RMS Setup

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RMS Setup Powered By Docstoc
					    RMS Setup




    March 27, 2009




   2170 Georgina Avenue
  Santa Monica, CA 90402
800-972-3027 or 310-451-3735
       www.rco.com
Table of Contents
1      Introduction ................................................................................................................. 1
2      Document History ....................................................................................................... 1
3      RMS Sever Setup ........................................................................................................ 2
    3.1 Windows Server ................................................................................................... 4
       3.1.1     New Setup ..................................................................................................... 5
          3.1.1.1    Install Java ............................................................................................. 5
          3.1.1.2    Install Tomcat ........................................................................................ 5
          3.1.1.3    RMS Server ........................................................................................... 9
          3.1.1.4    Database............................................................................................... 16
          3.1.1.5    Installing Services................................................................................ 18
          3.1.1.6    ISAPI Redirector ................................................................................. 18
          3.1.1.7    Full Text Search................................................................................... 28
          3.1.1.8    Active Directory .................................................................................. 32
          3.1.1.9    Server Properties.................................................................................. 33
          3.1.1.10 Restart Services ................................................................................... 36
       3.1.2     Update ......................................................................................................... 36
       3.1.3     Remove Components .................................................................................. 37
          3.1.3.1    Apache Tomcat .................................................................................... 37
          3.1.3.2    Java SDK ............................................................................................. 38
          3.1.3.3    Java runtime environment ................................................................... 38
    3.2 Unix Server ........................................................................................................ 38
       3.2.1     Unix Commands ......................................................................................... 39
       3.2.2     Unix Solaris ................................................................................................ 44
       3.2.3     Unix Connectivity ....................................................................................... 48
       3.2.4     Unix Import ................................................................................................. 50
       3.2.5     Patch............................................................................................................ 51
       3.2.6     Copy Files (Windows to Unix) ................................................................... 52
       3.2.7     Samba.......................................................................................................... 53
       3.2.8     Solaris9 Install ............................................................................................ 54
    3.3 Database Functions ............................................................................................ 62
       3.3.1     Running Patches.......................................................................................... 62
       3.3.2     Export Oracle – Import to SQL .................................................................. 62
       3.3.3     Export Oracle Windows – Import to Oracle Unix ...................................... 71
       3.3.4     Export a Microsoft SQL database ............................................................... 74
       3.3.5     Restore a Microsoft SQL database ............................................................. 75
       3.3.6     Create I2K Database in Microsoft SQL ...................................................... 80
       3.3.7     Run Create Scripts on Microsoft SQL ........................................................ 81
       3.3.8     Run Create Scripts on Oracle Windows ..................................................... 86
       3.3.9     Run Create Scripts on Oracle Unix ............................................................. 89
       3.3.10 Running Oracle Statistics ............................................................................ 90
       3.3.11 Running Microsoft Statistics....................................................................... 97
    3.4 Setting up Forms ................................................................................................ 98
    3.5 Installation Problems .......................................................................................... 99
       3.5.1     Can’t Browse to Login Screen .................................................................... 99
       3.5.2    MS SQL Database Error ........................................................................... 100
       3.5.3    Unable to Install InstallShield Scripting ................................................... 100
    3.6 SQL Database Size Estimates .......................................................................... 101
4      Workstation Setup................................................................................................... 102
    4.1 Java Runtime .................................................................................................... 102
    4.2 Configure the Java Plug-In ............................................................................... 103
    4.3 Internet Explorer .............................................................................................. 105
    4.4 Desktop Shortcuts ............................................................................................ 106
5      Devices .................................................................................................................... 108
    5.1 Barcode Readers ............................................................................................... 108
    5.2 Printers ............................................................................................................. 109
6      Workflow ................................................................................................................ 109
    6.1 Hibernate .......................................................................................................... 110
    6.2 SQL Server Setup ............................................................................................. 110
    6.3 JBPM Setup ...................................................................................................... 110
    6.4 Efile Destruction Coding.................................................................................. 110
    6.5 Physical Destruction Coding ............................................................................ 112
7      Mobile ..................................................................................................................... 113
8      Mail Setup ............................................................................................................... 115
9      Summary ................................................................................................................. 119
1 Introduction
This document presents the procedure used for installing RMS Pro on a Windows 2003
Server. A sample installation is performed on the c: drive. There are several steps to
installing the records management server. The setup program automates many of the
tasks but you may have to run several manual processes after running the setup such as:

   •   Run additional database script patches
   •   Run the forms setup.
   •   Setup the security.
   •   Run the database statistics
   •   Setup your peripherals
   •   Setup the workstation browsers.

Note that you need to disable all the popup blockers like Google, AIM, XP SP2, AOL.
Create a test list and perform this against the server. If your workstations are all different
then you have to test the connection and operations from each workstation.


2 Document History
The following table lists the modifications that have occurred on this document.

                                             REVISIONS
Author           Date           Version   Description
Roy Nabel        1Jan2000          1      Created RmsSetup.doc
Steve Babbitt    9Sep2003          2      Taken from RmsSetup.doc
Roy Nabel        9Feb2004          3      Added import section
Steve Babbitt    3Mar2004          4      Added Upgrade section
Roy Nabel        4Mar2004          5      Organized manual added ant description
Steve Babbitt    24Mar2004         6      Describe Image2000 version 6.8 install and upgrade
Roy Nabel        6May2004          7      Added SQL requirements; changed footer
Roy Nabel        28Jul2004         8      Added Database section
Roy Nabel        5Aug2004          9      Added Database statistics for Oracle and SQL
Roy Nabel        23Aug2004        10      Added printer section for zebra label printer driver install
Steve Babbitt    28Sep2004        11      Config Java plugin, Import Solaris database.
Roy Nabel        13Nov2004        12      Added Microsft SQL database restore
Roy Nabel        14Apr2005        13      Added running patches and setting up forms
Roy Nabel        26May2005        14      Added samba section
Steve Babbitt    28July2005       15      ms sql install, and some solutions to common errors
Randy Nichols    28Oct2005        16      Added Full Text search section
Roy Nabel        15Nov2005        17      Added ASP.NET to IIS section for Windows 2003 Servers
Roy Nabel        19Nov2006        18      Redid outline and added label and image scanner
Roy Nabel        25Nov2006        19      Added active directory login and Server Properties
Roy Nabel        26Nov2006        20      I don’t know what I changed
                                          Added desktop internet explorer icon setup; mobile setup; mail
Roy Nabel        04Jan2007         21
                                          relay setup using Microsoft Exchange
Roy Nabel        26Apr2007         23     Modified Mobile setup for jdk1.6 and tomcat6
Roy Nabel        10July2008        24     Added workflow setup


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3 RMS Server Setup
From a hardware perspective the server has to service several different types of clients. Each
client may have a different operating system and hardware requirements. The following table
discusses each type of user and a possible scenario for each.

User Type        Description
Normal User      This person will be making requests for physical records. They will normally
                 have a standard machine configuration running a win98 or win2k operating
                 system with Internet Explorer v5.5 and 128mb or ram and a standard
                 800x600x256 color display. They will make occasional searches and run a
                 simple report. They can use a simple 10mb network card although 100mb is
                 preferred.
Power User       Power users have the latest and greatest bar none. They may have a signature
                 panel, PDA, a win2k workstation. This person will be make lots of searches,
                 reports, and probably need a high speed printer to handle the volume requests.
Scan             This person requires lots of local storage a heavy duty workstation running
                 win2k and needs a large display for reviewing and coding images.
Record Center    There may be multiple workstations at different file rooms or record centers.
                 The workstation is similar to a normal user. The only difference is the active
                 synchronization software installed on local workstation.




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The Image 2000 software system requires Microsoft Internet Explorer version 5.5 or latter on the
“normal” client workstations. The server requires installing several modules and adding some
new registry values.




      Client          Server
                                                            Image 2000 Record Management Server Modules



                            Operating
                                                      Internet
                             System                                    Tomcat Server
    Browser                                         Information                                 RMS Server
                          Windows 2000                                  (jsp pages)
                                                    Service IIS
                             Server




                                                                                                Middleware
                                                     IP Server
                                                                                                  Corba
                           File System
                              NTFS




                                                      Other                                      Database
                                                    Applications                               Microsoft SQL
                                                                                                Server 2000




Client browsers make html and jsp requests of the operating system. The operating
system passes these requests to the IIS system, which in turn sends the request to the
Record Management Software using the TCP/IP protocol. Database requests are made
using a CORBA middleware module that uses a JDBC connection to the SQL Server
database.
In terms of memory requirements the server requires about 150mb or disk space for the
Server Modules. Network designers have several different approaches to working with
the NTFS and SQL database. Separate disk partitions are allocated for the file system and
for the database files. The help system if uploaded consumes about 150mb of disk space.
For 50,000 physical records with 64 characters per record you would need approximately
5gb of disk space.




3.1 Windows Server
The following is a list of prerequisites that must be installed prior to beginning the
installation:




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       Windows2003
       Internet Explorer 6.0
       IIS or Tomcat Web Server
       Oracle 9 (or above)
       Oracle Client (if database server in on another machine)
       Microsoft SQL 2000 (sp3 and above)

All old versions of Tomcat and the RMS must be removed prior to installing this version.


3.1.1 New Setup




3.1.1.1 Install Java
Select the Java 1.6 item from the Image2000 Setup Console to begin the JVM
installation. Verify the default installation directory is on the correct drive as shown in
the figure below then click next. Accept the rest of the defaults to complete the
installation.




3.1.1.2 Install Tomcat
Select the Tomcat 6 option form the Image2000 Setup Console. You will see the
following screen. Press next to start the Tomcat installation.


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The figure below shows the Tomcat Component Options. Check the Service box to force
the Tomcat service to automatically start when the computer boots. Pressing the plus sign
on the left expands the Tomcat options.




Pick an installation directory. Normally the default is to put Tomcat in the Program Files
Folder, but some of the more advanced Image2000 functions cannot tolerate spaces in the
Tomcat path. Please pick a directory named something similar to C:/Tomcat5 as shown
below.


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Be sure to select an available TCP port number. Image2000 is configured to use port
8081 by default. You will also need to select a password for the Tomcat administration
web page. This web page should be disabled after all the configuration steps are
completed to reduce access to the web server.




The following step is critical and easily missed. Please follow the instructions closely.
Tomcat must use the full JDK.

The Tomcat setup will now prompt you where the java virtual machine is located. This
location was determined when you setup the java software development kit in the
previous setup. Sometimes Tomcat tries to use the Java Runtime Directory as the default,
but this is incorrect. Please change this by browsing to the j2sdk directory shown below.




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Accept the rest of the defaults and press Finish to complete the Tomcat installation.


3.1.1.3 RMS Server
Select Image2000 from the Image2000 Setup Console. Press next to see the Feature
selection box shown below. Ensure that all of the selection boxes are checked.




The next screen shown below requires you to browse to the JVM directory that was just
created during the Java installation described above. Once again, verify that the j2sdk
directory shown below is selected, and not the Java Runtime directory.




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Next browse to the Tomcat directory.




The final directory we need to specify is the destination of the Image2000 Server files.




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Verify the computer name is correct as shown in the figure below. Then enter the
internal domain name of your company’s network. This will be used to authenticate user
logons.




Next enter the external domain of your company. This will allow external clients to
upload electronic files.




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RCO adds custom functionality to Image2000 for some customers. Entering your
company or project acronym here will enable advanced features. Some examples are
RCO, OCSD, FDAPPF.




Next enter information that will be used to build the directory tree. Enter your company
name then the name of the directory you would like to use for the root of the tree.




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Select the appropriate database type and version.




Enter the name of the computer hosting the database and the name of the database
service. (The name of the database service is not always the same as the SID).




Note that for SQL server, the DB Name above is typically Image2000.




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Image2000 can store user passwords within the database, or it can use validate the user
from an external source. Select the authentication source as shown in the example below.




The user information may be synchronized with an external database. Enter the database
name, user and password. These will typically be the same as the main Image2000
database. If this function is not used, just press next to accept the defaults.




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Browse to a directory where all the electronic files will be stored on the hard disk. This
directory should not be within the web directory. If large volumes of electronic images
or files are going to be stored, we recommend placing this directory in its own volume or
disk.




Click next to verify the disk locations then finish to complete this section of the install.
The screen may flicker a few times as new services are added to the system.


3.1.1.4 Database


3.1.1.4.1 Oracle Database Install
Image2000 uses an oracle database back end. You can create a separate database
instance specifically for Image2000, or simply add the Image2000 namespace to an
existing database instance. The following table lists a few of the non-default parameters
required for the database.

       shared_pool_size = 81 828 352
       large_pool_size = 64 603 008
        open_cursors = 1300

In Oracle 8, these can be added to init.ora file.




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In oracle 9, these values can be set using the Oracle Enterprise Manager Console.
Navigate to the Configuration Tab, then press the All Initialization Parameters button.
Be sure to select the SPFile option to make the changes permanent.




