(2-0) S

NUR 860 DNP Leadership 111: Transforming Systems
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. This course builds on previous DNP
Leadership courses and concepts, with an emphasis on DNP Leadership for transforming
health and healthcare delivery at the systems level to address health and healthcare
disparities. Concepts addressed include strategic planning; resource management; leading
and managing change and innovation in traditional and community environments;
entrepreneurship, healthcare economics; influencing organizational culture and behavior;
program/impact evaluation; and advanced leadership roles, such as consultant,
entrepreneur, and mentor. 4(4-0) S

NUR 991 Transforming Practice 1
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. This course is the preliminary DNP project
course. The DNP project courses focus on the concepts and skill necessary to create and
implement projects and evaluate outcomes for change in clinical practice. Skills learned
and applied in this preliminary course include developing a needs assessment, project
planning, budgeting, managing risk and navigating project barriers. This course has no less
tham 96 hours of clinical. 2(0-6) F, SU

NUR 992 Transforming Practice 11
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. During this course, the DNP student will
implement an evidence-based project to transform practice within a health care system.
The project will consider disparities in health and healthcare, and data will be collected for
project evaluation. The DNP student will complete a minimum of 192 clinical hours. 4(0-
12) S,F
NUR 993 Transforming Practice 111
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. During this course, the DNP student will
conclude and evaluate the project implemented in NUR 992 and will disseminate results of
the project through an abstract to a regional or national conference and an article to be
submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. The DNP student will complete a
minimum of 192 clinical hours. 4(0-12) S, Su
 Accelerated RN to Masters in Nursing Option
Entrance Requirements
Students must apply to the Accelerated RN to MSN Option when they first apply for
admission to the BSN completion program and prior to enrolling in nursing or supporting
courses required in the BSN. Students may not enter the RN-MSN option after they begin
taking courses for the BSN completion program. After successful completion of BSN
requirements, all students in this option will receive the BSN and may be granted full
admission to the Graduate College.

Admission requirements include:
 1. Junior standing
  2. Licensure as a registered nurse (RN) in good standing and eligible for licensure in
Missouri;
  3. Meet all admission requirements for the BSN completion program;
  4. A pre-admission interview in person or by phone, if out the area;
  5. Submission of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) combined test scores for verbal,
quantitative, and writing sections, with a section score of at least 400 on verbal and 400
on quantitative. The analytical writing section of the GRE will be evaluated on an
individual basis;
  6. 2 letters of recommendation (faculty or employer preferred);
  7. A written statement of goals;
  8. The equivalent of at least one (1) year of full-time experience in direct patient care as
a registered nurse;
  9. An overall GPA of 3.25 or higher;
 10. Current American Heart Association BLS for Healthcare Providers certification. No
online courses are accepted.
RDG 640 Analysis and Correction of Difficulties in Literacy
Prerequisite: RDG 318 or both RDG 420 and RDG 421, or equivalent; and admitted to
Teacher Education Program. Techniques of analysis and correction of difficulties in literacy
for elementary, secondary, special education and reading/literacy teachers. Trends in
dealing with diagnostic procedures, instructional techniques, special materials, and
assessment. Students concentrate study within their level of training. Family Care and
Safety Registry (FCSR) check is required. May be taught concurrently with RDG 574.
Cannot receive credit for both RDG 640 and RDG 574. 3(3-0) F,S

RDG 680 Successful Classroom Communities to Enhance Student Learning
Prerequisite: instructor recommendation and demonstrated proficiency in reading
education. Integration of areas supporting student learning including productive
interactions with families. Concentrated modules on literacy learning of regular education
students, struggling readers, and exceptional students. Basic principles in effective
communication with parents and other professionals to reinforce appropriate classroom
learning. May not be substituted for any course required for Special Education degrees or
certificates. May be taught concurrently with RDG 580. Cannot receive credit for both RDG
680 and RDG 580. 2(2-0) D
RDG 710 Content Area Literacy
Prerequisite: enrollment limited to students in MSED, MA, and MAT programs. Teaching
subject matter in content areas in ways for utilizing and further developing fundamental
literacy; effective reading and writing skills, vocabulary development in specific areas,
study skills, utilization of cognitive processes. 3(3-0), F,S,Su

RDG 730 Assessment and Instruction of Less Skilled Readers and Writers
Prerequisite: RDG 318; or both RDG 420 and RDG 421, or equivalent. Supervised small
group practice in a clinical setting assessing and instructing students who are experiencing
difficulty learning to read and write. Planned with and directed by a graduate faculty
member. Less intensive and more generalized clinical experience for those not intending
to pursue Special Reading Teacher certification. May not be substituted for any course
required for special reading certification (RDG 574/640, 780, 781, or 782). Family Care and
Safety Registry (FCSR) check is required. Literacy majors must enroll for 6 credit hours,
other majors may enroll for 3 credit hours. 3(2-2) or 6(2-8), F,S

Master of Science in Education, Literacy
Deanne Camp, Program Coordinator
Hill Hall, Room 102; Phone (417) 836-6983
DeanneCamp@missouristate.edu
Program Description
The purpose of the MSEd-Literacy degree is to furnish students with the necessary
knowledge and skills to be competent teachers of literacy from preschool through college.
 Also, persons completing the program will be qualified to supervise reading/literacy
programs and may qualify as literacy coaches. The MSEd-Literacy degree (along with
either a child or an adolescent psychology courses) results in students meeting
coursework requirements for DESE Special Reading Techer Certification. A research
component is required.
 Entrance Requirements
Admission decisions and assignment of an advisor will not be made until all required
materials are submitted. A student may take up to nine hours as a non-degree seeking
student before being accepted into the program.
1. To be considered for admission to the program, a student must first apply to the
Graduate College.
  2. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework must be submitted
to the Graduate College.
  3. Submit the following to the Director of the literacy program before the application will
be considered:
a. a letter of intent, which includes the candidate’s teaching and professional goals,
future plans, background and teaching experience; and
b. three letters of recommendation from professionals familiar with the candidate’s
academic abilities and teaching potential.
4. Admission to the program requires the following minimum criteria:
a. appropriate teacher certificate or eligibility for certification by a state or national
Technology Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades 9-12)
A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
    Specific General Education Requirements: BIO 102(4); PSY 121(3); ENG 110(3) and ENG
310(3) or ENG 321(3) or AGR 320(3); Recommend MTH 135(3) or MTH 138(5)
B. Major Requirements (45 hours)
      1. Technical Core (36 hours)
          a. Courses to be taken at Ozarks Technical College:
              1. Communications: PRT 101(4), DDT 100(4)
              2. Energy/Power: ICA 130 or ELT 102(4); and AUM 110(4) or AUM 121(4)
              3. Materials/Processes: DDT 115(4), MMT 125(4)
          b. Courses to be taken at Missouri State University:
              1. Energy/Power: AGR 357(3)
              2. Materials/Processes: AGE 337(3), AGR 377(3)
              3. Safety: TCM 455(3)
      2. Technical Education (9 hours): AGT 416(3), AGT 420(3); AGT 521(3) or AGV 521(3)
C. Professional Education Courses: AGT 493(6); AGT 494(6); and the Professional
Education Required Core and Competencies - see Teacher Certification, Teacher Education
Program and Secondary Education Requirements section of catalog
D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog
E. In order to meet Missouri state teacher certification requirements, candidates for the
LIS 589 Action Research in the School Library
Survey of action research techniques designed to assess the integration of the school
library into building-level curricula and its impact on student achievement. Students will
design, conduct, and evaluate an action research project in a schol library. This course will
be taken concurrently with LIS 599 Library Practicum. 2(2-0) D

THE 541 Theatre History I
Prerequisite: Writing 11. Traces the important periods in the development of theatre from
its beginning through the English Restoration. Through analysis of conventions of staging
and dramatic literature, examines the aesthetic, cultural, ethical, and social dimensions of
theatre in different cultures and time preiods. May be taught concurrently with THE 631.
Cannot receive credit for both THE 631 and THE 541. 3(3-0) F


THE 542 Theatre History II
Prerequisite: Writing 11. Traces the important periods in the development of theatre from
the 18th century to the present. Through analysis of conventions of staging and dramatic
literature, examines the aesthetic, cultural, ethical, and social dimensions of theatre in
different cultures and time periods. May be taught concurrently with THE 632. Cannot
receive credit for both THE 632 and THE 542. 3(3-0) S
CIS 732 Strategic IT Planning
Prerequisite: acceptance in the M.S. in CIS program. Introduction to fundamental issues of
information system (IS) planning. Current theory and specific IS planning practices are
studied. Emphasis on strategic implications of information technology, IS planning vis-à-vis
strategic planning, development and maintenance of IS plans, analysis of organization
information requirements, and prioritizing IS projects. Implications for business and
technology trends and application of planning concepts to IS planning projects are
examined. 3(3-0), D

CIS 736 Data Communications and Information
Prerequisite: acceptance in the M.S. in CIS program. Computer network planning,
including physical layout, resource requirements, and budgeting. Administration of
computer networks, including managing user accounts; selecting and loading applications
software; managing upgrades and enhancements; monitoring and optimizing system
performance; ensuring physical and logical system security. 3(3-0), D


CIS 746 Data Management
Prerequisite: acceptance in the M.S. in CIS program. Study of data modeling using tools
such as Entity-Relationship and Semantic Object Models. Examination of the Database
Administrator's responsibilities including monitoring and tuning of the database,
establishment of database reliability, and security. A case project will include the
development of a data model and a database administration plan for a client/server
database system. 3(3-0), D

CIS 750 IT Sourcing and Procurement
Prerequisite: acceptance in the M.S. in CIS program. In-depth study of key factors and
issues associated with hardware/software selection, acquisition and implementation.
Emphasis on problem definition and analysis, comparative methodologies for evaluation
and selection, identifying and qualifying vendors, and developing/evaluating request for
proposals (RFP's). Management implications of enterprise-wide software solutions
including software distribution, version and release management, and software standards
and practices are discussed. Completion of an acquisition project will be included. 3(3-0), D




CIS 790 Seminar in Management Information Systems
Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours in business administration and economics and permission
of the coordinator of graduate studies. Critical evaluation and interpretation of research
and literature in information systems. 3(3-0), D
   Reason for Course/Program Change - Or - Purpose of
                         Course
                                                                     College             Dept



                                                                   CHHS        Nursing




The Missouri Nurse Practice Act requires that the approval status CHHS         Nursing
of the program of nursing be published as required in 20 CSR
2200-2.120 (3).

Chemistry 175 (General Chemistry Laboratory) is undergoing a       CNAS        Chemistry
number and name change to CHM 171 (General Chemistry
Laboratory 11), and a change in hours from 3 to 2. This is to
facilitate the incorporation of a laboratory (CHM 161) to
strengthen the first semester general chemistry experience
(CHM 160).
With that re-implementation of a first semester General            CNAS        Chemistry
Chemistry Laboratory (CHM 161) to complement CHM 160
(General Chemistry 1), it is necessary to change certain aspects
of the current General Chemistry Laboratory. This numbering
change emphasizes that CHM 170 and 171 should, but are not
required, to be taken concurrently; this numbering will also
mirror the 160/161 course/lab sequence. CHM 161 will be a 1-
credit laboratory that meets 2-hours per week. To keep the
number of credits constant in the general chemistry sequence,
and to reflect the transfer of material/labs from the second to
first semester, CHM 175 (proposed 171) will become a 1- credit,
3-hour laboratory.
CHM 505 or 506 used to be prerequisites for CHM 545. They are      CNAS   Chemistry
no longer, and therefore do not need to be a part of the minor
requirements. CHM 514 offers another advanced course for
students interested in an organic chemistry minor.




With the re-introduction of a laboratory to the 1st semester       CGIP   General Education
general chemistry sequence (CHM 160, which is already an
option in the General Education Curriculum), it seems logical to
give students another option for completing their Natural World
with Laboratory Requirement.


Course has not been offed in several years.                        CHPA   Gender Studies
Course is no longer offered.                                      CHPA           Native American
                                                                                 Studies




Since the title of the minor addresses both "law" and "society", it CHPA         Law and Society
seems appropriate now that PHI 341 Social Philosophy is also
available (since Spring 2008) to allow students to take this course
alternatively to PHI 340 Philosophy of Law to satisfy the second
core course requirement. Since PHI 340 is offered in fall
semesters and PHI 341 is offered in spring semesters (even
years), this change will also allow somewhat greater flexibility in
student scheduling of core courses required for this minor.
(Comparable reasons had provided our rationale earlier to allow
alternative means to satisfy the third core course requirement.)




The course has not been offered in a long time nor will it be     Grad Council   Biology
offered in the future. Need to delete from the catalog.
Documents necessary for admission are not clearly stated in the   Grad Council   Biomedical Sciences
catalog. GRE scores will require a higher level of general
achievement for admission. A faculty research mentor will be
determined prior to admission to the program. Bioinformatics is
incorporated into revised courses and signal trasduction is
necessary.




Documents necessary for admission are not clearly stated in the   Grad Council   Biomedical Sciences
catalog. GRE scores will require a higher level of general
achievement for admission. A faculty research mentor will be
determined prior to admission to the program. Bioinformatics is
incorporated into revised courses and signal trasduction is
necessary.
Allows physical chemistry faculty to teach the two semester   Grad Council   Chemistry
course starting with either thermodynamics (the traditional
pedagogy) or quantum mechanics/molecule-first (a preferred
pedagogy that is growing in popularity nationwide).




Allows physical chemistry faculty to teach the two semester   Grad Council   Chemistry
course starting with either thermodynamics (the traditional
pedagogy) or quantum mechanics/molecule-first (a preferred
pedagogy that is growing in popularity nationwide).

Allows physical chemistry faculty to teach the two semester   Grad Council   Chemistry
course starting with either thermodynamics (the traditional
pedagogy) or quantum mechanics/molecule-first (a preferred
pedagogy that is growing in popularity nationwide).




Allows physical chemistry faculty to teach the two semester   Grad Council   Chemistry
course starting with either thermodynamics (the traditional
pedagogy) or quantum mechanics/molecule-first (a preferred
pedagogy that is growing in popularity nationwide).




                                                              Grad Council   Childhood Education
                                                                             and Family Studies




                                                              Grad Council   Computer Information
                                                                             Systems
                                                                      Grad Council   Computer Information
                                                                                     Systems




Enrollment is not sufficient to justify two offerings per year. The   Grad Council   Finance and General
spring semester is the logical choice for a one-time-per-year                        Business
offering based on the periodicity of other FGB Dept. graduate
course offerings.


This allows the program to have students enroll in multiple sites     Grad Council   Counseling,
for practicum if required, and enroll in multiple semesters if                       Leadership, and
needed, to allow more flexibility in program needs.                                  Special Education




                                                                      Grad Council   Counseling,
                                                                                     Leadership, and
                                                                                     Special Education




                                                                      Grad Council   Counseling,
                                                                                     Leadership, and
                                                                                     Special Education
Ensure all participants have essential prerequisites to advanced Grad Council   Counseling,
behavioral coursework. Ensure participants are trained in the use               Leadership, and
of appropriate communication approaches, specific to the needs                  Special Education
of persons with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Special Education teachers seeking advanced degrees require    Grad Council   Counseling,
specialized coursework in Autism Spectrum Disorders. This                     Leadership, and
disability area is the most rapidly growing area of childhood                 Special Education
disability and many classrooms serving mild/moderate
disabilities have children with this diagnosis. An Accelerated
Masters degree option will serve as a recruitment incentive to
increase undergraduate enrollment and encourage commitment
from the most highly performing undergraduates to complete
advanced coursework in Autism Spectrum Disorders.
Special Education teachers seeking advanced degree require         Grad Council     Counseling,
specialized coursework in Autism Spectrum Disorders. This                           Leadership, and
disability area is the most rapidly growing area of childhood                       Special Education
disability and many classrooms serving mild/moderate
disabilities have children with this diagnosis. A masters degree
with emphasis is Autism Spectrum Disorder better serves our
graduate students needs. Also, a more specialized masters
degree is more attractive to special education teachers as it
expands their knowledge in a high-need area of concern within
the field.




The course is best suited to the 600 level, so that it can be taught Grad Council   Library Science
by Library Science faculty who focus on school librarianship.
The internship has been a required 6-credit course in the MHA       Grad Council   Management
curriculum. Historically, nearly all MHA students already are
employed, many full time and many in healthcare positions, at
the time, near the end of their curriculum, when it is time for the
internship. It has not been possible to ask nurses, psychologists,
technologists, managers and others to take a leave from their
place of employment to complete an independent internship
lasting approximately two months, nor has it served any
pedagogical purpose for these individuals. For a period of time,
we have encouraged students to complete the internship
requirement in their own place of employment, but this has
been neither pedagogical logical nor helpful. The MHA Program
is one of the longest MSU graduate programs. In a separate
proposal, we request that the internship no longer be an MHA
Program requirement. In this proposal, we request that the
course be deleted. Those very infrequent MHA students who
would make a case for an internship can use MGT 794
Internship: Management.
1) Historically, nearly all MHA students already are employed,   Grad Council   Management
many full time and many in healthcare positions, during their
time in the program. It has not been possible to ask nurses,
psychologists, technologists, managers and others, many
supporting families, to take a leave from their work to complete
an independent, usually unpaid internship lasting approximately
two months, nor has it served any pedagogical purpose for these
individuals. We tried having students complete the internship
requirement in their own place of employment, but this has not
made pedagogical or logistical sense. 2) FGB 788 is a course in
Healthcare Finance that addresses the core learning needs of
MHA students much better than FGB 780. 3) MGT 711 is a course
in Measurement & Management of Healthcare Quality that
addresses the core learning requirements in management of
quality and in quantitative decision making much better than
QBA 765.
To enable outstanding Missouri State University undergraduate Grad Council   Master of Public
students to begin taking graduate course work in their junior or             Health Program
senior year and thus combine components of the undergraduate
and graduate curriculum.




                                                              Grad Council   Nursing




                                                              Grad Council   Nursing
Grad Council   Nursing




Grad Council   Nursing




Grad Council   Nursing




Grad Council   Nursing




Grad Council   Nursing




Grad Council   Nursing
Grad Council   Nursing




Grad Council   Nursing




Grad Council   Nursing




Grad Council   Nursing




Grad Council   Nursing
A review of curriculum for the BSN-C program done using the     Grad Council   Nursing
new accrediation recommendations.




Literacy is the more current term used in research; add FCSR    Grad Council   Reading, Foundations,
                                                                               and Technology




Deleted information now integrated in another Reading course;   Grad Council   Reading, Foundations,
reduce number of hours to fit with new program requirements;                   and Technology
Literacy is the more current term used in research; Request from Grad Council   Reading, Foundations,
BSEd committee to limit enrollment to those enrolled in master's                and Technology
programs because of DESE certification requirements. In
particular this course is not available to post-bac students;


Literacy is the more current term used in research; clean-up     Grad Council   Reading, Foundations,
description; add FCSR                                                           and Technology




The term literacy is currently used in research in the area of   Grad Council   Reading, Foundations,
education and more accurately describes the nature of the                       and Technology
program and required coursework. Clarify entrance
requirements and other sections in catalog description.
Ozard Technical CC changed the prefix for their IMT courses to   PEC   Agriculture
ICA. This change effects IMT 130. The course title and content
remains the same, just a change in prefix




                                                                 PEC   Library Science




Wanted to make sure that students have experience with writing PEC     Theatre and Dance
academic research papers.




Wanted to make sure that students have experience with writing PEC     Theatre and Dance
academic research papers.
To update the catalog with the evoving curriculum and to make   PEC   Computer Information
the course titles more accurately reflect current content and         Systems
industry trends.




To update the catalog with the evoving curriculum and to make   PEC   Computer Information
the course titles more accurately reflect current content and         Systems
industry trends.




Course name change                                              PEC   Computer Information
                                                                      Systems




To update the catalog with the evoving curriculum and to make   PEC   Computer Information
the course titles more accurately reflect current content and         Systems
industry trends.




Better reflects the course content which is managerial in       PEC   Computer Information
approach.                                                             Systems
            Course #
 Course             If
  code                      Date Approved       Date Approved
             renumbered,                                          Date Approved PEC
 If changed,   put new     Department Head      College Council
put new code    course
             number here

NUR                 530 Kathryn Hope         Paul Deal
                        4/6/10               4/7/10




                           Kathryn Hope      Paul Deal
                           3/3/10            4/6/10


CHM                 170 Alan Schick          Kandiah Manivannan
                        3/31/10              4/7/10




CHM                 171 Alan Schick          Kandiah Manivannan
                        3/31/10              4/7/10
Alan Schick   Kandiah Manivannan
3/31/10       4/7/10




Alan Schick   Kandiah Manivannan
3/31/10       4/7/10




Pam Sailors   Leslie Baynes
3/10/10       4/10/10
          Pam Sailors     Leslie Baynes
          3/10/10         4/10/10




          Pam Sailors     Leslie Baynes
          3/23/10         4/7/10




BIO   646 Alicia Mathis   Kandiah Manivannan
          2/11/10         3/19/10
Colette Witkowski
4/12/10




Colette Witkowski
4/12/10
          Alan Schick
          2/11/10




          Alan Schick
          2/11/10




          Alan Schick
          2/11/10




          Alan Schick
          2/11/10




CFD   702 Rebecca Swearingen
          3/15/10




CIS   748 Jerry Chin
          3/15/10
CIS   752 Jerry Chin
          3/15/10




FIN   785 Kent Ragan
          3/3/10




SPE   791 Tamara Arthaud   Carol Maples
          3/19/10          4/9/10




COU   757 Tamara Arthaud   Carol Maples
          3/19/10          3/19/10




COU   794 Tamara Arthaud   Carol Maples
          3/19/10          3/19/10
Tamara Arthaud   Deanne Camp   Carol Maples
12/3/09          1/12/10       4/9/10
Tamara Arthaud   Deanne Camp   Carol Maples
1/29/10          2/2/10        4/9/10
         Tamara Arthaud   Deanne Camp   Carol Maples
         9/21/10          2/2/10        4/9/10




LIS   728 Neosha Mackey   Bill Edgar                   4/9/2010
          2/26/10         2/26/10
MGT   793 Barry Wisdom
          4/9/10
Barry Wisdom
4/9/10
          Vickie Sanchez
          3/19/10




NUR   730 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10




NUR   750 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10
NUR   770 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10




NUR   800 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10




NUR   802 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10




NUR   820 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10




NUR   824 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10




NUR   830 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10
NUR   840 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10




NUR   860 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10




NUR   991 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10




NUR   992 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10




NUR   993 Kathryn Hope
          4/12/10
          Kathryn Hope   Paul Deal
          3/26/10        4/6/10




RDG   640 Fred Groves                Carol Maples
          1/24/10                    3/19/10




RDG   680 Fred Groves                Carol Maples
          1/24/10                    3/19/10
RDG   710 Fred Groves   Carol Maples
          1/24/10       3/19/10




RDG   730 Fred Groves   Carol Maples
          1/24/10       3/19/10




          Fred Groves   Carol Maples
          1/24/10       3/19/10
          Anson Elliott        Kandiah Manivannan   Carol Maples
          2/2/10               2/12/10              4/9/2010




LIS   598 Neosha Mackey        Bill Edgar           Carol Maples
          2/26/10              2/26/10              4/9/2010




THE   541 Robert Willenbrink   Randy Dillon         Carol Maples
          2/1/10               3/16/10              5/5/2010




THE   542 Robert Willenbrink   Randy Dillon         Carol Maples
          2/1/10               3/16/10              5/5/2010
CIS   732 Jerry Chin
          3/8/10




CIS   736




CIS   746 Jerry Chin
          3/8/10




CIS   750 Jerry Chin
          3/8/10




CIS   790 Jerry Chin
          3/8/10
Date Approved   Date Approved Grad   Date Approved
                                                          Challenge Period
    CGEIP             Council        Faculty Senate


                                                      August 23, 2010 to
                                                      September 13, 2010




                                                      August 23, 2010 to
                                                      September 13, 2010


                                                      August 23, 2010 to
                                                      September 13, 2010




                                                      August 23, 2010 to
                                                      September 13, 2010
            August 23, 2010 to
            September 13, 2010




            August 23, 2010 to
            September 13, 2010




5/12/2010   August 23, 2010 to
            September 13, 2010
5/12/2010                 August 23, 2010 to
                          September 13, 2010




5/12/2010                 August 23, 2010 to
                          September 13, 2010




            Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
            5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
5/5/10        September 13, 2010
August 23, 2010 to
September 13, 2010




August 23, 2010 to
September 13, 2010




August 23, 2010 to
September 13, 2010




August 23, 2010 to
September 13, 2010
Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010




Doug Gouzie   August 23, 2010 to
4/7/10        September 13, 2010
                                                                     Due to be
Received in     Date                    Date            NOTES:
                          Date to                                   Returned to     Need BOG
 Provost      Approved                Approved     disapproved/with
                         President                                    Faculty        Approval
  Office       Provost                President    drawn or on hold
                                                                      Senate

  9/14/2010    10/7/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010                        14-Oct-10




  9/14/2010    9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010                        14-Oct-10




  9/14/2010    9/23/2010 11/19/2010    12/2/2010                        14-Oct-10




                                                                        14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   12/2/2010   14-Oct-10




                                               14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   12/2/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010    12/2/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010    12/2/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   12/2/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   12/2/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010    9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010    9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010    9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010    9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010    10/7/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010    10/7/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010    9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010    9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/17/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
                                                 14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




                                                 14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




                                                 14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




                                                 14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010    12/2/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
9/14/2010    9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   11/19/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010    9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




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9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10




9/14/2010   9/23/2010 11/19/2010   11/23/2010   14-Oct-10
Date to BOG
                   Date Disposition
                                               Disposition Link          Disposition Link
- President's
                      Published
    Office

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                              Senate Resolution Text
Senate Action
or Resolution
      #
SA 1-10/11      N/A




SA 2-10/11      N/A

SR-1-10/11      Resolution in Honor of Dr. Margaret Weaver
                2009-2010 Faculty Senate Chair

                Whereas, Dr. Margaret Weaver has provided
                outstanding leadership to the University, to the
                community, and especially to the faculty while
                serving as Chair of the Faculty Senate of Missouri
                State during the 2009-2010 academic year; and

                Whereas, Dr. Weaver has faithfully, tirelessly,
                compassionately, and effectively served Faculty
                Senate, always with great concern for the welfare of
                the university, the faculty and the students; and

                Whereas, she has consistently provided a forum for
                full and open discussion and debate of issues and
                proposals of great importance to the faculty and
                students, ensuring that discussions and debates
                were respectful of all viewpoints; and

                Whereas, she has, in an extremely challenging time
                for Missouri State University, gone to great lengths
                to ensure that faculty have a clear understanding of
                and ample opportunity to respond to complex and
                controversial initiatives; and

                Whereas, she has never hesitated to raise and
                address issues of concern to the faculty when
SR 2-10/11   Resolution in Honor of Dr. Chris Herr
             2009-2010 Secretary of Faculty

             Whereas, Dr. Chris Herr’s service as Secretary of
             Faculty during the 2009-2010 academic year has
             been exemplary; and

             Whereas, he has excelled in a consistent pattern of
             leadership as the Secretary of Faculty for two
             consecutive years and as a member or chair of
             various standing and ad-hoc Senate committees; and

             Whereas, he has been organized, thorough,
             thoughtful, and insightful; and

             Whereas, he has served the best interests of both
             the University and its faculty by unselfishly providing
             his knowledge, experience, and expertise to the
             Executive Committee of the Faculty Senate;

             Therefore Be It Resolved, that the Faculty Senate of
             Missouri State University commends Dr. Herr for his
             commitment to faculty governance and for a job
             well done as Secretary of Faculty.
SR 3-10/11   Resolution in Honor of Dr. Eric Shade
             2009-2010 Faculty Senate Parliamentarian

             Whereas, Dr. Eric Shade’s service as Parliamentarian
             of the Faculty Senate since the 2005-2006 academic
             year has been exemplary; and

             Whereas, he continues to take on this arduous task
             of his own free will; and

             Whereas, he consistently and successfully directs the
             Faculty Senate through numerous policy-making,
             curriculum building, and program proposals with his
             knowledge and understanding of the Senate Bylaws,
             Robert’s Rules, and parliamentary procedure; and

             Whereas, in spite of not one faculty senate chair
             being able to increase his salary as parliamentarian,
             Dr. Shade continues to serve without any sort of
             compensation;

             Therefore Be It Resolved, that the Faculty Senate of
             Missouri State University recognizes, commends,
             and warmly thanks Dr. Eric Shade for this
             commitment to shared governance and for his
             extraordinary diligence in carrying out the duties of
             Parliamentarian of the Faculty Senate.
    Senate Action Text or Description        Date
                                           Approved                         Received in
                                                        Challenge Period
                                            Faculty                        Provost Office
                                            Senate
Program Deletion: Master of Science in    5/6/2010     5/17/2010 -         6/8/2009
Education, Secondary Education:                        6/7/2010
French/German/Latin/Spanish Area of
Emphasis
Program Change: General Education Basic   5/6/2010     5/17/2010 -         6/8/2009
Required Courses                                       6/7/2010
N/A                                       Adopted by   N/A                 6/8/2009
                                          Senate
                                          5/6/2010
N/A   Adopted by   N/A   6/8/2009
      Senate
      5/6/2010
N/A   Adopted by   N/A   6/8/2009
      Senate
      5/6/2010
                                                                    Date
                                  Date             NOTES:
Date Approved      Date to                                       Returned     Need BOG
                                Approved    disapproved/withdraw
   Provost        President                                      to Faculty    Approval
                                President        n or on hold
                                                                   Senate
6/11/2010       6/14/2010     6/19/2010                          6/22/2010




6/11/2010       6/14/2010     6/19/2010                          6/22/2010

N/A
N/A
N/A
Date to BOG -
 President's
    Office
 Curricular Proposal             Type
 Course or Program       (Note here if non-substan-
        Title                      tive)



ENG 508 Creative        Course Change
Writing Project




MED 561 Sound Mixing Course Change




MKT 464 International   Course Change
Logistics and Global
Supply Chain
Management




MKT 474 International   Course Change
Marketing




MGT 367 Purchasing      Course Change
and Supply
Management
BMS 599: Health         New Course
Literacy in the Human
Services




ATC 328 Lower Body      Course Change
Assessment




ATC 330 Surgical        Course Change
Pathology in Sports
Medicine




ATC 344 Foundations of Course Change
Rehabilitation
Bachelor of Science in   Program Change
Athletic Training




SWK 365 Families in      New Course
Later Life




NUR 311 Introduction     Course Change
to Family Health
Nursing
NUR 482 Nursing:        Course Change
Leadership and
Management




ANT 250 World           Course Change
Prehistory




ANT 350 Archaeological Course Change
Method and Theory




ANT 451 Field           Course Change
Archaeology




ANT 453 Archaeological Course Change
Laboratory Methods




ANT 454 Archaeological Course Change
Research and Report
Preparation


ANT 499 Internship in   Course Change
Anthropology




ANT 550 Advanced        Course Change
Methods in
Archaeology
ANT 555 Archaeological New Course
Theory




B.A. in Anthropology   Program Change




B.S. in Anthropology   Program Change




PLS 330 Introduction to Course Change
Political Theory
AGF 300 Wine            New Course
Appreciation for
Consumers




MKT 774 International   Course Change
Marketing




PLS 778 Ethic and       Course Change
Leadership in the
Public Sector
Master of Arts in     Program Change
Teaching




CHM 160 General       Course Change
Chemistry 1




CHM 161 General        New Course
Chemistry 1 Laboratory
NUR 800 DNP            New Course
Leadership 1: Concepts
for Evidence Based
Practice




NUR 824 Health Policy   New Course
to Improve Health
Disparities

NUR 860 DNP             New Course
Leadership 111:
Transforming Systems
                                         Current Catalog Description




ENG 508 Creative Writing Project
Prerequisite: ENG 501 or ENG 503. Directed development of a substantial work of poetry, fiction, or non-critical
prose, prepared for publication. May be taught concurrently with ENG 609. Cannot receive credit for both ENG
609 and ENG 508. 3(3-0) F,S

MED 561 Sound Mixing
Prerequisite: MED 461. An in-depth exploration of the art of sound design for digital film and TV. Students will
learn how to carry out the aesthetic considerations of sound through the mixing process. Emphasis will be
placed on advanced sound editing for sub- and final mixing, mix engineering, sound-effect processing and
surround-sound practice. Students will learn how to mix a movie's dialogue, sound effects, ambience and music
into stereo and surround tracks. May be taught concurrently with MED 661. Cannot receive credit for both MED
561 and MED 661. 3(3-1) S

MKT 464 International Logistics and Global Supply Chain Management
Prerequisite: MKT 430 or MKT 450; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to COBA. Principles of
logistics activities in international business with special emphasis on transportation, global sourcing, customs
issues, import-export opportunities, customs documentation, the role of government in international
transactions, customer service, and global supply chain management. Special emphasis is placed on current
events and their effect on the marketing and logistics activities of organizations. Cannot receive credit for both
MKT 464 and MKT 764. 3(3-0) F

MKT 474 International Marketing
Prerequisite: MKT 350; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to COBA. Management of
marketing functions in a multinational context where the parameters differ from those of domestic marketing.
3(3-0) F,S

MGT 367 Purchasing and Supply Management
Prerequisite: MGT 364; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to COBA. A study of the processes
and problems involved in acquiring and controlling materials and services required for operations management
in business, industry, and government. Includes source selection, quality and quantity control, value analysis,
and negotiation and legal consideration. 3(3-0) F
ATC 328 Lower Body Assessment
Prerequisite: ATC 221; and BMS 307 with grade of "C" or better; and PED 360. Content addresses observation
and evaluation techniques for injuries to the lower body. Students must integrate anatomical structures to
provide a basis for critical decision making in an injury management environment. Supplemental course fee. 3(2-
2) F

ATC 330 Surgical Pathology in Sports Medicine
Prerequisite: ATC 326 and BMS 308 with grades of "C" or better. An overview of orthopedic surgical procedures
common in athletic training with a focus primarily on joint and musculoskeletal structures. Tissue pathology for
each protocol, healing constraints, and implications for return to activity will be presented. 3(3-0) F


ATC 344 Foundations of Rehabilitation
Prerequisite: ATC 328 and PED 360. Content addresses basic concepts, foundations and principles of
musculoskeletal rehabilitation relating to the body. Orthopedic surgical procedures of the body common in
athletic training with a focus primarily on joint and musculoskeletal structures, tissue pathology for each
protocol, healing constraints, and implications for rehabilitation will also be presented. Supplemental course
fee. 4(3-2) F
Department of Sports Medicine and Athletic Training
160 Professional Building, Phone: (417) 836-8553, Fax: (417) 836-8554
Email: SportsMedicine@missouristate.edu
Web Site: http://sportsmed.missouristate.edu/
Department Head: Associate Professor Tona Hetzler, Ed.D.
Faculty (as of June 18, 2010)

Assistant Professors: Michael B. Hudson, Ph.D.; Gary L. Ward, M.S.

                              

Clinical Assistant Professor: Allan J. Liggett, M.E.Ed.

Medical Director: Richard A. Seagrave, M.D.

Medical Advisors: Bernard A. Griesemer, M.D.; Brian J. Mahaffey, M.D.
Accreditation

Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) — Athletic Training (BSAT)
Majors
Athletic Training (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training

Admission to the Athletic Training major is competitive and not all who apply can be accommodated. Admission
requires each applicant to complete an application and meet program requirements and guidelines prior to
acceptance into the Athletic Training major. The application process for the major in Athletic Training is separate
from the application process for admission to the University. The program is accredited by the Commission on
Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). Once admitted into the Athletic Training major, students
must maintain retention criteria to remain in the program.




NUR 311 Introduction to Family Health Nursing
Prerequisite: admission to the 4-year Generic Nursing program. A study of family across the life span as the basis
of health care in nursing. Focus on how the family impacts health care of individuals and how illness of
individuals impact family. Provides an introduction to theoretical foundations of nursing of family, family
assessment, planning nursing interventions for family and the use of health promotion and disease prevention
measures for families. 2(2-0) F
NUR 482 Nursing: Leadership and Management
Prerequisite: NUR 332 and NUR 442 and NUR 472 for generic 4-year BSN students. NUR 442; and NUR 472 or
concurrent enrollment; and departmental permission for BSN completion students. Development of the nurse
as a leader and manager in diverse settings. Includes clinical experience of not less than 96 hours. Supplemental
course fee. 6(4-6) F,S

ANT 250 World Prehistory
A survey of cultural developments around the world, from the Stone Age through the appearance of early
civilizations, as revealed by archaeology, with an emphasis on major changes, general trends, and processes of
change. 3(3-0) F

ANT 350 Archaeological Method and Theory
Prerequisite: ANT 240. How material evidence of the past is preserved, recorded, and analyzed: history of
archaeological research, concepts and methods for the study of prehistoric and historic cultures, public
archaeology. Optional field and laboratory assignments. 3(3-0) S

ANT 451 Field Archaeology
Prerequisite: ANT 240 and permission of instructor. Field experience in the techniques, methods and theories of
reconnaissance and excavation of archaeological sites. May be repeated to a total of 9 hours. Supplemental
course fee. 3-6 D

ANT 453 Archaeological Laboratory Methods
Prerequisite: ANT 240 and permission of instructor. Techniques of preparation, preservation, restoration,
interpretation, and cataloging of archaeological material recovered in the field. May be repeated to a total of 9
hours. 1-3 Su

ANT 454 Archaeological Research and Report Preparation
Prerequisite: ANT 451; and permission. The planning, funding, and logistics of an archaeological research
project, including data analysis and storage, documents search, recording and report writing. May be repeated
to a total of 9 hours. 1-3 D

ANT 499 Internship in Anthropology
Prerequisite: 18 hours of ANT and permission of instructor. This independent study course provides an
opportunity to earn academic credit for supervised work experience related to anthropology with an approved
business, industry, organization, or government agency. May be repeated to a total of six hours. 1-6 D


ANT 550 Advanced Methods in Archaeology
Prerequisite: ANT 240 and 80 hours. Practice in a variety of methods and techniques employed in cultural
resources archaeology. Includes in-depth analysis of archaeological remains in the laboratory and hands-on field
experience with cutting-edge technologies such as remote sensing. May be taught concurrently with ANT 650.
Cannot receive credit for both ANT 650 and ANT 550. 3(3-0) S
Anthropology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

 B. Major Requirements (30 hours)
     1. Required Core (15 hours): ANT 226(3), 227(3), 240(3) or 250(3), 280(3), 595(3)
     2. Choose one course from four of the following five categories (12 hours):
         1. Archaeology: ANT 340(3), 350(3), 360(3), 397(3)*, 451(3-6), 540(3), 598(3)*
         2. Biological Anthropology: ANT 365(3), 370(3), 375(3), 397(3)*, 598(3)*
         3. Cultural Anthropology: ANT 301(3), 302(3), 320(3), 397(3)*, 510(3), 598(3)*
         4. Linguistic Anthropology: ANT 380(3), 381(3), 382(3), 598(3)*; ENG 494(3), 592(3)
         5. Peoples and Cultures: ANT 325(3), 330(3), 331(3), 335(3), 525(3)
           *When applicable
     3. Complete 3 hours of upper division electives in Anthropology.

Anthropology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 B. Major Requirements (39 hours)
    1. Required Core (18 hours): ANT 226(3), 227(3), 240(3) or 250(3), 280(3), 595(3); SOC 302 or equivalent (3)
    2. Choose one course from four of the following five categories (12 hours):
        1. Archaeology: ANT 340(3), 350(3), 360(3), 397(3)*, 451(3-6), 540(3), 598(3)*
        2. Biological Anthropology: ANT 365(3), 370(3), 375(3), 397(3)*, 598(3)*
        3. Cultural Anthropology: ANT 301(3), 302(3), 320(3), 397(3)*, 510(3), 598(3)*
        4. Linguistic Anthropology: ANT 380(3), 381(3), 382(3), 598(3)*; ENG 494(3), 592(3)
        5. Peoples and Cultures: ANT 325(3), 330(3), 331(3), 335(3), 525(3)
          *When applicable
    3. Complete 9 hours of upper division electives in Anthropology.

PLS 330 Introduction to Political Theory
Prerequisite: PLS 101. An introduction to the study of political theory by examining the central questions that
animate our attempt to understand and secure the "good life." These concerns include: the nature and
significance of politics; the origin and character of legitimate authority; and the meaning of freedom, the value
of citizenship, and the education in virtue and in rights that are necessary to both individual liberty and civic
greatness. Bringing insights from classical and modern texts to bear on these fundamental questions of public
life, we aim to articulate and defend our own understanding of the ethical obligations and responsibilities that
citizens owe to one another. Identical with PHI 330. Cannot receive credit for both PLS 330 and PHI 330. 3(3-0) F
MKT 774 International Marketing
Prerequisite: MKT 600 or equivalent. Advanced management, theory, and analysis of marketing functions in a
multinational context where the parameters differ from those of domestic marketing. Students are required to
complete a research project in the course area. 3(3-0), F,S

PLS 778 Ethics and Leadership in the Public Sector
This course examines the role and impact of leadership in public organizations, with particular focus on the
ethical dimensions of leadership behavior. The course provides an overview of the knowledge, theory, and skills
regarding leadership and professional ethics. Topics include charismatic and transformational leadership,
leadership styles, the role of the leader in creating ethical climates and building effective ethical cultures,
organizational change strategies, power and politics, and motivation strategies. Also covered are the ethical
codes, standards, and practices promulgated by the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA) and the
International City Management Association (ICMA). 3(3-0) F
 Master of Arts in Teaching
Emmett Sawyer, Program Coordinator
Hill Hall, Room 207C; Phone (417) 836-3170
Emmett Sawyer@missouristate.edu
Program Description
The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program is intended for mid-career change students or individuals
beginning a second career following retirement. One of the admission qualifying factors is that a student must
hold at least a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college/university. The MAT is a combined masters and
certification program that has been approved by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education (DESE) and is fully accredited by NCATE. The program provides students the opportunity to earn
teacher certification in one of 20 different areas of secondary education while also completing a master’s
degree. The MAT involves extensive site-based clinical experience. Each student’s program of study is
individualized based on their strengths, life experiences and area of need identified in the PRAXIS II.
The MAT program offered by Missouri State University is offered from both the Springfield campus and the MSU
Joplin Graduate Center on the campus of Missouri Southern State University. The Joplin-based program has
been developed through an MSU-MSSU partnership. Students completing the program through the Joplin
Graduate Center will receive a diploma issued by Missouri State University signifying completion of the
cooperative program with MSSU.
Entrance Requirements
  1. Applicants must meet minimum Graduate College requirements for admission.
  2. Applicants must hold at least a bachelor’s degree in, or related to, the area of certification desired.
Students must take, before entering the program, the relevant PRAXIS II specialty area test.
  3. Applicants must complete the certification analysis request packet obtained from the Coordinator of
Certification/Compliance, Hill Hall 203, (417) 836-8772.
  4. Admission to the MAT includes academic department review.
  5. Applicants may sit for an admission interview with the MAT Admission’s Committee.
  6. Priority deadline is February 15 for all required documentation to be received in the MAT office.
 Degree Requirements (minimum of 40 hrs)
CHM 160 General Chemistry I
Prerequisite: eligibility for MTH 135 or higher. General Education Course (Natural World). Emphasis on
fundamental and theoretical concepts of chemistry. Recommended for all science majors, chemistry majors and
minors, and most preprofessional students. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to take
CHM 170 or CHM 200. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 4(4-0) F,S
                                    Complete NEW Catalog Description




ENG 508 Creative Writing Project
Prerequisite: ENG 500 or ENG 501 or ENG 503. Directed development of a substantial work of poetry, fiction, or
non-critical prose, prepared for publication. May be taught concurrently with ENG 609. Cannot receive credit for
both ENG 609 and ENG 508. 3(3-0) F,S

MED 561 Sound Mixing
Prerequisite: MED 461. An in-depth exploration of the art of sound design for digital film and TV. Students will
learn how to carry out the aesthetic considerations of sound through the mixing process. Emphasis will be
placed on advanced sound editing for sub- and final mixing, mix engineering, sound-effect processing and
surround-sound practice. Students will learn how to mix a movie's dialogue, sound effects, ambience and music
into stereo and surround tracks. May be taught concurrently with MED 661. Cannot receive credit for both MED
561 and MED 661. 3(3-1) F

MKT 464 International Logistics and Global Supply Chain Management
Prerequisite: MKT 350; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to COBA. Principles of logistics
activities in international business with special emphasis on transportation, global sourcing, customs issues,
import-export opportunities, customs documentation, the role of government in international transactions,
customer service, and global supply chain management. Special emphasis is placed on current events and their
effect on the marketing and logistics activities of organizations. Cannot receive credit for both MKT 464 and
MKT 764. 3(3-0) F

MKT 474 International Marketing
Prerequisite: MKT 350; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to COBA. Management of
marketing functions in a multinational context where the parameters differ from those of domestic marketing.
Cannot receive credit for both MKT 474 and MKT 774. 3(3-0) F,S

MGT 367 Purchasing and Supply Management
Prerequisite: MGT 364; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to COBA. A study of the processes
and problems involved in acquiring and controlling materials and services required for operations management
in business, industry, and government. Includes source selection, quality and quantity control, value analysis,
and negotiation and legal consideration. 3(3-0) S
BMS 599: Health Literacy in the Human Services
Prerequisite: junior standing and instructor permission. This online course offers and interdisciplinary approach
to understanding functional health literacy and how the public's literacy skills affect interactions with health and
human services professionals. Includes an examination of the data for national and international literacy levels
and populations at risk for low literacy; research on health literacy; assessment tools; and practical techniques
for addressing literacy issues in spoken and written communications at the practitioner and organizational
levels. BMS 599 is identical with SWK 599. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 599 and SWK 599. 3(3-0) S




ATC 328 Lower Body Assessment
Prerequisite: ATC 221; and BMS 307 with grade of "C" or better; and BMS 450. Content addresses observation
and evaluation techniques for injuries to the lower body. Students must integrate anatomical structures to
provide a basis for critical decision making in an injury management environment. Supplemental course fee. 4(3-
2) F

N/A




ATC 344 Foundations of Rehabilitation
Prerequisite: ATC 328 and BMS 450. Content addresses basic concepts, foundations and principles of
musculoskeletal rehabilitation relating to the body. Orthopedic surgical procedures of the body common in
athletic training with a focus primarily on joint and musculoskeletal structures, tissue pathology for each
protocol, healing constraints, and implications for rehabilitation will also be presented. Supplemental course
fee. 4(3-2) F
Department of Sports Medicine and Athletic Training
160 Professional Building, Phone: (417) 836-8553, Fax: (417) 836-8554
Email: SportsMedicine@missouristate.edu
Web Site: http://sportsmed.missouristate.edu/
Department Head: Associate Professor Tona Hetzler, Ed.D.
Faculty (as of June 18, 2010)

Assistant Professors: Michael B. Hudson, Ph.D.; Gary L. Ward, M.S.
Clinical Assistant Professor: Allan J. Liggett, E.Ed
Medical Director: Richard A. Seagrave, M.D.
Medical Advisors: Bernard A. Griesemer, M.D.; Brian J. Mahaffey, M.D.

Accreditation
Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) — Athletic Training (BSAT)

Majors
Athletic Training (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training
The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).
The admission process for the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) is separate from the application
process for admission to the University. Students do not officially apply for admission into the ATEP until they
have met all preadmission criteria (typically takes one year to complete). Admission to the ATEP is competitive
and not all who apply can be accommodated. Once admitted into the ATEP, students must maintain retention
criteria to remain in and progress through the program.

Incoming Freshman and Current Missouri State Students
Incoming freshman and current Missouri State University students interested in applying for the Athletic
Training major arein Later Life complete the ATEP Interest Form. Students are encourages to initially declare a
SWK 365 Families required to
Prerequisite: Psychology 121 and CFD 155 or CFD 163 or 30 hours. Examination of the structure and function of
families in later life. Topics of interest include demographic trends impacting the stucture of the family,
marriage, sibling relations, parent-adult child relations, grandparenthood, widowhood, and retirement. The
application of family theories and their relevance to later life families will be discussed. Identical with GER 365,
CFD 365, and SWK 365. Can only receive credit for one of the following: GER 365, CFD 365, SWK 365 or PSY 366.
3(3-0) F




NUR 311 Introduction to Family Health Nursing
 A study of family across the life span as the basis of health care in nursing. Focus on how the family impacts
health care of individuals and how illness of individuals impact family. Provides an introduction to theoretical
foundations of nursing of family, family assessment, planning nursing interventions for family and the use of
health promotion and disease prevention measures for families. 2(2-0) F
NUR 482 Nursing: Leadership and Management
Prerequisite: NUR 332 and NUR 442 and NUR 472 for generic 4-year BSN students. NUR 442; and NUR 472 or
departmental permission for BSN completion students. Development of the nurse as a leader and manager in
diverse settings. Includes clinical experience of not less than 96 hours. Supplemental course fee. 6(4-6) F,S


ANT 250 World Prehistory
A survey of cultural developments around the world, from the Stone Age through the appearance of early
civilizations, as revealed by archaeology, with an emphasis on major changes, general trends, and processes of
change. 3(3-0) D

N/A




ANT 351 Field Archaeology
Prerequisite: ANT 125 or 240 and permission of instructor. Field experience in the techniques, methods and
theories of reconnaissance and excavation of archaeological sites. May be repeated to a total of 9 hours.
Supplemental course fee. 3-6 D

N/A




N/A




ANT 499 Internship in Anthropology
Prerequisite: 18 hours of ANT and permission of instructor. This independent study course provides an
opportunity to earn academic credit for supervised work experience related to anthropology with an approved
business, industry, organization, or government agency. May be repeated to a total of six hours. Graded
Pass/Not Pass only. 1-6 D

ANT 550 Advanced Methods in Archaeology
Prerequisite: ANT 240 and 80 hours. Advanced study and practice in methods and techniques employed in
archaeology such as lithic, ceramic, and faunal analysis. Variable content course. May be repeated when topic
changes. May be taught concurrently with ANT 650. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 650 and ANT 550 for the
same topic. 3(3-0) S
ANT 555 Archaeological Theory
Prerequisite: ANT 240, 80 hours, and permission of instructor. A comprehensive and in-depth examination of
theoretical issues and perspectives concerning the practice of archaeology and the interpretation of
archaeological remains. May be taught concurrently with ANT 655. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 655 and
555. 3(3-0) D
 Anthropology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

 B. Major Requirements (30 hours)
     1. Required Core (15 hours): ANT 226(3), 227(3), 240(3) or 250(3), 280(3), 595(3)
     2. Choose one course from four of the following five categories (12 hours):
         1. Archaeology: ANT 340(3), 360(3), 397(3)*, 451(3-6), 540(3), 598(3)*
         2. Biological Anthropology: ANT 365(3), 370(3), 375(3), 397(3)*, 598(3)*
         3. Cultural Anthropology: ANT 301(3), 302(3), 320(3), 397(3)*, 510(3), 598(3)*
         4. Linguistic Anthropology: ANT 380(3), 381(3), 382(3), 598(3)*; ENG 494(3), 592(3)
         5. Peoples and Cultures: ANT 325(3), 330(3), 331(3), 335(3), 525(3)
           *When applicable
     3. Complete 3 hours of upper division electives in Anthropology.

Anthropology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 B. Major Requirements (39 hours)
    1. Required Core (18 hours): ANT 226(3), 227(3), 240(3) or 250(3), 280(3), 595(3); SOC 302 or equivalent (3)
    2. Choose one course from four of the following five categories (12 hours):
        1. Archaeology: ANT 340(3), 360(3), 397(3)*, 451(3-6), 540(3), 598(3)*
        2. Biological Anthropology: ANT 365(3), 370(3), 375(3), 397(3)*, 598(3)*
        3. Cultural Anthropology: ANT 301(3), 302(3), 320(3), 397(3)*, 510(3), 598(3)*
        4. Linguistic Anthropology: ANT 380(3), 381(3), 382(3), 598(3)*; ENG 494(3), 592(3)
        5. Peoples and Cultures: ANT 325(3), 330(3), 331(3), 335(3), 525(3)
          *When applicable
    3. Complete 9 hours of upper division electives in Anthropology.

PLS 330 Introduction to Political Theory
Prerequisite: PLS 101. An introduction to the study of political theory by examining the central questions that
animate our attempt to understand and secure the "good life." These concerns include: the nature and
significance of politics; the origin and character of legitimate authority; and the meaning of freedom, the value
of citizenship, and the education in virtue and in rights that are necessary to both individual liberty and civic
greatness. Bringing insights from classical and modern texts to bear on these fundamental questions of public
life, we aim to articulate and defend our own understanding of the ethical obligations and responsibilities that
citizens owe to one another. Identical with PHI 330. Cannot receive credit for both PLS 330 and PHI 330. 3(3-0)
F, S
AGF 300 Wine Appreciation for Consumers
Must be 21 years of age or older. Students participate in a series of tastings designed to introduce them to the
major wine types and the range of styles within those types. Tests and other materials will be available online.
$125 supplemental course fee required. 1 credit. Spring Semester-Second Block-Every Year




MKT 774 International Marketing
Prerequisite: MKT 600 or equivalent. Advanced management, theory, and analysis of marketing functions in a
multinational context where the parameters differ from those of domestic marketing. Students are required to
complete a research project in the course area. Cannot recieve credit for both MKT 474 and MKT 774. 3(3-0), F,S

PLS 778 Ethics and Leadership in the Public Sector
This course examines the role and impact of leadership in public organizations, with particular focus on the
ethical dimensions of leadership behavior. The course provides an overview of the knowledge, theory, and skills
regarding leadership and professional ethics. Topics include charismatic and transformational leadership,
leadership styles, the role of the leader in creating ethical climates and building effective ethical cultures,
organizational change strategies, power and politics, and motivation strategies. Also covered are the ethical
codes, standards, and practices promulgated by the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA) and the
International City Management Association (ICMA). 3(3-0) S
Master of Arts in Teaching
Emmett Sawyer, Program Coordinator
Hill Hall, Room 207C; Phone (417) 836-3170
Emmett Sawyer@missouristate.edu
Program Description
The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program is intended for mid-career change students or individuals
beginning a second career following retirement. One of the admission qualifying factors is that a student must
hold at least a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college/university. The MAT is a combined masters and
certification program that has been approved by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary
Education (DESE) and is fully accredited by NCATE. The program provides students the opportunity to earn
teacher certification in one of 20 different areas of secondary education while also completing a master’s
degree. The MAT involves extensive site-based clinical experience. Each student’s program of study is
individualized based on their strengths, life experiences and area of need identified in the PRAXIS II.
The MAT program offered by Missouri State University is offered from both the Springfield campus and the MSU
Joplin Graduate Center on the campus of Missouri Southern State University. The Joplin-based program has
been developed through an MSU-MSSU partnership. Students completing the program through the Joplin
Graduate Center will receive a diploma issued by Missouri State University signifying completion of the
cooperative program with MSSU.
Since summer 2009, the MAT program has been offered on the Missouri State University- West Plains' campus.
Course work meeting master's degree requirements are offered through a variety of delivery methods including
on-line, ITV and campusbased courses.
Entrance Requirements
  1. Applicants must meet minimum Graduate College requirements for admission.
  2. Applicants must hold at least a bachelor’s degree in, or related to, the area of certification desired.
Students must take, before entering the program, the relevant PRAXIS II specialty area test. If twelve or more
hours of course work in the content remains to be completed at the time of admission, the candidate may be
admitted conditionally to the program; however, the PRAXIS 11 must be passes by the candidate prior to
student teaching (SEC 784). I
CHM 160 General Chemistry
Prerequisite: eligibility for MTH 135 or higher. General Education Course (Natural World). Emphasis on
fundamental and theoretical concepts of chemistry. Recommended for all science majors, chemistry majors and
minors, and most preprofessional students. Concurrent registration in CHM 161 is highly recommended. A grade
of "C" or better is required in this course in order to take CHM 170, CHM 171, or CHM 200. May not be taken
Pass/Not Pass. 4(4-0) F,S
CHM 161 General Chemistry 1 Laboratory
Prereqisite: CHM 160 or concurrent enrollment. An introduction to laboratory chemistry emplying principles
and techniques that reflect material presented in CHM 160, e.g. , synthesis, stoichiometry, physical studies, and
data manipulation, and interpretation. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to take CHM
171. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 1(0-2) F, S
NUR 800 DNP Leadership 1: Concepts for Evidence Based Practice
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. This course builds on previous DNP Leadership courses and
concepts, with an emphasis on DNP Leadership for transforming health and healthcare delivery at the systems
level to address health and health care disparities. Concepts addressed include strategic planning; resource
management; leading and manageing change and innovation in traditional and community environments;
entrepreneurship, healthcare economics; influencing organizational culture and behavior; program/impact
evaluation; and advanced leadership roles, such as consultant, entrepreneur, and mentor. 3(2-3) Su
NUR 824 Health Policy to Improve Health Disparities
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. This course will analyze the development and implementation of
health care policy and promote the role of the advance practice nurse in policy making as an advocate for issues
related to social justice, vulnerable populations, and health disparities. 2(2-0) F
NUR 860 DNP Leadership 111: Transforming Systems
Prerequisite: Admission to the DNP Program. This course builds on previous DNP Leadership courses and
concepts, with an emphasis on DNP Leadership for transforming health and healthcare delivery at the systems
level to address health and health care disparities. Concepts addressed include strategic planning; resource
management; leading and managing change and innovation in traditional and community environments;
entrepreneurship, healthcare economics; influencing organizational culture and behavior; program/impact
evaluation; and advanced leadership roles, such as consultant, entrepreneur, and mentor. 4(4-0) S
      Reason for Course/Program Change - Or - Purpose of Course

                                                                                  College



To avoid prerequisite override.                                                 COAL




Moving the course to the fall semester will enable the audio students in MED    COAL
561 to do sound design work on the short films created in MED 562 in the
spring. This will give them a full semester to learn how to mix dialog, sound
effects and music to create and mix sound for narrative projects.




Opens up more seats for students, makes comparable to other international       COBA
course offerings




A student cannot receive credit for taking both of these classes.               COBA




MGT 367 requires prerequisite of MGT 364. Change allows transfer students       COBA
to take courses in correct order.
The Department of Biomedical Sciences has a need for an undergraduate           CHHS
elective in health literacy. The BMS 599 Health Literacy in the Human Services
is being cross-listed with SWK 599 Health Literacy in the Human Services
because these departments share a similar demand for the course. Health
Literacy is a growing field of inquiry within the health and human services.
There have been no health literacy courses available for Missouri State
University students despite the need for training in the area. This course will
broaden the student's understanding of health literacy fundamentals, research
on health literacy, and practical techniques for addressing literacy issues in
spoken and written communications at the practitioner and organizational
levels.

Changes are being made to better prepare Athletic Training graduates and      CHHS
strengthen the AT major via a larger curriculum revision




Changes are to better prepare Athletic Training graduates, make the AT major CHHS
more accessible to transfer students, allow for addition of a minor, and
strengthen the major via a larger curriculum revision.




Changes are being made to better prepare Athletic Training graduates and      CHHS
strengthen the AT major via a larger curriculum revision.
The admission criteria are being changed to facilitate a better understanding CHHS
of the admission progress for the ATEP. The current language has proven to be
confusing for prospective students and advisors. Additionally, a few proces
changes are being implemented to make the overall process more efficient.
These changes do not affect the actual program just the beginning application
process and current lanuage outlining the admissions process.




The School of Social Work has a need for an undergraduate elective in              CHHS
gerontology. Existing course GER 365 (Families in Later Life) is being cross-
listed with SWK 365 (Families in Later Life) (current proposal) and PSY 366
(Families in Later Life) (simultaneous proposal), as well as CFD 365 (already
cross-listed with GER 365). General purpose of the course: Examination of the
structure and function of families in later life. Topics of interest include
demographic trends impacting the structure of the family, marriage, sibling
relations, parent-adult chils relations, grandparenthood, widowhood, and
retirement. The application of family theories and their relevance to later life
families will be discussed.

The nursing student semester course load would be reduced from 17 credits          CHHS
to 15 credits if students could take the course prior to admission to the
generic nursing program, and give pre-nursing students the ability to take the
course.
To comply with current program course swquencing                               CHHS




We are no longer regularly offering this course, however we would like to      CHPA
leave the option open to do so in the future.




Most of the content is now covered in a newer course, ANT 240/Introduction     CHPA
to Archaeology.




This is generally a summer field school experience. We encourage students to   CHPA
take it when they are sophomores or juniors and not wait until they are
seniors.


No longer being offered. The content of this course is now being covered in    CHPA
other courses.




We do not see a need for it.                                                   CHPA




Grading such a course is too arbitrary and subjective.                         CHPA




We have decided that it is better for advanced students to master one method CHPA
(such as lithic analysis) than to survey many methods.
This course will thoroughly examine different theoretical perspectives in    CHPA
archaeology. It is vital for students who wish to practice archaeology and
pursue it in graduate school.


The course, ANT 350, is being deleted.                                       CHPA




The course, ANT 350, is being deleted.                                       CHPA




Class is needed every semester.                                              CHPA
This course will develop and enhance the critical tasting ability of novice wine CNAS
consumers and expose them to the major types and styles of Old and New
World wines including some of those produced in Missouri. Students will learn
the descriptive language of wine as well as the components of wine
appearence, aroma and flavor. The scientific basis of alcoholic fermentation;
sensory perception; grape varietal and wine chemistry as related to sensory
evaluation; and chemical changes in age-worthy wines through time is
presented. This course will promote better understanding, appreciation, and
responsible enjoyment of wine.

A student cannot receive credit for taking both of these classes.              Graduate
                                                                               College




Balance required courses better.                                               Graduate
                                                                               College
The changes for the email address and MSU-WP were informational.                Graduate
Candidates certifying in art needed a specialized art practicum given the       College
nature of that teaching position. The MSU art department worked
collaboratively with the MAT director and the Teacher Certification Office to
develop ART 783 to meet the needs of art candidates. However, if scheduling
or other conflicts occur, art students may be allowed to take SEC 783 with the
permission of the director of the MAT and director of the Teacher
Certification. Either course will meet state certification requirements and MAT
requirements for graduation.
PSY 710 meets the state competencies more effectively than PSY 703 or PSY
705. The psychology department recommended this change in courses.
RDG 710 name change was made at the recommendation of the reading
faculty to reflect the broader scope of literacy today.
IMT 662 course title was incorrectly listed in the catalogue. The Graduate
College indicated this could have been a clerical error; however, the course
number was correct. This change will correct the course title that was
inadvertently listed incorrectly.
New Course SFR 797 Advanced Studies in Teaching and Learning. Many MAT
candidates begin teaching the semester following this course in a provisional
certificate. The course prepares them to enter the classroom at an early stage
in the program. SFR 791, Educational Workshops, was the initial course for
MAT students. SFR 797 course will replace SFR 791. SFR 791 was intened to be
a variable content course based on a workshop format and has been used for
other purposes other than the MAT. This has created some confusion
regarding which section MAT candidates should enroll for the summer
semester. When the MAT program was developed, this was a convenient
course to use at that time. Over time, however, the connotation of workshops
does not adequately communicate the critical nature of the course. chemistry PEC
With the re-introduction of a laboratory to the 1st semester general
sequence, the change in description emphasizes that students should take
both CHM 160 and 161 concurrently.




For nearly 20-years Chemistry 160 (General Chemistry 1) has not had a       PEC
laboratory component; instead, a separate laboratory course was developed
(Chemistry 175) that was offered concurrently with the second semester of
General Chemistry (CHM 170). The main reasons for offering the courses in
this sequence were resource issues (e.g., staffing, space, supplies, etc).
Although these still remain issues, it has become clear to the chemistry
department that a first semester laboratory to accompany CHM 160 is needed.
This is a core course for the DNP program.   Grad Council




This is a core course for the DNP program.   Grad Council




This is a core course for the DNP program.   Grad Council
                           Course #
                Course             If
                 code                      Date Approved      Date Approved
     Dept                   renumbered,                                         Date Approved PEC
                If changed,   put new     Department Head     College Council
               put new code    course
                            number here

English       ENG                  508 W.D. Blanckmon       Michael Ellis
                                       8/31/10              9/14/10




Media,          MED                561 Mark Biggs
Journalism, and                        9/15/10
Film




Marketing     MKT                  464 Robert Luke          James Scott
                                       8/2/10               9/7/10




Marketing     MKT                  474 Robert Luke          James Scott
                                       8/2/10               9/7/10




Management    MGT                  367 Barry Wisdom         James Scott
                                       9/10/10              9/10/10
Biomedical      BMS      599 Colette Witkowski   Jim Hackney
Sciences                     9/8/10              9/8/10




Sports,           SMAT   328 Tona Hetzler        Jim Hackney
Medicine, and                7/20/10             9/7/10
Athletic Training




Sports,           SMAT   330 Tona Hetzler        Jim Hackney
Medicine, and                7/20/10             9/7/10
Athletic Training




Sports,           SMAT   344 Tona Hetzler        Jim Hackney
Medicine, and                7/20/10             9/7/10
Athletic Training
Sports,                       Tona Hetzler   Jim Hackney
Medicine, and                 6/15/10        9/7/10
Athletic Training




Social Work         SWK   365 Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney
                              8/29/10        9/7/10




Nursing             NUR   311 Kathryn Hope
                              8/27/10
Nursing         NUR   482 Kathryn Hope
                          8/27/10




Sociology,      ANT   250 Karl Kunkel    Leslie Baynes
Anthropology,             8/24/10        9/8/10
Criminology


Sociology,      ANT   350 Karl Kunkel    Leslie Baynes
Anthropology,             8/24/10        9/8/10
Criminology


Sociology,      ANT   451 Karl Kunkel    Leslie Baynes
Anthropology,             8/24/10        9/8/10
Criminology


Sociology,      ANT   453 Karl Kunkel    Leslie Baynes
Anthropology,             8/24/10        9/8/10
Criminology


Sociology,      ANT   454 Karl Kunkel    Leslie Baynes
Anthropology,             8/24/10        9/8/10
Criminology


Sociology,      ANT   499 Karl Kunkel    Leslie Baynes
Anthropology,             8/24/10        9/8/10
Criminology




Sociology,      ANT   550 Karl Kunkel    Leslie Baynes
Anthropology,             8/24/10        9/8/10
Criminology
Sociology,       ANT    555 Karl Kunkel     Leslie Baynes
Anthropology,               8/24/10         9/8/10
Criminology


Sociology,                  Karl Kunkel     Leslie Baynes
Anthropology,               8/24/10         9/8/10
Criminology




Sociology,                  Karl Kunkel     Leslie Baynes
Anthropology,               8/24/10         9/8/10
Criminology




Political Science PLS   330 George Connor
                            4/30/10
Agriculture      AGF    300 Anson Elliott   Melanie Grand
                            9/7/10          9/9/10




Marketing        MKT    774 Robert Luke     Eric Nelson
                            8/2/10          9/8/10




Political Science PLS   778 George Connor   Eric Nelson
                            4/29/10         9/8/10
Reading,                   Fred Groves   Eric Nelson
Foundations,               4/12/10       9/8/10
and Technology




Chemistry        CHM   160 Alan Schick   Kandiah Manivannan Jamaine Abdigodin
                           3/31/10       4/7/10             9/10/10




Chemistry        CHM   161 Alan Schick   Kandiah Manivannan Jamaine Abdigodin
                           3/31/10       4/7/10             9/10/10
Nursing   NUR   800 Kathryn Hope
                    4/12/10




Nursing   NUR   824 Kathryn Hope
                    4/12/10


Nursing   NUR   860 Kathryn Hope
                    4/12/10
Date Approved   Date Approved   Date Approved
                                                  Challenge Period
    CGEIP        Grad Council   Faculty Senate


                                                 September 30, 2010-
                                                 October 21, 2010




                                                 September 30, 2010-
                                                 October 21, 2010




                                                 September 30, 2010-
                                                 October 21, 2010




                                                 September 30, 2010-
                                                 October 21, 2010




                                                 September 30, 2010-
                                                 October 21, 2010
September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010
September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010
September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010
September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010
September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010




September 30, 2010-
October 21, 2010
              September 30, 2010-
              October 21, 2010




Mike Foster   September 30, 2010-
5/12/10       October 21, 2010




Mike Foster   September 30, 2010-
5/12/10       October 21, 2010
Doug Gouzie   Rebecca Woodard   September 30, 2010-
5/5/10        10/20/10          October 21, 2010




Doug Gouzie   Rebecca Woodard   September 30, 2010-
5/5/10        10/20/10          October 21, 2010


Doug Gouzie   Rebecca Woodard   September 30, 2010-
5/5/10        10/20/10          October 21, 2010
Received in Provost   Date Approved                          Date Approved
                                         Date to President
       Office            Provost                               President


    10/22/2010         11/19/2010          11/19/2010         11/23/2010




    10/22/2010         11/19/2010          11/19/2010         11/23/2010




    10/22/2010              11/19/2010     11/19/2010              11/23/2010




    10/22/2010              11/19/2010     11/19/2010              11/23/2010




    10/22/2010              11/19/2010     11/19/2010              11/23/2010
10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010
10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010    12/2/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010
10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




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10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010
10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010    12/2/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010    12/2/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010    12/2/2010
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10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010
10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010




10/22/2010   11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010
      NOTES:
                   Due to be Returned                    Date to BOG -
disapproved/withdr                    Need BOG Approval
                    to Faculty Senate                   President's Office
   awn or on hold

                             22-Nov-10




                             22-Nov-10




                             22-Nov-10




                             22-Nov-10




                             22-Nov-10
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22-Nov-10
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22-Nov-10




22-Nov-10
Date Disposition
                        Disposition Link
   Published


   2-Dec-10        Disposition of December 2,
                   2010




   2-Dec-10        Disposition of December 2,
                   2010




   2-Dec-10        Disposition of December 2,
                   2010




   2-Dec-10        Disposition of December 2,
                   2010




   2-Dec-10        Disposition of December 2,
                   2010
2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010
2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010
2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010
2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010
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           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010
2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010
2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010




2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010



2-Dec-10   Disposition of December 2,
           2010
               Senate Resolution Text      Senate Action Text or Description
  Senate
 Action or
Resolution #

SA 3-10/11                              New Program: Accelerated Master’s
                                        Degree Option, Master of Science in
                                        Education-Literacy

SA 4-10/11                              New Program: Master of Science in
                                        Education, Special Education: Autism
                                        Spectrum
                                        Disorders Emphasis Accelerated Masters
                                        Degree Option

SA 5-10/11                              New Program: Master of Public Health
                                        (MPH) Program Accelerated MPH

SA 6-10/11                              Program Change: Chemistry General
                                        Education
SA 7-10/11                              New Program—Bachelor of Science in
                                        Nursing to Doctor of Nursing Practice
                                        (BSN to DNP)

SA 8-10/11                              New Program—Post-Masters Doctor of
                                        Nursing Practice (PM to DNP)
SR 4-10/11       Resolution to Distribute the Report from the
                 Ad Hoc Committee on Faculty Unionization

                 Whereas, the Ad Hoc Committee to Explore
                 Unionization has presented its report to the
                 Faculty Senate (as per Faculty Senate Resolution
                 SR 15-09/10); and,

                 Whereas, this report is of vital interest to all
                 Faculty at Missouri State University;

                 Therefore, be it resolved that the Faculty Senate
                 charges the Chair of the Faculty Senate to
                 distribute the report to all Faculty Members at
                 Missouri State University via the Faculty Senate
                 Website, and as an email attachment.




Internal SA 1-                                                       Internal Senate Action on the State
10/11                                                                Auditor’s Report

                                                                     Be it resolved that,

                                                                     The Senate Executive Committee address
                                                                     the recent audit with Dr. Cofer in whatever
                                                                     way they deem most appropriate to
                                                                     express faculty sentiment. The Senate
                                                                     Executive Committee shall bring any
                                                                     potential recommendations to the Senate
                                                                     for a vote.
                                       Received in     Date                       Date
 Date Approved                                                      Date to
                   Challenge Period     Provost      Approved                   Approved
 Faculty Senate                                                    President
                                         Office       Provost                   President

10/21/2010        10-27-10 to 11-16-   11/17/2010    11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010
                  2010


10/21/2010        10-27-10 to 11-16-   11/17/2010    11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010
                  2010




10/21/2010        10-27-10 to 11-16-   11/17/2010    11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010
                  2010

10/21/2010        10-27-10 to 11-16-   11/17/2010    11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/30/2010
                  2010
10/21/2010        10-27-10 to 11-16-   11/17/2010    11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010
                  2010


10/21/2010        10-27-10 to 11-16-   11/17/2010    11/19/2010   11/19/2010   11/23/2010
                  2010
10/21/2010   N/A




10/21/2010   10-27-10 to 11-16-
             2010
              Date
  NOTES:
            Returned               Date to BOG -      Disposition Link
disapproved            Need BOG
               to                   President's
/withdrawn              Approval
             Faculty                  Office
 or on hold
             Senate
                                                   Disposition of December 3,
                                                   2010


                                                   Disposition of December 3,
                                                   2010




                                                   Disposition of December 3,
                                                   2010

                                                   Disposition of December 3,
                                                   2010
                                                   Disposition of December 3,
                                                   2010


                                                   Disposition of December 3,
                                                   2010
Disposition of December 3,
2010
Curricular Proposal Type
Course or Program (Note here if non-substan-
                    tive)
Title



ART 230 Computer        Course Change
Animation 1




ART 323 Jewelry and     Course Change
Metalsmithing




ART 324 Jewelry,     Course Change
Metals and Enameling




ART 430 Computer        Course Change
Animation 111




ART 322 Jewelry and     New Course
Metalsmithing
COM 499 Program      Course Change
Assessment




Communication BA,    PAIE
Communication BS,
Public Relations BS,
Socio-Political
Communication BS,
Speech and Theatre
Education/Communic
ation BSED
THE 121 Acting 1     Course Change




THE 221 Acting 11    Course Change




THE 321 Acting 111   Course Change




THE 421 Acting 1V    Course Change




THE 498 Advanced     Course Change
Actor Seminar
Musical Theatre         Program Change
Bachelor of Fine Arts




ART 300                 Course Change
Fundamentals of
Collaboration in
Electric Arts


ART 330 Computer        Course Change
Animation 11




ART 431 Professional Course Change
Practices in Computer
Animation




SPN 324 Topics in       Course Change
Spanish Linguistics
General Business     Program Change
(Comprehensive)




Communication         PAIE
Science and Disorders
B.S.


Exercise and          PAIE
Movement Science
B.S.
Physical Education
B.S.Ed
Radiography B.S.
Recreation,Sport, and
Part Administration
(Comp) B.S.
Recreation, Sport,
and Park
Administration (Non
Comp) B.S.
Respiratory Therapy
B.S.
Nursing Generic 4-   PAIE
year program BSN
Nursing Completion
Program for RN BSN

Nursing Generic 4-   Program Change
year program BSN
Nursing (Comp)        Program Change
Completion Program
for Registered Nurses




GER 302 Successful     Course Change
Aging and Identity
Issues in Later Life




GER 320 Gender         Course Change
Issues in Later Life
GER 330 Ethnic        Course Change
Diversity and Aging




GER 350 Death,        Course Change
Bereavement, and
the Elderly




GER 365 Families in   Course Change
Later Life




GER 498 Supervised    Course Change
Practicum in
Gerontology
GER 499 Seminar in     Course Change
Gerontology




PSY 354 Gender         New Course
Issues in Later Life
PSY 366 Families in   New Course
Later Life




Psychology (Non-      Program Change
comp) B.A.
Psychology (Non-       Program Change
comp) B.S.




SWK 205 Interviewing Course Change
Skills in Generalist
Social Work Practice




SWK 222 Human          Course Change
Behavior and the
Social Environment 1




SWK 305 Social Work Course Change
Practice with
Individuals
SWK 318 Methods of Course Change
Social Research in
Social Work Practices




SWK 322 Human         Course Change
Behavior and the
Social Environment 11




SWK 409 Social       Course Change
Welfare Policy and
Services 11




SWK 420 Social Work Course Change
Practice with Groups
and Families




SWK 430 Social Work Course Change
Practice in
Communities and
Organizations
SWK 480 Social Work Course Change
Integrative Seminar




SWK 490 Practicum in Course Change
Social Work




Social Work BSW     PAIE
Bachelor of Social    Program Change
Work




Athletic Training BSAT PAIE




BMS 528 Molecular      Course Change
Mechanism of
Bacterial Pathogenesis
BMS 535 Signal       Course Change
Transduction




PSY 365 Aging and    Course Change
Adjustment




SWK 219 Human        Course Change
Diversity




SWK 300 Service      Course Change
Learning in Social
Work
SWK 308 Social Justice Course Change




SWK 309 Social         Course Change
Welfare Policy and
Services I




ATC 320 Athletic       Course Change
Training
Administration




Philosophy B.A         PAIE
Philosophy B.S

REL 357 Religions of   New Course
China and Japan
Religious Studies B.A. Program Change
and B.S.




CRM 215 An            Course Change
Introduction to
Criminology and the
Profession
CRM 397 Special       Course Change
Topics in Criminology




SOC 284 Social         Course Change
Movements




SOC 290 Sociology of   Course Change
Gender




SOC 598 Senior         Course Change
Seminar




Anthropology B.A.      PAIE
Anthropology B.S.
Criminology B.A.
Criminology B.S.
Sociology B.A.
Sociology B.S.
SOC 398 Public         New Course
Sociology and
Community Studies
Criminology (Non-     Program Change
Comp) B.A.




