The Capital (Annapolis, MD) by 7qLLJv

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									                              The Capital (Annapolis, MD)

                                   May 24, 2002 Friday

OUR SAY;
Owens' School Board Pick: A bad mistake
SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. A8

LENGTH: 680 words


    COUNTY EXECUTIVE Janet Owens had the right to ask Gov. Parris N.
Glendening to ignore the choices of the School Board Nominating Convention.

     That doesn't mean it was a good idea. In fact, it was the worst decision Ms. Owens
has made in a long time. The choice of Konrad Wayson for that vacant seat will raise
charges of cronyism against Ms. Owens - charges of the sort that hurt Ms. Owens'
predecessor, John Gary, in the last election.

     It will also focus attention on the county's weak, trouble-prone system for picking
school board members. The system has endured this long only because county legislators
and officials can't agree on how to fix it.

     Under the system, civic groups come together in a nominating convention to screen
possible board members. The convention then sends its top two picks for each slot to the
governor. In theory, the governor picks anyone he wants. In practice, county executives
and ranking legislators murmur in the governor's ear - and then he usually picks from the
convention's choices. After all, if the convention selections were always ignored, why
would anyone bother to participate in the process?

      Mr. Glendening has always abided by convention choices - until this week. Then, at
Ms. Owens' urging, he picked Mr. Wayson, a contractor from Harwood, for an at-large
seat.

     The convention's first choice - and top vote-getter - had been Jim Snider of Severna
Park, a member of a Washington, D.C., think tank who has a master's degree in business
administration from Harvard and had served on a school board in Vermont. The alternate
choice was Terry Gilleland, chairman of the county Republican State Central Committee.

      Mr. Wayson has been treasurer of the Anne Arundel Economic Development Corp.
He's also president of a landscaping firm that, this year alone, has contracts worth nearly
$200,000 with the school system. And he's a distant relative of Ms. Owens and a member
of a highly influential family from Ms. Owens' own part of the county.
      And unlike Mr. Snider and Mr. Gilleland - who went before the convention to seek
the job, answer questions and make pledges - Mr. Wayson apparently expressed no
interest in a board position until the matter happened to come up during a chat with Ms.
Owens.

     So how did Ms. Owens think this would look? Is she surprised that a lot of people -
particularly those who took part in that convention - are furious?

      We don't think Mr. Wayson's past business dealings with the school system create
an ethical problem that should bar him from the job. But he'll probably have to recuse
himself from important votes. And that undercuts Ms. Owens' rationale for choosing him
- that the board needs someone with construction industry experience.

     Apparently Mr. Snider's Harvard MBA and experience with a family construction
firm weren't enough. Or did the reluctance to see him on the board have something to do
with his wife's leadership role in a group that has been arguing with the school board over
the middle school curriculum?

     In any case, Ms. Owens has handed her opponents an issue on a silver platter.
They'll use it. The county GOP promptly renewed its call for an elected school board - an
idea that it otherwise might have left on the shelf, given the recent shipwreck of the
elected board in Prince George's County.

     But it may do this county some good if a consensus finally emerges on changing the
current system for picking school board members.

     If the county executive is going to make the choices anyway, should we get rid of
the charade of gubernatorial involvement and give the power to the county executive
outright - subject to confirmation by the County Council? Should the choices be made by
County Council members for their districts? In either case, what should the role of the
nominating convention be?

     Or is there truly support for an elected school board? And with or without its own
taxing authority?

It's a complex issue - probably too complex for a clear consensus to emerge in an election
year. But it's one the county must resolve sooner or later.
                                  The Washington Post

                                May 23, 2002 Thursday
                                    Final Edition

Glendening Move Outrages Community;
School Board Appointments Draw Fire
BYLINE: Darragh Johnson, Washington Post Staff Writer

SECTION: ANNE ARUNDEL EXTRA; Pg. T03

LENGTH: 723 words


      Gov. Parris N. Glendening (D) sparked community outrage and accusations of
political string-pulling Tuesday by ignoring one of the recommendations of the Anne
Arundel Board of Education nominating convention and by appointing three men to the
school board.