3.1.1.4.2 Oracle Database Initialize
Start SQLPlus and connect to the destination Image2000 database using the System
account. Create the RMSADMIN namespace by typing the following commands into
SQLPlus

       CREATE USER RMSADMIN IDENTIFIED BY ADMIN;
       GRANT DBA TO RMSADMIN;
       GRANT CREATE ANY TABLE TO RMSADMIN

Connect to the new namespace (mailbert is an example database name).

       CONNECT RMSADMIN/ADMIN@MAILBERT

Select the Open option of the File menu and find empty.sql in the following directory:



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        F:/Program Files/RCO/Image2000/Server/Oracle/empty.sql

Select open then press enter.
Run the SQL scripts by typing the following commands:

        start CreateRmsOracle.sql;
        start InitRmsOracle.sql;
        start CreateRmsOracleProcs.sql;


3.1.1.4.3 Microsoft SQL 2003 Database
This is described in the “Database Functions” chapter of this document.


3.1.1.5 Installing Services
There are 3 rms services you need to install by running batch files located in the
c:\Image2000\Server\bin directory.

IpServer-Install-NTWrapper.bat
NamingService-Install-NTWrapper.bat
RmsServer-Install-NTWrapper.bat


3.1.1.6 ISAPI Redirector
The ISAPI Redirector is used to relay all the JSP processing from Microsoft IIS to
Apache Tomcat. Do the following steps after you have installed the java sdk and tomcat.
You have to do the sdk and tomcat first because the isapi needs the path to these in the
configuration file.

   1.   Install redirector
   2.   Setup registry
   3.   Add IIS Virtual Directory
   4.   Add Extensions
   5.   Restart IIS

*** Note that prior to restarting IIS we strongly suggest you stop the Apache Tomcat
services otherwise you will get a red arrow pointing down when you click the ISAPI
filters tab in IIS.

You can get information about the tomcat redirection process at http://tomcat.apache.org/
and then clicking on the Tomcat Connectors link.


3.1.1.6.1 Install Redirector
You can download the tomcat redirector from www.rco.com/down. Unzip all the files the
directory c:\Image2000\Tomcat Redirector


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Open the file c:\Image2000\Tomcat Redirector\conf\workers.properties and make sure
the paths to the tomcat and jdk are correct.

# workers.tomcat_home should point to the location where you
# installed tomcat. This is where you have your conf, webapps and lib
# directories.
#
workers.tomcat_home="C:\tomcat6"

#
# workers.java_home should point to your Java installation. Normally
# you should have a bin and lib directories beneath it.
#
workers.java_home="C:\jdk1.6.0"

3.1.1.6.2 Setup the Windows Registry
After you install the tomcat redirector please run the regedt32 from the start run
command and import the c:\Image2000\Tomcat Redirector\Registry\tomcat.reg. After
you import the registry file please check all the directory paths and driver letters are
correct.




3.1.1.6.3 Add Virtual Directory
Start the Internet Services Manager located within the Administrative Tools folder. Right
Click the Default Web Site to create a new Virtual Directory.



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This begins the creation wizard. Use the name jakarta for the alias.




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Browse to Tomcat Redirector directory within your Image2000 directory.




Check the Execute box.




Press Next a few times to finish the wizard.

3.1.1.6.4 Web Services Extensions
We need to give IIS permission to use the isapi dll. Begin by selecting the Web Service
Extensions folder from the bottom left side of the Internet Services Manager.




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Next enter the
   • Enter the extension name Tomcat ISAPI
   • Browse to the isapiredirector.dll
   • Select the Set extension status to Allowed
   • Press OK




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Finally verify that the Tomcat ISAPI Extension is in the allowed state. This is shown in
the figure below. Note that you should have the ASP.NET installed.




The ASP.NET is a windows component. To install the ASP.NET start the control panel
and then click on Add or Remove Programs. Chose Windows Components and then
choose the Application Server. Click on the Detail button and then check the ASP.NET.
Click Ok and then the Next button on the main screen to install the component.




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3.1.1.6.5 ISAPI Filter
Once again, right click on the Default Website then select properties. Select the ISAPI
Filters Tab.




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Hit the add button to add a filter. Use jakarta for the name, then browse to the dll located
within the bin folder we previously selected.

{e.g. c:\Image2000\Tomcat Redirector\bin\isapi_redirect.dll }




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Note that sometimes the redirector does not want to get active (you get a red down arrow
when you click the isapi filters tab in IIS) so we suggest that you restart the Tomcat
services. If everything is working you will get a green up arrow.

To stop the Apache Tomcat Service click the Start button and then click run, type in
services.msc and then click the Ok button.




Right click on the Apache Tomcat and select Stop.




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3.1.1.6.6 Restart IIS
Right click the name of the server and select Restart IIS.




When it has restarted, check the ISAPI Filter tab in the web server’s property page again.
If all is well there will be a green arrow next to the filter.




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Close the Internet Services Manager.

3.1.1.7 Full Text Search
Microsoft and Oracle implement full-text search differently.


3.1.1.7.1 Microsoft
Microsoft SQL Server requires the text to be loaded into a blob field to be indexed. The
full-text index catalog is located outside the database. There is a way to use the Indexing
Service to index documents in their home locations, but it seems to be less flexible, more
difficult to use, and probably performs slower. SQL Server 2000 does not seem to have
built-in indexing for PDF files, but an Adobe IFilter is available for download that can be
installed and enables indexing of PDF files.

The text search table in the Microsoft version of Image2000 is the FileProps table – it
contains a column for the text blob and a column that holds the file extension of the
document so the indexer knows what kind of document it is.


3.1.1.7.1.1 Adobe Filter


Adobe PDF IFilter v6.0


Need help with downloading? See our Downloading Help documents.


1. Download PDF IFilter.
2. Stop all appropriate clients.
3. Uninstall any previous version of Adobe PDF IFilter.
4. Double-click the downloaded file and follow the on-screen instructions.
5. After the installation completes, start all appropriate clients.
6. (SharePoint only) Add PDF as a file type to be included in the content index.
7. Re-index your system with the appropriate clients.

Detailed installation instructions are in the ReadMe file, which is included with the
Adobe PDF IFilter download.



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Some information on the web indicated the following to install it for SQL Server 2005,
but we did not need to do it for SS2000.


http://weblogs.asp.net/wallym/archive/2005/02/28/382060.aspx


Full-Text Indexing a PDF with SQL Server 2005

I just got finished installing and setting up the full-text indexing of a pdf file
for Sql Server 2005 December CTP Build. Here are the steps to getting it
working (assuming you have a functioning table to store BLOB data).

   1. Remember that your table must have a BLOB field, such as a
      varbinary(max), and a column to specify the file type to the full-text
      index create index commands or the full-text index wizard in Sql
      Server Management Studio.
   2. Download and install the Adobe Acrobate PDF Filter. It is available at
      http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=2611.
   3. Execute the following commands against your Sql Server 2005
      instance.
          o sp_fulltext_service 'load_os_resources',1. This command tells
             the Microsoft Search Service to load OS specific wordbreakers,
             stemmers, and such.
          o sp_fulltext_service 'verify_signature', 0. Do not verify that the
             binaries are signed.
   4. Bounce the Sql Server Service and MSFTESQL.
   5. Create your full-text index.
   6. Issue the necessary command(s) to (re)index.

Wally

posted on Monday, February 28, 2005 9:26 PM

Feedback
# re: Full-Text Indexing a PDF file with Sql Server 2005 December CTP (aka
Yukon) 3/1/2005 12:15 AM John Kane

Hi Wally,
This was posted by a Dev Lead when simalar advise was given on a fulltext
newsgroup thread: "This will work, but beware that making this change
makes your SQL instance a little less secure. Be sure to read the
documentation for these flags so you understand the risk."

From the Yukon BOL title "sp_fulltext_service" - "Enabling use of OS
resources provides access to resources for languages and document types



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registered with Microsoft Indexing Service that do not have an instance-
specific resource installed."

Basicly, you need to set this when adding a new IFilter, but should disable it
when you're finished, i.e., set it backe to:

sp_fulltext_service 'verify_signature', 1
sp_fulltext_service 'load_os_resources',0

Even FTS, now has to keep SQL Server secure ;-)
John


# re: Full-Text Indexing a PDF file with Sql Server 2005 December CTP (aka
Yukon) 3/11/2005 9:18 AM Flores

When will be released the Yukon version for the public?

Is there any way to index pdf files in SQL2000?

thanks

Nacho Flores

# re: Full-Text Indexing a PDF file with Sql Server 2005 December CTP (aka
Yukon) 3/11/2005 2:14 PM Wallym

It works basically the same except that you have use an image column
instead of a varbinary(max).

# re: Full-Text Indexing a PDF file with Sql Server 2005 December CTP (aka
Yukon) 3/16/2005 8:50 AM Vijay

Hi,

I have to search through six PDF documents stored in a particular location.
The input for the search is a keyword text and the output should be the
bookmarks under which the text is present(for each section and subsection a
bookmark will be present in the PDF). Preferably, the percentage of match
also needs to be displayed against each bookmark link. How do I achieve the
same? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Vijay

# re: Full-Text Indexing a PDF file with Sql Server 2005 December CTP (aka
Yukon) 3/16/2005 6:05 PM Wallym
Use Index Server if you are looking at indexing the so



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3.1.1.7.1.2 Setup
The following script is run in SQL Analyzer connected to the Image2000 database to
setup full-text search for Image2000:

USE Image2000

PRINT '---- drop and disable any preexisting fulltext table, catalog'

exec sp_fulltext_table 'dbo.FileProps', 'drop'
GO
exec sp_fulltext_catalog 'cat_fileprops', 'drop'
GO
exec sp_fulltext_database 'disable'
GO

PRINT '-------- Enabling Image2000 database for full-text search --------'
 exec sp_fulltext_database 'enable'
GO
PRINT '-------- Creating fulltext catalog cat_fileprops --------'
exec sp_fulltext_catalog 'cat_fileprops', 'create'
GO
PRINT '-------- Marking table FileProps for full-text indexing --------'
exec sp_fulltext_table 'dbo.FileProps', 'create', 'cat_fileprops', 'IX_FileProps_FileVerId'
GO

PRINT '-------- Marking column FileProps.DocContents for full-text indexing and
DocType to indicate the document type (file extension). --------'
exec sp_fulltext_column 'dbo.FileProps', 'DocContents', 'add', null, 'DocType'
GO

PRINT '-------- Starting change-tracking for FileProps . --------'
--exec sp_fulltext_table 'dbo.FileProps', 'start_change_tracking'
--GO

PRINT '-------- Starting background-update for FileProps . --------'
--exec sp_fulltext_table 'dbo.FileProps', 'start_background_updateindex'
--GO

PRINT '-------- Activating full-text index for FileProps . --------'
exec sp_fulltext_table 'dbo.FileProps', 'activate'
GO
PRINT '-------- Done!'


Issues
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;323324


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3.1.1.7.2 Oracle
Oracle stores the URL to files in columns of tables to be full-text indexed, so the actual
files reside outside the database. Oracle 9 comes with filters for PDF files. It can also do
a sometimes crude HTML “Highlighted” image of files that are text-searched.

The Oracle version of Image2000 database has a table called “TextSearch” which is
dynamically built and maintained during a full-text index update operation. Eventually, it
probably can be merged with the FileProps table. It has a column for the URL pointer to
the file to be indexed and also has a column for the file extension so the indexer knows
what kind of document it is. The full-text index is kept in the oracle database itself in
contrast to the Microsoft method. The TextSearch table and index is created by the
“CreateRmsOracle.sql” script, which also enables the feature.


3.1.1.8 Active Directory
If you want to use the active directory security so that your users can login to the RMS
with their regular NT accounts you must configure the ServerProperties.txt




 Active Directory   RMS Server
      Server


If the domain is for example rco.local then in the ServerProperties.txt file you will have
the following lines.

#Authentication Domain
Authentication.Domain = rco.local
Authentication.NtPwEnabled = true

If your RMS is currently not part of the domain right click the My Computer icon on
your server’s desktop.




Click on the Computer Name tab and then click the Change button. Click the radio button
Domain and enter the Active Directory Name. Click the Ok button and then the Ok
button in the main page to submit the change. You will have to restart the RMS server for
the change to take affect.




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3.1.1.9 Server Properties
While the Server setup does configure many of the items you need in the
ServerProperties.txt file you may want to manually change some of these settings.




The following is a typical listing of the ServerProperties.txt file which you can edit with
any text editor like Notepad.