Criminology (Non-     Program Change
Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science
Minors, Applied       Program Change
Social Research




Sociology (Non-       Program Change
Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts




Sociology (Non-       Program Change
Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science
Anthropology B.A.      PAIE
Anthropology B.S.
Criminology B.A.
Criminology B.S.
Sociology B.A.
Sociology B.S.
ECO 515 Public         Course Change
Finance




PLS 169 Introduction   Course Change
to Political Science




PLS 492 Program        Course Change
Assessment




PLS 493 Practicum in   Course Change
Political Science
PLS 494 Professional   Course Change
Internship




PLS 496 Independent    Course Change
Study in Political
Science




PLS 561 Ancient        Course Change
Political Thought




PLS 567 American       Course Change
Political Thought
SOC 309 Work,           Course Change
Industry, and Society




SOC 310 Social          Course Change
Deviance




SOC 320 Political       Course Change
Sociology




SOC 336 Race and        Course Change
Ethnicity




Environmental           Program Change
Science and Poilcy
Minor
HRA 497 International New Course
Hospitality Field Study




Hospitality and       Program Change
Restaurant
Administration Major-
Lodging




BIO 512 Industrial   Course Change
Microbiology
HRA 330 Banquet       Course Change
Operations




HRA 430 Special       Course Change
Event Planning




HRA 436 Casino        Course Change
Operations




BMS 110 Concepts in   Course Change
the Biomedical
Sciences




BMS 111 Introductory Course Change
Laboratory in the
Biomedical Sciences
COU 781 Field        Course Change
Experience-Secondary




COU 783 Field         Course Change
Experience-
Elementary




Masters of Business   Program Change
Administration
Master of Science in Program Change
Administrative Studies




Master of Science in   Program Change
Administrative
Studies- Applied
Communication
option

ENG 562                New Course
Contemporary
American
Poetry/Fiction
ENG 662
Contemporary
American
Poetry/Fiction
MGT 702 Managing   New Course
Healthcare
Organizations




MGT 703            New Course
Organizational
Behavior in
Healthcare
Organizations
MGT 704 Human       New Course
Resources in
Healthcare
Organizations




MGT 705 Strategic   New Course
Mangement of
Healthcare
Organizations
Master of Health     Program Change
Administration




PBH 798 Public Health Course Change
Field Experience
PBH 735 Software      New Course
Applications and Data
Sources in Public
Health




PBH 799 Capstone     New Course
Project in Public
Health
Master of Public   Program Change
Health Program




SWK 599/696 Health New Course
Literacy in the Human
Services
ANT 650 Advanced     Course Change
Methods in
Archaeology




ANT 790 Internship in Course Change
Applied Anthropology




ANT 797 Practicum in Course Change
Applied Anthropology




ANT 799 Thesis       Course Change




ANT 655               New Course
Archaeological Theory




MED 661 Sound        Course Change
Mixing
MUS 148 Introduction Course Change
to a Career in Music
Education




MUS 200 Clinical       Course Change
Experiences in Music
Education
Current Catalog Description




ART 230 Computer Animation I

Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110; and CIS 101 or CSC 101 or CSC 111. Exploration of visual
expression through the use of sequential images. Experience with a wide range of digital
processes. 3(0-6) F,S


ART 323 Jewelry and Metalsmithing

Prerequisite: ART 223. Further exploration of metal fabrication and smithing processes.
Introduction to enameling and other color techniques on metal. 3(0-6) S


ART 324 Jewelry, Metals and Enameling

Prerequisite: ART 223. Advanced problems in metals. Includes enameling and other metals
techniques. Emphasis on individual problem solving. Repeatable to 9 hours. 3(0-6) F,S


ART 430 Computer Animation III

Prerequisite: ART 330 and permission of the instructor. Priority will be given to those
students who have successfully completed the Computer Animation Emphasis Candidacy
Review for the BFA in Art or the BS in Electronic Arts. Individual problems in animation and
advanced techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the development of a personal, narrative
point of view. May be repeated to a total of 9 hours. 3(0-6) F,S


N/A
COM 499 Program Assessment

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Required assessment of programs for all
communication majors. Must be taken during the last semester of graduation or of
residence. Assessment activities include submission of a cumulative academic portfolio and
may include other elements such as exit interviews, surveys, or examinations. The focus is
on communication program development, rather than on individual student evaluation.
Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 0(0-0) D


N/A




THE 121 Acting I

Prerequisite: permission of instructor; and concurrent enrollment in THE 122; and open only
to BFA Acting and Musical Theatre majors admitted through the audition process. Discovery
and development of the actor's expressive behavior through improvisation. 3(1-4) F


THE 221 Acting II

Prerequisite: THE 121. Emphasis on finding truth in performance through various acting
techniques and physicalization of text. Application of play analysis to character study. 3(1-4) S

THE 321 Acting III

Prerequisite: THE 221. Projects in advanced characterization. 3(1-4) F

THE 421 Acting IV

Prerequisite: THE 321. Advanced techniques and tutorial scene work from classic theatre
literature of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. 3(1-4) S

THE 498 Advanced Actor Seminar

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Lecture and laboratory experience for the actor about
to enter the professional arena. 2(1-2) F
A. General Education Requirements- see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog.
B. Major Requirements (83 hours)
    1. Acting (14 hours): THE 121(3), 221(3), 321(3), 421(3), 451(2)
    2. Applied Voice (11 hours): MUS 498(2-4) and from MUS 153-453(1-2)

ART 300 Fundamentals of Collaboration in Electronic Arts

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Exploration of aesthetic and communication
issues involved in producing work in interdisciplinary electronic media. 3(0-6) F,S


ART 330 Computer Animation II

Prerequisite: ART 230. Further exploration of visual expression in animation. Advanced
techniques in the manipulating of forms and surfaces within the digital environment. 3(0-6) S


ART 431 Professional Practices in Computer Animation

Prerequisite: ART 430. Lecture, discussion and assignments for students seeking professional
careers in computer animation. Presentation skills will be emphasized. Students will be
required to write and perform research. 3(0-6) F


SPN 324 Topics in Spanish Linguistics

Prerequisite: SPN 202. Develops students' understanding of issues in Spanish linguistics by
exploring such topics as phonetics and phonology, morphology and syntax, semantics,
history of the language, and regional and social language variation. May be repeated one
with different content. Variable content Course. 3(3-0), F
General Business (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
  B. COBA Admission and Program Requirements - see College of Business
Administration/Admission and Program Requirements section of catalog
  C. Major Requirements (32-33 hours)
      1. INS 211(3); LAW 335(2) or 532(3)
      2. Complete one of the following: ENG 321(3); JRN 270(3); MGT 397(3)
      3. Complete a minimum of 24 hours from at least five of the following areas:
           a. Accounting: ACC 301(3), 302(3), 311(3), 321(3), 524(3), 532(3)
           b. Business Relationships: BUS/LAW 550(3); MGT 486(3)
           c. Computer Information Systems: CIS 205(3), 260(3), 270(3), 290(3); 370(3) or
510(3)**; 375(3)
           d. Finance: BUS 510(3)**; FIN 381(3), 384(3), 386(3), 390(3), 485(3)
          e. International: FIN 582(3); LAW 539(3); MGT 447(3); MKT 474(3)
           f. Management: LAW 531(3); MGT 345(3), 561(3); TCM 359(3)
           g. Marketing: MKT 351(3), 352(3), 354(3), 355(3), 430(3), 510(3)**
          h. Real Estate: FIN 266(3), 367(3), FIN/LAW 368(3), FIN 369(3)
          i. Risk Management and Insurance: FIN/INS 538(3); INS 312(3), 313(3), 314(3),
415(3); LAW 341(3)
 **Students with an interest in e-commerce are encouraged to take the designated courses
above. Recommended electives (not required): AGB 354(2); BUS 303(2), 307(2); ECO 305(3),
586(3); GRY 321(3); PSY 359(3), 525(3); SOC 150(3), 309(3), 359(3)
N/A




N/A
N/A




Nursing (Comprehensive) (Generic, 4-year Program)
Bachelor of Science in Nursing

The Department of Nursing offers a generic, 4-year nursing program that leads to a Bachelor
of Science in Nursing degree (BSN). Admission to this program is by application and selection
as stated in the admission policies.

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
    Specific General Education Requirements: CHM 105(5) or 160(4) preferred; PSY 121(3);
SOC 150(3)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. The following prerequisites must be completed before beginning the first nursing
course: BIO 210(3); BMS 130(3) or 240(3); BMS 307(4) or PED 250(3); BMS 308(4) or PED
252(3)
      2. Upper Division Nursing: NUR 302(4), 303(3), 304(5), 311(2), 312(6), 322(4), 323(4),
331(4), 342(4), 360(3), 416(2), 442(6), 472(3), 478(2), 482(6), 565(3)
      3. Select one or more courses from the following to equal three(3) credit hours: HCM
301(3), HCM 303(3), HCM 504(3), NUR 420(3), 490(3), NUR 499(1-6), NUR 501(3), NUR
502(3), NUR 503(3), NUR 515(3)
      4. Select one course in statistics from the following: SOC 302(3), PSY 200(3), MTH
340(3), ECO 308(3), QBA 237(3), AGR 330(3), REC 328(3) or PSY 527(3)
  C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog

Admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

Admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program (BSN) is competitive and selective,
Nursing (Comprehensive) (Completion Program for Registered Nurses)
Bachelor of Science in Nursing

The Department of Nursing offers a Junior-Senior level nursing program leading to a
Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree (BSN). Degree candidates must be registered nurse
graduates of associate degree or diploma nursing programs. Admission to this program is by
application and selection as stated in the admission policies. Students should refer to the
BSN Student Handbook for additional information on the policies and procedures in the
Department of Nursing.

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
    Specific General Education Requirements: SOC 150(3) and PSY 121(3)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. Upper Division Nursing Requirements: NUR 306(3), 341(4), 342(4), 442(6), 472(3),
482(6), 484(2), 515(3), 565(3)
      2. Select one course in statistics from the following: SOC 302(3), PSY 200(3), MTH
340(3), ECO 308(3), QBA 237(3), AGR 330(3), REC 328(3), PSY 527(3) or others by permission.
  3. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog
    A maximum of six hours in NUR 499 may be credited toward the degree.

Admission Policies

 1. Acceptance of application to the University by the Office of Admissions. (Note:
Admission to the University does NOT automatically constitute acceptance for the
professional program in nursing. The Department of Nursing’s Admissions, Promotion and
Graduation Committee will make recommendations on each application.)
GER 302 Successful Aging and Identity Issues in Later Life

Prerequisite: 30 hours. This course introduces students to the idea of successful aging in
later life and the necessary ingredients to maximize one's chances for a satisfying old age.
Society's views of older people and life situations confronted in later life will be explored
through the use of five commercial motion pictures. A review of three articles (through
quizzes and class discussion) will give students a basic understanding of successful aging and
identity issues in later life. 1(1-0) D


GER 320 Gender Issues in Later Life

Prerequisite: 45 hours or GST 170. A comparison of the aging experiences of men and
women in later life. The relevance of gender and gender roles to the aging process will be
considered. Specific topics of analysis will include the gender gap in longevity, psychological
and physical health, minority status, socioeconomic status, family relationships, and public
policy issues. 3(3-0) S
GER 330 Ethnic Diversity and Aging

Prerequisite: 45 hours. This course investigates ethnic/racial diversity and cultural
differences in relation to the experience of aging. Both a national and an international
perspective will be emphasized in the focus on aging experiences across different
ethnic/racial groups. Students will be exposed to fundamental concepts relative to ethnicity,
racial discrimination, and cultural differences and how these impact upon the aging process
and experiences in later life. 3(3-0) D

GER 350 Death, Bereavement, and the Elderly

Prerequisite: 30 hours. This course examines issues related to death and bereavement
within the context of later life. Students will examine the social construction of death within
American culture, and the physiology of death; they will be encouraged to consider personal
thoughts and beliefs surrounding this event. Students will be investigating and discussing
issues such as elder suicide, euthanasia, living wills, hospice, widowhood, AIDS and the
elderly, death in skilled care facilities, clustered loss, grieving, and attitudes toward death.
3(3-0) F

GER 365 Families in Later Life

Prerequisite: CFD 155 or CFD 163 or 30 hours. Examination of the structure and function of
families in later life. Topics of interest include demographic trends impacting the structure of
the family, marriage, sibling relations, parent-adult child relations, grandparenthood,
widowhood, and retirement. The application of family theories and their relevance to later
life families will be discussed. Identical with CFD 365, SWK 365, and PSY 366. Can only
receive credit for one of following: CFD 365, GER 365, PSY 366 or SWK 365. 3(3-0) F


GER 498 Supervised Practicum in Gerontology

Prerequisite: gerontology core courses with a grade of "C" or better in each and permission
of the program coordinator. On-site contacts with elderly individuals through an internship
at a residential or community placement approved by the coordinator. Direct supervision
will be provided by qualified professionals in the field of gerontology. Students will serve 45
clock hours for each credit hour awarded. May be repeated to a total of 12 hours. 3-12 F,S
GER 499 Seminar in Gerontology

Prerequisite: completion of the gerontology core courses with a grade of "C" or better in
each and permission of the program coordinator. Weekly meetings to allow students to
correlate experiences in GER 498 with academic knowledge, share experiences, and broaden
contacts in the field of aging. Survey of current literature in gerontology from various
disciplines will be included. 3(3-0) F,S




N/A
N/A




Psychology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

Admission Requirement: Complete PSY 150(1)

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
 B. Admission Requirement- Complete PSY 150 before admission to Psychology major.
 C. Major Requirements (34 hours)
      1. Required Core (16 hours): PSY 121(3), 150(1), 200(3), 302(3), 315(3), 411(3)
      2. Foundation Coursework (9 hours) Choose at least one course from each of the
following areas:
          a. Developmental: PSY 331(3), 350(3), 365(3), 441(3)
         b. Basic Processes: PSY 306(3), 336(3), 422(3), 506(3), 521(3), 525(3)
         c. Applied: PSY 304(3), 359(3), 512(3), 529(3)
      3. Additional 9 hours of psychology electives, at least 6 hours of which must be
numbered 300 or above.
 D. Minor Required (or second major)
  E. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and
Requirements section of catalog
 F. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog
Psychology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

Admission Requirement: Complete PSY 150(1)

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
  B. Admission Requirement- Complete PSY 150 before admission to Psychology major.
  C. Major Requirements (34 hours)
      1. Required Core (16 hours): PSY 121(3), 150(1), 200(3), 302(3), 315(3), 411(3)
      2. Foundation Coursework (9 hours) Choose at least one course from each of the
following areas:
          a. Developmental: PSY 331(3), 350(3), 365(3), 441(3)
          b. Basic Processes: PSY 306(3), 336(3), 422(3), 506(3), 521(3), 525(3)
          c. Applied: PSY 304(3), 359(3), 512(3), 529(3)
      3. Additional 9 hours of psychology electives, at least 6 hours of which must be
numbered 300 or above.
  D. Minor Required (or second major)
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog




SWK 205 Interviewing Skills in Generalist Social Work Practice

Prerequisite: SWK 212, 222 or concurrent enrollment. An introduction to basic interviewing
skills based upon the purpose of and plan for the interview in the context of generalist social
work practice. SWK 300 may be taken concurrently. 3(3-0) F


SWK 222 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

Prerequisite: SOC 150 and PSY 121 and COM 115 and SWK 212; and one of the following:
BIO 102, BIO 121, BMS 100, BMS 105 or BMS 110. An introduction to the dynamics of human
behavior and the effects of the social environment on the development of individuals and
families. SWK 212 may be taken concurrently. 3(3-0) F,Su


SWK 305 Social Work Practice with Individuals

Prerequisite: SWK 205 and SWK 212 and SWK 219 and SWK 222 and SWK 300 and PSY 304;
and Writing II or concurrent enrollment. Basic principles, practice theories and skill for
beginning generalist practice with individuals. Integrates practice theory and intervention
skills within the context of the Generalist Intervention/Problem-Solving model. The class
emphasizes personal awareness, professional growth, critical thinking and skills practice. 3(3-
0) F
SWK 318 Methods of Social Research in Social Work Practice

Prerequisite: SWK 212; and SWK 219 or concurrent enrollment; and SWK 222; and Writing II
or concurrent enrollment; and one of the following statistics courses: SOC 302, PSY 200, AGR
330, ECO 308, MTH 340, QBA 237, REC 328, or concurrent enrollment in statistics course.
The application and use of the social scientific method for conducting research and applying
research to social work practice including, but not limited to, single subject research design,
treatment intervention evaluation, and program evaluation. 3(3-0) S


SWK 322 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II

Prerequisite: SWK 212 and SWK 219 and SWK 222; and Writing II or concurrent enrollment.
Exploration of a broad systems' approach to the generalist practice of social work. Focuses
on the theories that support social work practice with groups, organizations, and
communities. 3(3-0), S

SWK 409 Social Welfare Policy and Services II

Prerequisite: SWK 219 and SWK 308 and SWK 309 and SWK 318 and SWK 322 and Writing II;
and Final Progression (fully "Admitted") status into the BSW program. An introduction to the
analytic, interactional, value clarification and political strategies necessary for policy analysis
and implementation. 3(3-0) F

SWK 420 Social Work Practice with Groups and Families

Prerequisite: SWK 219 and SWK 222 and SWK 305 and SWK 308 and SWK 322 and Writing II;
and Final Progression (fully "Admitted") status into the BSW program. Offers basic principles
of group and family (G/F) interventions with a generalist practice foundation. Contrasts G/F
with other forms of social work practice. Reviews skills required to conduct clinical and task
groups. Overviews skills needed to work with families. Emphasizes cultural diversity and
ethical parameters when offering G/F services. 3(3-0) F


SWK 430 Social Work Practice in Communities and Organizations

Prerequisite: SWK 219 and SWK 305; and SWK 409 or concurrent enrollment; and Writing II;
and Final Progression (fully "Admitted") status into the BSW program. Problem assessment
and practice interventions with macrosystems. Examines strategies and techniques for social
work practice with organizations and communities. 3(3-0) F
SWK 480 Social Work Integrative Seminar

Prerequisite: SWK 212 and SWK 219 and SWK 222 and SWK 305 and SWK 308 and SWK 318
and SWK 322 and SWK 409 and SWK 420 and SWK 430; and Final Progression (fully
"Admitted") status into the BSW program; and concurrent enrollment in SWK 490. Examines
student experiences, problems, and questions related to the practicum. Integrates theory,
knowledge, social work values and skills from previous social work courses to prepare
generalist social work practitioners. Failure to pass this course will result in failure to pass
SWK 490. 3(3-0) S


SWK 490 Practicum in Social Work

Prerequisite: SWK 212 and SWK 219 and SWK 222 and SWK 305 and SWK 308 and SWK 318
and SWK 322 and SWK 409 and SWK 420 and SWK 430; and Final Progression (fully
"Admitted") status into the BSW program; and concurrent enrollment in SWK 480. An
educationally directed social work practice experience with individuals, groups, families,
communities and organizations in a social service agency. Students are required to work a
minimum of 450 hours. A student who receives a not pass grade may repeat the course only
with Field Education Committee approval. Failure to pass this course will result in failure to
pass SWK 480. A student must perform at the "C" level or above in order to graduate with
the BSW. Supplemental course fee. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 9(0-32) S




N/A
Faculty (as of June 18, 2010)

Professor: Joan McClennen, Ph.D.

Associate Professors: Susan Dollar, Ph.D.; Mary Ann Jennings, Ph.D.

Assistant Professors: Jane G. Allgood, Ph.D.; Michele L. Day, Ph.D.; Darryl Haslam, Ph.D.

Coordinator of Field Education and MSW Program, Joplin: Renee White, M.S.W., LCSW

Coordinator of Field Education, Springfield: Lisa A. Street, M.S.W., LCSW
Accreditation

Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) – Social Work, B.S.W., M.S.W.
Graduate Programs

The following graduate programs are available:

Master of Social Work degree
Refer to the Graduate Catalog for more information.
Majors
Social Work (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Social Work

The Social Work major prepares graduates for beginning generalist social work practice.

Admission Requirements: The admission procedure to the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW)
program consists of a two-tier process (Initial Progression and Advanced Progression). To
N/A




BMS 528 Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis

Prerequisite: BMS 525. An in-depth study of the methods of genetic control and production
of pathogenic factors employed by disease causing bacteria. The course will use both
reference material and primary literature to illustrate the topics under discussion. May be
taught concurrently with BMS 628. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 528 and BMS 628.
2(2-0) S
BMS 535 Signal Transduction

Prerequisite: BMS 521. This course will examine the molecular mechanisms of various
ligand/receptor interactions. The dynamics involved in ligand/receptor binding will be
studied and examples of receptor-mediated signal transduction will be introduced. Signaling
pathways within the cell will be discussed. Primary literature and reference materials will be
utilized to illustrate specific examples under discourse. May be taught concurrently with
BMS 635. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 535 and BMS 635. 2(2-0) D


PSY 365 Aging and Adjustment

Prerequisite: PSY 121, and PSY 304. Personality adjustment in old age, with emphasis both
on adequate and maladjusted development. Factors influencing adjustment are considered.
Both functional and organic sources of maladjustment are surveyed. 3(3-0) F


SWK 219 Human Diversity

Prerequisite: COM 115. Content and skill development pertinent to working with diverse
racial, cultural, ethnic, and other populations such as persons with physical disabilities and
mental illnesses. This course is designed primarily to inform and sensitize individuals for
effective interventions within a heterogeneous society. SWK 300 may be taken concurrently.
3(3-0) S,Su

SWK 300 Service Learning in Social Work

Prerequisite: 30 hours, concurrent registration in a social work course designated as a
service learning offering (SWK 205, SWK 212, SWK 219). This service component for an
existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction to provide an
integrative learning experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an
awareness of and participation in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an
external community organization or human/social service agency. Approved settings will
focus on populations-at-risk, diverse populations and groups that have experienced social
and economic injustice. A list of approved placements and assignments is available from the
instructor and the Citizenship and Service Learning Office. May be repeated. Graded
Pass/Not Pass only. 1(0-2) S,Su
SWK 308 Social Justice

Prerequisite: SWK 212 and SWK 219 and SWK 222; and ECO 155 or ECO 165 or equivalent;
and PLS 101; and Writing II or concurrent enrollment. The primary subject matter of this
course is social and economic inequality in United States society. Students are introduced to
the patterns and processes of social and economic inequality in its major forms: class,
race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual and political orientation. 3(3-0) F


SWK 309 Social Welfare Policy and Services I

Prerequisite: SWK 212 and SWK 219 and SWK 222 and PLS 101; and ECO 155 or ECO 165;
and Writing II or concurrent enrollment. This course examines the historical development
and philosophical orientation of social welfare policy and services in the United States as
well as introduces students to the development of social work as a profession. The course
focuses on selected major social welfare policies and programs and the philosophical,
economic, social and political forces that shape their development. 3(3-0) S


ATC 320 Athletic Training Administration

Prerequisite: at least 75 hours towards Athletic Training major completed or at least 15
hours towards Sports Medicine minor completed; and permission of program director.
Development and administration of various procedures, records, forms, budgets, and
professional contacts needed to successfully manage an athletic training program. 3(3-0) F




N/A


N/A
Religious Studies (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

  1. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
  2. Major Requirements
      1. REL 100(3), 101(3), 102(3), 131(3), 210(3), 580(3)
      2. Complete 15 hours from the following four areas, distributed so that there will be at
least six hours in one area and three hours in each of the other three areas. Courses must be
chosen to include at least one 500-level course and another course at the 300-level or
above*:
          1. History of Religions: REL 350(3), 355(3), 360(3), 540(3)
          2. Biblical Studies: REL 312(3), 319(3), 320(3), 321(3), 323(3), 362(3), 510(3), 520(3),
570(3), 571(3)
          3. History of Judaism and Christianity: REL 103(1), 330(3), 340(3), 550(1-3)
          4. Religion, Self, and Society: REL 200(1), 315(3), 332(3), 344(3), 345(3), 346(3),
365(3), 370(3), 530(3), 531(3); REL 390(3) or SOC 390(3) or PSY 533(3)

          *Variable content courses (REL 197, 397, 399) may be counted where appropriate
with the approval of the advisor and department head.
 3. Minor Required (or second major)
 4. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and
Requirements section of catalog
 5. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog

Religious Studies (Non-Comprehensive)



CRM 215 An Introduction to Criminology and the Profession

Prerequisite: CRM 210. A course designed to acquaint students interested in Criminology
about the requirements of the major and the minors which are applicable in pursuing a
career in the field of Criminology. Students will be exposed to career opportunities, graduate
school opportunities and the job search process. 1(1-0) F,S
CRM 397 Special Topics in Criminology

A variable topic course offering an overview of one or more issues related to criminology.
May be repeated to a total of 6 hours when topic changes. 1-3 D




SOC 284 Social Movements

The study of collective attempts to implement social change in society. Specific groups
studied will vary, but may include the civil rights, feminist, political, religious, environmental
and health movements. 3(3-0) S

SOC 290 Sociology of Gender

This course focuses on gender differences, patterns, and inequalities. It analyzes the social
construction of gender, femininities and masculinities, gender socialization, and how gender
intersects with race, class, and sexuality. Specific attention is paid to the significance of
gender in interaction, culture, and social institutions, including work, politics, media, and the
family. 3(3-0) F

SOC 598 Senior Seminar

Prerequisite: SOC 301 and SOC 302 and SOC 325. A cumulative and integrative seminar
experience for the Sociology major during which the student will prepare and submit a
bachelor's paper. This course is normally taken in the semester a student graduates. 3(3-0)
F,S

N/A




N/A
Criminology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
  B. Major Requirements (34 hours)
      1. Required Core (22 hours): CRM 210(3), 215(1), 320(3), 340(3), 350(3), 360(3), 370(3),
598(3)
      2. Complete 12 additional hours in CRM courses below the 500 level
      3. A minimum GPA of 2.50 in the courses counted toward the major
  C. Minor Required (or second major)
  D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and
Requirements section of catalog
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog




Criminology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
  B. Major Requirements (34 hours)
     1. Required Core (22 hours): CRM 210(3), 215(1), 320(3), 340(3), 350(3), 360(3), 370(3),
598(3)
     2. Complete 12 additional hours in CRM courses below the 500 level
     3. A minimum GPA of 2.50 in the courses counted toward the major
  C. Minor Required (or second major)
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog
Applied Social Research
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Social Work

  1. SOC 301(3), 302(3), 325(3); SOC 470(3) or 499(3)
  2. Complete electives from the following to total 21 hours: SOC 305(3); PLS 576(3); PSY
529(3); or courses approved by the advisor which ties the major and minor fields of study
together.


Sociology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
  B. Major Requirements
      1. SOC 150(3), 301(3), 302(3), 303(1), 325(3), 598(3)
      2. Complete 21 additional Sociology hours
  C. Minor Required (or second major)
  D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and
Requirements section of catalog
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog




Sociology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
  B. Major Requirements
     1. SOC 150(3), 301(3), 302(3), 303(1), 325(3), 598(3)
     2. Complete 21 additional Sociology hours
  C. Minor Required (or second major)
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog
N/A




ECO 515 Public Finance

Prerequisite: ECO 155 and ECO 165. Allocation and distribution functions of the public sector
of the economy; theories of taxation and public expenditure; shifting and incidences of
taxes, local-state federal finance. May be taught concurrently with ECO 615. Cannot receive
credit for both ECO 615 and ECO 515. 3(3-0) D


PLS 169 Introduction to Political Science

An introduction to the contemporary concerns and historical development of political
science as a social science and as a mode of critical thinking about politics and society.
Emphasis is upon acquainting students with the scope of intellectual inquiry and the
specialized sub-fields of study of modern political science rather than with the particular
characteristics of American government and politics. 3(3-0) D


PLS 492 Program Assessment

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: senor standing. Required assessment
of undergraduate political science and public administration programs in the department. All
students majoring in political science and public administration are required to enroll in this
course during their senior year and pass a Major Field Achievement Test (MFAT). The focus is
on program assessment and development rather than on individual student evaluation.
Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 0 F,S


PLS 493 Practicum in Political Science

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA and junior or senior
standing. Supervised and departmentally approved part-time work experience related to
Political Science in public or private sector. May be repeated to a total of 12 hours, but only
6 hours will be counted toward the major and 3 hours toward the minor. Approximately 5
on-the-job hours per week required for 1 hour credit, in addition to fulfillment of academic
requirements. Normally restricted to Political Science/Public Administration majors, minors.
Students minoring in Paralegal Studies must take PLS 493 for 3 credit hours. Graded
Pass/Not Pass only. 1-3 D
PLS 494 Professional Internship

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA and junior or senior
standing. Supervised and departmentally approved full-time work experience related to
Political Science in public or private sector. May be repeated to a total of 12 hours, but only
6 hours will be counted toward the major. Approximately eight weeks of 40 on-the-job hours
per week required for 3 hours credit, in addition to fulfillment of academic requirements.
Normally restricted to Political Science/ Public Administration majors. Graded Pass/Not Pass
only. 3-6 D


PLS 496 Independent Study in Political Science

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA; and junior or senior
standing. Students should consult with a professor of the department who specializes in the
subject and with the professor's consent present a written proposal to the department head
for final approval. Proposals should be presented for approval before final registration for
the term in which the independent study is to be done. Only one approved independent
study program may be taken in any semester. A maximum of 6 semester hours of credit in
PLS 496 may be counted on a major in political science or public administration and 3
semester hours of credit on a minor in the two fields. Written work will be required in PLS
496 in addition to reading assignments and/or research activities. 1-3 D




PLS 561 Ancient Political Thought

Prerequisite: PLS 101. Recommended Prerequisite: 50 hours. An introduction to the study of
political theory by examining the contributions of classical political theorists and their
successors up to the age of the Renaissance. Includes Socrates, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle,
the Epicureans, Cynics and Stoics, Cicero and the Roman Lawyers, early Hebrew and
Christian political thought, Augustine and Aquinas. May be taught concurrently with PLS 640.
Cannot receive credit for both PLS 640 and PLS 561. 3(3-0) FO


PLS 567 American Political Thought

Prerequisite: PLS 101. Recommended Prerequisite: 50 hours. Political ideas in American
institutional and historical development. An examination of the relations between American
thought and political structures and processes. May be taught concurrently with PLS 643.
Cannot receive credit for both PLS 643 and PLS 567. 3(3-0) D
SOC 309 Work, Industry, and Society

The industrialization of society and its impact on formal and informal organization,
management philosophies, worker attitudes and labor relations. Current trends affecting the
work place are examined. 3(3-0) S

SOC 310 Social Deviance

An historical survey of the explanations of deviant behavior. Emphasis will focus on the
structure of norms and rules, their diversity, and their role in identifying deviance. 3(3-0) F,S


SOC 320 Political Sociology

Introduces students to a sociological analysis of political organization forms and their
relations with other elements of social life. Students examine the concept of power and the
intersection of personality, social structure, and politics. The course also emphasizes how
social inequality between groups (e.g. race, class, and gender, etc.) influences politics and
elaborates major social trends affecting the political process including how various social
forces work to change political policies. 3(3-0) S


SOC 336 Race and Ethnicity

This course explores the social construction of race and ethnicity. Issues of differential
power between racial and ethnic groups and the economic, political, and social structures
which are utilized to maintain these power differences are identified. Social movements and
social policies designed to address social inequality, prejudice and discrimination are also
examined. 3(3-0) S

A. Natural Science Courses: Select 3 of the following (9-11 hours)
   1. BIO 369, General Ecology (4)
   2. CHM 260, Principles of Environmental Chemistry (3) or CHM 460, Environmental
Chemistry (3)
   3. GLG 171, Environmental Geology (4)* or GRY 108, Ecology and Society (3)**
   4. GRY 351, Conservation or Natural Resources (3)
B. Policy: Select 3 of the following courses (9 hours)
   1. ECO 540, Economics of the Environment (3)
   2. PHI 302, Environmental Ethics (3)
   3. PLS 555, Public Policy for a Global Environment (3)
   4. LAW 537, Environmental Regulation (3)
   5. PSY 379, Environmental Psychology (3)
Hospitality and Restaurant Administration (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements
section of catalog
    Specific General Education Requirement: GRY 100(3)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. Core Courses: HRA 210(3), 215(3), 218(3), 310(3), 321(3), 354(3), 410(3), 426(3),
428(3), 480(3), 490(3), 499(6)
      2. Related Requirements: MKT 150(3) or 350(3); and ACC 201(3)
      3. Complete one of the following options (9 hours):
          a. Club Management: HRA 330(3), 430(3); HRA 360(3) or 436(3)
          b. Food and Beverage: HRA 330(3), 409(3), 435(3)
          c. Lodging: HRA 315(3), 360(3), 430(3)
          d. Senior Living Management: HRA 330(3); GER 310(3), 365(3)
          e. Tourism: GRY 310(3), 328(3); HRA 340(3)
  C. Electives to bring total number of hours to 125. Students are encouraged to use these
hours to complete more than one track and to take HRA electives.
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog


BIO 512 Industrial Microbiology

Prerequisite: BIO 210 or BIO 310. An introduction to the fundamental concepts of industrial
and applied microbiology. The industrial production of proteins, metabolites, polymers,
biocides, and vaccines will be discussed in addition to biotransformations and environmental
applications. Production improvement strategies that employ both physical and modern
molecular techniques will be introduced. Laboratory will emphasize the selection of
industrially important microorganisms, the theory and operation of a fermentor for the
production of proteins, antibiotics, and steroids, use of analytical equipment for monitoring
product formation, enzymes analysis, downstream processing, and bio-reactor construction
and design. May be taught concurrently with BIO 613. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 613
and BIO 512. 3(2-2) D
HRA 330 Banquet Operations

Prerequisite: HRA 210 and HRA 321. This course provides students with practical skills and
knowledge for effective management of food and beverage practices, from the preparation
of quantity foods to its service. Laboratory arranged. Supplemental course fee. 3(1-4) F,S


HRA 430 Special Event Planning

Prerequisite: HRA 310 and HRA 321. In-depth analysis of management and operational
challenges involved in planning and deploying events as they relate to the hospitality
industry. 3(3-0) F,S




HRA 436 Casino Operations

Prerequisite: HRA 354. This course provides an overview of the gaming industry with an
emphasis on casino hotel operations as an integral part of the hospitality industry. Topics
include the history of gaming, casino layout and design, surveillance, demographic profiles,
psychological profiles, and economic impact. 3(3-0) F,S


BMS 110 Concepts in the Biomedical Sciences

General Education Course (Natural World). An introductory course that focuses on examples
in human biology and prepares students for further study in the biomedical sciences or
cell/molecular biology. Partially fulfills the general education requirement for a laboratory
course in the natural sciences. Designed for students planning further laboratory or course
work in the biomedical sciences, such as departmental majors, minors, and others preparing
for courses in human genetics, human anatomy and human physiology. Recommended for
other science majors, students in pre-nursing and those preparing for various allied health
professions, most preprofessional students, students in the social sciences, and others who
require an understanding of the biological human. Students will receive credit for only one of
the following: BMS 100 or 105 or 110. Supplemental course fee. 4(3-2) F,S




BMS 111 Introductory Laboratory in the Biomedical Sciences

Prerequisite: BMS 100. This course is identical to the laboratory portion of BMS 110 and is
designed for students who require intensive introductory laboratory experience to prepare
for future laboratory work in the biomedical sciences. Cannot receive credit for both BMS
110 and BMS 111. 1(0-2) F,S
COU 781 Field Experience-Secondary

Prerequisite: admission to Counseling program; and either COU 780 or COU 784; and
department permission. Supervised experience in secondary school counseling at an
approved school site. Minimum of 150 hours on-site. Students will receive individual
supervision on-site, and small-group supervision from the department. Graded Pass/Not
Pass only. Supplemental course fee. 3(1-10), F,S


COU 783 Field Experience-Elementary

Prerequisite: admission to Counseling program; and COU 782; and department permission.
Supervised experience in elementary school counseling at an approved school site. Minimum
of 150 hours on-site. Students will receive individual supervision on-site, and small-group
supervision from the department. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. Supplemental course fee. 3(1-
10), F,S


Admission
Qualified applicants may enter the MBA program at the beginning of any semester.
Admission to the MBA program is granted to students who fulfill the following provisions.

  1. The student must have received a Bachelor's or Master's degree from a regionally
accredited college or university.
  2. The applicant must meet the following performance standards:
      a. A GPA of at least 2.75 for the last 60 hours of academic work;
      b. A Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) composite score of at least 400.
Arrangements for taking the GMAT can be made by calling Pearson Professional Centers at
(800) 717-4628 or by visiting their website.
        NOTE: With the approval of the Director of the MBA program, recent scores from
other national standardized tests for graduate study such as the Graduate Records
Examination (GRE) may be deemed equivalent. In these instances, equivalent test scores
can be used to meet minimum GMAT score requirements (above) and can be used in
formula calculations for admission purposes. A GMAT to GRE Conversion Chart is available at
http://www.ets.org/Medial/Campaign/gre/institutions/about/mba.
      c. A minimum value of 1,000 based on the following formula — (200 X GPA in last 60
hours) + GMAT score;
     d. A minimum score in the 20th percentile for both the verbal and the written
components of the GMAT. Applicants meeting performance standards “a”, “b”, and “c”, but
not standard “d” can be admitted conditionally to the MBA program pending completion of
the Speak Test, an essay test (graded on the CUNY Scale), and a grammar test. These tests
will be administered to conditionally admitted students during the MBA Orientation Program
prior to the beginning of each semester.
          i. Conditionally admitted students attaining the scores indicated below will be fully
admitted to the MBA Program: Speak Test = 40 or greater; essay test = 4.0 or greater on the
CUNY Scale; and grammar test = 70% or greater correct.
Degree Requirements (minimum of 33 hours)
1. Core Requirements (18 hours)
ACC 600 Financial Accounting Concepts for Managers 3 hrs
COM 736 Concepts & Analysis of Communication in Organizations 3 hrs
CIS 600 Information Systems in Business Organizations 3 hrs
PLS 651 Administrative Law 3 hrs
PLS 756 Financial Management for State and Local Government 3 hrs
PSY Personnel Selection, Placement and Classification 3 hrs
TOTAL 18 hrs

2. Research Methods/Research Requirement (3 hours)
Research Methods Requirement. The research methods requirement may be fulfilled by
selecting a graduate methods course at the 600 or 700 level from among the several
currently offered at Missouri State University. Selection of a methods course must be done
in consultation with a student's advisor. Typically, students will take a methods course within
their program option.

Research Requirement. MSAS students are expected to demonstrate research and writing
proficiency appropriate to their career path and program emphasis. Scholarly projects are
required within the option area and a research methods course to satisfy this requirement.
Students will complete a significant project as a capstone experience in an option area
course.
1. Applied Communication Option:
COM 611 Conflict and Communication 3 hrs
COM 617 Communication and Diversity in the Workplace 3 hrs
COM 732 Small Group Communication 3 hrs
COM 713 Media Resources for Organizations 3 hrs

N/A
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N/A
Master of Health Administration

D. Michael Leibert Graduate Director
                      (417) 836-
444
411 Glass Hall, Phone 
         4

 
 

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t
 missouri
tate.edu
   
   L 

Micha
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eiber
@          s
Program Description

The Master of Health Administration (MHA) degree is a College of Business Administration
degree that includes a number of interdisciplinary courses contributed by other colleges on
campus. The program is designed for students holding undergraduate degrees who wish to
further their careers in the administration of health organizations including integrated
systems, hospitals, group practices, long-term care facilities, clinics, managed care
organizations, and other types of health organizations. The program can be completed in as
little as two years. Students with little or no undergraduate work in business are welcome,
and will normally require additional time for completion.

The MHA program is accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance
Collegiate Schools of Business.
Academic Standing
A student who fails to attain a 3.00 GPA after completing the approved program may enroll
for additional course work not to exceed 6 hours to raise the GPA. The course work will be
approved by the Graduate Program Director and the Dean of the College of Business
Administration.

The maximum class load for a full-time student is normally 12 hours per semester. An
overload is permitted only after students have demonstrated their ability to achieve an
outstanding graduate record at this university. Students employed on a full-time job
generallyPublic Health Fieldfor more than 6 semester hours. All other University and
PBH 798 should not enroll Experience

Prerequisite: students must have successfully completed 33 credit hours including the
foundation and core courses, and passed the core course exam. The required field
experience provides experience in program development, community relations, public
education, and research. Possible sites include: official health agencies, voluntary health
agencies, or community social agencies. Selection is dependent on the students'
backgrounds and career expectations. Students may choose to spend their entire time in one
agency, or, for shorter periods, in 2 or more agencies. The field experience can be done
during the fall, spring, or summer and can be no less than 200 hours. All field experiences
must be approved by the internship coordinator and the Program Director to ensure the site
acceptability. May be repeated. 1-6, D
N/A




N/A
Master of Public Health

Vickie Sanchez, Program Director
Physical Therapy Building, room 112
Phone: (417) 836-8850
VSanchez@missouristate.edu; http://www.missouristate.edu/mph/
Program Description

The Master of Public Health (MPH) program offers a generalist MPH degree consisting of 42
credit hours. The program’s mission is to prevent disease, promote health, and protect the
well-being of the public through education, research and service.

Students gain knowledge in each of the five core disciplines of public health: biostatistics,
epidemiology, environmental health sciences, public health administration, and the social
and behavioral sciences. The program prepares students to assess community health needs,
plan effective health education and health intervention programs, implement and evaluate
educational experiences, and conduct public health research.

Graduates of this program will enter public health service as practitioners, administrators,
researchers, educators, and consultants in a wide variety of public health settings. Most will
be employed in local, state, and national public health agencies, while others will work for
non-profit organizations, private agencies, medical facilities, governmental agencies, and
educational institutions.
Retention and Readmission to the Program

Admission to the MPH program is through a competitive admissions process with only a
limited number of students admitted each year. Students who leave the program will be
required to apply for readmission. Applications for readmission will be reviewed by the MPH
N/A
ANT 650 Advanced Methods in Archaeology

Practice in a variety of methods and techniques employed in cultural resources archaeology.
Includes in-depth analysis of archaeological remains in the laboratory and hands-on field
experience with cutting-edge technologies such as remote sensing. May be taught
concurrently with ANT 550. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 550 and ANT 650. 3(3-0) S


ANT 790 Internship in Applied Anthropology

Prerequisite: ANT 700 and permission of instructor. A minimum of 200 hours of work
experience as an applied anthropologist with an approved business, organization, program,
or agency. Requires a written report and a public presentation. 3(0-6) Su


ANT 797 Practicum in Applied Anthropology

Prerequisite: ANT 770 and permission of instructor. The student will conduct an applied
research project from start to finish, culminating in a professional report. 3-6 D


ANT 799 Thesis

Prerequisite: ANT 770 and permission of instructor. Research and writing of a Master's thesis
under the direction of a faculty advisor. 3-6 D


N/A




MED 661 Sound Mixing

An in-depth exploration of the art of sound design for digital film and TV. Students will learn
how to carry out the aesthetic considerations of sound through the mixing process.
Emphasis will be placed on advanced sound editing for sub- and final mixing, mix
engineering, sound-effect processing and surround-sound practice. Students will learn how
to mix a movie's dialogue, sound effects, ambience and music into stereo and surround
tracks. May be taught concurrently with MED 561. Cannot receive credit for both MED 661
and MED 561. 3(3-1) S
MUS 148 Introduction to a Career in Music Education

Prerequisite: music major or minor. Introduction to the music teaching profession. Includes
current music education topics, observations, field experience, preliminary portfolio
preparation, projects and information designed to aid students in deciding whether to enter
the music teaching profession. 1(1-1) F,S




MUS 200 Clinical Experiences in Music Education

Prerequisite: MUS 148, and an initial C-Base exam must be taken. Concurrent enrollment in
MUS 148 and MUS 200 is permitted with a minimum of 60 credit hours completed. Students
enrolled attend a weekly clinical and/or discussion session on campus and participate in 40
hours of field experiences at the Greenwood Laboratory School and/or area schools.
Principles and objectives of music education, methods of meeting the diverse educational
needs of today's students; techniques of teaching music, unit construction and daily lesson
planning, assessment and utilization of technology will be included in the seminar and field
experiences components of this class. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in
order to take MUS 494 and MUS 496. This course may not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 3(2-4) F,S
Complete NEW Catalog Description




ART 230 Computer Animation I

Prerequisite: ART 100 or ART 110. Exploration of visual expression through the use of sequential
images. Experience with a wide range of digital processes. 3(0-6) F




ART 323 Jewelry, Metals, and Enameling

Prerequisite: ART 101 (may enroll concurrently) and ART 223. Further exploration of metal
fabrication and smithing processes. Introduction to enameling and other color techniques on
metal. 3(0-6) S

ART 324 Metals and Jewlery III

Prerequisite: ART 323. Advanced problems in metals. Greater exploration of materials and
techniques with an emphasis on individual problem-solving. May be repeated to a total of 12
hours. 3(0-6) F,S

ART 430 Computer Animation III

Prerequisite: ART 330 and permission of the instructor. Priority will be given to those students
who have successfully completed the Computer Animation Emphasis Candidacy Review for the
BFA in Art or the BS in Electronic Arts. Individual problems in animation and advanced
techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the development of a personal, narrative point of view.
May be repeated to a total of 9 hours. 3(0-6) F,S


ART 322 Jewelry and Metalsmithing

Prerequisite: ART 101 and ART 223. Further exploration of metal fabrication processes.
Introduction to jewelry scale casting and to silversmithing techniques. 3(0-6) F
COM 499 Program Assessment

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Required assessment of programs and public affairs
activity for all communication majors. Must be taken during the last semester of graduation or of
residence. Assessment activities include submission of a cumulative academic portfolio including
report of public affairs project and other elements such as exit interviews, surveys, or
examinations. The focus is on communication program development, rather than on individual
student evaluation. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 0(0-0) D


PAIE (credit bearing course or options); COM 495




THE 121 Acting Studio 1

Prerequisite: permission of instructor; and concurrent enrollment in THE 122; and open only to
BFA Acting and Musical Theatre majors admitted through the audition process. Discovery and
development of the actor's expressive behavior through improvisation. 3(1-4) F


THE 221 Acting Studio 11

Prerequisite: THE 121. Emphasis on finding truth in performance through various acting
techniques and physicalization of text. Application of play analysis to character study. 3(1-4) S

THE 321 Acting Studio 111

Prerequisite: THE 221. Projects in advanced characterization. 3(1-4) F

THE 421 Acting Studio 1V

Prerequisite: THE 321. Advanced techniques and tutorial scene work from classic theatre
literature of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. 3(1-4) S

THE 498 Advanced Actor Seminar

Prerequisite: THE 421 and permission of instructor. Lecture and laboratory experience for the
actor about to enter the professional arena. 2(1-2) F
A. General Education Requirements- see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog.
B. Major Requirements (83 hours)
    1. Acting (14 hours): THE 121(3), 221(3), 321(3), 421(3), 451(2)
    2. Applied Voice (11 hours): MUS 298(0), MUS 498(2-4) and from MUS 153-453(1-2)

ART 300 Fundamentals of Collaboration in Electronic Arts

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor based on passing Candidacy Review in Electronic Arts.
Exploration of aesthetic and communication issues involved in producing work in interdisciplinary
electronic media. 3(0-6) F,S

ART 330 Computer Animation II

Prerequisite: ART 230. Further exploration of visual expression in animation. Advanced
techniques in the manipulating of forms and surfaces within the digital 3D environment. 3(0-6) S


ART 431 Professional Practices in Computer Animation

Prerequisite: ART 430. Lecture, discussion and assignments for students seeking careers in
computer animation. Presentation skills will be emphasized. Students will be required to write
and perform research, as well as continue to develop their portfolio. 3(0-6) F


SPN 324 Topics in Spanish Linguistics

Prerequisite: SPN 312. Develops students' understanding of issues in Spanish linguistics by
exploring such topics as phonetics and phonology, morphology and syntax, semantics, history of
the language, and regional and social language variation. May be repeated one with different
content. Variable content course. 3(3-0), F
General Business (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
 B. COBA Admission and Program Requirements - see College of Business
Administration/Admission and Program Requirements section of catalog
 C. Major Requirements (32-33 hours)
     1. INS 211(3); LAW 335(2) or 532(3)
     2. Complete one of the following: ENG 321(3); JRN 270(3); MGT 397(3)
     3. Complete a minimum of 24 hours from at least five of the following areas:
          a. Accounting: ACC 301(3), 302(3), 311(3), 321(3), 513(3), 524(3), 532(3)
          b. Business Relationships: BUS/LAW 550(3);LAW 341(3), MGT 486(3)
          c. Computer Information Systems: CIS 205(3), 260(3), 270(3), 290(3); 370(3) or 510(3)**;
375(3)
          d. Finance: BUS 510(3)**; FIN 381(3), 384(3), 386(3), 390(3), 485(3)
         e. International: FIN 582(3); LAW 539(3); MGT 447(3); MKT 474(3)
          f. Management: LAW 531(3); MGT 345(3), 561(3); TCM 359(3)
          g. Marketing: MKT 351(3), 352(3), 354(3), 355(3), 430(3), 510(3)**
         h. Real Estate: FIN 266(3), 367(3), FIN/LAW 368(3), FIN 369(3)
         i. Risk Management and Insurance: FIN/INS 538(3); INS 312(3), 313(3), 314(3), 415(3);
LAW 537(3)
Recommended electives (not required): AGB 354(2); BUS 303(2), 307(2); ECO 305(3), 586(3); GRY
321(3); PSY 359(3), 525(3); SOC 150(3), 309(3), 359(3)
 D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
PAIE (credit bearing course or options); CSD 380, CSD 315




PAIE (credit bearing course or options); PED 491, PED 350, PED 500, PED 493, PED 496, REC 205,
REC 335, REC 390, REC 410, REC 491, REC 205
PAIE (credit bearning course or options); NUR 442, NUR 482, NUR 503




Nursing (Comprehensive) (Generic, 4-year Program)
Bachelor of Science in Nursing

The Department of Nursing offers a generic, 4-year nursing program that leads to a Bachelor of
Science in Nursing degree (BSN). Admission to this program is by application and selection as
stated in the admission policies. Students should refer to the BSN Student Handbook for
additional information on the policies and procedures in the Department of Nursing.

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
    Specific General Education Requirements: CHM 105(5) or 160(4) preferred; PSY 121(3); SOC
150(3)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. The following prerequisites must be completed before beginning the first nursing course:
BIO 210(3); BMS 130(3) or 240(3) perferred; BMS 307(4) or PED 250(3); BMS 308(4) or PED 252(3)
      2. Upper Division Nursing: NUR 302(4), 303(3), 304(5), 311(2), 312(6), 322(4), 323(4),
331(4), 342(4), 360(3), 416(2), 442(6), 472(3), 478(2), 482(6), 565(3)
      3. Select one or more courses from the following to equal three(3) credit hours: HCM
301(3), HCM 303(3), HCM 504(3), NUR 420(3), 490(3), NUR 499(1-6), NUR 501(3), NUR 502(3),
NUR 503(3), NUR 515(3), NUR 530(3)
      4. Select one course in statistics from the following: SOC 302(3), PSY 200(3), MTH 340(3),
ECO 308(3), QBA 237(3), AGR 330(3), REC 328(3) or PSY 527(3)
  C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog

Admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

Admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program (BSN) is competitive and selective, and
Nursing (Comprehensive) (Completion Program for Registered Nurses)
Bachelor of Science in Nursing

The Department of Nursing offers a Junior-Senior level nursing program leading to a Bachelor of
Science in Nursing degree (BSN). Degree candidates must be registered nurse graduates of
associate degree or diploma nursing programs. Admission to the program is by application and
selection as stated in the admission policies. Students should refer to the BSN Student Handbook
for additional information on the policies and procedures in the Department of Nursing.

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
    Specific General Education Requirements: SOC 150(3) and PSY 121(3)
 B. Major Requirements
     1. Upper Division Nursing Requirements: NUR 306(3), 341(4), 342(4), 442(6), 472(3), 482(6),
484(2), 515(3), 565(3)
     2. Select one course in statistics from the following: SOC 302(3), PSY 200(3), MTH 340(3),
ECO 308(3), QBA 237(3), AGR 330(3), REC 328(3), PSY 527(3) or others by permission.
 3. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog
    A maximum of six hours in NUR 499 may be credited toward the degree.

Admission Policies

  1. Acceptance of application to the University by the Office of Admissions. (Note: Admission to
the University does NOT automatically constitute acceptance for the professional program in
nursing. The Department of Nursing’s Admissions, Progression and Graduation Committee will
make recommendations on each application.)
  2.
N/A Current licensure in good standing as a registered nurse in the State of Missouri or in the




GER 320 Gender Issues in Later Life

Prerequisite: PSY 121, and GST 170 or 45 hours. A comparison of the aging experiences of men
and women in later life. The relevance of gender and gender roles to the aging process will be
considered. Specific topics of analysis will include the gender gap in longevity, psychological and
physical health, minority status, socioeconomic status, family relationships, and public policy
issues. 3(3-0) S
Deleted




Deleted




GER 365 Families in Later Life

Prerequisite: PSY 121; and CFD 155 or CFD 163 or 30 hours. Examination of the structure and
function of families in later life. Topics of interest include demographic trends impacting the
structure of the family, marriage, sibling relations, parent-adult child relations, grandparenthood,
widowhood, and retirement. The application of family theories and their relevance to later life
families will be discussed. Identical with CFD 365, SWK 365, and PSY 366. Can only receive credit
for one of following: CFD 365, GER 365, PSY 366 or SWK 365. 3(3-0) F


GER 598 Supervised Practicum in Gerontology

Prerequisite: completion of the gerontology core courses with a grade of "C" or better in each
and permission of the program coordinator. On-site contacts with elderly individuals through an
internship at a residential or community placement approved by the coordinator. Direct
supervision will be provided by qualified professionals in the field of gerontology. Students will
serve 45 clock hours for each credit hour awarded. May be repeated to a total of 12 hours. 3-12
F,S Must be taken concurrently with GER 599.
GER 499 Seminar in Gerontology

Prerequisite: completion of the gerontology core courses with a grade of "C" or better in each
and permission of the program coordinator. Weekly meetings to allow students to correlate
experiences in GER 498 with academic knowledge, share experiences, and broaden contacts in
the field of aging. Survey of current literature in gerontology from various disciplines will be
included. 3(3-0) F,S




PSY 354 Gender Issues in Later Life 3(3-0) S
Prerequisite: PSY 121, and GST 170 or 45 hours. A comparison of the aging experiences of men
and women in later life. The relevance of gender and gender roles to the aging process will be
considered. Specific topics of analysis will include the gender gap in longevity, psychological and
physical health, minority status, socioeconomic status, family relationships, and public policy
issues. Identical to GER 320. Can only receive credit for one of the following: GER 320 or PSY 354.
PSY 366 Families in Later Life 3(3-0) F
Prerequisite: Psychology 121 and CFD 155 or CFD 163 or 30 hours. Examination of the stucture
and function of families in later life. Topics of interest include demographic trends impacting the
stucture of the family, marriage, sibling relations, parent-adult child relations, grandparenthood,
widowhood, and retirement. The applicaion of family theories and their relevance to later life
families will be discussed. Identical with GER 365, CFD 365, and SWK 365. Can only recieve credit
for one of the following: GER 365, CFD 365, SWK 365, or PSY 366.




Psychology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

Admission Requirement: Complete PSY 150(1)

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
 B. Admission Requirement- Complete PSY 150 before admission to Psychology major.
 C. Major Requirements (34 hours)
      1. Required Core (13 hours): PSY 121(3), 150(1), 200(3), 302(3), 411(3)
      2. Foundation Coursework (12 hours) Choose at least one course from each of the following
areas:
          a. Developmental: PSY 331(3), 350(3), 365(3), 441(3)
          b. Learning and Cognition: PSY 306(3), PSY 422(3), PSY 502(3)
          c. Biological Processes: PSY 336(3), 506(3), 521(3), 525(3)
          d. Applied: PSY 304(3), 359(3), 512(3), 529(3)
      3. Additional 9 hours of psychology electives, at least 6 hours of which must be numbered
300 or above.
 D. Minor Required (or second major)
  E. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and
Requirements section of catalog
 F. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog
Psychology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

Admission Requirement: Complete PSY 150(1)

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
  B. Admission Requirement- Complete PSY 150 before admission to Psychology major.
  C. Major Requirements (34 hours)
      1. Required Core (13 hours): PSY 121(3), 150(1), 200(3), 302(3), 411(3)
      2. Foundation Coursework (12 hours) Choose at least one course from each of the following
areas:
          a. Developmental: PSY 331(3), 350(3), 365(3), 441(3)
          b. Learning and Cognition: PSY 306(3), PSY 422(3), PSY 502(3)
          c. Biological Processes: PSY 336(3), 506(3), 521(3), 525(3)
          d. Applied: PSY 304(3), 359(3), 512(3), 529(3)
      3. Additional 9 hours of psychology electives, at least 6 hours of which must be numbered
300 or above.
  D. Minor Required (or second major)
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog


SWK 205 Interviewing Skills in Generalist Social Work Practice

Prerequisite: SWK 212, 219, 222 or concurrent enrollment. An introduction to basic interviewing
skills based upon the purpose of and plan for the interview in the context of generalist social
work practice. SWK 300 may be taken concurrently. 3(3-0) F


SWK 222 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

Prerequisite: SOC 150; PSY 121; COM 115; SWK 212; and one of the following: BIO 102, BIO 121,
BMS 100, BMS 105 or BMS 110.Prerequisite: SWK 212 and SWK 219 or concurrent. An
introduction to the dynamics of human behavior and the effects of the social environment on the
development of individuals and families. SWK 212 may be taken concurrently. 3(3-0) F,Su


SWK 305 Social Work Practice with Individuals

Prerequisite: SWK 205, 212, 219, 222, 300, 322, 308, 309, and 318; and SOC 302/PSY 200 and PSY
304; and Writing II. Basic principles, practice theories and skill for beginning generalist practice
with individuals. Integrates practice theory and intervention skills within the context of the
Generalist Intervention/Problem-Solving model. The class emphasizes personal awareness,
professional growth, critical thinking and skills practice. 3(3-0) F
SWK 318 Methods of Social Research in Social Work Practice

Prerequisite: SWK 205, 212, 219, 308, 309, 300, 222, 322, or concurrent enrollment; and Writing
II or concurrent enrollment; and one of the following statistics courses: SOC 302, PSY 200, AGR
330, ECO 308, MTH 340, QBA 237, REC 328, or concurrent enrollment . The application and use
of the social scientific method for conducting research and applying research to social work
practice including, but not limited to, single subject research design, treatment intervention
evaluation, and program evaluation. 3(3-0) S


SWK 322 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II

Prerequisite: SWK 205, 212, 219, 222, 308, 309, 318 and Writing II or concurrent enrollment.
Exploration of a broad systems' approach to the generalist practice of social work. Focuses on the
theories that support social work practice with groups, organizations, and communities. 3(3-0), S


SWK 409 Social Welfare Policy and Services II

Prerequisite: SWK 205, 212, 219, 300, 308, 309, 318, 322 and Writing II; and admission into the
BSW program. An introduction to the analytic, interactional, value clarification and political
strategies necessary for policy analysis and implementation. 3(3-0) F


SWK 420 Social Work Practice with Groups and Families

Prerequisite: SWK 219 and SWK 222 and SWK 305 and SWK 308 and SWK 322 and Writing II; and
Final Progression (fully "Admitted") status into the BSW program. Offers basic principles of group
and family (G/F) interventions with a generalist practice foundation. Contrasts G/F with other
forms of social work practice. Reviews skills required to conduct clinical and task groups.
Overviews skills needed to work with families. Emphasizes cultural diversity and ethical
parameters when offering G/F services. 3(3-0) F


SWK 430 Social Work Practice in Communities and Organizations

Prerequisite: SWK 205, 212, 219, 222, 300, 308, 309, 322; and Writing II; and admission into the
BSW program. Problem assessment and practice interventions with macrosystems. Examines
strategies and techniques for social work practice with organizations and communities. 3(3-0) F
SWK 480 Social Work Integrative Seminar

Prerequisite: SWK 205, 212, 219, 222, 300, 308, 318, 322, 409, 420, 430; and admission into the
BSW program; and concurrent enrollment in SWK 490. Examines student experiences, problems,
and questions related to the practicum. Integrates theory, knowledge, social work values and
skills from previous social work courses to prepare generalist social work practitioners. Failure to
pass this course will result in failure to pass SWK 490. 3(3-0) S




SWK 490 Practicum in Social Work

Prerequisite: SWK 205, 212, 219, 222, 300, 308, 318, 322, 409, 420, 430; and admission into the
BSW program; and concurrent enrollment in SWK 480. An educationally directed social work
practice experience with individuals, groups, families, communities and organizations in a social
service agency. Students are required to work a minimum of 450 hours. A student who receives a
not pass grade may repeat the course only with Field Education Committee approval. Failure to
pass this course will result in failure to pass SWK 480. A student must perform at the "C" level or
above in order to graduate with the BSW. Supplemental course fee. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.
9(0-32) S




PAIE (credit bearing course or options); SWK 490- Practicum in Social Work
Faculty (as of June 18, 2010)

Professor: Joan McClennen, Ph.D.

Associate Professors: Susan Dollar, Ph.D.; Mary Ann Jennings, Ph.D.

Assistant Professors: Jane G. Allgood, Ph.D.; Michele L. Day, Ph.D.; Darryl Haslam, Ph.D.

Coordinator of Field Education and MSW Program, Joplin: Renee White, M.S.W., LCSW

Coordinator of Field Education, Springfield: Lisa A. Street, M.S.W., LCSW
Accreditation

Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) – Social Work, B.S.W., M.S.W.
Graduate Programs

The following graduate programs are available:

Master of Social Work degree
Refer to the Graduate Catalog for more information.
Majors
Social Work (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Social Work

The Social Work major prepares graduates for beginning generalist social work practice.

Admission Requirements
PAIE (credit eligible to apply options); ATC 320, 240, 241, 340, 341, 440, 441
Students arebearing course orfor admission into the BSW program when the following conditions




BMS 528 Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis

Prerequisite: BMS 521. An in-depth study of the methods of genetic control and production of
pathogenic factors employed by disease causing bacteria. The course will use both reference
material and primary literature to illustrate the topics under discussion. May be taught
concurrently with BMS 628. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 528 and BMS 628. 2(2-0) F
BMS 535 Signal Transduction

Prerequisite: BMS 521. This course will examine the molecular mechanisms of various
ligand/receptor interactions. The dynamics involved in ligand/receptor binding will be studied
and examples of receptor-mediated signal transduction will be introduced. Signaling pathways
within the cell will be discussed. Primary literature and reference materials will be utilized to
illustrate specific examples under discourse. May be taught concurrently with BMS 635. Cannot
receive credit for both BMS 535 and BMS 635. 2(2-0) S


PSY 365 Aging and Adjustment

Prerequisite: PSY 121. Personality adjustment in old age, with emphasis both on adequate and
maladjusted development. Factors influencing adjustment are considered. Both functional and
organic sources of maladjustment are surveyed. 3(3-0) F


SWK 219 Human Diversity

Prerequisite: COM 115. Content and skill development pertinent to working with diverse racial,
cultural, ethnic, and other populations such as persons with physical disabilities and mental
illnesses. This course is designed primarily to inform and sensitize individuals for effective
interventions within a heterogeneous society. SWK 300 may be taken concurrently. 3(3-0) F, S


SWK 300 Service Learning in Social Work

Prerequisite: 30 hours, concurrent registration in a social work course designated as a service
learning offering (SWK 205, SWK 212, SWK 219). This service component for an existing course
incorporates community service with classroom instruction to provide an integrative learning
experience that addresses the practice of citizenship and promotes an awareness of and
participation in public affairs. Includes 40 hours of service that benefits an external community
organization or human/social service agency. Approved settings will focus on populations-at-risk,
diverse populations and groups that have experienced social and economic injustice. A list of
approved placements and assignments is available from the instructor and the Citizenship and
Service Learning Office. May be repeated. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 1(0-2) F,S
SWK 308 Social Justice

Prerequisite: SWK 205, SWK 212, SWK 219, SWK 222; and ECO 155 or ECO 165 or equivalent; and
PLS 101. The primary subject matter of this course is social and economic inequality in United
States society. Students are introduced to the patterns and processes of social and economic
inequality in its major forms: class, race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual and political orientation.
3(3-0) F


SWK 309 Social Welfare Policy and Services I

Prerequisite: SWK 205, 212, 219, 222, 308, 309 and 318, or concurrent enrollment; PLS 101, ECO
155 or ECO 165; and Writing II. This course examines the historical development and
philosophical orientation of social welfare policy and services in the United States as well as
introduces students to the development of social work as a profession. The course focuses on
selected major social welfare policies and programs and the philosophical, economic, social and
political forces that shape their development. 3(3-0) S


ATC 320 Athletic Training Administration

Prerequisite: at least 75 hours towards Athletic Training major completed or at least 15 hours
towards Sports Medicine minor completed; and permission of program director. Development
and administration of current theoried, methods and techniques related to the organization and
administration of athletic training programs. Integration of leadership behaviors into the practice
and management of athletic training practice areas such as program management, budget,
insurance, facility design, legal issues, global issues, and ethics in the profession of athletic
training will be discussed. 3(3-0) F


PAIE (credit bearing course or options); PHI 350


REL 357 Religions of China and Japan
Recommended Prerequisite: REL 210. An historical survey of the major religions from East Asia,
with particular emphasis given to their doctrines, practices, and institutions. The course will focus
on Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, and Shinto. Some consideration will also be given to Korean
religious traditions, religion in contemporary East Asia, and popular relgious traditions. Important
themes include cultural adaptation and religious competition in East Asiam religious history. 3(3-
0) D
Religious Studies (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

  1. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
  2. Major Requirements
      1. REL 100(3), 101(3), 102(3), 131(3), 210(3), 580(3)
      2. Complete 15 hours from the following four areas, distributed so that there will be at least
six hours in one area and three hours in each of the other three areas. Courses must be chosen
to include at least one 500-level course and another course at the 300-level or above*:
          1. History of Religions: REL 350(3), 355(3), 357(3), 360(3), 540(3)
          2. Biblical Studies: REL 312(3), 319(3), 320(3), 321(3), 323(3), 362(3), 510(3), 520(3),
570(3), 571(3)
          3. History of Judaism and Christianity: REL 103(1), 330(3), 340(3), 550(1-3)
          4. Religion, Self, and Society: REL 200(1), 315(3), 332(3), 344(3), 345(3), 346(3), 365(3),
370(3), 530(3), 531(3); REL 390(3) or SOC 390(3) or PSY 533(3)

           *Variable content courses (REL 197, 397, 399) may be counted where appropriate with
the approval of the advisor and department head.
  3. Minor Required (or second major)
  4. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and
Requirements section of catalog
  5. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog

Religious Studies (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science




CRM 215 Career Preparation in Criminology and Criminal Justice

Prerequisite: Acquaint students with the types of job opportunities available in the field of
criminology and criminal justice including required credentials, career preparation, and the job
search process. Opportunities for graduate study, along with the proces of applying for more
advanced education, also are discussed. 1(1-0) F,S
CRM 397 Special Topics in Criminology

A variable topic course offering an overview of one or more issues related to criminology. May
be repeated. 1-3 D




SOC 384 Social Movements

The study of collective attempts to implement social change in society. Specific groups studied
will vary, but may include the civil rights, feminist, political, religious, environmental and health
movements. 3(3-0) S

SOC 337 Sociology of Gender

This course focuses on gender differences, patterns, and inequalities. It analyzes the social
construction of gender, femininities and masculinities, gender socialization, and how gender
intersects with race, class, and sexuality. Specific attention is paid to the significance of gender in
interaction, culture, and social institutions, including work, politics, media, and the family. 3(3-0)
D

Deleted




PAIE (credit bearing course or options); ANT 226, CRM 598, SOC 398, 336, 337, or 420




SOC 398 Public Sociology and Community Studies
Prerequisite: SOC 150 and SOC Major or Minor. Explores how Public Sociology is practiced and
connected to the local community. Provides conceptual tools for analyzing communities and
creates a foundation for meaningful community engagement. Each section will apply sociological
theories and methods to a specific community issue or problem. 3(3-0) F,S
Criminology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (36 hours)
     1. Required Core (21 hours): CRM 210(3), 320(3), 340(3), 350(3), 360(3), 370(3), 598(3)
     2. Complete 15 additional hours in CRM courses
     3. A minimum GPA of 2.50 in the courses counted toward the major
 C. Minor Required (or second major)
 D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and
Requirements section of catalog
 E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog




Criminology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (36 hours)
     1. Required Core (21 hours): CRM 210(3),320(3), 340(3), 350(3), 360(3), 370(3), 598(3)
     2. Complete 15 additional hours in CRM courses below the 500 level
 C. Minor Required (or second major)
 D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog
Deleted




Sociology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
 B. Major Requirements
     1. SOC 150(3), 301(3), 302(3), 303(1), 325(3), 398(3)
     2. Complete SOC 336, SOC 337, or SOC 420
     3. Complete one course designated as having a community engagement component: SOC
152(3), SOC 300(1), SOC 319(3), or SOC 320(3).
     4. Take additional SOC hours bringing total hours in major to 37.
 C. Minor Required (or second major)
 D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and
Requirements section of catalog
 E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog


Sociology (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
 B. Major Requirements
     1. SOC 150(3), 301(3), 302(3), 303(1), 325(3), 398(3)
     2. Complete SOC 336, SOC 337, or SOC 420
     3. Complete one course designated as having a community engagement component: SOC
152(3), SOC 300(1), SOC 319(3), or SOC 320(3).
     4. Take additional SOC hours bringing total hours in major to 37.
 C. Minor Required (or second major)
 D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog
PAIE (credit bearing course or options); ANT 226, CRM 598, SOC 398, 336, 337, or 420




ECO 515 Public Sector Economics

Prerequisite: ECO 155 and ECO 165. Allocation and distribution functions of the public sector of
the economy; theories of taxation and public expenditure; shifting and incidences of taxes, local-
state federal finance. May be taught concurrently with ECO 615. Cannot receive credit for both
ECO 615 and ECO 515. 3(3-0) D


PLS 169 Introduction to Political Science

An introduction to the contemporary concerns and historical development of political science as
a social science and as a mode of critical thinking about politics and society. Emphasis is upon
acquainting students with the scope of intellectual inquiry and the specialized sub-fields of study
of modern political science rather than with the particular characteristics of American
government and politics. 3(3-0) F,S


PLS 492 Program Assessment

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: senior standing. Required assessment of
undergraduate political science and public administration programs in the department. All
students majoring in political science and public administration are required to enroll in this
course during their senior year and pass a Major Field Achievement Test (MFAT). The focus is on
program assessment and development rather than on individual student evaluation. Graded
Pass/Not Pass only. 0 F,S


PLS 493 Practicum in Political Science

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA and junior or senior standing.
Supervised and departmentally approved part-time work experience related to Political Science
in public or private sector. May be repeated to a total of 12 hours, but only 6 hours will be
counted toward the major and 3 hours toward the minor. Approximately 5 on-the-job hours per
week required for 1 hour credit, in addition to fulfillment of academic requirements normally
restricted to Political Science majors and minors. Students minoring in Paralegal Studies must
take PLS 493 for 3 credit hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 1-3 D
PLS 494 Professional Internship

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA and junior or senior standing.
Supervised and departmentally approved full-time work experience related to Political Science in
public or private sector. May be repeated to a total of 12 hours, but only 6 hours will be counted
toward the major. Approximately eight weeks of 40 on-the-job hours per week required for 3
hours credit, in addition to fulfillment of academic requirements normally restricted to Political
Science majors. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 3-6 D




PLS 496 Independent Study in Political Science

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA; and junior or senior standing.
Students should consult with a professor of the department who specializes in the subject and
with the professor's consent present a written proposal to the department head for final
approval. Proposals should be presented for approval before final registration for the term in
which the independent study is to be done. Only one approved independent study program may
be taken in any semester. A maximum of 6 semester hours of credit in PLS 496 may be counted
on a major in political science and 3 semester hours of credit on a minor in political science or
public administration. Written work will be required in PLS 496 in addition to reading
assignments and/or research activities. 1-3 D




PLS 561 Ancient Political Thought

Prerequisite: PLS 101. Recommended Prerequisite: 50 hours. An introduction to the study of
political theory by examining the contributions of classical political theorists and their successors
up to the age of the Renaissance. Includes Socrates, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans,
Cynics and Stoics, Cicero and the Roman Lawyers, early Hebrew and Christian political thought,
Augustine and Aquinas. 3(3-0) FO




PLS 567 American Political Thought

Prerequisite: PLS 101. Recommended Prerequisite: 50 hours. Political ideas in American
institutional and historical development. An examination of the relations between American
thought and political structures and processes. 3(3-0) D
SOC 309 Work, Industry, and Society

The industrialization of society and its impact on formal and informal organization, management
philosophies, worker attitudes and labor relations. Current trends affecting the work place are
examined. 3(3-0) D

SOC 310 Social Deviance

An historical survey of the explanations of deviant behavior. Emphasis will focus on the structure
of norms and rules, their diversity, and their role in identifying deviance. 3(3-0) D


SOC 320 Political Sociology

Introduces students to a sociological analysis of political organization forms and their relations
with other elements of social life. Students examine the concept of power and the intersection of
personality, social structure, and politics. The course also emphasizes how social inequality
between groups (e.g. race, class, and gender, etc.) influences politics and elaborates major social
trends affecting the political process including how various social forces work to change political
policies. 3(3-0) D


SOC 336 Race and Ethnicity

This course explores the social construction of race and ethnicity. Issues of differential power
between racial and ethnic groups and the economic, political, and social structures which are
utilized to maintain these power differences are identified. Social movements and social policies
designed to address social inequality, prejudice and discrimination are also examined. 3(3-0) D


A. Natural Science Courses: Select 3 of the following (9-11 hours)
    1. BIO 369, General Ecology (4)
    2. CHM 260, Principles of Environmental Chemistry (3) or CHM 460, Environmental Chemistry
(3)
    3. GLG 171, Environmental Geology (4)* or GRY 108, Ecology and Society (3)**
    4. GRY 351, Conservation or Natural Resources (3) or AGA 335 Soil Conservation and Water
Management (3)
B. Policy: Select 3 of the following courses (9 hours)
    1. ECO 540, Economics of the Environment (3)
    2. PHI 302, Environmental Ethics (3)
    3. PLS 555, Public Policy for a Global Environment (3)
    4. LAW 537, Environmental Regulation (3)
    5. PSY 379, Environmental Psychology (3)
    6. SOC 319, Environmental Sociology (3)
HRA 497 International Hospitality Field Study
Prerequisite: HRA 210, 215, 218, and permission. Provides students with first-hand exposure to
international issues in hospitality administration. This Study Away Experience includes a
preparation phase, a two to three week visti to an international destination where students are
immersed in the local culture, and a debrief following the trip. Because credit and destinations
vary, the course may be repeated to a total of 6 credits. Grading Pass/Not Pass only. Variable
content course. Supplimental course fee. 1-3 D

Hospitality and Restaurant Administration (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section
of catalog
    Specific General Education Requirement: GRY 100(3)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. Core Courses: HRA 210(3), 215(3), 218(3), 310(3), 321(3), 354(3), 410(3), 426(3), 428(3),
480(3), 490(3), 499(6)
      2. Related Requirements: MKT 150(3) or 350(3); and ACC 201(3)
      3. Complete one of the following options (9 hours):
          a. Club Management: HRA 330(3), 430(3); HRA 360(3) or 436(3)
          b. Food and Beverage: HRA 330(3), 409(3), 435(3)
          c. Lodging: HRA 315(3), 360(3), 430(3) or HRA 436(3)
          d. Senior Living Management: HRA 330(3); GER 310(3), 365(3)
          e. Tourism: GRY 310(3), 328(3); HRA 340(3)
  C. Electives to bring total number of hours to 125. Students are encouraged to use these hours
to complete more than one track and to take HRA electives.
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree
Requirements section of catalog


BIO 512 Industrial Microbiology

Prerequisite: BIO 210 or BIO 310. An introduction to the fundamental concepts of industrial and
applied microbiology. The industrial production of proteins, metabolites, polymers, biocides, and
vaccines will be discussed in addition to biotransformations and environmental applications.
Production improvement strategies that employ both physical and modern molecular techniques
will be introduced. Laboratory will emphasize the selection of industrially important
microorganisms, the theory and operation of a fermentor for the production of proteins,
antibiotics, and steroids, use of analytical equipment for monitoring product formation, enzymes
analysis, downstream processing, and bio-reactor construction and design. May be taught
concurrently with BIO 613. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 613 and BIO 512. 3(2-2) S
HRA 330 Banquet Operations

Prerequisite: HRA 210 and HRA 321. This course provides students with practical skills and
knowledge for effective management of food and beverage practices, from the preparation of
quantity foods to its service. Laboratory arranged. Supplemental course fee. 3(2-2) F,S


HRA 430 Special Event Planning

Prerequisite: MKT 150 or 350 and HRA 321. In-depth analysis of management and operational
challenges involved in planning and deploying events as they relate to the hospitality industry.
3(3-0) F,S




HRA 436 Casino Operations

Prerequisite: HRA 354 or concurrent enrollment. This course provides an overview of the gaming
industry with an emphasis on casino hotel operations as an integral part of the hospitality
industry. Topics include the history of gaming, casino layout and design, surveillance,
demographic profiles, psychological profiles, and economic impact. 3(3-0) F,S


BMS 110 Introduction to the Biomedical Sciences

Prerequisite: eligibility for both ENG 110 and MTH 135.General Education Course (Natural
World). An introduction to concepts and techniques related to human anatomy, physiology,
genetics, cellular and molecular biology. Recommended for students in majors within the College
of Health and Human Services and those students interested in preprofessional programs and
Allied Health careers. Students will receive credit for only one of the following: BMS 100 or 105
or 110. Supplemental course fee. This course may not be taken pass/not pass. 4(3-2) F,S




BMS 111 Introductory Laboratory in the Biomedical Sciences

Prerequisite: BMS 100, BMS 105, or BIO 102 and eligibility for both ENG 110 and MTH 135. This
course is identical to the laboratory portion of BMS 110 and is designed for students who require
intensive introductory laboratory experience to prepare for future laboratory work in the
biomedical sciences. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 110 and BMS 111. This course may not
be taken pass/not pass. 1(0-2) F,S
COU 781 Secondary School Counceling Internship

Prerequisite: admission to Counseling program; and either COU 780 or COU 784; and department
permission. Supervised experience in secondary school counseling at an approved school site.
Minimum of 150 hours on-site. Students will receive individual supervision on-site, and small-
group supervision from the department. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours. Graded Pass/Not
Pass only. Supplemental course fee. 3(1-10), F,S


COU 783 Elementary School Counseling Internship

Prerequisite: admission to Counseling program; and COU 782; and department permission.
Supervised experience in elementary school counseling at an approved school site. Minimum of
150 hours on-site. Students will receive individual supervision on-site, and small-group
supervision from the department. May be repeated up to 9 credit hours. Graded Pass/Not Pass
only. Supplemental course fee. 3(1-10), F,S


Admission
Qualified applicants may enter the MBA program at the beginning of any semester. Admission to
the MBA program is granted to students who fulfill the following provisions.