      Glendening followed the nominating convention's wishes by appointing Eugene
Patterson, 54, of Laurel to replace board member Joseph H. Foster in District 32. But the
governor pointedly bypassed the other nominating convention favorite, Jim Snider, 43, of
Severna Park, in favor of Konrad M. Wayson, 41, a South County developer with close
ties to County Executive Janet S. Owens (D).

     Wayson, whose company, Hopkins & Wayson Inc., has been awarded school
construction contracts, will fill the at-large seat being vacated by Vaughn L. Brown.
Glendening also appointed Edward Carey, 40, of Brooklyn Park to take the seat of Janet
Bury, who died of cancer last month. The student board member will be Ashley
Nathanson, a junior at Arundel High School.

     The appointments dramatically change the composition of the Board of Education,
which had been led by female educators. Board President Carlesa Finney works as an
administrator at Anne Arundel Community College, and Bury, the board's former vice
president, was a professor at Morgan State University.

     Next year, Finney and Nathanson will be the only women on the eight-member
board.

     "I'm disappointed," Finney said. "We have too much of one thing on this board. Too
many business people. Too many of one gender. Too many of one race. It's not
representative of real life." Most of the board's members are white.

     And the likely replacement for former superintendent Carol S. Parham -- the first
African American to hold the position -- is also a white man: Eric J. Smith.
     Owens pushed Wayson's candidacy, citing his expertise in real estate development
and business finance. She just appointed a task force to investigate the spiraling costs of
school construction projects.

    Snider, who has an MBA from Harvard and worked as a construction project
manager for his family's real estate development business in Boston, said he would have
brought those same skills to the school board.

     "Finance is one of my strong points," said Snider, a former school board member in
Burlington, Vt., who works at the New America Foundation, a District think tank.

     But Snider and his wife, Terra, who have three children in Severna Park public
schools, may have alienated the Anne Arundel political establishment with their
outspokenness. Last year, Terra Snider led a band of parents who successfully challenged
the school system's decision to cut back physical education, arts and other electives to
double the amount of language arts instruction given to sixth-graders. The entire middle
school curriculum and schedule had to be overhauled as a result.

     Wayson, a graduate of Southern High School, lives in Harwood with his wife, Julie,
and their teenage sons. He got the job because of Owens's "strong support," Glendening
spokeswoman Raquel Gillory said.

     "That's why the governor went outside of the nominating convention," Gillory said.

      "The county executive is very fond of Mr. Wayson," Owens spokesman Matt Diehl
said. He dismissed concerns about the school construction awarded to Wayson's
company.

     "He will disclose all his interests, and if it's deemed a conflict, he has said he will
back away," Diehl said.

     Others were furious with Glendening for ignoring the recommendation of the school
board nominating convention, made up of delegates from PTAs, community
organizations and other groups. The convention screens candidates and votes on which
ones to recommend for the school board.

     "They don't even listen to the people," said Chris Catramados, a Marley Middle
School parent and spokeswoman for the nominating convention who had expressed
interest in Bury's open seat. "That's very obvious."

     In the 40 years the county has had an appointed school board, this was only the
fourth time the governor did not follow the convention's recommendations. Three of the
four were during William Donald Schaffer's tenure as governor. This was the first time
Glendening bypassed the convention during his eight years in office.

Gillory noted, though, that "he's not bound by what they send to him. Those are just
recommendations."
                                    The Baltimore Sun

                      May 22, 2002 Wednesday ARUNDEL Edition

Governor names 4 to Board of Education;
But Jim Snider, top choice of nominating panel, is passed over
BYLINE: Jackie Powder

SOURCE: SUN STAFF

SECTION: LOCAL, Pg. 1B

LENGTH: 992 words


    Gov. Parris N. Glendening appointed four new members to the county Board of
Education yesterday -- but passed over the nominee who received the most votes at the
county's school board nominating convention, in favor of a businessman recommended
by County Executive Janet S. Owens.

      Konrad M. Wayson -- owner of a landscape business and officer in a South County
construction firm -- was named to the at-large seat effective July 1 instead of Jim Snider,
top choice at last month's nominating convention, which is made up of delegates from
citizens groups.

    Wayson, who comes from a prominent South County family, will replace Vaughn L.
Brown, who decided not to seek a second term.