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#Preferences for Image2000 RMS Server

Application = RMS

#Naming Service Location
CORBA.NameService.Port = 1501
CORBA.NameService.Host = DUCK
CORBA.Host = DUCK
CORBA.External = www.rco.com
CORBA.Port = 1500
CORBA.MaxXfrBytes = 4000000

Web.Port = 80
Web.Dir.ClientData = C:\\Image2000\\webapps\\Image2000/ClientData
Web.Host = www.rco.com

Tomcat.Port = 8081
Tomcat.Directory = C:\\Program Files\\Apache Software Foundation\\Tomcat 5.0

#Directory Information
Tree.RootTitle = NM State Records
Image.Directory = C:\\Image2000\\Files\\ObjectFiles
Image.Directory.Personal = C:\\Image2000\\Files\\UserImages
Image.FilesPerDirectory = 500
Image.DirectoriesPerLevel = 100
Image.DirectoryLevelDepth = 3
Image.Directory.Base = C:\\Image2000\\webapps\\Image2000
Image.UploadDirectory.Base = C:\\Image2000\\webapps\\Image2000\\upload
Image.DownloadDirectory.Base = C:\\Image2000\\webapps\\Image2000\\download
Label.Directory = C:\\Image2000\\webapps\\Image2000\\zz
ServerLog.Directory = C:\\Image2000\\server\\logs
ClientLog.Directory = C:\\Program Files\\Apache Software Foundation\\Tomcat 5.0\\logs
Form.Directory = C:\\Image2000\\webapps\\Image2000\\pdfForms
FileSeparatorCharacter = /
LDAP.Enable = false
LDAP.ServerType = NONE
ServerLogMaxRecords = 10000
JDBCtimeoutSeconds = 9999
Uploader.TempDir = C:\\UploadTemp
Uploader.MaxRamBytes = 10000
Uploader.MaxHdBytes = 10000


Database.Server = DUCK
Database.Name = Image2000



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Database.Type = SQL
Database.Vendor = Microsoft
Database.Version = 2000
Database.SystemUserID = rmsadmin
Database.SystemPassword = admin
Database.ConnectionPoolSize = 6

#Logging Information
SMTP.Host = postal
Log.EmailAddress = I2000Logger@rco.com;royn@rco.com
Log.Active = true


#Authentication Domain
Authentication.Domain = rco.local
Authentication.NtPwEnabled = true


textsearch = true
moderan = devel
cadserver = false
eReview = false
accounting = true
InstalledFeature.TextSearch = false
InstalledFeature.Cold = false
InstalledFeature.Workflow = false
InstalledFeature.Email = false


ObjectType.RequestForm = FormRT2
ObjectType.RetentionForm = FormRT4
ObjectType.Org = Company
ObjectType.SubOrg = Department


CustomReport.MaxColumns = 10
CustomReport.MaxGroupBy = 5
CustomReport.MaxSortBy = 3
CustomReport.UserSecurityCodingField = Department Number
SearchFilter.ReplaceRows = 6
SearchFilter.CategoryRows = 5


CodingField.RecordLocator = HomeAddress2Web.Host = www.rco.com
CodingField.LinkedRetention = Record Series Code
CodingField.OrgNum = Department Number



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CodingField.OrgName = Department Name
CodingField.Customer = Customer
CodingField.DestroyedDate = Destroyed Date
CodingField.OrgNum = Department Number
CodingField.SubOrgNum = Department Number
CodingField.SubOrgName = Department Name
CodingField.SubOrgNum = Department Number
CodingField.ElectronicDocId = RMS Document Number
CodingField.RecordSeries = RMS Document Number


Property                        Description
Tree.RootTitle                  You may want to change the name of the directory root.
CORBA.External                  If you have an RMS server on the Internet you need to put
                                in your public URL.
SMTP.Host = postal              If you want to use the physical record alerts you need to
                                put in your SMTP server name.
Tomcat.Directory                Verify this is where you tomcat is installed
Textsearch                      This should be TRUE if you do full text searching for
                                electronic files.




3.1.1.10       Restart Services
A folder full of shortcuts named rms is created on the desktop of the server. Open this
and select the green rms restart shortcut. A command window will appear while the
services are being started.




At this point you can test the admin and portal interfaces.



3.1.2 Update
Run the setup.exe that you can get from www.rco.com/down under the description setup.


RCO / SetupGuide.doc                     3/27/2009                                36 of 11
3.1.3 Remove Components
Before you remove components for Image2000 you want to make sure that the common
components are not used by other applications. Please consult your system administrator
if you are unsure. If you don’t have an administrator you can do the removal and then add
the components back if you find an application requires them.


3.1.3.1 Apache Tomcat
Before you run the tomcat uninstall from the windows control panel (add/remove)
selection you will need to first stop the tomcat. From the start menu click the Run
command and then type in services.msc and then press the enter key on your keyboard.




Right click on the Apache Tomcat and then click the Stop menu command.




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After you have shut down the tomcat console monitor you can remove the Tomcat
directory using the file explorer.




3.1.3.2 Java SDK
Select the Start button in the Windows tray and select the control panel. Then choose Add
/ Remove programs. Click on the remove button for the Java 2 SDK.




3.1.3.3 Java runtime environment
Select the Start button in the Windows tray and select the control panel. Then choose Add
/ Remove programs. Click on the remove button for the Java 2 Runtime Environment.




3.2 Unix Server
1. Copy Image2000 installation files from CD

       (copy files from cd to a temp install directory)
       cp -r /cdrom/sun /install/sun

       (open up permissions)
        chmod -R 777 /install

2. build the jvm

        (move to temp install directory)
         cd /install/sun



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          (execute 32 bit jdk install script)
           ./j2sdk-1_4_2_03-solaris-sparc.sh

            (execute 64 bit jdk install script)
           ./j2sdk-1_4_2_03-solaris-sparc9.sh

         (the previous two commands build a /install/sun/j2sdk-1.4.2_03
directory)
3. move files and update the link

          (navigate to the final resting place for jvm)
           cd /usr

          (remove link to old jvm)
           rm /usr/java

          (copy jvm to new location)
           cp /install/sun/j2sdk-1.4.2_03 /usr/j2sdk-1.4.2_03

          (create static link to new jvm)
           ln -s /usr/j2sdk1.4.2_03 /usr/java



3.2.1 Unix Commands
-----------------
shutdown solaris box
-----------------

         open a console and type
         shutdown -g5 -i0 -y

-----------------
FILE COMMANDS
-----------------

    cat       display file

    chown     change user or group
              chown -R user:group file

    chmod     change permissions owner,group,everyone
              chmod -R 777 dirname

    cp        copy file/dir source target
              -r recursive /i prompt
              -p preserve owner, timestamp ...
              cp -r /scr /bkup -copies files to bkup if /bkup doesnt
exist
                  copies to /bkup/src if it does exist
              /usr/xpg4/bin/cp

    find      find . -name 'ff*' -print => curdir to screen


    ls        lists dir contents


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               -l info -a disp all files (hidden) -R recursive
               -lt filename.txt (to show permissions of a file)
               -li to show links lrwxrwx
    ~          home directory
    pwd        print working dir

    mkdir      -p creates all sub dirs
    .          filename hidden

    mv         move src dest (always recursive) (-i prompt)

    ln         hard link (can delete either file)
               ln /path/shortcut.ext /origpath/origfile.txt
    ln -s      shortcut - soft link - only one copy of file

    rm         remove (-R recursive)
    rmdir

    which      use to find path to a file


    |          redirect to program
    >          redirect to file
    >>         append to file

-----------------
NETWORK/SYSTEM COMMANDS
-----------------


    # halt      - gives OK prompt
    # stop A    - gives OK prompt
    ok go -     resume
    ok boot     -a interactive boot
        boot    -r reconfiguration boot
        boot    -s single user state

    netstat -i     shows interfaces

    ifconfig -a all interfaces
    ifconfig lo0 loopback or 1e0 for ethernet


    shutdown - BEST METHOD
        brings to runlevel 0, single user
        do this before power off.
        -g5 wait 5 seconds
        -y no continue prompt
        -i0
        % boot

    su       switch user

    poweroff
        same as init 5 (power down state)

    reboot


RCO / SetupGuide.doc                 3/27/2009                    40 of 11
           bring single user to multi user
           does not run shutdown scripts (fast)
           -- -rs

       who -r
           display run level
           0 = ok to shutdown
           s,1 single user
           2 = no NFS
           3 = normal

       netstat -an | grep ".389" (port busy ??)

-----------------
misc
-----------------

man       help (manual)
          man passwd | col -b -x > ~/my.password.cmd.notes (copy a manual
page)
          more     space B

touch /reconfigure - check for new hw
restart

metadb
    no opts displays metadevice databasae replicas
    # metadb -d -f c3t10d0s0 (delete bad replicas)


prtconf|grep -i mem (i = case insensitive)

fsck - file system check
    # fsck -F ufs -y /dev/md/dsk/d0
    # fsck -F ufs -y /dev/rdsk/c1t0d0s0
    # fsck -F ufs -y /dev/rdsk/c1t0d0s7


more (in text files press s to skip)


To unmount a local CD-ROM drive, as root, enter:

# cd

# umount /cdrom/cdrom0

# eject


dtpad      Text Editor dtpad filename &

-----------------
vi
-----------------




RCO / SetupGuide.doc                 3/27/2009                     41 of 11
    ESC - back to command mode

    /aa   search    for aa
    /     search    again
    n     search    again ( no return needed )
    N     search    back

    navigate    h j k l
    scroll      ctl d u f b
    ^   line start
    $   eol
    :1 first line
    :$ last line

    a     append (after cursor)
    A     append to end of line
    i     insert (before current character) o,c,s,R
    I     insert at line start
    r     overwrite single char
    R     overwrite characters

    x   delete char
    d0 delete from beginning of line
    dw delete to end of line
    dd delete line
    <n>dd delete <n> lines


    u undo /text search
    ctl l refresh screen
    :set showmode

    ZZ    save    quit
    :x    save    quit (also :wq)
    :w    save    (:w filename) (w! to force overwrite)
    :q!   quit    NO save

-----------------
shell
-----------------

    > /dev/null       send output to trashcan
    #!/bin/sh         first line of script file
    exit              last line

    #?                result of last operatoin

    << EOF            USE the follwing lines of text as input
    EOF

    >& digit          stdout redirected to file
                      digit = 0 stdin, 1=stdout, 2=stderr

                 su - oracle -c "ORACLE_SID=rmsppf ; export ORACLE_SID ; \
                 sqlplus /nolog" << EOF > /dev/null 2>&1
                 connect / as sysdba
                 startup


RCO / SetupGuide.doc                3/27/2009                         42 of 11
               exit
    EOF

-----------------
Packages and patches
-----------------

    pkginfo package_name (SUNWarc)
        verify package installed
        -i display only if fully installed
        -x show version
        (whole list shown if no name given)

    pkgadd
        copy pkgs to /var/spool/pkg first (default pkg dir)

    patchadd

    showrev -d > patches.txt

-----------------
telnet and ftp
-----------------

    telnet 192.168.1.99
        user iflow      iflow22
        su root

-----------------
xterm
-----------------
    del = backspace
-----------------
Solaris Apps
-----------------
 /usr/sbin/Solaris Mangemenent Console
 /usr/sbin../sadm/bin/smc

-----------------
Shortcuts
-----------------
    aF4     close
    Solaris Managaement Console

-----------------
SOLARIS paths
-----------------
/sbin/sh    shell directory
/etc/hosts ip address
/etc/vfstab disk volumes
/usr/java12
/usr/j2se   java 1.3 and 1.4 sdk

/usr/inetd.conf autostart services here
    (huh ?? only apache maybe )

/etc/init.d     lots of statup scripts


RCO / SetupGuide.doc              3/27/2009                   43 of 11
3.2.2 Unix Solaris
-----------------
shutdown solaris box
-----------------

         open a console and type
         shutdown -g5 -i0 -y

-----------------
FILE COMMANDS
-----------------

    cat       display file

    chown     change user or group
              chown -R user:group file

    chmod     change permissions owner,group,everyone
              chmod -R 777 dirname

    cp        copy file/dir source target
              -r recursive /i prompt
              -p preserve owner, timestamp ...
              cp -r /scr /bkup -copies files to bkup if /bkup doesnt
exist
                  copies to /bkup/src if it does exist
              /usr/xpg4/bin/cp

    find      find . -name 'ff*' -print => curdir to screen


    ls        lists dir contents
              -l info -a disp all files (hidden) -R recursive
              -lt filename.txt (to show permissions of a file)
              -li to show links lrwxrwx
    ~         home directory
    pwd       print working dir

    mkdir     -p creates all sub dirs
    .         filename hidden

    mv        move src dest (always recursive) (-i prompt)

    ln        hard link (can delete either file)
              ln /path/shortcut.ext /origpath/origfile.txt
    ln -s     shortcut - soft link - only one copy of file

    rm        remove (-R recursive)
    rmdir

    which     use to find path to a file




RCO / SetupGuide.doc               3/27/2009                       44 of 11
      |          redirect to program
      >          redirect to file
      >>         append to file

-----------------
NETWORK/SYSTEM COMMANDS
-----------------


      # halt      - gives OK prompt
      # stop A    - gives OK prompt
      ok go -     resume
      ok boot     -a interactive boot
          boot    -r reconfiguration boot
          boot    -s single user state

      netstat -i     shows interfaces

      ifconfig -a all interfaces
      ifconfig lo0 loopback or 1e0 for ethernet


      shutdown - BEST METHOD
          brings to runlevel 0, single user
          do this before power off.
          -g5 wait 5 seconds
          -y no continue prompt
          -i0
          % boot

      su       switch user

      poweroff
          same as init 5 (power down state)

      reboot
          bring single user to multi user
          does not run shutdown scripts (fast)
          -- -rs

      who -r
          display run level
          0 = ok to shutdown
          s,1 single user
          2 = no NFS
          3 = normal

      netstat -an | grep ".389" (port busy ??)