  1. The student must have received a Bachelor's or Master's degree from a regionally accredited
college or university.
  2. The applicant must meet the following performance standards:
      a. A GPA of at least 3.00 for the last 60 hours of academic work;
      b. A Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) composite score of at least 450.
Arrangements for taking the GMAT can be made by calling Pearson Professional Centers at (800)
717-4628 or by visiting their website at www.mba.com.
        NOTE: With the approval of the Director of the MBA program, recent scores from other
national standardized tests for graduate study such as the Graduate Records Examination (GRE)
may be deemed equivalent. In these instances, equivalent test scores can be used to meet
minimum GMAT score requirements (above) and can be used in formula calculations for
admission purposes. A GMAT to GRE Conversion Chart is available at
http://www.ets.org/gre/institutions/about/mba.
      c. A minimum value of 1,100 based on the following formula — (200 X GPA in last 60 hours)
+ GMAT score;
     d. A minimum score in the 20th percentile for both the verbal and the written components
of the GMAT. The verbal and written components of this requirement can be waived if the
applicant successfully completes the Missouri State University English Language Institute (see
below for more information).
  3. Students who do not meet the normal admission requirements, but who possess high
promise (usually based upon a successful record of managerial performance at increasing levels
of responsibility) may be considered for admission.
 GMAT preparation course
The International Center offers a GMAT preparation course each semester. The price of the
Degree Requirements (minimum of 33 hours)
1. Core Requirements (21 hours)
ACC 600 Financial Accounting Concepts for Managers 3 hrs
COM 718 Applied Communication Research Methods 3 hrs
COM 736 Concepts & Analysis of Communication in Organizations 3 hrs
CIS 600 Information Systems in Business Organizations 3 hrs
PLS 651 Administrative Law 3 hrs
PLS 756 Financial Management for State and Local Government 3 hrs
PSY Personnel Selection, Placement and Classification 3 hrs
TOTAL 21 hrs

2. Research Methods/Research Requirement
Research Methods Requirement. The research methods requirement is satisfied by completing
COM 718 Applied Communication Research Methods in the required core.

Research Requirement. MSAS students are expected to demonstrate research and writing
proficiency appropriate to their career path and program emphasis. Scholarly projects are
required within the option area and a research methods course to satisfy this requirement.
Students will complete a significant project as a capstone experience in an option area course.




1. Applied Communication Option:
COM 611 Conflict and Communication 3 hrs
COM 617 Communication and Diversity in the Workplace 3 hrs
COM 619 Communication and Ethics 3 hrs
COM 732 Small Group Communication 3 hrs
COM 713 Media Resources for Organizations 3 hrs
ENG 562 Contemporary American Poetry/Fiction
Prerequisite: 60 hrs. A survey of contemporary American poetry or fiction, which encompasses a
selection of significant authors and traces the history and development of various literary
theories, schools and movements, from New Criticism through more recent trends in both
narrative and lyric modes (poetry) and Post-Modern narrative techniques (fiction). 3(3-0) F,S
ENG 662 Contemporary American Poetry/Fiction
A survey of contemporary American poetry or fiction, which encompasses a selection of
significant authors and traces the history and development of various literary theories, schools
and movements, from New Criticism through more recent trends in both narrative and lyric
modes (poetry) and Post-Modern narrative techniques (fiction). 3(3-0) F,S
MGT 702 Managing Healthcare Organizations 3(3-0) S.
Prerequisite: MGT 701 or permission of instructor. A broad overview of techniques and practices
applied to managing healthcare provider organizations at levels including governing board;
professional staff; executive offices; and operational systems that deliver acute care,
rehabilitation, diagnosis, therapy, ambulatory care, clinical information, clinical support, patient
access, facilities and nutrition services. Organizational settings will include hospitals; physician
practices; integrated health systems; rehabilitation and sub-acute facilities; behavioral medicine;
long-term care; hospice; and home health. Course format will include a series of guest
presentations from actively practicing, senior health care executives, along with visits to
healthcare organizations.




MGT 703 Organizational Behavior in Healthcare Organizations 3(3-0) F
Prerequisite: MGT 600 or equivalent. The course with involve the study of individual and group
behavior viewed from a leadership perspective within a healthcare organization with specific
emphasis on leadership styles, ethics, motivational techniques, conflict resolution and
professional norms in relationship to the various healthcare stakeholders and providers.
Attention is focused on organizational dynamics, culture and governance of the different
business entities involved in the delivery of healthcare services.
MGT 704 Human Resources in Healthcare Organizations 3(3-0) S
Prerequisite: MGT 600 or equivalent. Integration of human resources management into the
strategic and operational decision-making processes of a comtemporary healthcare
organiztation. Functional topics include HR strategic planning, HR legal environment, direct and
indirect compensation strategies, recruitment/selection/retention, workforce planning, job
design and analysis, performance management, productivity analysis, workoforce
development/traininig, employee/labor and stakeholder relations and safety/health
considerations. Particular consideration for HR concepts related to clinical professionals and
physicians.




MGT 705 Strategic Management of Healthcare Organizations 3(3-0)
Prerequisite: 18 graduate hours in health administration, including FGB 788. Integration of the
functional areas of health care organizations via the strategic planning process. Emphasis is
placed upon the identication of major stratiegic processes for healthcare organiztations as well as
policy issues related to current and anticipated future healthcare environment.
Master of Health Administration

D. Michael Leibert Graduate Director
411 Glass Hall, Phone (417) 836-4444
MichaelLeibert@missouristate.edu
Program Description

The Master of Health Administration (MHA) degree is a College of Business Administration
degree that includes several interdisciplinary courses contributed by other colleges on campus.
The program is designed for students holding at least an undergraduate degrees who wish to
further their careers in the management of health organizations including integrated systems,
hospitals, group practices, long-term care facilities, clinics, managed care organizations, and
other types of health organizations. The program can be completed in as little as two years.
Students with little or no undergraduate work in business are welcome, and will normally require
additional time for completion.

The MHA program is accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate
Schools of Business.

Admission Requirements

  1. The student must have received at least a Bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited
college or university.
  2. The student must have a GPA of at least 2.75 for the last 60 hours of academic work and
submit a score on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), the Graduate Record
Examination (GRE), or equivalent standardized exam.
  3. Students who do not meet the admission requirements, but who show indication of high
promise will be Health Fieldfor probationary admission.
PBH 798 Public considered Experience

Prerequisite: students must have successfully completed 33 credit hours including all public
health core and other required courses and passed the core course exam. The required field
experience provides experience in program development, community relations, public education,
and research. Possible sites include: official health agencies, voluntary health agencies, or
community social agencies. Selection is dependent on the students' backgrounds and career
expectations. Students may choose to spend their entire time in one agency, or, for shorter
periods, in 2 or more agencies. The field experience can be done during the fall, spring, or
summer and can be no less than 200 hours. All field experiences must be approved by the field
experience faculty supervisor and the Program Director to ensure the site acceptability. May be
repeated. 1-6, D
PBH 735 Software Applications and Data Sources in Public Health
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. This course will provide an overview of important software
and databases that are commonly used in public health surveillance, program planning and
research. Students will learn to access, analyze, and interpret morbidity and mortality data from
a variety of national and statewide data sources (e.g., NHANES, BRFSS, MICA, CDC Wonder, vital
statistics). Data will be analyzed descriptively using statistical software including Excel, CDC's
EpiInfo, SPSS and/or SAS. 3(3-0) F




PBH 799 Capstone Project in Public Health
Prerequisite: admission to the Master of Public Health program. The Capstone Project provides
students the opportunity to integrate knowledge gained in the classroom with real-world
problems through completion of a major research, program planning development,
management, service delivery, or evaluatoin project. Some aspect of the project must be
original, whether it is the topic itself, an analysis of newly collected or extant data, the
reinterpretation of others' findings, or the design and completion of a community project. While
student led, the project is designed in consultation with, and carried out under the guidance of, a
faculty supervisor. Student must have the capstone project proposal form approved by the
faculty supervisor and program director prior to enrollment. 3(3-0) D
Master of Public Health
Vickie Sanchez, Program Director
Physical Therapy Building, room 112
Phone: (417) 836-8850
VSanchez@missouristate.edu; http://www.missouristate.edu/mph/
Program Description
The Master of Public Health (MPH) program offers a generalist MPH degree consisting of 42
credit hours. The program’s mission is to prevent disease, promote health, and protect the well-
being of the public through education, research and service.
Students gain knowledge in each of the five core disciplines of public health: biostatistics,
epidemiology, environmental health sciences, public health administration, and the social
behavioral sciences. The program prepares students to assess community health needs, plan
effective health education and health intervention programs, implement and evaluate
educational experiences, and conduct public health research.
Graduates of this program will enter public health service as practitioners, administrators,
researchers, educators, and consultants in a wide variety of public health settings. Most will be
employed in local, state, and national public health agencies, while others will work for non-
profit organizations, private agencies, medical facilities, governmental agencies, and educational
institutions.
Retention and Readmission to the Program
Admission to the MPH program is through a competitive admissions process with only a limited
number of students admitted each year. Students who leave the program will be required to
apply for readmission. Applications for readmission will be reviewed by the MPH admission,
progression and graduate (APG) committee. Previous enrollment does not guarantee
readmission. The student’s readmission will depend on where the student places in the
competitive enrollment process.
All students must enroll in at least one credit hour each fall and spring semesters until graduation
SWK 599/696 Health program. International students must
to remain in the MPHLiteracy in the Human Services 3(3-0) S comply with program and
Prerequisite: instructor permission. Course Description: This online course offers an
interdisciplinary approach to understanding functional health literacy and how the public's
literacy skills affect interactions with health and human services professionals. Includes an
examination of the data for national and international literacy levels and populations at risk for
low literacy; research on health literacy; assessment tools; and practical techniques for
addressing literacy issues in spoken and written communications at the practitioner and
organizational levels. Cannot receive credit for both SWK 599/696 and BMS 599.
ANT 650 Advanced Methods in Archaeology
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Advanced study and practice in methods and techniques
employed in archaeology such as lithic, ceramic, and faunal analysis. Variable content course.
May be repeated when topic changes. May be taught concurrently with ANT 550. Cannot receive
credit for both ANT 550 and ANT 650 for the same topic. 3(3-0) S




ANT 790 Internship in Applied Anthropology

Prerequisite: ANT 700 and permission of instructor. A minimum of 200 hours of work experience
as an applied anthropologist with an approved business, organization, program, or agency.
Requires a written report and a public presentation. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 3(0-6) Su


ANT 797 Practicum in Applied Anthropology

Prerequisite: ANT 770 and permission of instructor. The student will conduct an applied research
project from start to finish, culminating in a professional report. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 3-6 D


ANT 799 Thesis

Prerequisite: ANT 770 and permission of instructor. Research and writing of a Master's thesis
under the direction of a faculty advisor. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 3-6 D


ANT 655 Archaeological Theory
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A comprehensive and in-depth examination of theoretical
issues and perspectives concerning and practice of archaeology and the interpretation of
archaeological remains. May be taught concurrently with ANT 555. Cannot receive credit for both
ANT 555 and 655. 3(3-0) D
MED 661 Sound Mixing

An in-depth exploration of the art of sound design for digital film and TV. Students will learn how
to carry out the aesthetic considerations of sound through the mixing process. Emphasis will be
placed on advanced sound editing for sub- and final mixing, mix engineering, sound-effect
processing and surround-sound practice. Students will learn how to mix a movie's dialogue,
sound effects, ambience and music into stereo and surround tracks. May be taught concurrently
with MED 561. Cannot receive credit for both MED 661 and MED 561. 3(3-1) F
MUS 148 Introduction to a Career in Music Education

This coures is an orientation to the music education profession and to the teacher education
program. Students explore roles and responsibilities of music teachers, complete field
observations (minimum of 10 hours), develop a preliminary portfolio, and complete projects
designed to examine the skills involved in teaching music. The field observation component
requires the student to carry eduational liability insurance and register with the Missouri Family
Care Safety Registry. 1(1-1) F,S

MUS 200 Clinical Experiences in Music Education

Prerequisite: MUS 148. This serves as the gateway course to the teacher music education
program. An overview of school organization, management techniques, goals, objectives,
assessment, technology, curriculum preparation, unit planning, and diversity as a knowledge
base for K-12 music teachers is developed through student projects. Students participate in a 30-
hour field experience in area schools. The portfolio checkpoint required for admission to teacher
education will occur during this course. A grade "C" or better in this course and a score of 265 on
each section of the C-BASE exam is required to be admitted in the teacher education program.
The field observation component requires the student to carry educational liability insurance, a
TB exam and registration with the Missouri Family Care Safely Registry. 3(2-4) F,S
Reason for Course/Program Change - Or - Purpose College          Dept      Course      Course #
of Course                                                                  code           If
                                                                           If changed,  renumbered,
                                                                           put new code put new
                                                                                        course
                                                                                        number here


Computers for Learning is no longer a relevant         COAL      Art and   ART         230
prerequisite given the general knowledge base of                 Design
computing the incoming students already have, relative
to the needs of this course. Enrollment management is
the reason to reduce the periodicity of the semesters
this course can be offered.

Allow for more specific course information and program COAL      Art and   ART         323
structure.                                                       Design




Allow for more fluid course offering within the program. COAL    Art and   ART         324
                                                                 Design




This course change works in tandem with proposed new COAL        Art and   ART         430
courses: ART 331 and ART 432- to better defin the                Design
existing curricular path students in the BFA in Art,
Animation emphasis already travel- but do so now
under existing vaguely-worded course descriptions with
repeatable hours.




Change numbering sequence to allow for futher             COAL   Art and   ART         322
progression in Jewelry/Metal program. This clarifies that        Design
in the Fall semester the second metals class covers
casting and silversmithing and the Spring semester class
covers enameling and color techniques. The old way of
listing both the classes at this level as ART 323 made it
seem that the same material was covered both
semesters.
This report will provide the necessary documentation of COAL    Communica COM     499
a public affairs related activity completed by all              tion
communication majors. This requirement is noted in the
requirements of each degree program.




Expedited Curricular Proposal-Public Affairs Intensive   COAL   Communica
Experience                                                      tion




The name change will more accurately reflect the         COAL   Theatre     THE   121
program philosophy and nature of the specific                   and Dance
coursework. Will eliminate registration confusion with
non-BFA track acting classes.




The name change will more accurately reflect the         COAL   Theatre     THE   221
program philosophy and nature of the specific                   and Dance
coursework. Will eliminate registration confusion with
non-BFA track acting classes.

The name change will more accurately reflect the         COAL   Theatre     THE   321
program philosophy and nature of the specific                   and Dance
coursework. Will eliminate registration confusion with
non-BFA track acting classes.
The name change will more accurately reflect the         COAL   Theatre     THE   421
program philosophy and nature of the specific                   and Dance
coursework. Will eliminate registration confusion with
non-BFA track acting classes.

Students need to complete 2 advanced scene study         COAL   Theatre     THE   498
classes before taking this class.                               and Dance
To correct an oversight: MUS 298 Upper Division          COAL   Theatre
Applied Status was not included in the degree                   and Dance
requirements of Musical Theatre when added to the
other Music Major Requirements. This addition will not
change the number of credit hours required for the
degree.
The prerequisite change is to help clarify at what point COAL   Art and     ART   300
students should start seeking permission; periodicity           Design
change is housekeeping- this class has been only offered
in the spring for some time.


Editorial change in the description added to clarity.   COAL    Art and     ART   330
                                                                Design




Clarity                                                 COAL    Art and     ART   431
                                                                Design




Change in prerequisite                                  COAL    Modern      SPN   324
                                                                and
                                                                Classical
                                                                Languages
Adding ACC 513 to the Accounting line: The accounting COBA       Finance
line of the "complete 24 hours from at least five areas"         and
already included two intermediate accounting courses             General
and two tax courses, so the second managerial                    Business
accounting course (ACC 513 is being added to the
accounting line in addtion to the first one (ACC 311).
Moving LAW 341 from the Risk Management and
Insurance line to the Business Relationships line:
Apparently LAW 341 "Legal Research and Writing" was
part of the risk management and insurance line since it
formerly shared the RIL prefix with the insurance
courses. Learning how to research legal issues and to
write persuasively would be considered important in
how one's business relates to others, thus this course
fits better into the Business Relationships" line.
Adding LAW 537 to the Risk Management and Insurance
line: There are many risk management issues addressed
in this course. Here is an excerpt from the catalog
description: "Laws and government environmental
regulation of air, water and soil quality, energy
resources, solid and toxic waste disposal, storage tanks,
toxic torts, labeling of toxic substances..."
Removing the e-commerce phrasing: The e-business
class may be offered less frequently in the near future,
so it might be more difficult for students to complete
Expedited Curricular Proposal-Public Affairs Intensive    CHHS   Comunicati
Experience                                                       on Science
                                                                 and
                                                                 Disorders

Expedited Curricular Proposal-Public Affairs Intensive   CHHS    Health,
Experience                                                       Physical
                                                                 Education,
                                                                 and
                                                                 Recreation
Expedited Curricular Proposal-Public Affairs Intensive   CHHS   Nursing
Experience




The reason for the program changes are: 1) comply with CHHS     Nursing
the +/- grading system of the University; and 2) to clarify
statements regarding admission, retention, progression,
and graduation in the generic 4-year nursing program.
The reason for the program changes are: 1) comply with CHHS     Nursing
the +/- grading system of the University; and 2) to clarify
statements regarding admission, retention, progression,
and graduation in the BSN Completion nursing program.




This course was expanded to create the 3 credit hours   CHHS    Psychology GER   302
course: PSY 309 Identity and Aging in Literature and
Film. It is duplicative and should be eliminated.




Cross-listing GER 320 with PSY 354 will allow Psychology CHHS   Psychology GER   320
students to take the course as an elective in their major
and boost enrollment in the Gender Issues in Later Life
course.
GRE 330 has not been offered in many years and this        CHHS   Psychology GER   330
deletion is a way of clearning out a course no longer
offered. In addition, the Psychology course has just
developed a course on diversity issues that will be used
by students in the Gerontology Program who are
seeking more information in this area.




Since Gerontology is now a unit within the Psychology      CHHS   Psychology GER   350
Department, GER 350 is viewed as duplicating PSY 363
Death and Human Behavior and should therefore be
eliminated




The Gerontology Program is no longer an independent CHHS          Psychology GER   365
program. It is now located within the Department of
Psychology. Existing course GER 365 (Families in Later
Life)- is being cross-listed with PSY 366 (Families in Later
Life) (current proposal) and SWK 365 (Families in Later
Life) (simultaneous proposal), as well as with CFD 365
(already cross-listed with GER 365). This will allow
Psychology students to take this course as a part of their
major and minor electives

GRE 498 is the capstone practicum experience for          CHHS    Psychology GER   498
Gerontology students completing the major along with
their Senior Seminar (GER 499). It has been the practice
to limit enrollment in the practicum to ten students
since this is a very intensive load for the course
instuctor to oversee students in the field, make site
visits, to develop and process reflective assignments to
help students integrate field experiences into the Senior
Seminar, and to facilitate professional development in
the students individually and as a group. Therefore,
raising the course level from 498 to 598 more accurately
identifies this course at the highest undergraduate
academic level (500) within the Gerontology curriculum,
and lowers the enrollment cap to what is desired for an
optimal learning environment for students.
GRE 499 is the capstone practicum experience for          CHHS      Psychology GER   499
Gerontology students completing the major along with
their Senior Seminar (GER 499). It has been the practice
to limit enrollment in the practicum to ten students
since this is a very intensive load for the course
instuctor to oversee students in the field, make site
visits, to develop and process reflective assignments to
help students integrate field experiences into the Senior
Seminar, and to facilitate professional development in
the students individually and as a group. Therefore,
raising the course level from 499 to 599 more accurately
identifies this course at the highest undergraduate
academic level (500) within the Gerontology curriculum,
and lowers the enrollment cap to what is desired for an
optimal learning environment for students.


The Gerontology Program is no longer an independent          CHHS   Psychology PSY   354
program. It is now located within the Department of
Psychology. Existing course GER 320 (Gender Issues in
Later Life)- is being cross-listed with PSY 354 (Gender
Issues in Later Life) (current proposal). This will allow
Psychology student to take this course as part of their
major and minor electives. General purpose of thie
course: A comparison of the aging experiences of men
and women in later life. The relevance of gender and
gender roles to the aging process will be considered.
Specific topics of analysis will include the gender gap in
longevity, psychological and physical health, minority
status, socioeconomic status, family relationships, and
public policy issues.
The Gerontology Program is no longer an independent CHHS         Psychology PSY   366
program. It is now located within the Department of
Psychology. Existing course GER 365 (Families in Later
Life)- is being cross-listed with PSY 365 (Families in Later
Life) (current proposal) and SWK 365 (Families in Later
Life) (simultaneous proposal), as well as CFD 365
(already cross-listed with GER 365). This will allow
Psychology student to take this course as part of their
major and minor electives. General purpose of thie
course: Examination of the Structure and function of
families in later life. Topics of interest included
demographic trends impacting the stucture of the
family, marriage, sibling relations, parent-adult child
relations, grandparenthood, widowhood, and
retirement. The application of family theories and their
relevance to later life families will be discussed.


This was a change that was recommended by the             CHHS   Psychology
independent visiting evaluation team. It is consistent
with the recommendations of the American
Psychological Association regarding the stucture of the
psychology major.
This was a change that was recommended by the             CHHS   Psychology
independent visiting evaluation team. It is consistent
with the recommendations of the American
Psychological Association regarding the stucture of the
psychology major.




The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course      CHHS   Social Work SWK   205
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner. SWK
219 and 308 may be taken concurrently.




The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course      CHHS   Social Work SWK   222
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner. COM
115 is allowed to be taken concurrently, rather than as a
prereqisite, with SWK 222. SWK 222 only offered in fall
semester.


The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course      CHHS   Social Work SWK   305
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner. This
course is being paired with other 400 level courses,
which students take in their senior year.
The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course   CHHS   Social Work SWK   318
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner.




The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course   CHHS   Social Work SWK   322
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner.




The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course   CHHS   Social Work SWK   409
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner.




The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course   CHHS   Social Work SWK   420
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner.




The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course   CHHS   Social Work SWK   430
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner.
The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course     CHHS   Social Work SWK   480
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner.




The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course     CHHS   Social Work SWK   490
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner.




Expedited Curricular Proposal-Public Affairs Intensive   CHHS   Social Work
Experience
Change in admission requirements; change in faculty;     CHHS   Social Work
addition of one credit based on change from IDS 100(1)
to GEP 101(2)




Expedited Curricular Proposal-Public Affairs Intensive   CHHS   Sports
Experience                                                      Medicine
                                                                and
                                                                Athletic
                                                                Training
Since this course is taught by the same instuctor who    CHHS   Biomeidcal BMS   528
teaches BMS 535/635, which is moving to the spring,             Science
BMS 528/628 needs to be moved to the fall.
Additionally BMS 521 is now regarded as enough
background for a student to take BMS528/628 and the
prerequisite has been changed appropriately.
The companion graduate course to BMS 535 (BMS 635)        CHHS   Biomeidcal BMS    535
is now part of the curriculum for the CMB Master's               Science
degree. The course was originally taught in the fall;
however, we would like students to complete this
course early in their graduate careers and propose to
move it to the spring offering it immediately after the
prerequisite course BMS 521/622 rather than wait until
the following fall when it was originally available.


The departmental review of the course content           CHHS     Psychology PSY    365
indicated that the prerequisite was not necessary.
Furthermore, removing the prerequisite brought this
course in line with the other developmental foundations
courses in the major, which do not require PSY 304 as a
prerequisite.

The BSW cohort model offers this course in fall and       CHHS   Social Work SWK   219
spring, but not in summer.




SWK 300 is part of SWK 212, 222, and 205. With SWK      CHHS     Social Work SWK   300
212 and SWK 210, SWK 300 can be taken in the fall or
spring semester. SWK 205 is only offered in the fall
semester, thus, the SWK 300 that is attached is SWK 205
can only be taken in the fall.
The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course    CHHS       Social Work SWK    308
sequencing be made to ensure students, especially
transfer students, advance through the current model in
an efficient manner.




The BSN cohort model requires that changes in course        CHHS   Social Work SWK    309
sequencing be made to ensure students advance
through the current model in an efficient manner.




Recent review of course description revealed the            CHHS   Sports       ATC   320
description to inadequately describe the content of the            Medicine
course. The content of the course is not changing; the             and
course has had a leadership/mangement component                    Athletic
since the course was developed.                                    Training




Expedited Curricular Proposal-Public Affairs Intensive      CHPA   Philosophy
Experience

Offered as a variable topics course in the past, this       CHPA   Religious    REL   357
would regularize the course in the catalog. It will count          Studies
toward the Religious Studies minor. We are
concurrently proposing a program change so that it will
count toward Religious Studies major as well.
Adding a currently proposed new course, REL 357           CHPA   Religious
Religions of China and Japan, to the course option in the        Studies
History of Religions area of the B.A. major and B.S.
major.




New title and catalog description more accurately         CHPA   Sociology, CRM   215
reflect course intent and content. Since course no               Anthropolo
longer is a core requirement and will be an elective, the        gy, and
change in periodicity is warranted. Prerequisite is no           Criminology
longer relevant for a lower-division elective course.
CRM offers numerous three and one credit hour elective CHPA      Sociology, CRM   397
courses both during the semester and intersessions               Anthropolo
under CRM 397. Further, when students transfer upper-            gy, and
division courses to Missouri State that do not have an           Criminology
equivalent in our catalog, we award credit under this
"special topics" course. Thus, many students exceed the
current six hour limit and require a Department override.


To align course content with course level.                CHPA   Sociology, SOC   284
                                                                 Anthropolo
                                                                 gy, and
                                                                 Criminology


Numbering change will align course content with course CHPA      Sociology, SOC   290
level. Change in periodicity will increase flexibility.          Anthropolo
                                                                 gy, and
                                                                 Criminology




This course does not fit with the new major and we        CHPA   Sociology, SOC   598
need to make room for SOC 398.                                   Anthropolo
                                                                 gy, and
                                                                 Criminology




Expedited Curricular Proposal- Public Affairs Intensive   CHPA   Sociology,
Experience                                                       Anthropolo
                                                                 gy, and
                                                                 Criminology


Prepare students for critical engagement with the local   CHPA   Sociology, SOC   398
community by providing sociological analyses of                  Anthropolo
communities. Contribute to strengthening community               gy, and
by applying sociological theory and methods to                   Criminology
community issues and problems. Demonstrate how
sociological issues and concepts are manifested in the
community. Familiarize students with different types of
community information and prepare them for
citizenship by participating in the community.
Eliminating the 2.5 GPA in the major requirement for     CHPA   Sociology,
graduation will align the program requirements with the         Anthropolo
University GPA requirement. Course evaluation data              gy, and
indicate many students to not find CRM 215, and                 Criminology
orientation to careers in criminal justice, a worthwhile
course. Faculty experience also indicated the course
should not be part of the required core. As a result, we
propose eliminating CRM 215 as a requirement making
it an elective for students who want structured career
orientation, and replacing this one hour course with an
additional three hour CRM elective bringing the total
major hours to 36. The statement designating electives
must be below the 500 level is a relic from the "pre-
Banner" time when 500-level courses could be either
graduate or undergraduate level. Currently, 500 level
courses are undergraduate courses and should count as
electives in this undergraduate major.




Eliminating the 2.5 GPA in the major requirement for     CHPA   Sociology,
graduation will align the program requirements with the         Anthropolo
University GPA requirement. Course evaluation data              gy, and
indicate many students to not find CRM 215, and                 Criminology
orientation to careers in criminal justice, a worthwhile
course. Faculty experience also indicated the course
should not be part of the required core. As a result, we
propose eliminating CRM 215 as a requirement making
it an elective for students who want structured career
orientation, and replacing this one hour course with an
additional three hour CRM elective bringing the total
major hours to 36. The statement designating electives
must be below the 500 level is a relic from the "pre-
Banner" time when 500-level courses could be either
graduate or undergraduate level. Currently, 500 level
courses are undergraduate courses and should count as
electives in this undergraduate major.
Extremely low student demand.                        CHPA   Sociology,
                                                            Anthropolo
                                                            gy, and
                                                            Criminology




To integrate Public Sociology into the curriculum.   CHPA   Sociology,
                                                            Anthropolo
                                                            gy, and
                                                            Criminology




To integrate Public Sociology into the curriculum.   CHPA   Sociology,
                                                            Anthropolo
                                                            gy, and
                                                            Criminology
Expedited Curricular Proposal- Public Affairs Intensive     CHPA   Sociology,
Experience                                                         Anthropolo
                                                                   gy, and
                                                                   Criminology


The original title has led students to confuse this course CHPA    Economics     ECO   515
with a finance course. The modified title helps to
indicate the course content more clearly.




This is now a core class for the new program that went      CHPA   Political     PLS   169
into effect Fall 2010. Must be offered fall and spring to          Science
meet demand.




Correct spelling from senor to senior.                      CHPA   Political     PLS   492
                                                                   Science




Remove the work "normally". It gives the incorrect          CHPA   Political     PLS   493
impression that someone other than a political science             Science
major MIGHT be able to take the class-which is not the
case. Removal of reference to Public Administration
major which was deleted beginning with fall 2010.
Remove the work "normally". It gives the incorrect        CHPA     Political   PLS   494
impression that someone other than a political science             Science
major MIGHT be able to take the class-which is not the
case. Removal of reference to Public Administration
major which was deleted beginning with fall 2010.




Removal of reference to Public Administration major         CHPA   Political   PLS   496
which was deleted beginning with fall 2010. Clarification          Science
of the two minors that can take this class for credit. (The
Public Administration minor has not been dropped)




Course referenced in description, PLS 640, has been       CHPA     Political   PLS   561
deleted.                                                           Science




Course referenced in description, PLS 643, has been       CHPA     Political   PLS   567
deleted.                                                           Science
Increase flexibility.                   CHPA   Sociology, SOC   309
                                               Anthropolo
                                               gy, and
                                               Criminology


Increase flexibility.                   CHPA   Sociology, SOC   310
                                               Anthropolo
                                               gy, and
                                               Criminology


Increase flexibility.                   CHPA   Sociology, SOC   320
                                               Anthropolo
                                               gy, and
                                               Criminology




Increase flexibility.                   CHPA   Sociology, SOC   336
                                               Anthropolo
                                               gy, and
                                               Criminology




Courses being added to fit the major.   CNAS   College of
                                               Natural &
                                               Applied
                                               Sciences
                                               (CNAS)
The purpose of this course is to provide an accurate     CNAS     Hospitality HRA      497
course description for HRA students studying abroad.              and
Currently, students who study abroad register for HRA             Restaurant
400, Problems in Hospitaltiy and Restaurant                       Administrati
Administration.                                                   on




HRA majors in the Lodging Option will now have a           CNAS   Hospitality
choice of two event-related courses from which to                 and
choose: or HRA 430 (Special Even Planning) or HRA 436             Restaurant
(Casino Operations). Both are applicable to this industry         Administrati
segment and the addition of HRA 436 as a choice will              on
permit students to better individualize their chosen field
of study.




Course is offered every spring. Periolcity needs to be   CNAS     Biolgy         BIO   512
changed from D to S correctly reflect when the course is
offered.
Course is presented in lecture/blended fromat with the      CNAS    Hospitality HRA   330
laboratory component only being used for part of the                and
class. Having students sign up specifically for a 2 hours           Restaurant
lab makes better use of the limited laboratory space                Administrati
available.                                                          on


Requiring HRA 310 as a prerequisite made it extremely       CNAS    Hospitality HRA   430
difficult for students to take HRA 430 without being                and
waived into it due to the prereqisites for HRA 310.                 Restaurant
Requiring MKT 150 or 350 in place of HRA 310 as an                  Administrati
additional prerequisite to HRA 321 would be more                    on
effective in ensuring out students are adequately
prepared for HRA 430.

Requiring HRA 354 as a prerequisite made it extremely       CNAS    Hospitality HRA   436
difficult for students to take HRA 436 without being                and
wavied into it due to the prerequisites for HRA 354. By             Restaurant
adding "or concurrent enrollment," we will achieve the              Administrati
same outcome ensuring our students are adequately                   on
prepared for HRA 436.


The course name has been updated to distinguish it         CGIEP    Biomedical BMS    110
from BMS 100 (Concepts and Issues in the Life Sciences)             Sciences
and BMS 105 (Concepts and Laboratory in the Life
Sciences). The prerequisite was added to ensure that
students are prepared for the more rigorous course
content that is required as a foundation for further
study. The course description was changed in order to
better reflect the content of material being taught in the
course.




The prerequisites were added to ensure that students        CGIEP   Biomedical BMS    111
are prepared for the more rigorous course content that              Sciences
is required as a foundation for further study.
The change in title is to utilize a consistent          Grad      CLSE   COU   781
nomenclasture across all Counseling tracks. The changes Council
in hours is to reflect the change in program hours form
the previous 45 hours to the present 48 hours.




The change in title is to utilize a consistent          Grad      CLSE   COU   783
nomenclasture across all Counseling tracks. The changes Council
in hours is to reflect the change in program hours form
the previous 45 hours to the present 48 hours.




1. To update program admission requirements.           Grad       COBA
2. To meet AACSB accreditation recommendations.        Council
3. To make our program more attractive to higher
quality applicants
COM 718 Applied Communication Research Methods       Grad           Communica
has become the defacto methods course chosen by 98% Council         tion and
of MSAS students to complete the degree. This change                Graduate
formalizes what has become common practice.                         College
Appropriate substitutions would be considered upon
request.




The addition of this course is consistent with the theme Grad       Communica
of ethical leadership and provides students with greater Council    tion
choice in completing the Applied Communication option.




We designed this course to enhance students'                 Grad   English     ENG   562
knowledge of major trends in American literature since Council                        662
World War 11. This knowledge includes a broad
understanding of the various historical, cultural, literary,
and intellectual contexts that influenced contemporary
American authors.
Course focuses on learning needs and core                    Grad      Manageme MGT   702
competencies required by Master of Health                    Council   nt
Administration students. The course follows directly
upon MGT 701, a broad survey of healthcare systems,
organizations and financing mechanisms. MGT 702
addresses core competencies (Health Leaders Alliance)
related to organizational governance; the executive
offices and functions; organizing and managing
physicians and nurses; operations management of
clinical support services, information services, financial
departments, the human resource department,
plant/guest services, planning and marketing. The
course also emphasizes professional socialization into
healthcare administration via a series of 15 class
meetings with top healthcare executives from
throughout Missouri.


Course focuses on learning needs and core                    Grad      Manageme MGT   703
competencies required by Master of Health                    Council   nt
Administration students. Core competencies (Health
Leaders Alliance) addresses knowledge/skills related to
Organizational Behavior within several domains
including Leadership (leadership styles & techniques),
Professions (organizational & professional ethics,
conflict resolution), Business Knowledge & Skills
(management functions), Business Knowledge & Skills
and Human Resources (motivational techniques &
organizational policies), and Business Knowledge and
Skills and Organizational Dynamics and Governance
(healthcare culture and political realities, healthcare
organizationald theories and structures and the
functions and structure of governing boards).
Course focuses on learning needs and core               Grad         Manageme MGT   704
competencies required by Master of Health               Council      nt
Administration students. Core competencies (Health
Leaders Alliance) addresses knowledge/skills related to
Human Resources Management within the Business
Knowledge and Skills and Human Resources domain;
specifically compensation and benefits, employee
satisfaction and improvement techniques, outsourcing,
healthcare work environment, worker safety/health and
security, HR laws and regulations, job classifications,
physician compensation, staffing methodologies and
workforce planning. The course also requires the
student to indirectly utilize various other domain
competencies; Communications and Relationship
Mangaement (labor relations strategies), Healthcare
Environment (roles of clinical and non-clinical
professionals, workforce issues and educational funding
for healthcare personnel), Financial Management
(fundamental productivity measures) and Organizational
Dynamics and Governance (succession planning).




Course focuses on learning needs and core                  Grad      Manageme MGT   705
competencies required by Master of Health                  Council   nt
Administration students. Core competencies (Health
Leaders Alliance) addresses knowledge/skills related to
the Strategic Planning and Market domain; specifically
plan development and implementation, characteristics
of strategic decision support (e.g., planning, marketing,
modeling and forcasting), implementation planning (e.g.
operational plan, management plan, etc.), directional
strategies (organizational mission, vision, objectives,
and priorities) and strategic planning processes
development and implementation (scenario planning,
forcasting, etc.). Indirectly the course also requires the
student to utilize various other domain competencies
(e.g. Knowledge of the Healthcare Enviroment, Business
Knowledge and Skills and Financial Management)
acquired from other MHA courses.
1) MGT 702, Managing Healthcare Organizations,           Grad      Manageme
addresses the core learning needs of MHA students in     Council   nt
the area of healthcare operations. Course is currently
taught as an elective in the program. 2) MGT 705,
Strategic Management in Healthcare Organizations,
addresses the coures learning needs for MHA students.
course is currently taught as a separate section of MGT
767. 3) ACC 788, Healthcare Accounting, addresses the
core learning needs of the MHA students. Currently
being taught as a special projects course. 4) MGT 704,
Human Resources in Health Organizations, addresses
the coures learning needs of the MHA students. Course
has previously been taught as a section of MGT 762. 5)
MGT 703, Organizational Behavior in Healthcare
Organizations, addresses the core learning needs of the
MHA students. Course has previously been taught as a
section of MGT 764. 6 & 7) Allows program to focus on
core learning needs of the MHA student. 8) To be
consistent with other graduate degree programs within
COBA. Other COBA graduate programs do not delineate
Comprehensive Examination requirement in program
description. 9) Provides option for program to be
offered to a select group of students with significant
professional experience in healthcare. Execuitive option
similar to alternative offered through MBA program. 10)
Provides accelerated option for undergraduate majors
in COBA. Option similar to alternative offered through
MBA program.in the description of prerequisites reflects Grad
1. The change                                                      Master of   PBH   798
the distinction between "public health core" and "other Council    Public
required" courses in the proposed program changes.                 Health
2. The change in the description of who must approve               Program
the field experience is due to the fact that the MPH
Program does not have an internship coordinator but,
rather, a field experience faculty supervisor.
This course provides essential background and                Grad      Master of   PBH   735
experience to students on the use of EpiInfo and its         Council   Public
embedded GIS component. EpiInfo is a software                          Health
program (free from the Centers for Disease Control)                    Program
that is used to collect, enter, store, and analyze data.
The course also provides practical experience in the use
of other statisical software (such as SPSS) and Excel to
access, analyze and present data to answer questions
related to communities' health risks and health status.
Finally, students gain additional experience in how to
access existing data through the online analysis portals
to generate and present data related to the health
status and health risks in communities. These skills are
highly valued in local and state health departments
where these data sources and software programs are
utilized regularly. This course provides in-depth
experience with concepts and skills required to address
several program compentencies. In addition, the
information presented in this course will provide
students with the skills required to help address
important public health questions related to the core
areas of public health epidemiology, biostatistics, health
services administration, environmental health, and
behavioral health.
The purpose of this research/scholarship experience is       Grad      Master of   PBH   799
to have students synthesize and integrate advanced           Council   Public
knowledge and skills acquired in the program, and apply                Health
those to some aspect of public health. In doing so,                    Program
students will demonstrate proficiency with MPH
Program compentencies.
1. The MPH program is in the process of seeking           Grad      Master of
accreditation from the Council on Education for Public    Council   Public
Health (CEPH), and the Council has recommended we                   Health
increase the number of required courses to assure                   Program
sufficient coverage of our stated competencies. As such,
the proposed additional required courses will provide
greater emphasis on certain program competencies.
2. The elective courses being deleted are those that
have not been offered for the past two years, and it is
not known when they will again be offered. And, PLS
754 has been determined a very appropriate course for
MPH students.
3. Replacing PBH 790 with an actual Capstone Project
will provide students better direction and will allow the
program to continue to use the Independent Study
course as an elective.




The School of Social Work has a need for an              Grad       Social Work SWK   599/696
undergraduate and graduate elective in health literacy. Council
The SWK 599- Health Literacy in the Human Services is
being cross-listed with BMS 599- Health Literacy in the
Human Services because these departments share a
similar demand for the course. Health Literacy is a
growing field of inquiry within the health and human
services. There have been no health literacy courses
available for Missouri State University students despite
the need for training in the area. This course will
broaden the student's understanding of health literacy
fundamentals, research on health literacy, and practical
techniques for addressing literacy issues in spoken and
written communications at the practitioner and
orgranizational levels.
We have decided that it is better for advanced students Grad         Sociology, ANT    650
to master one method (such as lithic analysis) than to  Council      Anthropolo
survey many methods.                                                 gy, and
                                                                     Criminology




Grading such a course is too arbitrary and subjective.     Grad      Sociology, ANT    790
                                                           Council   Anthropolo
                                                                     gy, and
                                                                     Criminology




Grading such a course is too arbitrary and subjective.     Grad      Sociology, ANT    797
                                                           Council   Anthropolo
                                                                     gy, and
                                                                     Criminology


Grading such a course is too arbitrary and subjective.     Grad      Sociology, ANT    799
                                                           Council   Anthropolo
                                                                     gy, and
                                                                     Criminology


This course will thoroughly examine different              Grad      Sociology, ANT    655
theoretical perspectives in archaeology. It is vital for   Council   Anthropolo
students who wish to practice archaeology.                           gy, and
                                                                     Criminology

Moving the course to the fall semester will enable the     Grad      Media,      MED   661
audio students in MED 561 to do sound design work on Council         Journalism,
the short films created in MED 562 in the spring. This               and Film
will give them a full semester to learn how to mix dialog,
sound effects and music to create and mix sound for
narrative projects.
These revisions will improve the developmental          PEC   Music   MUS   148
appropriateness of a course designed for first semester
freshmen; move the lesson planning components and
completion of portfolio Checkpoint 1 into MUS 200;
indicate the field experience component required in the
course; and remove the CBASE exam as a requirement
in the first semester of college.


These revisions will 1) provide a more accurate         PEC   Music   MUS   200
description of the content and competencied covered in
the course; 2) move the lesson planning components
and completion of Portfolio Checkpoint 1 into MUS 200;
and 3) align the field experience expectation with what
is required in the course.
Date           Date        Date of     Date         Date       Date       Date
Approved       Approved    Dean        Approved PEC Approved   Approved   Approved
Department     College     Review                   CGEIP      Grad       Faculty
Head           Council     Signature                           Council    Senate


Wade Thompson Mike Ellis
10-20-10      10-21-10




Wade Thompson Mike Ellis
9-22-10       10-21-10




Wade Thompson Mike Ellis
9-22-10       10-21-10




Wade Thompson Mike Ellis
10-20-10      10-21-10




Wade Thompson Mike Ellis
10-20-10      10-21-10
Kelly Wood    Mike Ellis
10-5-10       10-21-10




              Mike Ellis   Carey Adams
              10-25-10     10-26-10




Robert        Mike Ellis
Willenbrink   10-21-10
10-5-10




Robert        Mike Ellis
Willenbrink   10-21-10
10-5-10


Robert        Mike Ellis   Carey Adams
Willenbrink   10-21-10     10-22-10
10-21-10

Robert        Mike Ellis   Carey Adams
Willenbrink   10-21-10     10-22-10
10-21-10


Robert        Mike Ellis   Carey Adams
Willenbrink   10-21-10     10-22-10
10-22-10
Robert          Mike Ellis   Carey Adams
Willenbrink     10-21-10     10-22-10
10-5-10




Wade Thompson
10-21-10




Wade Thompson Mike Ellis
10-20-10      10-21-10




Wade Thompson Mike Ellis
10-20-10      10-21-10




Madeleine       Mike Ellis   Carey Adams
Kernen          10-21-10     10-22-10
9-22-10
Kent Ragan     James Scott   Philip Harsha
9-13-10        10-12-10      10-13-10




Neil DiSarno   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
9-30-10        10-19-10    10-25-10




Sarah          Jim Hackney Helen Reid
McCallister    10-19-10    10-25-10
9-27-10
Kathryn Hope   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-14-10       10-21-10    10-25-10




Kathryn Hope   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-18-10       10-21-10    10-25-10
Kathryn Hope   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-18-10       10-21-10    10-25-10




Robert Jones   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
9-15-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Robert Jones   Jim Hackney
9-7-10         10-21-10
Robert Jones   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
9-15-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Robert Jones   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
9-15-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Robert Jones   Jim Hackney
8-25-10        10-21-10




Robert Jones   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-13-10       10-21-10    10-25-10
Robert Jones   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-13-10       10-21-10    10-25-10




Robert Jones   Jim Hackney
9-7-10         10-21-10
Robert Jones   Jim Hackney
8-25-10        10-21-10




Robert Jones   Jim Hackney
8-24-10        10-21-10
Robert Jones   Jim Hackney
8-24-10        10-21-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10
Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10
Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
9-21-10        10-21-10    10-25-10
Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Tona Hetzler   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
9-29-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Colette        Jim Hackney Helen Reid
Witkowski      10-21-10    10-25-10
9-24-10
Colette        Jim Hackney Helen Reid
Witkowski      10-21-10    10-25-10
9-24-10




Robert Jones   Jim Hackney
8-25-10        10-21-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10




Susan Dollar   Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10        10-21-10    10-25-10
Susan Dollar     Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10          10-21-10    10-25-10




Susan Dollar     Jim Hackney Helen Reid
10-1-10          10-21-10    10-25-10




Tona Hetzler     Jim Hackney Helen Reid
9-24-10          10-21-10    10-25-10




Pam Sailors      Leslie Baynes Victor
9-30-10          10-18-10      Matthews
                               10-18-10
Jack Llewellyn   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-22-10          10-18-10      Matthews
                               10-18-10
Jack Llewellyn   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-22-10          10-18-10      Matthews
                               10-18-10




Karl Kunkel      Leslie Baynes Victor
9-22-10          10-18-10      Matthews
                               10-18-10
Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-10-10       10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10




Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-27-10       10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10




Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-27-10       10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10




Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-27-10       10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10




Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
10-14-10      10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10




Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-27-10       10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10
Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-22-10       10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10




Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-22-10       10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10
Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-27-10       10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10




Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-27-10       10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10




Karl Kunkel   Leslie Baynes Victor
9-27-10       10-18-10      Matthews
                            10-18-10
Karl Kunkel      Leslie Baynes Victor
10-14-10         10-18-10      Matthews
                               10-18-10




Ardeshir Dalal
10-22-10




Ardeshir Dalal
9-20-10




Ardeshir Dalal
10-1-10




Ardeshir Dalal
10-1-10
Ardeshir Dalal
10-1-10




Ardeshir Dalal
10-1-10




Ardeshir Dalal
10-1-10




Ardeshir Dalal
10-1-10
Karl Kunkel
9-27-10




Karl Kunkel
9-27-10




Karl Kunkel
9-27-10




Karl Kunkel
9-27-10




Pawan Kahol   Melanie    Tamera
10-12-10      Grand      Jahnke
              10-12-10   10-22-10
Melissa Dallas   Melanie    Tamera
9-24-10          Grand      Jahnke
                 10-18-10   10-22-10




Melissa Dallas   Melanie    Tamera
10-7-10          Grand      Jahnke
                 10-12-10   10-27-10




Alicia Mathis
9-28-10
Melissa Dallas
9-24-10




Melissa Dallas
9-24-10




Melissa Dallas
9-24-10




Colette          Jim Hackney   Mike Foster
Witkowski        9-17-10       10-13-10
9-10-10




Colette          Jim Hackney   Mike Foster
Witkowski        9-17-10       10-13-10
9-10-10
Tamara Arthaud                   Jamaine    Eric Nelson
4-9-10                           Abidogun   10-13-10
                                 9-8-10




Tamara Arthaud                   Jamaine    Eric Nelson
4-9-10                           Abidogun   10-13-10
                                 9-8-10




David Byrd       Philip Harsha              Eric Nelson
9-20-10          9-20-10                    10-13-10
Kelly Wood                      Eric Nelson
9-9-10                          10-13-10




Kelly Wood                      Eric Nelson
9-9-10                          10-13-10




W.D. Blackmon   Michael Ellis   Eric Nelson
8-30-10         9-14-10         10-13-10
Barry Wisdom   Eric Nelson
8-19-10        10-13-10




Barry Wisdom   Eric Nelson
8-19-10        10-13-10
Barry Wisdom   Eric Nelson
8-19-10        10-13-10




Barry Wisdom   Eric Nelson
8-19-10        10-13-10
Barry Wisdom    Eric Nelson
8-19-10         10-13-10




Vicki Sanchez   Eric Nelson
9-10-10         10-13-10
Vicki Sanchez   Eric Nelson
9-21-10         10-13-10




Vicki Sanchez   Eric Nelson
9-21-10         10-13-10
Vicki Sanchez                 Eric Nelson
9-13-10                       10-13-10




Susan Dollar    Jim Hackney   Eric Nelson
9-8-10          9-7-10        10-13-10
Karl Kunkel   Eric Nelson
8-24-10       10-13-10




Karl Kunkel   Eric Nelson
8-24-10       10-13-10




Karl Kunkel   Eric Nelson
8-24-10       10-13-10




Karl Kunkel   Eric Nelson
8-24-10       10-13-10




Karl Kunkel   Eric Nelson
8-24-10       10-13-10




Mark Biggs    Eric Nelson
9-15-10       10-13-10
Dianne       Michael Ellis   Steve Willis
Strickland   9-14-10         10-13-10
6-29-10




Dianne       Michael Ellis   Steve Willis
Strickland   9-14-10         10-13-10
6-29-10
Challenge      Received in Date          Date to      Date Approved
Period         Provost     Approved      President    President
               Office      Provost



10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/7/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




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18-10




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10-29-10 to 11-              12/7/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
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10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/7/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10
10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010                12/23/2010   1/7/2011
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10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/14/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
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               11/19/2010    12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011




               11/19/2010    12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011




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10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
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10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
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10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
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10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   Not Approved 12/23/2010   Not approved
18-10
10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10
10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10
10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10
10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10
10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10
10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   Not Approved 12/23/2010   1/31/2011
18-10
10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10
10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10




10-29-10 to 11- 11/19/2010   12/23/2010   12/23/2010   1/7/2011
18-10
NOTES: disapproved/withdrawn or Due to be   Need BOG   Date to
on hold                         Returned to Approval   BOG -
                                Faculty                President's
                                Senate                 Office


                               1/3/2011




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                                     1/3/2011
Disapproved upon recommendation of the dean.
1/3/2011




1/3/2011




1/3/2011
1/3/2011




1/3/2011
1/3/2011




1/3/2011
The Master of Health Administration    1/3/2011
program change was pulled by Faculty
Senate due to several changes which
included the accelerated option. The
accelerated option should be put
through as a separate program change
because adding the accelerated option
requires approval by Faculty Senate as
a Senate Action.




                                      1/3/2011
1/3/2011




1/3/2011
                                       1/3/2011




This course was approved after the      1/3/2011
originator provided the resource sheet.
1/3/2011




1/3/2011




1/3/2011




1/3/2011




1/3/2011




1/3/2011
1/3/2011




1/3/2011
Date Disposition Published
                                           Disposition Link



Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf


Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf

Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf


Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf


Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf


Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf


Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_25_2011
                                   -2.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf


Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf




Published on Jan. 7, 2011--Revised http://www.missouristate.edu/asset
on January 21, 2011                s/registrar/Disposition_Jan_07_2011
                                   -1revised.pdf
                     Senate            Senate Action Text or
                  Resolution Text           Description
Senate Action                                                   Date Approved
or Resolution #                                                 Faculty Senate


SA 9-10/11        N/A               Program Deletion: Minors,   11/11/2010
                                    Applied Social Research
                                                                                NOTES:
                                                                    Date
                     Received in   Date Approved      Date to                 disapproved
 Challenge Period                                                 Approved
                    Provost Office    Provost        President                /withdrawn
                                                                  President
                                                                               or on hold
November 17, 2010   12/13/2010   12/14/2010        12/23/2010    1/7/2011
to December 11,
2010
   Date
                          Date to BOG
Returned to   Need BOG
                          - President's         Disposition Link
  Faculty      Approval
                              Office
  Senate
                                          http://www.missouristate.edu
                                          /assets/registrar/Disposition_J
                                          an_07_2011-2.pdf
Curricular           Type
Proposal             (Note here if non-
                     substan-
Course or            tive)
Program Title


ART 390 Art History New Course
Teaching Assistant




ENG 373 Writing      Course Change
with Technology




ENG 377 Scientific   Course Change
and Technical
Editing




ENG 421 Advanced Course Change
Technical Writing




ENG 422 Career       Course Change
Focus in
Professional
Writing
ENG 473 Writing    Course Change
with Technology 11




ENG 487 Analysis     Course Change
of Scientific
Literature




ENG 573 Writing      Course Change
for the Web




ENG 574 Technical    Course Change
Writing Internship




ENG 191 Grammer      New Course
Skills
ENG 216             New Course
Introduction to the
Graphic Novel




ENG 301 Seminar in New Course
English Studies and
Public Affairs
Creative Writing   Program Change
B.A.




Literature B.A.    Program Change
MED 492             Course Change
Independent Study
in Electronic Media




MED 562 Electronic Course Change
Field Production




MED 598 Seminar    Course Change
in Broadcast
Management




MED 130           New Course
Fundamentals of
Media Convergence
MED 220 Case       New Course
Studies in Mass
Media




Mass Media (Non-   Program Change
Comp) B.S.
Mass Media (Non-   Program Change
Comp) B.A.




Journalism (Non-   Program Change
Comp) B.S.
Electronic Arts   Program Change
Mass Media    Program Change
(Comp) B.S.
Admission          Program Change
Requirements




Electronic Arts    PAIE
(MJF Dept) (BS)
Journalism (BS)
Mass Media (BA)
Mass Media (Non-
Comp) (BS)
Mass Media
(Comp) (BS)
BA in Theatre        Program Change
Studies




Dance BFA          PAIE
Musical Theatre
(Theatre Dept) BFA
Speech and Theatre
Ed/Theatre BSED
Theatre BFA
Theatre Studies BA




ACC 470              Course Change
Professionalism in
Accountancy
ACC 553 Auditing      Course Change




Accounting Minor      Program Change
BS




HID 140               Course Change
Fundamentals of
Interior Design




HID 208 AutoCAD       Course Change
for Interior Design




HID 241 Residential Course Change
Design I




HID 245 Interior      Course Change
Design
Specifications
HID 247             Course Change
Presentation
Techniques




HID 305 Restaurant Course Change
Design




HID 306 Hotel       Course Change
Design




HID 325 Pre-       Course Change
Internship Seminar




HID 332 Color and   Course Change
Light in Interior
Design




HID 340 Residential Course Change
Design II: Green
Design




HID 342 Contract    Course Change
Design I




HID 344 19th and    Course Change
20th Century
Furniture and
Decorative Arts
HID 345 Housing   Course Change
and Environmental
Living


HID 346 Ancient       Course Change
and Medieval
Furnishings and
Decorative Arts

HID 347 Advanced      Course Change
Presentation
Techniques


HID 348 Furniture     Course Change
for Interior Design




HID 349               Course Change
Renaissance
Furnishings and
Decorative Arts

HID 408 Advanced      Course Change
AutoCAD




HID 424 Seminar in Course Change
Housing and
Interior Design




HID 441 Senior        Course Change
Design Studio
HID 442 Contract    Course Change
Design II




HID 499 Internship Course Change
in Housing and
Interior Design




HID 201 Studio 1    New Course




HID 202 Studio 11   New Course




HID 303 Studio 111 New Course




HID 304 Studio 1V   New Course




HID 405 Studio V    New Course




HID 406 Studio V1   New Course
Housing and        Program Change
Interior Design
(Comp)




MKT 42 Advanced    Course Change
Marketing




E-Business Minor   Program Change
Marketing         Program Change
Management




Retailing/Merchand Program Change
ising




Biomedical        Program Change
Sciences- Minor
Exercise Biology      Program Change
Minor




Nutrition Minor       Program Change




Cell and Molecular    PAIE
Biology (BS)
Clinical Laboratory
Sciences-Medical
Technology (BS)
Dietetics (BS)


PSY 451               New Course
Psychophysiology
of Aging
Gerontology Minor Program Change




Gerontology       Program Change
Program
ECO 308 Basic      Course Change
Statistics for
Economists




ECO 318 Economics Course Change
for Educators




Economics (Non-    Program Change
Comp) BA




Economics (Comp)   Program Change
BS




Economics (Non-    Program Change
Comp) BS
Economics Minor      Course Change
for B.A., B.S. and
B.S.Ed (non-
certifiable)




Economics BA (Non- PAIE
Comp)
Economics BS (Non-
Comp)
Economics BS
(Comp)
PLS 399            Course Change
Cooperative
Education in
Political Science




PLS 498 In-Service   Course Change
Training in Public
Administration




Religious Studies    PAIE
(BA)
Religious Studies
(BS)
REL 100              Course Change
Introduction to
Religion
BIO 380             Course Change
Comparative
Vertebrate
Anatomy




BIO 494 Senior      Course Change
Seminar




BIO 499 Special     Course Change
Topics in Biology




BIO 509 Stream      Course Change
Ecology




BIO 540           Course Change
Applications of
Molecular Markers
BIO 551 Advanced Course Change
Statistical Methods
for Biologists




BIO 563 Population Course Change
Ecology




BIO 567            Course Change
Physiological
Ecology




BIO 584 Fish       Course Change
Ecology




Biology            PAIE


Computer Science   PAIE
(BS)

Hospitality and     PAIE
Restaurant
Administration (BS)


Individualized     PAIE
Major (BA)
Individualized
Major (BS)
Native American     Program Change
Studies




BIO 710 Topics in   Course Change
Microbial
Physiology




BMS 628 Molecular Course Change
Mechanisms of
Bacterial
Pathogenesis




BMS 635 Signal      Course Change
Transduction
Master's Degree-   Program Change
Counseling (with
emphasis in
Elementary or
Secondary School
Counseling)




AuD and             Program Change
Accelerated M.S. in
EDHH
MSED- ELE         Program Change




MED 662 Electronic Course Change
Field Production




MED 698 Seminar   Course Change
in Broadcast
Management
Master of Global    Program Change
Studies




SOC 698             Course Change
Sociological
Research




SOC 700 Gender in   Course Change
Global Community
SOC 706 Advanced   Course Change
Social Research
Methodology




SOC 785          Course Change
Community Change




SOC 790 Religion in Course Change
Society




SOC 799 Thesis     Course Change
MS in Applied        Program Change
Anthropology




Master of Science,   Program Change
Criminology
CHM 175 General     Course Change
Chemistry
Laboratory




GRM 475 Topics in   Course Change
German(ic)
Literature and
Culture
Current Catalog Description




N/A




ENG 373 Writing with Technology

Prerequisite: ENG 110 or equivalent; CSC/CIS 101 or equivalent; and 45 hours. Explores software and
hardware tools that professional writers use in the workplace to design, compose, present, and
distribute technical information. Students will produce projects to gain a hands-on understanding of the
tools used in creating online Help and printed documentation, working with graphics, constructing web
pages, and other relevant areas. 3(3-0) F,S


ENG 377 Scientific and Technical Editing

Prerequisite: ENG 110 and 60 hours. The process of creating a new piece of writing by clarifying,
reducing, expanding, and synthesizing materials written by others. Emphasis on audience adaptation,
organization, style, and mechanics. 3(3-0) F,S




ENG 421 Advanced Technical Writing

Prerequisite: ENG 321. Practice in project planning and management, document design, online
documentation, web-page design, and usability testing. Students will develop a portfolio of polished
writing projects. Emphasis on practical and marketable skills. 3(3-0) F,S


ENG 422 Career Focus in Professional Writing

Prerequisite: ENG 373 and ENG 377 and ENG 421. Emphasis on skills associated with the smooth
transition from an academic study of professional writing to the professional workforce; employment
searches, résumés, portfolios, and interviewing skills. Emphasis on trends affecting employment in the
field and on sustaining continued success within a career path. 3(3-0) S
ENG 473 Writing with Technology II

Prerequisite: ENG 373. Builds on concepts students learn in ENG 373. Students will gain hands-on
practice working with more-advanced tools and features that professional writers use to produce
technical documents. Topics may include, but are not limited to, desktop publishing, online
documentation, and single sourcing. 3(3-0) F

ENG 487 Analysis of Scientific Literature

Prerequisite: ENG 110 and 60 hours. History and development of scientific writing. Stylistic analysis of
prose passages. 3(3-0) F




ENG 573 Writing for the Web

Prerequisite: 60 hours. Explores the professional writer's role in creating web pages and sites designed
to deliver information. Topics include planning, user analysis, organization, structure, content
development, writing style, and user testing. May be taught concurrently with ENG 679. Cannot receive
credit for both ENG 573 and ENG 679. 3(3-0) F

ENG 574 Technical Writing Internship

Prerequisite: ENG 421 and permission of instructor. Projects in technical writing, combining academic
training and supervised work experience in business and industry. Students are required to work a
minimum of 135 hours. May be taught concurrently with ENG 694. Cannot receive credit for both ENG
694 and ENG 574. 3(3-0) F,S

N/A
N/A




N/A
English/Creative Writing Option
Bachelor of Arts

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog
 B Major Requirements (33 hours)
      1. ENG 235(3), 351(3), 508(3)
      2. Two courses from: ENG 340(3), 341(3), 350(3)
      3. One course from: ENG 354(3), 355(3), 360(3), 361(3), 362(3), 363(3), 380(3)
      4. One 500-level literature course
      5. Two courses from: ENG 203(3), 215(3), 225(3)
      6. One course from: ENG 303(3), 315(3), 325(3)
      7. One course from: ENG 500(3), 501(3), 503(3), 506(3) for a total of not fewer than 33 hours
 C. Minor Required (or second major)
 D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and Requirements
section of catalog
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements
section of catalog




English/Literature Option
Bachelor of Arts

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog
  B. Major Requirements (36 hours)
      1. ENG 235(3), 340(3), 341(3), 350(3), 351(3); ENG 390(3) or 491(3)
      2. One course from: ENG 354(3), 355(3), 360(3), 361(3), 362(3), 363(3), 380(3), 483(3)
      3. One course from: ENG 312(3), 510(3), 513(3), 541(3), 543(3)
      4. Two 500-level literature courses (in addition to any 500-level literature courses used to fulfill the
requirements for the major)
      5. Six hours of English electives for a total of not fewer than 36 hours, not including ENG 110, 210,
221, 310
  C. Minor Required (or second major)
  D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and Requirements
section of catalog
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements
section of catalog
MED 492 Independent Study in Electronic Media

Prerequisite: admission to a departmental major, permission of instructor and 6 hours of upper division
MED or JRN coursework. Supervised independent study exploring selected areas determined by the
student in consultation with the media faculty. Course work may include readings, term papers, or
projects. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours with permission of the department. 2-3 F,S


MED 562 Electronic Field Production

Prerequisite: MED 461 or MED 462 or MED 465. Planning, designing and executing single camera video
production in non-studio settings. Emphasis will be placed on narrative projects that require advanced
application of media design concepts including cinematography, nonlinear editing, directing, producing,
and sound design. May be taught concurrently with MED 662. Cannot receive credit for both MED 662
and MED 562. 3(2-2) S

MED 598 Seminar in Broadcast Management

An in-depth analysis of management issues in the broadcast industry. Current theory and specific
practices are examined and applied to broadcast operations. May be taught concurrently with MED 698.
Cannot receive credit for both MED 698 and MED 598. 3(3-0) D

N/A
N/A




Mass Media (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog
  B. Major Requirements (39 hours)
     1. Departmental Core: MED 120(3), 204(3)
     2. Mass Media Core: MED 274(3), 325(3), 365(3), 454(3), 581(3); JRN 270(3), 407(3)
     3. Choose one of the following options:
         a. Film Studies: MED 374(3), 375(3), 470(3), 570(3)
         b. Media Studies: 12 hours of MED or JRN electives chosen with approval of advisor

    Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 3.00 in MED 120(3), MED 204(3) and MED 274(3)
along with a 2.25 overall GPA to be admitted to this major.
  C. Minor Required. Note: No course may count for both the Mass Media major and the minor.
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements
section of catalog
Mass Media (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog
  B. Major Requirements (39 hours)
     1. Departmental Core: MED 120(3), 204(3)
     2. Mass Media Core: MED 274(3), 325(3), 365(3), 454(3), 581(3); JRN 270(3), 407(3)
     3. Choose one of the following options:
         a. Film Studies: MED 374(3), 375(3), 470(3), 570(3)
         b. Media Studies: 12 hours of MED or JRN electives chosen with approval of advisor

    Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 3.00 in MED 120(3), MED 204(3) and MED 274(3)
along with a 2.25 overall GPA to be admitted to this major.
  C. Minor Required. Note: No course may count for both the Mass Media major and the minor.
  D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and Requirements
section of catalog
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements
section of catalog




Journalism (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog
  B. Major Requirements (39 hours)
     1. Departmental Core: MED 120(3), 204(3)
     2. Journalism Core: JRN 270(3), 407(3), 595(3); MED 454(3), 581(3)
     3. Choose one of the following options (18 hours):
         a. Broadcast Journalism: JRN 284(3), 381(3), 388(3) or 481(3); MED 365(3); MED 382(3) or
383(3); select 3 hours of JRN or MED electives chosen with approval of advisor.
         b. Print and Internet Journalism: JRN 370(3), 372(3), 476(3); select 9 hours from MED 390 and
JRN courses other than JRN 595 chosen with approval of advisor but no more than 6 hours of JRN 300.
     Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 3.00 in MED 120(3), MED 204(3) and JRN 270(3)
along with a 2.25 overall GPA to be admitted to this major.
  C. Minor required. Note: No course may count for both the Journalism major and the minor. A minor
in Mass Media will not meet the minor requirement.
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements
section of catalog
Electronic Arts (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

This program is offered in conjunction with the Department of Art and Design.
Preadmission Core Courses

Complete 9 hours with a GPA of 3.00 or higher from the following Electronic Arts preadmission core
courses before applying to the program: ART 110(3) or 100(3); MED 290(3), 365(3); MUS 216(3). Core
courses in the student’s chosen option must be completed before applying.
Initial Portfolio Review

Portfolio must include a minimum of two and a maximum of three examples of audio, video,
multimedia, and/or computer animation work, with at least one example coming from a core course.
Students seeking admission to the Electronic Arts program in the area of Computer Animation Studies
must include at least one work from ART 230 or ART 330. Specific guidelines are required for portfolios.
See advisor or the Electronic Arts Coordinator for details.

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog
  B. Major Requirements (37 hours)
     1. Core Courses: ART 110(3) or 100(3), 300(3); MUS 216(3); MED 290(3), 365(3); ART 498(4) or
MED 498(4)
     2. Choose one of the following options (18 hours):
         a. Audio Studies: MED 461(3), 561(3); MUS 316(3), 529(3); select 6 hours with advisor approval:
MED 361(3), 492(3), 595(1-3); MUS 103(3), 137(1), 327(2), 399(1-3), 512(3); THE 558(3)
         b. Computer Animation Studies: (See "Department of Art and Design" section of catalog)
         c. Multimedia Studies: MED 390(3), 490(3); ART 210(3); DES 202(3); select 6 hours with advisor
approval: ART 230(3); MED 355(3), 465(3), 492(3), 595(1-3). DES 202 should be taken only after
Mass Media (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog
  B. Major Requirements (51 hours)
     1. Departmental Core: MED 120(3), 204(3)
     2. Mass Media Core: MED 274(3), 325(3), 365(3), 454(3), 581(3); JRN 270(3), 407(3)
     3. Choose one of the following options (24 hours):
         a. Digital Film Production: MED 374(3) or 375(3); MED 461(3); 465(3) or 466(3); MED 561(3) or
562(3); MED 565(3); select 9 hours chosen with approval of advisor from MED 300(3), 361(3); MED
374(3) or 375(3); 462(3), 492(3), 561(3), 562(3), 570(3), 595(3), 597(3)
         b. Media Production: MED 382(3) or 383(3); MED 381(3); select 9 hours from MED 290(3),
361(3), 382(3), 383(3), 384(3), 390(3), 462(3), 490(3), 492(2-3), 583(3), 595(1-3); JRN 284(3); select 9
hours of elective courses chosen with approval of advisor

    Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 3.00 in MED 120(3), MED 204(3) and MED 365(3)
along with a 2.25 overall GPA to be admitted to this major.
  C. Note: No course may count for both the Mass Media major and a minor.
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements
section of catalog
Admission Requirements

All students majoring in the Department of Media, Journalism & Film (except for those seeking a major
in Electronic Arts) must satisfy the following requirements before they can be admitted to the program.

  A. Complete a minimum of 30 credit hours.
  B. Complete COM 115 and ENG 110.
  C. Have a combined grade point average (Missouri State and transfer) of 2.25 or higher.
  D. Complete the following departmental core courses and the core course for the Mass Media or
Journalism option to which they are applying with a GPA of 3.00. For the purpose of achieving the 3.00
GPA requirement for the three core courses, a student may retake a core course only once and may
retake no more than two of the core courses. A student should meet these requirements by the time
he/she has completed 75 hours of courses (Missouri State and transfer).
    Departmental Core: MED 120(3), MED 204(3)
    Core Courses for Departmental Options:
    Journalism (Non-Comprehensive) - JRN 270(3)
    Mass Media (Non-Comprehensive) - MED 274(3)
    Mass Media (Comprehensive) - MED 365(3)
  E. Complete any additional admission requirements for selected major.
  F. Submit application for admission and receive approval by faculty advisor and Head of the
Department of Media, Journalism & Film.

Restriction
Departmental majors may not take a second major within the department.


N/A
Theatre Studies
Bachelor of Arts

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog
    Specific General Education Requirement: THE 109(3)
  B. Major requirements (41-42 hours)
      1. Theatre Reading and Writing (6 hours): THE 130(3), 210(3)
      2. Acting and Directing (9 hours): THE 122(3), 123(3), 430(3)
      3. Theatre History (6 hours): THE 541(3), 542(3)
      4. Design/Technology/Stage Management (6 hours): THE 150(2), 151(1); choose 3 hours from THE
250(2) and 251(1), or THE 255(2) and 256(1), or THE 260(2) and 261(1), or THE 354(3)
      5. Performance Theory and Practice (6 hours): THE 109(3), 310(3)
      6. Elective (8-9 hours): choose from the following recommended focus areas or from other advisor
approved DAN and THE courses.
        Performance Focus: THE 505(3), 506(3), 510(3), 515(3)
        Dance Focus: DAN 117(2), 219(2), 320(2), 420(2), 452(3)
        History and Theory Focus: THE 543(3), 545(3), 547(3)
        NOTE: Courses counted for the major may not also be counted for the Bachelor of Arts Fine Arts
requirement.
  C Minor Required (or second major)
  D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and Requirements
section of catalog
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements
N/A




ACC 470 Professionalism in Accountancy

Prerequisite: 15 semester hours of upper division accounting courses; and undergraduate business
majors must be admitted to COBA. Cases (including written and oral presentations) will focus on ethical
and regulatory issues in accounting. Students will focus on professional behavior appropriate for
accounting professionals. 1(1-0) F,S
ACC 553 Auditing

Prerequisite: grades of "C" or better in ACC 301 and ACC 302 and ACC 311 and ACC 321 and ACC 341;
and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to COBA. Kinds of audits, the duties and
obligations of the auditor, principles and procedures to be followed in conducting an audit. A grade of
"C" or better is required in this course in order to take ACC 750. This course has a required assessment
component. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. May be taught concurrently with ACC 653. Cannot receive
credit for both ACC 553 and ACC 653. 3(3-0), F,S


Accounting
Bachelor of Science

 A. ACC 201(3)*, 211(3)*
 B. Complete nine additional hours of accounting from ACC 301(3), 302(3), 311(3), 321(3), 341(3),
421(3), 422(3), 504(3), 506(3), 513(3), 524(3), 532(3), 553(3), 555(3), and 556(3)
   * ACC 206(4) may be substituted for ACC 201 and 211.


HID 140 Fundamentals of Interior Design

Art principles and elements applied to interior environments. Projects will expose the student to interior
design skills with individual projects focusing on each student's major. 3(2-2) F,S


HID 208 AutoCAD for Interior Design

Prerequisite: HID 140 and CIS 101 or CSC 101 or CSC 111. Study and use of AutoCAD software to design a
structure. Both 2- and 3- dimensional aspects are covered. Design project required. 3(2-2) F,S


HID 241 Residential Design I

Prerequisite: HID 140. The design of a residence including the drawing of floor plans and the study of
both structural and decorative aspects. 3(2-2) F,S

HID 245 Interior Design Specifications

Prerequisite: HID 140 and General Education mathematics requirement. Measuring for and specifying of
interior materials, upholstery, flooring materials, wall coverings, and window treatments. An
examination of materials, installation, and maintenance techniques are coupled with creative design
exercises. 3(2-2) F
HID 247 Presentation Techniques

Perspective techniques utilizing a variety of media. Three-dimensional models used to demonstrate
various means of delineating interior spaces. Portfolio development will be encouraged. 3(1-4) S


HID 305 Restaurant Design

Prerequisite: HID 140. The interior design of lounges and public dining facilities ranging from table
service restaurants to fast food facilities will be covered in readings, projects and field trips. 2(1-2) F


HID 306 Hotel Design

Prerequisite: HID 140. The interior design of guest lodging facilities from urban hotels to resorts is
covered through readings, projects and field trips. Both new and remodeled facilities are examined. 2(1-
2) FE

HID 325 Pre-Internship Seminar

Prerequisite: C grade or better in HID 241. Sourcing and acquisition of an internship are examined.
Includes resume writing, phone, email and correspondence etiquette, and interview skills. 1(1-0) F


HID 332 Color and Light in Interior Design

Prerequisite: HID 140. A study of the properties and interrelationship of color and light. Uses of color,
light, types of lighting and fixtures, and the measuring and control of light are covered. Design projects
required. 3(2-2) S

HID 340 Residential Design II: Green Design

Prerequisite: HID 241 and HID 247. Design of a residence including sound conditioning, luxury features,
furnishing, accessories, and interiors using innovative, sustainable materials and products. 3(2-2) F


HID 342 Contract Design I

Prerequisite: HID 241 and HID 247. Professional interior design study involving problem solving,
exploration of resources and client presentation in the design of offices and public building spaces. An
office design project is required. Supplemental course fee. 3(1-4) S

HID 344 19th and 20th Century Furniture and Decorative Arts

An overview of interiors, furnishings, accessories, and related structure design during the 19th and 20th
centuries in Western Europe and the United States. 3(3-0) D
HID 345 Housing and Environmental Living

Prerequisite: HID 140. Economic and social aspects of designing an environment for contemporary
living. 3(3-0) F

HID 346 Ancient and Medieval Furnishings and Decorative Arts

An overview of interiors, furnishings, accessories, and related structure design from ancient civilizations
through the Middle Ages in Western Europe. 3(3-0) D

HID 347 Advanced Presentation Techniques

Prerequisite: HID 241 and HID 247. Continuation of development of visual communication skills to
delineate interior spaces. Projects require advanced detail and complexity. 3(1-4) F

HID 348 Furniture for Interior Design

Prerequisite: HID 140; and HID 344 or HID 346 or HID 349. Overview of residential and commercial
furniture resources, selling techniques, and furniture specifications. Project required with an emphasis
on written and oral skills. 3(3-0) SE

HID 349 Renaissance Furnishings and Decorative Arts

An overview of interiors, furnishings, accessories, and related structure design from the Renaissance
through the l8th century in Western Europe and the United States. 3(3-0) D

HID 408 Advanced AutoCAD

Prerequisite: HID 208. Further study and use of AutoCAD for interior designers with an emphasis on
blocks, Xrefs, and 3D drawings. Specialized lighting techniques and backgrounds included. Project
required. 3(3-0) F,S

HID 424 Seminar in Housing and Interior Design

Prerequisite: senior standing and major in Housing and Interior Design. Study the professional principles
of interior design. Prepare for seeking employment in interior design - portfolio preparation, resume
development, employer search, senior exhibition or show. Project will include a study problem for the
National Council on Interior Design Qualification examination. 3(3-0) S


HID 441 Senior Design Studio

Prerequisite: HID 340 or HID 442; and senior standing; and major in Housing and Interior Design.
Professional interior design problems including work with and presentation to clients. 3(1-4) S
HID 442 Contract Design II

Prerequisite: HID 342. Professional interior design study involving problem solving, exploration of
resources and client presentation, Health care facilities, institutions, and advanced office design are
included. 3(1-4) FO

HID 499 Internship in Housing and Interior Design

Prerequisite: Permission. Off-campus, supervised experiences in a cooperative program with an interior
design firm. The student is required to attend a beginning orientation, maintain short weekly visits with
their faculty advisor, attend a follow-up seminar and complete the assigned academic work and project
appropriate to the experience. The student must work a minimum of 180 hours for a 4 credit internship
and a minimum of 270 hours for a 6 credit internship. 1-6 D


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Housing and Interior Design (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog
    Specific General Education Requirement: CHM 105(5)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. CFD 155(3) or 163(3); FMD 202(3); HID 140(3), 208(3), 241(3), 245(3), 247(3), 332(3), 340(3),
342(3), 344(3), 345(3), 346(3), 349(3), 424(3), 441(3), 499(4-6)
      2. Complete 8 hours from the following: HID 145(2), 305(2), 306(2), 343(3), 347(3), 348(3), 442(3)
      3. Portfolio review prior to completion of degree program. Based on GPA, skills shown on projects,
and interest shown in the program, students will be evaluated as to whether to continue in the program.
      4. Related Requirements: ART 100(3), 101(3), plus enough hours from the following electives to
equal 125 total hours: ACC 201(3); AGH 243(2), 333(3); ART 115(3), 210(3), 226(3), 235(3), 255(3),
271(3), 272(3), 483(3), 484(3); DES 210(3), 300(3); MKT 350(3), 352(3), 355(3); TCM 110(3), 121(3),
221(3), 313(3), 321(3); THE 150(2), 250(2), 255(2)
  C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements
section of catalog




MKT 472 Advanced Marketing

Prerequisite: MKT 351; and MKT 360 or concurrent enrollment; and undergraduate business majors
must be admitted to COBA. An analysis of the marketing concepts, functions, and principles involved in
planning, implementing, and evaluating the total marketing program of various organizations. 3(3-0) F,S


e-Business
Bachelor of Applied Science
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science

CIS 370(3) or 510(3); BUS 510(3); MKT 450(3), 510(3); MKT 596(3) or CIS 591(3) – only if senior project is
e-business related
Marketing (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

A. Major Requirements

 1. MKT 351(3), 360(3); 464(3) or 474(3), 472(3); QBA 337(3)
 2. Complete one of the following options:

     a. Marketing Management:
           1. MKT 352(3), 430(3); MGT 397(3)
           2. Complete two of the following: MKT 354(3), 452(3), 470(3); 476(3) or 510(3)


Marketing (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog
 B. COBA Admission and Program Requirements - see College of Business Administration/Admission and
Program Requirements section of catalog
 C. Major Requirements
     1. MKT 351(3), 360(3); 464(3) or 474(3), 472(3); QBA 337(3)
     2. Complete one of the following options:

         d. Retailing/Merchandising:
                    1. MKT 352(3), 355(3), 455(3); MKT 394 or 596(3); FMD 101(3) or MKT 510(3)
                    2. Recommended electives (not required): MGT 341(3); MKT 354(3); ART 223(3);
HID 343(3); FMD 403(3)


Biomedical Sciences
Bachelor of Science

 A. Required Courses: BMS 110(4), 230(3), 307(4), 308(4)
 B. Choose Biomedical Sciences electives to bring total hours in the minor to at least 20 hours. BIO 101
or 102 will not count toward the minor.
Exercise Biology
Bachelor of Science

 A. Required Courses: BMS 430(3), 432(3), 467(3), BMS 520(3) or CHM 352(3), BMS 567(4)
 B. Choose electives from the following to bring total hours in the minor to at least 21 hours: BMS
230(3), 260(4), 335(3), 563(3), 570(4); PED 369(3); PSY 508(3)


Nutrition
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science

 A. Required Courses: BMS 240(3), 333(3)
 B. Choose electives from the following to bring total hours in the minor to at least 20 hours: BMS
300(1), 330(3), 331(4), 332(3), 335(3), 340(2), 430(3), 497(1-3), 532(3). No more than 3 hours of BMS
497 credit may be applied to the minor. See Dietetics Program Director for additional courses that may
be approved.