      Wayson is president of Childs Landscape and secretary-treasurer of Hopkins and
Wayson, a Lothian construction firm. The company was awarded a $148,000 contract by
the school board this year for the demolition of Glendale Elementary School, according
to the school system Web site.

    Also named to the board were Eugene Peterson, 52, of Laurel, president of the Anne
Arundel County Council of PTAs, and Edward Carey, 40, chief of the Maryland Aviation
Administration, who has served as president of the Brooklyn Park Elementary School
PTA.

     Peterson, who takes office July 1, was appointed to the District 32 seat being
vacated by Joseph H. Foster, who is completing his second five-year term and cannot be
reappointed.

    Carey will serve out the remainder of the late Janet Bury's District 31 term, which
began in July 2000. She died in April.
     Ashley Nathanson, a junior at Arundel High School, will serve as the student
representative on the board next year. She is ranked first in her class and serves as her
school's student government vice president.
Owens consulted

    Glendening made his selections after consulting with Owens and state legislators
from Anne Arundel County, his spokesperson said.

     He is not bound by the selections of the nominating convention, which
recommended that Peterson and Snider fill the seats of the two board members whose
spots become vacant in July.

     Wayson, a 41-year-old lifetime county resident, is a graduate of Southern High
School and Salisbury State University and lives in Harwood with his wife and two teen-
age sons. He could not be reached for comment yesterday.

     Matt Diehl, a spokesman for Owens, said that the county executive recommended
Wayson because of his experience in the construction business and his work on the Anne
Arundel Economic Development Corporation. Owens appointed him chairman of the
organization's board of directors in 1999, after revelations that some board members had
engaged in questionable loan practices.

      "When he came aboard he did some reshaping, and helped, along with Bill Badger
(the corporation's chief executive officer) and a number of other people, to get a focus
and really attract business to Anne Arundel County," Diehl said.

     Snider, 43, of Severna Park, is a fellow at the New America Foundation, a
Washington think tank, and served two terms on the elected school board in Burlington,
Vt. He has three children in county public schools.
Snider 'quite surprised'

    Snider said he received a call from the governor's office yesterday morning, letting
him know that he did not get the board appointment.

     "I was really quite surprised, because I have talked to many people, including school
board members and public officials, who treated it as a done deal," Snider said. "So I was
surprised to find out that it wasn't a done deal, and also surprised to find out that she
(Owens) did what she did and felt as strongly as she did."

     "From my perspective it was quite startling," he said. "Because if there was one
candidate who had a strong financial and construction background it was me."

     In addition to a master's degree from the Harvard Business School, Snider said that
he once worked in the family business, a design and construction firm in Sudbury, Mass.

    Snider said he couldn't help but wonder if his wife's involvement in the parents'
group Coalition for Balanced Excellence in Education had something to do with Owens'
recommendation to the governor. As chairwoman of the group, Terra Ziporyn Snider led
the effort to force the county school system to require middle school pupils to take
physical education and fine arts every year, as the state requires.

     The state Board of Education agreed with the group -- over the objections of county
school officials -- and in September ordered the county school board to include the
courses in pupils' schedules.

    "On the education front the coalition has been in the hair of the school system,"
Snider said.

      Diehl, however, said that Terra Ziporyn Snider's role in educational issues played no
role in Owens' decision.

     This is the fourth time in the nominating convention's 27-year history that a
governor has passed over a candidate recommendation, said Mark Fontaine, chairman of
the convention committee. He said it was the first time that Glendening has not appointed
a convention-backed candidate.

    "We're disappointed that the governor didn't see his way clear to support the
convention candidates completely," Fontaine said. "But we appreciate his support, and
we wish Mr. Wayson all the best."

     The governor's rejection of Snider stunned parent Sue Wincek, of Severna Park,
who said she strongly supported him after attending the three candidate forums held last
month by the nominating convention committee. The forums provided an opportunity for
the nominees to explain why they wanted to be on the board and answer questions from
the public.

