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					                         Highland School of Technology
                        Extended Lesson Plan 2008-2009
                  “Microsoft Operating Systems History Report”

Teacher: Dana Gardner               Course: Computer Engineering II
Dates Implemented: 3-25-2009 to     Integrated Course(s): DCS
4-18-2009
Extended Lesson Overview: Ms. Gardner’s students created a basic report on the
                                Microsoft Operating Systems History.
                                Ms. Gallagher’s student then created an
                                elaborate report following the North Carolina
                                guidelines using Microsoft Word.

Lesson 1: Typing Rough Draft of the Report
     Overview: Once the students were given the lesson on reports in DCS they took
        the basic report from Ms. Gardner’s students and created a cover page (with
        pictures, a table of contents, proper report formatting, and a bibliography.
        The students had to follow proper alignment, spacing, margins setup,
        spelling, grammar, and font effects.

      Objectives Addressed: Unit C 5.05 – Input reports and supporting documents in
        acceptable styles

      Essential Question(s): How do you format a bound report?

      Materials/Resources:      Microsoft Word
                                Computer Lab
                                Ms. Gardner’s’ Computer Engineering Reports
                                Lesson 5.06 Packet
                                Rubric

      Time Required: 270 minutes




Lesson 2: Final Copy of the Report
      Overview: The DCS students took their corrected (rough) report assignment and
        finalized any changes due to formatting issues based on the North Carolina
        Standard Course of Study. Then the reports were returned to Ms. Gardner’s
        class for final review. (Final Copy Below)

      Objectives Addressed: Unit C 5.06 – Input reports and supporting documents in
        acceptable styles

      Essential Question(s): How do you format and finalize a report?

      Materials/Resources:     Microsoft Word
                               Computer Lab
                               Ms. Gardner’s’ Computer Engineering Reports
                               Lesson 5.06 Packet
                               Rough Draft
                               Rubric

      Time Required: 90 minutes



Teacher Reflections:
        Ms. Gallagher:
This was an interesting integration. The students in DCS learned about the
operating systems at the same time learning how to “edit” a report and add the
“bells and whistles.” This took more time than expected but was a practice
assignment opposed to typing a report that just gave them practice at this
objective. This integration allowed them to learn more about reports and
technology at the same time.

Student Reflections/Work samples Included? ___ No __x_ Yes

        Ms. Gardner:
My Computer Engineering students got a great refresher course in report writing.
Their final projects were critiqued by Ms. Gallagher’s students and they were
surprised at how many mistakes needed to be corrected. They enjoyed learning
about the company who provides the majority of our other curriculum work and
earned a much greater respect for their product line.

Student Reflections/Work samples Included?      ____NO     ___X__YES
   Integration Project with Ms. Gallagher’s 3rd Period DCS class and Ms. Gardner’s 3rd
                          Period Computer Engineering II class

                           Computer Engineering II Rubric
Work with your assigned partner to create a historical report for Microsoft from the
company’s inception to modern day. Your report should include the following Operating
Systems:

Microsoft DOS
Microsoft Windows 3.x (all versions)
Microsoft Windows NT
Microsoft Windows 95 (all versions)
Microsoft Windows 98 (all versions)
Microsoft ME
Microsoft 2000 (all versions)
Microsoft XP (all versions)
Microsoft Vista
Windows Server families

Your report should include dates of releases, targeted audiences, and successes and failures
of each operating system.

This report will be used by Ms. Gallagher’s 3rd period class to create a brochure/timeline
for Microsoft using the data that you provide them.

You must include your resources in your report so her students can access the information
from which your report was written.

Please be sure to include any interesting facts that you come across such as changes in
management, corporate office locations, jobs associated with new operating system
engineering, and key players in the Microsoft organization.

Each operating system included and detailed ________50 Points

Correct Grammar & Spelling                    ________10 Points

Resources Stated                               ________20 Points

Correct Chronological Order                    ________10 Points

Partner Participation (Team Work)              ________ 10 Points
                   Integration Project with Ms. Gallagher’s DCS classes
                and Ms. Gardner’s 3rd Period Computer Engineering II class

                                         DCS Rubric

Work with the given historical report for Microsoft from the company’s inception to modern day
from Ms. Gardner’s class.

Your report should be constructed based on North Carolina Standard Coarse of Study from
Unit C Section 5.05. Use your notes and examples from class as a reference for this project.