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Gerontology
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Social Work

  A. Required Core Courses: GER 380(3); and two of the following courses: BMS 260(4); PSY 365(3); GER
310(3)
  B. Complete an additional 9 hours of elective courses chosen from the following with approval of the
program coordinator or delegate (6 hours must be courses with a GER designation) to bring total hours
in minor to at least 18 hours: GER 310(3)*, 320(3), 330(3), 350(3), 365(3), 396(1-3), 397(1-3); BMS
260(4)*; COM 390(3); PED 567(3); PSY 365(3)*; or another approved course.
    *Counts in elective hours if not taken as a "required" core course.




Gerontology (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of
catalog. The following prerequisite courses will meet General Education requirements: COM 115(3); PLS
101(3); PSY 121(3); BIO 102(4) or BMS 110(4); CHM 105(5) or 106(4) or 160(4)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. Prerequisite for required courses for Gerontology major: PSY 304(3) or 350(3)
      2. Core courses for Gerontology major:
          a. Substantive Aging Courses: BMS 260(4); GER 310(3), 380(3), 470(3); PSY 365(3)
          b. Research Methods Course: PSY 203(3) or PSY 302 or SOC 301(3) or another course approved
by advisor
          c. Communication Skills Course: COM 390(3) or 326(3) or 332(3) or 405(3) or another course
approved by advisor
          d. Statistics Course: AGR 330(3) or ECO 308(3) or MTH 340(3) or PSY 200(3) or QBA 237(3) or
REC 328(3) or SOC 302(3) or another course approved by advisor
          e. Health Sciences Course: BMS 130(3) or 240(3) or 310(3) or another course focusing on
physical health and wellness selected by the student with advisor approval
      3. Other required courses: GER 498(6-12), Supervised Practicum in Gerontology and GER 499(3),
Seminar in Gerontology
      4. Electives to complete comprehensive major: 6 hours of GER courses with another 3 hours
selected by the student with advisor approval
  C. Electives to complete 125 hours. Students are encouraged to use these hours to complete another
major or minor
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements
ECO 308 Basic Statistics for Economists

Prerequisite: ECO 155 and ECO 165; completion of mathematics general education requirement.
Descriptive statistics, probability theory, sampling distributions, estimation theory, tests of hypotheses.
Emphasis is placed on problems encountered in economic research. This course cannot be credited
toward a degree if the student has taken any of the following: AGR 330, MTH 340, PSY 200, QBA 237,
REC 328, SOC 302. 3(3-0) D

ECO 318 Economics for Educators

This course covers the basic economics concepts that elementary and middle school teachers are
required to master in order to teach effectively the economic concepts and tools outlines in Standard 4
(Economics Concepts and Principles) of the Social Studies area of the Show Me Knowledge Standards of
the Missouri Assessment Program. This knowledge content includes many of the basic economic
principles covered in macroeconomics. This course cannot be taken as a substitute for either ECO 155 or
ECO 165, and will not count towards an Economics major or the BSED in Secondary Education. 2(2-0) F,S




B. Major Requirements

 1. ECO 155(3), 165(3), 308(3) or equivalent, 365(3), 385(3), 409(3), 590(3)
 2. Minimum of nine additional credit hours in Economics


B. Major Requirements

 1. ECO 155(3), 165(3), 308(3) or equivalent, 365(3), 385(3), 409(3), 590(3)
 2. Minimum of 15 additional credit hours in Economics
 3. Minimum of 18 hours in satisfaction of Plan A or B
     a. Concentration of at least 18 hours in any discipline in which a major is offered
     b. Concentration of at least nine hours in each of two disciplines in which a major is offered




B. Major Requirements

 1. ECO 155(3), 165(3), 308(3) or equivalent, 365(3), 385(3), 409(3), 590(3)
 2. Minimum of 15 additional credit hours in Economics
 Minors
Economics
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Non-Certifiable)

 A. Minor must include ECO 155(3), 165(3)
 B. Additional hours in economics to total at least 18 hours. One of the following statistics courses may
be used toward this minor: AGR 330(3), ECO 308(3), MTH 340(3), PSY 200(3), QBA 237(3), REC 328(3), or
SOC 302(3)


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PLS 399 Cooperative Education in Political Science

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA and junior or senior standing. To enable
qualified students to apply theoretical constructs and analytical techniques in a supervised work
environment. This course cannot be credited toward a major in political science if the student has
completed a total of three or more credits in any combination of the following; PLS 493, PLS 494, PLS
498, or cooperative education in another discipline. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 1-6 S


PLS 498 In-Service Training in Public Administration

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA and junior or senior standing.
Supervised field work in an approved local, state, or national government agency including preparation
of an acceptable formal report. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 3(3-0) F,S


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REL 100 Introduction to Religion

General Education Course (Self-Understanding/Humanities Perspective).Investigates what religion is and
does, compares religious ideas and practices, and explores how religion influences the relationship
between individual and community. 3(3-0) F,S
BIO 380 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Prerequisite: BIO 121 and BIO 122. Vertebrate gross anatomy. Phylogeny and present status of organ
systems of vertebrates. Shark, mud puppy and cat serve as principal sources for laboratory exercises.
May be taught concurrently with BIO 680. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 380 and BIO 680.
Supplemental course fee. 5(2-6) F,S

BIO 494 Senior Seminar

Prerequisite: 90 hours and biology major. Current issues in the biological sciences will be discussed and
information on post-graduate opportunities for biology majors will be presented. Successful completion
of the Major Field Achievement Test will be required. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 1(1-0) S


BIO 499 Special Topics in Biology

Prerequisite: Biology major with a minimum of a 3.00 GPA; and 20 hours in Biology courses; and
permission of instructor. Outstanding students obtain additional experience through independent study.
May be repeated to a total of 3 credit hours. A maximum of 3 credit hours from any combination of BIO
300, 399 and 499 may be counted towards the major. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 1-3 F


BIO 509 Stream Ecology

Prerequisite: BIO 369. Recommended Prerequisite: CHM 175 or higher. The interdisciplinary study of
running waters, including study of the physical and chemical environment, trophic interactions, nutrient
cycling, and the multiple impacts of humans on modifying these systems. Lectures, group discussion of
readings, and laboratory and field exercises. One all-day Saturday field trip required. May be taught
concurrently with BIO 609. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 609 and BIO 509. 4(2-4) S


BIO 540 Applications of Molecular Markers

Prerequisite: BIO 235 and permission. Introduction to the use of molecular markers in biological
research. Topics covered include methods for identifying genetic variation at the molecular level
(protein electrophoresis, automatic DNA sequencing, RAPDs, RFLPs, AFLPs, microsatellites) and their
applications to research in systematics, ecology, evolution, conservation biology, forensics, and gene
mapping. Students will complete research projects using one or more of the techniques learned.
Supplemental course fee. May be taught concurrently with BIO 640. Cannot receive credit for both BIO
640 and BIO 540. 4(2-4) D
BIO 551 Advanced Statistical Methods for Biologists

Prerequisite: BIO 550. The design and analysis of biological experiments, with an emphasis on the choice
and interpretation of inferential statistics. Topics covered include causal inference, statistical power,
general linear models, repeated measures designs, log-linear models, nonparametric procedures, and
computer-intensive techniques. The use of computer software to analyze real data sets from the
biological literature is emphasized. May be taught concurrently with BIO 651. Cannot receive credit for
both BIO 651 and BIO 551. 2(1-2) D


BIO 563 Population Ecology

Prerequisite: BIO 369; and MTH 138 or higher. Discussion of factors controlling the distribution and
abundance of populations. Quantitative description of population dynamics is emphasized. May be
taught concurrently with BIO 663. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 663 and BIO 563. 3(2-2) S


BIO 567 Physiological Ecology

Prerequisite: BIO 369; and either BIO 361 or BIO 544 or BMS 308. Physiological adaptations of plants
and animals to environmentally stressful conditions and to ecological/evolutionary pressures. May be
taught concurrently with BIO 668. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 668 and BIO 567. 4(4-0) SE


BIO 584 Fish Ecology

Prerequisite: BIO 369 and BIO 575. The biology of fishes in relation to environmental conditions at the
individual, population, and community levels. May be taught concurrently with BIO 686. Cannot receive
credit for both BIO 686 and BIO 584. 3(3-0) D




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A. Complete 18 hours from the following courses and from at least three disciplines (course prefix), with
no more than nine hours from any one discipline: ANT 325(3), ANT 330(3)*, ANT 360(3), ANT 425(3),
ANT 451(3)*, ANT 453(3)*, ANT 454(3)*, ANT 490(3)*, ART 273(3), ART 385(3), ART 485(3), ART 496(3)*,
ENG 354(3)*, GRY 305(3)*, GRY 597(3)*, HST 397(3)*, HST 509(3), HST 510(3), REL 315(3).
*when applicable
B. Other courses (e.g., special topics, transfer) may be applied with the approval of the Administrator.


BIO 710 Topics in Microbial Physiology

Topics of interest in microbial physiology will be discussed. These may include, cell structure, energy
production, fermentation, nitrogen metabolism, protein and nucleic acid syntheses, regulation of gene
expression, and dynamics of cell growth. Lecture will supplement discussion sessions. 3(3-0), S


BMS 628 Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis

Prerequisite: BMS 625. An in-depth study of the methods of genetic control and production of
pathogenic factors employed by disease causing bacteria. The course will use both reference material
and primary literature to illustrate the topics under discussion. May be taught concurrently with BMS
528. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 528 and BMS 628. 2(2-0), S


BMS 635 Signal Transduction

Prerequisite: BMS 622. This course will examine the molecular mechanisms of various ligand/receptor
interactions. The dynamics involved in ligand/receptor binding will be studied and examples of receptor-
mediated signal transduction will be introduced. Signaling pathways within the cell will be discussed.
Primary literature and reference materials will be utilized to illustrate specific examples under discourse.
May be taught concurrently with BMS 535. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 535 and BMS 635. 2(2-0),
D
Program Description
The Counseling program grants the Master of Science degree in Counseling with options in elementary
school counseling, secondary school counseling and community agency counseling. Students interested
in public school settings must either have a valid Missouri teaching certificate, or complete additional
teaching course work, to be eligible for state certification as professional school counselors. The
elementary (EL) and secondary (SE) school counseling option program requirements fulfill the
professional counseling course requirements for permanent school counselor certification in the State
of Missouri. The community agency (CA) counseling option requirements fulfill the professional
counseling course work requirements for licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the
State of Missouri (The LPC also requires 3000 hours of additional post-master’s supervised experience).
Students may elect to complete either the ELE or SEC school counseling program and also quality for LPC
licensure by completing additional electives.
Ten components of the Counseling Knowledge Base:
1. Orientation. Knowledge of personal attributes (self-understanding) and professional identity and
issues.
2. Foundations. Knowledge of psychological and educational foundations of the profession.
3. Assessment. Competence in measuring, assessing, and diagnosing psychological and educational
attributes.
4. Information. Knowledge about personal-social and educational-career issues, research and resources.
5. Facilitation. Competence in interpersonal communication, counseling, educating, and consulting with
individuals and groups.
6. Intervention. Competencies in the counseling process.
7. Diversity. Knowledge about differences in cultures, competence in working with diverse clients.
8. Management. Competence in planning, developing and implementing counseling programs.
9. Technology. Knowledge of technological resources and competence in their use.
10. Ethics. Knowledge, understanding and practice of ethical standards for the profession.
Admission Requirements
Admission toof Communication Sciencesselective. Minimum admission requirements and application
Department the Counseling program is and Disorders
Professional Building, Room 237, Phone: (417) 836-5368, Fax: (417) 836-4242
Email: CommunicationSciencesandDisorders@missouristate.edu
Web Site: http://www.missouristate.edu/csd
Department Head: Neil DiSarno
Faculty
Professor: Neil J. DiSarno, Julie J. Masterson, Ronald W. Netsell, Lisa A. Proctor
Associate Professor: Klaas Bakker, Thomas C. Franklin, Wafaa Kaf
Assistant Professor: Jason L. Box, Clifford A. Franklin, Letitia White, Ye Wang
Clinical Associate Professor: Deborah Cron, Karen Engler, Jill Oswalt
2. Select Option Area. Course work to be selected in consultation with advisor to bring the total to
not less than 33 hours. Student should select from either Teaching and Learning (on campus option) OR
Curriculum and Instruction (online option) OR Teaching Certification Credit Option (certification students
only).

   Teaching and Learning Option (on campus)       21 hrs

A. Teaching Methods (select 4 to total 12 hrs)
ECE 726 Programming & Policy Issues for Early Childhood Settings
ELE 710 Elementary School Curriculum
ELE 713 Adv. Theory & Practice in the Teaching of Communication Arts
ELE 714 Adv. Theory & Practice in the Teaching of Social Studies
ELE 715 Adv. Theory & Practice in the Teaching of Mathematics
ELE 716 Adv. Theory & Practice in the Teaching of Science
ELE 717 Adv. Theory & Practice in the Teaching of Economics
ELE 722 Differentiated Instruction for Early Childhood, Elementary & Middle School Classrooms

B. Electives: (select with advisor to total 9 hrs)
CFD (632, 660, 662)
ECE (724, 725, 726, 727)
EEM (606, 607, 608, 676, 796)
IMT (650, 662)
MID (725, 810)
PSY (614, 703, 705)
RDG (660, 640, 700, 710, 730)
SFR (647, 680, 750, 793, 858)
SPE (613, 656, 660, 715, 780)
Other662 Electronic Field Production discretion of the program advisor
MED electives may be added at the

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Planning, designing, and executing single camera video
production in nonstudio settings. Emphasis will be placed on narrative projects which require advanced
application of media design concepts, including cinematography, nonlinear editing, directing, producing,
and sound design. May be taught concurrently with MED 562. Cannot receive credit for both MED 562
and MED 662. 3(2-2) F, S

MED 698 Seminar in Broadcast Management

An in-depth analysis of management issues in the broadcast industry. Current theory and specific
practices are examined and applied to broadcast operations. May be taught concurrently with MED 598.
Cannot receive credit for both MED 598 and MED 698. 3(3-0) D
 Master of Global Studies
(formerly Master of International Affairs and Administration)

Dennis V. Hickey, Program Director
Strong Hall, Room 325; Phone (417) 836-5850
DennisHickey@missouristate.edu; http://polsci.missouristate.edu/mgs/

Program Description

The program is designed to meet growing societal, occupational, and student needs and demands for
persons educated and knowledgeable in international affairs. It will help students to become
professionally involved in an increasingly competitive and interdependent world in which the United
States occupies a prominent position. The Master of Global Studies (MGS) will produce graduates who
will be well trained in international affairs and administration and can work in the public or private
sector. It is also designed to prepare its graduates to continue their graduate education at the doctoral
level in political science, international relations, or other related fields.

Students with demonstrated academic competence who are interested in the field of global studies will
be welcomed into the program regardless of undergraduate major.

Entrance Requirements

  1. Normally, applicants with a 3.00 GPA or above in their undergraduate degree from an accredited
institution and a combined GRE score of not less than 900 on the verbal and quantitative sections will be
admitted to the MGS program in good standing. A minimum score of 900 is required on the combined
verbal and quantitative sections of the GRE, with a minimum of 475 on either the verbal or quantitative
section and a score of not less than 425 on the other. All students applying for admission must take the
GRE 698 Sociological Research the program.
SOC before being admitted into

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Independent and/or group work in research methodology, data
manipulation and presentation in selected fields of sociology. May be repeated to total of 9 hours. May
be taught concurrently with SOC 599. Cannot receive credit for both SOC 599 and SOC 698. 1-3 D


SOC 700 Gender in Global Community

This course will explore the effects of an integrated global community on gender; how global trends are
gender-based in terms of labor market participation, resource allocation, family regulations, health care,
crime, war and regional politics. We will discuss how events and policies in one part of the globe affect
gender relations in another region. Cannot be taken for credit if GST 400 was taken for credit. 3(3-0) D
SOC 706 Advanced Social Research Methodology

Introduces research methodology in the context of understanding community social life. Covers surveys,
ethnographic accounts, community indicators, comparative studies, and evaluation studies. Also
instructs students in advanced skills of data analysis and presentation, report and grant writing. 3(3-0) F


SOC 785 Community Change

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Focus on the complexities in the sociological understanding
associated with social change and the long-term trends impacting local communities. Students will
conduct data research and develop strategies for implementing planned social change projects. 3(3-0) D


SOC 790 Religion in Society

This course examines the relationship between religion and its social context. Students will explore the
social nature of individual religious institutions. The interrelationship between religion and the problems
created by modernity will be studied. Taught concurrently with SOC 390. Cannot receive credit for both
SOC 390 and SOC 790. 3(3-0) S

SOC 799 Thesis

Independent research and study connected with preparation of thesis. 1-6 D
Master of Science, Applied Anthropology
William Wedenoja, Graduate Director
Strong Hall, Room 470; Phone (417) 836-5641
billwedenoja@missouristate.edu
Program Description

Applied Anthropology is the application of anthropological skills and knowledge to the needs and
problems of society today. This program is intended to be a terminal, practice degree, although it will
also be helpful preparation for a Ph.D. program. Applicants should have a strong undergraduate
background in anthropology. The program emphasizes the cultivation of professional skills such as
quantitative analysis, computer applications, technical writing, and public speaking. There are many
facets to applied anthropology, but the current focus of this program is the study and preservation of
cultural heritage through archaeology and ethnography. Every student will take courses in both
archaeology and in ethnography, but each student will normally focus on one or the other. The program
is concerned chiefly with American culture and diversity, particularly Native American culture and the
Ozarks region, and is intended to meet the steadily growing need for professionals in cultural resource
management, public archaeology, cultural and linguistic preservation, and heritage tourism.
Entrance Requirements

Admission to the program is selective. The minimum standards for admission are:

  1. A bachelor's degree from a college or university accredited by agencies recognized by Missouri State
University.
  2. A minimum overall GPA of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale; OR at least a 3.25 GPA on a 4.00 scale for the last 60
hours of academic course work; OR a combined score of 1000 or higher on the verbal and quantitative
sections of the Graduate Records Examination (GRE).
  3. At least a 3.25 in all anthropology courses.
Thesis Option (A minimum of 33 hours)

  1. Core Requirements - 15 hrs
    Course Code Course Title Credits
    CRM 706 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice 3 hrs
    CRM 707 Quantitative Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice 3 hrs
    CRM 720 Crime Theory and Policy 3 hrs
    CRM 799 Thesis 6 hrs
  2. Electives. Eighteen hours including a minimum of twelve hours taken from remaining CRM graduate-
level courses. Courses outside CRM must be approved by the student's advisor.
  3. Thesis. Students must complete a written thesis following by an oral defense in front of their
advisory committee.
CHM 175 General Chemistry Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHM 170 or concurrent enrollment. An introduction to laboratory chemistry, including
synthesis, physical studies, qualitative and quantitative analysis, and data manipulation and
interpretation. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to take CHM 302 or 342. May
not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 2(0-4) F,S




GRM 475 Topics in German(ic) Literature and Culture

Prerequisite: GRM 311 or above. Selected topics in German(ic) literature and culture. May be repeated
once with a different topic. Variable content course. 3(3-0) D
Complete NEW Catalog Description




ART 390 Art History Teaching Assistant

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Under the direct guidance of the professor, the student will assist the
professor in teaching, supervising, and/or grading course materials. May be repeated to a total of 3 hours.
Graded Pass/Not Pass only. Does not count toward BA or BSED in Art and Design or BFA in Art or BFA in Design.
0-1 D

ENG 373 Writing with Technology

Prerequisite: ENG 110 or equivalent; CSC/CIS 101 or equivalent; and 45 hours. Explores the ethical use of
software and hardware tools that professional writers use in the workplace to create and distribute technical
information. Students will produce projects to gain a hands-on understanding of the tools used in developing
online help and printed documentation, working with graphics, and other relevant areas. 3(3-0) F,S




ENG 377 Scientific and Technical Editing

Prerequisite: ENG 110 and 60 hours. The process of creating a new piece of writing by clarifying, reducing,
expanding, and synthesizing materials written by others. Emphasis on audience adaptation; professional ethics;
and document organization, style, and mechanics through a client-based editing project. Focus on building
author-editor relationships while managing the editing cycle. 3(3-0) F,S


ENG 421 Advanced Technical Writing

Prerequisite: ENG 321. Practice in project planning and managing projects. Emphasis on researched-based
audience analysis, document design, and usability testing, including ethical considerations. Students complete a
clientbased design project and supporting documents. Emphasis on practical and marketable skills. 3(3-0) F,S


ENG 422 Career Focus in Professional Writing

Prerequisite: ENG 373 and ENG 377 and ENG 421. A capstone course emphasizing reflection and synthesis of
concepts from previous courses. Focus on skills associated with the smooth transition from an academic study
of professional writing to the professional workforce. Students prepare a portfolio that demonstrates their
integration of course and program outcomes and complete individual research projects related to the three
pillars of the Public Affairs mission, including topics ranging from ethical and legal issues to globalization and
localization. 3(3-0) S
ENG 473 Writing with Technology II

Prerequisite: ENG 373. Builds on concepts students learn in ENG 373. Students will gain hands-on practice
working with more-advanced tools and features that professional writers use to produce technical documents.
Topics may include, but are not limited to, desktop publishing, web-page creation, single sourcing, and
accessibility. 3(3-0) F

ENG 487 Analysis of Scientific Literature

Prerequisite: ENG 110 and 60 hours. Examines the history and development of scientific writing. Students
survey a broad selection of scientific literature to better understand the cultural and ethical implications of
science writing as they apply to both the field of scientific and technical writing and the broader society. 3(3-0) F


ENG 573 Writing for the Web

Prerequisite: 60 hours. Explores the professional writer's role in creating web pages and sites designed to
deliver information. Topics include planning, user analysis, organization, structure, presentation, content
development, writing style, and accessibility accommodation. May be taught concurrently with ENG 679.
Cannot receive credit for both ENG 573 and ENG 679. 3(3-0) F

ENG 574 Technical Writing Internship

Prerequisite: ENG 421 and permission of instructor. Projects in technical writing, combining academic training
and supervised work experience in business, industry, government, academia, or nonprofit organizations.
Students are required to work a minimum of 135 hours. May be taught concurrently with ENG 694. Cannot
receive credit for both ENG 694 and ENG 574. 3(3-0) F,S

ENG 191 Grammer Skills

Development of specific skills in American English grammer (including sentence structure, punctuation,
capitalization, spelling, and diction). Students will explore and discuss grammer and usage in written
communication. Not a compostion course. Cannot be used to satisfy any general education requirement in
English or any requirement in the Bachelor of Science in Education degree. 1(1-0) D
ENG 216 Introduction to the Graphic Novel

Prerequisite: ENG 110. Introduction to the literature, theory, technique, and terminology of graphic narrative
and practical experience in the writing of graphic narrative. 3(3-0) F




ENG 301 Seminar in English Studies and Public Affairs

Prerequisite: ENG 235. Explores how literature shapes and is shaped by public debates, cultural heriages, and
community needs. Course Unit 1, "Writers, Writing, and Leadership," examines writers' and literary institutions'
interventions in crises of leadership, types of writing that have developed to fill voids in leadership, and/or
literary representations of leadership. Unit 2, "Writing Cultures and Intercultural Encounters," considers writers'
efforts to imagine or represent cultures and cross-cultural relations. Unit 3, "Texts and Their Communities,"
focuses on the relations between texts and their audiences, the development of literary communities and
institutions, and/or the process of writing or editing a text for a particular local community. 3(3-0) F,S
English/Creative Writing Option
Bachelor of Arts

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (36 hours)
      1. ENG 235(3), 351(3), 508(3)
      2. Two courses from: ENG 340(3), 341(3), 350(3)
      3. One course from: ENG 354(3), 355(3), 360(3), 361(3), 362(3), 363(3), 380(3)
      4. One 500-level literature course
      5. Two courses from: ENG 203(3), 215(3), 225(3)
      6. One course from: ENG 303(3), 315(3), 325(3)
      7. ENG 301 Seminar in English Studies and Public Affaris
      8. One course from: ENG 500(3), 501(3), 503(3), 506(3) for a total of not fewer than 36 hours
 C. Minor Required (or second major)
  D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and Requirements section of
catalog
 E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of
catalog




English/Literature Option
Bachelor of Arts

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog
  B. Major Requirements (36 hours)
      1. ENG 235(3), 340(3), 341(3), 350(3), 351(3); ENG 390(3) or 491(3)
      2. One course from: ENG 354(3), 355(3), 360(3), 361(3), 362(3), 363(3), 380(3), 483(3)
      3. One course from: ENG 312(3), 510(3), 513(3), 541(3), 543(3)
      4. Two 500-level literature courses (in addition to any 500-level literature courses used to fulfill the
requirements for the major)
      5. Three hours of English electives for a total of not fewer than 36 hours, not including ENG 110, 210, 221,
310
      6. ENG 301 Seminar in English Studies and Public affairs
  C. Minor Required (or second major)
  D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and Requirements section of
catalog
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of
catalog
MED 492 Independent Study in Electronic Media

Prerequisite: admission to a departmental major, permission of instructor and 6 hours of upper division MED or
JRN coursework. Supervised independent study exploring selected areas determined by the student in
consultation with the media faculty. Course work may include readings, term papers, or projects. May be
repeated to a total of 6 hours with permission of the department. 1-3 D


MED 562 Digital Filmmaking

Prerequisite: MED 461 or MED 462 or MED 465. A film-style production class in digital high-definition
filmmaking. Students will form small production teams to plan, design, and produce short narrative films. May
be taught concurrently with MED 662. Cannot receive credit for both MED 662 and MED 562. 3(2-2) S




N/A




MED 130 Fundamentals of Media Convergence

An exploration of the role and impact of convergence across all areas of journalism and media. Emphasis will be
placed on the teaching of audio, video, web and social media skills. 3(3-0) F,S
MED 220 Case Studies in Mass Media

Prerequisite: MED 130. A case study approach investigating how the mass media cover a single significant public
affairs issue such as Hurricane Katrina or health care reform. Emphasis will be placed on media literacy and
critical thinking as students consider the role that the mass media play in public discourse and social reality. 3(3-
0) S




Mass Media (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog
  B. Major Requirements (39 hours)
     1. Departmental Core: MED 120(3), 204(3)
     2. Mass Media Core: MED 274(3), 325(3), 365(3), 454(3), 581(3); JRN 270(3), 407(3)
     3. Choose one of the following options:
         a. Film Studies: MED 374(3), 375(3), 470(3), 570(3)
         b. Media Studies: 12 hours of MED or JRN electives chosen with approval of advisor
     4. Public Affairs Intensive Experience: MED 581
 Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 3.00 in MED 120(3), MED 204(3) and MED 274(3) along with a
2.25 overall GPA to be admitted to this major.
  C. Minor Required. Note: No course may count for both the Mass Media major and the minor.
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of
catalog
Mass Media (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (39 hours)
    1. Departmental Core: MED 120(3), 204(3)
    2. Mass Media Core: MED 274(3), 325(3), 365(3), 454(3), 581(3); JRN 270(3), 407(3)
    3. Choose one of the following options:
        a. Film Studies: MED 374(3), 375(3), 470(3), 570(3)
        b. Media Studies: 12 hours of MED or JRN electives chosen with approval of advisor
    4. Public Affairs Intensive Experience: MED 581

    Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 3.00 in MED 120(3), MED 204(3) and MED 274(3) along
with a 2.25 overall GPA to be admitted to this major.
  C. Minor Required. Note: No course may count for both the Mass Media major and the minor.
  D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and Requirements section of
catalog
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of
catalog




Journalism (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog
  B. Major Requirements (39 hours)
     1. Departmental Core: MED 120(3), 204(3)
     2. Journalism Core: JRN 270(3), 407(3), 595(3); MED 454(3), 581(3)
     3. Choose one of the following options (18 hours):
         a. Broadcast Journalism: JRN 284(3), 381(3), 388(3) or 481(3); MED 365(3); MED 382(3) or 383(3); select
3 hours of JRN or MED electives chosen with approval of advisor.
         b. Print and Internet Journalism: JRN 370(3), 372(3), 476(3); select 9 hours from MED 390 and JRN
courses other than JRN 595 chosen with approval of advisor but no more than 6 hours of JRN 300.
      4. Public Affairs Intensive Experience: MED 581
     Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 3.00 in MED 120(3), MED 204(3) and JRN 270(3) along
with a 2.25 overall GPA to be admitted to this major.
  C. Minor required. Note: No course may count for both the Journalism major and the minor. A minor in Mass
Media will not meet the minor requirement.
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of
catalog
Electronic Arts (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

This program is offered in conjunction with the Department of Art and Design.
Preadmission Core Courses

Complete 9 hours with a GPA of 3.00 or higher from the following Electronic Arts preadmission core courses
before applying to the program: ART 110(3) or 100(3); MED 290(3), 365(3); MUS 216(3). Core courses in the
student’s chosen option must be completed before applying.
Initial Portfolio Review

Portfolio must include a minimum of two and a maximum of three examples of audio, video, multimedia,
and/or computer animation work, with at least one example coming from a core course. Students seeking
admission to the Electronic Arts program in the area of Computer Animation Studies must include at least one
work from ART 230 or ART 330. Specific guidelines are required for portfolios. See advisor or the Electronic Arts
Coordinator for details.

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (37 hours)
    1. Core Courses: ART 110(3) or 100(3), 300(3); MUS 216(3); MED 290(3), 365(3); ART 498(4) or MED 498(4)
    2. Choose one of the following options (18 hours):
         a. Audio Studies: MED 461(3), 561(3); MUS 316(3), 529(3); select 6 hours with advisor approval: MED
361(3), 492(3), 595(1-3); MUS 103(3), 137(1), 327(2), 399(1-3), 512(3); THE 558(3)
         b. Computer Animation Studies: (See "Department of Art and Design" section of catalog)
         c. Multimedia Studies: MED 390(3), 490(3); ART 210(3); DES 202(3); select 6 hours with advisor
approval: ART 230(3); MED 355(3), 465(3), 492(3), 595(1-3). DES 202 should be taken only after successful
completion of initial portfolio review.
         d. Video Studies: ART 230(3); MED 465(3); select 12 hours with advisor approval: MED 390(3), 462(3),
Mass Media (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (51 hours)
     1. Departmental Core: MED 120(3), 204(3)
     2. Mass Media Core: MED 274(3), 325(3), 365(3), 454(3), 581(3); JRN 270(3), 407(3)
     3. Choose one of the following options (24 hours):
         a. Digital Film Production: MED 374(3) or 375(3); MED 461(3); 465(3) or 466(3); MED 561(3) or 562(3);
MED 565(3); select 9 hours chosen with approval of advisor from MED 300(3), 361(3); MED 374(3) or 375(3);
462(3), 492(3), 561(3), 562(3), 570(3), 595(3), 597(3)
         b. Media Production: MED 382(3) or 383(3); MED 381(3); select 9 hours from MED 290(3), 361(3),
382(3), 383(3), 384(3), 390(3), 462(3), 490(3), 492(2-3), 583(3), 595(1-3); JRN 284(3); select 9 hours of elective
courses chosen with approval of advisor
     4. Public Affairs Intensive Experience: MED 581

    Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 3.00 in MED 120(3), MED 204(3) and MED 365(3) along
with a 2.25 overall GPA to be admitted to this major.
  C. Note: No course may count for both the Mass Media major and a minor.
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of
catalog
Admission Requirements

All students majoring in the Department of Media, Journalism & Film (except for those seeking a major in
Electronic Arts) must satisfy the following requirements before they can be admitted to the program.

 A. Complete a minimum of 30 credit hours.
 B. Have a combined grade point average (Missouri State and transfer) of 2.3 or higher.
 C. Complete COM 115 and ENG 110.
 D. Complete the following departmental preadmission core courses and the appropriate degree option course
with at least a C- in each of these classes.
   Departmental Preadmission Core: MED120(3), 130(3), 220(3).
   Required Degree Option Courses:
   Journalism (Non-Comprehensive) - JRN 270(3)
   Mass Media (Non-Comprehensive) - MED 274(3)
   Mass Media (Comprehensive) - MED 365(3)
 E. Achieve a 2.7 or higher GPA across any three of the four preadmission courses (MED 120, 130, 220, and the
appropriate degree option course). To achieve the 2.7 GPA, a student may retake any of these courses only
once and may retake no more than two of these courses.
 F. Submit application for admission and receive approval by faculty advisor and Head of the Department of
Media, Journalism & Film.

Restriction
Departmental majors may not take a second major within the department.




PAIE (credit bearing course or options): MED 498, MED 492, MED 595, MED 581
Theatre Studies
Bachelor of Arts

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog
  B. Major requirements (41-42 hours)
      1. Theatre Reading and Writing (6 hours): THE 130(3), 210(3)
      2. Acting and Directing (9 hours): THE 122(3), 123(3), 430(3)
      3. Theatre History (6 hours): THE 541(3), 542(3)
      4. Design/Technology/Stage Management (6 hours): THE 150(2), 151(1); choose 3 hours from THE 250(2)
and 251(1), or THE 255(2) and 256(1), or THE 260(2) and 261(1), or THE 354(3)
      5. Performance Theory and Practice (3 hours): THE 310(3)
     6. Public Affairs Intensive Experience (3 hours): THE 515(3)
      7. Elective (8-9 hours): choose from the following recommended focus areas or from other advisor
approved DAN and THE courses.
        Performance Focus: THE 505(3), 506(3), 510(3), 515(3)
        Dance Focus: DAN 117(2), 219(2), 320(2), 420(2), 452(3)
        History and Theory Focus: THE 543(3), 545(3), 547(3)
        NOTE: Courses counted for the major may not also be counted for the Bachelor of Arts Fine Arts
requirement.
  C Minor Required (or second major)
  D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees, Programs and Requirements section of
catalog
  E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of
catalog
PAIE (credit bearing course or options): DAN 321, 465, 492; MUS 480; SEC 302; COM 417; THE 417; COM 536,
490, 491; THE 490, 491, 292, 392, 492, 498, 515.




ACC 470 Professionalism in Accountancy

Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of upper division accounting courses; and undergraduate business majors must
be admitted to COBA. Cases (including written and oral presentations) will focus on ethical and regulatory issues
in accounting. Students will focus on professional behavior appropriate for accounting professionals. A grade of
"C" or better is required in this course in order to take ACC 553 or 653. 1(1-0) F,S
ACC 553 Auditing

Prerequisite: grades of "C" or better in ACC 301 and ACC 302 and ACC 311 and ACC 321 and ACC 341 and 470;
and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to COBA. Kinds of audits, the duties and obligations of
the auditor, principles and procedures to be followed in conducting an audit. A grade of "C" or better is required
in this course in order to take ACC 703, 750, 752, 754, and 790. This course has a required assessment
component. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. May be taught concurrently with ACC 653. Cannot receive credit
for both ACC 553 and ACC 653. 3(3-0), F,S


Accounting
Bachelor of Science

 A. ACC 201(3)*, 211(3)*, 301(3)
 B. Complete nine additional hours of accounting from ACC 302(3), 311(3), 321(3), 341(3), 504(3), 506(3),
513(3), 524(3), 525(3), 532(3)
   * ACC 206(4) may be substituted for ACC 201 and 211.


HID 140 Fundamentals of Design and Interiors

Art principles and elements applied to interior environments. Projects will expose the student to interior design
skills, basic drafting techniques, design terminology, space planning, materials and applications. Interior design
as a profession will be discussed. 3(2-2) F,S

HID 208 CAD for Interior Design

Prerequisite: HID 140. An overview of AutoCAD, SketchUp, and other relevant software. Both 2- and 3-
dimensional aspects are covered. Design project required. 3(2-2) F,S


HID 241 Residential Design I

Prerequisite: HID 140 or concurrent enrollment. The design of a residence including the drawing of floor plans
and the study of both structural and decorative aspects. 3(2-2) F,S

N/A
N/A




N/A




N/A




HID 325 Pre-Internship Seminar

Prerequisite: HID 303. Sourcing and acquisition of an internship are examined. Includes resume writing, phone,
email and correspondence etiquette, and interview skills. 1(1-0) F


N/A




HID 340 Sustainable Design

Examines sustainable design and building practices employed in redidential and commercial structures. 3(3-0) D




N/A




HID 344 Historical Design Pre 19th Century

Ancient, Medievil, and Renaissance art, furnishings, and decorative design with emphasis on historical relevance
for the 21st century. 3(3-0) D
N/A




HID 346 Historical Design: 19th- 21st Century

An overview of interiors, furnishings, accessories, and related structure design during the 19th-21st century with
emphasis on historical relevancey for the 21st century. 3(3-0) D

N/A




N/A




N/A




HID 408 Computer Applications for Interior Design

Prerequisite: HID 208. Various computer programs with an emphasis on presentation and portfolios. (0-6)S




HID 424 Business Practices and Senior Show

Prerequisite: HID 405, LAW 231, ACC 201. Business principles and practices of interior design and Senior Show.
2(2-0) S




HID 441 National Council of Interior Design Qualifications (NCIDQ)

Prerequisite: HID 405. Study of NCIDQ written and practical exams. 2(1-2) S
N/A




HID 499 Internship in Interior Design

Prerequisite: HID 303 and HID 325. Off-campus, supervised experiences in a cooperative program with a kitchen
and Bath and/or an interior design firm. The student is required to attend a beginning orientation, maintain
weekly journals, communicate with their faculty advisor and complete the assigned academic work and project
appropriate to the experience. The student must work a minimum of 180 hours for a 4 credit internship and a
minimum of 270 hours for a 6 credit internship. 4-6 D


HID 201 Studio 1

Prerequisite: HID 140. Space planning and desgin for both residential design and commercial design. This course
will cover interior design specifications, materials, and green design. 3(0-6) F
HID 202 Studio 11

Prerequisite: HID 140, HID 208, HID 201. Residential design projects with emphasis on color and light,
presentation techniques as well as Universal Design. 3(0-6) S
HID 303 Studio 111

Prerequisite: HID 202. Kitchen and Bath Designs and Materials, preparing for the National Kitchen and Bath
Association certification. Addresses kitchen and bath systems, products, and planning. Also, drawing, design
principles, project and business management for kitchen and bath. 3(0-6) F
HID 304 Studio 1V

Prerequisite: HID 303 Hotel, Restaurant, and Healthcare design. The interior design of lounges and public dining
facilities, guest lodging facilities from urban hotels to resorts, hospital and healthcare interior design using codes
and universal design principles. 3(0-6) S
HID 405 Studio V

Prerequisite: HID 304 Retail Design and Display and Presentation Techniques Design from store planning to
merchandise display. 3(0-6)F
HID 406 Studio V1

Prerequisite: HID 305 Advanced presentation techniques, digital portfolio and models. 3(0-6) S
Housing and Interior Design (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog
    1. Mathematics: MTH 135 or higher
  B. Self-Understanding: PSY 121
  C. Major Requirements
      1. ART 100(3), ART 101(3), ACC 201(3), HID 140(3), 201(3), 202(3), 208(3), 241(3), 303(3), 304(3), 325(1),
344(3), 346(3), 405(3), 406(3), 408(3), 424(2), 441(2), 499(4), LAW 231(3), MKT 350(3), TCM 122(3), 221(3),
313(3), TCM 320(3), TCM 321(3), TCM 322(3).
  d. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of
catalog




MKT 472 Advanced Marketing

Prerequisite: MKT 351; and MKT 360; and undergraduate business majors must be admitted to COBA. An
analysis of the marketing concepts, functions, and principles involved in planning, implementing, and evaluating
the total marketing program of various organizations. 3(3-0) F,S


N/A
Marketing (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

A. Major Requirements

 1. MKT 351(3), 360(3); 464(3) or 474(3), 472(3); QBA 337(3)
 2. Complete one of the following options:

     a. Marketing Management:
           1. MKT 352(3), 430(3); MGT 397(3)
           2. Complete two of the following: MKT 354(3), 355(3), 452(3), 470(3); 476(3) or 510(3)


Marketing (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog
 B. COBA Admission and Program Requirements - see College of Business Administration/Admission and
Program Requirements section of catalog
 C. Major Requirements
     1. MKT 351(3), 360(3); 464(3) or 474(3), 472(3); QBA 337(3)
     2. Complete one of the following options:




Biomedical Sciences
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training
Bacheor of Science in Nursing

 A. Required Courses: BMS 110(4), 230(3), 307(4), 308(4)
 B. Choose Biomedical Sciences electives to bring total hours in the minor to at least 20 hours. BIO 101 or 102
will not count toward the minor.
Exercise Biology
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training

 A. Required Courses: BMS 430(3), 432(3), 467(3), BMS 520(3) or CHM 352(3), BMS 567(4)
 B. Choose electives from the following to bring total hours in the minor to at least 21 hours: BMS 230(3),
260(4), 335(3), 563(3), 570(4); PED 369(3); PSY 508(3)

Nutrition
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training
Bachelor of Science in Nursing

 A. Required Courses: BMS 240(3), 333(3)
 B. Choose electives from the following to bring total hours in the minor to at least 20 hours: BMS 300(1),
330(3), 331(4), 332(3), 335(3), 340(2), 430(3), 497(1-3), 532(3). No more than 3 hours of BMS 497 credit may be
applied to the minor. See Dietetics Program Director for additional courses that may be approved.


PAIE (credit bearing course or options): BMS 300, 380, 400, 498, CLS- MT Major, BMS 345




PSY 451 Psychophysiology of Aging 3(3-0) F

Prerequisite: Psychology 121 and BIO 102 or BMS 100 or 110. This course will provide an introduction to the
biology and physiology of aging. Students will examine broad changes in structure and function in humans, and
get a closer look at changes in systems, organs, tissues, and cells in humans and some nonhumans. The class will
explore the implications of these changes on function and independencein old age; learn about the impact of
these changes on research and development of therapeutic measures to prevent, maintain or improve structure
and function; and study methods for preventing decline, and maintaininig and improving health and quality of
life in older adults.
Gerontology
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Social Work

 A. Required Core Courses: GER 380(3); and two of the following courses: PSY 451(3); PSY 365(3); GER 310(3)
 B. Complete an additional 9 hours of elective courses chosen from the following with approval of the program
coordinator or delegate to bring total hours in minor to at least 18 hours: GER 310/SOC 375(3)*, GER 320/PSY
354(3), GER 365/CFD 365/PSY 366/SWK 365(3); GER 300(1); GER 396(1-3), GER 397(1-3); GER 597(1-3); PSY
309(3); PSY 363(3); PSY 365(3)*; COM 390(3); PED 567(3); PSY 365(3)*; or another approved course.
   *Counts in elective hours if not taken as a "required" core course.




Gerontology (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and Requirements section of catalog.
The following prerequisite courses will meet General Education requirements: COM 115(3); PLS 101(3); PSY
121(3); BIO 102(4) or BMS 100(4) or 105(4) or 110(4)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. Prerequisite for required courses for Gerontology major: None
      2. Core courses for Gerontology major:
          a. Substantive Aging Courses: GER 310/SOC 375(3), GER 380(3), GER 470/SWK 470(3); PSY 365(3); PSY
451(3)
          b. Research Methods Course: PSY 203(3) or PSY 302(3) or SOC 301(3) or another course approved by
advisor
          c. Communication Skills Course: COM 390(3) or 332(3) or 405(3) or another course approved by advisor
          d. Statistics Course: AGR 330(3) or ECO 308(3) or MTH 340(3) or PSY 200(3) or QBA 237(3) or REC
328(3) or SOC 302(3) or another course approved by advisor
          e. Health Sciences Course: BMS 130(3) or 240(3) or 310(3) or HCM 507(3) or another course focusing on
physical health and wellness selected by the student with advisor approval
      3. Other required courses: GER 598(3-12), Supervised Practicum in Gerontology and GER 599(3), Seminar in
Gerontology
      4. Electives to complete comprehensive major: 6 hours of GER or PSY designed courses related to aging
issues with another 3 hours selected by the student with advisor approval
  C. Electives to complete 125 hours. Students are encouraged to use these hours to complete another major or
minor
  D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of
N/A




N/A




B. Major Requirements

  1. ECO 155(3), 165(3), 365(3), 385(3), 409(3), 590(3)
  2. One of the following statistics courses: AGR 330(3), MTH 340(3), PSY 200(3), QBA 237(3), REC 328(3), or SOC
302(3)
  3. Minimum of nine additional credit hours in Economics
B. Major Requirements

 1. ECO 155(3), 165(3), 365(3), 385(3), 409(3), 590(3)
 2. One of the following statistics courses: AGR 330(3), MTH 340(3), PSY 200(3), QBA 237(3), REC 328(3), or SOC
302(3)
 3. Minimum of 15 additional credit hours in Economics
 4. Minimum of 18 hours in satisfaction of Plan A or B
     A. Concentration of at least 18 hours in any discipline in which a major is offered
     B. Concentration of at least nine hours in each of two disciplines in which a major is offered


B. Major Requirements

 1. ECO 155(3), 165(3), 365(3), 385(3), 409(3), 590(3)
 2. One of the following statistics courses: AGR 330(3), MTH 340(3), PSY 200(3), QBA 237(3), REC 328(3), or SOC
302(3)
 3. Minimum of 15 additional credit hours in Economics
 Minors
Economics
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Non-Certifiable)

  A. Minor must include ECO 155(3), 165(3)
  B. Additional hours in economics to total at least 18 hours. One of the following statistics courses may be used
toward this minor: AGR 330(3), MTH 340(3), PSY 200(3), QBA 237(3), REC 328(3), or SOC 302(3)




PAIE (credit bearing course or options): ECO 590, 310, 346, 397, 450, 456, 504, 515, 540




PLS 399 Cooperative Education in Jefferson City

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA and junior or senior standing. To enable
qualified students to apply theoretical constructs and analytical techniques in a supervised work environment.
This course cannot be credited toward a major in political science if the student has completed a total of three
or more credits in any combination of the following; PLS 493, PLS 494, PLS 498, or cooperative education in
another discipline. Restricted to Political Science majors and minors. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 1-6 S


PLS 498 In-Service Training in Public Administration

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: 2.50 GPA and junior or senior standing. Supervised field
work in an approved local, state, or national government agency including preparation of an acceptable formal
report. Restricted to Political Science majors or minors. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 3(3-0) F,S


PAIE (credit bearing course or options): REL 100




REL 100 Introduction to Religion

General Education Course (Self-Understanding/Humanities Perspective) that promotes the Public Affairs
Mission. Investigates what religion is and does, compares culturally diverse religious ideas and practices. This
course explores how religion influences the relationship between individual and community by examining
religious ethical systems, and providing community engagement opportunities. 3(3-0) F,S
BIO 380 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Prerequisite: BIO 121 and BIO 122. Vertebrate gross anatomy. Phylogeny and present status of organ systems of
vertebrates. Shark, mud puppy and cat serve as principal sources for laboratory exercises. May be taught
concurrently with BIO 680. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 380 and BIO 680. Supplemental course fee. 5(2-6)
S

BIO 494 Senior Seminar

Prerequisite: 90 hours and biology major. Current issues in the biological sciences will be discussed and
information on post-graduate opportunities for biology majors will be presented. Successful completion of the
Major Field Achievement Test will be required. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 1(1-0) F, S


BIO 499 Special Topics in Biology

Prerequisite: Biology major with a minimum of a 3.00 GPA; and 20 hours in Biology courses; and permission of
instructor. Outstanding students obtain additional experience through independent study. May be repeated to a
total of 3 credit hours. A maximum of 3 credit hours from any combination of BIO 300, 399 and 499 may be
counted towards the major. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 1-3 F, S, Su


BIO 509 Stream Ecology

Prerequisite: BIO 369. Recommended Prerequisite: CHM 175 or higher. The interdisciplinary study of running
waters, including study of the physical and chemical environment, trophic interactions, nutrient cycling, and the
multiple impacts of humans on modifying these systems. Lectures, group discussion of readings, and laboratory
and field exercises. One all-day Saturday field trip required. May be taught concurrently with BIO 609. Cannot
receive credit for both BIO 609 and BIO 509. 4(2-4) S, O


BIO 540 Applications of Molecular Markers

Prerequisite: BIO 235 and permission. Introduction to the use of molecular markers in biological research.
Topics covered include methods for identifying genetic variation at the molecular level (protein electrophoresis,
automatic DNA sequencing, RAPDs, RFLPs, AFLPs, microsatellites) and their applications to research in
systematics, ecology, evolution, conservation biology, forensics, and gene mapping. Students will complete
research projects using one or more of the techniques learned. Supplemental course fee. May be taught
concurrently with BIO 640. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 640 and BIO 540. 4(2-4) F, O
BIO 551 Advanced Statistical Methods for Biologists

Prerequisite: BIO 550. The design and analysis of biological experiments, with an emphasis on the choice and
interpretation of inferential statistics. Topics covered include causal inference, statistical power, general linear
models, repeated measures designs, log-linear models, nonparametric procedures, and computer-intensive
techniques. The use of computer software to analyze real data sets from the biological literature is emphasized.
May be taught concurrently with BIO 651. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 651 and BIO 551. 2(1-2) S




BIO 563 Population Ecology

Prerequisite: BIO 369; and MTH 138 or higher. Discussion of factors controlling the distribution and abundance
of populations. Quantitative description of population dynamics is emphasized. May be taught concurrently
with BIO 663. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 663 and BIO 563. 3(2-2) SE


BIO 567 Physiological Ecology

Prerequisite: BIO 369; and either BIO 361 or BIO 544 or BMS 308. Physiological adaptations of plants and
animals to environmentally stressful conditions and to ecological/evolutionary pressures. May be taught
concurrently with BIO 668. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 668 and BIO 567. 4(4-0) SO


BIO 584 Fish Ecology

Prerequisite: BIO 369 and BIO 575. The biology of fishes in relation to environmental conditions at the
individual, population, and community levels. May be taught concurrently with BIO 686. Cannot receive credit
for both BIO 686 and BIO 584. 3(3-0) S

See Note


PAIE (credit bearing course or options): CSC 450, 482


PAIE (credit bearing course or options): HRA 490, 499




PAIE (credit bearing course or options): SCI 493, 494, 499
A. Complete 18 hours from the following courses and from at least three disciplines (course prefix), with no
more than nine hours from any one discipline: ANT 325(3), ANT 330(3)*, ANT 360(3), ANT 451(3)*, ANT
490(3)*, ANT 525, ART 273(3), ART 385(3), ART 485(3), ART 496(3)*, ENG 354(3)*, GRY 305(3)*, GRY 597(3)*,
HST 397(3)*, HST 509(3), HST 510(3), REL 315(3).
*when applicable
B. Other courses (e.g., special topics, transfer) may be applied with the approval of the Administrator.


BIO 710 Topics in Microbial Physiology

Topics of interest in microbial physiology will be discussed. These may include, cell structure, energy production,
fermentation, nitrogen metabolism, protein and nucleic acid syntheses, regulation of gene expression, and
dynamics of cell growth. Lecture will supplement discussion sessions. 3(3-0), S


BMS 628 Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis

Prerequisite: BMS 622. An in-depth study of the methods of genetic control and production of pathogenic
factors employed by disease causing bacteria. The course will use both reference material and primary literature
to illustrate the topics under discussion. May be taught concurrently with BMS 528. Cannot receive credit for
both BMS 528 and BMS 628. 2(2-0), S


BMS 635 Signal Transduction

Prerequisite: BMS 622. This course will examine the molecular mechanisms of various ligand/receptor
interactions. The dynamics involved in ligand/receptor binding will be studied and examples of receptor-
mediated signal transduction will be introduced. Signaling pathways within the cell will be discussed. Primary
literature and reference materials will be utilized to illustrate specific examples under discourse. May be taught
concurrently with BMS 535. Cannot receive credit for both BMS 535 and BMS 635. 2(2-0), S
Program Description
The Counseling program grants the Master of Science degree in Counseling with options in elementary school
counseling, secondary school counseling and community agency counseling. Students interested in public
school settings must either have a valid Missouri teaching certificate, or complete additional teaching course
work, to be eligible for state certification as professional school counselors. The elementary (EL) and secondary
(SE) school counseling option program requirements fulfill the professional counseling course requirements for
permanent school counselor certification in the State of Missouri. The community agency (CA) counseling
option requirements fulfill the professional counseling course work requirements for licensure as a Licensed
Professional Counselor (LPC) in the State of Missouri (The LPC also requires 3000 hours of additional post-
master’s supervised experience). Students may elect to complete either the ELE or SEC school counseling
program and also quality for LPC licensure by completing additional electives.
Ten components of the Counseling Knowledge Base:
1. Orientation. Knowledge of personal attributes (self-understanding) and professional identity and issues.
2. Foundations. Knowledge of psychological and educational foundations of the profession.
3. Assessment. Competence in measuring, assessing, and diagnosing psychological and educational attributes.
4. Information. Knowledge about personal-social and educational-career issues, research and resources.
5. Facilitation. Competence in interpersonal communication, counseling, educating, and consulting with
individuals and groups.
6. Intervention. Competencies in the counseling process.
7. Diversity. Knowledge about differences in cultures, competence in working with diverse clients.
8. Management. Competence in planning, developing and implementing counseling programs.
9. Technology. Knowledge of technological resources and competence in their use.
10. Ethics. Knowledge, understanding and practice of ethical standards for the profession.
Admission Requirements
Admission to the Counseling program is selective. Minimum admission requirements and application materials
include the following.
1. Completed Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution.
2. Cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or higher, or 3.00 for the last 60 hours of course work.
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Professional Building, Room 237, Phone: (417) 836-5368, Fax: (417) 836-4242
Email: CommunicationSciencesandDisorders@missouristate.edu
Web Site: http://www.missouristate.edu/csd
Department Head: Neil DiSarno
Faculty
Professor: Neil J. DiSarno, Julie J. Masterson, Ronald W. Netsell, Lisa A. Proctor
Associate Professor: Klaas Bakker, Thomas C. Franklin, Wafaa Kaf
Assistant Professor: Jason L. Box, Clifford A. Franklin, Letitia White, Ye Wang
Clinical Associate Professor: Deborah Cron, Karen Engler, Jill Oswalt
2. Select Option Area. Course work to be selected in consultation with advisor to bring the total to not less
than 33 hours. Student should select from either Teaching and Learning (on campus option) OR Curriculum and
Instruction (online option) OR Teaching Certification Credit Option (certification students only).

   Teaching and Learning Option (on campus)      21 hrs

A. Teaching Methods (select 4 to total 12 hrs)
ECE 726 Programming & Policy Issues for Early Childhood Settings
ELE 710 Elementary School Curriculum
ELE 713 Adv. Theory & Practice in the Teaching of Communication Arts
ELE 714 Adv. Theory & Practice in the Teaching of Social Studies
ELE 715 Adv. Theory & Practice in the Teaching of Mathematics
ELE 716 Adv. Theory & Practice in the Teaching of Science
ELE 717 Adv. Theory & Practice in the Teaching of Economics
ELE 722 Differentiated Instruction for Early Childhood, Elementary & Middle School Classrooms

B. Electives: (select with advisor to total 9 hrs)
CFD (632, 660, 662)
ECE (724, 725, 726, 727)
EEM (606, 607, 608, 676, 796)
IMT (650, 662)
MID (725, 810)
PSY (614, 703, 705)
RDG (660, 640, 700, 710, 730)
SFR (647, 680, 750, 793, 858)
SPE (613, 656, 660, 715, 780)
Other electives may be added at the discretion of the program advisor
MED 662 Digital Filmmaking

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A film-style production class in digital high-definition filmmaking.
Students will form small production teams to plan, design, and produce short narrative films. May be taught
concurrently with MED 562. Cannot receive credit for both MED 562 and MED 662. 3(2-2) F, S




N/A
Master of Global Studies
(formerly Master of International Affairs and Administration)

Dennis V. Hickey, Program Director
Strong Hall, Room 325; Phone (417) 836-5850
DennisHickey@missouristate.edu; http://polsci.missouristate.edu/mgs/

Program Description
The program is designed to meet growing societal, occupational, and student needs and demands for persons
educated and knowledgeable in international affairs. It will help students to become professionally involved in
an increasingly competitive and interdependent world in which the United States occupies a prominent
position. The Master of Global Studies (MGS) will produce graduates who will be well trained in international
affairs and administration and can work in the public or private sector. It is also designed to prepare its
graduates to continue their graduate education at the doctoral level in political science, international relations,
or other related fields.
Students with demonstrated academic competence who are interested in the field of global studies will be
welcomed into the program regardless of undergraduate major.

Entrance Requirements
1. Normally, applicants with a 3.00 GPA or above in their undergraduate degree from an accredited institution
and a combined GRE score of not less than 900 on the verbal and quantitative sections will be admitted to the
MGS program in good standing. A minimum score of 900 is required on the combined verbal and quantitative
sections of the GRE, with a minimum of 475 on either the verbal or quantitative section and a score of not less
than 425 on the other. All students applying for admission must take the GRE before being admitted into the
program.
2. Three strong letters from professors at the undergraduate level and/or persons well acquainted with the
applicant’s education and abilities will be admitted to the MIAA program in good standing. These letters are to
be submitted to the Director of the MGS program.
N/A




N/A
N/A




N/A




N/A




N/A
Master of Science, Applied Anthropology
William Wedenoja, Graduate Director
Strong Hall, Room 470; Phone (417) 836-5641
billwedenoja@missouristate.edu
Program Description
Applied Anthropology is the application of anthropological skills and knowledge to the needs and problems of
society today. This program is intended to be a terminal, practice degree, although it will also be helpful
preparation for a Ph.D. program. Applicants should have a strong undergraduate background in anthropology.
The program emphasizes the cultivation of professional skills such as quantitative analysis, computer
applications, technical writing, and public speaking. There are many facets to applied anthropology, but the
current focus of this program is the study and preservation of cultural heritage through archaeology and
ethnography. Every student will take courses in both archaeology and in ethnography, but each student will
normally focus on one or the other. The program is concerned chiefly with American culture and diversity,
particularly Native American culture and the Ozarks region, and is intended to meet the steadily growing need
for professionals in cultural resource management, public archaeology, cultural and linguistic preservation, and
heritage tourism.
Admission Requirements
Admission to the program is selective. The minimum standards for admission are:
1. A bachelor's degree from a college or university accredited by agencies recognized by Missouri State
University.
2. A minimum overall GPA of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale; OR at least a 3.25 GPA on a 4.00 scale for the last 60 hours of
academic course work; OR a combined score of 1000 or higher on the verbal and quantitative sections of the
Graduate Records Examination (GRE).
3. At least a 3.25 in all anthropology courses.
This program is designed for students who have completed an undergraduate major in anthropology, which
should include at least two courses in cultural anthropology and in archaeology, a theory course, and an
introduction to statistics. A field school or fieldwork experience is highly recommended, as are courses in North
 Thesis Option (A and North American Archaeology. Promising applicants may be admitted provisionally with
American Indians minimum of 30 hours)


 1. Core Requirements - 15 hrs
   Course Code Course Title Credits
   CRM 706 Advanced Research Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice 3 hrs
   CRM 707 Quantitative Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice 3 hrs
   CRM 720 Crime Theory and Policy 3 hrs
   CRM 799 Thesis 6 hrs
 2. Electives. Fifteen hours including a minimum of nine hours taken from remaining CRM graduate-level
courses. Courses outside CRM must be approved by the student's advisor.
 3. Thesis. Students must complete a written thesis following by an oral defense in front of their advisory
committee.
CHM 171 General Chemistry 11 Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHM 170 or concurrent enrollment and a "C" or better in CHM 160 and CHM 161. An introduction
to laboratory chemistry empolying principles and techniques that reflect material presented in CHM 170, e.g.,
physical studies on kinetics and equilibra of aqueous systems, qualitative and quantitative analysis, and data
manipulation and interpretation. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to take CHM 302 or
342. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 1(0-3) F,S




GRM 475 Topics in German(ic) Literature and Culture

Prerequisite: GRM 311 or above. Selected topics in German(ic) literature and culture. May be repeated once
with a different topic. Variable content course. May be taught concurrently with GRM 375. Students enrolled in
GRM 475 will complete more advanced assignments. Cannot receive credit for both GRM 375 and GRM 475. 3(3-
0) D
Reason for Course/Program Change - Or - Purpose of Course                    College    Dept




This course is created to provide a record on the transcript that the student Art and   COAL
has been trained and has served as an undergraduate assistant to the          Design
professor in teaching, supervising, and/or grading course materials, under
the direct guidance of the professor. The student may choose to take this
course for no credit or for one upper-level credit, but the credit will not
count toward major requirements in the Department of Art and Design.

To reflect the Public Affairs Intensive Experience                           English    COAL




To reflect the Public Affairs Intensive Experience                           English    COAL




To reflect the Public Affairs Intensive Experience                           English    COAL




To reflect the Public Affairs Intensive Experience                           English    COAL
To reflect the Public Affairs Intensive Experience                    English   COAL




To reflect the Public Affairs Intensive Experience                    English   COAL




To reflect the Public Affairs Intensive Experience                    English   COAL




To reflect the Public Affairs Intensive Experience                    English   COAL




The purpose of ENG 191: Grammer Skills is to help students develop    English   COAL
confidence with language use through practice and study of grammer.
This course offers an introduction to the literature, theory, technique, and English   COAL
terminology of the graphic novel genre with experiential practice in the
craft of writing graphic narrative, specifically in the areas of graphic
memoir, graphic essay, graphic fiction (short story and novel), and graphic
adaptation. Students will participate in an academic approach to popular
culture both through their own writing (self-exploration of personal
cultures) and the writings of others, with specific attention to the graphic
narrative's unique visual-verbal approach to varying historical, social,
psychic, philosophical, and metaphysical (i.e. cultural) concerns o f the 20th
and 21st centuries. Loosely divided into two phases, the course will first
focus on the reading, or decoding in the language of the discipline, and
analysis of selected phase of the course will focus on the workshopping of
students' original graphic scripts. In this course, students will improve in
their ability as readers of literature of all forms and in appreciation of
interdisciplinary collaboration. The study of the literature and craft of
graphic narrative invites theoretical study, including but not limited to the
"materializing" of history in graphic memoirs such as Maus and Persepolis,
How do literary texts operate in the public sphere? How do writers             COAL    English
themselves function in it? How do literary institutions define the form and
content of public dicourse? These are the general questions that this
seminar will pose. The course will offer students a sustained opportunity to
consider literature's agency in public affairs and to think about the forces
that public debates, cultural identifications, and community imperatives
reciprocally exert upon literature.
We have added ENG 301 to the major in order to assure that all English    COAL   English
majors have equal opportunities to learn and practice PAIE standards as
recognized by Missouri State University. The change from 33 to 36 hours
aligns our Creative Writing Track with the Literature Track.




We have added ENG 301 to the major in order to assure that all English    COAL   English
majors have equal opportunities to learn and practice PAIE standards as
recognized by Missouri State University.
To bring the Media independent studies coruse in line with journalism         COAL   Media,
independent studies and allow students more choices. Independent Study               Journalism,
projects occur during the summer as well as during F and S.                          and Film




The title change will make it clear to prospective students that the course   COAL   Media,
concerns narrative digital film production. The catalog description change           Journalism,
better reflects the actual structure, organization and goals of the course.          and Film




The course was only taken by students in the Media Operations option,         COAL   Media,
which has been eliminated.                                                           Journalism,
                                                                                     and Film




This course will introduce all MJF majors to the concept of convergence      COAL    Media,
across media and to the fundamental convergence tools and techniques                 Journalism,
used in the media today. Students will learn about the significant impact            and Film
(social, business, aesthetic) that convergence is having on all aspects of
journalism and mass media. Equal emphasis will be placed on
understanding why convergence techniques should be used in various
contexts and how to use convergence tools effectively. Students will learn a
variety of convergence skills- including blogging, social media, and
audio/video/photo editing-- required by all media practitioners working in
media today. Collaboration and cooperation will be emphasized throughout
the course and incorporated into a series of assignments as well as
practiced through weekly blogging exercises. Students will learn how to
identify their intended audience, how to articulate clearly their mediated
messages, and how to become critically aware of what constitutes effective
communication in a converged environment.
This course will improve media literacy for MJF majors. By investigating how COAL   Media,
the mass media cover a single significant public affairs issue such as              Journalism,
Hurricane Katrina or health care reform, students will understand how mass          and Film
media function. They will also improve their critical thinking skills and gain a
better understanding of the role that the mass media play in public
discourse and social reality. MJF majors will also gain a deeper appreciation
for each of the disciplinary areas represented in the Media, Journalism, and
Film Department and come to understand the ethical and social
responsibilities they will bear as future media professionals.


To add a Public Affairs intensive experience component.                    COAL     Media,
                                                                                    Journalism,
                                                                                    and Film
To add a Public Affairs intensive experience component.   COAL   Media,
                                                                 Journalism,
                                                                 and Film




To add a Public Affairs intensive experience component.   COAL   Media,
                                                                 Journalism,
                                                                 and Film
To add a Public Affairs intensive experience component.   COAL   Media,
                                                                 Journalism,
                                                                 and Film
To add a Public Affairs intensive experience component.   COAL   Media,
                                                                 Journalism,
                                                                 and Film
The department is proposing the change to our admission requirements for COAL   Media,
the following reasons:                                                          Journalism,
1. The department has created two new pre-admission core classes (MED           and Film
130 and MED 220) that will replace MED 204 and MED 120. MED 120 will
become a general education requirement for MJF majors.
2. All preadmission core classes (MED 120, MED 130, MED 220 and the
degree option class) must be completed wit ha C- or better grade to ensure
a minimal competency across these classes.
3. The minimum combined GPA required for admission to the department
has been raised to 2.3 GPA to reflect the new +/- grade point values. (2.3=
C+)
4. The minimum preadmission core GPA has been lowered from 3.0 to 2.7
to reflect the new +/- grade point system. A 2.7 GPA= B-.




Expedited Curricular Proposal- Public Affairs Intensive Experience     COAL     Media,
                                                                                Journalism,
                                                                                and Film
We are dropping THE 109 from our requirements for this degree and adding COAL       Theatre and
THE 515 as a requirement rather than as an elective. This THE 515 course            Dance
will satisfy the Univeristy's need for Public Affairs Intensive Experience
courses quite well, and thus needs to be a required part of our program.
The THE 109 class is no longer applicable to our Theatre Studies BA because
it focused on Performance Studies but can still be taken as a General
Education course.




Expedited Curricular Proposal- Public Affairs Intensive Experience           COAL   Theatre and
                                                                                    Dance




1. To allow accounting major to take the course earlier in the curriculum,   COBA   School of
but not wait until they are graduating seniors.                                     Accountancy
To require accounting majors to take ACC 470 a litter earlier in their        COBA   School of
program. To up date information on subsequent courses.                               Accountancy




To require ACC 301 for all minors, while still allowing flexibility for the   COBA   School of
students. To include ACC 525 as an elective and delete ACC 421, 422, 553,            Accountancy
555, 556 as electives. To make our minor more consistant with other COBA
minors by increasing total upper-division hours to twelve. Faculty input.




To allow the department to pursue CIDA accreditation.                         COBA   Fashion and
                                                                                     Interior
                                                                                     Design




Allow department to pursue CIDA accreditation.                                COBA   Fashion and
                                                                                     Interior
                                                                                     Design




To allow the department to pursue CIDA accreditation.                         COBA   Fashion and
                                                                                     Interior
                                                                                     Design


The course will be incorporated into other studios.                           COBA   Fashion and
                                                                                     Interior
                                                                                     Design
The course will be incorporated into other studios.     COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design




The course will be incorporated into other studios.     COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design




The course will be incorporated into other studios.     COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design




To allow the department to pursue CIDA accreditation.   COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design




The course will be incorporated into other studios.     COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design




To address the need for a sustainable design course.    COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design




The course will be incorporated into other studios.     COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design




To allow the department to pursue CIDA accreditation.   COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design
The course will be incorporated into other studios.     COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design


To allow the department to pursue CIDA accreditation.   COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design


The course will be incorporated into other studios.     COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design


The course will be incorporated into other studios.     COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design




The course will be incorporated into other studios.     COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design


To allow the department to pursue CIDA accreditation.   COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design




To allow the department to pursue CIDA accreditation.   COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design




To allow the department to pursue CIDA accreditation.   COBA   Fashion and
                                                               Interior
                                                               Design
The course will be incorporated into other studios.                         COBA   Fashion and
                                                                                   Interior
                                                                                   Design




To allow the department to pursue CIDA accreditation.                       COBA   Fashion and
                                                                                   Interior
                                                                                   Design




To meet CIDA accreditation requirements and trying to adapt to a studio     COBA   Fashion and
model as our benchmark institutions have.                                          Interior
                                                                                   Design

To meet CIDA accreditation requirements and trying to adapt to a studio     COBA   Fashion and
model as our benchmark institutions have.                                          Interior
                                                                                   Design

Preparing for the National Kitchen and Bath Association certification and   COBA   Fashion and
addresses kitchen and bath systems, products, and planning.                        Interior
                                                                                   Design


To meet CIDA accreditation requirements and trying to adapt to a studio     COBA   Fashion and
model as our benchmark institutions have.                                          Interior
                                                                                   Design


To meet CIDA accreditation requirements and trying to adapt to a studio     COBA   Fashion and
model as our benchmark institutions have.                                          Interior
                                                                                   Design

To meet CIDA accreditation requirements and trying to adapt to a studio     COBA   Fashion and
model as our benchmark institutions have.                                          Interior
                                                                                   Design
To allow the department to pursue CIDA Accreditation.                     COBA   Fashion and
                                                                                 Interior
                                                                                 Design




By not allowing concurrent enrollment, we hope more of our majors will    COBA   Marketing
opt to take MKT 470 as an elective. We are making an effort to grow the
research classes and major/minor.




Low completion program. Deleting minor the department. Will offer MKT     COBA   Marketing
510-610 course as an elective in the department.
Due to deletion of Retailing/Mdse Program student will need to take Sales     COBA   Marketing
or Marketing Management. MKT 355 was already an elective for Sales, so
we are adding it as an elective to Marketing Management.




Low completion program. Deleting Retailing and Merchandising option and       COBA   Marketing
minor emphasis. Keeping courses MKT 355 and MKT 455. Will offer MKT
355, but leave both 355 and 455 in the catalog.




Currently, the BMS minor is only available for the BA and the BS degree.      CHHS   Biomedical
Historically, a large number of athletic training major's complete the BMS           Science
minor. Due to accreditation requirements, the athletic training major
recently changed the name of the degree from a Bachelor of Science
Degree to a Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training. In order to allow the
athletic training majors to continue to complete the BMS minor we are
adding the BSMAT degree as an option for the BMS minor. This will also
allow Nursing students (BSN) to take a BMS minor option with their degree
program.
Currently, the Exercise Biology minor is only available for the BS degree.      CHHS   Biomedical
Due to accreditation requirements, the athletic training major recently                Science
changed the name of the degree from a Bachelor of Science Degree to a
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training. In order to allow the athletic
training majors to be eligible for the Exersice Biology minor we are adding
the BSMAT degree as an option for the BMS minor. This will also allow
Nursing students (BSN) to take a BMS minor option for the exercise biology
minor.
Currently, the Nutrition minor is only available for the BA and the BS          CHHS   Biomedical
degree. Due to accreditation requirements, the athletic training major                 Science
recently changed the name of the degree from a Bachelor of Science
Degree to a Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training. In order to allow the
athletic training majors to be eligible for the Exersice Biology minor we are
adding the BSMAT degree as an option for the BMS minor. This will also
allow Nursing students (BSN) to take a BMS minor option with their degree
program.




Expedited Curricular Proposal- Public Affairs Intensive Experience              CHHS   Biomedical
                                                                                       Science




The Gerontology Program is no longer an independent program. It is now        CHHS     Psychology
located within the Department of Psychology. Three years ago, the
Biomedical Sciences Department decided to shift the offerings of BMS 260:
Biology of Aging from once a year to once every two years. Since this is a
core course in the Gerontology curriculum (for both majors and minors), it
needs to be offered every year. Consequently, a course was developed
within the Psychology Department that would addres this topic for majors
and minors in gerontology. The course has been offered in two consecutive
years as a variable topic course so it is now time requested a regular (i.e.,
permanent) number designation since it will be offered again in the coming
fall semester.
This revision updates the catalog fro the Gerontology Minor reflecting        CHHS   Psychology
changes resulting from courses no longer offered or replaced, cross listing
of courses, and the increased variety of courses that can be taken as
electives for the minor.




There have been a number of changes including course offerings in other       CHHS   Psychology
departments, course substitutions, course level designations, deleted
courses, and changed language under the Major Requirements area. The
current proposal corrects for all those changes so the catalog description of
the Gerontology Program is accurate.
This course has not been offered for at least the past 5 years, and the      CHPA   Economics
Economics Department has no plans to offer it in the future. Several
equivalent courses exist and out students will be directed to take one of
these. In fact, this has been the standard practice for several years now.




This course was taught for only 3 semesters- fall 2008 (as ECO 397 Studies   CHPA   Economics
in Economics), spring 2009 and fall 2009- and then discontinued. This was
primarily due to a lack of resources within the Economics Department.




ECO 308 is being deleted.                                                    CHPA   Economics




ECO 308 is being deleted. In item 4 lower case 'a' and 'b' have been changed CHPA   Economics
to upper case to be consistent with the reference to 'Plan A or B.'