     "This is a candidate who has a child in each level of the school system, has been on
a school board before, who has a financial degree and who has worked in construction,"
Wincek said. "He's an independent thinker, and I think that's what they don't want. They
want a school board that will do what Janet Owens says, and I don't think that's right."
                               The Capital (Annapolis, MD)

                                 May 22, 2002 Wednesday

Firestorm over school pick
BYLINE: LAURA GREEN, Staff Writer

SECTION: FRONT; Pg. A1

LENGTH: 902 words

     Infuriated by Gov. Parris N. Glendening's decision yesterday to appoint a south
county contractor to the school board over two community-backed candidates, organizers
of the nominating process are threatening to disband.

    They joined a chorus of residents who accused County Executive Janet S. Owens of
snubbing them and further eroding the school board appointment process by asking Mr.
Glendening to name Konrad Wayson, 41, of Harwood, to an at-large board seat.

     "To me, it really smacks of the machine politics," said Randy Landis, treasurer of
the School Board Nominating Convention Committee. "You get (Ms.) Owens who
doesn't care about the regular citizens and a governor who's trying to micro-manage the
process."

     Mr. Landis said the decision reduces the nominating convention - the only chance
residents have to offer direct input on who should be appointed - to "a waste of time."

     Jim Snider of Severna Park, a Harvard-educated fellow at a Washington, D.C., think
tank, was nominated as the convention's first choice. Terry Gilleland, chairman of the
county Republican State Central Committee, was the alternate.

     Ms. Owens instead recommended Mr. Wayson, a distant relative who has contracts
with the school system and is treasurer of the Anne Arundel Economic Development
Corp.

     Ms. Owens could not be reached for comment. Her spokesman, Matt Diehl, was
reluctant to comment on Mr. Wayson's specific qualifications.

    "The county executive is very happy with all of the appointees by the governor,"
Mr. Diehl said.

     Mr. Snider said the governor's representative told him Ms. Owens wanted a
candidate with more experience in finance and construction.

     Mr. Snider said he thinks the real issue is his wife's advocacy for the arts and his
push for more public access to the county.
     School board President Carlesa Finney said she is "greatly concerned" that the board
is becoming less representative of the community it serves.

     Ms. Finney, who's beginning the last year of her second five-year term, is the only
adult female on the eight-member board.

     Student member Ashley Nathanson, who was also appointed by the governor
yesterday, has a one-year term on the board.

      "It does not reflect the diversity and composition of our student population in any
way not to have an educator, not to have a representative number of females," Ms. Finney
said.

     "If the county executive and the governor had to get together to go against the
process, if you will, I would have thought they would have looked at the whole structure
of the board and made some decision based on the students' needs - not just what is
needed in terms of business perspective."

    It was the first time in his nearly eight-year term that Mr. Glendening has appointed
someone outside of the school board convention process.

     The School Board Nominating Convention is made up of members of local civic
and church groups who vote on candidates seeking a seat on the school board.

     The convention sends its top two picks for each open board seat to the governor who
can appoint one, or name his own candidate.

      Sen. Robert R. Neall, D-Davidsonville, who had supported Mr. Snider's candidacy,
said to go around the convention "gratuitously like this is a real slap in the face to all the
citizens who go to all the meetings and go through the convention process."

     Mr. Landis said the nominating committee will meet this week to decide whether to
continue.

    Meanwhile, some residents are sending angry letters condemning Mr. Glendening's
appointment.

      "With this appointment, you have effectively discouraged many caring and involved
citizens from ever putting forth any effort again to improve our education system," wrote
parent Sally H. VanZandt of Millersville.

     Others are questioning whether Mr. Wayson's background in construction would
create a conflict of interest.

     Mr. Wayson said he plans to step down as treasurer of the Anne Arundel Economic
Development Corp. at the end of the week, but he also has ties to school construction
projects.
     Mr. Wayson is president of Childs Robert W. Landscape Contractors Inc., which has
been paid $196,000 for work at schools this year, and secretary-treasurer of Hopkins &
Wayson Inc. General Contractor.

     Mr. Wayson said he'd like to put his background to use in controlling school
construction spending.

     "I think we could save some money on construction," he said.

     Terra Snider said her husband and others going through the convention had to sign a
statement promising not to profit "from any contract or purchase to which the Board of
Education is a party."

     School system Staff Attorney Synthia Shilling said Mr. Wayson's interests in the
companies do not prevent him from taking the board seat, but could limit his ability to
vote on matters relating to the companies.