-----------------
misc
-----------------

man        help (manual)
           man passwd | col -b -x > ~/my.password.cmd.notes (copy a manual
page)


RCO / SetupGuide.doc                   3/27/2009                    45 of 11
          more      space B

touch /reconfigure - check for new hw
restart

metadb
    no opts displays metadevice databasae replicas
    # metadb -d -f c3t10d0s0 (delete bad replicas)


prtconf|grep -i mem (i = case insensitive)

fsck - file system check
    # fsck -F ufs -y /dev/md/dsk/d0
    # fsck -F ufs -y /dev/rdsk/c1t0d0s0
    # fsck -F ufs -y /dev/rdsk/c1t0d0s7


more (in text files press s to skip)

dtpad     Text Editor dtpad filename &

-----------------
vi
-----------------

    ESC - back to command mode

    /aa   search   for aa
    /     search   again
    n     search   again ( no return needed )
    N     search   back

    navigate    h j k l
    scroll      ctl d u f b
    ^   line start
    $   eol
    :1 first line
    :$ last line

    a     append (after cursor)
    A     append to end of line
    i     insert (before current character) o,c,s,R
    I     insert at line start
    r     overwrite single char
    R     overwrite characters

    x   delete char
    d0 delete from beginning of line
    dw delete to end of line
    dd delete line
    <n>dd delete <n> lines


    u undo /text search
    ctl l refresh screen
    :set showmode


RCO / SetupGuide.doc               3/27/2009          46 of 11
    ZZ    save    quit
    :x    save    quit (also :wq)
    :w    save    (:w filename) (w! to force overwrite)
    :q!   quit    NO save

-----------------
shell
-----------------

    > /dev/null       send output to trashcan
    #!/bin/sh         first line of script file
    exit              last line

    #?                result of last operatoin

    << EOF            USE the follwing lines of text as input
    EOF

    >& digit          stdout redirected to file
                      digit = 0 stdin, 1=stdout, 2=stderr

                 su - oracle -c "ORACLE_SID=rmsppf ; export ORACLE_SID ; \
                 sqlplus /nolog" << EOF > /dev/null 2>&1
                 connect / as sysdba
                 startup
                 exit
    EOF

-----------------
Packages and patches
-----------------

    pkginfo package_name (SUNWarc)
        verify package installed
        -i display only if fully installed
        -x show version
        (whole list shown if no name given)

    pkgadd
        copy pkgs to /var/spool/pkg first (default pkg dir)

    patchadd

    showrev -d > patches.txt

-----------------
telnet and ftp
-----------------

    telnet 192.168.1.99
        user iflow      iflow22
        su root

-----------------
xterm
-----------------


RCO / SetupGuide.doc                3/27/2009                         47 of 11
    del = backspace
-----------------
Solaris Apps
-----------------
 /usr/sbin/Solaris Mangemenent Console
 /usr/sbin../sadm/bin/smc

-----------------
Shortcuts
-----------------
    aF4     close
    Solaris Managaement Console

-----------------
SOLARIS paths
-----------------
/sbin/sh    shell directory
/etc/hosts ip address
/etc/vfstab disk volumes
/usr/java12
/usr/j2se   java 1.3 and 1.4 sdk

/usr/inetd.conf autostart services here
    (huh ?? only apache maybe )

/etc/init.d   lots of statup scripts



3.2.3 Unix Connectivity
-------------------------
map a drive to solaris
-------------------------

    used to copy files between computers
    this maps to the /install directory on solaris box

    net use r: \\192.168.0.45\public admin22 /user:steve

-------------------------
humming bird terminal
-------------------------

    used to type commands at terminal prompt

    start vpn
    Start/Humming Bird/Exceed/X Client Wizard
    host: 192.168.0.45
    type: SUN
    method: rexec
    xterm
    application (use default)
    parameters (use default)
    user steve
    pw admin22
    name it and create a shortcut




RCO / SetupGuide.doc              3/27/2009                48 of 11
-------------------------
image2000 services
-------------------------

    start a humming bird terminal to execute these commands
    map a drive to copy files

    starting services

        /opt/Image2000/restart.sh

    stopping services

        /opt/Image2000/stop.sh

    get logfiles to /install/Image2000/logs

        /opt/Image2000/stop.sh
        /opt/Image2000/movelogs.sh
        copy r:/Image2000/logs folder to workstation

    start oracle

        ORACLE_SID=rmsppf
        export ORACLE_SID
        sqlplus /nolog
        connect / as sysdba
        startup
        exit

--------------------
to update roo jsp
--------------------

    map a drive to copy files

    copy new jsp's to

        R:\Image2000\jakarta\webapps\Image2000\jsp
        R:\Image2000\jakarta\webapps\Image2000

    copy jars to

        R:\Image2000\jakarta\webapps\Image2000\WEB-INF\lib
        R:\Image2000\Server\lib


    start a humming bird terminal to execute these commands

        su root
        cd /
        chmod -R 777 /install/Image2000
        /opt/Image2000/stop.sh

        cp install/Image2000/Server/lib/* /opt/Image2000/Server/lib

        cp install/Image2000/jakarta/webapps/Image2000/WEB-INF/lib/*


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                  /opt/Image2000/jakarta/webapps/Image2000/WEB-INF/lib

            cp install/Image2000/jakarta/webapps/Image2000/jsp/*
                /opt/Image2000/jakarta/webapps/Image2000/jsp

            cp install/Image2000/jakarta/webapps/Image2000/*
                /opt/Image2000/jakarta/webapps/Image2000

            /opt/Image2000/restart.sh



3.2.4 Unix Import
FYI here is what I had to do for a fresh import on unix running as UNIX user account oracle:
(note that actual passwords in the syntax below have been replaced with "<pw>"

---
Restart db
Lsnrctl status

sqlplus
Enter user-name: sys/<pw>@rmsppfp as sysdba

SQL> drop user rmsadmin cascade;

SQL> create user rmsadmin identified by "<pw>" (note that the double quotes are needed for our stricter
password rules)
 2 default tablespace rms
 3 quota unlimited on rms;

SQL> grant all privileges to rmsadmin; (note that just doing this one didn't work; Oracle complained and I
needed to add the next two as well)
SQL> grant create session to rmsadmin;
SQL> grant dba to rmsadmin;


./imp0206.sh & (run the import script in the background in case your shell session gets disconnected)

Here is the import script:

[root@turtle]:/u04/import_from_roy/0206 #cat imp0206.sh

#imp0206 import script
date=`date +%d%b%y_%T`
echo "date = $date"
imp system/<pw> fromuser=rmsadmin touser=rmsadmin file=rms9eagl_020604.dmp log=imp_$date.log

Which was based on doing and export on the NT box in a .bat file like this:

ECHO "RUNNING ORACLE EXPORT 020604 SCRIPT NOW...."

C:\oracle\ora92\bin\EXP.EXE system/<pw> full=n owner=rmsadmin statistics=none
file=e:\oracle_exports\rms9eagl_020604.dmp log=e:\oracle_exports\rms9eagl_020604.log

ECHO "ORACLE EXPORT SCRIPT COMPLETE"




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We never got these to work running them as user rmsadmin but doing as oracle system
user and using owner parameter in the export and the fromuser/touser in import seems to
work.

Roo import session 9/28/2004

1. STOP IMAGE2000 SERVICES
su root
 admin22
/opt/Image2000/erase.sh
exit

2. DROP OLD USER
su oracle
 admin22
cd /opt/Image2000/Server/scripts/Oracle
sqlplus
 sys/admin22@rmsppf as sysdba
drop user rmsadmin cascade;

3. CREATE NEW USER
start CreateRmsadminUser.sql;
 admin
 USERS
exit

4. IMPORT DATABASE
cd /install/aa
ls –ltr
imp userid=rmsadmin/admin@rmsppf file=rms.dmp log=rms.log



3.2.5 Patch
--------------------------------------------

 Patching Image2000 on Solaris 9

 this updates jars, jsp's and scripts

--------------------------------------------

1. Check all code into starteam

2. pc-Anywhere to Eagle



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3. Build new Jars
   run StarteamBuild.bat on eagle desktop

   Make sure you see the BUILD SUCCESSFUL message
   *** Do not forget to look for the SUCCESSFUL message ***

4. Required components

   rms/code/application folder
   rms/code/deploy folder

   map a drive to ROO/public

     net use r: \\192.168.1.45\public admin22 /user:steve

   copy the above two folders to

     r:/patch/application
     r:/patch/deploy

5. Log onto roo

   stop services

     opt/Image2000/stop.sh
     wait

   run patch

     install/patch/deploy/patch.sh

   start services

     opt/Image2000/restart.sh


3.2.6 Copy Files (Windows to Unix)
You have to be careful when you copy files from a Windows system to a Unix System
because the security permission settings get changed on a direct copy. A solution to this
problem is to copy to a temporary directory and then have a unix script file that copies
the files to the final destination directory.

Copy Window’s files (Image2000, jsp, client jars, server jars) to Unix temporary
directory
Start Xterm
$ su root


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Password: xxxxxxxx
# /opt/Image2000/erase.sh
# /install/Image2000/update.sh
# /opt/Image2000/restart.sh



3.2.7 Samba
In working with the Sun server we keep two directories on windows that point to the sun
server. One directory is readonly and used for diagnostics while the public is used to
update files. Once files have been updated on the public directory they a script
/install/Image2000 ./update.sh is run using xterm.




On the sun in the directory the samba configuration files located at /etc/sfw/smb.conf has
the following arguments that allow the above windows file configuration.

# A publicly accessible directory, but read only, except for people in
# the "staff" group
[public]
  comment = Install-public
  path = /install
  public = yes
  writable = yes
  printable = no
  create mask = 777

# A publicly accessible directory, read/write to all users. Note that all files
# created in the directory by users will be owned by the default user, so
# any user with access can delete any other user's files. Obviously this
# directory must be writable by the default user. Another user could of course
# be specified, in which case all files would be owned by that user instead.
[readonly]
  path = /
  public = yes
  writable = no


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  printable = no
  create mask = 777


3.2.8 Solaris9 Install
-------------------------------------

 Image2000 - Solaris Installation

     Babbitt Jan 19, 2004

-------------------------------------

Required Base System

   Solaris 9 Complete Installation
   Solaris 9 software supplement (default install)
   Solaris 9 software companion (defaults install)

File System Configuration

   /opt     - Image2000 Base directory
   /u01      - Oracle Home
   /u04      - Oracle Data, Image2000 Data (eFile Storage)
   /u05      - Oracle Logs
   /install - local copy of Installation software and notes

Copy Image2000 installation files from CD

   cp -r /cdrom/oracle-configs /install/oracle-configs
   cp -r /cdrom/Image2000 /install/Image2000
   cp -r /cdrom/sun /install/sun
   cp -r /cdrom/gnu /install/gnu
   cp -r /cdrom/gnu /install/tomcat
   cp -r /cdrom/configs /install/configs


   chmod -R 777 /install

---------------------------------
Java Install JDK 1.4.2_03
---------------------------------

   build the jvm

      cd /install/sun


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      ./j2sdk-1_4_2_03-solaris-sparc.sh
      ./j2sdk-1_4_2_03-solaris-sparc9.sh

   move files and update the link

      cd /usr
      rm /usr/java
      cp /install/sun/j2sdk-1.4.2_03 /usr/j2sdk-1.4.2_03
      ln -s /usr/j2sdk1.4.2_03 /usr/java

   test by typing

      which java
      /usr/java/java

---------------------------------
GNU Tools
---------------------------------

   We use GNU tools to build and install apache and tomcat.
   All files are included on the Image2000 CD

   Files were downloaded from (Reference Only):

      gcc.gnu.org
      www.sunfreeware.com

      console
      ftp ftp.sunfreeware.com
      Name: anonymous
      pw: email address
      bin
      cd pub/freeware
      cd sparc/9

   Set Root Environment Variables

      edit /.profile
        JAVA_HOME=/usr/JAVA
        export JAVA_HOME
        PATH=/usr/local/bin:$PATH:usr/ccs/bin
        export PATH

      logoff and logon to use new environment

   Install GNU Tools compilers



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      (if prompted, allow overwriting of existing files and atributes)

      cd /install/gnu
      pkgadd -d gcc-3.3.2-local
      pkgadd -d m4-1.4-local
      pkgadd -d autoconf-2.57-local
      pkgadd -d automake-1.7.2-local
      pkgadd -d libtool-1.5-local
      pkgadd -d make-3.90-local

   Create a link to perl to fix M4 bug

      ln -s /usr/bin/perl /usr/local/bin/perl

---------------------------------
Image2000 Install
---------------------------------

   copy files to destination directory

      cp /install/Image2000 /opt/Image2000

   edit config files

      /opt/Image2000/Server/ServerProperties.txt
        CORBA.Host = 127.0.0.1
        CORBA.External = ROY
        Database.Server = 127.0.0.1
        Database.Name = rmsppf