The report will be given to you from Ms. Gardner’s class, to create a rough draft; it is your
responsibility to add a cover page, table of contents, body, and reference. Make sure to follow
the rules that you have learned in this class such as margins, indents, spelling, grammar,
punctuation, spacing, etc…

Following the Academic Reports Rules:
   1. ___________________ 15 Points – Cover/Title Page
      (Report Title, Authors, School Name, Course, Teacher’s Names, and Pictures)

   2. ___________________ 20 Points - Table of Contents
      (All of the following parts must be on this page: )
          a. Microsoft DOS
          b. Microsoft Windows 3.X (All Versions)
          c. Microsoft Windows NT
          d. Microsoft Windows 95 (All Versions)
          e. Microsoft Windows 98 (All Versions)
          f. Microsoft ME
          g. Microsoft 2000 (All Versions)
          h. Microsoft XP (All Versions)
          i. Microsoft Vista
          j. Windows Server Families

   3. ___________________ 40 Points - Body

   4. ___________________ 25 Points - References (Use Academic Report Rules, MLA
      Style, and a Bibliography for the last page)



Remember this project will count twice as two test grades!
MICROSOFT HISTORY REPORT




     By: Wesley Alexander
        Samuel Brewer
      Madison McGraw

     Computer Engineering II
              And
 Digital Communications Systems

         Ms. Gardner
             And
         Ms. Gallagher




         April 14, 2008
                                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.        Introduction ..............................................................................................................2

II.       Microsoft DOS .........................................................................................................2

III.      1985: Windows 1.0 ..................................................................................................3

IV.       1987: Windows 2.0 .................................................................................................3

V.        1990: Windows 3.0 .................................................................................................4

VI.       1993: Windows for Workgroups 3.11 .....................................................................4

VII.      1995: Windows 95 ..................................................................................................4-5

VIII.     1998: Windows 98 ...................................................................................................5

IX.       1999: Windows 98 Second Edition..........................................................................5

X.        Windows CE 6 .........................................................................................................6

XI.       1993: Windows NT Workstation 3.1 .......................................................................6-7

XII.      1994: Windows NT Workstation 3.5 .......................................................................7

XIII.     1996: Windows NT Workstation 4.0 .......................................................................7

XIV. 2000: Windows 2000 .............................................................................................. 7-8

XV.       Editions of Windows 2000.......................................................................................8-9

XVI. 2001: Windows XP ..................................................................................................9

XVII. 2007 Microsoft Vista .............................................................................................10

XVIII. Editions of Microsoft Vista....................................................................................11

XIX. Windows Servers ...................................................................................................12

          A.   2000: Windows 2000 Server ............................................................................12
          B.   2003: Windows Server 2003 ............................................................................12
          C.   2007: Windows Home Server ..........................................................................12-13
          D.   2008: Windows Server 2008............................................................................13

XX.       Bibliography ..........................................................................................................14
Introduction

       On November 10, 1983, Microsoft announced Microsoft Windows®, an extension of the

MS-DOS® operating system that would provide a graphical operating environment for PC users.

Microsoft DOS

       DOS- (Disk Operating System) was the first widely installed operating system for

personal computers. (Earlier, the same name had been used for an IBM operating system for a

line of business computers.)

       The first personal computer version of DOS called PCS-DOS, was developed for IBM by

Bill Gates and his new Microsoft Corporation. He retained the rights to market a Microsoft

version, called MS-DOS. PC-DOS and MS-DOS are almost identical and most users have

referred to either of them as “DOS.” DOS was (and still is) a non-graphical line-oriented

command- or menu-driven operating system, with a relatively simple interface but not overly

“friendly” user interface. Its prompt to enter a command looks like this:

C:>

       The first Microsoft Windows operating system was really an application that ran on top

of the MS-DOS operating system. Today, Windows operating systems continue to support DOS

(or a DOS-like user interface) for special purposes by emulating the operating system.

       In the 1970s before the personal computer was invented, IBM had a different and

unrelated DOS (Disk Operating System) that ran on smaller business computers. It was replaced

by IBM’s VSE operating system.

1985: Windows 1.0

       The first version of Windows provided a new software environment for developing and

running applications that use bitmap displays and mouse pointing devices. Before Windows, PC
users relied on the MS-DOS® method of typing commands at the C prompt (C:\). With

Windows, users moved a mouse to point and click their way through tasks, such as starting

applications.

       In addition, Windows users could switch among several concurrently running

applications. The product included a set of desktop applications, including the MS-DOS file

management program, a calendar, card file, notepad, calculator, clock, and telecommunications

programs, which helped users manage day-to-day activities.