     Mr. Wayson, who said he was approached by Ms. Owens about the job three weeks
ago, vowed to avoid any conflict.

     "If (a contract) does pose a conflict, we just won't do it," he said.

     Mr. Glendening also appointed:

     Eugene Peterson, 52, of Laurel, who was the nominating convention's choice for the
District 32 seat.

     Ms. Nathanson, 17, of Crofton as the student board member.

      Ned Carey, 40, of Brooklyn Park, who will complete the remaining three years of
the late Janet Bury's term.

     The five-year terms for all four appointees are effective July 1.
                           Letters-To-The-Editor
                               The Capital (Annapolis, MD)

                                 June 27, 2002 Thursday

READERS' VIEWS

SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. A10

     School choice

     By sabotaging the School Board Nominating Convention, to which I was a delegate,
Janet Owens has instantly given voters who care about our public schools a number of
excellent reasons to vote against her this fall. In a single stroke, Ms. Owens has subverted
democracy, volunteerism, music and ethics.

      Jim Snider was the democratic choice of the volunteers from all across the county
who represented their PTAs, religious institutions and community associations at the
nominating convention. In a school system whose powers-that-be have repeatedly sought
to strangle the music program in our middle schools, Jim Snider was a welcome defender
of music and the entire arts curriculum.

      The most troubling aspect of this scandal, however, is the horrendous example it
sets for our children. Do we really want our children to believe that, yes, it is OK, if
you're the county executive, to ignore an established democratic process, to ask the
governor to appoint your first cousin (twice removed) to the board in place of the
legitimate nominee, and to ignore an established code of ethics?

     Of course not. If a Board of Education that includes Konrad Wayson asks our
children to strive for higher ethical standards, who will believe its pronouncements?
What credibility will it have?

     There is an honorable way out of the ethical mess that Janet Owens has dumped in
our laps. Remember John F. Kennedy's "Profiles in Courage"? Konrad Wayson should
take a leaf from JFK's splendid book. He should decline the governor's appointment.

     STEVEN H. JOHNSON
                              The Capital (Annapolis, MD)

                                 June 22, 2002 Saturday

Readers' views

SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. A8


     School board

    The rally I attended at Lawyers Mall on June 3 in response to the violation of the
Anne Arundel County School Board Nominating Convention process is yet another
example of why control needs to be vested at the local level.

     Central to the issue is neither Jim Snider nor Konrad Wayson, but rather the
integrity of a system some 30 years old. As we've just watched the dismemberment, if
you will, of the elected Prince George's County school board - an elected board, I might
add - we are ever more mindful of just how much politics plays a part in the education of
our children.

      It is understandable why, over the years, a nonpartisan group from the county
delegation to the General Assembly has offered legislation to change the current system.
Time and again, however, the measure has fallen short of gaining the support of the
number of delegates necessary to advance it. The situation, as sad as it is, will continue
until changes take place.

      I am dedicated to assist in making that change. Help me help you in establishing a
fair process, a workable process, a process originating and ending at the local level,
where it belongs.

     VICKY OVERBECK, Gambrills

     EDITOR'S NOTE: The writer is a candidate for House of Delegates in District 33A.
                                   The Baltimore Sun

                        June 9, 2002 Sunday ARUNDEL Edition

SECTION: LOCAL, Pg. 5B Letters to the editor

     Wayson appointment a slap in the face

    Gov. Parris Glendening recently appointed Konrad Wayson to the Anne Arundel
County Board of Education, in defiance of the public nominating convention that
recommended someone else.

    Apparently, the Governor made the appointment as a political favor to Anne
Arundel County Executive Janet Owens, who asked that Wayson be appointed.

     The appointment is a slap in the face to residents of the County, who through the
nominating convention system, at least had a little say in who would run their school
system.

      The appointment made the convention process a sham. It embarrassed the individual
nominated by the convention and again showed the true colors of our one-party ruled
state in which politicians of the governing party answer to no one but their own party.
The actions of Glendening and Owens are vivid examples of that kind of plain political
arrogance.

     Their actions also make the case once again for elected school boards that keep the
decision making local and in the hands of the people who are most affected.

     Parents deserve better than what the Governor and the County Executive are
delivering.