         JMS.DbServer = 10.29.0.30
         JMS.DbName = furls1
         JMS.InputQueueOwner = ffrmjms
         JMS.InputQueueName = PPFQueue
         JMS.OutputQueueOwner = ffrmjms
         JMS.OutputQueueName = FFRMQueue
         JMS.DbServerPort = 1526

   set IMAGE2000_HOME environment variable

      Edit Statup script
        IMAGE2000_HOME=/usr/tomcat
        export IMAGE2000_HOME

-----------------------



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rms server
-----------------------
wrappers added

add jvm path to config files
test to see if our nt jars work ok
create symbolic links

ln -s /opt/Image2000/Server/bin/rmsserver /etc/init.d/rmsserver
ln -s /opt/Image2000/Server/bin/namingservice /etc/init.d/namingservice

ln -s /etc/init.d/rmsserver /etc/rc0.d/K18rmsserver
ln -s /etc/init.d/namingservice /etc/rc0.d/K19namingservice
ln -s /etc/init.d/oracle /etc/rc0.d/K20oracle

ln -s /etc/init.d/oracle /etc/rc3.d/S91oracle
ln -s /etc/init.d/namingservice /etc/rc3.d/S92namingservice
ln -s /etc/init.d/rmsserver /etc/rc3.d/S93rmsserver

SWITCH TO 60,61,62

ensure scripts to not have any dos chars
cd /opt/Image2000/Server/bin
dos2unix rmsserver rmsserver
dow2unix namingservice namingservice
---------------------------------
Oracle
---------------------------------

   Install Oracle Version 9.2 per instructions

   increase system memory and semephores if required

   edit /etc/system
     set semsys:seminfo_semmns=1024
     set semsys:seminfo_semmni=100
     set semsys:seminfo_semmsl=256
     set shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=4294967295

   add environment variables to oracle user profile

   /export/home/oracle/.profile
      ORACLE_DATA=/u04/oracle/ora9201
      export ORACLE_DATA
      ORACLE_LOGS=/u05/oracle/ora9201
      export ORACLE_LOGS



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      ORACLE_HOME=/u01/oracle/ora9201
      export ORACLE_HOME
      ORACLE_BASE=/u01/oracle
      export ORACLE_BASE

      ORACLE_SID=rmsppf
      export ORACLE_SID

   edit root profile

   /.profile
      ORACLE_SID=rmsppf
      export ORACLE_SID

   create oracle database

      name = rmsppf
      password = admin22
      open_cursors = 1300

   manually start database

      ORACLE_SID=rmsppf
      export ORACLE_SID
      sqlplus /nolog
      connect / as sysdba
      startup

   copy and link oracle statup script

      cp /install/oracle-configs /etc/init.d/oracle
      ln -s /etc/init.d/oracle /etc/rc0.d/K19oracle
      ln -s /etc/init.d/oracle /etc/rc3.d/S91oracle

   test oracle startup script

      ./etc/init.d/oracle stop
      ./etc/init.d/oracle start

   run Image2000 scripts

      (we will import the Image2000 database later)


---------------------------------
Upgrade to Apache 2.0



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---------------------------------

   stop apache service

      ./etc/init.d/apache stop

   remove old links

      rm /etc/init.d/apache
      rm /etc/rc0.d/*apache
      rm /etc/rc1.d/*apache
      rm /etc/rc2.d/*apache
      rm /etc/rc3.d/*apache


   Create Apache configuration file

      (type the entire command on a single line without \'s )

      CC="gcc" CFLAGS="-O2" \
       ./configure --prefix=/usr/apache2 \
       --enable-rewrite=shared \
       --enable-speling=shared \
       --localstatedir=/var \
       --enable-so

   Compile and Install Apache

      (warnings about option 2 are ok)

      make
      make install

   Verify nogroup exists

      examine etc/group, to find nogroup entry

   Configure Apache

      edit /usr/apache2/conf/httpd.conf
        ServerName turtle
        User nobody
        Group nobody

   Test
     /usr/apache2/bin/apachectl stop



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      /usr/apache2/bin/apachectl start
      browse to http://localhost/
      look for apache login screen


---------------------------------
Tomcat 5.0.16 update
---------------------------------

   Extract and install Tomcat directory

      cd /install/tomcat
      tar xvf jakarta-tomcat-5.0.16.tar
      cp -r jakarta-tomcat-5.0.16 /usr/tomcat5.0.16
      ln -s /usr/tomcat5.0.16 /usr/tomcat

   Configure Tomcat server.xml

      edit /usr/tomcat/conf/server.xml

      change http port to 9955
        <!-- Define a non-SSL Coyote HTTP/1.1 Connector on port 8080 -->
        <Connector port="9955"

      add image2000 context (after last </Context> in file)

         <!-- Image2000 Root Context -->

         <Context path="/Image2000"
           docBase="/opt/Image2000/jakarta/webapps/Image2000" debug="0">
           <Logger className="org.apache.catalina.logger.FileLogger"
             prefix="Image2000." suffix=".txt" timestamp="true"/>
         </Context>

   Edit Statup script

      (not needed ?)
      edit usr/tomcat/bin/catalina.sh
      #add just after first batch of comments
      JAVA_HOME=/usr/java
      export JAVA_HOME
      CATALINA_HOME=/usr/tomcat
      export CATALINA_HOME

   Add links for auto startup




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      ln -s /usr/tomcat/bin/tomcat.sh /etc/init.d/tomcat
      ln -s /etc/init.d/tomcat /etc/rc0.d/K16tomcat
      ln -s /etc/init.d/apache /etc/rc0.d/K17apache

      ln -s /usr/apache2/bin/apachectl /etc/init.d/apache
      ln -s /etc/init.d/tomcat /etc/rc3.d/S63tomcat
      ln -s /etc/init.d/apache /etc/rc3.d/S64apache

----------------------------
jk2 connector -- connect apache to tomcat
----------------------------

   Copy jk2 connector files to tomcat bin directory

      cd /install/tomcat
      tar xvf jakarta-tomcat-connectors-jk2.0.2-solaris8-apache2.0.43.tar
      chmod -R 777 install

     cp jakarta-tomcat-connectors-jk2.0.2-solaris8-apache2.0.43/jkjni.so
usr/apache2/modules/jkjni.so
     cp jakarta-tomcat-connectors-jk2.0.2-solaris8-apache2.0.43/mod_jk2-2.0.43.so
usr/apache2/modules/mod_jk2-2.0.43.so

      cd /install/configs/tomcat/bin
      cp tomcat.sh /usr/tomcat/bin/tomcat.sh
      cp jsvc /usr/tomcat/bin/jsvc

   Attach to connector to apache

      edit /usr/apache2/conf/httpd.conf
        Add this line after other LoadModule commands
        LoadModule jk2_module modules/mod_jk2.0.43.so

      cp /install/config/workers2.properties /usr/apache2/conf

----------------------------
install ant
----------------------------

 install ant1.6
 set ANT_HOME environment variable
 copy Image2000/Ant/lib jars to ant lib directory.
  starteam53.jar
  xmltask.jar




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3.3 Database Functions
There are many database administrator functions you need to perform. This section talks
about a few of the more common operations you may have to perform.

On oracle remember to allow tables to dynamically extend.
On oracle remember to regularly check and clean log files.


3.3.1 Running Patches
You have to run all the patches that you currently don’t have. In addition you may have
to run patches that apply to your particular installation. One patch that is very important
is called “patch-ora-01.02.26-DepartmentNM.sql”. This creates the table that holds all the
department names which is crucial to creating new records and making the requests. Each
customer will have a patch for them to fill the table. For example the following patch
called “patch-ora-01.02.31-sd-DepartmentNMdata.sql” fills the company sd departments.


3.3.2 Export Oracle – Import to SQL
   One. Directory path: Enterprise Manager->Databases->Image 2000
   Action: Delete directory “Image 2000”




   1) Path: Enterprise Manager->Database

   Action: Right Click directory “Database” and click “New Database”


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   Two. Path: Databases->Image2000->User

   Action: Right Click directory “User” and select “New Database User”




   Check the User Properties: “db-owner” and “public”




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   Set up login properties and password (password = “performance”)




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   Three. Path: Program
   Files\RCO\Image2000\Servver\Scripts\Microsoft\SetupPostDataMicrosoft.bat

   Action: run executable “SetupPreDataMicrosoft.bat”. The following picture is
   highlighting the wrong file and needs to be updated.

   Wrong File Highlighted – Use SetupPreDataMicrosoft.bat




   Four. Path: Enterprise Manager->Data Transformation Services

   Action: Right click “Open Package”




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Seven. Select path: c:/DTS




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Import package: “ImportRms9sealRmsadminData”->4/20/2004 (or most recent version)




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Five. Runs DTS Processing by clicking the “Play” button (green arrow in upper right
hand corner)




Six. Path: Program Files\RCO\Image 2000\Server\Scripts\Microsoft

   Action Run: “SetupPostDataMicrosoft.bat”




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   Restart the RMS




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3.3.3 Export Oracle/Windows – Import to Oracle/Unix or Windows

Export

1. On the server hosting the source database, open a command window.
2. For convenience, change directory to the directory you want to put the export file in.
3. At the “DOS” command line run a similar to the following example run on day
07/04/2004 (type it all in one command):

C:\aa> exp userid=rmsadmin/admin@rms9seal file=rms9seal070404.dmp
log=rms9seal070404.log

Syntax: exp userid={user}/{password}@{database} file={exported data file
name}.dmp log={log file name}.log

where:

{user} is the name of the Oracle schema (user) to be exported.

{password} is the password of the Oracle schema (user) to be exported.

{database} is the name of the Oracle database, probably the SID (as opposed to the
service name, which may be mapped to a SID in the tnsnames.ora file).

{exported data file name} is any name you want to make up for the exported data file. A
useful choice is the user (schema) name followed by the date.

{log file name} is any name you want to make up for the data file log file holding the
messages displayed during export (particularly any errors). A useful choice is the user
(schema) name followed by the date. The export will work without any log file specified.

Note: the “.dmp” and “.log” extensions can be changed to another choice, but these
extensions are recommended.

Import

1. For the import you want to start an xterm session to your UNIX server.

2. Start SQL*Plus and Log in as sys/{password}@{database} as sysdba

3. Drop the user (schema) you are about to import as follows:

DROP USER rmsadmin CASCADE;




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@{pathprefix}/Image2000/Server/scripts/Oracle/CreateRmsadminUser.sql

where {pathprefix} is the path to the Image2000 directory from the root. The script will
prompt you for a user name (ex. admin) and a table space (ex. users). It is a good policy
to pick a difficult user name but then you have to remember this because you will need
when do SQL*Plus maintenance work.

You may now exit from SQL*Plus.


4. Somehow copy the “exported data file” (.dmp file) to the UNIX server.

5. Change directory to the directory you copied the exported data “.dmp” file.

5. Run a command like the following example (type it all in one command):

imp userid=rmsadmin/admin@{database} file=rmsadmin070404.dmp
log=rmsadmin070404import.log

***While the import may work without the database add this if you get a TNS Protocol
error.

If there is more than one database, you can add the database specifier to the userid
parameter (example where database = rms9roo):

imp userid=rmsadmin/admin@rms9roo file=rmsadmin070404.dmp

Syntax: exp userid={user}/{password}@{database} file={import data file name}.dmp
log={log file name}.log

where:

{user} is the name of the Oracle schema (user) to be imported.

{password} is the password of the Oracle schema (user) to be imported.

{database} is the name of the Oracle database, probably the SID (as opposed to the
service name, which may be mapped to a SID in the tnsnames.ora file).

{import data file name} the name of the previously exported and copied data file.

{log file name} is any name you want to make up for the data file log file holding the
messages displayed during import (particularly any errors). A useful choice is the user
(schema) name followed by the date. The import will work without any log file
specified.




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6. The data should import and you should see messages on the screen. However,
sometimes importing has problems.

Troubleshooting Import

1. Sometimes the import command doesn’t work if the tablespace of the import user is
different from the tablespace that the exporting user was in.

Usually you can make the import work in this case by just typing “imp” and answering
the prompts the best you can. If you don’t understand a prompt, just press enter to accept
the default value. Somehow it will (should) import to whatever tablespace the rmsadmin
user is “in” (default tablespace for the user).

If that doesn’t work, you could try creating a tablespace with the same name as the
exported data tablespace, and create the “rmsadmin” user in that tablespace (type in the
name for the default tablespace prompt when running the “CreateRmsadminUser.sql”
script with SQL*Plus). Unfortunately, that is too involved to describe here. Just
remember to make the tablespace infinitely expandable.


2. Sometimes a database administrator exports a schema while logged in as sysdba.
Then you may need to use the following command:

Syntax: exp userid=sys/{sys password}@{database} fromuser=rmsadmin
touser=rmsadmin file={import data file name}.dmp log={log file name}.log

If that doesn’t work, just type “imp” and answer the prompts. Use “sys” for the userid
prompt and “{password} as sysdba” for the password prompt where {password} is the
sys password. Use “rmsadmin” for the touser and fromuser prompts.