1987: Windows 2.0

       Windows 2.0 took advantage of the improved processing speed of the Intel 286

processor, expanded memory, and inter-application communication capabilities made possible

through Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE). With improved graphics support, users could now

overlap windows, control screen layout, and use keyboard combinations to move rapidly through

Windows operations. Many developers wrote their Windows-based applications for this release.

       The follow-up release, Windows 2.03, took advantage of the protected mode and

extended memory capabilities of the Intel 386 processor. Subsequent Windows releases

continued to improve the speed, reliability, and usability of the PC as well as the interface design

and capabilities.




1990: Windows 3.0

       The third major release of the Windows platform from Microsoft offered improved

performance, advanced graphics with 16 colors, and full support of the more powerful Intel 386
processor. A new wave of 386 PCs helped drive the popularity of Windows 3.0, which offered a

wide range of useful features and capabilities, including:

       The popularity of Windows 3.0 grew with the release of a new Windows software

development kit (SKD), which helped software developers focus more on writing applications

and less on writing device drivers. Widespread acceptance among a third-party hardware and

software developers helped fuel the success of Windows 3.0.

1993: Windows for Workgroups 3.11

       A superset of windows 3.1, Windows 3.11 added peer to peer workgroup and domain

networking support. For the first time, Windows-based PCs were network aware and became an

integral part of the emerging client/server computing evolution.

       Windows for workgroups was used in the local area networks (LANs) and on standalone

PCs and laptop computers. It added features of special interest to corporate users, such as

centralized configuration and security, significantly improved support for Novell NetWare

networks, and remote access service (RAS).

1995: Windows 95

       Windows 95 was the successor to the three existing general purpose desktop operating

systems from Microsoft- Windows 3.1, Windows for Workgroups, and MS-DOS. Windows 95

integrated a 32-bit TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) stack for built-in

internet support, dial-up networking, and new Plug and Play capabilities that made it easy for

users to install hardware and software.

       The 32-bit operating system also offered enhanced multimedia capabilities, more

powerful features for mobile computing, and integrated networking.

1998: Windows 98
       Windows 98 was the upgraded from Windows 95. Described as an operating system that

“Works Better, Plays Better,” Windows 98 was the first version of Windows designed

specifically for consumers.

       With Windows 98, users could find information more easily on their PCs as well as the

Internet. Other ease-of-use improvements included the ability to open and close applications

more quickly, support for reading DVD discs, and support for universal serial bus (USB)

devices.

1999: Windows 98 Second Edition

       Windows 98 SE, as it was often abbreviated, was an incremental update to Windows 98.

It offered consumers a variety of new and enhanced hardware compatibility and Internet related

features.

       Windows 98 SE helped improve users online experience with the Internet Explorer 5.0

browser technology and Microsoft Windows NetMeeting 3.0 conferencing software. It also

included Microsoft DirectX® API 9.1, which provided improved support for Windows

multimedia, and offered home networking capabilities through Internet connection sharing (ICS).

Windows 98 SE was also the first consumer operating system from Microsoft capable of using

device drivers that also worked with the Windows NT business operating system.




Windows CE 6

       Firstly, Windows CE 6 continues to focus it’s attentions on the ARM architecture, with

new BSP and compiler support for the next generation of ARM series or ARM6 processors.

Windows CE 6.0 will be the first Microsoft operation system to support Microsoft’s 21st Century
extensions to the dates File Allocation Table (FAT) file system in the form of the little discussed

ExFat While full details of ExFAT have yet to be revealed, it is known that the file system is

aimed at least from Windows CE’s point of view at catering for external storage, such as Solid

State CF and SD cards. The ExFAT addressing system will be optimized for embedded device

use and crucially remove the 32GB volume limitation imposed artificially upon the FAT

specification by Microsoft themselves. Additionally, in the age of digital multimedia, ExFAT

will see away with the 2GB file size limit for which in the Windows world NTFS is currently

required to remedy, a fact which Microsoft are pinning hopes of increased adoption of Windows

Automotive for the Windows CE 6.0 run.

1993: Windows NT 3.1

       Microsoft Windows NT® was released to manufacturing on July 27, 1993. “NT” stands

for new technology. To maintain consistency with Windows 3.1, a well-established home and

business operating system began with version 3.1. Unlike Windows 3.1, however, Windows NT

3.1 was a 32-bit operating system.

       Windows NT was the first Windows operating system to combine support for high-end,

client/server business applications with the industry’s leading personal productivity applications.

It was initially available in both a desktop (workstation) version and a server version called

Windows NT Advanced Server.

       Windows NT 3.1 contained overlapping windows and other features similar to Windows

3.1.