ECO 308 is being deleted.                                                    CHPA   Economics
ECO 308 is being deleted.                                                     CHPA     Economics




Expedited Curricular Proposal- Public Affairs Intensive Experience            CHPA     Economics




To inform students that this class can only be taken by Political Science       CHPA   Political
majors and minors. Change in title will clarify the location of the internship.        Science




To inform students that this class can only be taken by Political Science     CHPA     Political
majors and minors.                                                                     Science




Expedited Curricular Proposal- Public Affairs Intensive Experience            CHPA     Religious
                                                                                       Studies


To demonstrate more clearly that the course addresses all three of the        CHPA     Religious
major components of the Public Affairs Mission.                                        Studies
To indicate correct periodicity.   CNAS   Biology




To indicate correct periodicity.   CNAS   Biology




To indicate correct periodicity.   CNAS   Biology




To indicate correct periodicity.   CNAS   Biology




To indicate correct periodicity.   CNAS   Biology
To indicate correct periodicity.                                     CNAS   Biology




To indicate correct periodicity.                                     CNAS   Biology




To indicate correct periodicity.                                     CNAS   Biology




To indicate correct periodicity.                                     CNAS   Biology




Expedited Curricular Proposal- Public Affairs Intensive Experience   CNAS   Computer
                                                                            Science

Expedited Curricular Proposal- Public Affairs Intensive Experience   CNAS   Hospitality
                                                                            and
                                                                            Restaurant
                                                                            Administratio
                                                                            n
Expedited Curricular Proposal- Public Affairs Intensive Experience   CNAS   Interdisciplina
                                                                            ry Studies
                                                                            Program
The Anthropology Department is no longer offering ANT 453 and ANT 545.       CGEIP      Area Studies-
The course number for ANT 425 was changed to 525 last year.                             College of
                                                                                        Humanities
                                                                                        and Public
                                                                                        Affairs




This course is not offered every year, so the periodicity needs to be        Grad       Biology
changed to the correct frequency of offering.                                Council




Since this course is taught by the same instructor who teaches BMS           Grad       Biomedical
535/635, which is moving to the spring, BMS 528/628 needs to be moved        Council    Science
to the fall. Additionally BMS 521(622) is now regarded as enough
background for a student to take BMS 528/628; therefore to pre-requisite
for BMS 628 has been changed to BMS 622.




The graduate course, BMS 635, is now part of the curriculum for the CMB       Grad      Biomedical
Master's degree. The course was originally taught in the fall; since we would Council   Science
like students complete this course early in their graduate careers, we have
moved it to the spring so that they may take it immediately after the pre-
requisite course BMS 521/622 rather than wait until the following fall when
it was originally available.
To equate program hours across program areas and provide school         Grad      Counseling,
counseling students with adequate experience in the field through the   Council   Leadership,
inclusion of an additional field experience prior to graduation.                  and Special
                                                                                  Edcation




To make curriculum listing available in the Graduate Catalog.           Grad      Communicatio
                                                                        Council   n Sciences
                                                                                  and Disorders
The MSED-ELE accelerated master's degree option provides outstanding           Grad      Childhood
Missouri State University elementary education students with an                Council   Education
opportunity to enroll in a combined baccalaureate and master's degree                    and Family
program. The accelerated master's degree option will assist the graduate                 Studies
faculty in recruiting the strongest students into the MSED-ELE. Having 6-12
hours of dual credit will entice students to continue their learning with us
through the graduate program and obtain their MSED. This may also
support teacher retention as these students work with and are supported
by other graduate students/teachers. This option will help us with the post
baccalaureate students. There is a strong demand by students with a
degree outside of education to seek teacher certification. These students
are often non-traditional and eager to begin a new career. Certification in
elementary education offers inherit challenges due to the large number of
content hours required. Students typically take 3 to 4 semesters to
complete certification and currently the only option is with undergraduate
courses. Approximately 6-12 hours are currently available to post bac
students at the graduate level that meet certification requirements. The
new Accelerated Masters' students would be able to take these courses
along with post bac students increasing the enrollments and strengthening
the learning by combining two different groups of dedicated students.




The title change will make it clear to prospective students that the course    Grad      Media,
concerns narrative digital film production. The catalog description change     Council   Journalism,
better reflects the actual structure, organization and goals of the course.              and Film




The course was only taken by students in the Media Operations option,          Grad      Media,
which has been eliminated.                                                     Council   Journalism,
                                                                                         and Film
The adoption of the plus/minus grading system prevents A level students   Grad      Political
with a GPA of less than 3.75 from choosing the Thesis option and          Council   Science
disqualifies students from taking the comprehensive exam unless their GPA
is 3.75 or above.




No SOC graduate program.                                                 Grad       Sociology,
                                                                         Council    Anthropology,
                                                                                    and
                                                                                    Criminology




No SOC graduate program.                                                 Grad       Sociology,
                                                                         Council    Anthropology,
                                                                                    and
                                                                                    Criminology
No SOC graduate program.   Grad      Sociology,
                           Council   Anthropology,
                                     and
                                     Criminology




No SOC graduate program.   Grad      Sociology,
                           Council   Anthropology,
                                     and
                                     Criminology




No SOC graduate program.   Grad      Sociology,
                           Council   Anthropology,
                                     and
                                     Criminology




No SOC graduate program.   Grad      Sociology,
                           Council   Anthropology,
                                     and
                                     Criminology
The accelerated option should help us recruit outstanding students from     Grad       Sociology,
our majors to the Master's program, while enabling these students to        Council    Anthropology,
complete a Master's in a shorter period of time and at less expense.                   and
                                                                                       Criminology




We want to create a stronger incentive for our graduate students to pursue Grad        Sociology,
the "thesis option" versus the "non-thesis/practicum option." Currently, the Council   Anthropology,
thesis option requires 33 total hours and the non-thesis option requires 36.           and
30 hours is in-line with thesis-based master's programs in                             Criminology
criminology/criminal jusitice across the country.
With the re-implementation of a first semester General Chemistry            PEC   Chemisty
Laboratory (CHM 161) to complement CHM 160 (General Chemistry 1), it is
necessary to change certain aspects of the current General Chemistry
Laboratory. The numberings change emphasizes that CHM 170 and 171
should, but are not required, to be taken concurrently; this numbering will
also mirror the 160/161 course/lab sequence. CHM 161 will be a 1-credit
laboratory that meets 2-hours per week. To keep the number of credits
constant in the general chemistry sequence, and to reflect the transfer of
materials/labs from the second to first semester, CHM 175 (proposed 171)
will become a 1-credit, 3-hour laboratory.

This course can be taught concurrently for minors and majors completing    PEC    Modern and
appropriate requirements for either GRM 375 or GRM 475.                           Classical
                                                                                  Languages
Course         Course # Date            Date            Date of Dean Date Approved Date
code             If        Approved     Approved        Review       PEC           Approved
If changed,    renumbered, Department   College         Signature                  CGEIP
put new code   put new
               course      Head         Council
               number here


ART                   390 Wade          Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
                          Thompson      11/9/10         11/15/10
                          10/21/10




ENG                   373 W. D.         Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
                          Blackmon      11/9/10         11/15/10
                          10/22/10




ENG                   377 W. D.         Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
                          Blackmon      11/9/10         11/15/10
                          10/22/10




ENG                   421 W. D.         Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
                          Blackmon      11/9/10         11/15/10
                          10/22/10




ENG                   422 W. D.         Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
                          Blackmon      11/9/10         11/15/10
                          10/22/10
ENG   473 W. D.      Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          Blackmon   11/9/10         11/15/10
          10/22/10




ENG   487 W. D.      Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          Blackmon   11/9/10         11/15/10
          10/22/10




ENG   573 W. D.      Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          Blackmon   11/9/10         11/15/10
          10/22/10




ENG   574 W. D.      Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          Blackmon   11/9/10         11/15/10
          10/22/10




ENG   191 W. D.      Michael Ellis
          Blackmon   11/9/10
          10/22/10
ENG   216 W. D.      Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          Blackmon   11/9/10         11/15/10
          10/19/10




ENG   301 W.D.       Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          Blackmon   11/9/10         11/15/10
          10/22/10
W.D.       Michael Ellis
Blackmon   11/9/10
10/20/10




W.D.       Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
Blackmon   11/9/10         11/15/10
10/20/10
MED   492 Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10




MED   562 Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10




MED   598 Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10




MED   130 Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10
MED   220 Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10




          Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10
Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10




Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10
Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10
Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10
Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
10/25/10     11/9/10         11/15/10




Mark Biggs   Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
10/21/10     11/9/10         11/15/10
          Robert        Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          Willenbrink   11/11/10        11/15/10
          11/10/10




          Robert        Michael Ellis   Carey Adams
          Willenbrink   11/15/10        11/15/10
          10/15/10




ACC   470 John Williams James Scott     Philip Harsha
          11/1/10       11/9/10         11/10/10
ACC   553 John Williams James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10       11/9/10       11/10/10




          John Williams James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10       11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   140 Paula Kemp    James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10       11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   208 Paula Kemp    James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10       11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   241 Paula Kemp    James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10       11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   245 Paula Kemp    James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10       11/9/10       11/10/10
HID   247 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   305 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   306 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   325 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   332 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   340 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   342 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   344 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10
HID   345 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   346 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   347 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   348 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   349 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   408 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   424 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   441 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10
HID   442 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   499 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   201 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10


HID   202 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10


HID   303 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   304 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




HID   405 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10


HID   406 Paula Kemp   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10      11/9/10       11/10/10
          Paula Kemp    James Scott   Philip Harsha
          11/1/10       11/9/10       11/10/10




MKT   472 Robert Luke   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          10/26/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




          Robert Luke   James Scott   Philip Harsha
          10/26/10      11/9/10       11/10/10
Robert Luke   James Scott   Philip Harsha
10/28/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




Robert Luke   James Scott   Philip Harsha
10/26/10      11/9/10       11/10/10




Colette       Jim Hackney   Helen Reid
Witkowski     11/9/10       11/10/10
11/3/10
         Colette       Jim Hackney   Helen Reid
         Witkowski     11/9/10       11/10/10
         11/3/10




         Colette       Jim Hackney   Helen Reid
         Witkowski     11/9/10       11/10/10
         11/3/10




         Colette       Jim Hackney   Helen Reid
         Witkowski     11/9/10       11/10/10
         11/3/10




PSY   451 Robert Jones Jim Hackney   Helen Reid
          10/19/10     11/9/10       11/10/10
Robert Jones Jim Hackney   Helen Reid
10/20/10     11/9/10       11/18/10




Robert Jones Jim Hackney   Helen Reid
10/19/10     11/9/10       11/18/10
ECO   308 Ardeshir Dalal Leslie Baynes Victor
          10/21/10       11/10/10      Matthews
                                       11/15/10




ECO   318 Ardeshir Dalal Leslie Baynes Victor
          11/10/10       11/10/10      Matthews
                                       11/15/10




          Ardeshir Dalal Leslie Baynes Victor
          10/21/10       11/10/10      Matthews
                                       11/15/10




          Ardeshir Dalal Leslie Baynes Victor
          10/21/10       11/10/10      Matthews
                                       11/15/10




          Ardeshir Dalal Leslie Baynes Victor
          10/21/10       11/10/10      Matthews
                                       11/15/10
         Ardeshir Dalal Leslie Baynes Victor
         10/21/10       11/10/10      Matthews
                                      11/15/10




         Ardeshir Dalal Leslie Baynes Victor
         10/21/10       11/10/10      Matthews
                                      11/15/10




PLS   399 George      Leslie Baynes Victor
          Connor      11/10/10      Matthews
          10/1/10                   11/15/10




PLS   498 George      Leslie Baynes Victor
          Connor      11/10/10      Matthews
          10/1/10                   11/15/10




         George       Leslie Baynes Victor
         Connor       11/10/10      Matthews
         10/21/10                   11/15/10

REL   100 George      Leslie Baynes Victor
          Connor      11/10/10      Matthews
          10/21/10                  11/15/10
BIO   380 Alicia Mathis   Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          10/25/10        Grand     11/10/10
                          11/9/10




BIO   494 Alicia Mathis   Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          10/25/10        Grand     11/10/10
                          11/9/10




BIO   499 Alicia Mathis   Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          10/25/10        Grand     11/10/10
                          11/9/10




BIO   509 Alicia Mathis   Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          10/25/10        Grand     11/10/10
                          11/9/10




BIO   540 Alicia Mathis   Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          10/25/10        Grand     11/10/10
                          11/9/10
BIO   551 Alicia Mathis    Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          10/25/10         Grand     11/10/10
                           11/9/10




BIO   563 Alicia Mathis    Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          10/25/10         Grand     11/10/10
                           11/9/10




BIO   567 Alicia Mathis    Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          10/25/10         Grand     11/10/10
                           11/9/10




BIO   584 Alicia Mathis    Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          10/25/10         Grand     11/10/10
                           11/9/10




          Kenneth          Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          Vollman          Grand     11/15/10
          11/9/10          11/9/10
          Melissa Dallas   Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
          10/23/10         Grand     11/15/10
                           11/9/10


                           Melanie   Tamera Jahnke
                           Grand     11/15/10
                           11/9/10
          Paula Sailors   Leslie Baynes Victor      Terrel Gallaway
          9/17/10         10/18/10      Matthews    11/10/10
                                        10/18/10




BIO   710 Alicia Mathis
          9/28/10




BMS   628 Colette                      Helen Reid
          Witkowski                    10/1/10
          9/24/10




BMS   635 Colette                      Helen Reid
          Witkowski                    10/1/10
          9/24/10
Tamara                      Steve Willis
Arthaud                     10/13/10
4/9/10




Neil DiSarno   Helen Reid
10/4/10        10/11/10
          Rebecca      Dennis Kear   Steve Willis
          Swearingen   10/12/10      11/10/10
          10/8/10




MED   662 Mark Biggs
          10/20/10




MED   698 Mark Biggs
          10/19/10
          George        Leslie Baynes Victor
          Connor        10/18/10      Matthews
          9/20/10                     10/18/10




SOC   698 Karl Kunkel
          9/30/10




SOC   700 Karl Kunkel
          9/30/10
SOC   706 Karl Kunkel
          9/30/10




SOC   785 Karl Kunkel
          9/30/10




SOC   790 Karl Kunkel
          9/30/10




SOC   799 Karl Kunkel
          9/30/10
Karl Kunkel
9/30/10




Karl Kunkel
9/22/10
CHM   175 Alan Schick        4/7/2010                 Steve Willis
          3/31/10                                     11/10/10




GRM   475 Madeleine     Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Steve Willis
          Kernen        10/21/10        10/22/10      11/10/10
          9/13/10
Date           Date       Challenge     Received in    Date          Date to        Date
Approved       Approved   Period        Provost        Approved      President      Approved
Grad Council   Faculty                  Office         Provost                      President
               Senate


                          December 3        1/4/2011     1/12/2011      1/12/2011      1/31/2011
                          to December
                          23, 2010




                          December 3        1/4/2011     1/12/2011      1/12/2011      1/31/2011
                          to December
                          23, 2010




                          December 3        1/4/2011     1/12/2011      1/12/2011      1/31/2011
                          to December
                          23, 2010




                          December 3        1/4/2011     1/12/2011      1/12/2011      1/31/2011
                          to December
                          23, 2010




                          December 3        1/4/2011     1/12/2011      1/12/2011      1/31/2011
                          to December
                          23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/21/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010


December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010


December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010


December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010


December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010


December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010

December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010

December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010


December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010


December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010

December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3
to December
23, 2010
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to December
23, 2010




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23, 2010




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23, 2010




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23, 2010




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23, 2010

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23, 2010
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23, 2010




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23, 2010




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23, 2010




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23, 2010




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23, 2010




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              to December
              23, 2010




Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
11/10/10      to December
              23, 2010




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              23, 2010




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Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
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              23, 2010




Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
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              23, 2010




Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
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              23, 2010
Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
11/10/10      to December
              23, 2010




Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
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              23, 2010




Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
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              23, 2010
Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
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              23, 2010




Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
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              23, 2010




Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
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              23, 2010




Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
11/10/10      to December
              23, 2010
Eric Nelson   December 3               1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
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              23, 2010




Eric Nelson   December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
11/10/10      to December
              23, 2010
December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010




December 3    1/4/2011   1/12/2011   1/12/2011   1/31/2011
to December
23, 2010
NOTES:            Due to be        Need BOG   Date to BOG Date
disapproved/withd Returned to      Approval   - President's Disposition
rawn or on hold   Faculty Senate              Office        Published
This item was pulled
to go to January PEC




1-7-2011--This item
should be pulled
from the black book,
per L. Johnson,
Registrar's Office
Disposition Link




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                                              Senate Resolution Text
Senate Action or
  Resolution #

SR 5-10/11         Faculty Senate Resolution Conferring Honorary Doctorate Degree

                   Upon Dr. Bert E. Park

                   Whereas, Dr. Bert E. Park is a native of Springfield, a graduate of Parkview
                   High School and a capable and respected neurosurgeon who has distinguished
                   himself by his extraordinary contributions in the area of Public Affairs; and

                   Whereas, he has devoted more than fifteen years of service to medical
                   missions in developing countries of the world; and,

                   Whereas, he has performed, by his own count, some one thousand brain and
                   spinal surgeries at his own expense in seventeen different countries including
                   various nations in Africa, Central Vietnam, Nicaragua, the Palestinian West
                   Bank, and Porte au Prince, Haiti; and,

                   Whereas, since 2001 he has been an invited guest of the Vietnam government
                   to work and teach at the Da Nang General Hospital, located in the poorest,
                   central region of the country to upgrade the surgical skills and technology of
                   the surgical team; and,

                   Whereas, he has developed the first ever regional neurosurgery training
                   program in Central and East Africa that is now sanctioned by the Congress of
                   Neurological Surgeons of the United States and the Royal College of Surgeons
                   in United Kingdom; and,

                   Whereas, “his personal mission is not only to provide care to patients, but to
                   train local doctors to do the surgeries” (nomination letter quote); and,
SA 10-10/11   N/A




SA 11-10/11   N/A
      Senate Action Text or Description
                                          Date Approved or
                                            Adopted by         Challenge Period
                                           Faculty Senate
N/A                                       9-Dec-10           N/A
Faculty Senate Action on Honorary Undergraduate Degree          9-Dec-10   December 15, 2010 to
                                                                           January 13, 2011
Whereas, Missouri State University awarded its first
Honorary Undergraduate Degree during summer
commencement, 2010; and,

Whereas, MSU has established specific guidelines and
processes for the awarding of Honorary Doctorate Degrees;
and,

Whereas, no guidelines are in place for the awarding of
Honorary Undergraduate Degrees; Therefore,

Be it resolved, that the Faculty Senate recommends that
the University award Honorary Undergraduate Degrees
following the procedures in the attached Honorary
Undergraduate Degrees Policy;
Be it further resolved, that the MSU administration join
with the Faculty Senate to recommend that the attached
Honorary Undergraduate Degrees Policy be adopted by the
Board of Governors;
Be it further resolved, that if this Action and accompanying
policy are approved by the Board of Governors, then the
policy be forwarded to the Rules Committee of the Faculty
Senate for incorporation into the Bylaws of the Faculty.
The Rules Committee is not obligated to include the policy
verbatim, and may recommend any editorial changes it
Faculty Senate integrate the policy into the Bylaws,
sees fit to best Action Concerning CASL Director             9-Dec-10      December 15, 2010 to
Qualifications                                                             January 13, 2011

Whereas, Faculty Senate Action 10-95/96 states that the
director of the Office of Citizenship and Service-Learning
will be selected from SMSU ranked faculty; and,
Whereas, the academic responsibility of the program rests
with the CASL Oversight Committee; and,
Whereas, 57% of service-learning programs are led by a
master’s degree candidate;
Therefore, Be it Resolved, that the director of Missouri
State University’s Office of Citizenship and Service-Learning
may hold, minimally, a master’s degree and may be
selected from outside MSU ranked faculty.
Received in                                     Date           NOTES:      Date Returned
            Date Approved
 Provost                  Date to President   Approved    disapproved/with   to Faculty
               Provost
  Office                                      President   drawn or on hold     Senate
1/14/2011
1/14/2011   1/20/2011   1/21/2011   1/24/2011




1/14/2011   1/20/2011   1/21/2011   1/24/2011
            Date to BOG -
Need BOG
             President's          Disposition Link
 Approval
                Office
                            http://www.missouristate.ed
                            u/assets/registrar/Disposition
                            _Jan_25_2011.pdf
http://www.missouristate.ed
u/assets/registrar/Disposition
_Jan_25_2011.pdf




http://www.missouristate.ed
u/assets/registrar/Disposition
_Jan_25_2011.pdf
Curricular Proposal Type
Course or Program (Note here if non-substan-
                    tive)
Title



AGA 105 Soils and       Course Change
Crop Science




AGA 215 Soils           Course Change




AGA 335 Soil            Course Change
Conservation and
Water Management




AGA 345 Soil Judging    Course Change




AGA 365 Grain Crops     Course Change
AGA 375 Forage Crops Course Change




AGA 405 Soil Fertility   Course Change
and Plant Nutrition




AGA 425 Soil and         Course Change
Crop Management




AGA 455 Soils       Course Change
Genesis, Morphology
and Classification




AGA 485 Weed             Course Change
Science




AGA 495 Problems in Course Change
Plant and Soil Science
AGA 505 Advanced      Course Change
Soil Fertility




AGA 545 Soil Survey   Course Change
and Land Appraisal




AGA 555 Soil Genesis, Course Change
Morphology, and
Classification 11




AGA 575 Plant         Course Change
Improvement




AGF 121 Introduction Course Change
to Wine
AGF 193 Internship in Course Change
Plant Science




AGF 300 Wine          Course Change
Appreciation for
Consumers




AGF 401 Pomology      Course Change




AGF 411 Vitaculture   Course Change




AGF 493 Internship in Course Change
Fruit Science
AGF 496 Independent Course Change
Study in Fruit Science




AGF 497 Selected        Course Change
Topics in Fruit Science




AGF 499               Course Change
Undergraduate
Research




AGH 103 Introduction Course Change
to Horticulture




AGH 243 Indoor Plants Course Change




AGH 303 Suburban      Course Change
Horticulture
AGH 323 Floriculture   Course Change




AGH 325 Herbaceous Course Change
Plants




AGH 333 Landscape      Course Change
Design




AGH 343 Vegetable      Course Change
Production




AGH 353 Turf Science Course Change




AGH 363 Landscape      Course Change
Plants I
AGH 393 Fruit Culture Course Change




AGH 403 Nursery      Course Change
Management




AGH 443 Greenhouse Course Change
Management




AGH 453 Crop         Course Change
Physiology




AGH 483 Plant        Course Change
Pathology
AGH 493 Problems in Course Change
Horticulture




AGH 573 Plant        Course Change
Propagation




AGS 311 Feeds and    Course Change
Feeding




AGS 491 Animal       Course Change
Science Senior
Seminar




AGW 143               Course Change
Introductory Forestry




AGW 351 Game Bird    Course Change
Production
AGW 496 Wildlife      Course Change
Conservation Senior
Seminar




AGW 513 Insects       Course Change
Affecting
Horticultural and
Forestry Crops




AGN 115 Sustainable   New Course
Agriculture and the
Environment




AGN 465               New Course
Environmental Soil
Science
AGP 104 Plant         New Course
Science Laboratory




AGP 433 Advanced      New Course
Landscape Design




AGR 301 Agriculture   New Course
Transfer Student
Orientation
AGS 310 Animal   New Course
Nutrition
Agricultural Business   Program Change
Major
Agronomy Major      Program Change




Animal Science Major Program Change
General Agriculture   Program Change
Comprehensive
Major B.S.




General Agriculture   Program Change
Comprehensive
Major Bachelor of
Applied Science
Horticulture    Program Change
Comprehensive
Major B.S.
Wildlife Conservation Program Change
and Management
Comprehensive
Major B.S.




GRY 135 Atmospheric Course Change
Science




GRY 108 Ecology and   Course Change
Society
ART 331 Computer   New Course
Animation 111
Art History B.A.     Program Change




Art History B.S. Minor Program Change
MED 355 Social Media Course Change




MED 365 Media         Course Change
Design and Production




DAN 180 Introduction Course Change
to the Dance




THE 411 Structures   Course Change
and Styles
Shakespeare
BFA in Theatre      Program Change




BUS 550 Negotiation, Course Change
Mediation, and
Arbitration in Business
LAW 550 Negotiation, Course Change
Mediation, and
Arbitration in Business




CSC 201 Computer       Course Change
Applications in the
Fashion Industry




FCS 120 Family Health Course Change




FCS 301 Textiles,      Course Change
Apparel, and Fashion




FCS 335 Presentation Course Change
Techniques




Family and Consumer Program Change
Science General
Minor B.A.
Family and Consumer Program Change
Science Minor B.S.
and B.S.Ed




Housing and Interior Program Change
Design (Comp) Major
B.S.




TCM 221               Course Change
Construction Drawings




TCM 303 Facilities   Course Change
Operation and
Maintenance
TCM 321 Mechanical Course Change
Systems for Buildings




TCM 347 Industrial   Course Change
Equipment and
Control




TCM 354 Facility     Course Change
Planning
Technology         Program Change
Management (Non-
Comp) Major B.S.
BMS 490 Peer          New Course
Instruction in
Biomedical Sciences




Cell and Molecular    PAIE
Biology (BS)
Clinical Laboratory
Sciences-Medical
Technology (BS)
Dietetics (BS)
PSY 557 Legal Issues Course Change
for Professionals
Working with Children
ECO 325 Government Course Change
and Business




ECO 450 Location of    Course Change
Economic Activity




History BA             PAIE
History BSED


PLS 563 Modern
Political Theory


PLS 576 Quantitative   Course Change
Methods of Political
Science and Public
Policy
ANT 710 Cultural       Course Change
Resource
Management




ANT 332 Peoples and New Course
Cultures of Africa




BIO 370 Invertebrate   Course Change
Zoology




BIO 574 Aquatic        Course Change
Entomology




CHM 201 Essentials     Course Change
of Organic Chemistry
CHM 260 Principles of Course Change
Environmental
Chemistry




CHM 376 Inorganic    Course Change
Preparation




CHM 452              Course Change
Biochemistry 1




CHM 461              Course Change
Environmental
Chemistry II
CHM 462              Course Change
Environmental
Chemistry Laboratory




CHM 502 Techniques Course Change
of Instrumental
Analysis




CHM 506 Physical    Course Change
Chemistry I




CHM 507 Physical    Course Change
Chemistry II
CHM 508 Physical     Course Change
Chemistry Laboratory
I




CHM 514 Polymer      Course Change
Chemistry




CHM 533 Advanced     Course Change
Analytical Methods




CHM 542 Advanced     Course Change
Organic Chemistry
CHM 552               Course Change
Biochemistry II




CHM 574               Course Change
Intermediate
Inorganic Chemistry




CHM 575 Advanced      Course Change
Inorganic Chemistry
GEO 570 Thematic      Course Change
Cartography




GEO 572 Introduction Course Change
to Photogrammetry
and Spatial Statistics




GEO 573 Geographic    Course Change
Information Science
Programming
GEO 575 Satellite-     Course Change
Based Surveying and
Mapping




GLG 360 Directed       Course Change
Field Trips




GRY 300 Geography      Course Change
of the United States




GRY 301 Geography      Course Change
of the Ozarks
GRY 310               Course Change
Fundamentals of
Tourism




GRY 320 Cultural      Course Change
Geography




GRY 353               Course Change
Environmental Field
Studies




GRY 375 Advanced      Course Change
Plane Surveying




GRY 377 Legal         Course Change
Aspects of Boundary
Surveying
GRY 379 Surveying     Course Change
Computations




GRY 470 Field Study   Course Change
in Geography




GRY 498 Placement     Course Change
Seminar in
Geography,
Geospatial Sciences
and Planning




PLN 574 Open Space    Course Change
and Recreation
Planning
Geographic               Program Change
Information Sciences
University Certificate
(Undergratuate)




Geology B.A. Minor       Program Change




Geology B.S. Minor       Program Change
Planning              Program Change
(Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science
Geography B.A.   Program Change
Geography B.S.     Program Change




ACC 653 Auditing   Course Change
ACC 790 Seminar in     Course Change
Accounting




Graduate Certificate   New Program
in Tax Accounting
ART 794 Independent New Course
Study in Art History




ART 795 Graduate Art New Course
Internship in Art
History
MS in Early Childhood Program Change
and Family
Development




ENG 678 Writing for   Course Change
the Web




ENG 694 Technical     Course Change
Writing Internship
ENG 773 Writing for   Course Change
the Computer
Industry




ENG 702 Service        New Course
Learning in English 11




MKT 750 Supply        Course Change
Chain Management
Seminar




MKT 770 Seminar in    Course Change
Marketing Research
GRM 635 Advanced   Course Change
German Composition
and Conversation




TCM 603 Project Risk Course Change
Analysis




TCM 611 Product     Course Change
Design and
Development
TCM 645 Project        Course Change
Control Systems




TCM 651 Cost           Course Change
Analysis for Project
Management




TCM 701 Project        Course Change
Management
TCM 710 Project    Course Change
Leadership




TCM 726 Seminar in Course Change
Project Management




TCM 740            Course Change
Management of
Innovation and
Technology
TCM 750 Advanced   Course Change
Project Management




TCM 760 Special    Course Change
Investigations




TCM 792 Graduate   Course Change
Internship




TCM 798 Research   Course Change




TCM 799 Thesis     Course Change
Project Management Program Change
Certificate Program




BIO 101 Biological   Course Change
Concepts
ENG 221 Writing 1:    Course Change
Writing for the
Professions




ENG 321 Writing II    Course Change
Beginning Technical
Writing




Gender Studies        Program Change
LIS 101 Introduction   Course Change
to the Library




Agriculture Education Program Change
Art Education   Program Change
Major
Art History            Program Change
Minor




Art History (BA)       PAIE
Art and Design (BA)
Electronic Arts (BS)
Art Education (BSED)
Art (BFA)
Des (BFA)

Biology (BA)          PAIE
Biology (Comp) (BS)
Biology (Non Comp)
(BS)
Biology Education
(BSED)
Wildlife Conservation
and Management
(Bio Dept.) (BS)
BSEd Subject Specific   Program Change
Education Majors




Chemistry (BS)          PAIE
Chemistry (MS)
Chemistry (BSED)
CFD 365 Families in   Course Change
Later Life




Early Childhood       Program Change
Education




Communication (BA) PAIE
Communication (BS)
Public Relations (BS)
Socio-Political
Communication (BS)
Speech and Theatre
Education/Communic
ation (BSED)
English- BSEd(Cert 9-   PAIE
12)
English/Creative
Writing Option BA
English/Literature
Option BA
Professional Writing
BA
Professional Writing
BS

Earth Science           PAIE
Education (BSED)
Geography (BA)
Geography (BS)
Geology (Comp) (BS)
Geology (Non Comp)
(BS)
Geospatial Sciences
(BS)
Planning (BS)

PED 370 Content and Course Change
Materials in Safety
Education




PED 371 Driver          Course Change
Education
PED 372 Problems in    Course Change
Driver Education and
Traffic Safety




PED 373 Multiple Car Course Change
Driving Ranges
Simulation




Driver Education       Program Change
Certification
Exercise and          PAIE
Movement Science
(BS)
Physical Education
(BSED)
Radiology (BS)
Recreation, Sport,
and Park
Administration
(Comp) (BS)
Recreation, Sport,
and Park Admin.
(NonComp) (BS)
Respiratory Therapy
(BS)

Mathematics (BA)   PAIE
Mathematics (Comp)
(BS)
Mathematics (Non
Comp) (BS)
Mathematics (BSED)

GRM 535 Advanced   Course Change
German Composition
and Conversation




Antiquities (BA)      PAIE
French (BA)
French (BS)
German (BA)
German (BS)
Latin (BA)
Spanish (BA)
Spanish (BS)
Spanish (BSED)
German (BSED)
Latin (BSED)
French (BSED)
Music (BA)           PAIE
Music (BMUS)
Music-Instrumental
(BME)
Music-Vocal
Choral(BME)
Musical Theatre
(Music Dept)(BFA)
Engineering Physics  PAIE
(BS)
Physics (BS)
Physics Education
(BSED)
Dance (BFA)          PAIE
Musical Theatre
(Theatre Dept) (BFA)
Speech and Theatre
Education/Theatre(BS
ED)
Theatre (BFA)
Theatre Studies (BA)
Current Catalog Description




AGA 105 Soils and Crop Science

Soils as influenced by geography, geology, temperature, rainfall, and other
natural factors. Crop origin, adaptation, function and management
principles are investigated. 3(3-0) F,S

AGA 215 Soils

Recommended Prerequisite: CHM 105 or CHM 160. Physical, chemical and
biological activities within the soil as related to moisture, temperature,
drainage, and tillage. 3(2-2) F,S

AGA 335 Soil Conservation and Water Management

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 215. Conservation of soil by integrating
the various mechanical and agronomic management practices needed for
effective erosion control. Design and layout of water management
practices on the land. 3(3-0) F,S




AGA 345 Soil Judging

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 215. Introduction to soil morphology,
interpretation of water relationships, site characteristics, classification,
and land use. A soil judging team will be selected from this class. May be
repeated up to a total of 6 hours. 2(1-2) F,S


AGA 365 Grain Crops

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105. Adaptation, production, and
utilization of the major grain crops. 3(3-0) F
AGA 375 Forage Crops

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105. Culture, preservation and
management of crops useful for pasture, hay and silage. 3(3-0) S




AGA 405 Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 215. Principles of soil fertility and
fertilizer applications affecting nutrient availability and plant growth. 3(2-
2) S

AGA 425 Soil and Crop Management

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 215 and either AGA 365 or AGA 375.
Integration of soil and crop management techniques necessary to enhance
crop production and improve soil productivity. 2(2-0) F


AGA 455 Soil Genesis, Morphology and Classification

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 215. Pedogenetic processes that are
responsible for genesis, morphology, and classification of the eleven
orders of soil taxonomy. 2(2-0) F

AGA 485 Weed Science

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105 or AGA 375; and either BIO 102 or
BIO 121; and either CHM 105 or CHM 160. Identification, physiology and
impacts of invasive plants and crop weeds and methods for their control in
natural and agroecosystems. 3(2-2) F


AGA 495 Problems in Plant and Soil Science

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Assigned investigations, dealing
with current problems in plant and soil science supervised by an
agricultural staff member. Student prepares outline, investigates sources
of information concerning the subject, and summarizes his findings in a
written report. May be repeated with permission. 1-3 F,S
AGA 505 Advanced Soil Fertility

Prerequisite: Recommended: AGA 405. Theoretical and Applied aspects of
soil fertility emphasizing ion transport, nutrient availability, and root
absorption in soils-plant environments. May be taught concurrently with
AGA 605. Cannot receive credit for both AGA 605 and AGA 505. 3(2-2) D


AGA 545 Soil Survey and Land Appraisal

Prerequisite: Recommended: 6 credit hours in soils. Soil as a natural body,
its morphological and chemical properties, and methods used to
distinguish among different soils; description and identification of soil
profiles; techniques in soil mapping; and interpretation of soil survey data.
May be taught concurrently with AGA 645. Cannot receive credit for both
AGA 645 and AGA 545. 3(2-2) F


AGA 555 Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification II

Prerequisite: Recommended: AGA 345 and AGA 455. Pedogenetic
processes, macromorphology, micromorphology, redoximorphic features,
and classification as related to soil taxonomy. May be taught concurrently
with AGA 655. Cannot receive credit for both AGA 655 and AGA 555. 3(2-2)
D


AGA 575 Plant Improvement

Prerequisite: Recommended: AGA 105. Application of genetic principles to
the improvement of crop plants. Includes self-pollinated, cross-pollinated,
and asexually-propagated crops. May be taught concurrently with AGA
675. Cannot receive credit for both AGA 675 and AGA 575. 2(2-0) S


AGF 121 Introduction to Wine

An introduction to wine in the modern world. History, classification,
production and the geography of wine. The basics of wine appreciation will
also be examined. 2(2-0) S
AGF 193 Internship in Plant Science

Prerequisite: permission of department head. Supervised work experience
at the State Fruit Experiment Station involving selected research and/or
advisory projects. A written report and an oral examination are required. 1-
3D

AGF 300 Wine Appreciation for Consumers

Must be 21 years of age or older. Students participate in a series of
tastings designed to introduce them to the major wine types and the range
of styles within those types. Tests and other materials will be available
online. $125 supplemental course fee required. S,D

AGF 401 Pomology

The course will emphasize the production and management of perennial
fruit crops which are adapted to a temperate zone climate. The crops
include apple, peach, grape, blueberry, blackberry, raspberry, and
strawberry. The physiology of plants as a response to production practices,
and recent technology as it applies to fruit production will be addressed.
May be taught concurrently with AGF 701. Students cannot receive credit
for both AGF 401 and AGF 701. 3(3-0) S


AGF 411 Vitaculture

The course will emphasize the production and management of Vitis
species which are adapted to a temperate zone climate. The physiology of
grapevines as a response to production practices, and recent technology
as it applies to vineyard production will also be addressed. May be taught
concurrently with AGF 611. Students cannot receive credit for both AGF
411 and AGF 711. 3(3-0) S


AGF 493 Internship in Fruit Science

Prerequisite: permission of department head. Supervised work experience
either at the Fruit Experiment Station or in the commercial fruit
production and/or processing industry. A paper analyzing some major
aspect or aspects of the work experience as related to fruit production
and/or processing is required. 1-5 D
AGF 496 Independent Study in Fruit Science

The student, with the approval of the instructor, conducts an in-depth
literature review and writes a paper on a subject within the area of fruit
production, fruit processing, or fruit marketing. May be repeated for a
total of 3 credit hours. 1-3 D

AGF 497 Selected Topics in Fruit Science

Recommended Prerequisite: agriculture, biology, chemistry and related
majors with at least 60 hours. Study of highly specialized topics related to
fruit production or fruit processing. A variable content course which may
be repeated for up to 6 credit hours when topic varies. 1-4 D


AGF 499 Undergraduate Research

Prerequisite: 60 hours and permission of instructor. Individually conducted
field and/or laboratory research under faculty supervision resulting in a
research paper. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. 1-3 D


AGH 103 Introduction to Horticulture

An introduction to basic plant science and plant physiology including the
areas of fruit and vegetable production, foliage and landscape plants, plant
propagation and sustainable horticulture. 3(2-2) F


AGH 243 Indoor Plants

Identification, cultural requirements and growth habits of ornamental
foliage and flowering plants for indoor use. 3(3-0) SO

AGH 303 Suburban Horticulture

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105 or BIO 102 or BIO 121. Horticultural
concepts and their application to the growth and maintenance of fruit,
vegetables and ornamentals common to most homes. Will not count
toward Horticulture major or minor. 3(3-0) F
AGH 323 Floriculture

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105 or BIO 102 or BIO 121. Production
and management of greenhouse floriculture crops and herbaceous
landscape plants. 3(2-2) FE

AGH 325 Herbaceous Plants

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105 or BIO 102 or BIO 121.
Nomenclature, identification, characteristics and cultural requirements of
herbaceous ornamental plants. 3(2-2) FO


AGH 333 Landscape Design

Theory and practice of landscaping including elementary design. 3(2-2) F,S


AGH 343 Vegetable Production

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105 or BIO 102 or BIO 121. Methods and
practices of home and commercial vegetable production. 3(3-0) S




AGH 353 Turf Science

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105 or BIO 102 or BIO 121. A scientific
approach to the physiology of turfgrass in response to the environment,
and the selection, establishment, maintenance and pest management
relevant to utility, lawn and sports turf. 3(3-0) S


AGH 363 Landscape Plants I

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105 or BIO 102 or BIO 121.
Identification, classification and adaptation of common trees, shrubs and
groundcovers used for landscape purposes. 3(2-2) F
AGH 393 Fruit Culture

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105 or BIO 102 or BIO 121. The culture
and management of tree fruit, grapes, strawberries and other small fruit.
3(3-0) S




AGH 403 Nursery Management

Recommended Prerequisite: AGH 363 or BIO 334 or BIO 339. General
principles and practices involved in the commercial production,
management, and marketing of landscape plants. Field trips required. 3(2-
2) S

AGH 443 Greenhouse Management

Recommended Prerequisite: AGH 323. Factors involved in site selection,
construction, and management of greenhouses for the production of
horticulture crops. Supplemental course fee. 3(2-2) S


AGH 453 Crop Physiology

Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105, AGH 103 or BIO 102; 3 hours
additional AGA, AGH or BIO plant courses. General, stress-related and post-
harvest physiology of horticulture and agronomic crops in relationship to
their environments. 3(3-0) SE

AGH 483 Plant Pathology

Recommended Prerequisite: 9 hours of plant science. Diseases and
physiological disorders of fruit, vegetables, agronomic crops and
ornamental plants. Emphasis is placed on the interactions between plants
and pathogenic organisms, on environmental factors that cause plant
diseases, and on disease control methods. 3(2-2) F
AGH 493 Problems in Horticulture

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Assigned investigations dealing with
current problems in horticulture supervised by an agricultural staff
member. Student prepares outline, investigates sources of information
concerning the subject, and summarizes his findings in a written report.
May be repeated with permission. 1-3 F,S


AGH 573 Plant Propagation

Recommended Prerequisite: either AGA 105 or BIO 121 and either CHM
105 or CHM 160. Practices employed by fruit and ornamental plant
producers in propagation of plants, including seeds, cuttings, layerings,
grafting and micropropagation. Supplemental course fee. May be taught
concurrently with AGH 643. Cannot receive credit for both AGH 643 and
AGH 573. 3(2-2) S

AGS 311 Feeds and Feeding

Recommended Prerequisite: AGS 101 and MTH 135 or higher. Feed
composition and formulation of livestock rations. 3(3-0) F,S


AGS 491 Animal Science Senior Seminar

Recommended Prerequisite: 90 hours and Animal Science major.
Discussion and analysis of trends and developments in animal agriculture.
1(1-0) F,S

AGW 143 Introductory Forestry

Introduction to field of forestry. 3(3-0) F,S




AGW 351 Game Bird Production

Captive management of quail, pheasants and other gamebirds. Gamebirds
will be raised in laboratory. Supplemental course fee. 2(1-2) F
AGW 496 Wildlife Conservation Senior Seminar

Recommended Prerequisite: 90 hours and Wildlife Conservation Major.
Presentation, discussions and analysis of professional topics in Wildlife
Conservation. 1(1-0) F,S

AGW 513 Insects Affecting Horticultural and Forestry Crops

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Identification, life histories and
control methods of insects affecting gardens, ornamental plants, orchards
and forests. May be taught concurrently with AGW 613. Cannot receive
credit for both AGW 613 and AGW 513. 3(1-4) F


N/A




N/A
N/A




N/A




N/A
N/A
Agricultural Business (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
   Specific General Education Requirements: CHM 105(5); MTH 135(3) or
MTH 138(5); PSY 121(3)
 B. Major Requirements (58-65 hours)
    1. AGA 105(3), 215(3); AGB 144(4), AGB 314(3) or LAW 231(3); AGB
334(3), 354(2), 364(2), 374(3), 394(1), 494(1); AGB 514(3) or ECO 565(3) or
MKT 474(3); AGB 524(3); AGB 444(2) or AGR 499(2); AGR 330(3) or QBA
237(3); AGR 490(1); ACC 201(3)
    2. Complete one course from: COM 315(3); MGT 286 (3); AGB 384(2)
    3. Complete one of the following options:
         a. Agricultural Enterprise Management (18 hours):
             1. AGB 344(3) or 584(3); MGT 384(3)
             2. Complete 12 hours from one of the following groups:
                 a. Animal Science: AGS 101(4), 161(3), 301(3), 302(3),
306(3), 311(3), 316(3), 342(2), 346(2), 361(3), 402(2), 432(2), 442(2),
446(3), 451(3), 452(3), 461(3), 511(3); AGA 365(3) or 375(3)
                 b. Agronomy: AGA 335(3), 365(3), 375(3), 405(3), 425(2),
455(2), 485(3), 545(3), 555(3), 575(2)
                 c. Horticulture: AGH 243(2), 303(3), 323(2), 333(3), 343(3),
353(3), 363(3), 393(3), 403(3), 443(3), 483(3), 573(3)
         b. Agricultural Finance and Management (22 hours):
             1. ACC 211(3); AGB 344(3), 584(3); AGS 101(4)
             2. Complete two courses from: ACC 311(3); ECO 305(3); FIN
266(3), 380(3), 485(3); INS 211(3), 415(3); MGT 340(3), 345(3);
Agronomy (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog Specific General Education Requirements:
BIO 102(4) or 121(4); CHM 105(5) or 160(4); MTH 135(3) or MTH 138(5)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. AGA 105(3), 215(3), 335(3), 365(3), 405(3), 425(2), 485(3), 490(1);
AGB 144(4), 334(3) or 364(2); AGH 483; AGR 157(3), 300(3), 383(3); AGS
101(4), 311(3)
      2. Select one course from: AGA 353(3); AGH 375(3)
      3. Select one course from: AGA 345(2), 455(2), 495(2), 499(3)
      4. Select one course from: AGA 545(3), 555(3), 575(2)
      5. Select one course from: AGB 344(3), 354(2), 394(1), AGR 444(2)
  C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog




Animal Science (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
   Specific General Education Requirements: BIO 102(4); CHM 105(5) or
160(4); MTH 135(3) or MTH 138(5)
 B. Major Requirements
     1. AGS 101(4), 301(3), 302(3), 311(3), 316(3), 491(1); AGA 105(3),
215(3), 365(3) or 375(3); AGB 144(4); AGR 300(3), 330(3); BIO 210(3).
     2. Select a minimum of 24 hours from the following two groups of
courses including at least eight hours from each group:
         a. Group A courses: AGS 161(3), 191(2), 196(2), 306(3), 342(2),
346(2), 361(3), 402(3), 432(2), 442(2), 446(3), 451(3), 452(3), 461(3),
511(3)
         b. Group B courses: AGR 250(2), 377(3), 383(3), 499(3); AGB
314(3), 334(3), 344(3), 364(2), 394(1), 584(3); AGA 335(3), 405(3)
 C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
General Agriculture (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
    Specific General Education Requirements: AGR 100(3); BIO 102(4) or
121(4); CHM 105(5); MTH 135(3) or MTH 138(5); PSY 121(3)
  B. Major Requirements
     1. AGS 101(4); AGA 105(3), 215(3); AGB 144(4), AGR 157(3); AGR
300(3) or CHM 200(5)
     2. Complete 3 additional hours from each of the following areas:
Agriculture Business, Animal Science, Horticulture
     3. Complete one of the following options:
         a. Agricultural Communications (27-29 hours):
             1. COM 209(3) or MED 120(3), JRN 270(3), AGR 250(2) or 499
(3-5); or AGB 394(1)
             2. Select an additional 16 hours of courses with ENG, MED,
COM, or JRN prefixes in consultation with your advisor.
         b. Agricultural (27-29 hours):
             1. AGB 314(3) or AGR 250(2) or AGR 499(3-5)
             2. Select 6 additional hours of Agriculture courses from each of
the following areas: Agricultural Business, Agronomy, Animal Science,
Horticulture
         c. Food Plant Management (27-29 hours):
             1. ACC 201(3), BIO 210(3), MGT 340(3) or 345(3), AGB 394(1)
or AGR 499(3-5)
             2. Select an additional 15 hours from the following: AGS 342(2)
or 346(2); BMS 331(3); HRA 321(3); LAW 231(3), 531(3); ENG 321 or MGT
General Agriculture
Bachelor of Applied Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements
     1. Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science degree from
an accredited institution. Contact the department for details.
     2. AGA 105(3), 215(3); AGB 144(4); AGR 157(3); AGS 101(4)
     3. Thirty-five credit hours of upper-division courses in agriculture
 C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
Horticulture (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog.
Specific General Education Requirements: BIO 102(4) or 121(4); CHM
105(5) or CHM 107(4) or CHM 160(4)
 B. General Agriculture Major Requirements: AGH 103(3) or AGA 105(3);
AGA 215(3), AGA 405(3), AGA 485(3), AGH 483(3), AGH 573(3), AGR
383(3), AGR 490(1), AGR 499(3)
 C. Horticulture Major Requirements:
     1. Plant Identification: Select 2 courses from: AGH 243(3), AGH
325(3), AGH 363(3), BIO 334(3), BIO 399(2).
     2. Food Crops: Select 2 courses from AGF 401(3), AGF 411(3), AGH
343(3), AGH 393(3)
     3. Environmental Horticulture: Select 2 courses from: AGH 323(3),
AGH 333(3), AGH 353(3), AGH 403(3), AGH 443(3)
     4. Science/Technical: Select a minimum of 3 hours from: AGA 575(3);
AGH 453(3) or BIO 544(4); AGH 493(1-3), AGR 300(3), BIO 436(4), TCM
110(3), 3 hours foreign language
 D. Business Major Requirements: ACC 201(3); AGB 144(4) or ECO 155(3)
or ECO 165(3); AGB 334(3) or MKT 350(3); AGB 374(3) or MGT 340(3) or
MGT 384(3)
 E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
Wildlife Conservation and Management (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

This major is offered in cooperation with the Biology Department.

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog.
 Specific General Education Requirements: BIO 121(4); CHM 105(5) or
160(4); GLG 110(4); GRY 100(3); MTH 135(3) or 138(5)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. Agriculture Requirements:
          a. AGA 105(3), 215(3), 335(3), 365(3) or 375(3); AGR 383(3); AGW
143(3), 496(1)
          b. Select two courses (4-6 hours) from: AGA 485(3); AGB 354(2);
AGH 333(3), 483(3); AGW 351(2)
      2. Biology Requirements:
          a. BIO 121(4)*, 122(4)*, 334(3), 339(2) or 545(2), 373(3)
          b. Select one course from: BIO 369(4), 436(4), 562(4)
          c. Select two courses from: BIO 573(3), 575(3), 577(3)
            *Students who have prior credit for BIO 134 and 167
combination are not required to take BIO 121 and 122; BIO 121 and 122
cannot count as degree credit if BIO 134 and 167 are counted as credit.
      3. Select ten additional hours in Agriculture and/or Biology
  C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog


GRY 135 Atmospheric Science
General Education Course (Natural World). An introductory survey of the
earth's weather and climate. A description of the physical processes of the
atmosphere is followed by a survey of the world's varied climatic regions.
The laboratory involves the preparation and interpretation of
meteorological data and the classification of climates. 4(3-2) F, S




GRY 108 Ecology and Society
General Education Course (Culture and Society/Social Sciences
Perspective). Multidisciplinary problem study of population pressures,
environmental degradation and socio-political perils and opportunities,
through an integrated approch by a staff drawn chiefly from the natural
and social sciences. 3(3-0) F,S
N/A
B. Major Requirements (39 hours)

  1. Core Courses (18 hours): ART 271(3), 272(3), 273(3), 274(3), ART
492(3); and any 100 or 200 level studio course (3)
  2. In consultation with an advisor, complete 21 hours in at least four of
the following areas of art history:
      a. Ancient/Medieval Art: ART 472(3), 474(3)
      b. Renaissance/Baroque: ART 475(3), 478(3)
      c. Modern/Postmodern: ART 381(3), 479(3), 480(3), 482(3), 484(3)
      d. Non-Western Cultures: ART 374(3), 382(3), 385(3), 386(3), 485(3)
      e. Diverse Perspectives: ART 377(3), 378(3), 387(3)
        With advisor's approval, ART 496(3), Special Topics in Art History,
may substitute for a course in one of the areas.




Art History
Bachelor of Science

 A. ART 271(3) or 272(3); and ART 273(3) or 274(3)
 B. Additional 15 hours art history electives should be chosen with
advisement by an art history faculty member to bring the total number of
hours in Art and Design to no fewer than 21.
MED 355 Social Media

Prerequisite: MED 120. An overview of how social media are changing the
ways we communicate, collaborate and create through digital media.
Students will examine the historical, theoretical and practical implications
of social media on human communication through a series of critical
readings, media presentations and practical encounters with social
networking. 3(3-0) S


MED 365 Media Design and Production

Prerequisite: MED 120 required for MJF majors only. A study of visual
aesthetics and production techniques used in film and video. Students will
learn image, motion design, sound, and nonlinear concepts that will be
reinforced through video production exercises. 3(2-2) F,S




DAN 180 Introduction to the Dance

General Education Course (Self-Understanding/Creativity and Vision
Perspective). Survey of dance from a historical retrospective through the
creative process. Emphasis will be placed on 20th century multi-cultural
and societal influences on dance. The approach will be from the viewpoint
of the audience to help heighten awareness of and increase critical
thinking in relationship to the artistic experience. Buying tickets to and
attendance at local productions required. 3(3-0) F,S




THE 411 Structures and Styles Shakespeare

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Understanding text, style, and
dynamics of action in Shakespeare. Creating roles in Shakespeare's plays.
3(2-2) F
Theatre
Bachelor of Fine Arts

Admission Requirements: In addition to the University’s admission
requirements, students must be officially accepted into the BFA program
prior to the first semester of coursework in the major. Auditions and/or
interviews for placement in the program are held on campus during the
fall and spring semester of each year. Prospective students should contact
the Department of Theatre and Dance for specific information about the
audition process and dates.

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
    Note: Six hours of the General Education Humanities Requirement may
not be included in the courses fulfilling the major.
 B. Major Requirements (78 hours)
     1. Core Requirements (31 hours)
         a. Design/Technology (10 hours): THE 150(2) and 151(1); 224(1);
choose two groups from THE 250(2) and 251(1), or THE 255(2) and 256(1),
or THE 260(2) and 261(1)
         b. Directing (6 hours): THE 130(3), 430(3)
         c. History (6 hours): THE 541(3), 542(3)
         d. Acting (3 hours): THE 121(3)* or 123(3). *THE 121 is open to
admitted BFA in Theatre/Acting and Musical Theatre majors only.
         e. Electives from approved courses inside or outside the
department (5 hours)
         f. Senior BFA Project: THE 492(1)
     2. Complete one of the following options:
BUS 550 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business

Prerequisite: 60 hours; and LAW 231; and undergraduate business majors
must be admitted to COBA. A practical, skills-based study of negotiation,
mediation, and arbitration from the business manager's perspective. This
hands-on course is designed to develop the skills necessary to enable the
business manager to effectively participate in negotiation, mediation, and
arbitration as alternatives to litigation for resolving business disputes.
Identical with LAW 550. May be taught concurrently with BUS 650. Cannot
receive credit for more than one of BUS 550, BUS 650, LAW 550, or LAW
650. 3(3-0) F,S
LAW 550 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business

Prerequisite: 60 hours; and LAW 231; and undergraduate business majors
must be admitted to COBA. A practical, skills-based study of negotiation,
mediation, and arbitration from the business manager's perspective. This
hands-on course is designed to develop the skills necessary to enable the
business manager to effectively participate in negotiation, mediation, and
arbitration as alternatives to litigation for resolving business disputes.
Identical with BUS 550. May be taught concurrently with LAW 650. Cannot
receive credit for more than one of BUS 550, BUS 650, LAW 550, or LAW
650. 3(3-0) F,S


CSC 201 Computer Applications in the Fashion Industry

Prerequisite: FMD 101 or concurrent enrollment. A study of software tools
commonly used in the fashion industry. Focus is on the use of spreadsheet,
presentation, word processing, publishing, and image processing software.
2(1-2) F,S
FCS 120 Family Health

Current trends in family health care and home nursing care; practice in the
laboratory. Supplemental course fee. 2(1-2) F,S

FCS 301 Textiles, Apparel, and Fashion

Textiles and apparel course for teachers of Family the Consumer Sciences.
Study of textiles used in apparel, selection and care of apparel, apparel
construction techniques, and cultural, aesthetic, historical, legal and
environmental aspects of textiles, apparel and fashion. 3(2-2) S


FCS 335 Presentation Techniques

Prerequisite: COM 115 and 60 hours. Planning and presenting techniques
for teaching in the classroom, business, industry, or extension settings. A
focus on professional presentation strategies incorporating the use of
multimedia technology. 2(1-2) F,S


General Family and Consumer Sciences
Bachelor of Arts

Select 15 hours from: BMS 130(3); CFD 160(3), 163(3); FMD 103(3), 202(3);
HID 140(3); HRA 321(3)
General Family and Consumer Sciences
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Non-Certifiable)

Select 24 hours from: BMS 130(3); CFD 163(3); FMD 103(3), 202(3); HID
140(3); HRA 321(3), plus additional electives to bring total to at least 24
hours.

Interior Design (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

Admission Requirements: MTH 135
 A. General Education Requirements- see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog Specific General Education Requirements:
      1. Mathematics: MTH 135(3) or higher
      2. Self-Understanding: PSY 121(3) recommended
 B. Major Requirements
      1. ART 100(3), ART 101(3); ACC 201(3); HID 140(3), 201(3), 202(3),
208(3), 240(3), 244(3), 303(3), 304(3), 325(1), 346(3), 405(3), 406(3),
408(3), 424(2), 441(2), 499(4); LAW 231(3); MKT 350(3); TCM 122(3),
221(3), 313(3), TCM 321(3), TCM 322(3)
 C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements- see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog.

TCM 221 Construction Drawings

An introduction to working drawings and specifications commonly
encountered in residential and commercial construction. Designed to
develop the student's understanding of and ability to interpret
construction drawings and specifications. Principles of building design
including basic orthographic drafting, sketching theory and conventions,
auxiliaries, sections and dimensioning. This course will also enhance
student's ability to utilize CAD to access, modify and produce working
drawings. 3(2-2) F,S


TCM 303 Facilities Operation and Maintenance

Prerequisite: TCM 121 or TCM 331. Introduces history and concepts of
facility management, with emphasis on definition of key terms and
concepts. Introduction to operations and maintenance of buildings with an
emphasis on techniques utilized to maintain facilities. 3(2-2) S
TCM 321 Mechanical Systems for Buildings

Prerequisite: PHY 123 or PHY 203; and MTH 138 or higher. This course
addresses the principles and practices of heating, ventilation, cooling,
plumbing and fire protection systems used in residential, commercial and
industrial applications. Emphasis is placed on coordination of design,
applicable codes, estimating, installation, and problem solving. 3(3-0) F


TCM 347 Industrial Equipment and Control

Prerequisite: TCM 322. Examines industrial power delivery systems and
their control including electrical and mechanical systems. Laboratory
experiences will include an introduction to hydraulics and pneumatics,
motors and motor controls, and programmable logic controllers. 3(2-2), F


TCM 354 Facility Planning

Prerequisite: TCM 303 and TCM 313. This course emphasizes the strategic
role required of the facilities manager in providing information for
corporate managers and executives for facility forecasting. 3(3-0) F
Technology Management (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

Admission Requirement: "C" grade or better in MTH 135 or higher

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog Specific General Education Requirements:
    1. Mathematics: MTH 135(3) or higher
    2. Self-Understanding: PSY 121(3) recommended
 B. Major Requirements (60 hours)
    1. TCM 337(3), 350(3), 358(3), 359(3), 455(3), 456(3), 458(3), 494(1),
551(3). Complete one of the following options:
         a. 35 hours of approved transfer credit; and approved minor
         b. ACC 201(3); LAW 231(3); TCM 110(3), 303(3), 331(3), 347(3),
355(3), 365(3), 499(2), 511(3), and
             1. Approved TCM technical electives (6 hours)
             2. Minor (or second major) chosen from outside the
Department of Technology and Construction Management
 C. Minor Required (or second major)
 D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
N/A




N/A




PSY 557 Legal Issues for Professionals Working with Children

Prerequisite: PSY 121 and 60 hours. Study of the legal issues related to
child abuse and exploitation. Students will gain an understanding of the
law pertaining to child cases and how interactions with children can
bolster or diminish the quality of children's memory report as seen by the
judicial system. The Greene County Prosecutor's Office will participate in
the design of this course, thus the specific legal issues discussed will
remain current and may change based on the needs of the community.
May be taught concurrently with PSY 657. Cannot receive credit for both
PSY 557 and PSY 657. 3(3-0) F,S
ECO 325 Government and Business

Prerequisite: ECO 165. Theory and public policy concerning the structure,
conduct and performance of U.S. industries. Primary emphasis is on
oligopolies and monopolies. 3(3-0) S


ECO 450 Location of Economic Activity

Prerequisite: ECO 155 and ECO 165. Study of economic forces determining
the location of businesses and consumers, and the size, shape, and
changes in market areas/cities/land use. Also application of techniques of
economic impact analysis to location decisions. 3(3-0) F




N/A




PLS 576 Quantitative Methods of Political Science and Public Policy

Prerequisite: PLS 101; and SOC 302 or equivalent. Introduction to the use
of standard computer programs (especially SPSS) for the analysis and
interpretation of political and social data. Covers analysis of nominal and
ordinal data, descriptive and inferential statistics, hypothesis testing,
correlation, linear and multiple regression. There will be a critical review of
the applications of these techniques to the analysis of political science and
public policy research questions, including ethical issues associated with
quantitative research. May be taught concurrently with PLS 676. Cannot
receive credit for both PLS 676 and PLS 576. 3(3-0) F,S
ANT 710 Cultural Resource Management

An examination of laws and regulations pertaining to the preservation of
American history and culture and the professional management and
preservation of ethnic, historic, and prehistoric cultural resources. 3(3-0) F




N/A




BIO 370 Invertebrate Zoology

Prerequisite: BIO 121 and BIO 122. Biological principles exemplified by
study of functional morphology, taxonomy and phylogeny of invertebrate
phyla. 4(2-4) F

BIO 574 Aquatic Entomology

Prerequisite: BIO 370 or BIO 371 or AGR 383. Aquatic insects, ecology and
taxonomy with emphasis on field applications. May be taught concurrently
with BIO 674. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 674 and BIO 574. 2(1-3) D


CHM 201 Essentials of Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: a "C" grade or better in either CHM 105 or CHM 160.
Principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Identical to lecture
portion of CHM 200. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 200 and CHM
201. Does not apply toward a chemistry major or minor if student passes
CHM 342. 3(3-0) F,S
CHM 260 Principles of Environmental Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 105 or CHM 160. An introduction
to chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere, natural waters and
soil. Sources of pollution, effects and remediation strategies are
emphasized. 3(3-0) SE




CHM 376 Inorganic Preparation

Prerequisite: "C" grades or better in CHM 175 and CHM 375. Synthesis of
inorganic compounds and measurements of physical and chemical
properties of selected inorganic compounds. 2(0-4) S




CHM 452 Biochemistry I

Prerequisite: "C" or better in either CHM 343 or CHM 344. Recommended
Prerequisite: BIO 121 or BMS 110. Structure and function of biomolecules:
proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids and membranes.
3(3-0), F




CHM 461 Environmental Chemistry II

Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 302 and CHM 460. Continuation of CHM
460. May be taught concurrently with CHM 761. Cannot receive credit for
both CHM 461 and CHM 761. 3(3-0), S
CHM 462 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 302 and CHM 460. Techniques and
procedures for environmental monitoring to test natural samples.
Applications and limitations of wet chemical and instrumental methods
such as atomic absorption, gas chromatography, absorption
spectrophotometry. May be taught concurrently with CHM 762. Cannot
receive credit for both CHM 462 and CHM 762. Cannot receive credit for
both CHM 462 and CHM 463. 2(0-4), S


CHM 502 Techniques of Instrumental Analysis

Prerequisite: "C" or better in either CHM 200 or CHM 342; and "C" or
better in CHM 302. Recommended Prerequisite: PHY 124 or PHY 204.
Applications of instrumental methods for the separation and analysis of
materials; included are potentiometry, photometry and chromatography.
Does not apply to a Chemistry major or minor if the student passes CHM
533. May be taught concurrently with CHM 602. Cannot receive credit for
both CHM 602 and CHM 502. 4(3-3) F


CHM 506 Physical Chemistry I

Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 170; and MTH 280 or MTH 288 or
concurrent enrollment in MTH 280 or MTH 288. Recommended
Prerequisite: PHY 124 or PHY 204. First semester of a two-semester series
covering aspects of quantum mechanics, classical and statistical
thermodynamics, spectroscopy, kinetic theory of gases, and chemical
kinetics. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to take
CHM 507. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. May be taught concurrently
with CHM 606. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 606 and CHM 506. 3(3-
0) F

CHM 507 Physical Chemistry II

Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 506. Recommended Prerequisite:
CHM 375. Second semester of a two-semester series that builds upon and
completes the topics introduced in CHM 506. May be taught concurrently
with CHM 607. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 607 and CHM 507. 3(3-
0) S
CHM 508 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I

Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 302; and "C" or better in CHM 506 or
CHM 606 or concurrent enrollment in CHM 506 or CHM 606. Experiments
in physical chemistry employing principles and techniques reflecting
material presented in CHM 506. May be taught concurrently with CHM
608. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 608 and CHM 508. 2(0-4) F




CHM 514 Polymer Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 343 or CHM 344; and CHM 505 or CHM
605 or CHM 506 or CHM 606. Morphology and chemical structure,
polymer characterization, chemical structure and polymer properties, vinyl
and non-vinyl polymers and mechanism of formation. Inorganic and
partially inorganic polymers. May be taught concurrently with CHM 614.
Cannot receive credit for both CHM 614 and CHM 514. 3(3-0) SE


CHM 533 Advanced Analytical Methods

Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 302. Principles and techniques of
modern instrumental methods used in chemical analysis, with emphasis on
the fundamental physical and chemical theories and principles. Topics
covered include atomic and molecular spectroscopy, electrochemistry,
mass spectrometry, and separations. May be taught concurrently with
CHM 633. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 533 and CHM 633. 4(3-3), F


CHM 542 Advanced Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 343 or CHM 344. Structure,
reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry and other topics of theoretical
nature in organic and polymer chemistry. May be taught concurrently with
CHM 642. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 542 and CHM 642. 3(3-0), F
CHM 552 Biochemistry II

Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 452. Bioenergetics--Metabolism of
biomolecules including carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides.
Photosynthesis. Nitrogen metabolism. Mechanisms of hormone action.
May be taught concurrently with CHM 652. Cannot receive credit for both
CHM 552 and CHM 652. 3(3-0), S




CHM 574 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry

Structure of atoms, introduction to bonding, symmetry in chemistry,
inorganic spectroscopy, and descriptive inorganic chemistry. A grade of "C"
or better is required in this course in order to take CHM 575. CHM 375
may be taught concurrently with CHM 574. Cannot receive credit for both
CHM 375 and CHM 574. May be taught concurrently with CHM 674.
Cannot receive credit for both CHM 574 and CHM 674. 3(3-0), F


CHM 575 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 375; and CHM 507 or concurrent
enrollment. Theories and techniques of modern inorganic chemistry;
correlation of theories with inorganic compounds. May be taught
concurrently with CHM 675. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 575 and
CHM 675. 3(3-0), S
GEO 570 Thematic Cartography

Prerequisite: GEO 561. Theoretical and applied aspects of map design in
thematic mapping, animated mapping, interactive and web mapping.
Emphasis will be applying computer-assisted mapping techniques of the
problems of effective and efficient communication of spatial data. Field
trip is required. May be taught concurrently with GEO 668. Cannot receive
credit for both GEO 668 and GEO 570. 3(2-2) D




GEO 572 Introduction to Photogrammetry and Spatial Statistics

Prerequisite: GRY 360. Course covers basic concepts of photogrammetry
and spatial statistics such as stereo feature extraction, orthophoto, point
pattern recognition and kriging. Laboratory emphasizes geospatial stereo
feature extraction using digital photogrammetry software and ArcGIS
spatial statistics toolbox. May be taught concurrently with GEO 672.
Cannot receive credit for both GEO 672 and GEO 572. 3(1-4) S


GEO 573 Geographic Information Science Programming

Prerequisite: GEO 561; and either CIS 202 or CSC 121 or CSC 125. Course
devoted to theories and processes of analytical and automated
Geographic Information Science (GIS). Principal topics covered are spatial
programming, geographic data storage, computer map rendering,
application customization and automation and human interface
development of GIS. Advanced GIS and programming skills for professional
development are emphasized. May be taught concurrently with GEO 673.
Cannot receive credit for both GEO 673 and GEO 573. 3(2-2) S
GEO 575 Satellite-Based Surveying and Mapping

Prerequisite: 30 hours. Theory and operation of global positioning systems
(GPS) hardware and software. Including mission planning, measurement of
point, line and area features, differential correction techniques and
waypoint navigation. Field exercises required. May be taught concurrently
with GEO 675. Cannot receive credit for both GEO 675 and GEO 575. 3(1-4)
S

GLG 360 Directed Field Trips

Prerequisite: permission. Geologic field trips to areas of special interest.
Because credit and destinations vary, the course may be repeated to a
total of 8 credits. However, no more than 4 credits may count toward any
Geology major. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. Variable content course.
Supplemental course fee. 1-3 D


GRY 300 Geography of the United States

Physical and cultural regions of the United States, including their
characteristics and resource utilization. Topics include landforms, climates,
natural resources, economic activities, and cultural and political patterns.
3(3-0) F,S




GRY 301 Geography of the Ozarks

Physical and cultural geography of the Ozarks. Surveys basic geology,
landforms, soils, vegetation and the geography of settlement, population,
major economic activities, lifestyles and the cultural landscape. Emphasis
on historical development and spatial distributions. Field trip required. 3(3-
0) D
GRY 310 Fundamentals of Tourism

Geographical and recreational elements of tourism and travel including
social, economic, environmental and political factors. Career options will
be identified. Students participate in tourism research projects. One field
trip may be required. Team taught by Geography and Recreation and
Leisure Studies faculty. Identical with REC 320. Cannot receive credit for
both GRY 310 and REC 320. 3(3-0) F,S


GRY 320 Cultural Geography

Geographic patterns and interpretations of man's imprint on the natural
landscape; material and nonmaterial elements of culture. Population,
settlement, agriculture, language, race, religion, and man's
interrelationships with his natural surroundings and the resulting patterns
of adjustment. 3(3-0) F




GRY 353 Environmental Field Studies

Prerequisite: permission. Field methods in environmental science.
Mapping the physical variables of the natural environment to develop an
understanding of the interrelationships between geology, landforms, soils,
vegetation and climate. Field trips required. 1(0-2) D


GRY 375 Advanced Plane Surveying

Prerequisite: GRY 275. Office and field techniques used in route surveying
including circular, transitional and parabolic curves. Topographic mapping
applications, slope stake and earthwork computations. Field astronomy,
state plane coordinates, boundary control and USPLS surveys. 3(1-4) S


GRY 377 Legal Aspects of Boundary Surveying

Prerequisite: GRY 375. The legal principles of surveying: Missouri surveying
law, Boundary Control, and the role of the surveyor within the judicial
frame work of the court system. 3(3-0) F
GRY 379 Surveying Computations

Prerequisite: GRY 375. Computations in horizontal control networks,
projections including Universal Transverse Mercator and State Plane
Coordinates, Practical Astronomy, and Global Positioning Systems. 3(3-0) S


GRY 470 Field Study in Geography

Prerequisite: GRY 363 and GRY 367 and permission. Methods and
techniques for collecting and processing field data in Geography. During
the course, students will research, collect and analyze data. The research
focuses on a geography issue or issues affecting a geographical location.
Travel to field location is required. Some travel may be outside the United
States. Students should check with the department head at the start of
each academic year to learn about the different field studies scheduled
throughout the year. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. Supplemental course fee.
2(0-4) D


GRY 498 Placement Seminar in Geography, Geospatial Sciences and
Planning

Prerequisite: 90 hours. Readings and discussion of current trends in
geography, geospatial sciences, and planning with consideration given to
future employment. A senior assessment evaluation is included in this
course. 1(1-0) F,S


PLN 574 Open Space and Recreation Planning

Content focuses on planning and design for parks, both active and passive
recreation, and other open space amenities. Open space and recreation
planning will be integrated with land use, economic, social, and
transportation considerations involved in community and regional
planning. Field problem required. May be taught concurrently with PLN
674. Cannot receive credit for both PLN 674 and PLN 574. 3(2-2) S
Geographic Information Sciences

The certificate in Geographic Information Sciences provides an 18 hour
undergraduate level program for students and professionals who desire
credentials in this area.

Admission Requirements: at least a 2.50 Missouri State cumulative GPA
and a minimum of 30 credit hours

Program Requirements (18 hours)

 A. GEO 551(3), 561(3), 566(3), 573(3)
 B. Six additional hours from: GRY 360(3), 363(4), 470(2); GEO 562(3),
570(3), 572(3), 575(3), 578(3)
 C. Attain a 2.75 GPA in required courses


Geology
Bachelor of Arts

 A. GLG 110(4) or both GLG 171(4) and 172(1); GLG 314(5); four hours of
GLG 360(1-3) or 412(4)
 B. Three additional hours of GLG courses numbered 318 or higher.




Geology
Bachelor of Science

 A. GLG 110(4) or both GLG 171(4) and 172(1); GLG 314(5); four hours of
GLG 360(1-3) or 412(4)
 B. Six additional hours of GLG courses numbered 318 or higher.
Planning (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (69-70 hours)
     1. PLN 100(3) or GRY 100(3) or GRY 108(3); PLN 271(3), 367(3),
372(3), 400(3), 570(3), 571(3), 576(4), 599(3); GRY 142(4) or GLG 110(4);
GRY 321(3), 322(3), 363(4); ECO 155(3), SOC 150(3); MTH 340(3) or one of:
AGR 330(3), ECO 308(3), PSY 200(3), QBA 237(3), REC 328(3), SOC 302(3)
     2. Complete one of the following options:
         a. Community and Regional Planning (19 hours)
             1. PLN 572(4); PLS 351(3); SOC 305(3)
             2. Select an additional 9 hours from the following (at least 5
hours to be selected from GRY, GEO, or PLN courses): PLN 505(3), 573(3),
574(3), 596(1-3), 597(1-5), 599(1-3); FIN 266(3); GRY 310(3), 320(3),
348(3), 351(3), 360(3), 410(3), 470(2), 510(3), 525(3), 545(3); GEO 551(3),
561(3), 566(3), 570(3); PLS 255(3), 354(3); ECO 450(3); HST 515(3)
         b. Tourism Planning and Development (18 hours)
             1. GRY 310(3), 410(3), 510(3); HRA 340(3); PLN 574(3)
             2. Select an additional 3 hours from the following: PLN 505(3),
572(4), 573(3), 596(1-3), 597(1-5), 599(1-3); GRY 320(3), 324(3), 326(3),
348(3), 351(3), 360(3), 525(3), 545(3); GEO 551(3), 561(3), 566(3), 570(3);
REC 152(3), 390(3), 422(3); HRA 410(3); ECO 540(3); HST 515(3)
 C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
Geography (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (35 hours)
     1. GRY 100(3), 142(4), 363(4), 367(3), 470(2), 498(1)
     2. Complete one of the following: GRY 300(3), 301(3), 305(3)
     3. Related requirements (3 hours): AGR 330(3) or ECO 308(3) or MTH
340(3) or PSY 200(3) or QBA 237(3) or REC 328(3) or SOC 302(3)
     4. Complete 12 additional hours with GRY, GEO, or PLN prefix.
 C. Minor Required (or second major)
 D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees,
Programs and Requirements section of catalog
 E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
Geography (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (38-44 hours)
    1. Core Requirements (17 hours): GRY 100(3), GRY 142(4), 363(4),
367(3), 470(2), 498(1)
    2. Related Requirements (3 hours): AGR 330(3) or ECO 308(3) or MTH
340(3) or PSY 200(3) or QBA 237(3) or REC 328(3) or SOC 302(3)
    3. Complete one of the following options:
         a. Cultural and Regional Geography (18 hours)
             1. Complete one of the following: GRY 300(3), 301(3), 305(3)
             2. Complete one of the following: GRY 320(3), 321(3), 322(3),
323(3)
             3. Complete 12 additional hours with GRY, GEO or PLN prefix
         b. Environmental and Natural Resources (22 hours)
             1. GRY 135(4), 348(3), 351(3), 535(3); GEO 561(3)
             2. Complete one of the following: GRY 300(3), 301(3), 305(3),
320(3), 321(3), 322(3), 323(3)
             3. Complete 3 additional hours with GRY, GEO, or PLN prefix
             4. Recommended supplementary courses: CHM 105(5) or CHM
160(4); AGA 215(3); BIO 122(4); GRY 597(1-5). Students should select a
minor in science, mathematics, agriculture, or an approved personalized
minor.
         c. Geotourism (24 hours)
             1. GRY 308(3), 310(3), 328(3), 410(3), 510(3); HRA 340(3)
             2. Complete one of the following: GRY 318(3), 320(3); PLN
ACC 653 Auditing

Prerequisite: grades of "C" or better in ACC 301 and ACC 302 and ACC 311
and ACC 321 and ACC 341; and admitted to the MACC Program. Kinds of
audits, the duties and obligations of the auditor, principles and procedures
to be followed in conducting an audit. A grade of "C" or better is required
in this course in order to take ACC 750. This course has a required
assessment component. May be taught concurrently with ACC 553. Cannot
receive credit for both ACC 553 and ACC 653. 3(3-0), F,S
ACC 790 Seminar in Accounting

Prerequisite: 12 graduate credit hours of accounting courses; and
admitted to MACC program. Critical evaluation and interpretation of the
current research and professional literature in accounting. Study of ethical
and institutional features of the accounting environment. Completion of a
significant research project. 3(3-0), D


N/A
N/A




N/A
N/A




ENG 679 Writing for the Web

Explores the professional writer's role in creating web pages and sites
designed to deliver information. Topics include planning, user analysis,
organization, structure, content development, writing style, and user
testing. May be taught concurrently with ENG 573. Cannot receive credit
for both ENG 573 and ENG 679. 3(3-0) F




ENG 694 Technical Writing Internship

Projects in technical writing, combining academic training and supervised
work experience in business and industry. Students are required to work a
minimum of 135 hours. May be taught concurrently with ENG 574. Cannot
receive credit for both ENG 574 and ENG 694. 3(3-0) F,S
ENG 773 Writing for the Computer Industry

Study and practice in developing readable computer system
documentation; includes formatting, graphic design, text organization,
user testing. 3(3-0), S




N/A




MKT 750 Supply Chain Management Seminar

Prerequisite: MKT 730 or BUS 610. This course emphasizes the adoption of
a supply chain orientation toward business and the need for more
effective inter-firm relationships and operational processes. The course
incorporates analyses of comprehensive cases involving strategic and
tactical decisions throughout product and service supply chains in a
domestic and global environment. 3(3-0),
S

MKT 770 Seminar in Marketing Research

Prerequisite: 12 graduate hours in business administration and economics
including MKT 772. Designed to enable students through first-hand
experience to understand the various parts of research papers, methods of
gathering data, appropriate tests of information, and interpretation of
findings, including implications for further study. 3(3-0) F
GRM 635 Advanced German Composition and Conversation

A study of German grammar, style and modes of expression. Designed to
further develop the mastery of spoken and written German. May be
taught concurrently with GRM 535. Cannot receive credit for both GRM
535 and GRM 635. 3(3-0), D


TCM 603 Project Risk Analysis

Prerequisite: TCM 701. In-depth analysis of the types of risks that threaten
projects at each stage of development. Strategies used to recognize risks,
assess probabilities and potential impacts, steps to respond to project
risks. Tools used to analyze and plan for managing project risk. May be
taught concurrently with TCM 503. Cannot receive credit for both TCM
603 and TCM 503. 3(3-0) D




TCM 611 Product Design and Development

Prerequisite: TCM 701. An overview of the product development process
from concept generation to design in an entrepreneurial environment. The
perspectives of marketing, design and manufacturing are blended into a
single approach to product development. Provides students with an
appreciation for the realities of industrial practice and for the complex and
essential roles played by the various members of product development
teams. May be taught concurrently with TCM 511. Cannot receive credit
for both TCM 611 and TCM 511. 3(3-0), D
TCM 645 Project Control Systems

Prerequisite: TCM 359; and admission to an TCM program, or permission
of Project Management graduate coordinator. Advanced application of
microcomputers with an emphasis on their use in project control. Topics
include project control planning and objectives, change control processes,
project documentation and communication, project progress/variance
reports, payment requisitions, project closure activities, and project
lessons learned systems. May be taught concurrently with TCM 545.
Cannot receive credit for both TCM 645 and TCM 545. 3(3-0), Su




TCM 651 Cost Analysis for Project Management

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management graduate coordinator.
The use of cost analysis as a decision-making tool in the context of project
management. Topics include the time value of money, analysis of
alternatives, decision-making under risk, estimating, cost accounting, and
capital budgeting. May be taught concurrently with TCM 551. Cannot
receive credit for both TCM 651 and TCM 551. 3(3-0), S




TCM 701 Project Management

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management graduate coordinator.
This course provides a comprehensive overview of project management.
The culture, principles, and basic techniques of project management are
addressed using the project lifecycle as the primary organizational
guideline. The project management functions of planning, organizing,
motivating and controlling with an emphasis on the application to business
and technology are explained. Basic tools of project management such as
work breakdown structure, scheduling, contracting, earned value analysis,
and risk management are explained and demonstrated. 3(3-0), F,S
TCM 710 Project Leadership

Prerequisite; permission of Project Management graduate coordinator. A
practical and relevant course that focuses on the people skills needed to
manage a project successfully. Prepares students to handle project
problems related to communication, motivation, performance, behavior,
and crisis. Students analyze real life scenarios and develop solutions that
are supported by the latest research to develop skills necessary for strong,
effective project leadership. 3(3-0), F




TCM 726 Seminar in Project Management

Prerequisite: 9 graduate hours; and permission of Project Management
graduate coordinator. Presentation and discussion of professional or
technical problems in the organization and management of projects.
Students are expected to demonstrate the ability to apply the knowledge
and experience gained in their program of study to the critical evaluation
and analysis of the theory, research and practice of project management.
3(3-0), D




TCM 740 Management of Innovation and Technology

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management graduate coordinator.
Focuses on the strategic management of technology and innovation in
organizations. Builds primarily on broad models of technological evolution
and organizational change. Students analyze crucial organizational
innovation and technology issues and identify concrete managerial actions
to address innovation and technology problems and opportunities. May be
taught concurrently with TCM 458. 3(3-0), D
TCM 750 Advanced Project Management

Prerequisite: TCM 701; and one other TCM graduate level course; and
permission of Project Management graduate coordinator. Builds upon the
foundation of prerequisite courses by discussing advanced problems
encountered in the discipline of project management in a seminar format.
Practical examination of projects using the criteria of project excellence
and project management maturity models. Students are expected to
demonstrate the ability to apply the knowledge and experience gained in
their program of study to the critical evaluation and analysis of the theory,
research and practice of project management. 3(3-0), S




TCM 760 Special Investigations

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management graduate coordinator.
The student in consultation with the advisor selects for in-depth study an
area determined by the interest and background of the students. Based on
demand and timeliness of the subject a cluster study group may engage in
a joint investigation. May be repeated to a total of 5 hours. 1-5, D


TCM 792 Graduate Internship

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management graduate coordinator.
Educational experience in cooperation with student's full-time employer.
Written, oral, and classroom assignments related to workplace
improvement. May be repeated, but no more than 6 hours may be
counted as credit toward a Master's degree. 3(3-0), F,S,Su




TCM 798 Research

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management graduate coordinator.
Supervised research in technology. May be repeated, but not more than 3
hours may be counted toward a Master's degree. Graded Pass/Not Pass
only. 1-3, F,S,Su


TCM 799 Thesis

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management graduate coordinator.
Preparation of a thesis. May be repeated, but no more than 3 hours may
be counted as credit toward a Master's degree. Graded Pass/Not Pass
only. 1-3, F,S,Su
Project Management Certificate Program
R. Neal Callahan, Program Director
Kemper Hall, Room 104B; Phone (417) 836-5160
NealCallahan@missouristate.edu

Program Description
The Certificate for Project Management provides a 12 hour graduate-level
experience with application in such diverse industries and organizations as
defense, construction, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, banking, hospitals,
accounting, advertising, law, state and local governments. The certificate
is designed to meet the needs of individuals who are established in careers
and are seeking professional growth and advancement within their
professions. The project management approach adapts special
management techniques with the purpose of obtaining better control and
use of existing resources.