Sometimes when you export from another system and then are trying to import on a
server the import command fails. You can try the following imp line where the system
logon is used and you specify a fromuser and a touser.

imp system/admin fromuser=rmsadmin touser=rmsadmin file=rms28jan2009.dmp



Otherwise, call the DBA that exported the data and ask how to import the data.




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3.3.4 Export a Microsoft SQL database
This is just a backup and restore operation using Enterprise Manager.

Backup

1.   Start Enterprise Manager for SQL Server.
2.   Drill down in the tree to the Image2000 database.
3.   Click on the Image2000 database node to highlight it.
4.   Select the menu choice Tools | Backup Database

In the “General” tab, choose:

Database: Image2000
Name: {invent a name for your backup file}


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[x] Database complete.
Destination – Backup To: {enter a file pathname for your backup file}
[x] Overwrite existing media.

5. Click OK button – backup runs.


3.3.5 Restore a Microsoft SQL database
In the event your hard disk fails and you have to rebuild the system or you had some
person gain access to the system and corrupt the database you will need to restore the
database. The following gives the steps you need to perform to restore a Microsoft SQL
database.

1. Start Enterprise Manager for SQL Server.

2. Drill down in the tree to the Image2000 database.

3. Right-click on the Image2000 database and select the “Delete” menu choice to delete
the database. It may take a while.




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4. Select the menu choice “Tools | Restore Database”.

5. In the dialog box, enter or choose the following controls:
Make sure that you enter data in the edit box called “Restore as database:” Image2000.




6. Click “Select Devices Button”

7. In the dialog box, enter or choose the following controls:
Restore from: [x] Disk




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If the “Device Name” list is blank or does not include the file with your backup data,
click the “Add” button, and enter or choose the following controls:
[x] File name
Use the “...” button and locate and select your file. Then click “OK”.

8. Select the file name with the data you want to restore.

9. Click “OK” and the restore should commence. It make take a long time, even longer
than the export did.


After you restore the database you may have to recreate the Image2000 user. Under the
Image2000 database select the Users and then delete Image2000 if it is there.




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When you recreate the User make sure that it has the following properties.




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You may have to recreate the Image2000 user in the Security section under logins. The
password is “performance” all lower case.




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In the server Roles tab you only need to select System Administrator.

After you finish restoring the database you will need to restart the Image2000 system.


3.3.6 Create I2K Database in Microsoft SQL
First use the windows explorer to create a storage folder for the database datafiles. The
example below uses a folder named SqlData.




Next start the Enterprise Manager and expand the tree branches until you find the
Databases folder. Right click and select New Database.




Give it the name Image2000




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Select the Data Files tab the browse to the folder we just created for database data
storage.




Next, select the Transaction Log tab and find the same folder.
Finally press the FINISH button.

Before closing the Enterprise manager, let’s verify that SQL authentication is enabled.
Select your server from the tree on the left (or local). Right click and choose Properties.
Now hit the security tab and verify that the “sql Server and Windows” option is selected.




3.3.7 Run Create Scripts on Microsoft SQL
If you are an administrator, odds are you will be able to see the computer running SQL
and will not need to make a remote connection. However, in the even that the Database
Administrator is not around or you do not have direct access to the computer running
SQL you may have to remotely restart the service. Microsoft has made this task very


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simple. The local admin may or may not allow you to establish a “remote connection”
with the SQL server for a number of reasons. However, if you were to be given
permission these are the steps you should follow:

First we need to make a “remote connection” with the Server running SQL. The “remote
connection” configuration menu is located under Start>Settings>Control Panel. This
needs to be done ON THE COMPUTER WHERE SQL IS RUNNING!!




Once you’re in Control Panel menu, double click on the “System” icon.
In the “System” options select the “Remote” tab.




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Click the “Allow users to connect remotely to this computer” box and configure the
remote users and you are good to go.




Now go back to your workstation and try to logon to the server by going to
C:\WINNT\System32 (this is the location for Windows Sever 2003, see below for
information on Windows XP) and double clicking the file mstsc.exe (Hint, there are
many files in the system32 directory. To make life much easier on you and your eyes
press ctrl-f to bring up a “find” menu and enter mstsc.exe. Also, to make life even
simpler you could create a shortcut to this file and place it on the desktop.).



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***BE AWARE, the directory in which mstsc.exe is located depends on your operating
system. In Windows XP, mstsc.exe is located in the C:\WINDOWS\system32 directory
The feature was introduced with the release of Windows XP so all previous operating
systems do not have this feature available.




After executing the file a very nice looking “Remote Connection” menu box should
appear that will allow you to enter the IP address of the machine running SQL and where
“remote connection” was set up and press “Connect”




After pressing “Connect” a desktop screen should pop up that looks strikingly similar to
your own. Congratulations you are looking at the desktop of the remote computer.

Open the directory C:\Program Files\RCO\Iamge2000\Server\Scripts\Microsoft on
the remote machine




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And run the batch file named, SetupMicorosoft.bat




After the batch file has finished running, go to the desktop and open the folder called:
C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Desktop\Image2000


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And double click on the Restart Image2000 icon




Congratulations SQL Server has now been restarted. That wasn’t so bad was it?


3.3.8 Run Create Scripts on Oracle Windows
Before you can begin, you need to make sure that the server running Oracle has “Remote
Connection” enabled (see above on how to configure “Remote Connection”

Once that has been setup, you will be looking at the desktop of the remote computer. On
the desktop there is a shortcut called “SQL Plus”. After you have found the shortcut
double click on the icon. This will bring up Oracle. It will look like this:




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The Default User Name is: rmsadmin
The Default Password is: admin
The Host String is: rms9MACHINENAME (MACHINENAME being whatever the
name of the machine the Oracle is running on)

After entering those fields you should be looking at a screen that looks similar to DOS.




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In the SQL window, go to File>Open and open the sql file:
C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\Image2000\Server\Scripts\Oracle\empty.sql

This is a precautionary measure to ensure that no preexisting tables complicate our restart
of the Oracle Server.

After empty.sql has been loaded, at the command line type these commands one after the
other, waiting until each one has fully executed before entering the next one:

(the @ sign is included)

@creatermsoracle.sql          and press enter

@createprocsoracle.sql        and press enter

@initrmsoracle.sql            and press enter


After the last command finishes executing you can close the SQL window.

Now return to the desktop and double click the shortcut named:
(1) Restart RMS.bat




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Congratulations Oracle and Image2000 has been successfully restarted.


3.3.9 Run Create Scripts on Oracle Unix
-------------------
Running Image2000 Oracle - Solaris scripts
-------------------
  start new xterm or console

    cd /
    su oracle
    admin22
    cd /opt/Image2000/Server/scripts/Oracle

 check dates of the scripts (show the latest last)

    ls -ltr

 start sql plus

    sqlplus
    rmsadmin
    admin

 run the scripts

    start CreateRmsOracle.sql;
    start InitRmsOracle.sql;
    start CreateProcsOracle.sql;
    commit;

 clean exit (must type 3 times)

    exit



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    exit
    exit


3.3.10      Running Oracle Statistics
In the Image2000 directory expand the Server directory and then scripts
and then Oracle and finally click on the Util directory.




1. Log in to SQL*Plus as sys/admin@rms9seal as sysdba.
2. Use the file open and select empty.sql to set your directory
3. At the prompt, enter:

exec dbms_stats.gather_schema_stats(ownname => 'rmsadmin');

When the prompt returns, the statistics are updated.

You want to run statistics if you add or delete many records from the
record management system. Running the Oracle statistics does make a
difference. The following is an interesting article.




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Understanding System Statistics
by Jonathan Lewis

Understanding the optimizer's use of system statistics can make a big difference when migrating to a new
version of the Oracle Database.

What is the most important component of the Oracle Database engine? My vote goes to the optimizer. Everything the
database does is SQL, and every piece of SQL has to be translated into something that can work efficiently. Whatever
you do with your data, the optimizer gets involved.

The Cost-Based Optimizer (CBO) is a subtle and complex piece of code, so when it first appeared in Oracle7 it wasn't
too surprising that a few problems existed. However, it didn't take many patch releases before it was perfectly viable to
implement a purely cost-based system. I recall setting up several such systems in 7.1, and at least one major system in
7.2.

Nevertheless, a surprising number of sites avoided the CBO for quite a long time—the reason being that many
developers and DBAs were still thinking in a "rule-based" manner, and therefore doing things that make life difficult
for the CBO. Basically, they were "lying" to their optimizer and then wondering why it made poor decisions.

I suspect the reason for my early success was that I happened to notice something that is now well understood: the fact
that the CBO "likes" to do tablescans when the value for parameter db_file_multiblock_read_count is
big, and "prefers" to use indexes when the value is small. As we now know, a few other parameters display similar
characteristics—that is, RBO liked them big but CBO needed them small. And, of course, there was the little detail that
in a '"tie-break" the CBO will work down the list of tables in the from clauses, whereas the RBO works up that list.

CBO is very different from RBO — but there are just a few particularly critical differences that you must know about,
because if you don't understand them and keep treating CBO as you would treat the RBO, you can give yourself a
number of unnecessary problems.


History Repeats Itself

The CBO keeps evolving. Some releases of Oracle introduce minor enhancements, some releases introduce major
enhancements, and some releases change the paradigm.

Unless you spot the major enhancements and paradigm shifts, you can end up fighting the CBO for years, trying to
work around remembered weaknesses instead of playing to new strengths — just as many people did in the shift from
RBO to CBO.

So are there any recent changes in the CBO that could have as much impact on our thinking as the change from the
RBO? The answer is "yes."

In Oracle9i Database, Oracle added system statistics (which I rate as a new paradigm) and automatic workarea sizing
(which I rate as a major enhancement). In Oracle Database 10g, we get various tuning advisors that optimize your
developers' time by helping them produce more efficient SQL, indexing, materialized views or PL/SQL more quickly.
We also get query profiles, a major enhancement that stores statistical information in the database for the purpose of
helping the optimizer make better decisions. This information is particularly useful when you have to deal with
untouchable third-party SQL.

Across both versions we get dynamic_sampling, a very useful feature introduced in 9i that is particularly beneficial for
data warehouse and decision support systems. But if you haven't paid any attention to dynamic sampling in 9i, it can
become a nuisance if you're running an OLTP system on 10g because dynamic sampling is effectively enabled by
default, and it's probably an unnecessary overhead.

The most important of all these changes is the introduction of system statistics. In fact, I would go so far as to say that
one of the key steps in migrating from Oracle8 to Oracle9i is enabling system statistics and working through the impact
they have on your system. Similarly, system statistics are really quite critical to getting the most out of the optimizer in
10g, and the best time to get familiar with system statistics is the moment you decide to migrate from 8i.



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This feature is so significant that I'll devote the rest of this article to nothing else, saving dynamic_sampling and
profiles as topics for another day.


System Statistics

Prior to Oracle9i, the CBO based its calculations on the number of I/O requests that would be needed to satisfy a query,
using various constants to massage figures for tablescans and throwing in a few rules to account for things such as
caching of small indexes. (See my DBAzine.com article "Why isn't Oracle using my index?" [for an introduction to this
topic.)

Initially some of the assumptions built into the optimizer were a little naive, but as time passed assumptions were
refined, algorithms improved, and new features implemented. However, the side effect of estimating I/O requests
became a persistent limitation.

In 9i, Oracle introduced cpu_costing, a mechanism that allows the CPU cost of an operation to be included as part of
the overall estimate. This feature is enabled in 9i only if you collect system statistics; in 10g, it's enabled by default.

So what does cpu_costing do, and what are system statistics exactly? Let's start with system statistics, using a couple of
calls to the dbms_stats package to demonstrate. (This example uses 9.2.0.4, and your account will need to be granted
the role gather_system_statistics for it to work.)

execute dbms_stats.gather_system_stats('Start');
-- some time delay while the database is under a typical workload
execute dbms_stats.gather_system_stats('Stop');

To see what you have done, you can query a table (owned by the SYS schema) called aux_stats$. After gathering
system statistics, this table will contain a few critical numbers used by the new optimizer algorithms to calculate costs.
(You have to flush the shared_pool to invalidate existing execution plans, though.) The following query will show you
the current settings:

select pname, pval1
from   sys.aux_stats$
where  sname = 'SYSSTATS_MAIN';

The exact list of results is version dependent (the code is still evolving, some versions of Oracle gather more statistics
than others) but you will probably see something like this:

PNAME                               PVAL1
------------------------------ ----------
CPUSPEED                              564
MAXTHR                           13899776
MBRC                                    6
MREADTIM                           10.496
SLAVETHR                           182272
SREADTIM                            1.468

10g also introduces a few extra rows with values that are set as the database starts up:



CPUSPEEDNW                                              904.86697
IOSEEKTIM                                                      10
IOTFRSPEED                                                   4096




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I've quoted the SQL for convenience; in fact, the approved method for viewing this information is the
get_system_stats procedure in the dbms_stats package. There is also a set_system_stats procedure if you want
to "adjust" the values without gathering them properly.