1994: Windows NT Workstation 3.5

       The Windows NT Workstation 3.5 release provided the highest degree of protection yet

for critical business applications and data with support for the OpenGL graphics standard, this
operating system helped power high-end applications for software development, engineering,

financial analysis, scientific, and business-critical tasks.

        The product also offered 32-bit performance improvements and better application support

for NetWare file and print servers. Other improved productivity features included the capability

to use friendlier, long names of up to 225 characters.

1996: Windows NT Workstation 4.0

        This upgrade to the Microsoft business desktop operating system brought increased ease

of use and simplified management, higher network capacity, and tools for developing and

managing intranets. Windows NT Workstation 4.0 included the popular Windows 95 user

interface yet provided improved networking support for easier and more secure access to the

Internet and corporate networks.

        In October 1998, Microsoft announced that Windows NT would no longer carry the

initials NT and that the next major version of the business operating system would be called

Windows 2000.

2000: Windows 2000

        More than just the upgrade to Windows NT Workstation 4.0, Windows 200 professional

was also designed to replace Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows NT Workstation 4.0 on

all small business desktops and laptops. Built on top of the proven Windows NT Workstation 4.0

code base, Windows 2000 added major improvements in reliability, ease of use, Internet

compatibility, and support for mobile computing.

        Among other improvements, Windows 2000 Professional simplified hardware

installation by adding support for a wide variety of new Plug and Play hardware, including
advanced networking and wireless products, USB devices, IEEE 1394 devices, and infrared

devices.

Editions

       Microsoft released various versions of Windows 2000 to cater to different markets and

business needs. It released Windows 2000 professional, Windows 2000 server, Windows 2000

Advanced Server and Windows 2000 Datacenter Server. Each edition was packaged separately.

       Windows 2000 Professional was designed as the desktop operating system for businesses

and power users. It is the basic unit of Windows 2000, and the most common. It offers greater

security and stability than many of the previous Windows desktop operating systems.

Windows 2000 Server products share the same user interface with Windows 2000 Professional,

but contain additional components for running infrastructure and application software.

       Windows 2000 Advanced Server is a variant of the Windows 2000 Server operating

system designed for medium-to-large businesses. It offers clustering infrastructure for high

availability and scalability of applications and services.

       Windows 2000 Datacenter Server is a variant of the Windows 2000 Server that is

designed for large businesses that move large quantities of confidential or sensitive data

frequently via a central server. As with Advanced Server, it supports clustering, failover and load

balancing. Its minimum system requirements are normal, but it was designed to be capable of

handling more advanced hardware – for instance it was capable of supporting computers with up

to 32 CPUs and 64 GBs RAM. A limited edition 64-bit version of Windows 2000 Datacenter

Server was made available via the OEM Channel.

2001: Windows XP
        With the release of Windows XP in October 2001, Microsoft merged its two Windows

operating system lines for consumers and businesses, uniting them around the Windows 2000

code base.

        The “XP” in Windows XP stands for “experience,” symbolizing the innovative

experiences that Windows can offer to personal computer users. With Windows XP, home users

can work with and enjoy music, movies, messaging, and photos with their computer, while

business users can work smarter and faster, thanks to new technical-support technology, a

“fresh” user interface, and many other improvements that make it easier to use for a wide range

of tasks.

Windows XP for Specialized Hardware

        Microsoft has also customized Windows XP to suit different markets.

Windows XP Professional x64-bit Edition

        This edition was designed specifically for Intel Itanium-based workstations. This edition

was discontinued in early 2005, after HP, the last distributor of Itanium-based workstations,

stopped selling Itanium systems marketed as ‘workstations’. However, Itanium support continues

in the server editions of Windows.



Windows XP Professional x64 Edition

        Not to be confused with the previous Itanium edition of Windows XP, this edition is

derived from Windows Server 2003 and supports the x86-64 extension of the Intel IA-32

architecture. X86-64 is implemented by MD as “AMD64”, found in AMD’s Opteron and Athlon

64 chips, and implemented by Intel as “Intel 64”, found in Intel’s Pentium 4 and later chips.

Windows XP Media Center Edition
       This edition is designed for media center PCs. Originally, it was only available bundled

with one of these computers, and could not be purchased separately. In 2003 the Media Center

Edition was updated as “Windows XP Media Center Edition 2003”, which added additional

features such as FM radio tuning. Another update was released in 2004, and again in 2005

2007: Windows Vista

       Windows Vista is a line of operation systems developed by Microsoft for use on personal

computers, including home and business desktops, laptops, Tablet PCs, and media centers.

