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2001 Comtech Program Abstracts _MS Word_

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2001 Comtech Program Abstracts _MS Word_ Powered By Docstoc
					Ada Public Schools
P.O. Box 1359
Ada, OK 74280

Project Director: Rebecca Hill, 580/310-7218, rhill@adapss.com

Computer Literacy Instruction for Communities and Kids – “CLICK” for Ada’s program
takes into account the needs of the community, offering quality technology and training
at a safe, easy access location, and positioning computers in diverse locations around the
city and within the county. It provides laptops for special needs students to take home
when needed. It increases student access to computer assisted instruction (CAI), the
network and the Internet by opening the CLICK center after school hours, and by making
technology mobile – brings the lab to the student instead of the student to the lab. The
program is expected to serve a possible student population of 280 per year. In addition,
the free computers will allow six students access per night. Programs will also be
available to adults and will include technology, basic literacy, workplace skills and GED
instructions.

Primary Partners: The Ada Chamber of Commerce; the Ada Housing Authority, the
                  Workforce Development Council; the East Central University Child
                  Care Facility; Burris Communications; Care-A-Lot and Precious
                  Friends Day Care Centers; the Tri-County Indian Nations Community
                  Development Corporation; the Evenstart program; the Oklahoma
                  Parents as Teachers and Parents as Partners program; the Hugh Warren
                  Memorial Library; the First National Bank of Ada; the Kiwanis Club
                  of Ada; and the Big 5 (Headstart)

New Centers:      The CLICK learning center at Ada High School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $179,247
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $57,463

AdEdge, LLC
4150 Rio Bravo, Suite 128
El Paso, TX 79902-1048

Project Director: Sister Maria Jesus Munguia, 915/532-6875, Johndogbreath@yahoo.com

The Father Yermo CTC will include a Cisco Networking Academy , IT training, GED
instruction, ESL instruction, and small-business assistance. The neighborhood, in central
El Paso adjacent to the US/Mexico border, is a predominately Hispanic community with
an unemployment rate of 10.3%. The Cisco Networking Academy is a comprehensive
four-semester course that trains students to design, build and maintain computer
networks, and prepare them for industry standard certifications. It will give people the
skills necessary to succeed at good-paying jobs in IT and other industries. Management
and technical assistance services will be offered to small businesses, particularly in the
areas of promotions/sales and IT. These custom-tailored services will address specific
needs of small business toward greater stabilization and growth. A minimum of 358
individuals are expected to be served by this program.

Primary Partners:      Cisco Networking Academy Program; Career and Technology
                       Advisory Committee (a partnership of business, industry and
                       education in the El Paso area)

New Centers:           (1) The Father Yermo CTC, El Corazon de El Paso, El Paso, TX

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $240,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $409,075

Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind
P.O. Box 698
Talladega, AL 35161-0698

Project Director: Ms. Renita Holman, 256/761-3434

“The World at My Finger Tips” CTC will provide the sensory impaired, multi-disabled
population in rural Talladega County and any persons, businesses, or educational
organizations that work with or serve this population, with access to a sophisticated,
technically advanced centralized technology center. A potential demonstration model for
states/counties with highly concentrated numbers of persons with sensory impairments
and multiple disabilities, the Center will give this traditionally underserved population
access to computer software and assistive technology specific to their disabilities.
Offering seminars, self-paced computer training and individual instruction to enhance
knowledge and use of assistive equipment, the primary goal of the Center is to increase
educational and employment opportunities. The CTC expects to provide services to a
minimum of 400 individuals

Primary Partners: Helen Keller National Center; The United Way of North Talladega;
                  University of Alabama at Birmingham; Vision Science Research
                  Center; Community Action Agency of Talladega; Clay and Randolph
                  Counties

New Centers:        (1) “The World at My Finger Tips” CTC, Alabama Institute for Deaf
                    and Blind

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $191,300
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $201,151

Alisal Union School District
1205 East Market Street
Salinas, CA 93905
Project Director: Tim Landeck, 831/753-5700, tlandeck@sccs.santacruz.k12.ca.us

The Alisal Union School District’s (AUSD) Alisal’s Access for All (AAA) project will
add two new CTCs as expansion satellites, using the existing successful CTC as a model.
The current CTC is able to serve 500 community members per month of the more than
14,000 in need of services. The programs offered will assist participants in improving
work skills, technology skills, English literacy skills, and communication skills and will
provide access to job opportunities. Each of the three sites expects to serve at least 500
community participants per month, or 6,000 per year.

Primary Partners:     Salinas Adult School; Community-Based English Tutoring Program;
                      Monterey Institute of International Studies; California State
                      University at Monterey Bay; City of Salinas and Chamber of
                      Commerce

Expanded Centers:     (2) New: CTC, Jesse Sanchez Elementary School; CTC, Frank
                      Paul Elementary School (1) Current: Alison Union School
                      District’s Healthy Start CTC

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $130,000

Antioch Community Development Corporation
177 Dartmouth Avenue
Hempstead, NY 11550

Project Director: Sheila Elliott, 516/292-4157, madamelliot@aol.com

This program will serve approximately 2,300 low-income and underserved residents of
Hempstead, New York. It will offer introductory, intermediate and advanced level
classes on Windows, use of the Internet and web page design, online homework
assistance and tutoring, Internet-based employment opportunities and job skills training,
and the opportunity to explore and develop skills in the use of computer technology.

Primary Partners: Adelphi University

New Centers: (1) Antioch Baptist Church

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $202,730.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $62,758.00

Appalachian Center for Economic Networks
94 Columbus Road
Athens, OH 45701

Project Director: Russell V. Combs, 740/592-3854, russc@acenetworks.org
This program will serve approximately 280 underemployed and unemployed adults and
children living in poverty in rural southeastern Ohio. The program will allow access to
computer labs in local high schools during after school hours for adults and students. It
will offer work readiness classes, an after-school Computer Club for students and small
business opportunities for students and adults.

Primary Partners: Ohio State University; 4-H Clubs; Department of Job and Family
                  Services; Workforce Investment Board; and the One Stop Center.

New Centers: (3) Expand on existing programs in local high schools.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $158,210.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $121, 200.00

Applied Information Management Institute
118 S. 19th Street, Suite 1A
Omaha, NE 68102-1305

Project Director: Eve Bleyhl, 402/345-5025, eve@omaha.org

The OMAHA Community ConNEctions Project will expand services to the residents of
the Omaha Enterprise Community focusing especially on the most vulnerable and
underserved populations residing in this geographic area: out-of-school youth, Native
Americans, and the elderly. It is anticipated that over 800 people will be served over the
one-year period of the grant. A variety of activities will be implemented to increase
access to computers and computer training including: adult basic education programs;
intergenerational activities; graphic arts model program for Native American high school
students; tutoring; career development and planning; customized business training and
basic computer literacy program for elderly taught by target area high school students.

Primary Partners: The Applied Information Management (AIM) Institute, fiscal agent
                  and lead organization for the OMAHA Community ConNEctions
                  Program, is a community wide consortium comprised of 250
                  businesses, local and regional colleges and universities, over 55
                  secondary school districts, the Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce,
                  and the State of Nebraska

Expanded Centers: (2) Centers are to be added, increasing the total number of OMAHA
                 Community ConNEctions Project CTCs to five. Current centers: La
                 Raza Job Training, Inc.; Main Branch, Omaha Public Library; and
                 Turning Point. New centers will be located at the Bryant Resource
                 Center in north Omaha and the Nebraska Indian Community College,
                 Omaha campus in south-central Omaha.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $299,999
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $253,947
Arizona Supreme Court
Administrative Office of the Courts
1501 West Washington
Phoenix, AZ 85007-3231

Project Director: Lynn A. Wiletsky, 602/542-9309, lwiletsky@supreme.sp.state.az.us

Arizona’s Project Learn – Literacy, Education And Resource Network was established in
1987 as a pilot project by the Arizona Supreme Court, Administrative Office of the
Courts (AOC). Installation and implementation of computerized literacy labs in
probation departments and other community settings, began that year and has continued
to grow statewide. Initially the project offered only literacy education, but within a year
of start up, some labs added additional programming to serve the diversified needs of the
adult and juvenile populations. Two new LEARN labs will be added to the existing
network, in juvenile detention facilities, one in a large urban area and the other in a small
rural community and five labs will be upgraded. Computer-based instruction provides
consistent, individualized programming which can be adapted to the students’ academic
needs and abilities. The new labs and the five upgraded labs are expected to serve over
2,303 students during the upcoming fiscal year.

Primary Partners: Each local lab has partnered with a probation department, school
                  district or community agency to physically house and staff the lab.
                  The AOC has partnered with the Arizona Department of Education.
                  Many local LEARN labs have partnered with the Arizona Department
                  of Education, Adult Education Division.

Expanded Centers: (2 New) LEARN Lab, Phoenix and LEARN Lab, St. Johns
                 (5) LEARN Labs will be upgraded, one in Navajo County, Santa Cruz
                 County and Yuma County, and two in Pinal County

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $225,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $90,000

Arizona Board of Regents for and on behalf of Northern Arizona
Office of Grant and Contract Services
Babbitt Administrative Center
Room 100, Building 51
Flagstaff, AZ 86011

Project Director: Greg Larkin, 928/523-0251, Gregory.larkin@nau.edu

This program will serve approximately 200 Native American residents of Ganado,
Arizona and the surrounding communities on the Navajo Reservation. The community
has a Community Technology Center. This program will expand on existing services to
hire and use Navajo instructors who know the area and culture, to teach the residents how
to use the technology. In addition to instruction on basic computer skills and Internet
use, the program will provide job skills training, employment and career information and
expanded and distance learning opportunities.

Primary Partners: Northern Arizona Literacy Enterprises and the Ganado Unified School
                  District

New Centers: (1) NALE/Ganado Community Technology Center (expand services)

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $106,650.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $34,216.00

Bay Ridge Associates L.P.
c/o Landex of Maryland
575 S. Charles Street, Suite 506
Baltimore, MD 21201

Project Director: Juanita Marbury, 410/234-0111, jmarbury@aol.com

The new CTC will enhance the existing Neighborhood Network Center (NNC) at the Bay
Ridge Garden Apartments in Annapolis, Maryland. Bay Ridge Gardens is a privately
managed low income housing community assisted under the HUD Section 8 program,
State funds and Low Income Housing Tax Credits. The development has 197
households, with over 50% of residents 18 or younger. The CTC grant will allow the
NNC to provide: job training assistance; youth technology courses; and a music
production workshop to give teenagers from Bay Ridge Gardens the opportunity to learn
computer-based audio recording and editing techniques. The program will serve 20 users
on a daily basis and a total of 200 individuals throughout the grant period.

Primary Partners:     Housing Opportunities Unlimited (HOU); Annapolis Business and
                      Professional Women’s Club

New Centers:          (1) CTC at Bay Ridge Garden Apartments, Annapolis

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $112,772
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $68,000

Bay View Community Health Center
458 26th Street
San Diego, CA 92102

Project Director: Marlo Antonio, 619/234-7398, Marl0@aol.com

The purpose of the San Diego CTC program is to challenge and prepare local residents to
use technology as a tool for advancement and success at school, home and in the
community. Through the development of three unique and strategically-located CTC’s,
the program will provide a minimum of 1,300 local residents with first-time access to
technology-based adult education and family literacy training; after school technology-
based tutorial and enrichment opportunities; career development and job preparation
assistance; and small business development support.

Primary Partners: San Diego School District; United Education Institute; Reuben H.
                  Fleet Science Center; Barrio Logan College Institute; Inner-City
                  Business Association Historic San Diego Agency; City of San Diego
                  Community Development Corporation; Desert Pacific Council – Boy
                  Scouts and Girl Scouts of America; North Park Clergy Association

New Centers:      (3) Student Success Technology Resource Center, Adult Learners
                  Technology Resource Center and Career Success Technology
                  Resource Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $299,490
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $161,150

Black Hills Special Services Cooperative
P.O. Box 218
Sturgis, SD 57785

Project Director: Mary Baumeister, 605/347-4467, maryb@bhssc.tie.net

This program will serve approximately 300 disadvantaged youth and adults in the
economically distressed community of North Rapid City, North Dakota. It will increase
access to technology and offer opportunities for career planning and development,
including skills training for technology related careers. Students will have access to
technology-based programs that will provide homework assistance and supplemental
learning activities. Literacy programs for adults and families also will be available.