     And, clearly, given the autocratic authority to make these decisions, the Governor
and County Executive do a lousy job of it.

     Mike Johnson

     Davidsonville



Applauding Owens for Wayson choice

     I applaud the County Executive Owens for her courage in making such a crucial
decision as to who should sit on the School Board. This is why I voted for her before and
why I will vote for her again this fall.
     These are exactly the kind of decisions she should be making. Education has been
one of her top priorities since she was elected and this proves once again that she is
willing to take a stance.

     The only difference is that I would have recommended to her to choose all three of
the appointees. I understand why some people may be upset as they did not get their way;
I understand why others are vocal as they are Ms. Owens political adversaries; but what I
do not understand is why the public is not cheering the appointment of a successful
business person.

     Maybe a little business savvy will go along way on a Board that has proven it can be
very creative in finding ways to spend money.

     Sandra Cassidy

     Annapolis


Praise for Wayson as businessman

     It seems like every other year this same scenario is reported - the School Board
Nominating Convention recommends candidates for appointment and the Governor
chooses someone else. We all remember that every School Board appointment made
while Bobby Neall was County Executive was someone other than the top choice.

     If anything, I would think the public should be upset over the salary for the new
superintendent. $197,000 plus bonuses? Oh, but that's right, members of the Board of
Education are not answerable to the taxpayers.

     As a professional educator myself, I believe the focus needs to be on what's right for
the children.

      As reported in Education Week, the percent of students in Maryland that are testing
at or above the proficient level is abysmal. Only 22 percent are proficient in math and 29
percent in reading. A recent study on school readiness reports that just two in five
Maryland children are fully prepared to enter kindergarten.

     Something is obviously broken in our current system. Councilman Klosterman is
working on a resolution asking the General Assembly to change the current selection
process, doing away with the School Board Nominating Convention. Why? Could it
possibly be because it does not work?

    In Maryland we are spending $328 million in state and federal money this year on
remediation alone and $6.6 billion on K-12 expenditures. With a budget like this, it
makes sense to have a successful businessman like Konrad Wayson on the team.
     Albert Einstein observed, "The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the
same level of thinking we were at when we created them." Konrad Wayson adds a new
level, a deeper level of thinking.

     Eric Cotton

     Annapolis


Let citizens choose the school board

     Ordinary taxpaying citizens must be flabbergasted and frustrated and perhaps
amused as they witness the ongoing scrap between the School Board Nominating
Convention politicians and the professional politicians. The former want Jim Snider on
the Board, the latter, Konrad M. Wayson.

      Who do our citizens want on the Board? They want neither of the two choices of the
politicians. As the latest polls and other evidence suggests, at least a plurality and
probably a majority of our citizens wish to make the choice at the ballot box.

     The only entity of elected officials that appears to support the people having a
choice is the County Council.

      The Council resolution urging the General Assembly to let the people decide on
their School Board member ... passed by a vote of 4-to-0. Our delegation paid it no heed.
This citizen predicts that the delegation will also pay no attention to the efforts of the
Nominating Convention politicians.

    Selecting our School Board Members by a nominating convention makes about as
much sense as selecting the President of the United States by an Electoral College.

     An even more enlightening analogy is that it makes about an much sense to appoint
the Board as it does to appoint the County Council. After all, the Board spends more than
half of the tax revenues of Anne Arundel County and sets the education policy for all of
our public schools.

     We should focus on the enrichment of our democracy by electing the School Board
of our County and the President of our Country.

     Bill D. Burlison

     Odenton

     The writer is Anne Arundel County Council chairman.
                              The Capital (Annapolis, MD)

                                  June 4, 2002 Tuesday

Readers' Views

SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. A8

     School choice

     This is to protest Gov. Parris N. Glendening's decision to appoint Konrad Wayson to
the school board.

     I have been a delegate to the School Board Nominating Convention for the past 10
years and can attest to the rigorous procedure of determining the nominees by a
democratic process.

     The first choice of this year's convention, Jim Snider of Severna Park, was a highly
qualified person for the job, and his background includes the experience in finance and
construction County Executive Janet S. Owens wished for.

     I have generally been supportive of Ms. Owens' policies, but her interference with
the nominating convention's results is wrong and undermines confidence in her
leadership.