       Windows Vista contains many changes and new features, including an updated graphical

user interface and visual style dubbed Windows Aero, improved searching features, new

multimedia creation tools such as Windows DVD Makers, and redesigned networking, audio,

print, and display sub-systems. Vista also aims to increase the level of communication between

machines on a home network, using peer-to-peer technology to simplify sharing files and digital

media between computers and devices.



Editions

Windows Vista Home Basic

       Similar to Windows XP Home Edition, Home Basic targets budget-conscious users not

requiring advanced media support for home use. This edition lacks the Windows Aero theme

with its translucent effects. Home Basic supports one physical CPU. Microsoft will support it

until 2012.

       Like Windows XP Home Edition, this version includes Windows Firewall, parental

Controls, Safety Center, Windows Movie Maker, Windows Photo Gallery, and more functions.

Windows Vista Home Premium
       Containing all features from Home Basic, this edition also supports additional features

aimed for the home market-segment, such as support for HDTV and DVD-authoring. It also

includes “extra Premium” games, support for mobile and tablet PCs, for network projectors, for

touch screens, and for auxiliary displays (via Windows Sideshow), and a utility to schedule

backups.

Windows Vista Business

       Comparable to Windows XP Professional and Windows XP Tablet PC Edition, Windows

Vista Business Edition targets the business-market. It includes all the features of Home Basic

with the exception of Parental Controls and the Windows Vista Standard theme. It includes the

IIS web-server, fax support, Rights management Services (RMS) client, file-system encryption,

dual-processor (two sockets) support, system-image backup and recovery, off-line support, a full

version of Remote Desktop that supports incoming connections, ad-hoc P2P collaboration

capabilities, the “Previous Versions” feature (Windows Shadow Copy), several other commercial

features, the Windows Aero Theme and support for tablet PCs.

Windows Servers

2000: Windows 2000 Server

       Windows 2000 Server products share the same the same user interface with Windows

2000 Professional, but contain additional components for running infrastructure and application

software.

2003: Windows Server 2003

       Released on April 24, 2003, Windows Server 2003 is the follow-up to Windows 2000

Server, incorporating compatibility and other features from Windows XP. Unlike Windows 2000

Server, Windows Server 2003’s default installation has none of the server components enabled.
Windows Server 2003 includes compatibility modes to allow older applications to run with

greater stability. It was made more compatible with Windows NT 4.0 domain-based networking.

Incorporating and upgrading a Windows NT 4.0 domain to Windows 2000 was considered

difficult and time-consuming, and generally was considered an all-or-nothing upgrade,

particularly when dealing with Active Directory. Windows Server 2003 brought in enhanced

Active Directory compatibility, and better deployment support, to ease the transition from

Windows NT 4.0 to Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP Professional.

2007: Windows Home Server

       Windows Home Server is a home server operating system from Microsoft. Announced on

January 7, 2007, at the Consumer Electronics Show by Bill Gates, Windows Home Server is

intended to be a solution for homes with multiple connected PCs to offer file sharing, automated

backups, and remote access. It is based on Windows Server 2003 SP2. Windows Home Server

was released to manufacturing on July 16, 2007.

2008: Windows Server 2008

       Windows Server 2008 is built from the same code base as Windows Vista; therefore, it

shares much of the same architecture and functionality. Since the code base is common, it

automatically comes with most of the technical, security, management and administrative

features new to Windows Vista such as the rewritten networking stack (native IPv6, native

wireless, speed and security improvements); improved image-based installation, deployment and

recovery; improved diagnostics, monitoring, event logging and reporting tools; new security

features such as Bitlocker and ASLR; improved Windows Firewall with secure default

configuration.
                                     BIBLIOGRAPHY


"Microsoft Windows," Wikipedia, Nov. 2007, 16 Apr. 2008,
      <en.wikipedia.org/wiki/microsoft_windows>.

“History of Windows,” History of Windows,26 Mar. 2008 ,<Microsoft.com>.

"Windows," How Stuff Works, 16 Apr. 2008
      <http://computer.howstuffworks.com/windows.htm>.

"Windows History," Microsoft, 30 June 2003, 16 Apr. 2008,
      <www.microsoft,com/windows/>.

"Microsoft Windows History," Computerhope, 16 Apr. 2008,
      <www.computerhope.com/history/windows.htm>.

"The History of Windows CE," Hpcfactor, 16 Apr. 2008,
      <www.hpcfactor.com/support/windowsce/>.

"Inventors Articles," About, 16 Apr. 2008,
       <http://inventors.about.com/od/mstartinventions/a/windows.htm>.

				
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