Primary Partners: One-Stop Career Center Board of the Black Hills; Career Learning
                  Center of the Black Hills; Technology and Innovations in Education;
                  Rapid City Area School District; Rapid City Academy; North Middle
                  School; Even Start Family Literacy; South Dakota Parent Resource
                  Center; South Dakota Department of Labor; West River Business
                  Service Center; Small Business Development Center; Black Hills State
                  University; Ardent Learning Center; National American University;
                  and the Black Hills Foster Grandparents Program.

New Centers: (1) Family Opportunity and Technology Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $297,281.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $134,276.00

Boys & Girls Clubs of Southeastern Michigan
26777 Halsted Road, Suite 100
Farmington Hills, MI 48331-3560

Project Director: Lisa Beiharz-Tyler, 248/473-1400, LBTyler@bgcsm.org

CONNECT is a program designed to bridge the digital divide by providing access to
technology in six Boys and Girls Clubs in Southeastern Michigan. All six clubs are
located within the Detroit MSA (Wayne County) and serve over 8,000 youth annually
who live in economically distressed areas. The program will build stronger relationships
between Boys & Girls Clubs and community through partnerships with other nonprofit
agencies. Activities provided by the project include basic computer skills training, career
exploration using the Internet, resume writing, interviewing skills, etc.; informational
sessions hosted by local nonprofit agencies like Michigan Works! Project Connect will
serve students age 6-18, parents and community members.

Primary Partners: City of Detroit; EDS Corporation; Microsoft; Boys & Girls Clubs
                  of America; Infocus; Mobil Communications; JASON Foundation;
                  U.S. Secret Service (Michigan Branch); Academy for Business
                  Technology; Davenport University, Holistic Development Center;
                  Eastern Michigan University

New Centers:       (6) Howard B. Bloomer Club, Detroit; Lloyd H. Diehl Club, Detroit;
                   James and Lynelle Holden Club, Detroit; Adam H. Sarver Club,
                   Redford; Edgar A. Guest Club, Dearborn; and Fauver-Martin Club,
                   Highland Park.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $240,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $121,400

Boys Club of San Diego, CA, Inc.
1761 Hotel Circle South
Suite 123
San Diego, CA 92108

Project Director: Michelle Regan, 619/298-3520, michelleregan7@yahoo.com

This program will serve at-risk youth that have come into contact with the juvenile justice
system in two of San Diego’s poorest neighborhoods, Encanto and Logan Heights. The
youth will be selected to serve as interns in the CTC’s, and will receive a small stipend
and encouraged to continue their technology education. The program will offer courses
in GED preparation, career preparation and development, job readiness training and
employment skills, resume building, online job search and computer skills training. In
addition, the program will provide GED preparation, basic computer classes, introduction
and exploration of the Internet for adults.

Primary Partners: Family Health Centers; San Diego @ Work/SD Workforce Partnership
                   Turn Around Dynamics; and the Lutheran Social Services.

New Centers: (2) William J. Oakes (Logan Heights) Branch and Encanto Branch

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $138,406.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $111,092.00

Calcasieu Parish School Board
1724 Kirkman Street
Lake Charles, LA 70601-6299

Project Director: Sheryl Abshire, 337/437-6150, sheryl.abshire@cpsb.org

INCITE (INvolved Community through Integrated Technology Education) will provide
two well-defined CTCs promoting guidance, education, and support to community
members of Calcasieu Parish, LA. The program will reach all areas of the parish,
providing participants of all ages an opportunity to learn, apply, and synthesize training
of technology-based skills, increasing educational foundations, real-world business
transactions, personal correspondence, research and information-gathering and access to
online job databases. INCITE will establish a digital connection for those who lack
access to these tools, increasing economic educational, and social advancement. Over
3,000 people are expected to take part in INCITE activities.

Primary Partners: Calcasieu Parish Public Library; Calcasieu Career Center; Workforce
                  Investment Board; School to Work and Simon Properties

New Centers:       (2) North INCITE Center, Curriculum and Instruction Department
                   Building, Calcasieu Parish School Board; South Incite Center, Prien
                   Lake Mall, Lake Charles

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $430,430

Caruthers Unified School District
P.O. Box 127
Caruthers, CA 93609

Project Director: Dwight Miller, 559/864-3274, dmiller@caruthers.k12.ca.us

This program will serve approximately 350 families in Caruthers, an isolated agricultural
community in Fresno County, California. The program will offer adult basic education
classes, career development and job preparation, English language instruction and
computer skills training. In addition to the programs offered in the CTC’s, the program
also will place on loan 150 computers and free Internet access in the homes of families
who have not had this technology available to them before.
Primary Partners: California State University Fresno; CSUF Kremen School of
                  Education; CSUF Agricultural Technology Information Network;
                  Fresno City College; Caruthers Adult School; Caruthers Community
                  Library; and the California Technology Assistance Project.

New Centers: (2) Caruthers Elementary School and Caruthers High School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $242,114.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $103,149.00

Catholic Community Services of the Mid-Willamette Valley and Central Coast
142 Glynbrook Street, NE
P.O. Box 20400
Keizer, OR 97307-0400

Project Director: James T. Seymour, 503/390-2600, jseymour@goccs.org

The CTC is an essential component of the Highland-Grant Community Center, focusing
on adult education, high school completion, career development, job preparation for
adults and youth who have dropped out of school or who are at risk of dropping out, open
access to the broader community and family activities in conjunction with the 21st
Century Community Learning Centers at both elementary schools. A second CTC,
within the Northgate Neighborhood Center, will be opened once this first one is up and
running.

Primary Partners: The Family Systems Investment Consortium (20 participating
                  organizations)

New Centers:      (2) CT: Highland-Grant Community Center and the Northgate
                  Neighborhood Center, Salem, OR

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $120,643
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $94,195

CCTV d/b/a/ CyberSkills/Vermont
294 N. Winooski Avenue
Burlington, VT 05401

Project Director: Jayne Sheridan, 802/860-4057 x22, jsheridan@cyberskillsvt.org

The CyberSkills Alliance for Opportun-IT combines the successful efforts of CyberSkills
/Vermont, a six year old CTC operating in Burlington’s Enterprise Community with ten
Alliance Partner Service Agencies to establish an integrated and comprehensive model
that overcomes barriers and provides essential support services for low-income and
disadvantaged individuals, including at-risk youth, seniors, entrepreneurs, job seekers,
refugees, and individuals moving from welfare to work so that they can increase their
capacity to participate in the region’s emerging Information Society. The CTC will
expand, support and strengthen public access to the sites, including the resource center at
CyberSkills/Vermont’s Old North End, a new public access center at the library and the
eight existing public access sites currently available. There will also be a computer loan
program. The project will deliver services to an estimated 841 participants.

Primary Partners:      Fletcher Free Library; Vermont Adult Learning; Champlain Senior
                       Center; Vermont Refugee Resettlement; Micro Business
                       DevelopmentProgram; King Street Youth Program; Vermont
                       Department of Employment and Training; Recycle North;
                       Vermont Development Credit Union; Vermont Girl Scouts Council

Expanded Centers:      (1) CyberSkills/Vermont (1) New Public Access: Fletcher Free
                       Library, (8) existing access sites: Trinity College; Sarah Holbrook
                       Center; St. Michael’s College; Multi-Generational Center;
                       Heinenburg Club; Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program; King
                       Street Youth Program; Vermont Department of Employment and
                       Training

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $271,926
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $418,948

Central Washington University
400 E. 8th Avenue
Ellensburg, WA 98926-7510

Project Director: Kevin Nemeth, 509/963-1508, nemethk@cwu.edu

The Open Spaces Technology Center (OS Tech Center) includes community and mobile
technology training labs. Given the rural and remote nature of Eastern Washington and
the lack of technology sophistication and training, the Open Spaces project will increase
access and knowledge of technology among county residents who are most in need. The
efforts of this program will result in a more technology savvy citizenry and ultimately
result in a better-trained workforce. The program is expected to reach an estimated 936
residents each year.

Primary Partners: Central Washington University Office of Continuing Education;
                  WorkSource; Ellensburg Chamber of Commerce; City of Ellensburg
                  Department of Recreation; United Way of Kittatas County

New Centers:        (2) Open Spaces Technology Center, Ellensburg, WA and a mobile
                    technology training lab

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $283,971
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $112,426
Centro Cultural of Washington County, Oregon
P.O. Box 708
1110 North Adair
Cornelius, OR 97113

Project Director: Barbara Raymons, 503/359-0446, sbr@centrocultural.org

This program will serve approximately 700 low-income Latino families and individuals
in Western Washington County, Oregon whose proficiency in English is limited and
whose access to, and computer skills are also limited. Expanding upon existing computer
centers, the program will provide a basic orientation to computers. It will provide job
search and resume writing classes as well as advanced computer skills training for those
with computer skills. It also will provide open use time for practice and Spanish
speaking mentors and instructors will be available for assistance.

Primary Partners: Family Literacy Program; Portland Community College Literacy
                  Program; 4-H Web Wizards/Oregon State Extension Service;
                  Hillsboro Public Library Digital Bridge; and the Forest Grove School
                  District.

New Centers: (3) Centro; Hillsboro Library; and Neil Armstrong Middle School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $148,800.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $64,987.80

Chemeketa Community College
P.O. Box 14007
4000 Lancaster Drive, NE
Salem, OR 97309

Project Director: Harvey Franklin, 503/399-5207, frah@chemeketa.edu

This program will serve approximately 795 low-income residents of the economically
distressed rural communities of North Marion County, Oregon. The program will expand
the services of an existing program, the Woodburn Workforce Transition Center, which
serves individuals recently dislocated by a plant closure in Woodburn. It will provide
information on education, training and job career opportunities, adult literacy tutoring in
English and Spanish, computer workshops and classes, use of the Internet and business
planning skills training for the small business community and farm business community.

Primary Partners: Oregon Human Development Corporation; Marion County Housing
                  Authority; Oregon Child Development Coalition; Child Care
                  Information Service/Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action
                  Agency; Woodburn School District; Salud Medical Center; Green
                  Thumb; YWCA of Salem’s Resource Assistance Program; Woodburn
                  Chamber of Commerce; Mid-Willamette Workforce Network; Oregon
                  Economic & Community Development Department; Palo Alto
                  Software; The City of Woodburn; and the Oregon Employment
                  Department.

New Centers: (1) Woodburn Computer Technology Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $286,729.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $204,979.00

Church United for Community Development
19202 Highland Road
Baton Rouge, LA 70809

Project Director: Mark Stermer, 225/753-2273, marks@healingplacechurch.org

Specific objectives for the Donaldson CTC include: providing technology-based
academic assistance and enrichment for school-aged children; increasing the number of
students/adults who obtain a high school degree and higher-than-minimum wage jobs;
providing academically credited CBT vocational courses for youth and adults; and
increasing the number of minority youth involved in technology-leadership training
programs. The program is expected to serve a minimum of 500 people during the first
year and activities will include an after-school program, a summer program, a preschool
program and a Minority Technology-Leadership Intern Program.

Primary Partners: The Mayor of Donaldsonville; The Ascension Parish President;
                  Ascension Technical Institute; Ascension Parish School Board;
                  Americorp*VISTA; Volunteer Ascension; Ascension Parish
                  Mentoring Program; Ascension Parish Youth Council; Ascension
                  Parish Council on Aging; The Ascension Parish Arts and Recreation
                  Council; The Ascension Weekly; People First; and Local Churches
                  involved with TCUFCD.

New Centers: (1) Donaldson CTC, Donaldson

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $208,611
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $98,212

CINCO, The Center to Increase Community Organization
125 South Avenue 57
Los Angeles, CA 90042

Project Director: Casey Bahr, 323/255-9030, caseybahr@compuserve.com

This program will serve approximately 750 low-income, predominately Latino residents
of northeast Los Angeles, California, a community that is characterized by a high poverty
rate, high unemployment and a lack of educational attainment. The program will
establish a consortium to provide technology-based education and training programs that
include, adult education and family literacy, community-based English tutoring, basic,
intermediate and advanced computer training, web design, office skills training and job
placement services.