Entrance Criteria
To be considered for the program, a student must apply and be admitted
to the Graduate College.

Required Courses
Course Code Course Title Credits
TCM 701 Project Management 3 hrs
TCM 750 Advanced Project Management 3 hrs
Plus two of the following:
TCM 611 Product Design and Development 3 hrs
TCM 645 Project Control Systems 3 hrs
TCM101 Biological Concepts
BIO 651 Cost Analysis for Project Management 3 hrs

Lecture portion only of BIO 102. Does not count for general education
credit for students whom enter under the fall 1997 catalog or later. Does
not count for credit towards a major or minor in biology. Students receive
credit towards graduation for only one of BIO 100, 101, or 102. 3(3-0) F,S
ENG 221 Writing II: Writing for the Professions

Prerequisite: 30 hours and ENG 110 or equivalent. General Education
Course (Basic Required Courses). Practice in a variety of writing situations
encountered by professionals: correspondence, proposals, documented
research reports, abstracts, definitions, product and process descriptions.
Emphasis on developing skills in audience analysis, analytical reading,
critical thinking, research methods, and clear writing. 3(3-0) F,S




ENG 321 Writing II Beginning Technical Writing

Prerequisite: 45 hours and ENG 110 or equivalent. General Education
Course (Basic Required Courses). Practice in application letters, résumés,
brochures, instructions, graphic illustrations, collaborative writing, and
ethical considerations. Students complete a manual or other professional
document. Emphasis on presenting information clearly and concisely, in
both prose and visuals. 3(3-0) F,S




  A. GST 170(3) or PSY 355(3) or PSY 356(3) or SOC 290(3)
  B. Complete 15 hours from the following areas with at least three hours
from each area and no more than six hours from each discipline (course
prefix):
      1. Arts and Letters: ART 378(3); COM 307(3); ENG 380(3), 580(3)
      2. Humanities and Public Affairs: CRM 410(3); ECO 315(3) or GST
315(3); GST 326(3), 400(3); HST 324(3), 321(3), 323(3); PHI 319(3); PLS
319(3), 517(3); REL 370(3); SOC 290(3), 326(3)
      3. Health and Human Services: FCS 300(3); GER 320(3); NUR 327(3);
PED 402(3), 405(3); PSY 307(3), 355(3), 356(3); SWK 320(3)
  C. Attain a minimum GPA of 2.50 in all courses counted toward the
minor.
LIS 101 Introduction to the Library 1(1-0) F,S

Introduces the concept of information in its various forms, decribes
libraries as information storage and retrieval centers, and prepares
students to successfully identify, locate, and use information.




Agriculture Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades 9-12)
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
Specific General Education Requirements: BIO 102(4); CHM 105(5) or
160(4); MTH 135(3) or 138(5); PSY 121(3)
B.Major Requirements
1.AGS 101(4); AGA 105(3), 215(3); AGB 144(4), 334 (3); AGH 303(3); AGE
337(3); AGW 143(3)
2.AGE 318(2), 568(3), 578(2), 588(2)
3.Area of Specialization: Students must select a minimum of 20 hours of
Agriculture courses to complete 45 hours of Technical Agriculture required
by the State Department of Education. These courses must consist of any
agriculture course not required as a major or Professional Education
requirement.
C.Professional Education courses: AGE 558(3), 493(5-6), 494(5-6); and the
Professional Education Required Core and Competencies - see Teacher
Certification, Teacher Education Program and Secondary Education
Requirements section of catalog
D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
E.In order to meet Missouri state teacher certification requirements,
candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree are required to
meet the following grade point average requirements: at least a 2.50 GPA
B. Major Requirements (60 hours)
  2. Art History (9 hours): ART 272(3) or 273(3), and 480(3) or 484(3)
Art History
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Non-Certifiable)
A.ART 271(3), 272(3), 273(3) and 274(3)
B.Additional 9 hours art history electives should be chosen with
advisement by an art history faculty member to bring the total number of
hours in Art and Design to no fewer than 21.




N/A




N/A
Secondary Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades 9-12 and K-12)
All students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program and to
Supervised Teaching in order to earn this degree. See application
procedures at the beginning of this section of catalog.

In order to meet Missouri state teacher certification requirements,
candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree are required to
meet the following grade point average requirements: at least a 2.50 GPA
on all course work attempted at all colleges attended; at least a 2.50 GPA
in the certificate subject area (major field of study in Social Science
requires a 2.75 GPA) which includes all courses listed under C; at least a
2.50 GPA in any additional certificate subject area; at least a 2.50 GPA in
the professional education courses; and no grade lower than a “C” in all
professional education courses. All GPA requirements include both
Missouri State and transfer grades. Additional State Board of Education
certification rules require passing scores on all portions of the College
Basic Academic Subject Examination (C-BASE) and successful completion of
the appropriate Praxis II Examination Specialty Area Test with a score
equal to Missouri’s qualifying score.

The curriculum for secondary teaching leads to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Education and carries with it an initial professional certificate
(PCI) to teach in the state of Missouri.

A.General Education Requirements - see “General Education Program"
section of catalog (43-51 hours)
N/A
CFD 365 Families in Later Life


Prerequisite: CFD 155 or CFD 163 or 45 hours. Examination of the
structure and function of families in later life. Topics of interest include
demographic trends impacting the structure of the family, marriage,
sibling relations, parent-adult child relations, grandparenthood,
widowhood, and retirement. The application of family theories and their
relevance to later life families will be discussed. Identical with GER 365,
PSY 366 and SWK 365. Can only receive credit for one of following: CFD
365, GER 365, PSY 366 or SWK 365. 3(3-0) F




D.Professional Education (54 hours): NOTE: A grade of "C" or better in
each course is required for state certification.
1.Foundations of Teaching: EDC 150(1), 350(3); ELE 302(3); SPE 310(3)
2.Teaching Methods: IMT 365(3); ECE 301(3), 302(2), 303(3), 304(1),
401(3), 402(2); CFD 455(4); ENG 334(3); RDG 318(3); 420(3), 421(2)
3.Clinical Experiences: choose 2 of the following 3 courses: ECE 490(6),
491(6), or 492(6)




N/A
N/A




N/A




PED 370 Content and Materials in Safety Education


General safety education in the instruction program of elementary and
secondary schools; accident causes and remedial action. 3(3-0) D




PED 371 Driver Education


Prerequisite: valid operator's license and 60 credit hours. Prepares student
to teach driver education in secondary school. Methods, lesson planning,
psychophysical testing and driver education materials presented. Each
student instructs one individual to operate an automobile. 4(3-2) D
PED 372 Problems in Driver Education and Traffic Safety


Prerequisite: PED 371. Acquaints the prospective driver education teacher
with problems of automotive and traffic safety. 3(3-0) D




PED 373 Multiple Car Driving Ranges Simulation


Prerequisite: PED 371. Design and use of multiple car driving ranges.
Simulation involving electro-mechanical devices and programmed films to
reproduce situations which occur in the actual driving environment. 2(2-0)
D




Missouri State Teacher Certification
Driver Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades 9-12, additional endorsement only)
Students who complete the Bachelor of Science in Education degree with a
major in Secondary Education may receive Missouri state certification in
Driver Education grades 9-12 by completing the following courses: ATC
222(2) or PED 253(2); PED 370(3), 371(4), 372(3); PSY 390(3) or 441(3);
electives from PED 373(2), 499(1-5); CRM 210(3); IMT 365(3) or 565(2);
SFR 442(2) or 547(2) or PSY 535(3); IDM 455(3) to bring total to no fewer
than 21 hours. In order to meet Missouri State teacher certification
requirements, all candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education
degree must have at least a 2.50 GPA (Missouri State and transfer grades
combined) in the certificate subject area which includes all courses listed
above.
N/A




N/A




GRM 535 Advanced German Composition and Conversation

Prerequisite: GRM 311 and GRM 312. A study of German grammar, style
and modes of expression. Designed to further develop the mastery of
spoken and written German. May be taught concurrently with GRM 635.
Cannot receive credit for both GRM 635 and GRM 535. 3(3-0) D




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Complete NEW Catalog Description




N/A




AGA 215 Soils

Recommended Prerequisite: CHM 105 or 160 or 107 or 160. Physical,
chemical and biological activities within the soil as related to moisture,
temperature, drainage, and tillage. 3(2-2) F,S

AGN 335 Soil Conservation and Water Management

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 103 or AGN 115 or AGN 215. The history
and policies surrounding management of soil and water resources will be
considered, but the majority of time will be used addressing the processes of
erosion and nutrient loss, and the practices used to conserve natural
resources and sustain productivity/function of cropland, pasture, urban, and
wild landscapes. 3(3-0) F,S


N/A




AGP 365 Grain Crops for Food, Feed and Energy

Prerequisite: AGP 103 or AGN 115. Adaptation, production, and utilization of
the major grain crops for human and animal (livestock and wildlife)
consumption and energy production. 3(3-0) F
AGP 375 Forage Crops

Prerequisite: AGP 103 or AGN 115. Adaptation, production, and utilization of
the major forage crops for grazing, hay, and silage production, as well as their
effects on environmental quality and wildlife. 3(3-0) S


AGN 405 Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition

Recommended Prerequisite: AGN 215. Principles of soil fertility, amendments
and factors affecting nutrient availability and plant growth. 3(2-2) S


N/A




N/A




AGP 485 Weed Science

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 103 or AGN 115 or 365 or 375; and either
BIO 102 or BIO 121; and either CHM 105 or CHM 160. Identification,
physiology and impacts of invasive plants and crop weeds and methods for
their control in natural and agroecosystems. 3(2-2) F


AGN 495 Problems in Plant Science and Natural Resources

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Assigned investigations, dealing with
current problems in plant and soil science supervised by an agricultural staff
member. Student prepares outline, investigates sources of information
concerning the subject, and summarizes his findings in a written report. May
be repeated with permission. 1-3 F,S,U
N/A




N/A




AGN 455 Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification II

Prerequisite: Recommended: AGN 215. Pedogenetic processes that are
responsible for genesis, morphology, and classification of the twelve orders
of soil taxonomy will be covered along with interpretation of water
relationships, site characteristics, soil classification and land use. May be
taught concurrently with AGA 655. Cannot receive credit for both AGN 655
and AGN 555. 3(2-2) D

AGA 575 Plant Breeding and Genetics

Prerequisite: Recommended: AGP 103 or AGN 115. Application of genetic
principles to the improvement of crop plants. Includes self-pollinated, cross-
pollinated, and asexually-propagated crops. May be taught concurrently with
AGA 675. Cannot receive credit for both AGP 675 and 575. 2(2-0) S


AGP 121 Introduction to Wine

An introduction to wine in the modern world. History, classification,
production and the geography of wine. The basics of wine appreciation will
also be examined. 2(2-0) S
N/A




AGP 300 Wine Appreciation for Consumers

Must be 21 years of age or older. Students participate in a series of tastings
designed to introduce them to the major wine types and the range of styles
within those types. Tests and other materials will be available online.
supplemental course fee required. S,D

N/A




N/A




N/A
AGP 496 Independent Study in Fruit Science

The student, with the approval of the instructor, conducts an in-depth
literature review and writes a paper on a subject within the area of fruit
production, fruit processing, or fruit marketing. May be repeated for a total
of 3 credit hours. 1-3 D

N/A




N/A




AGP 103 Plant Science

An introduction to the fascinating world of plant science and plant physiology
including the areas of food and ornamental crops and sustainable agriculture.
3(3-0) F


N/A




AGP 303 Suburban Horticulture

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 103 or AGN 115 or BIO 102 or BIO 121.
Horticultural concepts and their application to the growth and maintenance
of fruit, vegetables and ornamentals common to most homes. Will not count
toward Horticulture major or minor. 3(3-0)S
N/A




AGP 325 Herbaceous Plants

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 103 or AGN 115 or BIO 102 or BIO 121.
Nomenclature, identification, characteristics and cultural requirements of
indoor and outdoor herbaceous ornamental plants. 3(2-2) F


AGP 333 Landscape Design

Theory and practice of landscaping including elementary design. 3(2-2) F,S


AGP 343 Vegetable Production

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 103 or AGN 115 or BIO 102 or BIO 121.
Methods and practices of home and commercial vegetable production with
an emphasis on using environmentally-friendly production and maintenance
techniques to optimize yield and quality of vegetables. The purpose of this
course is to familiarize students with the basic practices required to
successfully produce a wide variety of vegetables. 3(3-0) S


AGP 353 Turf Science

Recommended Prerequisite:AGP 103 or BIO 102 or BIO 121. A scientific
approach to the physiology of turfgrass in response to the environment, and
the selection, establishment, maintenance and pest management relevant to
utility, lawn and sports turf. 3(3-0) S


AGP 363 Landscape Plants

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 103 or BIO 102 or BIO 121. Identification,
classification and adaptation of common trees, shrubs and groundcovers used
for landscape purposes. 3(2-2) F
AGP 393 Fruit Production

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 103, BIO 102 or BIO 121. The culture and
management of tree fruit, grapes, strawberries and other small fruit. Nuts,
tropical and subtropical fruits, sustainable management, and production
technology are also addressed. 3(3-0) S


AGP 403 Nursery Management

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 363 or BIO 334 or BIO 339. General
principles and practices involved in the commercial production, management,
and marketing of landscape plants. Field trips required. 3(2-2) F,O


AGP 443 Greenhouse Management

Prerequisite: AGP 103. Factors involved in site selection, construction, and
management of greenhouses and high tunnels, and of floriculture crops.
Sustainable production methods are emphasized. Supplemental course fee.
3(2-2) S

AGP 453 Crop Physiology

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 103 or BIO 102; 3 hours additional AGP or
BIO plant courses. General, stress-related and post-harvest physiology of
horticulture and agronomic crops in relationship to their environments. 3(3-
0) SE

AGP 483 Plant Pathology

Recommended Prerequisite: 9 hours of plant science. Diseases and
physiological disorders of fruit, vegetables, agronomic crops and ornamental
plants. Emphasis is placed on the interactions between plants and pathogenic
organisms, on environmental factors that cause plant diseases, and on
disease control methods that reduce or eliminate the need for chemical
applications. Students will gain insight into the techniques to manage plant
diseases, and the impact plant diseases have on humans and the
environment. 3(2-2) F
N/A




AGP 573 Plant Propagation

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 103 or BIO 102 or 121 and either CHM 105
or 106 or 107 or 160. Practices employed by fruit and ornamental plant
producers in propagation of plants, including seeds, cuttings, layerings,
grafting and micropropagation. Supplemental course fee. May be taught
concurrently with AGP 643. Cannot receive credit for both AGP 643 and AGP
573. 3(2-2) S

AGS 311 Feeds and Feeding

Recommended Prerequisite: AGS 101, AGS 310 and MTH 130 or higher. Feed
composition and formulation of livestock rations. 3(3-0) F,S


N/A




AGN 143 Introductory Forestry

Introduction to field of forestry. In addition to traditional topics of species
identification, biology and timber management, this course examines the
sociological, environmental, political and industrial influences on domestic
and international management of forest resources. 3(3-0) F,S


AGN 351 Game Bird Production

Production and management of quail, pheasants and other game birds.
Supplemental course fee. 2(1-2) F
N/A




AGP 513 Insects Affecting Horticultural and Forestry Crops

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Identification, life histories and control
methods of insects affecting gardens, ornamental plants, orchards and
forests. May be taught concurrently with AGN 613. Cannot receive credit for
both AGP 613 and AGP 513. 3(1-4) F


AGN 115 Sustainable Agriculture and the Environment

This course examines the practices of agro-ecology: the interface of
management, biology, and the environment in our effort to produce food,
feed, and fiber for a rapidly growing human population. Consequences of
historical and current practices, as well as strengths and weaknesses of
alternative practices that attempt to emply more knowledge of biology and
ecology, will also be evaluated. 3(3-0) S




AGN 465 Environmental Soil Science

Techniques in gathering onsite soil and other field data to develop reports for
nutrient and pest management plans, soil evaluations for home sewage
disposal systems, Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plans, log soil pits by
Unified Soil Classification for pond site investigations, and use soil survey
information for crop production and conservation planning, as well as how
soil survey information is used to make Highly Erodible Land and Wetland
determinations. 3(2-2).
AGP 104 Plant Science Laboratory

Prerequisite: AGP 103 or concurrent enrollment or instructor permission.
Provides opportunities for "hands-on" application of concepts of plant
science through the use of basic plant science research and production
practices. 1(0-2) F
AGP 433 Advanced Landscape Design

Prerequisites: AGP 333 and AGP 325 or AGP 363. Concepts and development
of sustainable landscapes for residential, commercial and governmental land,
including rain gardens, green roofs, riparian buffer zones, prairies and
wetlands, plus more in-depth coverage of specializes landscape areas such as
water gadens and Japanese-style gardens. Training in use of landscape design
2D/3D software is included. 2(2-0) F

AGR 301 Agriculture Transfer Student Orientation

An integrative experience which addresses public affairs issues and individual
choices promoting academic success for first semester School of Agriculture
transfer students. Required of all sophomore, junior, and senior transfer
students during their first two semesters at Missouri State who have not
taken GEP 100 or 110. 1(1-0) F, S
ANS 310 Animal Nutrition

Recommended Prequisites: AGS 101 and CHM 105 or 106 or 107 or 160. Key
topics include the basic fundamentals of nutrition and comparative nutrition
of farm animals. Anatomy and physioloy of the digestive system and basic
metabolism will also be covered along with the characteristics, digestion and
functions of the basic nutrients. 3(3-0) F
Agricultural Business (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science
A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
Specific General Education Requirements: CHM 105(5) or 106(4) or 107(4) or
160(4); MTH 135(3) or MTH 138(5) or higher; PSY 121(3), GEP 101(2) or
110(2) or AGR 301(1); AGR 499(0)
B. Major Requirements (58-65 hours)
1. AGN 115(3) or AGP 103(3); AGN 215(3); AGB 144(4), AGB 314(3) or LAW
231(3); AGB 334(3), 354(2), 364(2), 374(3), 394(1), 494(1); AGB 514(3) or ECO
565(3) or MKT 474(3); AGB 524(3); AGB 444(2) or AGR 499(2); AGR 330(3) or
QBA 237(3); AGR 490(1); ACC 201(3)
2. Complete one course from: COM 315(3); MGT 286 (3); AGB 384(2)
3. Complete one of the following options:
a. Agricultural Enterprise Management (18 hours):
1. AGB 344(3) or 584(3); MGT 384(3)
2. Complete 12 hours from one of the following groups:
a. Animal Science: AGS 101(4), 161(3), 301(3), 302(3), 306(3), 310(3) or
311(3), 316(3), 342(2), 346(2), 361(3), 402(2), 432(2), 442(2), 446(3), 451(3),
452(3), 461(3), 511(3); AGA 365(3) or 375(3)
b. Natural Resources: AGN 335(3), AGP 485(3)
c. Environmental Plant Science: AGP 303(3), 333(3), 343(3), 353(3), 363(3),
365(3), 375(3), 393(3), 403(3), 443(3), 483(3), 573(3), 575(2)
b. Agricultural Finance and Management (22 hours):
1. ACC 211(3); AGB 344(3), 584(3); AGS 101(4)
2. Complete two courses from: ACC 311(3); ECO 305(3); FIN 266(3), 380(3),
485(3); INS 211(3), 415(3); MGT 340(3), 345(3);
3. Complete one course from: AGN 335(3); AGP 303(3), 353(3), 483(3); AGN
Natural Resources (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog Specific General Education Requirements:
BIO 102(4) or 121(4); CHM 105(5) or 106(4) or 107(4) or 160(4); GEP 499;
GLG 110(4), GRY 135(4) or 142(4); MTH 130(3) or higher; GEP 101(2) or
110(2) or AGR 301(1); AGR 499(0)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. AGN 115(3), 215(3), 335(3), 405(3), 465(3); AGB 144(4); AGR 300(3),
490(1), 499(3); AGS 101(4)
      2. Select one course from: AGP 343(3), 353(3), 365(3), 375(3), 393(3)
      3. Select one course from: AGB 314(3) or 354(2)
      4. Core pest management requirements: AGR 383(3), 483(3), 485(3)
      5. Select 6 hours from: AGP 103(3), AGN 143(3), AGP 453(3), AGB
394(1), 494(1), GRY 360(3), GRY 363(4)
  C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate
Degree Requirements section of catalog




Animal Science (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
   Specific General Education Requirements: BIO 102(4) or 121(4); CHM
105(5) 106(4) or 107(4) or 160(4); MTH 130(3) or higher; GEP 101(2) or
110(2) or AGR 301(1); AGR 499(0)
 B. Major Requirements
     1. AGS 101(4), 301(3), 302(3), 310(3), 311(3), 316(3), 491(1); AGP 103(3)
or AGN 115(3); AGN 215(3), AGP 365(3) or 375(3); AGB 144(4); AGR 300(3),
AGR 490(1).
     2. Select a minimum of 24 hours from the following two groups of
courses including at least eight hours from each group:
         a. Group A courses: AGR 399(1-5), AGS 161(3), 162(1), 191(2), 196(2),
262(1), 306(3), 342(2), 346(2), 361(3), 362(3), 402(3), 432(2), 442(2), 446(3),
451(3), 452(3), 461(3), 492(1-4), 511(3)
         b. Group B courses: AGR 250(2), 377(3), 383(3), 399(1-3), 499(3);
AGB 314(3), 334(3), 344(3), 364(2), 384(2), 394(1), 494(1), 524(3), 584(3);
AGN 215(3), 335(3), 405(3)
 C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate
Degree Requirements section of catalog
General Agriculture (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
    Specific General Education Requirements: AGR 100(3); BIO 102(4) or
121(4); CHM 105(5) or 106(4) or 107(4) or 10(4); MTH 130(3) or higher; PSY
121(3); GEP 101(2) or 110(2) or AGR 301(1); AGR 499(0)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. AGS 101(4); AGN 115(3) or AGP 103(3); AGN 215(3); AGB 144(4), AGR
157(3); AGR 300(3) or CHM 200(5)
      2. Complete 3 additional hours from each of the following areas:
Agriculture Business, Animal Science, Environmental Plant Science
      3. Complete one of the following options:
          a. Agricultural Communications (27-29 hours):
              1. COM 209(3) or MED 120(3), JRN 270(3), AGR 250(2) or 499 (3-
5); or AGB 394(1)
              2. Select an additional 16 hours of courses with ENG, MED, COM,
or JRN prefixes in consultation with your advisor.
          b. Agricultural (27-29 hours):
              1. AGB 314(3) or AGR 250(2) or AGR 499(3-5)
              2. Select 6 additional hours of Agriculture courses from each of
the following areas: Agricultural Business, Natural Resources, Animal Science,
Environmental Plant Science
  General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate
Degree Requirements section of catalog


General Agriculture
Bachelor of Applied Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements
     1. Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science degree from an
accredited institution. Contact the department for details.
     2. AGP 103(3) or AGN 115(3); AGN 215(3); AGB 144(4); AGR 157(3); AGR
301(1); AGS 101(4); AGR 499(0)
     3. Thirty-five credit hours of upper-division courses in agriculture
 C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate
Degree Requirements section of catalog
Environmental Plant Science (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog.
Specific General Education Requirements: BIO 102(4) or 121(4); CHM 105(5)
or 106(4) or CHM 107(4) or 160(4); GEP 499(0); MTH 130(3) or higher; GEP
101(2) or 110(2) or AGR 301(1); AGR 499(0)
  B. Core Requirements: AGP 103(3), AGN 115(3), 215(3), 405(3), AGP 453(3);
AGB 144(4) or ECO 155(3) and 163(3); AGR 300(3), AGR 490(1), AGR 499(3)
  C. Core Pest Management Requirements: AGP 483(3), AGP 485(3); AGR
385(3)
  D. Major Requirements:
      1. Complete on of the following options:
            a. Horticulture (21-22 hours)
                   i. AGP 104(1), 325(3), 343(3), 363(3), 393(3), 573(3)
                  ii. Horticulture Electives: Select two courses from the
following: AGN 143(3), AGP 333(3), 353(3), 403(3), 433(2), 443(3), TCM
110(3) or foreign language course 300 level or above.
            b. Crop Science: (23-26 hours)
                   i. AGB 144(4); AGN 335(3), AGN 465(3)
                  ii. Crop Production courses: Select two course from the
following: AGP 343(3), 365(3), 375(3), 393(3)
                 iii. Crop Science Electives: Select 3 courses from the following:
AGS 101(4), AGN 143(3), AGS 311(3), GRY 360(3), 363(4), or additional AGP
course(s) 300 level or above
      2. Complete one of the emphasis areas below:
            a. Business Emphasis: (11-13 hours)
Wildlife Conservation and Management (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

This major is offered in cooperation with the Biology Department.

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog.
Specific General Education Requirements: BIO 121(4); CHM 105(5) or 106(4)
or 107(4) or 160(4); GLG 110(4); GRY 100(3); MTH 130(3) or higher; GEP
101(2) or GEP 110(2) or AGR 301(1); AGR 499(0)
  B. Major Requirements
      1. Agriculture Requirements:
          a. AGN 115(3) or AGP 115(3); AGN 215(3), 335(3); AGN 143(3); AGP
365(3) or 375(3); AGR 383(3); AGR 490(1)
          b. Select two courses (4-6 hours) from: AGB 354(2); AGR 333(3), AGP
483(3), 485(3); AGN 351(2)
      2. Biology Requirements:
          a. BIO 121(4)*, 122(4)*, 334(3), 339(2) or 545(2), 373(3)
          b. Select one course from: BIO 369(4), 436(4), 562(4)
          c. Select two courses from: BIO 573(3), 575(3), 577(3)
            *Students who have prior credit for BIO 134 and 167 combination
are not required to take BIO 121 and 122; BIO 121 and 122 cannot count as
degree credit if BIO 134 and 167 are counted as credit.
      3. Select ten additional hours in Agriculture and/or Biology
  C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate
Degree Requirements section of catalog

GRY 135 Principles of Weather and Climate
General Education Course (Natural World). An introductory survey of the
earth's weather and climate. A description of the physical processes of the
atmosphere is followed by a survey of the world's varied climatic regions. The
laboratory involves the preparation and interpretation of meteorological data
and the classification of climates. 4(3-2) F,S




GRY 108 Principles of Sustainability
General Education Course (Culture and Society/Social Sciences Perspective).
Multidisciplinary problem study of population pressures, environmental
degradation and socio-political perils and opportunities, through an
integrated approch by a staff drawn chiefly from the natural and social
sciences. 3(3-0) F,S
ART 331 Computer Animation 111

Prerequisite: ART 330 and permission of the instructor. Priority will be given
to those students who have successfully completed the Computer Animation
Emphasis Candidacy Review for the BFA in Art or the BS in Electronic Arts.
Further exploration of visual expression in animation. Advanced techniques in
animating within the digital 3D environment. 3(0-6) F
B. Major Requirements (39 hours)

  1. Core Courses (18 hours): ART 271(3), 272(3), 273(3), 274(3), ART 492(3);
and any 100 or 200 level studio course (3)
  2. In consultation with an advisor, complete 21 hours in at least four of the
following areas of art history:
      a. Area 1: ART 472(3), 474(3)
      b. Area 11: ART 475(3), 478(3)
      c. Area 111: ART 381(3), 479(3), 480(3), 482(3), 484(3)
      d. Area 1V: ART 374(3), 382(3)
      e. Area V: ART 385(3), 485(3)
       f. Area V1: ART 386(3)
       g. Area V11: ART 378(3), ART 377(3), ART 387(3)
         With advisor's approval, ART 496(3), Special Topics in Art History, may
substitute for a course in one of the areas.




Art History
Bachelor of Science

 A. ART 271(3) or 272(3); and ART 273(3) or 274(3)
 B. Additional 15 hours art history electives should be chosen with
advisement by an art history faculty member to bring the total number of
hours in Art History to no fewer than 21. Note: Students may not use both
ART 480(3) and 484(3) to fulfill the 9 hours of electives.
MED 355 Social Media

Prerequisite: MED 120. An overview of how social media are changing the
ways we communicate, collaborate and create through digital media.
Students will examine the historical, theoretical and practical implications of
social media on human communication through a series of critical readings,
media presentations and practical encounters with social networking. 3(3-0) D




MED 365 Digital Film and Media Production

Prerequisite: MED 120 required for MJF majors only. A study of visual
aesthetics and production techniques used in film and video. Students will
learn image, motion design, sound, and nonlinear concepts that will be
reinforced through video production exercises. 3(2-2) F,S




DAN 180 Introduction to the Dance

General Education Course (Self-Understanding/Creativity and Vision
Perspective). Survey of dance from a historical retrospective through the
creative process. Emphasis will be placed on historic, multi-cultural and
societal influences on dance. The approach will be from the viewpoint of the
audience to help heighten awareness of and increase critical thinking in
relationship to the artistic experience. Buying tickets to and attendance at
local productions required. 3(3-0) F,S




THE 511 Structures and Styles Shakespeare

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Understanding text, style, and
dynamics of action in Shakespeare. Creating roles in Shakespeare's plays. 3(2-
2) F
Theatre
Bachelor of Fine Arts

Admission Requirements: In addition to the University’s admission
requirements, students must be officially accepted into the BFA program
prior to the first semester of coursework in the major. Auditions and/or
interviews for placement in the program are held on campus during the fall
and spring semester of each year. Prospective students should contact the
Department of Theatre and Dance for specific information about the audition
process and dates.

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
    Note: Six hours of the General Education Humanities Requirement may
not be included in the courses fulfilling the major.
  B. Major Requirements (78 hours)
     1. Core Requirements (31 hours)
         a. Design/Technology (10 hours): THE 150(2) and 151(1); 224(1);
choose two groups from THE 250(2) and 251(1), or THE 255(2) and 256(1), or
THE 260(2) and 261(1)
         b. Directing (6 hours): THE 130(3), 430(3)
         c. History (6 hours): THE 541(3), 542(3)
         d. Acting (3 hours): THE 121(3)* or 123(3). *THE 121 is open to
admitted BFA in Theatre/Acting and Musical Theatre majors only.
         e. Electives from approved courses inside or outside the department
(5 hours)
         f. Senior BFA Project: THE 492(1)
     2. Complete one of the following options:
BUS 550 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business

Prerequisite: 60 hours and undergraduate business majors must be admitted
to COBA. A practical, skills-based study of negotiation, mediation, and
arbitration from the business manager's perspective. This hands-on course is
designed to develop the skills necessary to enable the business manager to
effectively participate in negotiation, mediation, and arbitration as
alternatives to litigation for resolving business disputes. Identical with LAW
550. May be taught concurrently with BUS 650. Cannot receive credit for
more than one of BUS 550, BUS 650, LAW 550, or LAW 650. 3(3-0) F,S
LAW 550 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business

Prerequisite: 60 hours and undergraduate business majors must be admitted
to COBA. A practical, skills-based study of negotiation, mediation, and
arbitration from the business manager's perspective. This hands-on course is
designed to develop the skills necessary to enable the business manager to
effectively participate in negotiation, mediation, and arbitration as
alternatives to litigation for resolving business disputes. Identical with BUS
550. May be taught concurrently with LAW 650. Cannot receive credit for
more than one of BUS 550, BUS 650, LAW 550, or LAW 650. 3(3-0) F,S




FMD 210 Computer Applications in the Fashion Industry

Prerequisite: FMD 101 or concurrent enrollment. A study of software tools
commonly used in the fashion industry. Focus is on the use of spreadsheet,
presentation, word processing, publishing, and image processing software.
2(1-2) F,S
FCS 120 Family Health

Current trends in family health care and home nursing care; practice in the
laboratory. Supplemental course fee. 2(1-2) F

FCS 301 Textiles, Apparel, and Fashion

Textiles and apparel course for teachers of Family the Consumer Sciences.
Study of textiles used in apparel, selection and care of apparel, apparel
construction techniques, and cultural, aesthetic, historical, legal and
environmental aspects of textiles, apparel and fashion. (1-4) S


FCS 335 Presentation Techniques

Prerequisite: COM 115 and 60 hours. Planning and presenting techniques for
teaching in the classroom, business, industry, or extension settings. A focus
on professional presentation strategies incorporating the use of multimedia
technology. 2(1-2) S


General Family and Consumer Sciences
Bachelor of Arts

Select 15 hours from: BMS 130(3); CFD 160(3), 163(3); FCS 301; HRA 218; HID
140(3); HRA 321(3)
General Family and Consumer Sciences
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Non-Certifiable)

Select 24 hours from: BMS 130(3); CFD 163(3); FCS 301; HRA 218; HID 140(3);
HRA 321(3), plus additional electives to bring total to at least 24 hours.


Interior Design (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

Admission Requirements: MTH 135
 A. General Education Requirements- see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog Specific General Education Requirements:
      1. Mathematics: MTH 135(3) or higher
      2. Self-Understanding: PSY 121(3)
 B. Major Requirements
      1. ART 100(3), ART 101(3); ACC 201(3); HID 140(3), 201(3), 202(3),
208(3), 240(3), 244(3), 303(3), 304(3), 325(1), 346(3), 405(3), 406(3), 408(3),
424(2), 441(2), 499(4); LAW 231(3); MKT 350(3); TCM 122(3), 221(3), 313(3),
TCM 321(3), TCM 322(3)
 C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements- see General Baccalaureate
Degree Requirements section of catalog.

TCM 221 Construction Drawings

Prerequisite: TCM 121 or TCM 122 or concurrent enrollment. An introduction
to working drawings and specifications commonly encountered in residential
and commercial construction. Designed to develop the student's
understanding of and ability to interpret construction drawings and
specifications. Principles of building design including basic orthographic
drafting, sketching theory and conventions, auxiliaries, sections and
dimensioning. This course will also enhance student's ability to utilize CAD to
access, modify and produce working drawings. 3(2-2) F,S


TCM 303 Facilities Operation and Maintenance

Introduces history and concepts of facility management, with emphasis on
definition of key terms and concepts. Introduction to operations and
maintenance of buildings with an emphasis on techniques utilized to maintain
facilities. 3(2-2) S
TCM 321 Mechanical Systems for Buildings

Prerequisite: TCM 121 or TCM 122; and MTH 135 or higher. This course
addresses the principles and practices of heating, ventilation, cooling,
plumbing and fire protection systems used in residential, commercial and
industrial applications. Emphasis is placed on coordination of design,
applicable codes, estimating, installation, and problem solving. 3(3-0) F


TCM 347 Industrial Equipment and Control

Prerequisite: TCM 322 or TCM 331. Examines industrial power delivery
systems and their control including electrical and mechanical systems.
Laboratory experiences will include an introduction to hydraulics and
pneumatics, motors and motor controls, and programmable logic controllers.
3(2-2), F

TCM 354 Facility Planning

Prerequisite: TCM 313. This course emphasizes the strategic role required of
the facilities manager in providing information for corporate managers and
executives for facility forecasting. 3(3-0) F
Technology Management (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

Admission Requirement: "C" grade or better in MTH 135 or higher

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog Specific General Education Requirements:
     1. Mathematics: MTH 135(3) or higher
     2. Self-Understanding: PSY 121(3) recommended
 B. Major Requirements (60 hours)
     1. TCM 337(3), 350(3), 358(3), 359(3), 455(3), 456(3), 458(3), 494(1),
551(3). Complete one of the following options:
         a. 35 hours of approved technical transfer credit
         b. ACC 201(3); LAW 231(3); TCM 110(3), 303(3), 331(3), 347(3),
355(3), 365(3), 499(2), 511(3), and approved TCM technical electives (6)
 C. Approved Minor Required (or second major)
 D. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate
Degree Requirements section of catalog
BMS 490 Peer Instruction in Biomedical Sciences

Prerequisite: acceptance into Cell and Molecular Biology, Clinical Laboratory
Sciences-Medical Technology, or Dietetics programs; 60 credit hours;
approval of course director. A mentored experience in teaching within the
Biomedical Sciences. Students will serve as undergraduate learning assistants
(ULAs) in a BMS course along with the instructor and teaching assistants.
Students will required to attend an intersession workshop and weekly
sessions for reflection and discussion in addition to their weekly BMS course
assignment. Intended for students interested in developing classroom
leadership skills. 3 credits F,S




PAIE (credit bearing course or options): BMS 490




PSY 557 Forensic Psychology: Child Abuse and the Law

Prerequisite: PSY 121 and 60 hours. Study of the legal issues related to child
abuse and exploitation. Students will gain an understanding of the law
pertaining to child cases and how interactions with children can bolster or
diminish the quality of children's memory report as seen by the judicial
system. The Greene County Prosecutor's Office will participate in the design
of this course, thus the specific legal issues discussed will remain current and
may change based on the needs of the community. May be taught
concurrently with PSY 657. Cannot receive credit for both PSY 557 and PSY
657. 3(3-0) F,S
ECO 325 Industrial Organizations

Prerequisite: ECO 165. Theory and public policy concerning the structure,
conduct and performance of U.S. industries. Primary emphasis is on
oligopolies and monopolies. 3(3-0) S


ECO 450 Urban and Regional Economics

Prerequisite: ECO 155 and ECO 165. Study of economic forces determining
the location of businesses and consumers, and the size, shape, and changes in
market areas/cities/land use. Also application of techniques of economic
impact analysis to location decisions. 3(3-0) F




PAIE (credit bearing course or options): HST 598, 422, 423, 418




PLS 576 Quantitative Methods of Political Science and Public Policy

Prerequisite: PLS 101. Introduction to the use of standard computer
programs (especially SPSS) for the analysis and interpretation of political and
social data. Covers analysis of nominal and ordinal data, descriptive and
inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, correlation, linear and multiple
regression. There will be a critical review of the applications of these
techniques to the analysis of political science and public policy research
questions, including ethical issues associated with quantitative research. May
be taught concurrently with PLS 676. Cannot receive credit for both PLS 676
and PLS 576. 3(3-0) F,S
ANT 545 Cultural Resource Management

Prerequisite: ANT 240, 80 hours, and permission of instructor. An
examination of laws and regulations pertaining to the preservation of
American history and culture and the professional management and
preservation of ethnic, historic, and prehistoric cultural resources. May be
taught concurrently with ANT 645. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 545
and ANT 645. 3(3-0) F

ANT 332 Peoples and Cultures of Africa

An exploration of African societies (especially sub-Saharan), including family
structure, gender relations, social and political organizations, beliefs,
economics, art, oral literature, music, dance, and other aspects of culture. 3(3-
0) D




BIO 370 Invertebrate Zoology

Prerequisite: BIO 121 and BIO 122. Biological principles exemplified by study
of functional morphology, taxonomy and phylogeny of invertebrate phyla.
4(2-4) SO

BIO 574 Aquatic Entomology

Prerequisite: BIO 370 or BIO 371 or AGR 383. Aquatic insects, ecology and
taxonomy with emphasis on field applications. May be taught concurrently
with BIO 674. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 674 and BIO 574. 2(1-3) SE


CHM 201 Essentials of Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: a "C-" grade or better in either CHM 105 or CHM 160. Principles
of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Identical to lecture portion of CHM
200. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 200 and CHM 201. Does not apply
toward a chemistry major or minor if student passes CHM 342. 3(3-0) F,S
CHM 260 Principles of Environmental Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in CHM 105 or CHM 160. An introduction to
chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere, natural waters and soil.
Sources of pollution, effects and remediation strategies are emphasized. 3(3-
0) SE




CHM 376 Inorganic Preparation

Prerequisite: "C-" grades or better in CHM 175 and CHM 375. Synthesis of
inorganic compounds and measurements of physical and chemical properties
of selected inorganic compounds. 2(0-4) S




CHM 452 Biochemistry I

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in either CHM 343 or CHM 344. Recommended
Prerequisite: BIO 121 or BMS 110. Structure and function of biomolecules:
proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, lipids and membranes. 3(3-
0), F




CHM 461 Environmental Chemistry II

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in CHM 302 and CHM 460. Continuation of CHM
460. May be taught concurrently with CHM 761. Cannot receive credit for
both CHM 461 and CHM 761. 3(3-0), S
CHM 462 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in CHM 302 and CHM 460. Techniques and
procedures for environmental monitoring to test natural samples.
Applications and limitations of wet chemical and instrumental methods such
as atomic absorption, gas chromatography, absorption spectrophotometry.
May be taught concurrently with CHM 762. Cannot receive credit for both
CHM 462 and CHM 762. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 462 and CHM
463. 2(0-4), S


CHM 502 Techniques of Instrumental Analysis

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in either CHM 200 or CHM 342; and "C-" or better
in CHM 302. Recommended Prerequisite: PHY 124 or PHY 204. Applications
of instrumental methods for the separation and analysis of materials;
included are potentiometry, photometry and chromatography. Does not
apply to a Chemistry major or minor if the student passes CHM 533. May be
taught concurrently with CHM 602. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 602
and CHM 502. 4(3-3) F


CHM 506 Physical Chemistry I

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in CHM 170; and MTH 280 or MTH 288 or
concurrent enrollment in MTH 280 or MTH 288. Recommended Prerequisite:
PHY 124 or PHY 204. First semester of a two-semester series covering aspects
of quantum mechanics, classical and statistical thermodynamics,
spectroscopy, kinetic theory of gases, and chemical kinetics. A grade of "C-"
or better is required in this course in order to take CHM 507. May not be
taken Pass/Not Pass. May be taught concurrently with CHM 606. Cannot
receive credit for both CHM 606 and CHM 506. 3(3-0) F


CHM 507 Physical Chemistry II

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in CHM 506. Recommended Prerequisite:
CHM 375. Second semester of a two-semester series that builds upon and
completes the topics introduced in CHM 506. May be taught concurrently
with CHM 607. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 607 and CHM 507. 3(3-0) S
CHM 508 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in CHM 302; and "C-" or better in CHM 506 or
CHM 606 or concurrent enrollment in CHM 506 or CHM 606. Experiments in
physical chemistry employing principles and techniques reflecting material
presented in CHM 506. May be taught concurrently with CHM 608. Cannot
receive credit for both CHM 608 and CHM 508. 2(0-4) F




CHM 514 Polymer Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in CHM 343 or CHM 344; and CHM 505 or CHM
605 or CHM 506 or CHM 606. Morphology and chemical structure, polymer
characterization, chemical structure and polymer properties, vinyl and non-
vinyl polymers and mechanism of formation. Inorganic and partially inorganic
polymers. May be taught concurrently with CHM 614. Cannot receive credit
for both CHM 614 and CHM 514. 3(3-0) SE


CHM 533 Advanced Analytical Methods

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in CHM 302. Principles and techniques of modern
instrumental methods used in chemical analysis, with emphasis on the
fundamental physical and chemical theories and principles. Topics covered
include atomic and molecular spectroscopy, electrochemistry, mass
spectrometry, and separations. May be taught concurrently with CHM 633.
Cannot receive credit for both CHM 533 and CHM 633. 4(3-3), F


CHM 542 Advanced Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in CHM 343 or CHM 344. Structure,
reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry and other topics of theoretical nature
in organic and polymer chemistry. May be taught concurrently with CHM 642.
Cannot receive credit for both CHM 542 and CHM 642. 3(3-0), F
CHM 552 Biochemistry II

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in CHM 452. Bioenergetics--Metabolism of
biomolecules including carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides.
Photosynthesis. Nitrogen metabolism. Mechanisms of hormone action. May
be taught concurrently with CHM 652. Cannot receive credit for both CHM
552 and CHM 652. 3(3-0), S




CHM 574 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry

Structure of atoms, introduction to bonding, symmetry in chemistry,
inorganic spectroscopy, and descriptive inorganic chemistry. A grade of "C-"
or better is required in this course in order to take CHM 575. CHM 375 may
be taught concurrently with CHM 574. Cannot receive credit for both CHM
375 and CHM 574. May be taught concurrently with CHM 674. Cannot receive
credit for both CHM 574 and CHM 674. 3(3-0), F


CHM 575 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in CHM 375; and CHM 507 or concurrent
enrollment. Theories and techniques of modern inorganic chemistry;
correlation of theories with inorganic compounds. May be taught
concurrently with CHM 675. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 575 and
CHM 675. 3(3-0), S
GEO 568 Thematic Cartography

Prerequisite: GEO 561. Theoretical and applied aspects of map design in
thematic mapping, animated mapping, interactive and web mapping.
Emphasis will be applying computer-assisted mapping techniques of the
problems of effective and efficient communication of spatial data. Field trip is
required. May be taught concurrently with GEO 668. Cannot receive credit for
both GEO 668 and GEO 568. 3(2-2) F




GEO 572 Introduction to Photogrammetry and LiDAR Technology

Prerequisite: GRY 360. Course covers basic concepts of photogrammetry and
LiDAR techniques such as stereo feature extraction, orthophoto, LiDAR point
cloud visualization and DEM/DTM generation. Laboratory emphasizes
geospatial stereo feature extraction using digital photogrammetry software,
ArcGIS and Matlab toolboxes. May be taught concurrently with GEO 672.
Cannot receive credit for both GEO 672 and GEO 572. 3(1-4) S


GEO 573 Geographic Information Science Programming

Prerequisite: GEO 561; and either CIS 202 or CSC 121 or CSC 125. Course
devoted to theories and processes of analytical and automated Geographic
Information Science (GIS). Principal topics covered are spatial programming,
geographic data storage, computer map rendering, application customization
and automation and human interface development of GIS. Advanced GIS and
programming skills for professional development are emphasized. May be
taught concurrently with GEO 673. Cannot receive credit for both GEO 673
and GEO 573. 3(2-2) F
GEO 575 GPS Surveying and Mapping

Prerequisite: 30 hours. Theory and operation of global positioning systems
(GPS) hardware and software. Including mission planning, measurement of
point, line and area features, differential correction techniques and waypoint
navigation. Field exercises required. May be taught concurrently with GEO
675. Cannot receive credit for both GEO 675 and GEO 575. 3(1-4) S


GLG 360 Directed Field Trips

Prerequisite: GLG 110 or both 171 and 172 and permission. Geologic field
trips to areas of special interest. Because credit and destinations vary, the
course may be repeated to a total of 8 credits. However, no more than 4
credits may count toward any Geology major. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.
Variable content course. Supplemental course fee. 1-3 D


GRY 300 Geography of the United States

Physical and cultural regions of the United States, including their
characteristics and resource utilization. Topics include landforms, climates,
natural resources, economic activities, and cultural and political patterns. 3(3-
0) F




GRY 301 Geography of the Ozarks

Physical and cultural geography of the Ozarks. Surveys basic geology,
landforms, soils, vegetation and the geography of settlement, population,
major economic activities, lifestyles and the cultural landscape. Emphasis on
historical development and spatial distributions. Field trips required. In order
to apply geographic theory to practical settings the collection and analysis of
field data is required. Supplemental course fee. 3(2-2) D
GRY 310 Fundamentals of Tourism

Geographical and recreational elements of tourism and travel including social,
economic, environmental and political factors. Career options will be
identified. Students participate in tourism research projects. One field trip
may be required. Team taught by Geography and Recreation and Leisure
Studies faculty. Identical with REC 320. Cannot receive credit for both GRY
310 and REC 320. 3(3-0) F


GRY 320 Cultural Geography

Geographic exploration of material and nonmaterial elements of culture,
focusing on spatial patterns, regional similarities, unique places, and the
changing imprint on the natural landscape. Specific topics include settlement,
agriculture, language, religion, foodways, music, sport, and their spatial
interrelationships. Discussions and readings will emcompass global, national,
and local scales. 3(3-0) F


GRY 353 Geographic Field Studies

Prerequisite: permission. Field methods in physical and cultural geography
involving the collection and analysis of data. Field trips required. Graded
Pass/Not Pass only. Supplemental course fee. Variable contnet course;
because destinations vary, the course may be repeated to a total of 4 credits.
2(0-4) D

GRY 375 Advanced Plane Surveying

Prerequisite: GRY 275. Office and field techniques used in route surveying
including circular, transitional and parabolic curves. Topographic mapping
applications, slope stake and earthwork computations. Field astronomy, state
plane coordinates, boundary control and USPLS surveys. 3(1-4) D


GRY 377 Legal Aspects of Boundary Surveying

Prerequisite: GRY 375. The legal principles of surveying: Missouri surveying
law, Boundary Control, and the role of the surveyor within the judicial frame
work of the court system. 3(3-0) D
GRY 379 Surveying Computations

Prerequisite: GRY 375. Computations in horizontal control networks,
projections including Universal Transverse Mercator and State Plane
Coordinates, Practical Astronomy, and Global Positioning Systems. 3(3-0) D


GRY 470 Field Study in Geography

Prerequisite: permission. Focuses on a geography issue or issues affecting an
international geographical location. Travel to field location outside the
United States is required. In order to apply geographic theory to practical
settings the collection and analysis of field data is required. Graded Pass/Not
Pass only. Supplemental course fee administered through Study Away.
Variable content course; because destinations vary, the course may be
repeated to a total of 4 credits. 2(0-4) D




GRY 498 Placement Seminar in Geography, Geospatial Sciences and Planning

Prerequisite: 90 hours. Readings and discussion of current trends in
geography, geospatial sciences, and planning with consideration given to
future employment. A senior assessment evaluation is included in this course.
1(1-0) S




PLN 574 Open Space Planning

Principles and methods of open space planning. Students will learn about the
relationship between open space and the quality of life in cities and will
obtain a foundation for conducting open space planning projects. Class
format includes lecture, seminar, and studio. Field problem required. May be
taught concurrently with PLN 674. Cannot receive credit for both PLN 674
and PLN 574. 3(2-2) S
Geographic Information Sciences

The certificate in Geographic Information Sciences provides an 18 hour
undergraduate level program for students and professionals who desire
credentials in this area.

Admission Requirements: at least a 2.50 Missouri State cumulative GPA and a
minimum of 30 credit hours

Program Requirements (18 hours)

 A. GEO 551(3), 561(3), 566(3), 573(3)
 B. Six additional hours from: GRY 360(3), 363(4), 470(2); GEO 562(3),
570(3), 572(3), 575(3), 578(3)
 C. Attain a 2.75 GPA in required courses


Geology
Bachelor of Arts

 A. GLG 110(4) or both GLG 171(4) and 172(1); GLG 314(4); four hours of
GLG 360(1-3) or 412(4)
 B. Three additional hours of GLG courses numbered 318 or higher.




Geology
Bachelor of Science

 A. GLG 110(4) or both GLG 171(4) and 172(1); GLG 314(4); four hours of
GLG 360(1-3) or 412(4)
 B. Six additional hours of GLG courses numbered 318 or higher.
Planning (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

  A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
  B. Major Requirements (69-70 hours)
      1. PLN 100(3) or GRY 100(3) or GRY 108(3); PLN 271(3), 367(3), 372(3),
400(3), 570(3), 571(3), 576(4), 599(3); GRY 142(4) or GLG 110(4); GRY 321(3),
322(3), 363(4); ECO 155(3), SOC 150(3); MTH 340(3) or one of: AGR 330(3),
PSY 200(3), QBA 237(3), REC 328(3), SOC 302(3)
      2. Complete one of the following options:
          a. Community and Regional Planning (19 hours)
              1. PLN 572(4); PLS 351(3); SOC 305(3)
              2. Select an additional 9 hours from the following (at least 5 hours
to be selected from GRY, GEO, or PLN courses): PLN 505(3), 573(3), 574(3),
596(1-3), 597(1-5), 599(1-3); FIN 266(3); GRY 301(3), 310(3), 320(3), 348(3),
351(3), 360(3), 410(3), 470(2), 510(3), 525(3), 545(3); GEO 551(3), 561(3),
566(3), 570(3); PLS 255(3), 354(3); ECO 450(3); HRA 340(3); HST 515(3)
          b. Tourism Planning and Development (18 hours)
              1. GRY 310(3), 410(3), 510(3); HRA 340(3); PLN 574(3)
              2. Select an additional 3 hours from the following: PLN 505(3),
572(4), 573(3), 596(1-3), 597(1-5), 599(1-3); GRY 320(3), 328(3), 348(3),
351(3), 360(3), 470(3), 525(3), 545(3); GEO 551(3), 561(3), 566(3), 570(3);
REC 152(3), 390(3), 422(3); HRA 410(3); ECO 540(3); HST 515(3)
  C. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate
Degree Requirements section of catalog
Geography (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (35-36 hours)
     1. GRY 100(3), 142(4), 363(4), 367(3), 498(1)
     2. Complete one of the following: GRY 300(3), 305(3)
     3. Related requirements (3 hours): AGR 330(3) or MTH 340(3) or PSY
200(3) or QBA 237(3) or REC 328(3) or SOC 302(3)
     4. Complete 12 additional hours with GRY, GEO, or PLN prefix.
 C. Minor Required (or second major)
 D. Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees,
Programs and Requirements section of catalog
 E. General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate
Degree Requirements section of catalog
Geography (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science

 A. General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
 B. Major Requirements (38-44 hours)
    1. Core Requirements (15 hours): GRY 100(3), GRY 142(4), 363(4),
367(3), 498(1)
    2. Related Requirements (3 hours): AGR 330(3) or ECO 308(3) or MTH
340(3) or PSY 200(3) or QBA 237(3) or REC 328(3) or SOC 302(3)
    3. Complete one of the following options:
         a. Cultural and Regional Geography (20-21 hours)
             1. Complete one of the following: GRY 300(3), 305(3)
             2. Complete one of the following: GRY 320(3), 321(3), 322(3),
323(3)
             3. Complete 12 additional hours with GRY, GEO or PLN prefix
         b. Environmental and Natural Resources (24-25 hours)
             1. GRY 135(4), 348(3), 351(3), 535(3); GEO 561(3)
             2. Complete one of the following: GRY 300(3), 305(3), 320(3),
321(3), 322(3), 323(3)
             3. Complete one of the following field-studies courses: GRY
301(3), 353(3), 470(2); GLG 360(2)
             4. Complete 3 additional hours with GRY, GEO, or PLN prefix
             5. Recommended supplementary courses: CHM 105(5) or CHM
160(4); AGA 215(3); BIO 122(4); GRY 597(1-5). Students should select a
minor in science, mathematics, agriculture, or an approved personalized
minor.
ACC 653c. Geotourism (26 hours)
         Auditing

Prerequisite: grades of "C" or better in ACC 301 and ACC 302 and ACC 311
and ACC 321 and ACC 341 and 470; and admitted to the MACC Program.
Kinds of audits, the duties and obligations of the auditor, principles and
procedures to be followed in conducting an audit. A grade of "C" or better is
required in this course in order to take ACC 730, 750, 751, 752, 754 and 790.
This course has a required assessment component. May be taught
concurrently with ACC 553. Cannot receive credit for both ACC 553 and ACC
653. 3(3-0), F,S
ACC 790 Seminar in Accounting

Prerequisite: grade of "C" or better in ACC 653 or ACC 553; and admitted to
MACC program. Critical evaluation and interpretation of the current research
and professional literature in accounting. Study of ethical and institutional
features of the accounting environment. Completion of a significant research
project. 3(3-0), F,S


Tax Accounting Graduate Certificate

The Tax Accounting Graduate Certificate Program provides a 12 hour
graduate-level experience in the tax accounting field. The program involoves
in depth study of tax accounting topics, including individual taxation,
corporate taxation, tax planning, applied tax problems and others. Contact
the Director of the School of Accoutancy or the MAcc Program Director for
Additional information.

Entrance Criteria
Candidates for the certificate program must be admitted to the University as
a graduate student. The candidate should have a bachelor's degree in
accounting and meet minimum admission criteria for the Master of
Accountancy program. All course work must be approved by the MAcc
Program Director.

Required Courses 12 hrs.

ACC 721 Advanced Tax Accounting 3 hrs.
ACC 722 Public Service Tax Accounting 3 hrs.
ACC 723 Tax Considerations for Decision Makers 3 hrs.

Select one of the following:
ACC 625 Individual Income Tax Assistance 3 hrs.
FIN 638 Introduction to Estate Planning 3 hrs.
ACC 794 Internship (Tax Acc. related) 3 hrs.
ACC 796 Independent Study (Tax Acc. Related) 3 hrs.
ART 794 Independent Study in Art History

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Individual projects and special
problems in Art History. Permission granted only in special circumstances.
May be repeated to a total of 9 hours. 1-3 D




ART 795 Graduate Art Internship in Art History

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Student will complete various duties as
assigned with art history-related organizations. These include local museums,
galleries, and/or visual resource-media collections. May be repeated to a
total of 6 hours. 1-3 D
The Accelerated Master's Program in Early Childhood and Family
Development

The Accelerated Master's Program option in Early Childhood and Family
Development provides an opportunity for outstanding undergraduate Child
and Family Development majors and outstanding undergradute Early
Childhood Edcuation majors to begin their graduate course work during their
junior or senior year.
If accepted into the accelerated program, up to a maximum of 10 hours of
graduate courses taken after admission into the program may be given credit
for both undergraduate and graduate programs. Only 3 hours of 600-level
courses can be applied to the graduate degree.
Before enrolling in a course to be counted as both undergraduate and
graduate credit and to count the course towards the masters degree, an
undergraduate students must be accepted into the accelerated program, and
receive prior approval from the graduate program advisor, and complete a
"Mixed Credit" form. This form can be obtained from the student's
department or the Graduate College. Mixed credit registration must be done
in person.
Admission requirements for CFD majors include:
1. Junior or senior standing
2. Overall GPA of 3.25 or higher
3. To be considered for admission to the program, a student must apply to
both the Graduate College and the Early Childhood and Family Development
Graduate Program
Admission requirements for ECE majors include:
1. Junior or senior standing
2. Admitted into the the Web
ENG 679 Writing for Early Childhood Education Program

Explores the professional writer's role in creating web pages and sites
designed to deliver information. Topics include planning, user analysis,
organization, structure, presentation, content development, writing style,
and accessibility accommodation. May be taught concurrently with ENG 573.
Cannot receive credit for both ENG 573 and ENG 679. 3(3-0) F




ENG 694 Technical Writing Internship

Projects in technical writing, combining academic training and supervised
work experience in business, industry, government, academia, or nonprofit
organizations. Students are required to work a minimum of 135 hours. May
be taught concurrently with ENG 574. Cannot receive credit for both ENG 574
and ENG 694. 3(3-0) F,S
ENG 773 Writing for the Computer Industry

Study and practice in developing user-centered computer system
documentation. Topics include working with workplace and user
communities to develop content; formatting, organizing, and designing
information; and user analysis and testing. 3(3-0), S


ENG 702 Service Learning in English 11

Prerequisite: concurrent registration in an English Department course
designated as a service-learning offering. This service component for an
existing course incorporates community service with classroom instruction. It
provides an integrated learning experience, addressing the practice of
citizenship and promoting an awareness of and participation in public affairs.
It includes a minimum of 40 hours of service that benefits an external
community organization or public-service provider. Approved service
placements and assignments will vary depending on the course topic. May be
taken once for credit. 1 F,S




MKT 750 Supply Chain Management Seminar

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours in business administration and economics.
This course emphasizes the adoption of a supply chain orientation toward
business and the need for more effective inter-firm relationships and
operational processes. The course incorporates analyses of comprehensive
cases involving strategic and tactical decisions throughout product and
service supply chains in a domestic and global environment. 3(3-0), S


MKT 770 Seminar in Marketing Research

Prerequisite: 18 graduate hours in business administration and economics
including MKT 772. Designed to enable students through first-hand
experience to understand the various parts of research papers, methods of
gathering data, appropriate tests of information, and interpretation of
findings, including implications for further study. 3(3-0) F
N/A




TCM 603 Project Risk Analysis

Prerequisite: TCM 701 and acceptance in the Project Management M.S. or
Graduate Certificate program; or permission of the Project Management M.S.
program director. In-depth analysis of the types of risks that threaten
projects at each stage of development. Strategies used to recognize risks,
assess probabilities and potential impacts, steps to respond to project risks.
Tools used to analyze and plan for managing project risk. May be taught
concurrently with TCM 503. Cannot receive credit for both TCM 603 and TCM
503. 3(3-0) D




TCM 611 Product Design and Development

Prerequisite: TCM 701 and acceptance in the Project Management M.S. or
Graduate Certificate program; or permission of the Project Management M.S.
program director . An overview of the product development process from
concept generation to design in an entrepreneurial environment. The
perspectives of marketing, design and manufacturing are blended into a
single approach to product development. Provides students with an
appreciation for the realities of industrial practice and for the complex and
essential roles played by the various members of product development
teams. May be taught concurrently with TCM 511. Cannot receive credit for
both TCM 611 and TCM 511. 3(3-0), D
TCM 645 Project Control Systems

Prerequisite: TCM 701 and acceptance in the Project Management M.S. or
Graduate Certificate program; or permission of the Project Management M.S.
program director. Advanced application of microcomputers with an emphasis
on their use in project control. Topics include project control planning and
objectives, change control processes, project documentation and
communication, project progress/variance reports, payment requisitions,
project closure activities, and project lessons learned systems. May be taught
concurrently with TCM 545. Cannot receive credit for both TCM 645 and TCM
545. 3(3-0), Su




TCM 651 Cost Analysis for Project Management

Prerequisite: acceptance in the Project Management M.S. or Graduate
Certificate program; or permission of the Project Management M.S. program
director. The use of cost analysis as a decision-making tool in the context of
project management. Topics include the time value of money, analysis of
alternatives, decision-making under risk, estimating, cost accounting, and
capital budgeting. May be taught concurrently with TCM 551. Cannot receive
credit for both TCM 651 and TCM 551. 3(3-0), S




TCM 701 Project Management

Prerequisite: acceptance in the Project Management M.S. or Graduate
Certificate program; or permission of the Project Management M.S. program
director. This course provides a comprehensive overview of project
management. The culture, principles, and basic techniques of project
management are addressed using the project lifecycle as the primary
organizational guideline. The project management functions of planning,
organizing, motivating and controlling with an emphasis on the application to
business and technology are explained. Basic tools of project management
such as work breakdown structure, scheduling, contracting, earned value
analysis, and risk management are explained and demonstrated. 3(3-0), F,S
TCM 710 Project Leadership

Prerequisite; acceptance in the Project Management M.S. or Graduate
Certificate program; or permission of the Project Management M.S. program
director. A practical and relevant course that focuses on the people skills
needed to manage a project successfully. Prepares students to handle project
problems related to communication, motivation, performance, behavior, and
crisis. Students analyze real life scenarios and develop solutions that are
supported by the latest research to develop skills necessary for strong,
effective project leadership. 3(3-0), F




TCM 726 Seminar in Project Management

Prerequisite: acceptance in the Project Management M.S. or Graduate
Certificate program; or permission of the Project Management M.S. program
director. Presentation and discussion of professional or technical problems in
the organization and management of projects. Students are expected to
demonstrate the ability to apply the knowledge and experience gained in
their program of study to the critical evaluation and analysis of the theory,
research and practice of project management. 3(3-0), D




TCM 740 Management of Innovation and Technology

Prerequisite: acceptance in the Project Management M.S. or Graduate
Certificate program; or permission of the Project Management M.S. program
director. Focuses on the strategic management of technology and innovation
in organizations. Builds primarily on broad models of technological evolution
and organizational change. Students analyze crucial organizational innovation
and technology issues and identify concrete managerial actions to address
innovation and technology problems and opportunities. May be taught
concurrently with TCM 458. 3(3-0), D
TCM 750 Advanced Project Management

Prerequisite: TCM 701 and a total of 12 graduate hours in the Project
Management M.S. program of study. Builds upon the foundation of
prerequisite courses by discussing advanced problems encountered in the
discipline of project management in a seminar format. Practical examination
of projects using the criteria of project excellence and project management
maturity models. Students are expected to demonstrate the ability to apply
the knowledge and experience gained in their program of study to the critical
evaluation and analysis of the theory, research and practice of project
management. 3(3-0), S




TCM 760 Special Investigations

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management M.S. program director. The
student in consultation with the advisor selects for in-depth study an area
determined by the interest and background of the students. Based on
demand and timeliness of the subject a cluster study group may engage in a
joint investigation. May be repeated to a total of 5 hours. 1-5, D


TCM 792 Graduate Internship

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management graduate coordinator.
Educational experience in cooperation with student's full-time employer.
Written, oral, and classroom assignments related to workplace improvement.
May be repeated, but no more than 6 hours may be counted as credit toward
a Master's degree. 3(3-0), F,S,Su




TCM 798 Research

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management M.S. program director.
Supervised research in technology. May be repeated, but not more than 3
hours may be counted toward a Master's degree. Graded Pass/Not Pass only.
1-3, F,S,Su


TCM 799 Thesis

Prerequisite: permission of Project Management M.S. program director.
Preparation of a thesis. May be repeated, but no more than 3 hours may be
counted as credit toward a Master's degree. Graded Pass/Not Pass only. 1-3,
F,S,Su
Project Management Certificate Program
R. Neal Callahan, Program Director
Kemper Hall, Room 104B; Phone (417) 836-5160
NealCallahan@missouristate.edu

Program Description
The Certificate for Project Management provides a 12 hour graduate-level
experience with application in such diverse industries and organizations as
defense, construction, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, banking, hospitals,
accounting, advertising, law, state and local governments. The certificate is
designed to meet the needs of individuals who are established in careers and
are seeking professional growth and advancement within their professions.
The project management approach adapts special management techniques
with the purpose of obtaining better control and use of existing resources.

Entrance Criteria
To be considered for the program, a student must apply and be admitted to
the Graduate College.

Required Courses
Course Code Course Title Credits
TCM 701 Project Management 3 hrs
TCM 645 Project Control Systems 3 hrs
Plus two of the following:
TCM 611 Product Design and Development 3 hrs
TCM 651 Cost Analysis for Project Management 3 hrs
TCM 710 Project Leadership 3 hrs
TECM 749 Mgt. of Innovation and Technology 3 hrs
BIO 101 Biological Concepts

Prerequisite: permission. Lecture portion only of BIO 102. This course allows
students who have prior transfer credit for the laboratory portion of BIO 102
to take the lecture portion of BIO 102 as a stand-alone three credit hour
course. Does not count for general education credit for students whom enter
under the fall 1997 catalog or later unless prior approval is granted. Does not
count for credit towards a major or minor in biology. Students receive credit
towards graduation for only one of BIO 100, 101, or 102. 3(3-0) F,S
ENG 221 Writing II: Writing for the Professions

Prerequisite: 30 hours and ENG 110 or equivalent. General Education Course
(Basic Required Courses). Practice in a variety of writing situations
encountered by professionals: correspondence, proposals, documented
research reports, abstracts, definitions, product and process descriptions.
Emphasis on developing skills in audience analysis, including multicultural
consideration; analytical reading, critical thinking, research methods, and
clear writing with attention to the ethical dimensions of workplace writing in
general. 3(3-0) F,S




ENG 321 Writing II Beginning Technical Writing

Prerequisite: 45 hours and ENG 110 or equivalent. General Education Course
(Basic Required Courses). Practice in application letters, résumés, brochures,
instructions, graphic illustrations, and researched writing. Students
experience community engagement through client-based projects such as
manuals or other professional documents. Students also practice audience
analysis, including multicultural considerations. Emphasis on presenting
information clearly, concisely, and ethically in both prose and visuals. 3(3-0)
F,S


  A. GST 170(3) or PSY 355(3) or PSY 356(3) or SOC 290(3)
  B. Complete 15 hours from the following areas with at least three hours
from each area and no more than six hours from each discipline (course
prefix):
      1. Arts and Letters: ART 378(3); COM 307(3); ENG 380(3), 580(3)
      2. Humanities and Public Affairs: CRM 410(3); ECO 315(3) or GST 315(3);
GST 326(3), 400(3); HST 324(3), 321(3), 323(3); PHI 319(3); PLS 319(3),
517(3); REL 370(3); SOC 337(3), 326(3)
      3. Health and Human Services: FCS 300(3); GER 320(3); NUR 327(3); PED
402(3), 405(3); PSY 307(3), 355(3), 356(3); SWK 320(3)
  C. Attain a minimum GPA of 2.50 in all courses counted toward the minor.
LIS 101: Introduction to Information Literacy 1(1-0) F,S

Introduction to basic strategies and skills related to locating, evaluating, and
using print and digital information resources. Information technologies,
determining information needs, types of information sources, searching for
an retrieving information, evaluating information for relevancy and quality,
properly documenting use of information, and applying information ethically.
Face to face or blending formats.




Agriculture Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades 9-12)
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education Program and
Requirements section of catalog
Specific General Education Requirements: BIO 102(4); CHM 105(5) or 160(4)
or 107(4) or 160(4); MTH 135(3) or 138(5); PSY 121(3); GEP 101(2) or 110(2)
or AGR 301(1); AGR 499 (0)
B.Major Requirements
1.AGS 101(4); AGP 103(3) or AGN 115(3), AGN 215(3); AGN 143(3), 335(3) or
AGR 383(3); AGB 144(4), 334 (3); AGP 303(3) or 333(3); AGE 337(3)
2.AGE 318(2), 568(3), 578(2), 588(2)
3.Area of Specialization: Students must select a minimum of 20 hours of
Agriculture courses to complete 45 hours of Technical Agriculture required by
the State Department of Education. These courses must consist of any
agriculture course not required as a major or Professional Education
requirement.
C.Professional Education courses: AGE 558(3), 493(5-6), 494(5-6); and the
Professional Education Required Core and Competencies - see Teacher
Certification, Teacher Education Program and Secondary Education
Requirements section of catalog
D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General Baccalaureate
Degree Requirements section of catalog
E.In order to meet Missouri state teacher certification requirements,
candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree are required to
B. Major Requirements (60 hours)
  2. Art History (9 hours): ART 271(3) or 272(3), 273(3) or 274(3), and 480(3)
or 484(3)
Art History
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Non-Certifiable)
A.ART 271(3), 272(3), 273(3) and 274(3)
B.Additional 9 hours art history electives should be chosen with advisement
by an art history faculty member to bring the total number of hours in Art
History to no fewer than 21. Note: Students may not use both ART 480(3) and
484(3) to fulfill the 9 hours of electives.




PAIE (credit bearing course or options): ART 374, 382, 385, 485, 386, 484,
378, 498, 399, 407, 366, 401, 466, 490, 491, 360, 499; DES 490




PAIE (credit bearing course or options): BIO 494, 499; SCI 493, 493
Secondary Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades 9-12 and K-12)
All students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program and to
Supervised Teaching in order to earn this degree. See application procedures
at the beginning of this section of catalog.

In order to meet Missouri state teacher certification requirements,
candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree are required to
meet the following grade point average requirements: at least a 2.50 GPA on
all course work attempted at all colleges attended; at least a 2.50 GPA in the
certificate subject area (major field of study in Social Science requires a 2.75
GPA) which includes all courses listed under C; at least a 2.50 GPA in any
additional certificate subject area; at least a 2.50 GPA in the professional
education courses; and no grade lower than a “C” in all professional
education courses. All GPA requirements include both Missouri State and
transfer grades. Additional State Board of Education certification rules require
passing scores on all portions of the College Basic Academic Subject
Examination (C-BASE) and successful completion of the appropriate Praxis II
Examination Specialty Area Test with a score equal to Missouri’s qualifying
score.

The curriculum for secondary teaching leads to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Education and carries with it an initial professional certificate (PCI)
to teach in the state of Missouri.