Tablescans

There are two significant changes that apply to the optimizer cost calculations when system statistics are available. You
will note first that sys.aux_stats$ holds values for the following:


     •    sreadtim: Average time for a single-block read request in milliseconds
     •    mreadtim: Average time for a multi-block read request in milliseconds
     •    MBRC: Average number of blocks in a multi-block read.

Using this information, Oracle can estimate how long it will take to do a tablescan (or index fast full scan). The
arithmetic is easy: it's just the number of multi-block reads needed to do the scan, multiplied by the average time to do
a multi-block read. Ignoring the minor changes due to automatic segment space management, we just take the high-
water mark, and work from there:

Time to completion = mreadtim * HWM / MBRC.

Rather then reporting this "time to completion" as the cost of the query, Oracle restates the time in terms of the
equivalent number of single block reads. To do this, simply divide the time to completion by the average time for a
single-block read.

Cost = time to completion / sreadtim

Or, putting the two formulae together and rearranging terms:

Cost of tablescan = (HWM / MBRC) * (mreadtim / sreadtim)

From this example, you can see that the cost of a query is the time to completion of a query, but expressed in units of
single block reads rather than in proper time units.

When you start using system statistics, the optimizer automatically starts to be more "sensible" when choosing between
tablescans and indexed access paths because the cost of the multiblock reads used for tablescans will include a proper
and appropriate time component.

Historically, the cost of a tablescan was simply:

Cost of tablescan = HWM / (modified db_file_multiblock_read_count).

This formula made little allowance for the fact that your choice of value for the parameter
db_file_multiblock_read_count could be unrealistic, nor did it allow for the extra time that an
extremely large db_file_multiblock_read_count would take compared to a single block read.

This weakness is largely why Oracle created the optimizer_index_cost_adj parameter in 8.1.6 to allow
you to introduce a factor that was similar in intent to the mreadtim that you collect in system statistics. (You may
have spotted the similarity between the mreadtim/sreadtim element in the new cost formula, and the common
method for estimating a sensible optimizer_index_cost_adj.) But there are some unexpected side effects
to using the optimizer_index_cost_adj parameter that can cause problems and the mechanisms that come
into play when you start using system statistics are much more robust.

It is still meaningful, by the way, to use optimizer_index_cost_adj as a clue to table caching effects
(specifically, what percentage of single block table reads are likely to turn into real read requests) even when using



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system statistics. There are some indications in 10g, though, that even this clue will become unnecessary in the not too
distant future.


CPU Costs

System statistics do more than correct for the I/O and time trade-off between single-block and multi-block reads. They
also cater for two further enhancements (or corrections) to costing: first, Oracle can be even better at balancing
tablescans against indexed access paths; second, Oracle can be smart about rearranging predicate order.

Note how the statistics include the apparent CPU speed, nominally in MHz. Don't be alarmed if this is nothing like the
actual CPU speed of your system — the figure is probably just an internal calibration of a baseline operation that
Oracle uses to produce relative CPU costs of other operations. On one machine running at 2.8GHz, I typically come up
with an apparent CPU speed of a few hundred MHz. (Bear in mind that what you see is the nominal speed of a single
CPU, not the sum of all the CPUs in a multi-CPU system.)

So why does it help the optimizer to know the (apparent) speed of your CPU? Consider an example where you have a
choice:

     •    Option 1: use an index on a simple date column to find 20 scattered rows in a table.
     •    Option 2: use a tablescan to examine every row in the table, checking every single row in the table to see if
          the date column falls in the correct range.

Oracle may decide, based purely on the number and speed of single-block and multi-block reads, that a tablescan would
be quicker. But how much CPU will this take if the tablescan requires a test like the following on 10,000 rows:

date_col between to_date('01-Jan-2004') and to_date('02-Jan-2004);

CPU operations take time as well, and if the number and nature of the tests that have to be performed on a tablescan
require a lot of CPU, Oracle factors this cost into the equation and might switch a query from a CPU-intensive
tablescan to an index range scan. You can see this from the formula in the Oracle9i Database Performance Tuning
Guide and Reference (A96533 p. 9-22):

Cost = (
                      #SRds * sreadtim +
                      #MRds * mreadtim +
                      #CPUCycles / cpuspeed
                ) / sreadtim


The #CPUCycles value in this equation is visible in the cpu_cost column of the newer versions of the plan_table
used by the Explain Plan facility. (Here's another small, but important, detail of optimizer enhancements: always check
to see how the explain plan facility has evolved.)

In fact, if you use this column in the cost equation, the formula needs a fudge factor thrown in—cpuspeed is recorded
in MHz, and the other timings are given in milliseconds, so the CPU component of the formula looks as if it should be
adjusted by a factor of 1,000:

#CPUCycles / (cpuspeed * 1000)

Predicate Order

Apart from the high-level choices, knowledge of CPU operations and the complexity of predicates can allow Oracle to
do things that you might never consider in a manual tuning exercise. The best demonstration of this principle comes
from a (slightly contrived) worked example. For the purposes of a repeatable test, the following code ran under 9.2.0.4
and used a locally managed tablespace with a uniform extent size of 1MB, and manual segment space allocation.



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create table t1 as
select
               trunc(sysdate-1) + rownum/1440 d1,
               rownum                                                                                                n1,
               rpad('x',100)                                                                            padding
from
               all_objects
where
               rownum <= 3000
;

alter table t1
        add constraint t1_pk primary key (d1,n1)
        using index (create index t1_pk on t1(d1,n1))
;

execute dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user,'t1',cascade=>true)

Based on this data set, here are two virtually identical queries. Which one of them will be faster? The index hint is there
just in case your test database has some unexpected parameter settings that push the optimizer into doing a tablescan:

select /*+ index(t1) */
               padding
from   t1
where  n1 = 2800
and            d1 >= trunc(sysdate)
;

select /*+ index(t1) */
               padding
from   t1
where  d1 >= trunc(sysdate)
and            n1 = 2800
;

Notice that the only difference between the two queries is the order of the predicates. If you run the queries through
autotrace (set autotrace on), you'll find that they both produce the same plan and the same number of consistent gets to
execute.

Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
 0      SELECT STATEMENT Optimizer=CHOOSE (Cost=8 Card=1 Bytes=112)
 1    0    TABLE ACCESS (BY INDEX ROWID) OF 'T1' (Cost=8 Card=1
Bytes=112)
 2    1      INDEX (RANGE SCAN) OF 'T1_PK' (NON-UNIQUE) (Cost=7
Card=1562)

Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
0 recursive calls
0 db block gets
9 consistent gets
0 physical reads




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So when I put each query in turn into a PL/SQL loop that executed it 10,000 times, why did the first query take 4.34
CPU seconds to run 10,000 times (at 2.8GHz) and the second query take 13.42 CPU seconds if system statistics were
not enabled? And why, when I enabled system statistics, did both queries run in the shorter time?

The answer isn't visible in autotrace, but if you run the two queries through Oracle's dbms_xplan package to get the full
execution plan, you see the following for the faster query when system statistics are not enabled:

   Id       Operation                                         Name           Rows Bytes     Cost
-----       ----------------------------                      ------------ ------ ------- -------
    0       SELECT STATEMENT                                                    1     110        8
    1       TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID                       T1                1     110        8
 * 2        INDEX RANGE SCAN                                  T1_PK          1562                7

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   2 - access("T1"."D1">=TRUNC(SYSDATE@!) AND "T1"."N1"=2800)
       filter("T1"."N1"=2800 AND "T1"."D1">=TRUNC(SYSDATE@!))

Note: cpu costing is off

If you swap the order of the predicates (still without system statistics) to check the slower query, you will spot a small
change in the Predicate Information section:

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   2 - access("T1"."D1">=TRUNC(SYSDATE@!) AND "T1"."N1"=2800)
       filter("T1"."D1">=TRUNC(SYSDATE@!) AND "T1"."N1"=2800)

However, when you enable system statistics (specifically it's the cpu_costing component that counts), then it doesn't
matter which way round you write the predicates in your query—the execution plan shows that the filter() line
operates the numeric check before the date test, and the query runs in the shorter time.

There are two important points to address here. First, why is there a significant difference in the run time, and second,
what was Oracle doing when it found the quicker path automatically?

The difference in run time depends on the fact that I engineered the data set and the query to force Oracle to check both
columns (d1 and n1) for every index entry covered by the index range scan, and the specific predicate values required
Oracle to check 1,560 rows. Of those 1,560 rows, every single one will pass the date test, but only one will pass the
numeric test. So, by switching the order of the predicates manually, I was actually choosing between executing:

1,560 date tests that pass, followed by 1,560 numeric tests

and

1,560 numeric tests of which one passes, and one subsequent date test.

The difference in run time is entirely due to the absence of 1,559 date tests (multiplied by the 10,000 iterations of the
loop).

How did Oracle find the optimal order of predicate evaluation when cpu_costing was enabled? First, as part of its
"traditional" optimization mechanism, the optimizer always works out the selectivity (fraction of rows that will be
returned) for each of the predicates on a table. Second, Oracle keeps an internal reference list of basic operations with
their costs in the form: "operation X requires N cpu units," and this list is calibrated against the cpuspeed element of
system statistics.




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Combining these two sets of figures, the optimizer can work out figures for "number of tests required for this predicate
* CPU cost of test" and "number of rows for next predicate because of this predicate" as it re-arranges the order of
predicates—all it has to do is minimize the total CPU cost across all tests.

In summary, when CPU costing is enabled, a new code path comes into play that may improve the performance of
some of your queries without affecting the visible execution path, and you will only understand what's going on if you
check the new explain plan output. (This re-arrangement of predicate order can be stopped by using the hint /*+
ordered_predicates */, but the hint is deprecated in 10g.)


Conclusion

Although system statistics haven't yet achieved much popularity, they are not only important overall but actually
critical to certain optimization options in 10g. System statistics give the optimizer more of the "truth" about how your
system really performs, and therefore allow the optimizer to produce a better match between estimated and actual query
execution time.

System statistics also include details that allow the optimizer to trade I/O costs against CPU costs. At a gross level,
knowledge of CPU speeds allow even better decisions on execution paths; at a finer level of detail, Oracle even allows
for re-arranging the order of predicate testing to minimize CPU time after the path has been decided.

If you are still running 8i and plan to migrate to Oracle9i, you should include system statistics as part of your migration
plan. If you are running 9i without using system statistics, you should enable them as soon as possible. If you are
migrating to 10g without first implementing system statistics on 9i, then make some allowances for investigating
system statistics in your test plans. If you don't, you may spend a lot of time trying to understand why odd things are
happening in those places where you've put in a workaround for a problem that wouldn't have existed if you had been
doing the right thing in the first place.




3.3.11              Running Microsoft Statistics
When running Microsoft statistics you want to make sure you run the full statistics to see
any affects. The path to the script is located on the RMS server in the Server / Scripts /
Microsoft / Maintenance directory. The script is called UpdateStats as shown in the
following figure.




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You can read a short article regarding running statistics from the Microsoft web site at
the following address.
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/q195565/



3.3.12         Odbc Access to Oracle Setup
If you receive the following message

"Unable to connect SQLState=IM004 [[Microsoft]][[ODBC Driver Manager]] Driver's
SQLAllocHandle on SQL_HANDLE_ENV failed"

while trying to setup an odbc connection from access to oracle try the following.


Setup an ORACLE_HOME environment variable pointing to the oracle home directory
in your environment variables.

Set permissions on the oracle home directory as follows:

1)Opened up Windows Explorer


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2)Navigated to Oracleora92 (or whatever your Oracle home dir is)
3)Right clicked and selected properties
4)Clicked on Securities tab
5)Clicked on Authenticated Users
6)Unchecked Read and Execute
7)Rechecked Read and Execute
8)Clicked ok to close window
9)Restarted web server
10)No longer get the error message

3.4 Setting up Forms
From the administrator interface select the tools menu / request form / request form
creator. Click on this menu command and wait awhile since there is no feedback. This
only works on Oracle! When you run tools / coding setup check that the coding fields for
each of the forms is in the right hand list box for each form. If you see any forms coding
fields in the left hand list box then you need to manually add them to the right hand list
box. The form coding fields have the form number followed by an underline and then the
form coding field name (i.e. Form1590_FormNumber).




3.5 Installation Problems
There are many problems that can occur and we have documented the following.

3.5.1 Can’t Browse to Login Screen
If the apache tomcat service is started, try to go to its base website by opening a brower
and typing

       http://localhost:8081


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If you get an error, try the following steps:

   1. Ensure that localhost is recognized to be a either a local or trusted site.
   2. Check the browser’s proxy server settings.
   3. Verify that no other applications are using port 8081. (TCPView is a good tool for
       this. It can be downloaded as freeware)
Ping localhost to verify the network does not have serious errors.