Primary Partners: Northeast Los Angeles Community Technology Consortium; The
                  Rock; Hathaway Family Resource Center; Occidental College;
                  Franklin Adult School; and the Northeast Community Resources
                  Coordinating Council.

New Centers: (3) Expand on existing services at CINCO, Hathaway Family Resource
                 Center and THE ROCK.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $299,110.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $656,888.00

Circle Terrace Associates, L.P.
C/o Landex of Maryland
575 South Charles, Suite 506
Baltimore, MD 21201

Project Director: Juanita Marbury, 410/234-0111, jmarbury@aol.com

This program will serve the residents of a 303 unit low-income housing complex in
Baltimore County, Maryland. Circle Terrace is considered a very low-income
community as defined by HUD with 39% of the households receiving some type of
federal income assistance, and an additional 11% reported no income at all. The program
will provide computer assisted GED preparation and literacy classes; web-based job
search and job readiness workshops; place computers on loan to homes of residents with
barriers to participating in programs in the center.

Primary Partners: Circle Terrace Residents’ Association; Literacy Works, Inc.;
                 Community College of Baltimore County; and Housing Opportunities
                 Unlimited.

New Centers: 0

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $277,530.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $155,032.00

City College of San Francisco (CCSF)
50 Phelan Avenue, C306
San Francisco, CA 94112-1821

Project Director: Veronica Hunnicutt, 415/550-4347, vhunnicu@ccsf.org
The purpose of San Francisco Computers and Learning expansion project (SFCAL) is to
improve the lives of people in housing facilities by giving them skills needed to obtain
and hold decent paying jobs. The San Francisco Housing Authority (SFHA) will recruit
150 residents from public housing to participate in this program. They will learn to use
the Internet as well as the basics of Microsoft Office software. In addition, they will
learn to put together computer components for a computer which will become theirs at
the end of the class. Upon completion they will be encouraged to 1) work with the One
Stop to improve job readiness skills, learn how to improve their current work situation,
and/or to find jobs; and 2) take additional courses at CCSF that will prepare them for
better careers. They will also be directed to the Information Technology Career Ladder
formed by the City’s Workforce Investment Board.

Primary Partners:     San Francisco Housing Authority and One Stop

Expanded Centers:     (2) Hunter’s View and Sunnydale HUD-supported Computer
                      Learning Centers

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $250,737
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $145,467

City of Albuquerque
Department of Family and Community Services
P.O. Box 1293
Albuquerque, NM 87103

Project Director: Gerald Ortiz y Pino, 505/768-2870, jortizypino@cabq.gov

This program will serve approximately 48,500 residents, particularly those 14-21, in the
poorest neighborhoods in the City of Albuquerque, New Mexico. It will provide access
to technology for the community for computer training, technology-based educational
programs, job skills training and career development opportunities. Youth, after-school
programs will be a year round activity. Adult programs will have two focuses, serving as
mentors to youths and other adults and, adult education courses and Internet training to
access resources to take part in community planning and decision-making. There also
will be ESL classes and online health and nutritional information programs.

Primary Partners: Robert F. Kennedy Charter School; University of New Mexico;
                  Middle Rio Grande Business and Education Collaborative;
                  Albuquerque Public Schools; the Cornstalk Institute; Prime Time; and
                  the Albuquerque chapter of the League of United Latin American
                  Citizens.

New Centers: (5) Barelas Community Center; Jack Candelaria Community Center; Los
                 Durances Community Center; Thomas Bell Community Center; and
                 Wells Park Community Center.
Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $299,866.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $620,139.00

City of Kalamazoo
241 W. South Street
Kalamazoo, MI 49007-4796

Project Director: Rob Reibeling, 616/337-8839, reibeling@kalamazoocity.org

Kalamazoo Alliance for Service Learning Technology (see “Primary Partners”) will
develop CTCs to address the achievement gaps and the digital divide that exist in their
community. The six objective of this program are to: 1) provide computer and Internet
access to eight community sites in four of the seven Community Development Block
Grant (CDBG) neighborhoods; 2) implement a computer mentoring program at each
CTC; 3) promote academic development for youth and adults through technology; 4)
provide career development opportunities through technology use; 5) promote technology
aided small business opportunities; and 6) use technology to positively influence youth
development. The potential number of residents to be served at each of the centers is
estimated at 800, or almost 6,400 by the end of the first year.

Primary Partners:     Boys and Girls Club; New Genesis Incorporated; Health Futures;
                      Alliance for Service Learning, and the Kalamazoo Public Library
                      have formed the Kalamazoo Alliance for Service Learning
                      Technology (KPLT)

New/Expanded Centers:
                   (8) Eight CTCs will be established and/or expanded to serve youth
                   and adults that reside in the Edison, Vine, Eastside, and Northside
                   neighborhoods of Kalamazoo: City of Kalamazoo Youth
                   Development Center; Boys and Girls Club of Greater Kalamazoo,
                   Lake Street Campus; New Genesis, Incorporated;
                   Hillside Middle School; Kalamazoo Central High School;
                   Eastwood Branch – Kalamazoo Public Library; Washington
                   Square Branch – Kalamazoo Public Library; Central Branch –
                   Kalamazoo Public Library.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $199,215
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $172,299

City of Orlando
400 South Orange Avenue
P.O. Box 4990
Orlando, FL 32802

Project Director: Marcia Bowen, 407/246-3360, marcia.bowen@ cityoforlando.net
This program will serve approximately 2,500 low-income residents of Parramore, a
community in the City of Orlando, Florida, that is historically underserved and plagued
by poverty and low incomes. The program will provide access to technology for a
community that has experienced a loss of access through its public institutions (libraries,
schools, etc.). The center will provide programs in SAT preparation, general computer
skills training, resume preparation, tutoring for youth and job training and counseling for
the adult population.

Primary Partners: University of Central Florida-McKnight Achievers; One Stop Career;
                  Seniors First; Healthy Communities Initiative; Callahan Neighborhood
                  Association; and Inner City Games.

New Centers: (1) Callahan Community Technology Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $68,332.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $34,440.00

City of Riverside
3581 Mission Inn Avenue
P.O. Box 468
Riverside, CA 92502-0468

Project Director: Carolyn A. Denny, 909/686-4920, marcylib@pacbell.net

In 1998 the Riverside Public Library inaugurated an information literacy program for
youth 9 – 17 in the Eastside. The Eastside Cybrary Connection (ECC), has trained over
1,000 youth in basic computer and information search skills as well as offering
homework assistance. The Library has opened two additional CTCs in other
economically distressed areas. The Smart Community Project will 1) replicate and
enhance the training program developed at the Eastside Cybrary at two other sites; 2)
increase free access and training at these sites; and 3) initiate new technology-based
training programs for adult members of these neighborhoods.

Primary Partners: The University of California at Riverside, Riverside Community
                  College; the City’s Parks and Recreation Department; and People
                  Reaching Out

Expanded Centers: (3) Eastside Cybrary Connection, Eastside; The Downtown Computer
                 Lab, Main Branch, Riverside Public Library; and The Homework
                 Assistance Center in the Community Center at Nichols Park

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $184,577
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $192,854

City of South Sioux City
1615 1st Avenue
South Sioux City, NE 68776

Project Director: Lance Hedquist, 402/494-7517, lhedquist@sscdc.net

This program will serve approximately 3,110 residents of South Sioux City in Dakota
County, Nebraska. It will provide year-round technology-based education programs for
children and adults, establish a computer lending program, provide training workshops
and continuing education or degree credits for adults, career development and job
readiness training, and a centralized business and industry resource center with computer
access.

Primary Partners: Northeast Community College; South Sioux City Community School
                  District; South Sioux City Chamber of Commerce; Dakota County
                  Interagency Team; and the South Sioux City Public Library.

New Centers: (1) Cardinal Opportunity Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $138,500.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $309,125.00

Clinton County Board of Education
Rt. 4, Box 85
Albany, KY 42602

Project Director: Paula Little, 606/387-9772, plittle@clinton.k12.ky.us


This project will serve persons in Clinton County, KY, where more than one half of the
adults have less than a high school credential, while 35% have less than a 9th grade
education. The program is expected to serve more than 1,000 people and will include
such innovative activities as: a networked computer lab w/internet access to host a
myriad of workshops for adults and children; academic assistance for youth and GED
preparation for adults; college and continuing education courses using distance learning;
technology “Fun Nights for Families”; and a laptop loan program.

Primary Partners: Clinton County: InterAgency Council, Local Government, Extended
                  School Services, Middle School Youth Services Center, Even Start
                  Empowerment Zone Community, Inc., Family Resource Center,
                  Migrant Education Program, Historical Society, Community
                  Education, Board of Education, Arts Council, Adult Education, Green
                  Thumb Program, Hospital, Public Library, High School Youth
                  Services Center; Kentucky Tele-Linking Network Users Group
                  Association; Albany Manor Apartments; Bank of Clinton County;
                  Lake Cumberland District Health Department; Lake Cumberland Head
                  Start; Caltech; Kentucky Cabinet for Families and Children; GEAR
                  UP; Gibson Printing Company; Somerset Community College;
                   Kentucky Department for Community Based Services – Protection and
                   Permanency Section, Kentucky Department of Education; Cagle’s-
                   Keystone Foods, LLC; Kentucky Technology Students of America;
                   Ferguson Bros., Inc.; CHANCE, Department for Employment
                   Services; WANY AM-FM Radio; Albany-Clinton County Chamber of
                   Commerce; Citizen’s Bank of Albany; Assistance to Bring Lasting
                   Employment (ABLE); Sparks Insurance; Western Kentucky
                   University; Davis & Associates; Families Against Drugs

New Centers: (1) Clinton County Board of Education CTC

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $210,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $66,754

Clovis Unified School District
1450 Herndon Avenue
Clovis, CA 93611

Project Director: Cathie Smith-Yang, 559/327-2870, johnballinger@clovis.k12.ca.us

This program will serve approximately 600 low-income Hispanic and Hmong residents in
the southeast area of Fresno, California. The program will make computers and the
Internet accessible to families who are not currently online, and who do not have access
to computers. Technology-based ESL courses and adult education classes will be offered
for those with limited English skills. Bi-lingual instruction will be provided for
individual technical instruction. In addition, computer skills and Internet training will be
provided along with online and distance learning courses for adults to further their
education.

Primary Partners: California State Department of Rehabilitation; Fresno County Human
                  Services System; Fresno County Office of Education; and One-Stop.

New Centers: (1) Clovis Adult Education’s Community Job/Technology Resource
                 Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $277,112.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $122,807.00

Coalgate Independent School District
P.O. Box 368
11- Fox Avenue
Coalgate, OK 74538-0368

Project Director: David Unsell, 580/927-2338, dunsell@coalgateschools.org
This project will create and expand educational programs and access to technology for
low-income residents of the Tri-County Indian National Enterprise Community in
southeastern Oklahoma. The CENTER will foster life-long learning, increase computer
literacy, help residents develop and expand employment goals, train and assist welfare-
to-work clients, and increase technology awareness and provide a vehicle for in-home
computer acquisition. These objectives will be met by providing after-school enrichment
activities and tutoring, computer skills development classes, and Adult Education/Family
Literacy services. The CENTER will also serve as a business development center where
local entrepreneurs can improve their ability to be successful and explore e-commerce
opportunities. It is anticipated that the program can serve between 1,200 and 1,500
people annually.

Primary Partners: Durant Public Schools; Big 5 Community Action Agency; Police
                  Athletic League (PAL); Murray State College and Southeastern State
                  University; Advanced Academics, Inc.; Oklahoma Parents as Teachers
                  (OPAT) Coordinator

New Centers: (1) The CENTER, Coalgate, OK

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $180,957
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $102,396

Communities Creating Connections
P.O. Box 400
Kooskia, ID 83539

Project Director: Jim May, 208/926-0855, jimmay@cybrquest.com

This program will serve approximately 1,000 low-income residents of Kooskia and Elk
City, Idaho. It will offer increased access to the Internet, provide computer-based
training for basic entrepreneurial skill development and e-commerce, enhanced
educational and job-skill training for adults, increase computer-based learning activities
for school age children and increase computer-based learning activities for adults of low-
income households.

Primary Partners: Idaho County Joint School District; Greater Kooskia Chamber of
                  Commerce; Kooskia City Government; Lewis and Clark State
                  College’s Outreach/Extended Programming Department; Friends of the
                  Kooskia Library; Idaho Fish and Game Department; Rural School and
                  Community Trust; The University of Idaho’s Department of Civil
                  Engineering; The US Fish and Wildlife Service; and the Upper
                  Clearwater Arts Council.