A.General Education Requirements - see “General Education Program"
section of catalog (43-51 hours)
PAIE: (credit bearing course or options): CHM 398, 498, 700; SCI 493/494
CFD 365 Families in Later Life


Prerequisite: PSY 121; and CFD 155 or CFD 163 or 30 hours. Examination of
the structure and function of families in later life. Topics of interest include
demographic trends impacting the structure of the family, marriage, sibling
relations, parent-adult child relations, grandparenthood, widowhood, and
retirement. The application of family theories and their relevance to later life
families will be discussed. Identical with GER 365, PSY 366 and SWK 365. Can
only receive credit for one of following: CFD 365, GER 365, PSY 366 or SWK
365. 3(3-0) F




D.Professional Education (56 hours): NOTE: A grade of "C" or better in each
course is required for state certification.
1.Foundations of Teaching: EDC 345(3), 350(3); ELE 302(3); SPE 310(3)
2.Teaching Methods: IMT 365(3); ECE 301(3), 302(2), 303(3), 304(1), 401(3),
402(2); CFD 455(4); ENG 334(3); RDG 318(3); 420(3), 421(2)
3.Clinical Experiences: choose 2 of the following 3 courses: ECE 490(6),
491(6), or 492(6)




PAIE (credit bearing course or options): COM 495, 305, 496, 491/490
PAIE (credit bearing course of options): ENG 405, 432, 433, 301, 321, 422, 574




PAIE (credit bearing course of options): SCI 493/494; GRY 315, 399, 470, 510,
599, 572; GLG 330, 358, 399, 499; PLN 599




PED 370 Introduction to Safety Education


General safety education in the instruction program of elementary and
secondary schools; accident causes and remedial action. 3(3-0) D




PED 371 Driver Task Analysis


Prerequisite: valid operator's license. Prepares student to teach driver
education in secondary school. Methods, lesson planning, psychophysical
testing and driver education materials presented. Each student instructs one
individual to operate an automobile. 3(2-2) D
PED 372 Developing Vehicle Operation Skills and Competencies


Prerequisite: PED 371. Acquaints the prospective driver education teacher
with problems of automotive and traffic safety. 3(3-0) D




PED 373 Developing Classroom Knowledge


Prerequisite: PED 371 and PED 372. Course provides students the opportunity
to do an action research project with regard to knowledge and skills
necessary to provide classroom instruction, successfully manage the on-
street activities and provide for appropriate student evaluation. This course
should be viewed as the culmination of the Driver Education endorsement.
3(3-0) D




Missouri State Teacher Certification
Driver Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades 9-12, additional endorsement only)
Students who complete the Bachelor of Science in Education degree with a
major in Secondary Education or K-12 Physical Education may receive
Missouri state certification in Driver Education grades 9-12 by completing the
following courses: PED 370(3); PED 371(3); PED 372(3); and PED 373(3). In
order to meet Missouri State teacher certification requirements, all
candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree must have at least
a 2.50 GPA (Missouri State and transfer grades combined) in the certificate
subject area which includes all courses listed above.
PAIE (credits bearing course or options): PED 491, 350, 500, 493, 496; REC
205, 335, 390, 410, 491




PAIE (credits bearing course or options): MTH 300, 497, 575, 493,494




N/A




PAIE (credits bearing course or options): Service Learning, Study Away, Latin
450, SPN 314
PAIE (credits bearing course or options): MUS 162, 165, 168, 174, 175, 176,
193, 130, 301, 309, 398, 498, 148, 200, 340, 410, 411, 430, 488




PAIE (credits bearing course or options): PHY 386, 486; SCI 493/494




PAIE (credit bearing course or options): DAN 321, 465, 492; MUS 480; SEC
302; THE 417, 490, 491, 498, 492, 292, 392, 492, 515; COM 536
Reason for Course/Program          College   Dept          Course         Course # Date
Change - Or - Purpose of                                   code             If        Approved
Course                                                     If changed,    renumbered, Department
                                                           put new code   put new
                                                                          course      Head
                                                                          number here


Replacing this course with AGN     SOA       Agriculture   AGA            105           Anson Elliott
115 and AGP 103.                                                                        12/14/10




Change of degree program and       SOA       Agriculture   AGA            215           Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                                        12/17/10




Change of degree program and       SOA       Agriculture   AGA            335           Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                                        12/17/10




Course no longer part of revised   SOA       Agriculture   AGA            345           Anson Elliott
curriculum.                                                                             12/16/10




Change of degree program and       SOA       Agriculture   AGA            365           Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                                        12/17/10
Change of degree program and       SOA   Agriculture   AGA   375   Anson Elliott
course prefixes                                                    12/17/10




Change of degree program and       SOA   Agriculture   AGA   405   Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                   12/17/10




Replacing this course with AGN     SOA   Agriculture   AGA   425   Anson Elliott
115.                                                               12/16/10




Course no longer part of revised   SOA   Agriculture   AGA   455   Anson Elliott
curriculum.                                                        12/16/10




Change of degree program and       SOA   Agriculture   AGA   485   Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                   12/17/10




Change in course prefixes          SOA   Agriculture   AGA   495   Anson Elliott
                                                                   12/17/10
Change of degree program and        SOA   Agriculture   AGA   505   Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                    12/16/10




Course no longer part of revised    SOA   Agriculture   AGA   545   Anson Elliott
curriculum.                                                         12/16/10




Change of degree program and        SOA   Agriculture   AGA   555   Anson Elliott
course prefixes, plus revision of                                   12/17/10
description to reflect current
content.




Change of degree program and        SOA   Agriculture   AGA   575   Anson Elliott
course prefixes, and change title                                   12/17/10
closer to description.




Change of degree program and        SOA   Agriculture   AGF   121   Anson Elliott
course prefixes                                                     12/17/10
Combining this course in with      SOA   Agriculture   AGF   193   Anson Elliott
internship course AGR 499.                                         12/16/10




Change of degree program and       SOA   Agriculture   AGF   300   Anson Elliott
course prefixes                                                    12/21/10




Course no longer part of revised   SOA   Agriculture   AGF   401   Anson Elliott
curriculum.                                                        12/16/10




Course no longer part of revised   SOA   Agriculture   AGF   411   Anson Elliott
curriculum. Combined with AGP                                      12/16/10
393




Combining this course in with      SOA   Agriculture   AGF   493   Anson Elliott
internship course AGR 499.                                         12/16/10
Change of degree program and         SOA   Agriculture   AGF   496   Anson Elliott
course prefixes                                                      12/17/10




Change of degree program and         SOA   Agriculture   AGF   497   Anson Elliott
course prefixes. Combining into                                      12/16/10
AGN 495.




Change of degree program and         SOA   Agriculture   AGF   499   Anson Elliott
course prefixes to reflect area of                                   12/16/10
research.




Program change                       SOA   Agriculture   AGH   103   Anson Elliott
                                                                     12/17/10




Combining this course in with        SOA   Agriculture   AGH   243   Anson Elliott
AGP 325.                                                             12/16/10




Change of degree program and         SOA   Agriculture   AGH   303   Anson Elliott
course prefixes                                                      12/17/10
Combining this course in with    SOA   Agriculture   AGH   323   Anson Elliott
AGP 443.                                                         12/16/10




Change of degree program and     SOA   Agriculture   AGH   325   Anson Elliott
course prefixes and increasing                                   12/17/10
periodicity.




Change of degree program and     SOA   Agriculture   AGH   333   Anson Elliott
course prefixes                                                  12/17/10




Program change                   SOA   Agriculture   AGH   343   Anson Elliott
                                                                 12/21/10




Change of degree program and     SOA   Agriculture   AGH   353   Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                 12/17/10




Change of degree program and     SOA   Agriculture   AGH   363   Anson Elliott
course prefixes                                                  12/17/10
Change of degree program and    SOA   Agriculture   AGH   393   Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                12/17/10




Change of degree program and    SOA   Agriculture   AGH   403   Anson Elliott
course prefixes; change                                         12/17/10
preiodicity and time offered.




Program change, and elimination SOA   Agriculture   AGH   443   Anson Elliott
of another course, AGH 323                                      12/17/10
Floriculture, so material from
Floriculture will be incorporated
into this course.


Change of degree program and    SOA   Agriculture   AGH   453   Anson Elliott
course prefixes                                                 12/17/10




Program change                  SOA   Agriculture   AGH   483   Anson Elliott
                                                                12/17/10
Change of degree program and      SOA   Agriculture   AGH   493   Anson Elliott
course prefixes. Combining into                                   12/16/10
AGN 495.




Change of degree program and      SOA   Agriculture   AGH   573   Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                  12/17/10




Addition of a new course, AGS    SOA    Agriculture   AGS   311   Anson Elliott
310 Animal Nutrition, which will                                  12/17/10
be a recommended prerequistie.




Combining with general            SOA   Agriculture   AGS   491   Anson Elliott
agriculture seminar.                                              12/16/10




Change of degree program and      SOA   Agriculture   AGW   143   Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                  12/17/10




Change of degree program and      SOA   Agriculture   AGW   351   Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                  12/17/10
Change of degree program and      SOA   Agriculture   AGW   496   Anson Elliott
course prefixes. Combining into                                   12/17/10
AGN 495.




Change of degree program and      SOA   Agriculture   AGW   513   Anson Elliott
course prefixes.                                                  12/17/10




The purpose of this course is to  SOA   Agriculture   AGN   115   Anson Elliott
provide much of the perspective                                   12/17/10
and education that was
previously available only to
advanced agriculture students
through AGA 425. Many students
today have an interest in the
environment, but normally have
only rudimentary understanding
of how sunlight, soil, air and
water are managed to produce
sufficien food and materials for
current and future consumption.
Consequently, this course will
address the strenths and
weaknesses of various
approaches to farming in relation
to their environment
consequences.


To provide valuable technical     SOA   Agriculture   AGN   465   Anson Elliott
training needed for government                                    12/17/10
agency positions involved in
water quality protection and land
usage.
To provide "hands-on"             SOA     Agriculture   AGP   104   Anson Elliott
experience in plant production                                      12/17/10
that cannot be covered in the
lecture only course (AGP 103).


To provide additional information SOA     Agriculture   AGP   433   Anson Elliott
and exposure to sustainable and                                     12/17/10
specialized landscapes for
environmental horticulture
majors, who will benefit from this
in their career development.




An increasing number of             SOA   Agriculture   AGR   301   Anson Elliott
agriculture students are                                            12/17/10
transferring from other
institutions. Many are upper
classmen with less than adequate
preparedness in the foundations
of university life. This new course
provides transfer students the
similar educational training
offered in the traditional GEP 101
or 110 classes currently required
for all first semester freshmen
and will broaden the student's
knowledge of agricultureal issues
relative to the university's pubic
affairs mission of cultural
diversity, ethical leadership, and
community service.
In the last few years, students in SOA   Agriculture   AGS   310   Anson Elliott
the animal science program have                                    12/17/10
increasingly become transfer
students. There is a great deal of
variation in the number of 100
and 200 level biology and
chemistry courses they have
completed prior to enrolling in
the upper division animal science
courses here are Missouri State.
Making it more difficult to teach
students, animal nutrition to the
degree that it should be covered.
This new course provides
students with the opportunity to
learn more in-depth information
about the basic principles of
digestion, absorption,
metabolism and excretion of
nutrients and feed additives by
the farm animal and companion
animal species. This will provide
greater opportunity for enhanced
teaching and learning of hands-
on applicatior of these principles
in AGS 311- Feeds and Feeding.
Course prefixes changes from    SOA   Agriculture   Anson Elliott
horticulture and agronomy                           12/17/10
courses that now are plant
science and natural resources
courses, and replacement of AGA
105 with AGP 103 or AGN 115.
To respond to changing career       SOA   Agriculture   Anson Elliott
opportunities and student career                        12/17/10
interests in the horticulture and
agronomy fields, which is more
appropriately reflected by the
new course arrangements and
titles. A portion of the changes
only reflect course prefix changes.




Course prefixes changes from    SOA       Agriculture   Anson Elliott
horticulture and agronomy                               12/17/10
courses that now are plant
science and natural resources
courses, and replacement of AGA
105 with AGP 103 or AGN 115.
Course prefixes changes from    SOA   Agriculture   Anson Elliott
horticulture and agronomy                           12/17/10
courses that now are plant
science and natural resources
courses, and replacement of AGA
105 with AGP 103 or AGN 115.




Course prefixes changes from    SOA   Agriculture   Anson Elliott
horticulture and agronomy                           12/17/10
courses that now are plant
science and natural resources
courses, and replacement of AGA
105 with AGP 103 or AGN 115.
To respond to changing career       SOA   Agriculture   Anson Elliott
opportunities and student career                        12/17/10
interests in the horticulture and
agronomy fields, which is more
appropriately reflected by the
new course arrangements and
titles. A portion of the changes
only reflect course prefix changes.
Course prefixes changes from    SOA      Agriculture               Anson Elliott
horticulture and agronomy                                          12/17/10
courses that now are plant
science and natural resources
courses, and replacement of AGA
105 with AGP 103 or AGN 115.




Changing course title to make the CNAS   Geography,    GRY   135   Thomas
actual subject matter and                Geology &                 Plymate
emphasis of the general                  Planning                  2/24/2010
education course more clear to
the potential audience.




Changing course title to make the CNAS   Geography,    GRY   108   Thomas
actual subject matter and                Geology &                 Plymate
emphasis of the general                  Planning                  2/24/2010
education course more clear to
the potential audience.
This proposed new course will       COAL   Art & Design   ART   331   Wade
give first-semester, junior-level                                     Thompson
students in the BFA in Art,                                           10/20/10
Animation emphasis and the BS
in Electronic Arts, Animation
Studies, a clearer and more
specific description of what they
are currently taught under a
broadly defined umbrella class
(currently ART 430- which is
repeatable to 9 hours). This
course proposal works in tandem
with proposed course changes
for: ART 230, 330, 430, 431 - and
new course ART 432 to better
define the existing curricular path
students already travel- but do so
now under existing vaguely-
worded course descriptions with
repeatable hours. Also included
in this curricular package:
program changes for BFA in Art
and the BS in Electronic Arts.
The original categories were      COAL   Art & Design   Wade
primarily established to reflect                        Thompson
the courses that could regularly                        10/20/10
be offered by the previous art
history faculty. The new
categories do not depend upon
resident faculty; instead, these
categories represent more logical
divisions of the areas of Art
History, with each major area of
non-Western art(Asia, Africa, the
Americas, and Oceania)
represented by a separate
category. This course more
equitably reflects the diversity
offered by these very different
courses, and it also reflects the
great expansion in the teaching
of Art History over the last 30
years from a Western-oriented
discipline to a more globally
oriented discipline.




Changes were made to bring the COAL      Art & Design   Wade
description and requirements                            Thompson
into line with the other minors                         11/10/10
offered in Art History. This
included the note that students
may not use both ART 480(3) and
484(3) to fulfill the 15 hours of
electives because these courses
are heavily oversubscribed
already since all BFA Art and
Design students must take one of
these classes to graduate from
their program. Language was
corrected to designate that hours
for the minor should be in art
history, not more broadly Art and
Design.
Change in periodicity from Spring COAL   Media,        MED   355   Mark Biggs
to Demand.                               Journalism,               12/17/10
                                         and Film




There was confusion among       COAL     Media,        MED   365   Mark Biggs
prospective students as to what          Journalism,               12/17/10
this course actually entailed.           and Film
Name change reflects an updated
identity for the course.




To reflect and clarify proposed   COAL   Theatre and   DAN   180   Robert
program changes. This course will        Dance                     Willenbrink
replace DAN 451 as a degree                                        12/15/10
requirement for dance majors. To
clarify course description.




This is a senor level performance COAL   Theatre and   THE   411   Robert
class designed for students with         Dance                     Willenbrink
an advanced understanding of                                       10/5/10
the acting process.
Course number changed for       COAL   Theatre and               Robert
required courses.                      Dance                     Willenbrink
                                                                 10/5/10




To remove an unnecessary pre-   COBA   Finance and   BUS   550   Kent Ragan
requisite.                             General                   11/22/10
                                       Business
To remove an unnecessary pre-      COBA   Finance and       LAW   550   Kent Ragan
requisite.                                General                       11/22/10
                                          Business




FID has moved to COBA, this will   COBA   Fashion and     CSC     201   Paula Kemp
allow FID to better manage the            Interior Design               1/3/11
course content.




Better utilization of resources.   COBA   Fashion and     FCS     120   Paula Kemp
                                          Interior Design               1/3/11




To reflect lab component.          COBA   Fashion and     FCS     301   Paula Kemp
                                          Interior Design               1/3/11




Better utilization of resources.   COBA   Fashion and     FCS     335   Paula Kemp
                                          Interior Design               1/3/11




Better utilization of resources.   COBA   Fashion and                   Paula Kemp
                                          Interior Design               1/3/11
Better utilization of resources.   COBA   Fashion and                   Paula Kemp
                                          Interior Design               1/3/11




PSY 121 serves as a prerequisite   COBA   Fashion and                   Paula Kemp
for MKT 350. MKT 350 is now a             Interior Design               1/3/11
required course.




Adding prerequisites will better   COBA   Technology        TCM   221   Shawn Strong
prepare students for the course.          and                           1/3/11
                                          Construction
                                          Management




To encourage initial enrollment in COBA   Technology        TCM   303   Shawn Strong
a new academic program.                   and                           1/3/11
                                          Construction
                                          Management
To accommodate Interior Design COBA    Technology     TCM   321   Shawn Strong
majors who now have this course        and                        1/3/11
as a requirement.                      Construction
                                       Management




Correction from 2009/2010       COBA   Technology     TCM   347   Shawn Strong
submission.                            and                        1/3/11
                                       Construction
                                       Management




To allow students to progress   COBA   Technology     TCM   354   Shawn Strong
through curriculum more                and                        1/3/11
efficiently.                           Construction
                                       Management
To comply with accreditation   COBA   Technology     Shawn Strong
standards.                            and            1/3/11
                                      Construction
                                      Management
This course will provide students CHHS      Biomedical   BMS   490   Colette
with an opportunity to develop              Sciences                 Witkowski
classroom leadership skills                                          12/13/10
through a mentored experience
in a Biomedical Sciences course.
Undergraduate students will gain
experience in teaching and
assisting peers in learning. In
addition, this course will provide
transcript evidence of the
teaching expereinces that
students may obtain during their
program of study. The Biomedical
Sciences Department currently
has several volunteer Peer
Leaders in the anatomy labs
assisting students with their
anatomy studies. The
development of this course will
extend to other courses offered
in the BMS Department.




Expedited Curricular Proposal-      CHHS    Biomedical               Colette
Public Affairs Intensive Experience         Sciences                 Witkowski
                                                                     12/13/10




The original title was off-putting   CHHS   Psychology   PSY   557   Robert Jones
to students and the new title                                        11/17/10
better reflects the course.
The altered title provides a more CHPA     Economics   ECO   325   Ardeshir Dalal
accurate descirption of the                                        12/17/10
course content.




The altered title provides a more CHPA     Economics   ECO   450   Ardeshir Dalal
accurate descirption of the                                        12/17/10
course content.




Expedited Curricular Proposal-      CHPA   History                 Tom Dicke
Public Affairs Intensive Experience                                10/21/10




SOC 302 deleted from degree       CHPA     Political   PLS   576   George
program in 2009.                           Science                 Connor
                                                                   12/22/10
This course will be offered as a  CHPA   Sociology,    ANT   710   Karl Kunkel
senior/graduate course, in order         Anthropology,             12/27/10
to make it accessible to advanced        and
undergraduates as well as                Criminology
graduate students.




The course will be an upper-      CHPA   Sociology,    ANT   332   Karl Kunkel
division elective in the "Peoples        Anthropology,             12/29/10
and Cultures" requirement for            and
the anthropology major. It has           Criminology
been offered successfully as a
section of the variable topics
course ANT 330 Peoples and
Cultures, and will now be an
independent course with its own
course number.


The change to every other year   CNAS    Biology      BIO    370   Alicia Mathis
reflects current student demand.                                   12/16/10




The change places the course in a CNAS   Biology      BIO    574   Alicia Mathis
standard rotation so that                                          1/4/11
students can predict when it will
be offered.




The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry    CHM    201   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                     12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.
The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   260   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.

The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   376   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.

The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   452   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.

The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   461   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.
The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   462   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.


The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   502   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.


The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   506   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.




The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   507   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.
The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   508   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.

The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   514   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.

The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM         Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.

The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM         Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                                   12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.
The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                             12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.

The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                             12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.

The department determined         CNAS   Chemistry   CHM   Alan Schick
there needed to be consistency                             12/17/10
in grade prerequisites for all
courses. This removes the
possibility of some courses
having C's and some courses
having C-'s. All courses in the
department will contain this
change.
1. Coures number. The graduate CNAS       Geography,   GEO   568   Tom Plymate
equivalent is GEO 668. (GEO 670           Geology &                11/19/10
was unavailable when the 600-             Planning
level course number was
created.)
2. Periodicity. Three years ago,
we restructured this course and
made it a requirement for our
Comprehensive B.S. in Geospatial
Sciences. We have been offering
this course every Fall semester
since that time. The Catalog
description needs to be updated
to reflect the current preiodicty
for this course.




To better serve the needs of the CNAS     Geography,               Tom Plymate
current students in our geospatial        Geology &                11/19/10
sciences programs.                        Planning




Course needs to be offered in Fall CNAS   Geography,               Tom Plymate
semester to fit best with the             Geology &                11/19/10
sequencing of our other 500-level         Planning
geospatial sciences courses.
The term "GPS" is now part of     CNAS     Geography,   Tom Plymate
our common vernacular.                     Geology &    11/19/10
                                           Planning




Based on experience from past    CNAS      Geography,   Tom Plymate
years, students need a                     Geology &    11/19/10
background in geology equivalent           Planning
to at least GLG 110 or GLG
171+172 to be able to benefit
from the type of intensive
geologic field experience
provided by this course.

Cost-cutting measure. Demand        CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
for course has dropped below               Geology &    11/19/10
the level that can justify offering        Planning
every semester. To best fit the
sequencing of courses in our new
Geotourism option, GRY 300
needs to be offered in the Fall
semester. It will alternate with
GRY 316 (Geography of National
Parks) which will be taught each
Spring semester.


The field component of this        CNAS    Geography,   Tom Plymate
course is being expanded so that           Geology &    11/19/10
this course can be used to satisfy         Planning
the field-studies requirement for
geography majors (except those
in the new Geotourism option).
Cost-cutting measure. Demand        CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
for course has dropped below               Geology &    11/19/10
the level that can justify offering        Planning
every semester. To best fit the
sequencing of courses in our new
Geotourism option, GRY 310
needs to be offered in the Fall
semester.


Update catalog description to     CNAS     Geography,   Tom Plymate
reflect current course content;            Geology &    11/19/10
eliminate sexist language.                 Planning




To make this variable-topics     CNAS      Geography,   Tom Plymate
course abailable to serve as the           Geology &    11/19/10
"domestic equivalent" to our GRY           Planning
470, which will now be used only
for international field courses
administered through Study
Away.

Cost-cutting measure. Demand        CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
for course has dropped below               Geology &    11/19/10
the level that can justify hiring a        Planning
per-course instructor every year.
We will try to offer on every-
other-year basis from now on.


Cost-cutting measure. Demand        CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
for course has dropped below               Geology &    11/19/10
the level that can justify hiring a        Planning
per-course instructor every year.
We will try to offer on every-
other-year basis from now on.
Cost-cutting measure. Demand        CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
for course has dropped below               Geology &    11/19/10
the level that can justify hiring a        Planning
per-course instructor every year.
We will try to offer on every-
other-year basis from now on.

To clearly indicate international   CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
scope of the Study Away                    Geology &    11/19/10
experiences offered under this             Planning
variable-topics course number.




Cost-cutting measure. Demand        CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
for course has dropped below               Geology &    11/19/10
the level that can justify offering        Planning
every semester. To best fit the
sequencing of courses in our new
Geotourism option, GRY 498
needs to be offered in the Spring
semester.

To better serve the needs of our    CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
current planning students.                 Geology &    11/19/10
                                           Planning
GRY 360 and GRY 363 are            CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
prerequistie for all our 500-level        Geology &    11/19/10
GEO classes, so they should be            Planning
listed as specific requirements
(rather than hidden
prerequisites). The reduction in
total hours is intended to bring
this certificate more in line with
our undergraduate certificate in
planning as well as other
undergraduate certificates across
the University.




Last year, we changed GLG 314     CNAS    Geography,   Tom Plymate
from 5 credit hours to 4, and we          Geology &    11/19/10
made the corresponding changes            Planning
in the catalog description of our
geology majors (both
comprehensive and non-
comprehensive). However, we
neglecter to make the
corresponding change in the
catalog description of our
geology minors.

Last year, we changed GLG 314     CNAS    Geography,   Tom Plymate
from 5 credit hours to 4, and we          Geology &    11/19/10
made the corresponding changes            Planning
in the catalog description of our
geology majors (both
comprehensive and non-
comprehensive). However, we
neglecter to make the
corresponding change in the
catalog description of our
geology minors.
Remove ECO 308 from the "or        CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
one of" list. Reason: course is no        Geology &    11/19/10
longer being offered on a regular         Planning
basis.
1. GRY 470 is being changed from CNAS   Geography,   Tom Plymate
"Field Study in Geography" to           Geology &    11/19/10
"International Field Study in           Planning
Geography." The old version of
GRY 470 was required for all
Geography majors (both BA and
all options within the BS). The
new international version will be
required only for the students in
the Geotourism option of the BS
geography major. For all other
Geography majors, the field-
studies requirement can be
satisfied either with an
international GRY 470 or with a
lower-cost domestic alternative.
This change spells out those
alternatives.
2. Remove ECO 308 from the list
of courses that can be used to
satisfy the "Related
Requirement." Reason: course is
no longer being offered on a
regular basis.
1. Remove ECO 308 form the list CNAS              Geography,               Tom Plymate
of courses that can be used to                    Geology &                11/19/10
satisfy the "Related                              Planning
Requirement." Reason: course is
no longer being offered on a
regular basis.
2. GRY 470 is being changed form
"Field Study in Geography" to
"International Field Study in
Geography." The old version of
GRY 470 was required for all
Geography majors. The new
international version will be
required only for the students in
the Geotourism-option majors.
For all other Geography majors,
the field-studies requirement can
be satisfied either with an
international GRY 470 or with a
lower-cost domestic alternative.
This change spells out those
alternatives.




To require accounting majors to    Grad Council   Accounting   ACC   653   John Williams
take ACC 470 a little earlier in                                           11/1/10
their program. To update
information on subsequent
courses.
1. To up-date prerequisite to    Grad Council    Accounting   ACC   790   John Williams
current practice.                                                         11/1/10
2. To make prerequisite
consistent with ACC 703.
3. To update preiodicity to
current practice.




The purpose of this program is to Grad Council   Accounting               John Williams
develop graduate accounting                                               11/1/10
students' skills in the important,
rapidly expanding, and highly
demanding field of tax
accounting. The proposed
program will include learning
activities and experiences that
will provide students with as
much significant tax accounting
background as possible within
four courses.
Currently, students enrolling in    Grad Council   Art & Design   ART   794   Wade
independent study in art history                                              Thompson
at the graduate level have no                                                 10/21/10
option but to enroll in "ART 799
Independent Study". The catalog
description for ART 799,
however, is specific to Studio Art
and does not adequately
communicate the character and
goals of upper-level Art Historical
study and research.

Currently there is no course on    Grad Council    Art & Design   ART   795   Wade
the books to allow for such                                                   Thompson
internship experience beyond the                                              10/21/10
undergraduate-level ART 494.
This course would allow
transcripts to reflect the more
demanding and sophisticated
character of advanced internship
work. Student will gain advanced,
practical experience in Art
History through completion of
various duties as assigned in the
environment of professional-
level, art history-related
organization/s (including but not
limited to local museums,
galleries, and/or visual resource-
media collections).
To encourage strong              Grad Council   Childhood                    Rebecca
undergraduate students to                       Education and                Swearingen
pursue their masters degree here                Family Studies               10/29/10
at Missouri State University.




To reflect the Public Affairs    Grad Council   English          ENG   679   W.D.
Intensive Experience.                                                        Blackmon
                                                                             10/22/10




To reflect the Public Affairs    Grad Council   English          ENG   694   W.D.
Intensive Experience.                                                        Blackmon
                                                                             10/22/10
To reflect the Public Affairs       Grad Council   English     ENG   773   W.D.
Intensive Experience.                                                      Blackmon
                                                                           10/22/10




Service Learning in English 11 is   Grad Council   English     ENG   703   W.D.
the service-learning curricular                                            Blackmon
course that accompanies English                                            10/22/10
courses designated as service
learning in the schedule. As an
integral component of English
instruction in those courses, it is
intended to provide
opportunities for learning
through service that enables
students to apply classroom
theory to serve society and helps
develop and foster students'
understanding of how their
course work builds a foundation
for responsible citizenship.




Additional prerequisite hours for   Grad Council   Marketing   MKT   750   Robert Luke
consistency with other COBA                                                10/27/10
graduate seminar classes.




Additional prerequisite hours for   Grad Council   Marketing   MKT   770   Robert Luke
consistency with other COBA                                                10/26/10
graduate seminar classes.
Consistently low enrollment and   Grad Council    Modern &       GRM   635   Madeleine
lack of interest by students.                     Classical                  Kernen
                                                  Languages                  9/13/10




To better manage enrollment       Grad Council    Technology     TCM   603   Shawn Strong
and assure that students are                      and                        11/1/10
qualified to take the course.                     Construction
                                                  Management




Reason for proposed change or      Grad Council   Technology     TCM         Shawn Strong
deletion: to better manage                        and                        11/1/10
enrollment and assure that                        Construction
students are qualified to take the                Management
course. To reflect current course
rotation schedule.
Reason for proposed change or      Grad Council   Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: to better manage                        and                  11/1/10
enrollment and assure that                        Construction
students are qualified to take the                Management
course.




Reason for proposed change or      Grad Council   Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: to better manage                        and                  11/1/10
enrollment and assure that                        Construction
students are qualified to take the                Management
course. To reflect current course
rotation schedule.




Reason for proposed change or      Grad Council   Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: to better manage                        and                  11/1/10
enrollment and assure that                        Construction
students are qualified to take the                Management
course. To reflect current course
rotation schedule.
Reason for proposed change or      Grad Council   Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: to better manage                        and                  11/1/10
enrollment and assure that                        Construction
students are qualified to take the                Management
course. To reflect current course
rotation schedule.




Reason for proposed change or      Grad Council   Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: to better manage                        and                  11/1/10
enrollment and assure that                        Construction
students are qualified to take the                Management
course. To reflect current course
rotation schedule.




Reason for proposed change or      Grad Council   Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: to better manage                        and                  11/1/10
enrollment and assure that                        Construction
students are qualified to take the                Management
course. To reflect current course
rotation schedule.
Reason for proposed change or      Grad Council   Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: to better manage                        and                  11/1/10
enrollment and assure that                        Construction
students are qualified to take the                Management
course. To reflect current course
rotation schedule.




Reason for proposed change or     Grad Council    Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: To be consistent with                   and                  11/1/10
College terminology.                              Construction
                                                  Management




Reason for proposed change or     Grad Council    Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: To be consistent with                   and                  11/1/10
College terminology.                              Construction
                                                  Management




Reason for proposed change or     Grad Council    Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: To be consistent with                   and                  11/1/10
College terminology.                              Construction
                                                  Management




Reason for proposed change or     Grad Council    Technology     TCM   Shawn Strong
deletion: To be consistent with                   and                  11/1/10
College terminology.                              Construction
                                                  Management
TCM 645 applies basic project      Grad Council   Technology                 Shawn Strong
management skills that all                        and                        11/1/10
certificate students should learn.                Construction
TCM 750 is a capstone course for                  Management
the Project Management
Master's program and is at a
higher level than is appropriate
for the certificate program. TCM
740 if project oriented and is at
an appropriate level for the
certificate program.




This course requires permission. CGEIP            Biology        BIO   101   Alicia Mathis
The course is intended for                                                   10/8/10
students who have had the
laboratory component of BIO 102
but not when lecture component.
This should be indicated in
catalog description.
To reflect the Public Affairs   CGEIP    English         ENG   221   W.D.
Intensive Experience.                                                Blackmon
                                                                     10/22/10




To reflect the Public Affairs   CGEIP    English         ENG   321   W.D.
Intensive Experience.                                                Blackmon
                                                                     10/22/10




The Sociology Department         CGEIP   Area Studies-               Pamela Sailors
changed the course number in an          College of                  10/25/10
earlier curricular action. This          Humanities
revision is made to reflect that         and Public
change.                                  Affairs
In recent years, information has CGEIP   Library Science LIS   101   Neosha
become abundantly available in                                       Mackey
both print and digital form.                                         11/24/10
However, using information
resources effectively can only
occur when students and citizens
have the knowledge and skills to
apply them critically and
systematically. This course will
provide a basis for enabling them
to do so effectively. The
knowledge gained in the course
will prepare students to conduct
university level research and to
develop skills necessary for life-
long learning.


Course prefixes changes from    PEC      Agriculture                 Anson Elliott
horticulture and agronomy                                            12/17/10
courses that now are plant
science and natural resources
courses, and replacement of AGA
105 with AGP 103 or AGN 115.
The Art History survey             PEC   Art & Design   Wade
requirements have been changed                          Thompson
to offer students increased                             10/20/10
choice and blance within their
course options and to reflect the
kinds of materials that they may
be asked to teach in a K-12
classroom. Faculty in Art
Education felt it was important to
give students the option to take
either ancient/medieval Art
History or early modern through
modern Art History, as well as
broadening the non-Western
choice to include Asian Art.
Students now select Art 271
(History or Western Art 1) or Art
272 (History of Western Art 11),
Art 273 (Survey of the Art of
Africa, Oceanic, and the
Americas) or Art 274 (Survey of
Asian Art), and a choice of upper
level Art 480 (Modern Art) or Art
484 (Contemporary Art).
Changes were made to bring the PEC        Art & Design   Wade
description and requirements                             Thompson
into line with the other minors                          11/10/10
offered in Art History. This
included the note that students
may not use both ART 480(3) and
484(3) to fulfill the 15 hours of
electives because these courses
are heavily oversubscribed
already since all BFA ART and
Design students must take one of
these classes to graduate from
their program. Language was
corrected to designate that hours
for the minor should be in art
history, not more broadly Art and
Design.




Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   Art & Design   Wade
Public Affairs Intensive Experience                      Thompson
                                                         10/26/10




Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   Biology        Alicia Mathis
Public Affairs Intensive Experience                      11/9/10
MSU has a statewide mission in PEC        BSEd        Denise
public affairs and is obligated to        Oversight   Fredrick
assess how a MSU graduate is              Committee   12/13/10
more competent and educated in
public affairs (community
engagement, cultural
competence, and ethical
leadership) than graduates of
other state colleges and
universities.




Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   Chemistry   Alan Schick
Public Affairs Intensive Experience                   11/9/10
The Gerontology Program is no         PEC   Childhood      CFD   365   Rebecca
longer an independent program.              Education and              Swearingen
It is now located within the                Family Studies             10/19/10
Department of Psychology.
Existing course CFD 365 (Families
in Later Life)- is being cross-listed
with PSY 365 (Families in Later
Life)(current proposal) and SWK
365 (Families in Later Life)
(simultaneous proposal), as well
as with GER 365 (already cross-
listed with CFD 365). This will
allow Psychology and Social Work
students to take this course as a
part of their major and minor
electives.


Competencies covered in EDC      PEC        Childhood                  Rebecca
150 are covered in other courses            Education and              Swearingen
(particularly ECE 304). EDC 345,            Family Studies             10/10/10
Introduction to Multicultural
Education and Diversity has been
added as a required course for
Early Childhood Education majors
to better enhance their
understanding of a multicultural
society.

Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC     Communicatio               Kelly Wood
Public Affairs Intensive Experience         n                          1/11/11
Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   English                    W.D.
Public Affairs Intensive Experience                                  Blackmon
                                                                     10/25/10




Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   Geography,                 Thomas
Public Affairs Intensive Experience       Geology &                  Plymate
                                          Planning                   10/19/10




This program change reflects the PEC      Health,        PED   370   Sarah
title change at the state level for       Physical                   McCallister
certification/endorsement in              Education,                 9/27/10
Driver Education. Course                  and Recreation
competencies remain unchanged.




This program change reflects the PEC      Health,        PED   371   Sarah
title change at the state level for       Physical                   McCallister
certification/endorsement in              Education,                 9/27/10
Driver Education. The change in           and Recreation
credit hour is a result of moving
competencies in general driver
education teaching methodology
to PED 373 Developing
Classroom Knowledge. The 60
hour credi requirement is no
longer needed.
This program change reflects the PEC   Health,        PED   372   Sarah
title change at the state level for    Physical                   McCallister
certification/endorsement in           Education,                 9/27/10
Driver Education. Course               and Recreation
competencies remain unchanged.




This program change reflects the PEC   Health,        PED   373   Sarah
title change at the state level for    Physical                   McCallister
certification/endorsement in           Education,                 9/27/10
Driver Education. The change in        and Recreation
credit hour is a result of
incorporating competencies in
general driver education teaching
methodology from PED 371. PED
372 was added as a prerequisite
to ensure course were taken in
proper progressive sequence.


This program change reflects the PEC   Health,                    Sarah
changes in requirements at the         Physical                   McCallister
state level for                        Education,                 9/27/10
certification/endorsement in           and Recreation
Driver Education
Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   Health,                      Sarah
Public Affairs Intensive Experience       Physical                     McCallister
                                          Education,                   9/27/10
                                          and Recreation




Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   Mathematics                  Yungchen
Public Affairs Intensive Experience                                    Cheng
                                                                       10/7/10




Consistently low enrollment and    PEC    Modern &         GRM   535   Madeleine
lack of interest in German MSED           Classical                    Hooper
Program. Low enrollment by                Languages                    9/13/10
undergraduate students when
last offered.




Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   Modern &                     Madeleine
Public Affairs Intensive Experience       Classical                    Hooper
                                          Languages                    12/13/10
Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   Music           Julia Combs
Public Affairs Intensive Experience                       10/27/10




Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   Physics,        Robert
Public Affairs Intensive Experience       Astronomy,      Patterson
                                          and Materials   11/9/10
                                          Science

Expedited Curricular Proposal-      PEC   Theatre and     Robert
Public Affairs Intensive Experience       Dance           Willenbrink
                                                          10/15/10
Date            Date of Dean Date       Date       Date         Date Approved
Approved        Review       Approved   Approved   Approved     Faculty Senate
College         Signature    PEC        CGEIP      Grad Council
Council


Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig                                 Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10                                        Woodard
12/20/10                                                        2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig                                 Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10                                        Woodard
12/20/10                                                        2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig                                 Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10                                        Woodard
12/20/10                                                        2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig                                 Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10                                        Woodard
12/20/10                                                        2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig                                 Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10                                        Woodard
12/20/10                                                        2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/21/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
                Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
                12/21/10          Woodard
                                  2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011


Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011


Clydette        Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Alsup-Egbers    12/21/10          Woodard
12/21/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/10/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette        Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Alsup-Egbers    12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers                            Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10          Woodard
12/20/10                          2/22/2011
Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig              Rebecca
Egbers          12/20/10                     Woodard
12/20/10                                     2/22/2011




Approved                          Approved   Rebecca
                                             Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Approved                          Approved   Rebecca
                                             Woodard
                                             2/22/2011
Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Rebecca
10/21/10        10/22/10      Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Rebecca
10/21/10        10/22/10      Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Rebecca
11/11/10        11/15/10      Woodard
                              2/22/2011
                              Rebecca
                              Woodard
                              2/22/2011




                              Rebecca
                              Woodard
                              2/22/2011




                              Rebecca
                              Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Rebecca
10/21/10        11/25/10      Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Michael Ellis   Carey Adams     Rebecca
10/21/10        11/23/10        Woodard
                                2/22/2011




James Scott     Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11         1/13/11         Woodard
                                2/22/2011
James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011


James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
James Scott   Philip Harsha   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/13/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Jim Hackney   Helen Reid   Rebecca
1/18/11       1/19/11      Woodard
                           2/22/2011




                           Rebecca
                           Woodard
                           2/22/2011




Jim Hackney   Helen Reid   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/19/11      Woodard
                           2/22/2011
Leslie Baynes   Victor     Rebecca
1/12/11         Matthews   Woodard
                12/20/10   2/22/2011




Leslie Baynes   Victor     Rebecca
1/12/11         Matthews   Woodard
                12/20/10   2/22/2011




Leslie Baynes   Victor     Rebecca
11/10/10        Matthews   Woodard
                11/12/10   2/22/2011




                           Rebecca
                           Woodard
                           2/22/2011
Leslie Baynes   Victor        Rebecca
1/12/11         Matthews      Woodard
                11/12/10      2/22/2011




Leslie Baynes   Victor        Rebecca
1/12/11         Matthews      Woodard
                1/12/10       2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/14/11       1/14/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/17/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/1/11        1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11         Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke                 Rebecca
1/11/11       1/11/11                       Woodard
                                            2/22/2011




Philip Harsha                 Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10                       12/8/10       Woodard
                                            2/22/2011
Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Carey Adams   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
10/22/10      12/8/10       Woodard
                            2/22/2011




Carey Adams   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
10/22/10      12/8/10       Woodard
                            2/22/2011
Dennis Kear   Steve Willis   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/4/10       12/8/10        12/8/10       Woodard
                                           2/22/2011




Carey Adams                  Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/9/10                      12/8/10       Woodard
                                           2/22/2011




Carey Adams                  Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/9/10                      12/8/10       Woodard
                                           2/22/2011
Carey Adams     Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/9/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Carey Adams     Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/9/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Michael Ellis   Carey Adams     Eric Nelson   Rebecca
10/21/10        10/22/10        12/8/10       Woodard
                                              2/22/2011




                Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
                11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                                              2/22/2011




                Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
                11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                                              2/22/2011
Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011
Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011




Philip Harsha   Eric Nelson   Rebecca
11/5/10         12/8/10       Woodard
                              2/22/2011
              Philip Harsha                 Eric Nelson   Rebecca
              11/5/10                       12/8/10       Woodard
                                                          2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke   Mike Foster                 Rebecca
11/9/10       11/10/10        12/1/10                     Woodard
                                                          2/22/2011
Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Mike Foster   Rebecca
11/9/10         11/15/10      12/1/10       Woodard
                                            2/22/2011




Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Mike Foster   Rebecca
11/9/10         11/15/10      12/1/10       Woodard
                                            2/22/2011




Leslie Baynes   Victor        Mike Foster   Rebecca
11/10/10        Matthews      12/1/10       Woodard
                11/15/10                    2/22/2011
Bill Edgar      Neosha Mackey                    Mike Foster   Rebecca
11/22/10        11/24/10                         12/1/10       Woodard
                                                               2/22/2011




Clydette Alsup- Frank Einhellig   Steve Willis                 Rebecca
Egbers          12/21/10          1/19/11                      Woodard
12/20/10                                                       2/22/2011
Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Steve Willis   Rebecca
11/9/10         11/15/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011
Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Steve Willis   Rebecca
11/11/10        11/15/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Steve Willis   Rebecca
11/9/10         11/15/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke Steve Willis     Rebecca
11/9/10       11/15/10      12/8/10          Woodard
                                             2/22/2011
              Dennis Kear     Steve Willis   Rebecca
              12/14/10        12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke                  Rebecca
11/9/10       11/15/10                       Woodard
                                             2/22/2011
Joan Test                 Steve Willis   Rebecca
11/9/10                   12/8/10        Woodard
                                         2/22/2011




Joan Test   Dennis Kear   Steve Willis   Rebecca
11/9/10     11/10/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                         2/22/2011




                                         Rebecca
                                         Woodard
                                         2/22/2011
Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Steve Willis   Rebecca
11/9/10         11/15/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke                  Rebecca
11/9/10       11/15/10                       Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Jim Hackney     Helen Reid    Steve Willis   Rebecca
10/19/10        10/25/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Jim Hackney     Helen Reid    Steve Willis   Rebecca
10/21/10        10/25/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011
Jim Hackney   Helen Reid   Steve Willis   Rebecca
10/21/10      10/25/10     12/8/10        Woodard
                                          2/22/2011




Jim Hackney   Helen Reid   Steve Willis   Rebecca
10/21/10      10/25/10     12/8/10        Woodard
                                          2/22/2011




Jim Hackney   Helen Reid   Steve Willis   Rebecca
10/21/10      10/25/10     12/8/10        Woodard
                                          2/22/2011
Jim Hackney     Helen Reid    Steve Willis   Rebecca
10/19/10        10/25/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke                  Rebecca
11/9/10       11/15/10                       Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Steve Willis   Rebecca
10/21/10        10/22/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Steve Willis   Rebecca
10/21/10        10/22/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011
Michael Ellis   Carey Adams   Steve Willis   Rebecca
11/9/10         10/15/10      12/8/10        Woodard
                                             2/22/2011




Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke Steve Willis     Rebecca
11/9/10       11/15/10      12/8/10          Woodard
                                             2/22/2011


Melanie Grand Tamera Jahnke Steve Willis     Rebecca
11/15/10      11/15/10      12/8/10          Woodard
                                             2/22/2011
Challenge       Received in    Date          Date to     Date        NOTES:
Period          Provost Office Approved      President   Approved    disapproved/withdra
                               Provost                   President   wn or on hold



February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   Not signed   3/15/2011   3/23/2011
2011 - February 2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011


February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011


February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   Recommended
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            prerequisites enforced?
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   New course. Deletion
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            of many others. No new
22, 2011                                                             faculty. Syllabus?




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   New course. Deletion
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            of many others. No new
22, 2011                                                             faculty. Syllabus?
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   New course. Deletion
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            of many others. No new
22, 2011                                                             faculty. Syllabus?




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   New course. Deletion
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            of many others. No new
22, 2011                                                             faculty. Syllabus?




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   New course. Deletion
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            of many others. No new
22, 2011                                                             faculty. Syllabus?
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   New course. Deletion
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            of many others. No new
22, 2011                                                             faculty. Syllabus?
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   Probably needs to go to
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            CBHE for approval
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   Need to go to CBHE?
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




April 14, 2010 -                             3/15/2011               This curricular item was
May 4, 2010                                                          out for a special
                                                                     challenge period with
                                                                     gen ed programs--
                                                                     unknown why it was
                                                                     delayed in going for
                                                                     administrative approval.


April 14, 2010 -                             3/15/2011               This curricular item was
May 4, 2010                                                          out for a special
                                                                     challenge period with
                                                                     gen ed programs--
                                                                     unknown why it was
                                                                     delayed in going for
                                                                     administrative approval.
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011   New course- part of a
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            package of program
22, 2011                                                             revisions. No new
                                                                     faculty. Syllabus?
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,                     John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February                 3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   Non-sub, no   3/15/2011   Non-sub, no
2011 - February 2011            signature                 signature
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   Non-sub, no   3/15/2011   Non-sub, no
2011 - February 2011            signature                 signature
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   Non-sub, no   3/15/2011   Non-sub, no
2011 - February 2011            signature                 signature
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau    3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   Not signed   3/15/2011   Not Signed   Missing cover sheet,
2011 - February 2011                                                  need of change and
22, 2011                                                              why. No action.




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011


February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011   New Course. No new
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            faculty.
22, 2011




February 1,                     John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February                 3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau    3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau    3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau    3/15/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011

                Februrary 23,   Non-sub, no   3/15/2011   Non-sub, no
                2011            signature                 signature


February 1,     Februrary 23,   Non-sub, no   3/15/2011   Non-sub, no
2011 - February 2011            signature                 signature
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011   New course. No new
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            faculty. Has been
22, 2011                                                             offered previously as
                                                                     variable topics.




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   Not signed   3/15/2011   No Action   Course numbers above
2011 - February 2011                                                 and below differ. No
22, 2011                                                             action.




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011   Three surveying
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            courses, switched to
22, 2011                                                             demand. How can
                                                                     students plan?




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/21/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,
2011 - February
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   New course. No new
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            faculty.
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   New course. No new
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            faculty.
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   In the Faculty Senate
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            book this is labeled as
22, 2011                                                             ENG 679




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011   New course. No new
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011                            faculty.
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   No Signature 3/15/2011   No Signature   NO SIGNATURES
2011 - February 2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011




February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011


February 1,     Februrary 23,   John Catau   3/15/2011   3/22/2011
2011 - February 2011            3/12/2011
22, 2011
Due to be      Need BOG   Date to BOG - Date        Disposition Link
Returned to Approval      President's Disposition
Faculty Senate            Office        Published



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                Senate Senate Action Text or
                Resolut     Description      Date Approved or
Senate Action                                                                   Received in
                  ion                          Adopted by     Challenge Period
or Resolution #                                                                Provost Office
                 Text                         Faculty Senate

SA 12-10/11            Program Deletion: E-   13-Jan-11       January 17, 2011 - 2/7/2011
                       Business Minor                         February 6, 2011

SA 13-10/11            Program Deletion:       13-Jan-11      January 17, 2011 - 2/7/2001
                       Retailing/Merchandising                February 6, 2011
                       Minor
                                           NOTES:         Date                     Date to
   Date                      Date
               Date to                 disapproved/wit Returned to   Need BOG       BOG -
 Approved                  Approved
              President                 hdrawn or on     Faculty      Approval   President's
  Provost                  President
                                             hold        Senate                     Office
2/8/2011    2/8/2011      2/9/2011


2/8/2011    2/8/2011      2/9/2011
Curricular         Type                         Current Catalog Description
Proposal           (Note here if non-substan-
                   tive)
Course or
Program Title


BFA in Art         Program Change               4.Studio Emphasis (15-21 hours): a minimum of 15 but no more
                                                than 21 upper-division (300 level or above) hours in one of the
                                                following studio areas:

                                                b.Computer Animation: Required: ART 330(3), 430(3-9), 431(3).
                                                Electives: ART 399(3-6)


BS in Electronic   Program Change               B.Major Requirements (37 hours)
Arts
                                                2.Choose one of the following options (18 hours):

                                                b.Computer Animation Studies: ART 230(3); MED 465(3); select
                                                12 hours with advisor approval: ART 330(3), 430(3-9), 431(3),
                                                399(3-6)

JRN 378            Course Change                JRN 378 Multimedia Journalism
Multimedia
Journalism                                      Prerequisite: JRN 270. Instruction and practice in multimedia
                                                reporting and publishing for print media and the Internet,
                                                including digital still photography, video, audio, social media, and
                                                text. The course will also address content management systems
                                                for the web, ethics, and legal concerns. Note: Students must
                                                have a digital camera (3.1 megapixels or greater) with still and
                                                video modes. (All-in-one devices such as the iPhone fulfill this
                                                requirement.) 3(3-0) S




MED 204 Survey Course Change                    MED 204 Survey of Mass Media Theory
of Mass Media
Theory                                          A survey of the history, development, and current state of mass
                                                communication theory and its relationship to the ways in which
                                                mediated messages are delivered and received. 3(3-0) F,S
MED 290           Course Change   MED 290 Introduction to Multimedia Design
Introduction to
Multimedia                        A broad exploration of multimedia design via readings and
Design                            creative experiences. The following areas are considered:
                                  principles underlying the production of multimedia titles,
                                  elements of appropriate multimedia design, evaluation of
                                  existing multimedia releases, and group participation in a
                                  multimedia project. 3(3-1) F


MED 325 History Course Change     MED 325 History of Broadcasting
of Broadcasting
                                  The development and growth of broadcasting with emphasis on
                                  political economic history, regulatory development and
                                  programming history and development. 3(3-0) F,S




MED 390          Course Change    MED 390 Website Design and Construction
Website Design
and Construction                  Through readings and production experiences, students are
                                  expected to acquire a basic working knowledge of WWW site
                                  design. Web design is analyzed on many levels: audience
                                  considerations, screen layout, navigation controls, image use,
                                  interactivity options, etc. This course includes the creation and
                                  publication of a website. 3(3-1) F,S
MED 490         Course Change   MED 490 Multimedia Interactivity Design
Multimedia
Interactivity                   Prerequisite: MED 290 and MED 390. An advanced study of
Design                          interactive multimedia design based on human-computer
                                interaction principles. Course will include the creation of a CD-
                                ROM or DVD-ROM project incorporating interactivity as a core
                                multimedia design element. May be repeated to a total of 6
                                hours if topics are different. 3(2-2), D. Approved recurring course
                                topic: Flash for the Web. A detailed exploration into the practical
                                use and artistic applications of Flash multimedia software for
                                creation of online interactive media. 3(2-2),D. Approved
                                recurring course topic: Game Design and Development. An
                                investigation into methods of creating real-time, 3D animated
                                games without programming. Students will be introduced to the
                                latest software applications allowing 3D artists and animators to
                                create interactive immersive environments and games without
                                writing codes. 3(2-2), D




MED 570 Film    Course Change   MED 570 Film Theory
Theory
                                An analysis of the art of film by using classical and contemporary
                                film theory to investigate such aspects as the relationship
                                between form and content, visual style and the nature of
                                pictorial motion. Weekly screenings and discussions of short
                                films, excerpts, complete classics and contemporary films. May
                                be taught concurrently with MED 670. Cannot receive credit for
                                both MED 670 and MED 570. 3(3-1) D
Mass Media      Program Change   Mass Media (Non-Comprehensive)
(Non-Comp) BS                    Bachelor of Science
                                 A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                                 Program and Requirements section of catalog
                                 B.Major Requirements (39 hours)
                                 1.Departmental Core: MED 120(3), 204(3)
                                 2.Mass Media Core: MED 274(3), 325(3), 365(3), 454(3), 581(3);
                                 JRN 270(3), 407(3)
                                 3.Choose one of the following options:
                                    a.Film Studies: MED 374(3), 375(3), 470(3), 570(3)
                                    b.Media Studies: 12 hours of MED or JRN electives chosen
                                 with approval of advisor

                                 Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 3.00 in MED
                                 120(3), MED 204(3) and MED 274(3) along with a 2.25 overall
                                 GPA to be admitted to this major.
                                 C.Minor Required. Note: No course may count for both the Mass
                                 Media major and the minor.
                                 D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                                 Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
Mass Media     Program Change   Mass Media (Comprehensive)
(Comp) BS                       Bachelor of Science
                                A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                                Program and Requirements section of catalog
                                B.Major Requirements (51 hours)
                                1.Departmental Core: MED 120(3), 204(3)
                                2.Mass Media Core: MED 274(3), 325(3), 365(3), 454(3), 581(3);
                                JRN 270(3), 407(3)
                                3.Choose one of the following options (24 hours):
                                a.Digital Film Production: MED 374(3) or 375(3); MED 461(3);
                                465(3) or 466(3); MED 561(3) or 562(3); MED 565(3); select 9
                                hours chosen with approval of advisor from MED 300(3), 361(3);
                                MED 374(3) or 375(3); 462(3), 492(3), 561(3), 562(3), 570(3),
                                595(3), 597(3)
                                b.Media Production: MED 382(3) or 383(3); MED 381(3); select 9
                                hours from MED 290(3), 361(3), 382(3), 383(3), 384(3), 390(3),
                                462(3), 490(3), 492(2-3), 583(3), 595(1-3); JRN 284(3); select 9
                                hours of elective courses chosen with approval of advisor
                                Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 3.00 in MED
                                120(3), MED 204(3) and MED 365(3) along with a 2.25 overall
                                GPA to be admitted to this major.
                                C.Note: No course may count for both the Mass Media major and
                                a minor.
                                D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                                Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog



MUS 30 Applied Course Change    MUS 30 Applied Strings (Pre-Audition)
Strings (Pre-
Audition)                       Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Applied instruction in
                                strings. Holding registration for students not previously
                                auditioned for studio assignment. 1-4 F


MUS 40 Applied Course Change    MUS 40 Applied Voice (Pre-Audition)
Voice (Pre-
Audition)                       Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Applied instruction in
                                voice. Holding registration for students not previously auditioned
                                for studio assignment. 1-4 F
MUS 50 Applied Course Change      MUS 50 Applied Keyboard (Pre-Audition)
Keyboard (Pre-
Audition)                         Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Applied instruction in
                                  keyboard. Holding registration for students not previously
                                  auditioned for studio assignment. 1-4 F

MUS 60 Applied Course Change      MUS 60 Applied Woodwinds (Pre-Audition)
Woodwinds (Pre-
Audition)                         Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Applied instruction in
                                  woodwinds. Holding registration for students not previously
                                  auditioned for studio assignment. 1-4 F


MUS 70 Applied Course Change      MUS 70 Applied Brass (Pre-Audition)
Brass (Pre-
Audition)                         Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Applied instruction in
                                  brass. Holding registration for students not previously auditioned
                                  for studio assignment. 1-4 F


MUS 80 Applied Course Change      MUS 80 Applied Percussion (Pre-Audition)
Percussion (Pre-
Audition)                         Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Applied instruction in
                                  percussion. Holding registration for students not previously
                                  auditioned for studio assignment. 1-4 F




MUS 134 Guitar   Course Change    MUS 134 Guitar Class II
Class II
                                  Prerequisite: MUS 133. Intermediate and advanced guitar
                                  techniques are studied, with related literature. 1(0-2) S


"Minor in        Program Change   Ancient Greek, French, Latin, Spanish
Ancient Greek                     Bachelor of Arts
BA" program                       Complete 18 hours in one language beyond courses 101 and 102
changes to                        in consultation with advisor. Six hours of upper division courses
"Minor in                         are required for all B.A. minors. LLT 121 and LLT 325 may be
Classics BA-                      counted as part of the 18 hours required for the Ancient Greek
Concentration in                  minor.
Ancient Greek"
French BA   Program Change   French
                             Bachelor of Arts
                             A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                             Program and Requirements section of catalog
                             B.Major Requirements (30 hours)
                             1.Complete 30 hours beyond FRN 102 in consultation with
                             advisor. Twelve hours of upper division courses are required for
                             all majors including at least six hours of 400 or 500 level courses.
                             2.MCL 499(0)
                             C.Minor Required (or second major)
                             D.Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see
                             Degrees, Programs and Requirements section of catalog
                             E.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                             Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog




French BS   Program Change   French
                             Bachelor of Science
                             A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                             Program and Requirements section of catalog
                             B.Major Requirements (30 hours)
                             1.Complete 30 hours beyond FRN 102 in consultation with
                             advisor. Twelve hours of upper division courses are required for
                             all majors including at least six hours of 400 or 500 level courses.
                             2.MCL 499(0)
                             C.Minor Required (or second major)
                             D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                             Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
German BA   Program Change   German
                             Bachelor of Arts
                             A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                             Program and Requirements section of catalog
                             B.Major Requirements (30 hours)
                             1.Complete 30 hours beyond GRM 102. Twelve hours of upper
                             division courses are required for all majors including at least six
                             hours of 400 or 500 level courses. A maximum of six hours may
                             be taken in LLT 225 and LLT 271 with advisor approval.
                             2.MCL 499(0)
                             C.Minor Required (or second major)
                             D.Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see
                             Degrees, Programs and Requirements section of catalog
                             E.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                             Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog




German BS   Program Change   German
                             Bachelor of Science
                             A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                             Program and Requirements section of catalog
                             B.Major Requirements (30 hours)
                             1.Complete 30 hours beyond GRM 102. Twelve hours of upper
                             division courses are required for all majors including at least six
                             hours of 400 or 500 level courses. A maximum of six hours may
                             be taken in LLT 225 and LLT 271 with advisor approval.
                             2.MCL 499(0)
                             C.Minor Required (or second major)
                             D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                             Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
"Latin BA"       Program Change   Latin
Program                           Bachelor of Arts
changes to                        A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
"Classics BA-                     Program and Requirements section of catalog
Latin                             B.Major Requirements (32 hours)
Concentration"                    1.Complete 32 hours beyond LTN 101 and 102 in consultation
                                  with advisor, including two hours of LTN 480. Either LLT 121 or
                                  LLT 321 and either LLT 326 or HST 343 may be counted as part of
                                  the 32 hours required for the Latin major.
                                  2.MCL 499(0)
                                  C.Minor Required (or second major)
                                  D.Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see
                                  Degrees, Programs and Requirements section of catalog
                                  E.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                                  Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog




"Minor in Latin Program Change    French, German, Latin, Spanish
BS" program                       Bachelor of Science
changes to                        In consultation with advisor, complete 18 hours in one language
"Minor in                         beyond courses 101 and 102.
Classics BS-Latin
Concentration"
Spanish BA   Program Change   Spanish
                              Bachelor of Arts
                              A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                              Program and Requirements section of catalog
                              B.Major Requirements (30 hours)
                              1.SPN 325(3), 326(3), 450(3), 460(3)
                              2.Three additional hours in Spanish numbered 400 or above
                              3.Additional Spanish electives beyond 102 to bring total to at
                              least 30 hours. No more than three hours of SPN 301, 302, or 303
                              may count.
                              4.MCL 499(0)
                              C.Minor Required (or second major)
                              D.Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see
                              Degrees, Programs and Requirements section of catalog
                              E.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                              Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog




Spanish BS   Program Change   Spanish
                              Bachelor of Science
                              A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                              Program and Requirements section of catalog
                              B.Major Requirements (30 hours)
                              1.SPN 415(3)
                              2.Six hours in Spanish numbered 400 or above
                              3.Three additional hours in Spanish numbered 300 or above
                              4.Additional Spanish electives beyond 102 to bring total to at
                              least 30 hours. No more than three hours of SPN 301, 302, or 303
                              may count.
                              5.MCL 499(0)
                              C.Minor Required (or second major)
                              D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                              Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
DAN 116         Course Change     DAN 116 Modern Dance I-A
Modern Dance I-
A                                 Basic elements of modern dance technique with an emphasis on
                                  creative movement dynamics, rhythmic and spatial aspects, and
                                  alignment. Designed for students with little or no dance
                                  experience. 1(0-2) F,S


DAN 125 Tap      Course Change    DAN 125 Tap Dance I
Dance I
                                  Basic elements of tap dance, stylized steps and terminology
                                  coordinated with the rhythmic structure of tap dance. 1(0-2) F




DAN 130 Ballet I- Course Change   DAN 130 Ballet I-A
A
                                  Fundamental techniques of classical ballet with an emphasis on
                                  alignment and basic classical vocabulary. Designed for students
                                  with little or no experience. 1(0-2) F,S




DAN 131 Ballet I- Course Change   DAN 131 Ballet I-B
B
                                  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Continues development of
                                  the basic fundamentals of classical ballet technique and
                                  vocabulary. Designed for students with at least one year of
                                  formal ballet training. Variable content course. May be repeated
                                  for a maximum of 4 hours. 2(0-4) F,S




DAN 145 Jazz     Course Change    DAN 145 Jazz Dance I
Dance I
                                  Techniques of jazz dancing; application to contemporary musical
                                  theatre performance. 1(0-2) F,S
DAN 216         Course Change     DAN 216 Modern Dance II
Modern Dance II
                                  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated to a total
                                  of 6 hours. 2(0-4) F,S




DAN 217          Course Change    DAN 217 Modern Dance II-B
Modern Dance II-
B                                 Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Continued development of
                                  the intermediate fundamentals of modern dance technique.
                                  Further exploration of movement dynamics, rhythmic and spatial
                                  aspects, musicality, and alignment. May be repeated to a total of
                                  6 hours. 2(0-4) F,S




DAN 219 Dance    Course Change    DAN 219 Dance Improvisation
Improvisation
                                  Prerequisite: DAN 117. Contemporary dance improvisation
                                  techniques. 2(0-4) S


DAN 225 Tap      Course Change    DAN 225 Tap Dance II
Dance II
                                  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated to a total
                                  of 4 hours. 2(0-4) F


DAN 230 Ballet II Course Change   DAN 230 Ballet II

                                  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Continues development of
                                  the basic fundamentals of classical ballet technique and
                                  vocabulary. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours. 2(0-4) F,S
DAN 231 Ballet II- Course Change   DAN 231 Ballet II-B
B
                                   Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Continued development of
                                   the intermediate fundamentals of ballet techniques. Further
                                   exploration and development of alignment, musicality, and ballet
                                   vocabulary. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours. 2(0-4) F,S




DAN 235 Mens     Course Change     DAN 235 Mens Dance Technique I
Dance
Technique I                        Prerequisite: DAN 117 or DAN 131 or DAN 145. Basic techniques
                                   for the male dancer. Emphasis will be on strength building and
                                   developing the male dancer's technique and style. May be
                                   repeated to a total of 4 hours. 2(0-4) S




DAN 245 Jazz     Course Change     DAN 245 Jazz Dance II
Dance II
                                   Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Continues development of
                                   jazz technique and vocabulary. May be repeated to a total of 6
                                   hours. 2(0-4) F,S




DAN 316          Course Change     DAN 316 Modern Dance III
Modern Dance III
                                   Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated to a total
                                   of 6 hours. 2(0-4) D




DAN 319          Course Change     DAN 319 Contact Improvisation
Contact
Improvisation                      Prerequisite: DAN 219. Contemporary dance improvisation that
                                   explores sharing weight, rolling, lifting, flying and finding one's
                                   center. Dancers will explore and focus on specific relationships in
                                   partnering. Previous movement studies (DAN 219) necessary. 2(0-
                                   4) F
DAN 320 Dance    Course Change     DAN 320 Dance Composition I
Composition I
                                   Prerequisite: DAN 219. Creative approaches to development of
                                   basic movement themes and simple and complex manipulations
                                   of those themes. Emphasis on solo and small group studies that
                                   explore time, shape, space and dynamics. 2(0-4) F




DAN 321 Dance    Course Change     DAN 321 Dance Composition II
Composition II
                                   Prerequisite: DAN 320. Further exploration of theme and
                                   manipulation as related to complex group compositional studies.
                                   Emphasis will be placed on spatial exploration and design, and
                                   various musical forms and structures. 2(0-4) S




DAN 323 Dance    Course Change     DAN 323 Dance Choreography for Musical Theatre
Choreography
for Musical                        Prerequisite: DAN 320. Acquaints students with a variety of
Theatre                            strategies to use when staging ensembles for musical theatre
                                   productions. Students will gain further knowledge on
                                   incorporating dance into musical theatre through solo and small
                                   group numbers. 2(0-4) S




DAN 325 Tap      Course Change     DAN 325 Tap Dance III
Dance III
                                   Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated to a total
                                   of 4 hours. 2(0-4) S




DAN 330 Ballet III Course Change   DAN 330 Ballet III

                                   Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated to a total
                                   of 6 hours. 2(0-4) D
DAN 335 Men's     Course Change   DAN 335 Men's Dance Technique II
Dance
Technique II                      Prerequisite: DAN 235. Continued techniques for the male
                                  dancer. Emphasis will be on strength building and developing the
                                  male dancer's technique and style. May be repeated to a total of
                                  4 hours. 2(0-4) F




DAN 345 Jazz      Course Change   DAN 345 Jazz Dance III
Dance III
                                  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated to a total
                                  of 6 hours. 2(0-4) D




DAN 348           Course Change   DAN 348 Partnering
Partnering
                                  Prerequisite: any two of the following courses: DAN 216, DAN
                                  230, DAN 245. Exploration of the fundamental and effective
                                  techniques of contemporary partnering. Includes the physics and
                                  dynamics of dance partnering that is essential to Musical Theatre
                                  choreography and concert dance. May be repeated to a total of 4
                                  hours. 2(0-4) S




DAN 364           Course Change   DAN 364 Kinesiology for the Dancer
Kinesiology for
the Dancer                        Prerequisite: PED 250. The specific study of dance techniques
                                  through the principles of motion, muscle action and joint
                                  mechanics. 3(3-0) SE


DAN 370 Music     Course Change   DAN 370 Music Resources for Dance I
Resources for
Dance I                           Development of musical skills for dance. Dance accompaniment
                                  techniques; study of musical elements related to dance.
                                  Practicum through experience with percussion and other
                                  instruments. 2(1-2) FE
DAN 371 Music     Course Change   DAN 371 Music Resources for Dance II
Resources for
Dance II                          Prerequisite: DAN 370. Further development of dance
                                  accompaniment techniques; survey of music literature for dance.
                                  Recording techniques and sound production for dance. Practicum
                                  through experience with recording devices and instruments. 2(1-
                                  2) SO


DAN 416         Course Change     DAN 416 Modern Dance IV
Modern Dance IV
                                  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated to a total
                                  of 6 hours. 2(0-4) D




DAN 420 Dance     Course Change   DAN 420 Dance Composition III
Composition III
                                  Prerequisite: DAN 321 and THE 150. Directed large group
                                  composition that will culminate with an end of semester
                                  performance. Students will explore aspects of staging a complete
                                  work that will include the creation of original theme, casting of
                                  performers, choices of accompaniment, and lighting and
                                  costume design. 2(0-4) F




DAN 430 Ballet IV Course Change   DAN 430 Ballet IV

                                  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated to a total
                                  of 6 hours. 2(0-4) D




DAN 445 Jazz      Course Change   DAN 445 Jazz Dance IV
Dance IV
                                  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated to a total
                                  of 6 hours. 2(0-4) D
DAN 451 History Course Change   DAN 451 History of Dance I
of Dance I
                                Prerequisite: 60 hours. Overview of the history of dance from the
                                primitive era through the 16th century. The primary focus will be
                                on the development of classical ballet. 3(3-0) FO




DAN 465 Dance   Course Change   DAN 465 Dance Pedagogy
Pedagogy
                                Prerequisite: 45 hours and DAN 125 and DAN 216 and DAN 230
                                and DAN 245. Overview of general theories and practices of
                                teaching. This course investigates class content and various
                                methodologies used to teach dance techniques and creative
                                movement in workshop settings. Emphasis is placed on methods
                                for teaching the beginning level student. 3(2-2) FE




DAN 466 Dance   Course Change   DAN 466 Dance Pedagogy II
Pedagogy II
                                Prerequisite: DAN 465. In-depth examination of effective
                                teaching strategies for training dancers. Opportunities to develop
                                and implement lessons appropriate to intermediate and
                                advanced level dancers, to develop comprehensive training
                                syllabi for dance in private studios and public schools. 3(3-0) SO




DAN 470 Dance   Course Change   DAN 470 Dance Production
Production
                                Management of technical, business and artistic procedures
                                involved in producing and staging all types of dance
                                performances in their appropriate environments. 2(2-0) FO




DAN 490        Course Change    DAN 490 Choreographers and Composers Workshop
Choreographers
and Composers                   Collaboration of musicians and dancers in developing original
Workshop                        accompaniment for contemporary dance choreography.
                                Exploration of music; percussion and avant-garde techniques for
                                accompaniment of ballet, modern and jazz dance. May be
                                repeated for credit. 1-4 D
DAN 530 Pointe   New Course       N/A




DAN 592          New Course       N/A
Performance




Minor in Dance   Program Change   Minors
                                  Dance
                                  Bachelor of Arts
                                  Bachelor of Science
                                  A.6 hours from: DAN 216(2), 316(2), 416(2), 230(2), 330(2),
                                  430(2), 245(2), 345(2), 445(2)

                                  B.DAN 451(3) or 452(3)

                                  C.9 hours of electives from: DAN 219(2), 320(2), 321(2), 370(2),
                                  371(2), 451(3), 452(3), 465(3), 470(2) for a total of 18 hours
BFA in Theatre    Program Change   Theatre
                                   Bachelor of Fine Arts
                                   Admission Requirements: In addition to the University’s
                                   admission requirements, students must be officially accepted
                                   into the BFA program prior to the first semester of coursework in
                                   the major. Auditions and/or interviews for placement in the
                                   program are held on campus during the fall and spring semester
                                   of each year. Prospective students should contact the
                                   Department of Theatre and Dance for specific information about
                                   the audition process and dates.