     This regrettable event supports the arguments of those, like myself, who would
prefer to see an elected school board in Anne Arundel County. Once more I appeal to the
county delegation to bring this matter to a referendum and let the will of the people be
heard.

     As for Mr. Wayson, whose only contribution to this process so far is a possible
conflict-of-interest issue, may I suggest that he quietly decline the appointment?

     MARIO E.C. VIEIRA

     Severna Park
                              The Capital (Annapolis, MD)

                                  June 1, 2002 Saturday

READERS' VIEWS

SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. A8

     School choice

     I am writing as a parent of three children in the county public school system and a
delegate to the School Board Nominating Convention. I was deeply disturbed and
disheartened to learn of the governor's appointment of Konrad Wayson over the
convention's choice of Jim Snider.

      This was the first year I participated in the school board convention, for which I
represented my community. I also encouraged our elementary school to send delegates
for the first time because I felt it was important that we participate in the process. I
believe in public education and feel that public participation is an important factor in
creating excellent schools.

      It is extremely apparent to me that Janet Owens, our county executive, does not
share that opinion. She apparently disregarded the convention process, in which 156
people from across the county listened to candidates' backgrounds and opinions and made
their choices of who they felt would best serve them, the county residents, on the school
board.

     I feel my efforts in the meetings I was required to attend were completely wasted. It
also bothers me that Mr. Wayson - unlike all five official candidates - did not take the
time to go through the application process, go through the dialogue process with the
community, and go out and visit the county schools.

    Naively, I believed Janet Owens truly wanted to improve county schools and create
a working partnership with the community. It is obvious to me that she does not care
about the opinions of Anne Arundel County residents.

     JANICE KEATING

     Severna Park
                              The Capital (Annapolis, MD)

                                  June 1, 2002 Saturday

READERS' VIEWS

SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. A8

     School choice

     I am writing as a parent of three children in the county public school system and a
delegate to the School Board Nominating Convention. I was deeply disturbed and
disheartened to learn of the governor's appointment of Konrad Wayson over the
convention's choice of Jim Snider.

      This was the first year I participated in the school board convention, for which I
represented my community. I also encouraged our elementary school to send delegates
for the first time because I felt it was important that we participate in the process. I
believe in public education and feel that public participation is an important factor in
creating excellent schools.

      It is extremely apparent to me that Janet Owens, our county executive, does not
share that opinion. She apparently disregarded the convention process, in which 156
people from across the county listened to candidates' backgrounds and opinions and made
their choices of who they felt would best serve them, the county residents, on the school
board.

     I feel my efforts in the meetings I was required to attend were completely wasted. It
also bothers me that Mr. Wayson - unlike all five official candidates - did not take the
time to go through the application process, go through the dialogue process with the
community, and go out and visit the county schools.

    Naively, I believed Janet Owens truly wanted to improve county schools and create
a working partnership with the community. It is obvious to me that she does not care
about the opinions of Anne Arundel County residents.

     JANICE KEATING

     Severna Park
                                   The Washington Post

                                 May 30, 2002 Thursday
                                     Final Edition

So Much for Public's Say ...

SECTION: ANNE ARUNDEL EXTRA; Pg. T02

      I am very disheartened by what I have heard concerning the governor of Maryland.
His decision not to appoint Jim Snider to the Anne Arundel County school board shows
that those of us who struggled through the nomination process basically wasted our time.
The candidates who put their lives on display and allowed us to question them on their
credentials, expectations, beliefs and dreams for the future apparently wasted their time
also.

     By this action, am I to assume that the School Board Nominating Convention
Committee will disband, since it is apparent that anyone involved simply wasted their
time? As a delegate to the convention, I had taken pride in being a part of the process.
Now I stand in awe at how quickly we were brushed aside.

     Something is very wrong here -- things that we may never find out. Mr. Snider
deserved that position, and if he didn't get it, then why wasn't Mr. Gilleland, Mr. Roberts
or Mr. Cope considered? Why wasn't Mr. Wayson up on that stage like the others were?
Not one citizen had a chance to meet or question him.

     Mr. Glendening has made me understand why so many of us don't get involved.

     Bonnie Gollup

     Lothian
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