New Centers: (2) Kooskia City Council Municipal Building, and a portable classroom in
                 Elk City
Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $299,432.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $101,828.00

Compton Community College Development Foundation
1111 East Artesia Boulevard
Compton, CA 90221

Project Director: Ronald Chatman, 310/900-1600, chatman_r@compton.cc.ca.us

This program will serve approximately 550 low-income, predominately African
American and Hispanic residents of South Central Los Angeles, California. The program
will provide middle school children with computer skills and computer lab time to
practice, high school and college credit computer literacy learning, basic computer ESL
classes, job preparation and basic job skills, and an introduction to computer technology
involving programming, graphic arts and desk top publishing. There also will be options
for pre-literate adults to pursue educational and vocational training to help them prepare
for the world of work, and at the same time offer assistance to their children.

Primary Partners: Community Centers, Inc. and Compton Community College

New Centers: (1) Community Technology Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $236,400.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $775,000.00

Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes (CSKT)
P.O. Box 278
Pablo, MT 59855

Project Director: Teresa Wall-McDonald, 406/675-2700, teresawm@cskt.org

The CSKT’s Department of Human Resource Development (DHRD) will be the lead
agency for this project, which will serve tribal members and descendants residing on the
Flathead Indian Reservation. There will be a mobile computer lab called Computer
Operations at Outreach Locations (COOL) which will travel to remote areas of the
reservation to provide services. The project will include: 1) Adult Education and Family
Literacy, including GED, English Language instruction, and adult basic education classes
or programs, introduction to computers, intergenerational activities, and lifelong learning
opportunities through technology and the Internet; 2) After-School Activities for children
of all ages to use software that provides homework help and academic enrichment,
exploration of the Internet, and multimedia activities, including web page design and
creation; and 3) Career Development and Job Preparation, such as computer skills
training, resume writing workshops, and access to databases of employment
opportunities, career information, and other online materials. The project will serve a
minimum of 200 families, or approximately 600 individuals.
Primary Partners: The CSKT Department of Human Resource Development; Salish
                  Kootenai Adult Basic Education; Tribal Administration, Ronan/Pablo
                  Public School District

New Centers:        (2) the COOL mobile computer lab and the Community Computer
                    Center located in a trailer owned by CSKT

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $296,867
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $310,000

Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas University of Arkansas
P.O. Box 960
183 Highway 399
De Queen, AR 71832-0960

Project Director: Frank G. Adams, 870/584-4471, fadams@cccua.cc.ar.us

Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas (CCCUA) in partnership
with more than a dozen community groups and agencies, will establish six mini-CTCs
located within existing community based organizations and industries and one mobile
CTC. The project will include training in computer, job seeking, and selected work
readiness skills, and adult literacy. The target populations are primarily rural minority-
Americans; rural Hispanics with limited English speaking capacity, isolated poor, and
senior citizens living in three primarily rural southwest Arkansas counties. An estimated
1,300 people will be served during the first year.

Primary Partners:    St. Barbara’s Community Center; Dodson Street Center; Ashdown

New Centers:        (7) Mini-CTCs plus a mobile CTC: Ashdown Incubator; Fifth Street
                    County Facility; Tyson Foods, Inc.; Dodson Street Family Life Center;
                    Pilgrim’s Pride; St. Barbara’s Community Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $248,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $152,865

CPS Office of High School Intervention
c/o Orr High School
Room 120
Chicago, IL 60624

Project Director: JoAnn Roberts, 773/534-6770, bwilliams@csc-julex.com

Five satellite CTCs will implement the learning model known as REST – Reengineering
Education for Success through the use of Technology. The REST model is designed to
serve in three different capacities: 1) a resource center for both youth and adults to
improve reading skills as well as prepare for GED tests; 2) after-school learning center to
help students improve academic performance in Reading and Mathematics; and 3) Career
development center offering training classes on, word processing, spreadsheets, and
presentation software programs. The program is expected to serve over 450 people
during the year

Primary Partners: Computer Services & Consulting, Inc. Library partners include Austin
                  Branch Public Library, Hall Branch Library, Douglass Branch Library,
                  Avalon Public Library and South Shore Library. Coalition for
                  Improved Education in South Shore and Leadership for Quality
                  Education (Collins High School Partners)

New Centers:       (5) REST CTCs will be located in five high schools: Bowen, Collins,
                   DuSable, Orr and South Shore Academy

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $240,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $672,750

Crowder College
601 Laclede Avenue
Neosho, MO 64850

Project Director: Pam Hudson, 417/455-5506, phudson@crowdercollege.net

This program will serve approximately 3,500 low-income residents of rural,
economically distressed communities in southwest Missouri. The program will provide
extended access to technology and training in basic computer literacy and software
applications. It will also offer adult education and employment readiness skills training,
career counseling, job placement and follow-up services. In addition, there will be after
school access to computers and programs for academically at-risk students.

Primary Partners: Division of Workforce Development; Division of Employment
                  Security; Southwest Region Private Industry Council; Division of
                  Family Services; Division of Vocational Rehabilitation; Economic
                  Security Corporation; School-To-Careers Partnership; Parent’s Fair
                  Share; Area Agency on Aging; Joplin R-VIII School District Adult
                  Education and Family Literacy; Franklin Technology Center; and
                  Missouri Southern State College.

New Centers: (4) Main center: Missouri Career Center; sub-centers: Neosho, Nevada,
                 Cassville

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $195,916.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $219,501.00

Cumberland County College
P.O. Box 1500, College Drive
Vineland, NJ 08360-1500

Project Director: W. Barry McLaughlin, Interim, 856/691-8600, wbmc1@ccnj.net

Cumberland’s Community Technology Center is a collaborative partnership between
Cumberland County College and all of the major businesses, education/social delivery
systems within this county of rural farming communities. Each center will offer basic
computer literacy programs, expanded access/service hours, a repair/own computer
program, a GED computer-based bridge program, workshops, resume production, job
search enhancement, technical assistance, development and training workshops, a tutorial
program, and supplemental enabling services which link low income residents to other
education and career opportunities. 400 low-income students and adults will be served.

Primary Partners: Cumberland County Office of Employment and Training; Cumberland
                  County One Stop Career Center; New Job Security Services
New Centers: (1) CTC central facility and (2) two outreach centers

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $295,152
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $175,377

Curators of the University of Missouri
Office of Sponsored Program Administration
310 Jesse Hall, UMC
Columbia, MO 65211

Project Director: Dr. Satish Nair, 573/882-2964, nairs@missouri.edu

The College of Engineering of the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) and MU
Extension are partnering to establish a Tech-4-U CTC in a low income neighborhood of
Columbia, MO, and will help to establish computer labs at the sites of six identified
partners. Unique programs will be developed in four focus areas with extensive
involvement of the community members and the students from the College of
Engineering. These computer education based focus areas are After-School Computer
Activities for Children and Summer Technology-based Programming, Training in E-
Commerce for Small Business, Career Development and Job Preparation, and Adult
Education and Family Literacy.

Primary Partners: Adult Learning Center; Blind Boone Community Center; Boys and
                  Girls Clubs; Centro Latino; Community Recreation Building;
                  Successful Neighborhood Resources Center, E-T’RAD

New Centers:      (1) Tech-4-U CTC, Columbia, MO. (6) Computer labs to be
                  established at the Adult Learning Center; Blind Boone Community
                  Center; Boys and Girls Club; Centro Latino; Community Recreation
                  Program; Successful Neighborhood Resource Center
Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $197,144
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $87,942

Dalene J. Juarez & D. Scott Glasrud
9904 Montgomery Boulevard, N.E.
Albuquerque, NM 87111

Project Director: Dalene J. Juarez, 505/296-7677, djuarez@sslc-mn.com

This program will serve approximately 500 low-income Native Americans, Hispanics,
African Americans and community members who speak English as a second language. It
will provide courses in basic adult education, English language development, basic
computer skills, job training, career counseling and job placement services. The program
also will establish a homework hotline for students and provide information on colleges
and universities and entrance requirements. There will be a multi-media production lab
and training in industry recognized advanced certification programs.

Primary Partners: Southwest Secondary Learning Center; New Mexico Virtual School;
                  Middle Rio Grande Business and Education Collaborative; City of
                  Albuquerque; and the Alternative Public Education Foundation.

New Centers: (1) Tres Llaves Technology Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $292,376.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $1,241,668.00

Delaware Technical And Community College
100 Campus Drive
Dover, DE 19904-1383

Project Director: Shelby Jones Crawford, 302/857-1400, scrawfor@outland.dtcc.edu

Working to Heighten Education and Employee Learning Skills (WHEELS), is a
customized bus containing 13 computer work stations, and traveling to sites throughout
Kent County. Expanding from 12 to 17 sites, the program expects to serve a minimum of
400 new program participants. Services offered include: financial management; ESL
and computer literacy to Hispanics; computer classes for incarcerated or expelled youth;
and work readiness and computer literacy classes for those receiving TANF or
Unemployment assistance. WHEELS will also serve as an after-school site for local
alternative middle and high schools that serve over 150 students.

Primary Partners: Stevenson House; Workforce Investment Board; Groves Adult High
                  School; City of Harrington; House of Pride; Clark’s Corner; Liberty
                  Court; Manchester Square; McLane Gardens; Simon Circle; William
                  Henry Middle School; Harrington Senior Center; Modern Maturity;
                  The Shepherd’s Place; Dover Air Force Base; Boys and Girls Clubs of
                   Delaware; Houston Fire Hall; Mt. Zion AME Church; Church of God
                   La Roca; Weed and Seed; Delaware Department of Labor; Delaware
                   Department of Aging

Expanded Centers: (5) WHEELS will travel to 5 new sites: Because We Care Alternative
                 Middle School and PEAK Alternative High School both in Kent
                 County; the Church of God LaRoca; an additional low income housing
                 project and a State Service Center, which house divisions of
                 Unemployment, Labor Employment and Training, Vocational
                 Rehabilitation and Social Services.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $119,800
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $35,964

Detroit International Stake Adult Housing Corporation
16631 Lahser Road
Detroit, MI 48219

Project Director: G. Jerry van Rossum, 313/531-5903, vanrossum@cofchristdetroit

This program will serve the residents of Highland Park, an economically depressed
community within the city limits of Detroit, Michigan where 73% of adults over 25 do
not have a high school diploma. The program will offer beginning, intermediate and
advanced classes in basic computer skills. It also will offer training programs in family
budgeting, GED preparation, welfare to work classes, conflict resolution and resume
writing.

Primary Partners: Highland Park Neighborhood Association; Highland Park Public
                  Schools; African American Ministry Center; Highland Park Police
                  Department; Highland Park City Government; Detroit Department of
                  Senior Citizens; and the Community of Christ Church.

New Centers: (1) Local church in Highland Park.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $209,557.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $398,500.00

Douglas-Cherokee Economic Authority
534 East First North Street
P.O. Box 1218
Morrristown, TN 37816

Project Director: Cathy Kitts, 423/587-4500, cathykitts@aol.com

This program will serve approximately 300 female heads of households and other
disadvantaged individuals in Claiborne and Hawkins Counties, Tennessee, communities
that are rural and economically distressed. The program will provide access to computer-
based technology to enhance job skills training, GED preparation, access online
educational and employment opportunities, and lend technical assistance to small
businesses.

Primary Partners: Claiborne County School System; Hawkins County School System;
                  Claiborne County Department of Human Resources; Claiborne County
                  Chamber of Commerce; DCEA’s Workforce Development Programs;
                  DCEA’s Child Care Services Program; Of One Accord Ministry;
                  Tennessee Department of Labor, Workforce Development; Five Rivers
                  Career Center; and the Douglas-Cherokee Economic Authority.

New Centers: (4) Expand existing services, Appalachian Technical Education Center
                 And three satellite centers in Census Tracts 9703, 9709 in Claiborne
                 County and Census Tract 502 in Hawkins County

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, 157,616.00

Drumright Public Schools
P.O. Box 191
Drumright, OK 74030

Project Director: Roxie Terry, 918/352-2492, drmrite@galstar.com

This program will serve low-income families and adults in Drumright, Oklahoma, an
extremely poor and isolated community. The program will establish a computer lab with
additional classrooms for videoconferencing and instruction. It will provide access to
technology students during the day and after school and access in the evening for the
entire community. Workshops and online services will provide technology training for
students and adults. After school activities will include homework assistance, literacy,
career development and entrepreneurial skills training for residents and small business
owners.