                                   A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                                   Program and Requirements section of catalog
                                   Note: Six hours of the General Education Humanities
                                   Requirement may not be included in the courses fulfilling the
                                   major.
                                   B.Major Requirements (78 hours)
                                   1.Core Requirements (31 hours)
                                   a.Design/Technology (10 hours): THE 150(2) and 151(1); 224(1);
                                   choose two groups from THE 250(2) and 251(1), or THE 255(2)
                                   and 256(1), or THE 260(2) and 261(1)
                                   b.Directing (6 hours): THE 130(3), 430(3)
                                   c.History (6 hours): THE 541(3), 542(3)
                                   d.Acting (3 hours): THE 121(3)* or 123(3). *THE 121 is open to
                                   admitted BFA in Theatre/Acting and Musical Theatre majors only.
                                   e.Electives from approved courses inside or outside the
                                   department (5 hours)
PLS 497 Special   Course Change    f.Senior BFA Project: THE 492(1)
                                   PLS 497 Special Topics
Topics
                                   A course designed to provide a means of study for topics not
                                   addressed elsewhere in the curriculum. May be repeated up to a
                                   maximum of 6 hours. Variable content course. 3(3-0) D
Chemistry      Program Change    Chemistry (Comprehensive)
(Comp) BS                        Bachelor of Science
                                 A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                                 Program and Requirements section of catalog
                                 B.Major Requirements
                                 1.CHM 160(4)*, 170(3), 175(2), 302(5), 342(5), 343(5), 375(3),
                                 398(1), 452(3), 498(1), 506(3), 507(3), 508(2), 533(4), 575(3)
                                 2.Related science and mathematics requirements: MTH 287* and
                                 288(6) or MTH 261* and 280(10) or MTH 261* and 288(8); PHY
                                 123* and 124(8) or PHY 203* and 204(10); Recommended CSC
                                 111(3)*
                                 3.Complete requirements in one of the following options:
                                 a.Biochemistry: This program is designed for students preparing
                                 for a career in medicine or graduate study in biochemistry.
                                 Required courses: CHM 399(1-3) or 499(1-3), 453(2), 552(3),
                                 553(2); BIO 121(4)*, 235(4), 320(4) Suggested electives: BIO
                                 310(5). Premedical students should also take courses in anatomy
                                 and physiology.
                                 b.Graduate School: This program is designed for students
                                 preparing for graduate study in chemistry. Required courses:
                                 CHM 376(2), 499(1-3), 509(2); Select one: CHM 514(3), 542(3),
                                 552(3). Suggested electives: one year foreign language
                                 c.Industrial: This program is designed for students preparing for
                                 industrial positions upon completion of the B.S. degree, but who
                                 wish to be prepared for future entry into graduate school.
                                 Required courses: CHM 376(2), 509(2), 514 or 542(3), four hours
                                 selected from 397(2), 399(1-3), 499(1-3)
Minor Chemistry Program Change   Chemistry
BA and BS                        Bachelor of Arts
                                 Bachelor of Science
                                 A.CHM 160(4), 170(3), 175(2); CHM 200(5) or CHM 342(5)
                                 B.Select an emphasis area from the options below:
                                 1.Analytical: CHM 302(5)
                                 2.Biochemistry: CHM 352(3) and 353(2); or CHM 452(3) and
                                 453(2)
                                 3.Environmental: CHM 460(3) and 461(3)
                                 4.Inorganic: CHM 375(3) and 376(2)
                                 5.Organic: CHM 343(5) or 344(3); and CHM 505(4) or 506(3); and
                                 CHM 542(3)
                                 6.Physical: CHM 506(3); and CHM 507(3) or 508(2)
                                 7.Student Option: Select at least 8 hours in CHM courses
                                 numbered 302 or higher.
Chemistry (Non- Program Change   Chemistry (Non-Comprehensive)
Comp) BS                         Bachelor of Science
                                 A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                                 Program and Requirements section of catalog
                                 B.Major Requirements
                                 1.CHM 160(4)*, 170(3), 175(2), 302(5), 342(5), 343(5), 375(3),
                                 398(1); 505(4) or 506(3) and CHM 507(3) and 508(2); 498(1),
                                 502(4); and one hour from CHM 397, 399 or 499
                                 *Will also count toward General Education Requirements
                                 2.Chemistry electives (8-10 hours) from one of the following
                                 categories:
                                 a.For a basic chemistry program without a specific area of
                                 emphasis, at least eight hours from CHM 352(3), 376(2), 399 or
                                 499 (2-3), 460(3), 509(2)
                                 b.For students with a strong interest in environmental chemistry:
                                 CHM 460(3), 461(3), 462(2)
                                 c.For students with a strong interest in biochemistry or pre-
                                 medicine: CHM 452(3), 453(2), 552(3), 553(2)
                                 d.For a specific area of interest not included in categories a, b, or
                                 c: at least nine hours of chemistry courses numbered 300 or
                                 above selected in consultation with the student’s academic
                                 advisor and approved by the department head.
                                 3.Related science and mathematics requirements: MTH 261* and
                                 280(10) or MTH 261* and 288(8) or MTH 287* and 288(6); PHY
                                 123* and 124(8) or PHY 203* and 204(10)
                                 C.Minor Required (or second major)
                                 D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
GRY 599        Course Change     Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
                                 GRY 599 Research in Geography
Research in
Geography                        Prerequisite: permission. Enrichment through guided but
                                 independent, original research in geography and geography
                                 related subject areas. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit
                                 hours. May be taught concurrently with GRY 698. Cannot receive
                                 credit for both GRY 698 and GRY 599. 1-3 F,S
BS Engineering   Program Change   Engineering Physics (Comprehensive)
Physics (Comp)                    Bachelor of Science
                                  A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                                  Program and Requirements section of catalog
                                  Specific General Education Requirements: CSC 111(3); PHY
                                  203(5); MTH 261(5); ENG 321(3)
                                  B.Major Requirements (67-69 hours)
                                  1.CSC 121(3) or CSC 125(4); MTH 280(5), 302(3), 303(3); PHY
                                  204(5), 252(3), 343(3), 352(3), 375(3), 391(3), 392(3)
                                  2.Select one of the following options (30-31 hours)
                                  a.Computer Engineering: PHY 220(4), 324(4), 353(3), 354(3),
                                  385(2), 386(1); PHY 475(3) or MAT 580(3); PHY 485(3), 486(1),
                                  524(4), 558(3)
                                  b.Materials Science: PHY 353(3), 385(2), 386(1), 475(3), or MAT
                                  580(3), 476(3), 485(3), 486(1), 558(3); MAT 540(3), 550(3). In
                                  addition at least 5 hours chosen from: PHY 463(3), 543(3),
                                  553(3), 575(3), BMS 514(2).
                                  c.Personalized: PHY 333(3), 353(3), 386(1), 486(1); TCM 110(3);
                                  plus 19 hours of optional computer science, mathematics, and
                                  science courses in a program covering some engineering
                                  specialty. This emphasis is to be developed with the student’s
                                  advisor and is subject to approval of the head of the Department
                                  of Physics, Astronomy, and Materials Science.
                                  C.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                                  Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog

CHM 105         Course Change     CHM 105 Fundamentals of Chemistry
Fundamentals of
Chemistry                         Prerequisite: eligibility for MTH 103 or have completed MTH 103,
                                  or be concurrently enrolled in MTH 102. General Education
                                  Course (Natural World). Emphasis on chemical fundamentals and
                                  applications. Recommended for students needing only one
                                  semester of general chemistry. (CHM 105 will not count toward a
                                  chemistry major or minor.) Course does satisfy prerequisite for
                                  CHM 200. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in
                                  order to take CHM 200. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 5(4-2)
                                  F,S
Global Studies   Program Change   Global Studies (Non-Comprehensive)
Major, BA                         Bachelor of Arts

                                  A. General Education Requirements- see General Education
                                  Program and Requirements section of catalog.
                                  B. Major Requirements (45-51 hours)
                                  1. GBL 250(3)
                                  2. Complete four of the following courses: ANT 100(3); ECO
                                  155(3); GRY 100(3); HST 200(3); PLS 232(3), REL 210(3); SOC
                                  150(3)
                                  3. Complete 15 hours in one of the following focus areas, with
                                  courses with at least four different course prefixes:
                                  a. Language and Culture: ANT 226(3), 280(3), 310(3), 320(3),
                                  380(3), 490(3)*; COM 360(3); ENG 283(3); GRY 320(3); IDS
                                  397(3)*; MCL 550(3)*; MUS 239(3); PHI 115(3); REL 210(3)
                                  b. Business and Economics: AGB 514(3); AGR 100(3); ECO 346(3),
                                  456(3), 565(3); GRY 308(3), 321(3); HST 340(3); IDS 397(3)*; MCL
                                  550(3)*; MGT 447(3); MKT 474(3)
                                  c. Politics, Society and Environmental Issues: CRM 420(3); ECO
                                  540(3); GRY 108(3), 316(3), 322(3), 323(3), 351(3), 535(3); HST
                                  200(3), 328(3); IDS 397(3)*; MCL 550(3)*; PHI 302(3); PLS 205(3),
                                  232(3), 330(3), 437(3), 535(3), 546(3), 555(3), 561(3), 565(3);
                                  SOC 305(3), 336(3)
                                  *When applicable
                                   4. Complete 15 hours in Regional Studies with at least one
                                  course in each of the following five regions. The following
                                  courses may apply to various regions depending upon course
ACC 688          New Course       content: ANT 330, ENG 362, or GRY 303.
                                  N/A
Healthcare
Accounting
Concepts
AGA 645 Soil    Course Change    AGA 645 Soil Survey and Land Appraisal
Survey and Land
Appraisal                        Recommended Prerequisite: 6 hours in soils. Soil as a natural
                                 body, its morphological and chemical properties, and methods
                                 used to distinguish among different soils; description and
                                 identification of soil profiles; techniques in soil mapping; and
                                 interpretation of soil survey data. May be taught concurrently
                                 with AGA 545. Cannot receive credit for both AGA 545 and AGA
                                 645. 3(2-2), F

AGF 730          Course Change   AGF 730 Advanced Topics in Plant Science
Advanced Topics
in Plant Science                 Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An advanced topic in plant
                                 science will be addressed via faculty lectures and student
                                 projects. Examples of proposed topics include: Improved Disease
                                 Resistance in Viticulture, Application of Field Collected Data to
                                 Computer Analysis. Identical with AGH 730. Variable content
                                 course. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours with differing
                                 topics. 3(3-0), F


AGF 798          Course Change   AGF 798 Research
Research
                                 Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Supervised research in
                                 areas of emphasis within the discipline of plant science. May be
                                 repeated, but not more than 6 hours may be counted toward the
                                 M.S. degree. 1-6, F,S,Su




AGF 799 Thesis   Course Change   AGF 799 Thesis

                                 Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Demonstration of the
                                 capacity for research and independent thought culminating in a
                                 thesis. May be repeated, but no more than 6 hours will be
                                 applied to the master's degree. 1-6, F,S,Su
BIO 609 Stream   Course Change   BIO 609 Stream Ecology
Ecology
                                 Recommended Prerequisite: ecology course and one year of
                                 college chemistry. The interdisciplinary study of running waters,
                                 including study of the physical and chemical environment,
                                 trophic interactions, nutrient cycling, and the multiple impacts of
                                 humans on modifying these systems. Lectures, group discussion
                                 of readings, and laboratory and field exercises. One all-day
                                 Saturday field trip required. May be taught concurrently with BIO
                                 509. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 509 and BIO 609. 4(2-4),
                                 S




BIO 640 App of   Course Change   BIO 640 App of Molecular Markers
Molecular
Markers                          Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: genetics
                                 course. Introduction to the use of molecular markers in biological
                                 research. Topics covered include methods for identifying genetic
                                 variation at the molecular level (protein electrophoresis,
                                 automatic DNA sequencing, RAPDs, RFLPs, AFLPs, microsatellites)
                                 and their applications to research in systematics, ecology,
                                 evolution, conservation biology, forensics, and gene mapping.
                                 Students will complete research projects using one or more of
                                 the techniques learned. Supplemental course fee. May be taught
                                 concurrently with BIO 540. Cannot receive credit for both BIO
                                 540 and BIO 640. 4(2-4), D




BIO 651          Course Change   BIO 651 Advanced Statistical Methods for Biologists
Advanced
Statistical                      Recommended Prerequisite: statistics course. The design and
Methods for                      analysis of biological experiments, with an emphasis on the
Biologists                       choice and interpretation of inferential statistics. Topics covered
                                 include causal inference, statistical power, general linear models,
                                 repeated measures designs, log-linear models, nonparametric
                                 procedures, and computer-intensive techniques. The use of
                                 computer software to analyze real data sets from the biological
                                 literature is emphasized. May be taught concurrently with BIO
                                 551. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 551 and BIO 651. 2(1-2),
                                 D
BIO 663         Course Change   BIO 663 Population Ecology
Population
Ecology                         Recommended Prerequisite: ecology course and pre-calculus
                                mathematics course. Discussion of factors controlling the
                                distribution and abundance of populations. Quantitative
                                description of population dynamics is emphasized. May be
                                taught concurrently with BIO 563. Cannot receive credit for both
                                BIO 563 and BIO 663. 3(2-2), S




BIO 668         Course Change   BIO 668 Physiological Ecology
Physiological
Ecology                         Recommended Prerequisite: ecology course; and general
                                physiology or plant physiology or human physiology course.
                                Physiological adaptations of plants and animals to
                                environmentally stressful conditions and to
                                ecological/evolutionary pressures. May be taught concurrently
                                with BIO 567. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 567 and BIO
                                668. 4(4-0), SE


BIO 680         Course Change   BIO 680 Vertebrate Anatomy and Evolution
Vertebrate
Anatomy and                     Vertebrate gross anatomy. Phylogeny and present status of
Evolution                       organ systems in vertebrates. May be taught concurrently with
                                BIO 380. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 380 and BIO 680. 2(2-
                                0), F,S


CSD 876 Hearing Course Change   CSD 876 Hearing Conservation and Instrumentation
Conservation
and                             Prerequisite: permission. Theory and practice of noise
Instrumentation                 assessment, including the physiological effects of noise, and the
                                development of hearing conservation and industrial measures.
                                Includes the use of instrumentation for in-depth sound analysis
                                as well as calibration in relation to accepted standards, and use
                                of various types of instrumentation. Bioelectrical hazards,
                                physical characteristics and measurements of acoustic, electric,
                                and other non-acoustic stimuli-determination of calibration will
                                also be covered. 3(2-2), D
Master of         Program Change
Sciences in CIS                    CIS 732    Information Systems Planning
                                   CIS 734   Staffing The Information Systems Function
                                   CIS 736   Network Planning & Administration
                                   CIS 738    Information System Project Management
                                   CIS 744   Information System Management
                                   CIS 742   Management of End-User Computing
                                   CIS 740   Comparative System Development Methodology
                                   CIS 746   Data Modeling & Database Administration
                                   CIS 747   IT Legal Issues
                                   CIS 750   Information System Resource Acquisition
                                   CIS 754   Organizational Transformation
                                   CIS 756   Special Topics in Information Systems


ECO 708 Topics    Course Change    ECO 708 Topics in Economic Education
in Economic
Education                          Instruction for teachers in a limited number of economic
                                   concepts. Subject matter will change depending upon grade
                                   levels and goals involved. Attention will be given to ways
                                   concepts can be incorporated into the curricula. Variable content
                                   course. May be repeated as topics change, to a maximum of 6
                                   credit hours. 1-3, D


BUS 650           Course Change    BUS 650 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business
Negotiation,
Mediation, and                     Prerequisite: LAW 231 or LAW 600. A practical, skills-based study
Arbitration in                     of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration from the business
Business                           manager's perspective. This hands-on course is designed to
                                   develop the skills necessary to enable the business manager to
                                   effectively participate in negotiation, mediation, and arbitration
                                   as alternatives to litigation for resolving business disputes.
                                   Identical with LAW 650. May be taught concurrently with BUS
                                   550. Cannot receive credit for more than one of BUS 550, BUS
                                   650, LAW 550, or LAW 650. 3(3-0) F,S
LAW 637          Course Change   LAW 637 Environmental Regulation
Environmental
Regulation                       Prerequisite: LAW 231 or LAW 600. Laws and government
                                 environmental regulation of air, water and soil quality, energy
                                 resources, solid and toxic waste disposal, storage tanks, toxic
                                 torts, labeling of toxic substances, recycling; ethical, public policy
                                 and international implications such regulations pose for business
                                 practices, natural resource utilization, health quality and
                                 biodiversity. May be taught concurrently with LAW 537. Cannot
                                 receive credit for both LAW 637 and LAW 537. 3(3-0) SO




LAW 650          Course Change   LAW 650 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business
Negotiation,
Mediation, and                   Prerequisite: LAW 231 or LAW 600. A practical, skills-based study
Arbitration in                   of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration from the business
Business                         manager's perspective. This hands-on course is designed to
                                 develop the skills necessary to enable the business manager to
                                 effectively participate in negotiation, mediation, and arbitration
                                 as alternatives to litigation for resolving business disputes.
                                 Identical with BUS 650. May be taught concurrently with LAW
                                 550. Cannot receive credit for more than one of BUS 550, BUS
                                 650, LAW 550, or LAW 650. 3(3-0) F,S
HST 644 Women New Course   N/A
in Islam
HST 673 History New Course   N/A
and Archaeology
of the Middle
East
HST 674 Jordan   New Course   N/A
Archaeology
Study Away




HST 725 The      New Course   N/A
Upland South
HST 775           New Course   N/A
Proseminar in
the Middle East
Instructional     Program Change   Instructional Technology Specialist Certificate Program
Technology                         Program Description
specialist                         The Certificate for Instructional Technology Specialist provides a
Certification                      15 hour graduate-level experience for school administrators,
Program                            teachers and staff working at the school building level. The
                                   program provides for the acquisition of knowledge and skills
                                   necessary for supporting teachers and students. The certificate
                                   is interdisciplinary in nature and provides competencies in 3 core
                                   areas of Administration and Management, Technology
                                   Infrastructure, and Technology Integration in the teaching
                                   process. This certificate is a Missouri State University Certificate
                                   and does not meet Missouri State Certification requirements for
                                   teaching.
                                   Entrance Criteria
                                   To be considered for the program, a student must apply and be
                                   admitted to the Graduate College.
                                   GPA Requirements
                                   Attain a grade point average of at least 3.00 on all graduate
                                   course work at Missouri State University.
                                   Required Courses
                                   Core I - Administration and Management
                                   IMT 763 Administration of Instructional Tech.          3 hrs
                                   Core II - Technology Infrastructure
                                   CSC 600 Hardware, Software,
                                   & Troubleshooting Of Personal Computers              3 hrs
                                   Core III - Technology Integration
                                   IMT 764 Instructional Design                          3 hrs
ANT 710 Cultural Course Change     IMT 767 Cultural Resource Management
                                   ANT 710 Instructional Technology Practicum            2 hrs
Resource
Management                         An examination of laws and regulations pertaining to the
                                   preservation of American history and culture and the
                                   professional management and preservation of ethnic, historic,
                                   and prehistoric cultural resources. 3(3-0) F




ANT 725           Course Change    ANT 725 Computer Applications in Anthropology
Computer
Applications in                    A survey of computer applications in applied anthropology.
Anthropology                       Includes experience with database programs, digital imagery,
                                   mapping software, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
                                   3(3-0) F
M.S. in Applied   Program Change   Degree Requirements (A minimum of 36 hours)
Anthropology                       1. Core Requirements                             27 hrs
                                   Course Code Course Title Credits
                                   ANT 611 Ethnographic Field Methods OR
                                   ANT 650 Advanced Methods in Archaeology 3 hrs
                                   ANT 700 Applying Anthropology 3 hrs
                                   ANT 710 Cultural Resource Management 3 hrs
                                   ANT 720 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology 3 hrs
                                   ANT 725 Computer Applications in Anthrop. 3 hrs
                                   ANT 770 Research Design & Writing in Anth. 3 hrs
                                   ANT 790 Internship in Applied Anthropology 3 hrs
                                   ANT 797 Practicum in Applied Anthropology OR
                                   ANT 799 Thesis 6 hrs

                                   2. Electives                                   9 hours
                                   Course Code Course Title Credits
                                   ANT 611 Ethnographic Field Methods 3 hrs
                                   ANT 625 North American Indians Today 3 hrs
                                   ANT 650 Advanced Methods in Archaeology 3 hrs
                                   ANT 692 Directed Research in Anthropology 1-3 hrs
                                   ANT 696 Directed Readings in Anthropology 1-3 hrs
                                   ANT 698 Seminar in Anthropology* 3 hrs

                                       *When applicable (e.g., The Anthropology of Tourism,
                                   Ethnohistory, Language Preservation, Historic Archaeology,
                                   Interpreting Skeletal Remains)
                                       Up to 6 hours of related graduate level courses in other
AGA 675 Plant     Course Change    AGA 675 Plant Improvement
Improvement
                                   Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 105. Application of genetic
                                   principles to the improvement of crop plants. Includes self-
                                   pollinated, cross-pollinated, and asexually-propagated crops.
                                   May be taught concurrently with AGA 575. Cannot receive credit
                                   for both AGA 575 and AGA 675. 2(2-0), S




AGA 725           Course Change    AGA 725 Advanced Soils Interpretations
Advanced Soils
Interpretations                    Recommended Prerequisite: AGA 345 and AGA 455. Field
                                   interpretation of physical and chemical properties, water
                                   relationships, and soil landscape relationships. 3(2-3), D
AGF 700 Plant   Course Change   AGF 700 Plant Science Colloquium
Science
Colloquium                      Prerequisite: permission of graduate coordinator. A series of oral
                                presentations on new developments in plant science.
                                Presentations to be made by faculty members, students, and
                                guest speakers from industry and academe. May be repeated,
                                but not more than 2 hours may be counted toward the M.S.
                                Degree. 1(1-0), F,S,Su




AGF 721 Enology Course Change   AGF 721 Enology

                                Recommended Prerequisite: BIO 310. The course will study the
                                chemistry, microbiology, and technology of modern wine
                                production. 3(3-0), S


AGF 722 Enology Course Change   AGF 722 Enology Lab
Lab
                                Prerequisite: AGF 721. Laboratory techniques in assessing wine
                                production methods and quality. 2(0-4), F


AGF 731 Plant   Course Change   AGF 731 Plant Genetic Engineering
Genetic
Engineering                     Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Principles, methodology,
                                and commercial applications of plant biotechnology. Includes
                                brief introduction to nucleic acid structure, gene regulation, and
                                genome organization in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms.
                                3(3-0), S


AGH 643 Plant   Course Change   AGH 643 Plant Propagation
Propagation
                                Recommended Prerequisite: either AGA 105 or BIO 121; and
                                either CHM 105 or CHM 160. Practices employed by fruit and
                                ornamental plant producers in propagation of plants, including
                                seeds, cuttings, layerings, grafting and micropropagation.
                                Supplemental course fee. May be taught concurrently with AGH
                                573. Cannot receive credit for both AGH 643 and AGH 573. 3(2-2)
                                S
AGH 730          Course Change    AGH 730 Advanced Topics in Plant Science
Advanced Topics
in Plant Science                  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An advanced topic in plant
                                  science will be addressed via faculty lectures and student
                                  projects. Examples of proposed topics include: Improved Disease
                                  Resistance in Viticulture, and Application of Field Collected Data
                                  to Computer Analysis. Variable content course. Identical with
                                  AGF 730. May be repeated to a total of 6 hours with differing
                                  topics. 3(3-0), F




AGH 753 Plant     Course Change   AGH 753 Plant Stress Physiology
Stress Physiology
                                  Prerequisite: permission of instructor. The effects of
                                  environmental stresses on plant physiological functions and plant
                                  growth, plus cultural methods to help plants adapt to stress. 3(3-
                                  0), D


AGH 773 Plant    Course Change    AGH 773 Plant Growth Regulation
Growth
Regulation                        Prerequisite: permission of instructor. The role of natural and
                                  synthetic plant hormones and related compounds in the growth,
                                  reproduction and cultivation of plants. 3(3-0), D

ECO 615 Public   Course Change    ECO 615 Public Finance
Finance
                                  Recommended Prerequisite: ECO 155 and ECO 165. Allocation
                                  and distribution functions of the public sector of the economy;
                                  theories of taxation and public expenditure; shifting and
                                  incidences of taxes, local-state federal finance. May be taught
                                  concurrently with ECO 515. Cannot receive credit for both ECO
                                  515 and ECO 615. 3(3-0), D
PSY 657 Legal     Course Change   PSY 657 Legal Issues for Professionals Working with Children
Issues for
Professionals                     Study of the legal issues related to child abuse and exploitation.
Working with                      Students will gain an understanding of the law pertaining to child
Children                          cases and how interactions with children can bolster or diminish
                                  the quality of children's memory report as seen by the judicial
                                  system. The Greene County Prosecutor's Office will participate in
                                  the design of this course, thus the specific legal issues discussed
                                  will remain current and may change based on the needs of the
                                  community. May be taught concurrently with PSY 557. Cannot
                                  receive credit for both PSY 657 and PSY 557. 3(3-0) F,S




ELE 302           Course Change   ELE 302 Introduction to Elementary Education and Clinical/Field
Introduction to                   Experience
Elementary
Education and                     Prerequisite: EDC 150 or concurrent enrollment if 30 hours
Clinical/Field                    completed. An overview of elementary school organization,
Experience                        management techniques, and personalized teaching styles for
                                  use with children including those from various cultural
                                  backgrounds and exceptional children who are mainstreamed in
                                  regular classrooms. Students will participate in a 30 clock hour
                                  field experience at Greenwood Laboratory School and/or area
                                  elementary schools. A grade of "C" or better is required in this
                                  course to student teach. 3(2-2) F,S




ELE 500 Current   Course Change   ELE 500 Current Issues and Applications in Elementary Education
Issues and
Applications in                   Prerequisite: ELE 429 and ELE 434 and ELE 438 and RDG 420 and
Elementary                        RDG 421. Application of current innovations and examination of
Education                         contemporary issues facing elementary teachers including
                                  classroom management, inclusion, English language learners,
                                  integrated planning and instruction with art, music, health and
                                  physical education. A comprehensive field experience in area
                                  school classrooms is required. May be taught concurrently with
                                  ELE 600. Cannot receive credit for both ELE 600 and ELE 500. 4-5
                                  F,S
Elementary        Program Change   Admission Requirements
Education B.S. Ed                  All students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program
                                   and to Supervised Teaching in order to earn this degree (see
                                   application procedures in the "Teacher Certification, Teacher
                                   Education Program" section of the catalog.)
                                   In addition to meeting all requirements for admission to the
                                   Teacher Education Program, those wishing to pursue a degree in
                                   Elementary Education must have accomplished the following:
                                   •Completed at least 30 hours
                                   •Passed all sections of C-BASE with a score of 265 or higher
                                   •Registered with the Missouri Family Care Safety Registry
                                   •Completed EDC 150 and ELE 302 with grades of "C" grade or
                                   better
                                   •A combined (MSU and transfer) GPA of 2.50 or higher
                                   •Application approved by the Professional Education Committee
                                   (PEC).
                                   Program Requirements
                                   In order to meet Missouri state teacher certification
                                   requirements, candidates for the Bachelor of Science in
                                   Education degree are required to meet the following grade point
                                   average requirements: at least a 2.50 GPA on all course work
                                   attempted at all colleges attended; at least a 2.50 GPA in the
                                   certificate subject area (major field of study) which includes all
                                   courses listed under B, C, and D; at least a 2.50 GPA in any
                                   additional certificate subject area; at least a 2.50 GPA in the
                                   professional education courses; and no grade lower than a "C" in
                                   all professional education courses. All GPA requirements include
CHM 170         Course Change      both Missouri State and transfer grades.
                                   CHM 170 General Chemistry II
General
Chemistry II                       Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 160. Emphasis on
                                   reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, precipitation reactions,
                                   acid-base theory and oxidation-reduction reactions. Concurrent
                                   registration in CHM 175 is highly recommended. A grade of "C"
                                   or better is required in this course in order to take CHM 342, 352
                                   or 506. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 3(3-0) F,S
CHM 171           Course Change   CHM 171 General Chemistry 11 Laboratory
General
Chemistry 11                      Prerequisite: CHM 170 or concurrent enrollment and a "C" or
Laboratory                        better in CHM 160 and CHM 161. An introduction to laboratory
                                  chemistry employing principles and techniques that reflect
                                  material prestented in CHM 170, e.g., physical studies on kinetics
                                  and equilibira of aqueous systems, qualitative and quantitative
                                  analysis, and data manipulation and interpretation. A grade of
                                  "C" or better is required in this course in order to take CHM 302
                                  or 342. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 1(0-43) F,S




CHM 200           Course Change   CHM 200 Essentials of Organic Chemistry
Essentials of
Organic                           Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in either CHM 105 or CHM 160.
Chemistry                         Principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Does not apply
                                  toward a chemistry major or minor if the student passes CHM
                                  342. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to
                                  take CHM 352. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. Lecture portion
                                  identical to CHM 201. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 200
                                  and CHM 201. Supplemental course fee. 5(4-3) F,S




CHM 302           Course Change   CHM 302 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry
Introduction to
Analytical                        Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 170 and CHM 175.
Chemistry                         Fundamentals of chemical analysis and basic statistics; solution
                                  equilibria, fundamentals of spectrophotometric,
                                  chromatographic, and electrochemical methods. Laboratory
                                  includes both wet chemical and instrumental methods.
                                  Representative analyses are performed in laboratory. 5(3-4), F,S




CHM 342           Course Change   CHM 342 Organic Chemistry I
Organic
Chemistry I                       Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in both CHM 170 and CHM 175.
                                  Systematic coverage of reactions and properties of organic
                                  compounds. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in
                                  order to take CHM 343, CHM 344 or CHM 352. May not be taken
                                  Pass/Not Pass. Supplemental course fee. 5(4-3), F,S
CHM 343           Course Change   CHM 343 Organic Chemistry II
Organic
Chemistry II                      Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 342. Continuation of
                                  CHM 342. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in
                                  order to take CHM 542. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass.
                                  Supplemental course fee. 5(4-3), F,S




CHM 344           Course Change   CHM 344 Organic Chemistry II
Organic
Chemistry II                      Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 342. Continuation of the
                                  lecture part of CHM 342. (Identical to lecture part of CHM 343.) A
                                  grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to take
                                  CHM 542. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 3(3-0), F,S




CHM 352           Course Change   CHM 352 Introduction to Biochemistry
Introduction to
Biochemistry                      Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in either CHM 200 or CHM 342.
                                  Recommended Prerequisite: BIO 121 or BMS 110. Essentials of
                                  biochemistry; chemistry and metabolism of biologically
                                  important compounds. Does not apply to a chemistry major or
                                  minor if the student passes CHM 452. 3(3-0), F,S




CHM 375           Course Change   CHM 375 Inorganic Chemistry
Inorganic
Chemistry                         Prerequisite: "C" grade or better in CHM 170. Atomic structure,
                                  chemical bonding, acid/base and reduction/oxidation concepts,
                                  reactivity of inorganic compounds, chemistry of main group
                                  elements, fundamentals of coordination theory. A grade of "C" or
                                  better is required in this course in order to take CHM 575. May
                                  not be taken Pass/Not Pass. May be taught concurrently with
                                  CHM 674. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 375 and CHM 674.
                                  3(3-0) F
CHM 460         Course Change   CHM 460 Environmental Chemistry I
Environmental
Chemistry I                     Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 170; and "C" or better in CHM
                                200 or CHM 343. Recommended Prerequisite: CHM 302.
                                Chemistry of pollution. Sources, effects, detection and
                                abatement of pollutants in air, water and soil. May be taught
                                concurrently with CHM 760. Cannot receive credit for both CHM
                                460 and CHM 760. 3(3-0), F


CHM 463         Course Change   CHM 463 Environmental Analysis
Environmental
Analysis                        Prerequisite: "C" or better in CHM 302 and CHM 460. Techniques
                                and procedures for environmental analysis of natural water
                                samples with an emphasis on wet chemical methods. Cannot
                                receive credit for both CHM 462 and CHM 463. Scheduled as First
                                Block class. 1(0-2), S


CHM 505         Course Change   CHM 505 Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry
Fundamentals of
Physical                        Prerequisite: 20 hours of chemistry coursework; and "C" or
Chemistry                       better in either MTH 287 or MTH 261. A one semester
                                introduction to physical chemistry including the following topics:
                                thermodynamics, solution chemistry, electrochemistry, kinetics,
                                and atomic and molecular structure. Laboratory experiments will
                                illustrate principles of physical chemistry and techniques of
                                analysis. Does not apply to a Chemistry major or minor if the
                                student passes CHM 506. May be taught concurrently with CHM
                                605. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 605 and CHM 505. 4(3-
                                3) S
Chemisty         Program Change   Chemistry Education
Education B.S.Ed                  Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable                      (Certifiable grades 9-12)
grades 9-12)                      A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                                  Program and Requirements section of catalog
                                  The following required courses can be used to meet both General
                                  Education and Major Requirements: BIO 121(4); CHM 160(4) or
                                  PHY 123(4) or GLG 110(4) or GLG 171(4); MTH 287(3)
                                  B.Major Requirements:
                                  1.Core (31-36 hours): CHM 160(4), 170(3), 175(2); CHM 200(5),
                                  or CHM 342(5) and CHM 343(5), or CHM 342(5) and CHM 344(3);
                                  CHM 302(5), 352(3), 460(3), 435(2), 505(4)
                                  Note: Students seeking American Chemical Society certification
                                  must take either CHM 342 and 343, or CHM 342 and 344.
                                  2.Related Requirements (22 hours): PHY 123(4), 124(4); SCI
                                  505(3); BIO 121(4); GLG 110(4) or GLG 171(4); MTH 287(3)
                                  3.Complete the requirements in one of the following grades 9-12
                                  certification areas:
                                  a.Categorical Science (3 hours): CHM 375(3)
                                  b.Unified Science (13 hours): CHM 463(1); BIO 122(4); GLG
                                  110(4); GRY 135(4)
                                  C.Professional Education courses (37 hours): SCI 214(1), 314(3),
                                  414(3), 493(6), 494(6); and the Professional Education Required
                                  Core and Competencies - see Teacher Certification, Teacher
                                  Education Program and Secondary Education Requirements
                                  section of catalog
                                  D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
                                  Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
B.S.Ed Special  Program Change   Special Education/Cross Categorical
Education/Cross                  Bachelor of Science in Education
Categorical                      (Certifiable grades K-12)
                                 All students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program
                                 and to Supervised Teaching in order to earn this degree (see
                                 application procedures in the "Teacher Certification, Teacher
                                 Education Program" section of catalog).
                                 In order to meet Missouri state teacher certification
                                 requirements, candidates for the Bachelor of Science in
                                 Education degree are required to meet the following grade point
                                 average requirements: at least a 2.50 GPA on all course work
                                 attempted at all colleges attended; at least a 2.50 GPA in the
                                 certificate subject area (major field of study) which includes all
                                 courses listed under B and C; at least a 2.50 GPA in any additional
                                 certificate subject area; at least a 2.50 GPA in the professional
                                 education courses; and no grade lower than a "C" in all
                                 professional education courses. All GPA requirements include
                                 both Missouri State and transfer grades.
                                 Additionally, State Board of Education certification rules require
                                 a passing score on each portion of the College Basic Academic
                                 Subject Examination (C-BASE) and successful completion of the
                                 appropriate Praxis II Examination Specialty Area Test with a score
                                 equal to Missouri's qualifying score. Missouri State further
                                 requires C-BASE minimum scores of 265.
                                 The curriculum for special education teaching leads to the degree
                                 of Bachelor of Science in Education and carries with it an initial
                                 professional certificate (IPC) to teach in the state of Missouri.
                                 Recipients of this special education certificate may be employed
Earth Science    Program Change   Earth Science Education
Education B.S.Ed                  Bachelor of Science in Education
                                  (Certifiable grades 9-12)
                                  A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
                                  Program and Requirements section of catalog
                                  The following required courses can be used to meet both General
                                  Education and Major Requirements: BIO 102(4); MTH 138(5), or
                                  MTH 135(3) and MTH 181(3), or MTH 261(5) or MTH 287(3); AST
                                  115(4) or CHM 105(5) or GLG 110(4) or GRY 135(4) or PHY 100(4)
                                  B.Major Requirements
                                  1.Core (26 hours): GLG 110(4), 314(5), 318(3), 412(4); GRY
                                  135(4), 348(3), 351(3)
                                  2.Major Electives (3 hours): Select 3 additional hours from any
                                  GLG course numbered 171 or above in consultation with advisor
                                  3.Related Requirements (10-13 hours): AST 115(4); MTH 138(5),
                                  or MTH 135(3) and 181(3) or MTH 261(5) or MTH 287(3); SCI
                                  505(3)
                                  4.Complete one of the following options:
                                  a.Categorical Science (13 hours): BIO 102(4); CHM 105(5); PHY
                                  100(4)
                                  b.Unified Science (25 hours): BIO 121(4), 122(4); CHM 160(4),
                                  170(3), 175(2); PHY 123(4), 124(4)
                                  C.Professional Education Courses (37 hours): SCI 214(1), 314(3),
                                  414(3), 493(6), 494(6) and see Teacher Certification, Teacher
                                  Education Program and Secondary Education Requirements
                                  section of catalog
                                  D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
IMT 365           Course Change   IMT 365 Instructional Requirements Technology and Media
                                  Baccalaureate Degree Applications of section of catalog
Instructional
Applications of                   Prerequisite: CIS 101 or CSC 101 or waiver exam, and one of the
Technology and                    following: ELE 302, SPE 310, or SEC 302, or concurrent
Media                             enrollment for teacher education majors. Principles and
                                  techniques for selection and utilization of computer and video
                                  systems as well as other basic forms of media and technology.
                                  The class combines research, instructional design, equipment
                                  operation and materials production in lecture and laboratory
                                  settings to prepare teachers to be reflective decision makers on
                                  proper methods of using technology in teaching. 3(3-0) F,S
IMT 562           Course Change   IMT 562 Educational Applications of Computers for Teaching
Educational
Applications of                   Using microcomputers in educational settings. Includes the
Computers for                     investigation of software in desktop publishing, record
Teaching                          management and multimedia applications. Special emphasis will
                                  be given to selection of appropriate programs for specific
                                  classroom utilization as well as computer interfaced peripheral
                                  devices. May be taught concurrently with IMT 662. Cannot
                                  receive credit for both IMT 662 and IMT 562. 3(2-2) F,S,Su




IMT 597 Topical   Course Change   IMT 597 Topical Issues in Instructional Technology
Issues in
Instructional                     A variable credit course with amount of credit based on the
Technology                        extent of the work required. Special topics related to the field of
                                  Instructional Technology which may broaden the scope of the
                                  program of study. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hours.
                                  May be taught concurrently with IMT 690. Cannot receive credit
                                  for both IMT 690 and IMT 597. 1-6 D




MID 400:          New Course      N/A
Philosophy,
Curriculum, and
Organization of
Middle School
Education
Complete NEW Catalog Description




4.Studio Emphasis (15-21 hours): a minimum of 15 but no more
than 21 upper-division (300 level or above) hours in one of the
following studio areas:

b.Computer Animation: Required: ART 330(3), 430(3), 431(3).
Electives: ART 399(3-6)


B.Major Requirements (37 hours)

2.Choose one of the following options (18 hours):

b.Computer Animation Studies: ART 230(3); MED 465(3); select 12
hours with advisor approval: ART 330(3), 430(3), 431(3), 399(3-6)


JRN 378 Multimedia Journalism

Prerequisite: JRN 270. Instruction and practice in multimedia
reporting and publishing for print media and the Internet, including
digital still photography, video, audio, social media, and text. The
course will also address content management systems for the web,
ethics, and legal concerns. Note: Students must have a digital
camera (3.1 megapixels or greater) with still and video modes. (All-
in-one devices such as the iPhone fulfill this requirement.) 3(3-1) S




MED 304 Mass Media Theory

Prerequisite: MED 120. An examination of the history,
development, and current state of mass communication theory and
its relationship to the ways in which mediated messages are
delivered and received. 3(3-0) F,S
MED 290 Fundamentals of Multimedia Design

A broad exploration of multimedia design via readings and creative
experiences. The following areas are considered: fundamental
design principles, effective multimedia design, implementation and
implications of multimedia, evaluation of existing multimedia
examples, and collaboration in a group multimedia project. 3(3-1)
F, S


MED 325 Media History

The development and growth U.S. mass media from their origins
through the development of the Internet. Emphasis will be placed
on changing technologies, changing socio-political roles and
changing structure of the mass media industry. 3(3-0) F,S




MED 390 Website Design and Construction

Through readings and production experiences, students are
expected to acquire a basic working knowledge of WWW site
design. Web design is analyzed on many levels: audience
considerations, screen layout, navigation controls, image use,
interactivity options, etc. This course includes the creation and
publication of a website. 3(3-1) F,S
MED 490 Advanced Interactive Multimedia Design

Prerequisite: MED 290. An advanced study of interactive
multimedia design based on human-computer interaction
principles. Course will include the creation of a project
incorporating interactivity as a core element. Topics may include
mobile applications, site-specific multimedia design, trans-media,
advanced physical interactivity, or advanced Flash design. May be
repeated to a total of 6 hours if topics are different. Variable
Content Course. 3(2-2), SE




MED 570 Film Theory

An analysis of the art of film by using classical and contemporary
film theory to investigate such aspects as the relationship between
form and content, visual style and the nature of pictorial motion.
Weekly screenings and discussions of short films, excerpts,
complete classics and contemporary films. May be taught
concurrently with MED 670. Cannot receive credit for both MED
670 and MED 570. 3(3-1) D
Mass Media (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog. Specific General
Education Requirement: MED 120(3)
B.Major Requirements (39 hours)
1.Departmental Preadmission Core: MED 130(3), 220(3)
2. Departmental Required Courses: MED 304(3), 581(3); JRN 407(3)
3.Mass Media (Non-Comprehensive) Core: MED 274(3), 454(3)
4.Choose one of the following options (18 hours):
   a.Film Studies: MED 374(3), 375(3), 470(3), 570(3); select 6
hours of elective courses chosen with approval of advisor
   b.Media Studies: MED 290(3); MED 320(3) or 355(3) or 580(3);
MED 325(3), 381(3); select 6 hours of MED or JRN electives chosen
with approval of advisor

Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 2.7 or higher
across any three of the four preadmission courses [MED 120(3),
130(3), 220(3) and 274(3)] to be admitted to this major.
C.Minor Required. Note: No course may count for both the Mass
Media major and the minor.
D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
Mass Media (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog. Specific General
Education Requirements: MED 120(3)
B.Major Requirements (51 hours)
1.Departmental Preadmission Core: MED 130(3), 220(3)
2. Departmental Required Courses: MED 304(3), 581(3); JRN 407(3)
3.Mass Media (Comprehensive) Core: MED 274(3), 365(3), 454(3)
4.Choose one of the following options (27 hours):
a.Digital Film Production: MED 361(3) or 461(3); MED 374(3) or
375(3); MED 462(3); MED 464(3) or 565(3); MED 465(3) or 466(3);
MED 561(3) or 562(3); select 9 hours of elective courses from MED
300(3), 361(3); MED 374(3) or 375(3); MED 461(3), 463(3); MED
464 (3) or 565(3); MED 465(3) or 466(3); MED 470(3), 492(1-3);
MED 561(3), 562(3); MED 566(3), 567(3), 570(3), 595(3), 597(3)
b.Media Production: MED 290(3), 325(3); MEd 361(3) or 382(3);
MED 381(3) or 464(3); MED 383(3), 583(3); select 9 hours of
elective courses from MED 320(3), 355(3), 390(3); MED 361(3) or
382(3); MED 381(3) or 464(3); MED 462(3), 463(3), 466(3), 490(3),
492(1-3), 566(3), 595(1-6), 597(3).
Note: A student must achieve a combined GPA of 2.7 or higher
across any three of the four preadmission courses [MED 120(3),
130(3), 220(3) and 365(3)] along with a combined GPA of 2.3 or
higher to be admitted to this major.
C.Note: No course may count for both the Mass Media major and a
minor.
D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
N/A




N/A
N/A




N/A




N/A




N/A




N/A




Classics-Concentration in Ancient Greek, French, Latin, Spanish
Bachelor of Arts
Complete 18 hours in one language beyond courses 101 and 102 in
consultation with advisor. Six hours of upper division courses are
required for all B.A. minors. LLT 121 and LLT 325 may be counted as
part of the 18 hours required for the Ancient Greek minor.
French
Bachelor of Arts
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
B.Major Requirements (33 hours)
1. FRN 201(3), 202(3), 311(3), 312(3), 326(3), 335(3), 410(3), and
415(3)
2. FRN 313(3) or 314(3)
3. Six hours of additional French electives beyond 102 to bring total
to at least 33 hours. Study abroad and service learning are highly
recommended. Students typically receive credit for such
experiences.
4.MCL 499(0)
C.Minor Required (or second major)
D.Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees,
Programs and Requirements section of catalog
E.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog




French
Bachelor of Science
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
B.Major Requirements (33 hours)
1. FRN 201(3), 202(3), 311(3), 312(3), 326(3), 335(3), 410(3), and
415(3)
2. FRN 313(3) or 314(3)
3. Six hours of additional French electives beyond 102 to bring total
to at least 33 hours. Study abroad and service learning are highly
recommended. Students typically receive credit for such
experiences.
4.MCL 499(0)
C.Minor Required (or second major)
D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
German
Bachelor of Arts
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
B.Major Requirements (33 hours)
1.Complete 33 hours beyond 102. Of the total, at least 12 hours
must come from upper-division courses, including at least six hours
at the 400 or 500 levels. With advisor approval, a maximum of six
hours from LLT 225 and LLT 271 may count toward the degree.
2.MCL 499(0)
C.Minor Required (or second major)
D.Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees,
Programs and Requirements section of catalog
E.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog




German
Bachelor of Science
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
B.Major Requirements (33 hours)
1.Complete 33 hours beyond 102. Of the total, at least 12 hours
must come from upper-division courses, including at least six hours
at the 400 or 500 levels. With advisor approval, a maximum of six
hours from LLT 225 and LLT 271 may count toward the degree.
2.MCL 499(0)
C.Minor Required (or second major)
D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
Classics- Latin Concentration
Bachelor of Arts
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
B.Major Requirements (32 hours)
1.Complete 32 hours beyond LTN 101 and 102 in consultation with
advisor, including two hours of LTN 480. Either LLT 121 or LLT 321
and either LLT 326 or HST 343 may be counted as part of the 32
hours required for the Latin major.
2.MCL 499(0)
C.Minor Required (or second major)
D.Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see
Degrees, Programs and Requirements section of catalog
E.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog




French, German, Classics- Latin Concentration, Spanish
Bachelor of Science
In consultation with advisor, complete 18 hours in one language
beyond courses 101 and 102.
Spanish
Bachelor of Arts
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
B.Major Requirements (30 hours)
1.SPN 201(3), 202(3), 205(3), 312(3), 324(3), 410(3), and SPN 415(3)
2. SPN 325(3) or SPN 326(3)
3. SPN 450(3) or SPN 460(3)
4. Six hours of additional Spanish electives beyond 102 to bring
total to at least 33 hours. Study abroad and service learning are
highly recommended. Students typically receive credit for such
experiences.
5.MCL 499(0)
C.Minor Required (or second major)
D.Specific Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree - see Degrees,
Programs and Requirements section of catalog
E.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog




Spanish
Bachelor of Science
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
B.Major Requirements (30 hours)
1.SPN 201(3), 202(3), 205(3), 312(3), 324(3), 410(3), and SPN 415(3)
2. SPN 325(3) or SPN 326(3)
3. SPN 450(3) or SPN 460(3)
4. Six hours of additional Spanish electives beyond 102 to bring
total to at least 33 hours. Study abroad and service learning are
highly recommended. Students typically receive credit for such
experiences.
5.MCL 499(0)
C.Minor Required (or second major)
D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
N/A




DAN 125 Tap Dance I

Basic elements of tap dance, stylized steps and terminology
coordinated with the rhythmic structure of tap dance. 2(0-4) F,S




DAN 130 Dance Fundamentals 1

First course in the fundamentals of classical ballet and modern
dance techniques, with an emphasis on alignment and basic
movement vocabulary. Designed for students with little or no
dance experience. First course in a two-semester module. Variable
content course. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. 2(0-4)
F


DAN 131 Dance Fundamentals 11

Prerequisite: DAN 130. Second course in the fundamentals of
classical ballet and modern dance techniques, with an emphasis on
alignment and basic movement vocabulary. Designed for students
with little or no dance experience. Variable content course. May be
repeated for a maximum of 6 hours. 2(0-4) S




N/A
DAN 216 Elementary Modern Dance

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Explores elements of
modern dance technique. Designed for students with at least one
year of formal dance training. Variable content course. May be
repeated to a total of 12 hours. 3(1-4) F,S


N/A




N/A




DAN 225 Tap Dance II

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Elementary tap dance
techniques and vocabulary. Variable content course. May be
repeated to a total of 6 hours. 1(0-2) F

DAN 230 Elementary Ballet

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Elementary classical ballet
technique and vocabulary. This course is designed for students with
at least one to two years of formal and consistent ballet training.
Variable content course. May be repeated to a total of 12 hours.
3(1-4) F,S
N/A




DAN 235 Mens Dance Technique I

Prerequisite: DAN 216 and DAN 230. Basic techniques for the male
dancer. Emphasis will be on strength building and developing the
male dancer's technique and style. Variable content course. May be
repeated to a total of 4 hours. 2(0-4) D




DAN 245 Elementary Jazz Dance

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Continues development of
jazz dance technique and vocabulary. Elementary level technique
designed for students with at least one year of formal dance
training. Variable content course. May be repeated to a total of
12hours. 3(1-4) F,S


DAN 316 Intermediate Modern Dance

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Intermediate level modern
dance technique. Variable content course. May be repeated to a
total of 12 hours. 3(1-4) D


DAN 319 Contact Improvisation

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Contemporary dance
improvisation that explores sharing weight, rolling, lifting, flying
and finding one's center. Dancers will explore and focus on specific
relationships in partnering. 2(0-4) D
DAN 320 Dance Composition I: Improvisation and Solo Forms

Prerequisite: DAN 216. Contemporary dance improvisation
techniques, and creative approaches to development of basic
movement themes and simple and complex manipulations of those
themes. The first course in the Dance Composition Series. 2(0-4) F




N/A




DAN 323 Musical Theatre Styles

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Students will continue to
refine their performance techniques as they relate to historical
trends in choreography and staging for American Musical Theatre.
A minimum of three production numbers featuring either original
Broadway choreography or choreography devised by the instructor
will be taught and performed during the semester. Students will
also have the opportunity to either sing or act or both depending
on the numbers that are mastered. 2(0-4) D




DAN 325 Tap Dance III

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Continues development of
intermediate level tap dance technique and vocabulary. Variable
conent course. May be repeated to a total of 3 hours. 1(0-2) S




DAN 330 Intermediate Ballet

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Intermediate level ballet
technqiue. Variable content course. May be repeated to a total of
12 hours. 3(1-4) D
DAN 335 Men's Dance Technique II

Prerequisite: DAN 235. Continued techniques for the male dancer.
Emphasis will be on strength building and developing the male
dancer's technique and style. Variable content coures. May be
repeated to a total of 4 hours. 2(0-4) D




DAN 345 Intermediate Jazz Dance

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Intermediate level jazz dance
technique. Variable content course. May be repeated to a total of 6
hours. 2(0-4) D


DAN 348 Partnering

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Basic and elementary
techniques of classical and contemporary partnering. Variable
content course. May be repeated to a total of 4 hours. 2(0-4) SE




DAN 364 Applied Kinesiology for the Dancer

Prerequisite: PED 250. The specific study of dance techniques
through the principles of motion, muscle action and joint
mechanics. 3(3-0)FO


N/A
N/A




DAN 416 Advanced Modern Dance

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Advanced level modern
dance technique. Variable content course. May be repeated to a
total of 12 hours. 3(1-4) D


DAN 420 Dance Composition II: Small Group Forms

Prerequisite: DAN 320. Choreographic techniques that explore
creative approaches to the development and manipulation of
movement themes. Emphasis on small group studies that explore
space, time and energy. 2(0-4) S




DAN 430 Advanced Ballet

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Advanced level ballet
technique. Variable content course. May be repeated to a total of
12 hours. 3(1-4) S


DAN 445 Advanced Jazz Dance

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Advanced level jazz dance
technique. Variable content course. May be repeated to a total of
12 hours. 3(1-4) D
N/A




DAN 565 Dance Pedagogy

Prerequisite: 45 hours and DAN 316 and DAN 330 and DAN 345.
Overview of general theories and practices of teaching. This course
investigates class content and various methodologies used to teach
dance techniques and creative movement. Emphasis is placed on
methods for teaching the beginning and elementary level student.
Opportunities to develop and implement lesson plans, and to
develop comprehensive training syllabi. 4(2-4) FE




N/A




N/A




N/A
DAN 530 Pointe

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Pointe technique that
focuses on stability, correct alignment of the feet, and use of turn-
out. At least one classical variation will be taught. 1(0-2), D

DAN 592 Performance

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Performance laboratory for
students majoring in Dance. Focused study of dance repertory from
a variety of genres. Emphasis will be placed on performance
techniques as related to various styles. Variable content.
Repeatable up to 4 credit hours. 1(0-1) D

Minors
Dance
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
A.9 hours from: 316(3), 416(3), 330(3), 430(3), 345(3), 445(3)

B.DAN 180(3)

C.6 hours of electives from: 320(2), 348(2), 364(3), 420(2), 499(1),
520(3), 552(2), 565(4), 592(1) for a total of 18 hours
Theatre and Dance
Bachelor of Fine Arts
Admission Requirements: In addition to the University’s admission
requirements, students must be officially accepted into the BFA
program prior to the first semester of coursework in the major.
Auditions and/or interviews for placement in the program are held
on campus during the fall and spring semester of each year.
Prospective students should contact the Department of Theatre
and Dance for specific information about the audition process and
dates.

A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
Note: Six hours of the General Education Humanities Requirement
may not be included in the courses fulfilling the major.
B.Major Requirements (78 hours)
1.Core Requirements (31 hours)
a.Design/Technology (10 hours): THE 150(2) and 151(1); 224(1);
choose two groups from THE 250(2) and 251(1), or THE 255(2) and
256(1), or THE 260(2) and 261(1)
b.Directing (6 hours): THE 130(3) and THE 430(3) or DAN 520(3)
c.History (6 hours): THE 541(3) and THE 542(3) or DAN 552(3)
d.Acting (3 hours): THE 121(3)* or 123(3). *THE 121 is open to
admitted BFA in Theatre/Acting and Musical Theatre majors only.
e.Electives from approved courses inside or outside the
department (5 hours). 2-3 hours of Dance courses suggested.
f.Senior BFA Project: THE 492(1) or DAN 492(1)
2.Complete oneTopics following options:
PLS 497 Special of the

A course designed to provide a means of study for topics not
addressed elsewhere in the curriculum. May be repeated up to a
maximum of 9 hours. Variable content course. 3(3-0) D
Chemistry (Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
B.Major Requirements
1.CHM 160(4)*, 161(1), 170(3), 171(1), 302(5), 342(5), 343(5),
375(3), 398(1), 452(3), 498(1), 506(3), 507(3), 508(2), 533(4),
575(3)
2.Related science and mathematics requirements: MTH 287* and
288(6) or MTH 261* and 280(10) or MTH 261* and 288(8); PHY
123* and 124(8) or PHY 203* and 204(10); Recommended CSC
111(3)*
3.Complete requirements in one of the following options:
a.Biochemistry: This program is designed for students preparing for
a career in medicine or graduate study in biochemistry. Required
courses: CHM 399(1-3) or 499(1-3), 453(2), 552(3), 553(2); BIO
121(4)*, 235(4), 320(4) Suggested electives: BIO 310(5). Premedical
students should also take courses in anatomy and physiology.
b.Graduate School: This program is designed for students preparing
for graduate study in chemistry. Required courses: CHM 376(2),
499(1-3), 509(2); Select one: CHM 514(3), 542(3), 552(3). Suggested
electives: one year foreign language
c.Industrial: This program is designed for students preparing for
industrial positions upon completion of the B.S. degree, but who
wish to be prepared for future entry into graduate school. Required
courses: CHM 376(2), 509(2), 514 or 542(3), four hours selected
from 397(2), 399(1-3), 499(1-3)
Chemistry
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
A.CHM 160(4), 161(1), 170(3), 171(1); CHM 200(5) or CHM 342(5)
B.Select an emphasis area from the options below:
1.Analytical: CHM 302(5)
2.Biochemistry: CHM 352(3) and 353(2); or CHM 452(3) and 453(2)
3.Environmental: CHM 460(3) and 461(3)
4.Inorganic: CHM 375(3) and 376(2)
5.Organic: CHM 343(5) or 344(3); and CHM 505(4) or 506(3); and
CHM 542(3)
6.Physical: CHM 506(3); and CHM 507(3) or 508(2)
7.Student Option: Select at least 8 hours in CHM courses numbered
302 or higher.
Chemistry (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Science
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
B.Major Requirements
1.CHM 160(4)*, 161(1), 170(3), 171(1), 302(5), 342(5), 343(5),
375(3), 398(1); 505(4) or 506(3) and CHM 507(3) and 508(2);
498(1), 502(4); and one hour from CHM 397, 399 or 499
*Will also count toward General Education Requirements
2.Chemistry electives (8-10 hours) from one of the following
categories:
a.For a basic chemistry program without a specific area of
emphasis, at least eight hours from CHM 352(3), 376(2), 399 or 499
(2-3), 460(3), 509(2)
b.For students with a strong interest in environmental chemistry:
CHM 460(3), 461(3), 462(2)
c.For students with a strong interest in biochemistry or pre-
medicine: CHM 452(3), 453(2), 552(3), 553(2)
d.For a specific area of interest not included in categories a, b, or c:
at least nine hours of chemistry courses numbered 300 or above
selected in consultation with the student’s academic advisor and
approved by the department head.
3.Related science and mathematics requirements: MTH 261* and
280(10) or MTH 261* and 288(8) or MTH 287* and 288(6); PHY
123* and 124(8) or PHY 203* and 204(10)
C.Minor Required (or second major)
D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements Geographycatalog
GRY 495 Undergraduate Research in section of

Prerequisite: permission. Enrichment through guided but
independent, original research in geography and geography related
subject areas. 1-3 D
N/A




CHM 105 Fundamentals of Chemistry

Prerequisite: eligibility for MTH 103 or have completed MTH 103,
or be concurrently enrolled in MTH 102. General Education Course
(Natural World). Emphasis on chemical fundamentals and
applications. Recommended for students needing only one
semester of general chemistry. (CHM 105 will not count toward a
chemistry major or minor.) Course does satisfy prerequisite for
CHM 200. A grade of "C-" or better is required in this course in
order to take CHM 200. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 5(4-2) F,S
Global Studies (Non-Comprehensive)
Bachelor of Arts

A. General Education Requirements- see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog.
B. Major Requirements (45-51 hours)
1. GBL 250(3)
2. Complete four of the following courses: ANT 100(3); ECO 155(3);
GRY 100(3); HST 200(3); PLS 232(3), REL 210(3); SOC 150(3)
3. Complete 15 hours in one of the following focus areas, with
courses with at least four different course prefixes:
a. Language and Culture: ANT 226(3), 280(3), 310(3), 320(3),
380(3), 490(3)*; COM 360(3); ENG 283(3); GRY 320(3); IDS 397(3)*;
MCL 550(3)*; MUS 239(3); PHI 115(3); REL 210(3); REL 342(3)
b. Business and Economics: AGB 514(3); AGR 100(3); ECO 346(3),
456(3), 565(3); GRY 308(3), 321(3); HST 340(3); IDS 397(3)*; MCL
550(3)*; MGT 447(3); MKT 474(3); PHI 342(3)
c. Politics, Society and Environmental Issues: CRM 420(3); ECO
540(3); GRY 108(3), 316(3), 322(3), 323(3), 351(3), 535(3); HST
200(3), 328(3); IDS 397(3)*; MCL 550(3)*; PHI 302(3); PLS 205(3),
232(3), 330(3), 437(3), 535(3), 546(3), 555(3), 561(3), 565(3); SOC
305(3), 336(3); PHI 342(3)
*When applicable
 4. Complete 15 hours in Regional Studies with at least one course
in each of the following five regions. The following courses may
apply to various regions depending upon course content: ANT 330,
ENG 362, or GRY 303.
ACC 688 ART 273(3)*, 386(3); ENG 363(3);
a. Africa: Healthcare Accounting Concepts GRY 507(3); HST 323(3),


The role of accounting in the financial and operational
management of healthcare organizations is approached via an
introduction to healthcare financial and managerial accounting
principles. This course addresses the definition of financial
accounting; external reporting; development and use of the income
statement, balance sheet and statement of cash flows. The course
also addresses the managerial accounting topics of cost behavior
and allocation; accounting data for pricing and service decisions;
planning and budgeting in healthcare organizations; analysis of
financial condition; and selected topics in ethics. The course is a
core requirement for MHA students an may be of interest to
students in other graduate programs. Note that ACC 688 cannot
substitute for ACC 711 in the MBA program and cannot be counted
in the 33 semester hours required for the MAcc degree. 3(3-0) S, Su
N/A




N/A




N/A




N/A
BIO 609 Stream Ecology

Recommended Prerequisite: ecology course and one year of
college chemistry. The interdisciplinary study of running waters,
including study of the physical and chemical environment, trophic
interactions, nutrient cycling, and the multiple impacts of humans
on modifying these systems. Lectures, group discussion of readings,
and laboratory and field exercises. One all-day Saturday field trip
required. May be taught concurrently with BIO 509. Cannot receive
credit for both BIO 509 and BIO 609. 4(2-4), S O




BIO 640 App of Molecular Markers

Prerequisite: permission. Recommended Prerequisite: genetics
course. Introduction to the use of molecular markers in biological
research. Topics covered include methods for identifying genetic
variation at the molecular level (protein electrophoresis, automatic
DNA sequencing, RAPDs, RFLPs, AFLPs, microsatellites) and their
applications to research in systematics, ecology, evolution,
conservation biology, forensics, and gene mapping. Students will
complete research projects using one or more of the techniques
learned. Supplemental course fee. May be taught concurrently with
BIO 540. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 540 and BIO 640. 4(2-
4), FO




BIO 651 Advanced Statistical Methods for Biologists

Recommended Prerequisite: statistics course. The design and
analysis of biological experiments, with an emphasis on the choice
and interpretation of inferential statistics. Topics covered include
causal inference, statistical power, general linear models, repeated
measures designs, log-linear models, nonparametric procedures,
and computer-intensive techniques. The use of computer software
to analyze real data sets from the biological literature is
emphasized. May be taught concurrently with BIO 551. Cannot
receive credit for both BIO 551 and BIO 651. 2(1-2), S
BIO 663 Population Ecology

Recommended Prerequisite: ecology course and pre-calculus
mathematics course. Discussion of factors controlling the
distribution and abundance of populations. Quantitative
description of population dynamics is emphasized. May be taught
concurrently with BIO 563. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 563
and BIO 663. 3(2-2), S E




BIO 668 Physiological Ecology

Recommended Prerequisite: ecology course; and general
physiology or plant physiology or human physiology course.
Physiological adaptations of plants and animals to environmentally
stressful conditions and to ecological/evolutionary pressures. May
be taught concurrently with BIO 567. Cannot receive credit for both
BIO 567 and BIO 668. 4(4-0), SO




BIO 680 Vertebrate Anatomy and Evolution

Vertebrate gross anatomy. Phylogeny and present status of organ
systems in vertebrates. May be taught concurrently with BIO 380.
Cannot receive credit for both BIO 380 and BIO 680. 2(2-0), F




CSD 876 Hearing Conservation and Calibration

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. This course will prepare the
audiologist to meet industrial needs for sound measurement and
hearing conservation. Government standards will be reviewed and
applied to industrial settings that fall under OSHA guidelines for
hearing sonservation. This will include the anatomical and
physiological effects of noise on humans; Federal Standards and
Damage-Risk criteria, the susceptibility and predisposing factors
related to industrial noise as well as conducting and reporting a
noise survey with a hearing conservation plan. The course will also
cover caliboration of audiometers and the use of ANSI standards.
3(2-2), D
CIS 732 Information Systems Planning
CIS 734 Staffing The Information Systems Function
CIS 736 Network Planning & Administration
CIS 738 Information System Project Management
CIS 744 Information System Management
CIS 742 Management of End-User Computing
CIS 740 Comparative System Development Methodology
CIS 746 Data Modeling & Database Administration
CIS 747 IT Legal Issues
CIS 752 Behavior and Leadership in IT
CIS 750 Information System Resource Acquisition
CIS 748 Principles of IT Security
CIS 754 Organizational Transformation
CIS 756 Special Topics in Information Systems
N/A




BUS 650 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business

A practical, skills-based study of negotiation, mediation, and
arbitration from the business manager's perspective. This hands-on
course is designed to develop the skills necessary to enable the
business manager to effectively participate in negotiation,
mediation, and arbitration as alternatives to litigation for resolving
business disputes. Identical with LAW 650. May be taught
concurrently with BUS 550. Cannot receive credit for more than
one of BUS 550, BUS 650, LAW 550, or LAW 650. 3(3-0) F,S
LAW 637 Environmental Regulation

Laws and government environmental regulation of air, water and
soil quality, energy resources, solid and toxic waste disposal,
storage tanks, toxic torts, labeling of toxic substances, recycling;
ethical, public policy and international implications such regulations
pose for business practices, natural resource utilization, health
quality and biodiversity. May be taught concurrently with LAW 537.
Cannot receive credit for both LAW 637 and LAW 537. 3(3-0) SO




LAW 650 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration in Business

A practical, skills-based study of negotiation, mediation, and
arbitration from the business manager's perspective. This hands-on
course is designed to develop the skills necessary to enable the
business manager to effectively participate in negotiation,
mediation, and arbitration as alternatives to litigation for resolving
business disputes. Identical with BUS 650. May be taught
concurrently with LAW 550. Cannot receive credit for more than
one of BUS 550, BUS 650, LAW 550, or LAW 650. 3(3-0) F,S
HST 644 Women in Islam

This course examines the complexities of Middle Eastern culture
through the lens of gender, focusing on women in Islamic society.
We will examine and critique current scholarly and journalistic
literature (largely by Muslim women), films and documentaries,
and current events in order to better understand current social,
political, and economica developments in the Middle East. Special
emphasis is on Egypt and Iran, which have enjoyed the lion's share
of academic and legal attention. While we focus on the modern
Middle East, coverage also includes a historical review of scriptural
roots and socio-political structures from the Middle Ages until
today. The course has been designed as a quasi-seminar, where we
will meet in round-table fashion and discuss together readings that
have been prepared in advance, in combination with lecture. May
be taught concurrently with HST 544. Cannot receive credit for both
HST 544 and HST 644. 3(3-0) D
HST 673 History and Archaeology of the Middle East

Archaeology as a tool for historical inquiry is the focus of this
course. In this course students will become familiar with the
problems and methods of the discipline as they relate to the larger
questions of Middle Eastern history, including migration and
settlement, the impact of war, land use and ecological issues,
religion and identity, transformations of the traditional Middle
Eastern household, and the relations between local society and the
state. Topics covered in lectures and students' projects include the
use of textual sources, palaeography, and other methodological
challenges; historic perservation and heritage management; legal
issues and the politics of archaeology; and museum work. Cast
studies in the course chronologically range from ancient to
Ottoman-era sites, but the focus of the course is the medieval era
(Byzantine, Crusader, Islamic). A series of lectures, hands-on work
with the Jordan study collection, and documentaries will expose
the student to the wide range of disciplines pulled into the service
of archaeology and different methodologies. Special emphasis is
placed on current fieldwork at Tall Hisban in Jordan and the
Northern Jordan Project. Enrollment in this course is strongly
HST 674 Jordan Archaeology Study Away

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Recommended prerequisite:
HST 673(History and Archaeology of the Middle East). This course is
a formal archaeological field school- with field, lab, and classroom
components- held on-site in Jordan as a MSU Study Away program
in the summers. The field school provides hands-on training in
archaeological excavation and post-season object analysis
techniques; students will also participate in several projects related
to site presentation, architectural preservation, and community
outreach that are running concurrently with the project. The field
school rotates between the Tall Hisban excavations and the
Northern Jordan Project(NJP), held at each site in alternative
summers. Excursions to sites of archaeological, historical, religious,
and cultural interest are organized in weekends. Students attending
the field school are strongly encouraged to take the course "History
and Archaeology of the Middle East" beforehand. The program,
depending on the research objectives that year, will run 3-6 weeks.
May be taught concurrently with HST 574. Cannot receive credit for
both HST 574 and HST 674. 3 Su




HST 725 The Upland South

Recommended Prerequisite: HST 701. Readings in the history of the
Upland South (the Ozarks and Appalachia) for the graduate student.
3(3-0) D
HST 775 Proseminar in the Middle East

This proseminar in the Middle East introduces students to the
historiography of the medieval Middle East (defined as the Arab
heartland, Persia, and Anatolia), familiarizing them with the range
of primary and secondary sources available for study,
methodological approaches to using them, and the most important
debates in modern scholarship generated by them. Through
seminar discussions and debates based on intersive reading,
students learn and practice historical method, tailored to this field.
Among the topics covered in this course are the nature (and
pitfalls) of medieval Arabic texts; how archives are created; the
development of medieval Islamic historiography by contemporary
Muslim and modern historians; the problematic of medieval
political theory in the Arab, Persian, and Turkish worlds; the
development of classical Islamic institutions; alternative state forms
and how they developed; the impact of developments in the
Middle East for world history; and the transition in this region to
the modern era. 3(3-0) D
Instructional Technology Specialist Certificate Program
Program Description
The Certificate for Instructional Technology Specialist provides a 15
hour graduate-level experience for school administrators, teachers
and staff working at the school building level. The program
provides for the acquisition of knowledge and skills necessary for
supporting teachers and students. The certificate is
interdisciplinary in nature and provides competencies in 3 core
areas of Administration and Management, and Technology
Integration in the teaching process. All 15-16 hours may be applied
toward the MS degree in IMT. This is a Missouri State University
graduate certificate and does not meet Missouri State Certification
requirements for teaching.
Entrance Criteria
To be considered for the program, a student must apply and be
admitted to the Graduate College.
GPA Requirements
Attain a grade point average of at least 3.00 on all graduate course
work at Missouri State University.
Required Courses
Core I - Administration and Management
IMT 640 Tech. Administration and Management            2 hrs
IMT 763 Administration of Instructional Tech.          3 hrs
Core II - Technology Integration
IMT 764 Instructional Design                              3 hrs
IMT 767 Instructional Technology Practicum              3 hrs
Electives - chose two courses 5-6 hours
CSC 605 Cultural Resource Management
ANT 710

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An examination of laws and
regulations pertaining to the preservation of American history and
culture and the professional management and preservation of
ethnic, historic, and prehistoric cultural resources. May be taught
concurrently with ANT 545. Cannot receive credit for both ANT 545
and ANT 645. 3(3-0) F




N/A
Degree Requirements (A minimum of 36 hours)
1. Core Requirements                             21 hrs
Course Code Course Title Credits
ANT 611 Ethnographic Field Methods OR
ANT 650 Advanced Methods in Archaeology 3 hrs
ANT 700 Applying Anthropology 3 hrs
ANT 720 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology 3 hrs
ANT 770 Research Design & Writing in Anth. 3 hrs
ANT 790 Internship in Applied Anthropology 3 hrs
ANT 797 Practicum in Applied Anthropology OR
ANT 799 Thesis 6 hrs

2. Electives                                   15 hours
Course Code Course Title Credits
ANT 611 Ethnographic Field Methods 3 hrs
ANT 625 North American Indians Today 3 hrs
ANT 645 Cultural Resource Management 3 hrs
ANT 650 Advanced Methods in Archaeology 3 hrs
ANT 655 Archaeological Theory 3 hrs
ANT 692 Directed Research in Anthropology 1-3 hrs
ANT 696 Directed Readings in Anthropology 1-3 hrs
ANT 698 Seminar in Anthropology* 3 hrs

    *When applicable (e.g., The Anthropology of Tourism,
Ethnohistory, Language Preservation, Historic Archaeology,
Interpreting Skeletal Remains)
    Up to 6 hours of related graduate level courses in other
AGP 675 Plant Breeding and Genetics

Recommended Prerequisite: AGP 103 and AGN 115. Application of
genetic principles to the improvement of crop plants. Includes self-
pollinated, cross-pollinated, and asexually-propagated crops.
Cannot receive credit for both AGP 575 and 675. 2(2-0), S




AGN 725 Advanced Soils Interpretations

Recommended Prerequisite: AGN 345. Field interpretation of
physical and chemical properties, water relationships, and soil
landscape relationships. 3(2-3), D
AGP 700 Plant Science Colloquium

Prerequisite: permission of graduate coordinator. A series of oral
presentations on new developments in plant science. Presentations
to be made by faculty members, students, and guest speakers from
industry and academe. May be repeated, but not more than 2
hours may be counted toward the M.S. degree. 1(1-0), F,S,Su




AGP 721 Enology

Recommended Prerequisite: BIO 310. The course will study the
chemistry, microbiology, and technology of modern wine
production. 3(3-0), S


AGP 722 Enology Lab

Prerequisite: AGP 721. Laboratory techniques in assessing wine
production methods and quality. 2(0-4), F


AGP 731 Plant Genetic Engineering

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Principles, methodology, and
commercial applications of plant biotechnology. Includes brief
introduction to nucleic acid structure, gene regulation, and genome
organization in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. 3(3-0), S




AGP 643 Plant Propagation

Recommended Prerequisite: either AGP 103, AGN 115 or BIO 121;
and either CHM 105, 106, 107, or CHM 160. Practices employed by
fruit and ornamental plant producers in propagation of plants,
including seeds, cuttings, layerings, grafting and micropropagation.
Supplemental course fee. May be taught concurrently with AGP
573. Cannot receive credit for both AGP 643 and AGP 573. 3(2-2) S
AGP 730 Advanced Topics in Plant Science

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An advanced topic in plant
science will be addressed via faculty lectures and student projects.
Examples of proposed topics include: Improved Disease Resistance
in Viticulture, and Application of Field Collected Data to Computer
Analysis. Variable content course. May be repeated to a total of 6
hours with differing topics. 3(3-0), F




AGP 753 Plant Stress Physiology

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. The effects of environmental
stresses on plant physiological functions and plant growth, plus
cultural methods to help plants adapt to stress. 3(3-0), D




AGP 773 Plant Growth Regulation

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. The role of natural and
synthetic plant hormones and related compounds in the growth,
reproduction and cultivation of plants. 3(3-0), D

ECO 615 Public Sector Economics

Recommended Prerequisite: ECO 155 and ECO 165. Allocation and
distribution functions of the public sector of the economy; theories
of taxation and public expenditure; shifting and incidences of taxes,
local-state federal finance. May be taught concurrently with ECO
515. Cannot receive credit for both ECO 515 and ECO 615. 3(3-0), D
PSY 657 Forensic Psychology: Child Abuse and the Law

Study of the legal issues related to child abuse and exploitation.
Students will gain an understanding of the law pertaining to child
cases and how interactions with children can bolster or diminish
the quality of children's memory report as seen by the judicial
system. The Greene County Prosecutor's Office will participate in
the design of this course, thus the specific legal issues discussed will
remain current and may change based on the needs of the
community. May be taught concurrently with PSY 557. Cannot
receive credit for both PSY 657 and PSY 557. 3(3-0) F,S




ELE 302 Introduction to Elementary Education and Clinical/Field
Experience

Prerequisite: 30 hours completed; attempted C-BASE. An overview
of elementary school organization, management techniques, and
personalized teaching styles for use with children including those
from various cultural backgrounds and exceptional children who
are mainstreamed in regular classrooms. Students will participate in
a 30 clock hour field experience at Greenwood Laboratory School
and/or area elementary schools. A grade of "C" or better is
required in this course to student teach. 3(2-2) F,S




ELE 500 Current Issues and Applications in Elementary Education

Prerequisite: ELE 429 and ELE 434 and ELE 438 and RDG 420 and
RDG 421. Application of current innovations and examination of
contemporary issues facing elementary teachers including
classroom management, inclusion, English language learners,
integrated planning and instruction with art, music, health and
physical education. A comprehensive field experience in area
school classrooms is required. May be taught concurrently with ELE
600. Cannot receive credit for both ELE 600 and ELE 500. 3-5 F,S
Admission Requirements
All students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program
and to Supervised Teaching in order to earn this degree (see
application procedures in the "Teacher Certification, Teacher
Education Program" section of the catalog.)
In addition to meeting all requirements for admission to the
Teacher Education Program, those wishing to pursue a degree in
Elementary Education must have accomplished the following:
•Completed at least 30 hours
•Passed all sections of C-BASE with a score of 265 or higher
•Registered with the Missouri Family Care Safety Registry
•Completed ELE 302 with a "C" grade or better
•A combined (MSU and transfer) GPA of 2.75 or higher
•Application approved by the Professional Education Committee
(PEC).
Program Requirements
Candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education
degree are required to meet the following grade point average
requirements: at least a 2.75 GPA on all course work attempted at
all colleges attended; at least a 2.75 GPA in the certificate subject
area (major field of study) which includes all courses listed under B,
C, and D; at least a 2.75 GPA in the professional education courses;
and no grade lower than a "C" in all professional education courses.
All GPA requirements include both Missouri State and transfer
grades.
B.Degree Requirements for Teacher Certification (10 hours):
1.Mathematics: MTH 320(3) and MTH 360(3)
2.Earth Science: GRY 240(4) II
CHM 170 General Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in CHM 160. Emphasis on
reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, precipitation reactions, acid-
base theory and oxidation-reduction reactions. Concurrent
registration in CHM 175 is highly recommended. A grade of "C-" or
better is required in this course in order to take CHM 342, 352 or
506. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 3(3-0) F,S
CHM 171 General Chemistry 11 Laboratory

Prerequisite: CHM 170 or concurrent enrollment and a "C-" or
better in CHM 160 and CHM 161. An introduction to laboratory
chemistry employing principles and techniques that reflect material
prestented in CHM 170, e.g., physical studies on kinetics and
equilibira of aqueous systems, qualitative and quantitative analysis,
and data manipulation and interpretation. A grade of "C-" or better
is required in this course in order to take CHM 302 or 342. May not
be taken Pass/Not Pass. 1(0-43) F,S




CHM 200 Essentials of Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in either CHM 105 or CHM 160.
Principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Does not apply
toward a chemistry major or minor if the student passes CHM 342.
A grade of "C-" or better is required in this course in order to take
CHM 352. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. Lecture portion
identical to CHM 201. Cannot receive credit for both CHM 200 and
CHM 201. Supplemental course fee. 5(4-3) F,S




CHM 302 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in CHM 170 and CHM 175.
Fundamentals of chemical analysis and basic statistics; solution
equilibria, fundamentals of spectrophotometric, chromatographic,
and electrochemical methods. Laboratory includes both wet
chemical and instrumental methods. Representative analyses are
performed in laboratory. 5(3-4), F,S




CHM 342 Organic Chemistry I

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in both CHM 170 and CHM 175.
Systematic coverage of reactions and properties of organic
compounds. A grade of "C-" or better is required in this course in
order to take CHM 343, CHM 344 or CHM 352. May not be taken
Pass/Not Pass. Supplemental course fee. 5(4-3), F,S
CHM 343 Organic Chemistry II

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in CHM 342. Continuation of CHM
342. A grade of "C-" or better is required in this course in order to
take CHM 542. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. Supplemental
course fee. 5(4-3), F,S




CHM 344 Organic Chemistry II

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in CHM 342. Continuation of the
lecture part of CHM 342. (Identical to lecture part of CHM 343.) A
grade of "C-" or better is required in this course in order to take
CHM 542. May not be taken Pass/Not Pass. 3(3-0), F,S




CHM 352 Introduction to Biochemistry

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in either CHM 200 or CHM 342.
Recommended Prerequisite: BIO 121 or BMS 110. Essentials of
biochemistry; chemistry and metabolism of biologically important
compounds. Does not apply to a chemistry major or minor if the
student passes CHM 452. 3(3-0), F,S




CHM 375 Inorganic Chemistry

Prerequisite: "C-" grade or better in CHM 170. Atomic structure,
chemical bonding, acid/base and reduction/oxidation concepts,
reactivity of inorganic compounds, chemistry of main group
elements, fundamentals of coordination theory. A grade of "C" or
better is required in this course in order to take CHM 575. May not
be taken Pass/Not Pass. May be taught concurrently with CHM 674.
Cannot receive credit for both CHM 375 and CHM 674. 3(3-0) F
CHM 460 Environmental Chemistry I

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in CHM 170; and "C-" or better in CHM
200 or CHM 342. Recommended Prerequisite: CHM 302. Chemistry
of water and soil, water treatment, agricultural chemistry, and
related topics. May be taught concurrently with CHM 760. Cannot
receive credit for both CHM 460 and CHM 760. 3(3-0), F




CHM 463 Environmental Analysis

Prerequisite: "C-" or better in CHM 302 and CHM 460. Techniques
and procedures for environmental analysis of natural water
samples with an emphasis on wet chemical methods. Cannot
receive credit for both CHM 462 and CHM 463. Scheduled as First
Block class. 1(0-2), S


CHM 505 Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry

Prerequisite: 20 hours of chemistry coursework; and "C-" or better
in either MTH 287 or MTH 261. A one semester introduction to
physical chemistry including the following topics: thermodynamics,
solution chemistry, electrochemistry, kinetics, and atomic and
molecular structure. Laboratory experiments will illustrate
principles of physical chemistry and techniques of analysis. Does
not apply to a Chemistry major or minor if the student passes CHM
506. May be taught concurrently with CHM 605. Cannot receive
credit for both CHM 605 and CHM 505. 4(3-3) S
Chemistry Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades 9-12)
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
The following required courses can be used to meet both General
Education and Major Requirements: BIO 121(4); CHM 160(4) and
CHM 161(1) or PHY 123(4) or GLG 110(4) or GLG 171(4); MTH
287(3)
B.Major Requirements:
1.Core (31-36 hours): CHM 160(4), 161(1)*, 170(3), 171(1); CHM
200(5), or CHM 342(5) and CHM 343(5), or CHM 342(5) and CHM
344(3); CHM 302(5), 352(3), 460(3), 435(2), 505(4)
Note: Students seeking American Chemical Society certification
must take either CHM 342 and 343, or CHM 342 and 344.
2.Related Requirements (22 hours): PHY 123(4), 124(4); SCI 505(3);
BIO 121(4); GLG 110(4) or GLG 171(4); MTH 287(3)
3.Complete the requirements in one of the following grades 9-12
certification areas:
a.Categorical Science (3 hours): CHM 375(3)
b.Unified Science (13 hours): CHM 463(1); BIO 122(4); GLG 110(4);
GRY 135(4)
C.Professional Education courses (37 hours): SCI 214(1), 314(3),
414(3), 493(6), 494(6); and the Professional Education Required
Core and Competencies - see Teacher Certification, Teacher
Education Program and Secondary Education Requirements section
of catalog
D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Special Education/Cross Categorical
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades K-12)
All students must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program
and to Supervised Teaching in order to earn this degree (see
application procedures in the "Teacher Certification, Teacher
Education Program" section of catalog).
In order to meet Missouri state teacher certification requirements,
candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree are
required to meet the following grade point average requirements:
at least a 2.50 GPA on all course work attempted at all colleges
attended; at least a 2.50 GPA in the certificate subject area (major
field of study) which includes all courses listed under B and C; at
least a 2.50 GPA in any additional certificate subject area; at least a
2.50 GPA in the professional education courses; and no grade lower
than a "C" in all professional education courses. All GPA
requirements include both Missouri State and transfer grades.
Additionally, State Board of Education certification rules require a
passing score on each portion of the College Basic Academic
Subject Examination (C-BASE) and successful completion of the
appropriate Praxis II Examination Specialty Area Test with a score
equal to Missouri's qualifying score. Missouri State further requires
C-BASE minimum scores of 265.
The curriculum for special education teaching leads to the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Education and carries with it an initial
professional certificate (IPC) to teach in the state of Missouri.
Recipients of this special education certificate may be employed to
teach in grades K-12 in Cross Categorical settings and other
Earth Science Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
(Certifiable grades 9-12)
A.General Education Requirements - see General Education
Program and Requirements section of catalog
The following required courses can be used to meet both General
Education and Major Requirements: BIO 102(4); MTH 138(5), or
MTH 135(3) and MTH 181(3), or MTH 261(5) or MTH 287(3); AST
115(4) or CHM 105(5) or GLG 110(4) or GRY 135(4) or PHY 100(4)
B.Major Requirements
1.Core (25 hours): GLG 110(4), 314(4), 318(3), 412(4); GRY 135(4),
348(3), 351(3)
2.Major Electives (3 hours): Select 3 additional hours from any GLG
course numbered 171 or above in consultation with advisor
3.Related Requirements (10-13 hours): AST 115(4); MTH 138(5), or
MTH 135(3) and 181(3) or MTH 261(5) or MTH 287(3); SCI 505(3)
4.Complete one of the following options:
a.Categorical Science (13 hours): BIO 102(4); CHM 105(5); PHY
100(4)
b.Unified Science (25 hours): BIO 121(4), 122(4); CHM 160(4),
170(3), 175(2); PHY 123(4), 124(4)
C.Professional Education Courses (37 hours): SCI 214(1), 314(3),
414(3), 493(6), 494(6) and see Teacher Certification, Teacher
Education Program and Secondary Education Requirements section
of catalog
D.General Baccalaureate Degree Requirements - see General
Baccalaureate Degree Requirements section of catalog
E.In order to meet Missouri state teacher certification
EDT 365 Educational Applications of Technology and Media

Prerequisite: CIS 101 or CSC 101 or waive