3.5.2 MS SQL Database Error
Login to Image2000 browser, and it says “Rms server not started”

ServerLog file

        Database Error...
        ([]Login failed for user 'Image2000'.
        Reason: Not associated with a trusted SQL Server connection.)
        error code (18452)

Solution:

      Ensure that database is set for mixed mode authentication. See the brief reference
      in this document labeled “Creating Image2000 Databse in Microsoft SQL” for
      information on how to set the authentication mode.

Solution #2 from Randy

If you restore an Image2000 database, you need to delete the "Image2000" user IN THE DATABASE (not
in the Sql Server Security logins). Then create a new "Image2000" database user by selecting the
"Image2000" login, and give it ownership of the database.

3.5.3 Unable to Install InstallShield Scripting




Rebooting will most likely resolve this problem. Retry the install when computer comes
back up.

Virus protection software may prevent programs from being installed. Disable it, then
retry the Image2000 installation.


This information was taken from the InstallShield website.


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Document ID: Q108393
Last Revised On: 3/20/2003

Description
Installation issues may arise if the same installation has two instances running
simultaneously. This may cause conflict between the two instances of the installation
engine.

Procedure
Detect if another installation process is running

   1. Press Ctrl + Alt + Del and select Task Manager.
   2. Go to the Processes tab.
   3. Check the running processes for any or some of these names:
          • setup.exe
          • isetup.exe
          • ikernel.exe
          • msiexec.exe
          • idriver.exe
          • IsUninst.exe
          • IsUn16.exe
          • Uninst.exe
          • Uninst16.exe

End previously running installation processes

Follow these steps for any of the above processes that are found running on the system.

   1. Select each process.

Select End Process.

3.6 SQL Database Size Estimates
The database stores the links to everything and is really the brain of the program. Install
Microsoft SQL Server 2000. For version of SQL Server prior to SQL 2000 Do not
perform a default installation – a default installation does not allow full-text indexing.
You must select a custom installation, so that you can activate full-text indexing.

Create a SQL database; suggested name is Image2000.

Estimating the size of the SQL database:
Although the database disk space requirements will vary according to the number of
items to be tracked (and associated records such as security and coding), a good estimate
for the database size is: 1,000 times the number of items to be tracked. For example, if
you plan to track 10,000,000 items, then create the SQL database at 10 gigabytes.

Also keep in mind that full-text indexing (if activated), will consume from about 2 to 3
times the space that the database consumes. Using the above example, the space required


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for full-text indexing will be from 20 to 30 GB (in addition to the space required by the
database). This disk space does not include the space required by the Indexing Service.


Estimating the size required by Tracked Items and Indexing Service
Item such as images (i.e. TIF, JPG, BMP, etc), OCR files associated with the images,
Acrobat PDF, Word Documents, Spreadsheets, email, etc. that are tracked by Image 2000
consume disk space and must be included in the estimate of total disk usage. These files
can range in size from 4,000 to 10,000,000 bytes. If the Indexing Service is activated,
then estimate an additional 40% against the total size of all indexable files (everything
except images).

For example, if you track 1,000,000 images (at an average size of 10,000 bytes), each image has an associated OCR file
(with a size of 2,000 bytes), 100,000 PDF files (average 20,000 bytes), and 100,000 Word Documents (average 1,000 bytes),
then the disk space requirements are:




Type                     Items             Avg Item               Items’ Disk              Index Space             Total
                      Tracked                   Size                    Space
Images               1,000,000               10,000            10,000,000,000
OCR                  1,000,000                2,000             2,000,000,000               800,000,000
PDF                    100,000               20,000             2,000,000,000               800,000,000
Word                   100,000                1,000               100,000,000                40,000,000
Total                2,200,000                                         14 GB                      2 GB           16 GB

Run the SQL script, CreateImage2000DB.SQL, to create the database tables.


4 Workstation Setup
There are a few things you need to setup on the workstation so that it runs correctly. You
will need to install the latest Java Runtime engine from Sun and you should check the
browser version and settings.


4.1 Java Runtime
The latest sun java runtime is required since Microsoft no longer distributes the Sun java
virtual machine. You can get the java runtime engine for free by using the browser and
typing in the address line (http://www.sun.com). Look for the java download icon as
shown in the next figure.




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This will automatically take you to the following link http://www.java.com/en/index.jsp
and you should click on the following icon to install the java runtime version.




There may be times when you have to first download the java runtime engine as a file
and then run a manual installation. Click on the “>> Manual Download “ in the figure
above.


4.2 Configure the Java Plug-In
Open the Control Panel and select the Java Plug-In Icon.




Click the advanced tab, and select the latest java version that appears in the list.




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Next select the Proxies tab and clear the “Use Browser Settings” check box.




Select the Cache Tab the n press the clear button.
Then finally press the Apply button.




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4.3 Internet Explorer
Upgrade to Internet Explorer version 6.0.

The web page needs to be refreshed every time the page is visited. To do this, begin
Internet Explorer and select Internet Options from the Tools menu.




Select the Setting Button to see the following dialog




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Select the Every visit to page button.

You may want to instruct users to clear the cache on a regular basis if they are
encountering problems.


4.4 Desktop Shortcuts
Users like to click an icon to start the record management applications. There are two
icons that you may want to create depending on whether you have an administrator or
end user.




For the people that need to use the administrator interface create an rms admin icon
where you have the following internet explorer properties with the Shortcut tab selected.




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Target: "c:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\IEXPLORE.EXE"
http://servername/Image2000/checklogin.jsp?txtID=admin&txtPass=admin

Start in: "C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer"

For the people that need to use the administrator interface create an rms portal icon where
you have the following internet explorer properties with the Shortcut tab selected.

Target: "C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\IEXPLORE.EXE"
http://servername/Image2000/pchecklogin.jsp?txtID=admin&txtPass=admin

Start in: "C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer"

When you configure the browser you want people to be able to click and start and have
both interfaces running at the same time. Make sure you have the Reuse Windows
checked.




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5 Devices
There are many devices that can get used in a records management environment. We
have listed some of the common things that need to be addressed. While the
manufacturers have good manuals on the web you may have to call product support since
devices tend to be hardware and software dependent. Installing and configuring the
drivers is not always straight forward.


5.1 Barcode Readers
For barcode readers you want to program the device so that it automatically inserts a
carriage return (CR) and a line feed (LF) after each scan. Some of these devices have
problems uploading data from the scanner to the computer so make sure you call the
vendor about any work arounds.




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5.2 Printers
Some label printers require special installation procedures depending on the operating
system. The zebra printer when getting installed on a windows 2003 server operating
system requires certain preparation prior to installing the printer driver.

Microsoft has made some changes in the default policies on this platform, and there is
one that affects the installation of drivers:

* By default the server has a policy that will not allow Kernel Mode
NT4.0 or Win2K driver to be installed. The current Zebra Universal Driver is Kernel
Mode a kernel mode driver, and has always been that way.

This policy must be changed to install the driver.

To change the policy from the default state the administrator must do the following;

   1. Goto Start Menu and select "Run"

   2. Type the following and hit enter "gpedit.msc". This will load the Group Policy
      Object Editor.

   3. Select "Computer Configuration" and then "Administrative Templates".
   4. Under the "Printer Section" select "Disallow installation of printers using kernel-
      mode drivers" and set it to disabled in the properties page.

Once the above is completed the driver can be installed.

Microsoft has removed the need for a Digital Signature to install the driver. It is the same
behavior as Win 2K, it will warn you but will still allow you to install.

Below is a link to a MS Knowledge Base article that talks about this issue.
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;282011

Zebra Technical Support
Knowledge Base
TS3@Zebra.com



6 Workflow
There are several predefined workflows. You need to setup the hibernate, jbpm, database
scripts, create record types and add all the associated coding fields.

You have to create 2 record types Process and Process Record Stat.




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6.1 Hibernate

6.2 SQL Server Setup

6.3 JBPM Setup
6.4 Efile Destruction Coding
You must have a Monitor node for each suborg that has a workflow process. The
Monitor, eFile Destroyed Stats and the year nodes are all of type Storage.


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For soft eFile destruction you need to create an eFiles Destroyed node.




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6.5 Physical Destruction Coding
Under the Monitor node in each suborg create a Physical Destruction Process node that is
of Record Type Process.




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For the soft destruction process box records are moved into a Destroyed node that you
need to create for each suborg. The year month and day nodes are created by the program
during the destruction process.




7 Mobile
You can manually install the Image2000 rms application on an xp pro laptop computer by
doing the following steps.

1.) Copy image 2000 and i2kdata directories to the c drive.



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2.) Download tomcat 6.0 from www.rco.com/down item#5 install to c:\tomcat6; install
the tomcat as a service by running the service.bat install in the tomcat6\bin directory
3.) Download jdk1.6.0 from www.rco.com/down item #4 install to c:\jdk1.6.0 and add to
your path (at the start before any other jre paths)
4.) Set java_home in environment variables to point to the java c:\jdk1.6.0
5.) Install the 3 services by running install programs in \Image2000\server\bin
6.) Install the adobe ifilter60.exe from www.rco.com/down
8.) Copy ifilter.bat to the \oracle\bin directory
copy filtdump.exe and testForPDF.exe in addition to ifilter.bat to the <oracle home>/bin directory.
All three files are in StarTeam under Developer | Image2000 | code | support | Adobe.
9.) Install oracle 10grel2 using all the defaults
10.) Pick enterprise and use rms10MachineName admin for password
11.) Create rms_data tablesapce from sqlplus
12.) Create rmsadmin user running \server\scripts\oracle\creatermsuser.sql
13.) Import database from a dos cmd prompt where import file located
The oracle import file is in the i2kdata directory at the root. From a dos command prompt
change directory to the c:\i2kdata and run the following command line.
imp rmsadmin/admin@rms10MachineName file=’ocwddec2006.dmp’
Note that if the import single command line does not work you can type imp and then let
the system prompt you.

14.) Test the admin interface using a browser http://localhost/Imag2000

15.) Test the portal interface using a browser http://localhost/Image2000/plogon.htm

To see images you probably need to see a loopback network connection if you operate
the laptop not connected to your local area network.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/839013

The Microsoft Loopback adapter is a testing tool for a virtual network
environment where network access is not available. Also, you must use
the Loopback adapter if there are conflicts with a network adapter or
with a network adapter driver. You can bind network clients, protocols,
and other network configuration items to the Loopback adapter, and you
can install the network adapter driver or network adapter later while
retaining the network configuration information. You can also install
the Loopback adapter during the unattended installation process.

Manual installation
To manually install the Microsoft Loopback adapter in Windows XP,
follow these steps:
1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
2. If you are in Classic view, click Switch to Category View under
Control Panel in the left pane.
3. Double-click Printers and Other Hardware, and then click Next.
4. Under See Also in the left pane, click Add Hardware,and then click
Next.
5. Click Yes, I have already connected the hardware, and then click
Next.




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6. At the bottom of the list, click Add a new hardware device, and then
click Next.
7. Click Install the hardware that I manually select from a list, and
then click Next.
8. Click Network adapters, and then click Next.
9. In the Manufacturer box, click Microsoft.
10. In the Network Adapter box, click Microsoft Loopback Adapter, and
then click Next.
11. Click Finish.



Personally, I think it is easier to just plug in a small 4 port switch to simulate a network.


8    Mail Setup
In order to send external mail attachments using Microsoft Exchange server you need to
enable the smtp relay. On the server where you have Exchange start the Exchange system
manager application. Open the Administrative Groups and then navigate down to
Protocols and the SMTP like the following figure. Right click the SMTP server and click
the Access tab.




Now click the relay button. Click the “Only the list below” radio button and then add the
ip address of where the RMS server is located.

!!! Make sure you have the bottom check box unchecked otherwise the spammers can use
your system to send out junk mail.



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!!! Now select Message Delivery in the Global Settings and then right click and select
properties. Now select the Recipient Filtering tab and make sure the check box at the
bottom is checked. If you have Active Directory then it will get rid of sending out bogus
Non deliverable emails.




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You can enable logging and then use the run command to view the logs for suspicious
activities.




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You can test the mail relay using telnet. The following is a good reference for using telnet
to test the Exchange SMTP connectivity.

153119 XFOR: Telnet to Port 25 to Test SMTP Communication
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;153119


You should test the email configuration by creating an external email account and then
running the RMS email and then selecting a file from the results list and then click the
email button.

The following are useful references.

310380 How To Prevent Exchange 2000 from Being Used as a Mail Relay in Windows
2000
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;310380

842851 SMTP tar pit feature for Microsoft Windows Server 2003
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;842851



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823866 How to configure connection filtering to use Realtime Block Lists (RBLs) and
how to configure recipient filtering in Exchange 2003
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;823866

823019 How to Help Secure SMTP Client Message Delivery in Exchange 2003
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;823019




9 Summary
Congratulations on setting up your new system. Please contact support and get yourself a
help desk account so you can monitor any problems or issues you may encounter. We
recommend the following actions you may want to consider performing on a regular
basis.

   1.   Database backups
   2.   RMS file backups (if you do electronic files)
   3.   Security audit reports
   4.   Clean the tree for orphan records
   5.   Destruction reports




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