Primary Partners: Central Technology Center; Drumright Adult Learning Center;
                  Drumright Gusher; City of Drumright; Drumright Area Chamber of
                  Commerce; Drumright Medical Clinic; Drumright Rotary Club;
                  Drumright Memorial Hospital; Lions Club of Drumright; Mathwhys;
                  Ministerial Alliance of Drumright; Oklahoma Institute of Learning
                  Styles; and Drumright Indian Education.

New Centers: (1) Drumright Community Technology Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $205,345.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $83,800.00
Easter Seals Goodwill Industries Rehabilitation Center
95 Hamilton Street
New Haven, CT 06511

Project Director: Jennifer Kelley, MSW, 203/777-2000, jkelley@esginh.com

Easter Seals Goodwill Industries Rehabilitation Center, Inc. established the West Rock
Neighborhood Network Center (WRNNC) in March of 2001. Funded by the City of New
Haven Enterprise Community, the WRNNC provides computer literacy, homework help,
senior programs, and an Employment Center. The objectives of the CTC program are 1)
the Tenant and Neighborhood Leadership will be trained and equipped for computer
intranetworking and communication; 2) 50 unemployed or underemployed job seekers
will receive Job Seeking and Retention skills training and join the Job Club; 3) 50
students ranging from six to eighteen will improve their academic performance; 4) 200
people will receive training in computer literacy, Internet use, and e-mail; 5) 250 people
(150 workforce aged, 25 seniors, and 75 students will receive adult basic education
and/or reading literacy education, and 6) 10 people will receive skill training in computer
hardware maintenance and repair.

Primary Partners: Literacy Volunteers of America – Greater New Haven; The Regional
                  Workforce Development Board, City of New Haven, Department of
                  Mental Retardation; Department of Mental Health and Addiction
                  Services, Bureau of Rehabilitation Services; Family Alliance (the
                  TANF Case Management entity in New Haven; the West Rock Tenant
                  Representative Councils; Department of Adult Education; Empower
                  New Haven; Division of Workers Compensation; State Administered
                  General Assistance; the Chamber of Commerce; neighborhood schools
                  and Gateway Community College

Expanded Centers: (1) West Rock Neighborhood Network Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $207,232
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $151,713

Easter Seals Massachusetts
484 Main Street
Worcester, MA 01608

Project Director: Anthony Morin, 508/751-6406, tonym@eastersealsma.org

Easter Seals Massachusetts plans to open the first CTC with access for all in Boston.
Their intent is to locate in, and to draw consumers from, an economically distressed area
of the city, and to serve at least 251 consumers in a 12-month period. Services will
include specialized job training and employment services and they expect to place
approximately 25 of those who choose the CTC’s specialized services in new
employment with pay of at least $9.75 hourly in the first year of operation.
Primary Partners: Boston Public School system; the Massachusetts Rehabilitation
                  Commission; the Statewide Head Injury Program; the Massachusetts
                  Commission for the Blind; The Massachusetts Department of Mental
                  Retardation; The Massachusetts Division of Employment and
                  Training; and the Massachusetts Department of Industrial Accidents
                  Workers Compensation

New Centers:      (1) CTC located in Boston

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $459,442

Education 21
39 First Street
Troy, NY 12180

Project Director: Frank San Felice, 845/229-8732, franksanfelice@att.net

The program will serve 400 residents of the Taylor Apartments, a low-income public
housing complex in Troy, New York. It will provide access to computers and
technology, improve residents’ proficiency in the use of computers and technology, and
provide opportunities for job training skills and academic improvement through
technology-based learning programs and classes.

Primary Partners: Ark Community Center; Ark Community Charter School; Troy City
                  School District; Troy Housing Authority; and the Rensselear
                  Polytechnic Institute.

New Centers: (1) Ark Community Technology Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $255,100.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $141,000.00

El Camino College
16007 Crenshaw Boulevard
Torrance, CA 90506-0002

Project Director: Patricia Caldwell, 310/660-3472, pcaldwell@elcamino.cc.ca.us

The Inglewood Community Education and Technology Center network will provide basic
computer training, free access and support to at least 1,000 low-income Inglewood
residents who would otherwise have limited access to technology. The program will
include education and training, relevant life-enhancing information, career planning and
job seeking, and K-12 after-school support. There are 18 computer labs within
Inglewood Unified School District that could potentially be opened to the public in the
evenings and on weekends. To be able to effectively use the technology to improve their
education and employability, adult community residents will need training and on-going
support. That is why the other critical component of the project will be developing a
training program for computer lab assistants, who will then provide the necessary
support.

Primary Partners:     Inglewood Unified School District; Inglewood One-Stop Career
                      Center; and Inglewood Public Library

New Centers:          (2) Inglewood Community Education and Technology Centers
                      (CETC), Inglewood; and Worthington Elementary School
                      Computer Lab

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $199,771
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $299,564

El Centro, Inc.
650 Minnesota Avenue
Kansas City, KS 66101

Project Director: Ian Bautista, 913/281-1186, xicano@kcnet.com

This program will serve approximately 2,900 Hispanic residents of Kansas City, Kansas.
All program services will be offered in a bilingual, bicultural environment. Expanding
on existing programs and services, the center will offer courses and training in basic
computer skills, Internet access and use, technology-based educational and employment
opportunities, and open lab time to practice and improve computer skills. The program
also will offer courses on resume building, web page design, budgeting and electronic
communication. The expanded program will increase access for students seeking
assistance with homework, general study purposes and educational resources found on
the Internet.

Primary Partners: Unified School District 500; Kansas City Kansas Community College;
                  First Step Fund; and the Hispanic Economic Development
                  Corporation.

New Centers: (1) Expand on existing services at the Macias Flores Family Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $147,416.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $51,476.00

Episcopal Community Services of San Francisco
201 8th Street
San Francisco, CA 94103-3901

Project Director: Lisa Stringer, 415/487-3790, lstringer@ecs-sf.org
The Episcopal Community Services Skills Center for Adult Education, Training and
Employment serves over 1,500 homeless and extremely low-income San Franciscans
each year. Over 60 hours of classes and workshops are offered weekly at seven different
sites in the city, including two homeless shelters and four supportive housing sites. The
Skills Center’s range of open-entry, open-exit classes include beginning literacy, basic
reading, writing and math, GED preparation, family literacy, computer skills, critical
thinking, work/life skills, resume writing, interview skills, job searches and vocational
training.

Primary Partners: Supportive Housing Employment Collaborative; the Homeless
                  Employment Collaborative of the San Francisco Private Industry
                  Council; For-profit/Not-for-profit partnership with CMP Media, Inc.;
                  and volunteer tutors with the AOMA Starbucks outlet and Bank of
                  America; Corporation for Supportive Housing

Expanded Center: (1) The Skills Center, San Francisco

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $203,241
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $578,635

Everett Community College
2000 Tower Street
Everett, WA 98201

Project Director: Bill Sperling, 425/388-9389, bsperlin@evcc.ctc.edu

This program will serve approximately 2,400 residents of economically distressed and
under educated areas in urban, Everett and rural, Monroe Counties, and two rural tribal
communities in Snohomish County, Washington. The program will provide adult
education and literacy classes, introduction to computers, computer skills training,
resume writing workshops, access to employment opportunities and career information.

Primary Partners: Tulalip Indian Tribe; Stillaguamish Indian Tribe; the Refugee Forum;
                  And the Monroe School District

New Centers: (5) Monroe Education Center, WorkSource at Everett Station, Everett
                 Community College Adult Education Center, Stillaguamish Tribal
                 Center and the Tulalip Indian Reservation Education Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $242,655.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $116,845.00

Fairfax County Public Schools
10700 Page Avenue
Fairfax, VA 22030
Project Director: Francine Gallagher, 703/846-8620, fgalagher@fcps.edu

By focusing on meeting the needs of a group of 87 families (approximately 235 people),
the Families Centered on Technology Project develops a core community for the CTC.
This grant directly supports the daily use of technology by providing wireless laptop
capability and connectivity at home and at school. After-school sessions, summer
sessions and access to an online community website will foster the development of a
virtual and a real world community.

Primary Partners: EarthWalk Communications; Fairfax County Department of Family
                  Services; United Community Ministries; George Mason University –
                  Social Work Program; Fairfax County Office of Partnerships; Fairfax
                  County Public Schools – Instructional Services Department; Fairfax
                  County Public Schools – Department of Information Technology; and
                  Woodley Hills Elementary School.

New Centers:       (1) Families Centered on Technology Project, Woodley Hills
                   Elementary School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $217,939
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $333,212

Fairfax County Public Schools
10700 Page Avenue
Fairfax, VA 22030-4085

Project Director: Brandon Kosatka, 703/971-4651, bkosatka@fcps.edu

The Franconia CTC (FCTC) after-hours program will promote the use of technology
through training and access, not only for students, but also for their parents and the
residents of this community of low-income and multiculturally diverse households.
Essential program features include: 1) technology orientation for all students and
community participants; 2) technology training for students and community participants;
3) academic support for students; 4) academic counseling and monitoring; 5) student
homework club; 6) parent involvement and training; and 7) business community
involvement. It is anticipated that 600 parents and students will receive services over the
project period.

Primary Partners: FCTC is a formal collaboration between: Fairfax County Public
                  Schools; the Edison pyramid of schools; the Center for Promoting
                  Family Learning and Involvement; the Parent Resource Center; the
                  Career Connection Office; the ESL and Adult ESL Offices; and
                  Northern Virginia Regional Partnership.

New Centers: (1) Franconia CTC, Franconia Elementary School/Special Center
Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $111,082
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $57,607

Fairfield Youth Advocacy, Inc.
405 North 2nd Street
P.O. Box 2065
Fairfield, IA 52556

Project Director: Lisa Robb, 641/472-9784, thebeatbox@zxmail.com

This program will serve approximately 1,560 disadvantaged youth in southeast Iowa. It
will provide free technical training that will lead to certification in four computer related
areas: 1) Cisco Certified Network Professional; 2) Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer;
3) Basic Digital Film Production; and 4) Basic Web Design. Another component of the
program will be the Career Lab and Employment Readiness Center, which will provide
individual career counseling, workshops on job seeking skills, resume writing and career
planning.

Primary Partner: Beatbox

New Centers: (1) Expansion of existing programs at the Beatbox Youth Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $117,075.00

Franklin County Public Schools
25 Bernard Road
Rocky Mount, VA 24151

Project Director: Sharlene Williamson, 540/483-5289, swilliamson@frco.k12.va.us

This program will serve approximately 300 residents of Franklin County, Virginia, an
economically distressed, rural community. It will provide access to computer technology
and instruction on basic computer skills, GED preparation, use of the Internet and
distance learning opportunities. The program will have a computer loan program for
residents to use at home. Tutors and mentors will be available and a special training
module will be created for the Hispanic population. The program also will expand the
after-school program and encourage parents to take part in their children’s learning
experience.

Primary Partners: Town of Rocky Mount, County of Franklin; Virginia Western
                  Community College; STEP, Inc.; Franklin County Business
                  Development, Inc.; Rotary Club of Rocky Mount; Franklin County
                  Chamber of Commerce; Mountain View Apartments; Cooper Woods
                  Products; and the Newbold Corporation.
New Centers: (3) Franklin County Community Technology Center will be housed in the
                 Professional Development Center; 2 satellite centers: Rocky Mount
                 Elementary School and Mountain View Apartments.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $155,461.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $82,985.00

Fremont County BOCES
2660 Peck Avenue
Riverton, WY 82501

Project Director: Ms. Sandy Barton 307/855-2297, sbarton@cwc.cc.wy.us

The program will establish six strategically located CTC’s. The objectives of the project
are to 1) integrate the centers into the school districts; 2) increase collaboration between
school and community based organizations; 3) empower the community to become
involved in the technology training process; 4) provide computer training that leads to
reduced unemployment; and 5) ensure that the program continues beyond the grant. The
centers will provide access to computer training for adults, school age children, teachers
and businesses, serving a minimum of 1,350 individuals during the coming year.

Primary Partners: Central Wyoming College, Fremont School Districts #: 1, 2, 6, 21, 24,
                  26, and 38; Microsoft Corporation; United States Senator Michael B.
                  Enzi; Wyoming Business Council, State of Wyoming Department of
                  Employment; Fremont County Youth Opportunity Alliance; Shoshone
                  Public Library; Shoshoni Recreation District #24; Shoshoni Senior
                  Citizens; Boys and Girls Club, Town of Shoshoni

New Centers:       (6) three to be located at Indian Schools on the Wind River Indian
                   Reservation, two in the surrounding communities and one lead center
                   at Central Wyoming College.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $253,810
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $357,350

Future Teachers of Chicago/Illinois
513 West 72nd Street
Chicago, IL 60621-3018

Project Director: Ruth E. Gibson, 773/651-0954, ruthagibson@hotmail.com

Future Teachers of Chicago and Illinois (FTCI) with the primary partners have
established a project entitled Learning is Fun Through Technology (LIFTT). The three
CTCs are located in three low income communities in Chicago. The overall goal of
LIFTT is to provide access to state of the art technology for families of low income
communities. Pre-kindergarten computer awareness classes are designed to reach 25
children at each center. After School Technology classes for K-8 grade expect to provide
classes for 500 students over the course of a year. Technology classes for high school
and college students will be offered to a total of 75 students. Other programs include
Saturday Workshops, Summer Technology Camps for grades K-8, Technology classes
for senior citizens, and Open Lab in the evenings and on the weekends. The LIFTT
program will serve an estimated 1,000 students and adults over the course of a year.

Primary Partners: City Colleges of Chicago; Bessemer Park of the Chicago Park District;
                  Chicago Youth Centers; Clarence J. Jones Life Long Learning
                  Institute; Professional Systems, Inc.

New Centers:        (3) One located in the North Lawndale Community on the west side
                    of Chicago, one in the Riverdale community at Altgeld Gardens, the
                    largest public housing community in Chicago and the third in the
                    South Chicago Community.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $271,948
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $88,017

Grand Rapids Cable Access
dba Community Media Center
711 Bridge NW
Grand Rapids, MI 49504-5560

Project Director: Dirk W. Koning, 616/459-4788, dirk@grcmc.org

The Community Media Center (CMC) will equip a mobile CTC that will respond to
needs for technology education from several areas of the community. In its weekly
scheduled visits to inner-city and other schools, community centers, and neighborhood
associations, CMC’s Mobile Media Laboratory (MML) will provide access to computers
and the Internet, to digital video cameras and non-linear video editing programs, and to e-
learning courses on the use of media tools, provided in both English and Spanish. The
MML Project will work to improve literacy skills, to enhance existing school and after-
school academic programs, to remove barriers and embarrassment for adults who are
“technology have nots” so they can derive benefits from technology and to integrate
CMC and MML services into a broader community plan. The CMC anticipates
providing regularly scheduled, direct multi-media training for a minimum of 800 people.

Primary Partners:      Grand Rapids Public Schools.

New Centers: (1) Mobile Media Laboratory.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $234,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $218,000
Greater Washington Urban League
3501 14th Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20010

Project Director: Charlene McLeod, 202/291-1230, trc@primanet.com

This program will provide service to approximately 4,600 low-income residents in the
District of Columbia who have limited access to technology. It will provide work
readiness training, job related computer instruction, after school programs, A+
certification and small business development classes. It will also establish a resource
library and family literacy services for individuals and families.

Primary Partners: Howard University Small Business Development Center; Power Up
                  Initiative; America OnLine; National Urban League’s Helping Hands
                  Org.; America’s Promise; Verizon; AT&T; and Microsoft.

New Centers: (3) Expanding on existing programs at the Technology Training Center,
                 Brookland Manor PowerUp Center and the GWUL/AT&T Digital
                 Campus

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $295,103.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $153,956.00

Hands on Miami
3250 S.W. Third Avenue
Miami, FL 33129

Project Director: Julie A. Moxley, 305/646-7202, Julie@handsonmiami.org

This program will serve approximately 600 low-income residents of Miami-Dade
County, Florida. This program will expand the existing services and operating hours of
four computer centers in economically depressed areas that are underutilized because of
the hours of operation and/or cost. In addition to extending the hours of operation to
increase access, the program will provide instruction on basic computer skills,
educational tutorials, literacy training and provide access to web-based programs and
classes.

Primary Partners: Bank of America; The City of Homestead Police Department;
                  Homestead/Florida City Weed and Seed; Horace Mann Middle
                  Community School; Human Services Coalition; Miami Beach
                  Chamber of Commerce; People’s Portal; Regis House; Union Planters
                  Bank; and the Virtual Adult Registration Center.

New Centers: (4) Expand on existing programs at Homestead/Florida City Weed and
                 Seed; The Gardens Apartments; Horace Mann Middle Community
                 School; and Regis House.
Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $229,387.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $100,023.00

High Plains Regional Education Cooperative
130 Park Avenue
Raton, NM 87740

Project Director: Dr. Peggy Poling, 505/374-2139, polingp@plateautel.net

This program will serve approximately 875 low-income residents of three extremely rural
counties in northeastern New Mexico. The program will create portable community
technology centers to take technology to those who do not have access and the
remoteness of their communities act as another barrier to the use of computers and the
Internet. Through the use of portable computer laptops, the program will provide
technology skills for upper division high school students, recent high school graduates
and adults seeking employment or information on career opportunities. It also will
provide opportunities for distance learning and increase technology skills for small
business owners, agriculturalists/ranchers and professionals.

Primary Partners: The School Districts of Cimarron, Clayton, Des Moines, Maxwell,
                  Mosquero, Raton, Roy and Springer; and the New Mexico State
                  Department of Education.

New Centers:     Laptops will be used as portable CTC’s

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $299,506.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $1,555,303.00

Hmong MN Pacific Association
965 Payne Avenue, Suite 102
Saint Paul, MN 55101-3967
Project Director: Eng T. Herr, 651/778-8937, engtherr@yahoo.com

Through the Pilot Workforce Development Project, Hmong Minnesota Pacific
Association, Inc. (HMPA) will create a model for providing culturally appropriate access
to education and training in computer applications for the at-risk Hmong population in
the core urban neighborhood of the East Side of St. Paul, Minnesota. The program will
serve low-income unemployed and/or underemployed members of the Hmong
community who are seeking to enhance their employment and job seeking skills and to
pursue work opportunities. In addition, this project will help address the very real
problem of “social isolation” faced by many Hmong adults. The program will integrate
computer skills into the agency’s: after-school enrichment activities for children and
teens; career development and job preparation programming for teens and adults;
intergenerational family enrichment activities for children and families; and family
literacy, and English language support services. Over 150 people are expected to be
served by the project.

Primary Partners: Payne Phalen Multi-Cultural Work Resource Hub

New Centers:       (1) Hmong Minnesota Pacific Association CTC, East Side St. Paul,

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $82,820
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $58,080

Huntington Beach Adult School
Huntington Beach Union High School District
16666 Tunstall Lane
Huntington Beach, CA 92647

Project Director: Marilyn Palomino, 714/847-2873, mpalomino@hbuhsd.k12.ca.us

This program will serve approximately 300 students in the Oak View community in
Huntington Beach, California, where 91% of the student’s parents did not graduate from
high school and 55% did not complete the 6th grade. The program will offer access to
technological resources and enhance the language skills and education of adults by
providing technology-based and technology-assisted learning. It will provide assistance
in the use of information technology to help children with schoolwork and create
awareness of other educational opportunities.

Primary Partners: Huntington Beach High School District Adult School; Ocean View
                  School District; and the City of Huntington Beach.

New Centers: (1)   Oak View Preschool and Education Resource Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $250,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $156,453.00

Jefferson County Public Schools
VanHoose Education Center
P.O. Box 34020
Louisville, KY 40232

Project Director: Julie Scoskie, 502/485-3400, jscoskie@adulted.win.net

This program will serve approximately 2,500 residents of two public housing
communities in the inner-city of Louisville, Kentucky. It will provide access to computer
technology and training during and after school hours. It will also demonstrate the value
of technology in learning, enhance job readiness skills and help raise the level of
awareness of other opportunities through technology.
Primary Partners: The Adult Education Advisory Council; Kentucky Department for
                  Adult Education and Literacy; Louisville Enterprise Community
                  Executive Board; Service Corp of Retired Entrepreneurs; City of
                  Louisville Office for International and Cultural Affairs; Neighborhood
                  Places; KentuckianaWORKS; Career Resources, Inc.; Small Business
                  Development Center; Project LINK; Housing Authority of Louisville;
                  and the Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club.

New Centers: (2) Park DuValle Education Center and Ahrens Education Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $251,560.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $116,713.00

Jobs For Progress, Inc. – Fresno County SER
407 S. Clovis, Suite 109
Fresno, CA 93727

Project Director: Rebecca Mendibles 559/452-0881, bmendibles.sefresno@netzero.net

SER-Jobs for Progress, Inc. plans to operate a 12-month SER-Rural Technology Center
(SER-RTC) program in the City of Orange Cove, in rural Fresno County, CA. SER-RTC
will develop programs to serve the various community groups as follows 1) the business
community will be offered business planning and loan application software; 2) seniors
will have access to computers with Internet capacity and e-mail accounts; 3) California
Employment Development Dept. will help the unemployed via online services;
4) University of California Cooperative Extension will aid residents with careers in
agriculture; 5) high school dropouts will have access to computerized (GED preparation
classes); 6) computerized classes will assist teenage parents develop parenting and job
skills; 7) an After-School program will offer children educational and entertainment
activities and 8) pre-school children will be provided access to age-appropriate software.
The project is planned to reach 1,730 people in its initial year.

Primary Partners: SBA SCORE program; the Valley Small Business Development
                  Center; the Central California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and
                  State Center Community College District; and Agencies located at the
                  California State University, Fresno

New Centers:      (3) Core Center: Victor P. Lopez Rural Development Job Training
                  Center; Orange Cove; Satellite locations will also be used. Initially,
                  one site will be at the Senior Center, Orange Cove and the others at
                  two early childhood development center programs

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $271,101
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $103,304

Julia C. Hester House, Inc.
2020 Solo Street
Houston, TX 77020-4293

Project Director: Maryland Ray, 713/672-2573, rjames@veriomail.com

The Julia C. Hester House, Inc. (Hester House) a United Way Agency will expand and
improve its existing High-Tech Academy (begun in 1997) as a pre-college initiative to 48
minority student participants from local elementary, middle and high schools. As a CTC
the agency and partners will expose, guide and prepare students at an early age from
grades K-12 for leadership, college and professional careers in Mathematics, Science and
Engineering. The primary objective for the program is to advance disenfranchised
youngsters and to help them learn and develop high-technology skills through multimedia
technology classes. The program’s ultimate goal is to promote college readiness and
career preparation skills to “first-time college goers” on a reciprocal basis beginning with
elementary students to high school students.

Primary Partners:   Texas Southern University Department of Technology, Houston;
Independent School District’s Communities in Schools

Expanded Centers: (1) The High Tech Academy, Julia C. Hester House, Houston, TX

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $180,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $173,330

L.A. Lee Family YMCA of Broward County
408 NW 14th Terrace
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33311

Project Director: Alan M. McLeod, 954/467-2444, amcleod@ymcabroward.org

The L.A. Lee Family YMCA of Broward County’s CTC will serve approximately 450
youth and adults who have computer skills ranging from novice to advanced. The
YMCA integrates all of the following in its CTC Program: instruction, assessment,
professional development, neighborhood involvement and community outreach. The
program will address adult education and family literacy, after-school activities and
career development and job placement.

Primary Partners:      Paine Webber; Sun Sentinel Newspaper; Kids in Distress; Broward
                       Partners Act (Homeless Shelters); Broward Sheriff Office; North
                       Broward Hospital District

New Centers:           (1) L.A. Lee Family YMCA of Broward County, 408 NW 14th
                       Terrace, Ft. Lauderdale

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $177,950
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $0
Lewis and Clark Community College
5800 Godfrey Road
Godfrey, IL 62035-2466

Project Director: Valorie Harris, 618/468-4100, vharis@lc.cc.il.us

Lewis & Clark Community College will establish four model CTCs to offer computer-
based adult education and family literacy services, after-school activities for children,
career development and job preparation activities, and small business activities to the
economically and educationally disadvantaged populations of Alton, East Alton, Glen
Carbon and Royal Lakes Village. The Alton and East Alton CTC will serve 200 new
students/clients.

Primary Partners: Glen-Ed Community Hope, Inc.; London Simmons, Mayor of the
                  Royal Lakes Community; Michael Gray, Superintendent of East Alton
                  Elementary School District #13; James Baiter, Superintendent of Alton
                  Community Unit School District #11; Ed Hightower, Superintendent
                  of Edwardsville School District #7

New Centers:       (4) Two of the CTCs will be located in existing Adult Education
                   Centers in Alton and East Alton; the other two will be in Glen Carbon
                   and Royal Lakes Village

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $281,554
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $147,868

Light of Restoration Ministries, Inc.
326 Appleton Street, Suite 9
Holyoke, MA 01044

Project Director: Mary Anne R. Ramirez, 413/533-3647, marCCs@hampshire.edu

The Holyoke CTC is a community based initiative sponsored by Light of Restoration
Ministries, Inc. It has as its initial goals: 1) adult basic education, GED, ESL, and
parenting classes; 2) youth development; 3) job training and career development; and 4)
Public Access and Open Lab Time that includes family computer literacy, computer
based health library, family programming, school support for children, and civic and
corporate use. It is anticipated the CTC will have an initial membership of 150 adults
and 300 children.

Primary Partners: University of Massachusetts; Amherst, Hampshire College; Holyoke
                  Children’s Museum; Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty
                  to Children; Arbor House Transitional Treatment Center; The Care
                  Center; Centro De Educacion, Prevencion; Y Accion (CEPA); Loredo
                  House; Holyoke Public Schools; Enlase Familia; Holyoke Planning
                  Commission; Holyoke Consumer Health Library Project; Friendly’s
                  Corporation

New Centers:      The Holyoke CTC

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $0

Literacy Works, Inc.
9100 Franklin Square Drive
Baltimore, MD 21237

Project Director: Helene Hahn Waranch, 410/887-2001, reading@bcpl.net

This program will serve approximately 250 residents of the Villages of Huntington,
Randallstown, Baltimore County, Maryland, an economically distressed urban
community. The program will provide access to computers for students and adults.
Laptops will be available for adult students with barriers to use of computers in the
center. There will be a focus on computer-assisted instruction, web delivered curriculum
and individualized learning plans for each participant.

Primary Partners: The Community College of Baltimore County; Office of Community
                  Conservation; and PlayKeepers.

New Centers:      Expand upon an existing program at the Adult Literacy Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $204,642.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $103,792.00

Long Beach City School District
235 Lido Boulevard
Long Beach, NY 11561-5093

Project Director: Maryann Norcott, 516/897-2111, mnantique@aol.com

The CTC of Long Beach’s (CTCLB) program is expected to serve 1,500 people. The
goal is to expand the Long Beach Adult Learning ACCESS Centers’ (ALAC) mission to
empower those they serve through technology to reach their greatest potential as learners,
parents, consumers, and citizens. The CTCLB will consist of a site-based computer lab
and a Mobile Community Outreach Lab. These labs will provide open computer time as
well as educational, employment, computer literacy, family literacy and intergenerational
activities.

Primary Partners: Head Start; Project Challenge; The One Stop Center; Chamber of
                  Commerce Long Beach Public Library; REAP
New Centers: (2) A site-based CTC and a Mobile Community Outreach Lab.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $200,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $117,781

Macon County Board of Education
Highway 49
Oglethorpe, GA 31068-0488

Project Director: Mickey George, 912/472-8188, hwaters@macon.k12.ga.us

Enhancing IT Learning in Macon County with The Road Scholar, this program will serve
five rural public schools. It plans to serve 300 students by 2003 and 300 community
members. To increase technological learning in Macon County the school district is
contracting with Georgia Tech Universities’ Center for Rehab Tech to bring their mobile
computer-learning bus: The Road Scholar, to Macon County. Participants will enhance
their IT skills by using the research-based literacy curriculum, Learning For Life and
Desktop Publishing. The program will also afford the opportunity to improve job skills,
set up small businesses, and interact with local businesses and agencies to support and
enhance lifestyle.

Primary Partners: The Macon County Board of Education; Georgia Institute of
                  Technology; Fort Valley State University; Chamber of Commerce;
                  Small Business Development Center; The Georgia Department of
                  Labor; City of Oglethorpe; The Literacy Council of Macon County
                  Inc.; Montezuma Public Library; Weyerhauser; Flint Area
                  Consolidated Housing Authority; Flint River Community Hospital;
                  Agrilink

Centers:          The Road Scholar, Mobile computer learning bus from Georgia Tech
                  University

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $297,271
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $683,477

Maryland State Department of Education
200 West Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201

Project Director: Patricia Bennett, 410/767-0168, pbennett@msde.state.md.us

The project will establish four new CTCs within four existing community based
organizations to serve minority and low-income households with low literacy levels from
10 neighborhoods in Baltimore, MD. These programs will serve 2,541 individuals during
the coming year. The project has three sets of planned activities. First, each center will
provide adult basic education and computer and Internet skills, preparation for GED tests,
and career development. Second, the centers will provide professional development to
teachers on using technology for instruction. And third, the centers will implement
distance learning courses.

Primary Partners: Baltimore READS; The Learning Bank; South Baltimore Learning
                  Center and South East Community Organization/Learning Is For
                  Tomorrow (LIFT)

New Centers:      (4) Baltimore READS; The Learning Bank; South Baltimore Learning
                  Center; and South East Community Organization/ Learning Is For
                  Tomorrow (Lift)

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $198,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $275,223

Massachusetts Community Action Program Directors’ Association (MASSCAP)
105 Chauncy Street
3rd Floor
Boston, MA 02111

Project Director: Joseph P. Diamond, 617/357-6086, joediamond@prodigy.net

MASSCAP is the association for the state’s 25 Community Action Agencies that
combined, serve over 300,000 low-income people each year. This program will upgrade
existing services at five of the centers to include adult/family literacy, after-school
activities, career development and employment training, and small business development.
The program will provide projects with education and technical assistance, build links to
statewide groups and facilitate information-sharing and joint problem solving among all
projects.

Primary Partners: Greater Lawrence Community Action Council; North Shore
                  Community Action Programs, Inc.; Tri-City Community Action
                  Program, Inc.; Franklin Community Action Corporation, Inc.; and
                  Valley Opportunity Council.

New Centers: (5) Expand upon existing programs at five CAA’s.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $262,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $148,093.00

McCurtain County Educational Co-op
103 N.E. Avenue A
Idabel, OK 74745

Project Director: Sonny Victor, 580/286-3344, mccare@oio.net
This program will serve approximately 1,330 students and adults in the Southeast
Oklahoma Enterprise Community. This community is described as one of the most
depressed in the US. Expanding on an existing program, it will provide access to
educational programs, employment opportunities and training and small business
opportunities.

Primary Partners: Idabel Minority Action Committee; Booker T. Washington
                  Community Center; and the Southeastern Oklahoma Enterprise
                  Community.

New Centers:      Expand on existing program at Booker T. Washington Community
                  Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $209,596.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $76,170.00 (in kind)

Mercy Housing Southwest
601 E. 18th Avenue
Suite 150
Denver, CO 80203-1493

Project Director: Diane Baker, 303/830-3431, dbaker@mercyhousing.org

Mercy Housing SouthWest (MHSW) will expand its CTCs in six affordable-housing
properties located in Arizona and Colorado. The CTCs are part of the MHSW Family
Learning Centers formed to serve low-income residents of Mercy Housing properties and
those living in the surrounding economically-disadvantaged communities. Building on
the success of the existing labs, the project will provide expanded open lab time and new
programming, offering a variety of activities to promote the use of technology in adult
education/family literacy and after-school programs. During the project period, it is
anticipated that approximately 21,000 visits will be made to the Family Learning Centers.

Primary Partners: Established collaborations exist at each property and are unique, based
                  on the history and proximity of certain organizations to the properties.
                  Every site has existing relationships between neighboring schools,
                  MHSW staff and Community and Resident Initiatives (CRI) leaders

Expanded Centers: (6) Mercy Court Apartments (AZ); Villas de Merced (AZ); Wishing
                     Well II Apartments (AZ); Decatur Place Apartments (CO); Grace
                     Apartments (CO); and Holly Park Apartments (CO)

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $283,942
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $170,884

Mi Casa Resource Center for Women, Inc.
571 Galapago
Denver, CO 80204

Project Director: Gayle Warner, 303/573-1302, gwarner@micasadenver.org

This program will serve approximately 1,300 low-income residents of predominately
Latino communities in Denver and Pueblo, Colorado. It will expand on existing services
and increase access to computer technology and the Internet, as well as offer computer
skills training for those who have had little or no access. Job preparation, entrepreneurial
and career development training for English and Spanish speaking adults will be offered,
in addition to after-school activities that will include technology-based courses to
improve academic performance and career guidance. Program materials will be
translated into Spanish for greater ease of instruction.

Primary Partners: Open World Leaning; Escuela Tlatelolco; and the OMNI Institute.

New Centers: (4) Mi Casa Galapago, West Denver; Mi Casa Knox Court, Southwest
                 Denver; Mi Casa Pueblo, Escuela Tlatelolco, Northwest Denver.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, 265,019.00

Milwaukee Public Schools
5225 West Vliet Street
Milwaukee, WI 53208

Project Director: Susan Stuckert, 414/475-8639, stuckes@mail.milwaukee.k12.wi.us

This program will target students in grades 9-12 and adults in the neighborhoods where
the CTC’s are located in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. These neighborhoods are
predominately African American communities that have been subjected to high crime
rates, low-incomes and poor academic achievement. The program will expand on
Community Learning Center programs and provide additional activities for youth in the
after-school programs, literacy and basic skills development, and computer skills for
adults through education and training programs in cooperation with the Milwaukee
Public Library.

Primary Partner: The Conover Company

New Centers (7) North Division High School; South Division High School; Washington
                High School; Riverside High School; Milwaukee High School of the
                Arts; Hamilton High School; and Marshall High School.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $299,999.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $150,000.00

Mimbres Valley Learning Center
P.O. Drawer 551
Deming, NM 88031

Project Director: Elizabeth Burr, 505/469-0682, lunacom@zianet.com

This program will serve approximately 400 residents of two rural and extremely isolated
communities in Luna County in southwestern New Mexico. The program will, through
the use of technology, provide access to basic adult education and English classes, job
skills training and access to the Internet for students and small business owners. The
program also will offer distance-learning opportunities for those adults wanting degree
programs and advanced degree opportunities for professional adults. The program will
help connect these rural and isolated communities to the rest of the world.

Primary Partners: Dona Ana Community College; Western New Mexico University;
                  Deming Public Schools; H.E.L.P./R.O.Y.A.; and New Mexico
                  Works/New Mexico Department of Labor.

New Centers: (2) Expansion of services at Mimbres Valley Learning Center and
                 Construction of new center in the village of Columbus

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $255,428.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $84,734.00

Minute Circle Friendly House
2405 Elmwood
Kansas City, MO 64127

Project Director: Andrew Campos, 816/231-0143, kcmomcfh@crn.org

The Northeast Family Project, in Northeast Kansas City, will have three purposes:
education, access and strengthening the community. Twenty-one organizations will be
part of the project. Education opportunities will be offered through five Computer Labs
and 16 Neighborhood Access Points (2 terminals). Users will include residents of all
ages. It is anticipated that 900 residents will complete a 20-hour training module in basic
computer technology and computer literacy through the Computer Labs; 1,350 residents
will complete a 5-hour training module in basic computer technology and computer
literacy through Neighborhood Access Points; 1,100 individuals will connect to Internet-
based job-search sites; and 550 residents will use instructional modules, including GED
preparation, ESL, SAT/ACT preparation coursework, and self-directed study, such as
MathBlasters.

Primary Partners: Don Bosco Senior Center; Northeast Middle School; Salvation Army
                  Bellefontaine Corps; Whatsoever Community Center; Della Lamb
                  Community Services; Don Bosco Counseling Center; Glennon Place;
                  Holy Cross School; Italian Cultural Center; Joe Rogers Community
                  Center; Kansas City Free Health Clinic; Northeast News; Nowlin Hall;
                  Old Northeast, Inc.; River Market Coffee House; River Market
                  Fitness; St. Stephen’s Academy; Salvation Army Blue Valley Corps.;
                  Sheffield Family Life Center and Sons of Columbus

New Centers:      (5) Five Computer Labs located at: the Salvation Army Bellefontaine
                  Corps; Minute Circle Friendly House; Don Bosco Senior Center;
                  Northeast Middle School; Whatsoever Community Center; and (16)
                  sixteen Neighborhood Access Points (two terminals)

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $256,632
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $109,985

Montana State University-Northern
P.O. Box 7751
Havre, MT 59501-7751

Project Director: Vicki Gist, 406/265-3706, gist@msun.edu

The Community Technology Education Center (C-TEC) project is an activity of Montana
State University-Northern. The objectives of the project are to provide free or low-cost
access to technology and training to people in this extremely rural region that would not
normally be able to afford or have access to it; to provide a safe, fun, drug-free
environment where children can learn and be creative using technology; and to provide
training to small businesses that will increase opportunities for minorities, specifically
Native Americans, and first-time entrepreneurs. The Center is designed to serve 30 new
clients each week and 250 clients who will be revisiting the Center. Desired outcomes:
1) school and community participation in the technology center; 2) better-educated and
trained students, adults and seniors; 3) more academically competitive graduates; and a 4)
re-energized community that comfortably and confidently applies and uses technology in
their every day lives.

Primary Partners: Department of Business Services and History, Computer Information
                  Systems; Bear Paw Development Corporation’s SBDC; Human
                  Resources and Development Council (HRDC – District IV)

New Center:       (1) The Community Technology Education Center, Montana State
                  University-Northern, Vande Bogart Library

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $281,532
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $122,831

Morris Brown College
643 Martin Luther King, Jr., Drive, N.W.
Atlanta, GA 30314

Project Director: Carolyn Jackson, 404/739-1073, carolyn.Jackson@morrisbrown.edu
This program will serve approximately 200 third and fifth grade students and their
parents who live in the low-income Atlanta Empowerment Zone and do not have access
to computers nor the Internet in their home or at work. The program will provide
computer training and Internet access classes for the parents of sixty students. The after-
school program for students will provide homework assistance in reading, language arts,
math, science and social studies, explorations of the Internet and multimedia activities
that include web page creation and design.

Primary Partners: City of Atlanta Community Technology Center; Atlanta Public
                  Schools; U.S. Wireless, Inc. of Atlanta; Oglethorpe Elementary
                  School; and Rusk Elementary School.

New Centers: (1) City of Atlanta Community Technology Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $209,537.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $88,279.00

Mott Community College
1401 East Court Street
Flint, MI 48503-2089

Project Director: Robert Mathews, 810/762-9360, rmatthew@mcc.edu

Mott Community College (MCC) and the University of Michigan-Flint (UMF) have
established five CTCs serving low income residents of Flint, Michigan. The Career Path
Enhancement (CPE) Program will be established, offered at the CTC’s, and will consist
of the following elements: 1) curriculum designed in module short courses with online
course delivery; 2) case studies and relevant problem solving; 3) job shadowing
experiences; 4) mentors and ementors; 5) access to PALM Pilot Technology; and 6) a
Computer Ownership Incentive Program. It is anticipated that 60 individuals will
participate in the CPE program and that 30 will complete the 16 mini-courses required to
receive a CPE certificate.

Primary Partners:

(3) Expanded Centers, (2) New Centers:
                 MCC’s centers are located at the Faith-based Economic Development
                 Corporation; the Disability Network; and the Hispanic Technology
                 Center (scheduled to open Fall of 2001). UMF centers are located at
                 the Oak Business Center and Northbank Center.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $225,168
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $98278

Municipality of Orocovis
 P.O. Box 2106
 Orocovis, PR 00720

 Project Director: Jose Burgos, 787/867-5000, orocovis@coqui.net

 The program will serve 800 low-income Hispanic, single household parents, students and
 small business owners in rural, economically distressed communities in the Municipality
 of Orocovis, Puerto Rico. The program and services will focus on a cyber mobile unit
 that will take technological services, training and access to the Internet to the rural
 communities. It will provide computer literacy and training to rural single women with
 children, provide career and occupational information to students through the Internet and
 provide small business owners with training in the use of technology to increase
 productivity and reach new markets.

 Primary Partners: Municipality of Orocovis Public Library; Mountain Consortium;
                   Department of Natural and Environmental Resources; School-to-Work
                   Partnership; Association for the Development of Agriculture; School
                   District of Orocovis; Ana Dalila Secondary Unit School; Northeast
                   and Islands Regional Educational Laboratory; Oro-Centro
                   Corporation; Producciones Interactivas, Inc.; and the Small Business
                   Development Center- Inter American University of Puerto Rico.

 New Centers: (1) Mobile unit

 Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $235,787.00
 Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $110,550.00

 National Homes Trust
 12400 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 980
 Los Angeles, CA 90025

 Project Director: Susan Nakaoka, 310/207-9056, snakaoka@nht.org

 A current CTC grantee, National Homes Trust (NHT) has successfully opened a CTC in
 Washington DC and will use its expertise to develop a “computer lending program” to
 enhance the work at NHT’s Campus of Opportunity sites in Pittsburgh, PA, Louisville,
 KY, and Lanham, MD. Typically located in a housing development, program activities
 will include expansion of existing CTC reach through new classes, computer terminals
 and computer lending and the development of customized modules for Adults, Youth and
 Elderly. It is anticipated that 75 seniors, 12 adults, and 52 youth will participate in the
 computer lending program.

Project Partners:   Glenarden Campus of Opportunity in Landover, MD: Resident
                    Council; J.J. Heritage Community Development Corporation; Ice
                    Tech; Even Start; and Glenarden Senior Services Department.
                  Second East Hills Campus of Opportunity in Pittsburgh, PA: East
                  Hills Residents Community Board; Second East Hills Social Service
                  Agency; East Hills International Academy; and Community College of
                  Allegheny County.
                  Louisville Campus of Opportunity in the Russell Neighborhood, KY:
                  Christ Church Community Development Corporation; Housing
                  Authority of Louisville – Shepherd Square Resident Advisory Council;
                  Space Scan Technologies; Louisville Central Community Center; and
                  Dress for Success.

Expanded Centers: (3)Glenarden Campus of Opportunity in Landover, MD; Second East
                 Hills Campus of Opportunity in Pittsburgh, PA; Louisville Campus of
                 Opportunity in the Russell Neighborhood, Louisville, KY

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $172,476

National Telephone Cooperative Association (NTCA)
4121 Wilson Boulevard, 10th Floor
Arlington, VA 22203

Project Director: Maria Kendro, 703/351-2011, mkendro@ntca.org

This program will serve Native Americans on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in
Eagle Butte, South Dakota, which has a population of over 5,000. Computers will be
used to provide education and training that will improve work skills and offer technology
certification programs. The program will focus on job preparation and skills training,
personal financial management, maximizing accessibility for the entire community and
outreach to enhance utilization of available resources. The program also will focus on
serving the needs of women by encouraging their participation in the activities of the
center.

Primary Partners: Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Telephone Authority and
                  Lakota Technologies; Si Tanka/Huron University; Cheyenne River
                  Cisco Systems Networking Academy; Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal
                  Authority; and the Cheyenne River Housing Authority.

New Centers: (1) Eagle Butte

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $195,326.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $143,954.00

Neighborhood House, Inc.
1218 B Street
Wilmington, DE 19801
Project Director: Arthur W. Boswell, 302/652-3928, aboswell@neighborhoodhse.org

The goal of the Family Technology Center is to provide instruction for computer and
Internet literacy skills to a minimum of 200 Southbridge students and 100 adults; to
provide computer-based supplemental tutoring in reading, writing and math to a
minimum of 100 Southbridge students; to train a minimum of 10 area residents to serve
as computer trainers for any interested area resident; and to provide free computer access
to the Southbridge community for 40 hours per week beginning in January, 2002.

Primary Partners:      Christina School District and BoardRoom Presentations, Inc.

New Center:         Neighborhood House, Inc., Family Technology Center, Wilmington

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $191,465
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $300,000

New Rochelle Municipal Housing Authority
50 Sickles Avenue
New Rochelle, NY 10801-4029

Project Director: Steven D. Horton, 914/235-1717, nrmha@nrmha.org

The Housing Authority will initiate, enhance and expand computer training to its
residents and to the surrounding community. It will provide computer technology centers
at its four sites (housing developments). After-school activities will be enhanced and
expanded through a “Computer Training Program” conducted at the two family
complexes. Adult education and family literacy activities will be conducted at the
neighboring Frederick Douglas Institute, in cooperation with Audrey Cohen College, by
means of a new computer training program. This specially structured program will
enable students to achieve advanced computer software and hardware certification which
will be a “pathway” to greater employment possibilities, as well as increasing the
opportunity, on a priority basis, to attend Audrey Cohen College. The programs will be
open to the entire community of approximately 15,000 people.

Primary Partners:      Audrey Cohen College; Frederick Douglas Institute

Expanded Centers:      (4) Four CTCs in housing developments administered and
                       managed Rochelle Municipal Housing Authority, New Rochelle,
                       NY

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $143,040
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $84,600

Nine Star Enterprises, Inc.
125 West Fifth Avenue
Anchorage, AK 99501-2521
Project Director: David S. Alexander, 907/279-7827, davida@ninestar.com

The Nine StarT-UP Project serves the residents of Mountain View and Russian Jack Park
in the Municipality of Anchorage, AK. The project’s areas of emphasis include: adult
Education and Family Literacy; After-School Activities; Career Development/Job
Preparation and Lifelong Learning Opportunities. Activities include: instructing adult
basic education; GED preparation; and English literacy – as well as basic and advanced
computer skills; using computer-assisted learning units to prepare for the test of U.S.
citizenship; and workshops on writing resumes, letters of inquiry, and cover letters. It is
estimated that 1,500 people will successfully participate in the program.

Primary Partners: Include Mountain View YMCA; Mountain View Clark Middle
                  School; Mountain View Elementary School; Russian Jack schools
                  served by 21st Century Community Learning Center grant; Mountain
                  View Boys and Girls Club; Russian Jack Anchorage Literacy Project;
                  Russian Jack/ Mountain View Digital Divide Project.

Expanded Centers:(6) The six Nine StarT-UP Project Technology Centers are located at:
                 the Mountain View Boys and Girls Club, Mountain View YMCA,
                 Clark Middle School, Anchorage Literacy Project, Anchorage Job
                 Center-Mountain View, and Mountain View Kids’ Kitchen,
                 Anchorage Alaska

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $147,999
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $44,399

Northeast Mississippi Business Incubation System, Inc.
1828 Proper Street
Corinth, MS 38835

Project Director: Ray McClellan, 662/297-4369, nembis@tsixroads.com

The Tech-Connect project is expected to offer 1,000 students, 100 “out-of-school” youth,
and 900 adults in rural Alcorn County technological, educational, career, and cultural
enrichment opportunities. A comprehensive array of services will include: technology-
based training, career counseling, and GED preparation for adults; extended-day and
summer technology-based tutorial and enrichment services for students; and
technology/vocational classes for high school students, “out of school” youth, and adults.

Primary Partners: Alcorn School District; The Alliance; Boys & Girls Club of Corinth;
                  Mississippi State University Extension Service/Alcorn County Office;
                  Crossroads Reading Council; Alcorn Vocational Technical Center;
                  Corinth – Alcorn County Project Homestead; the 40 Assets Initiative
                  of Corinth & Alcorn County
New and Expanded Centers:
               (1) New: NEMBIS, Alcorn County. Expanded: services will also be
               provided/expanded at 6 school sites, at the Boys and Girls Club of
               Corinth (will also expand program by using a mobile unit) and the
               Alcorn Vocational-Technical Center.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $187,122
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $179,525

Nueva Esperanza, Inc.
401 Main Street
Holyoke, MA 01040

Project Director: Carlos Vega, 413/533-9442, neihousing@Juno.com

This program will serve approximately 4,400 low-income, predominately Latino
residents of Holyoke, Massachusetts. It will provide access to computers and
technology-based education for residents and households that typically do not have
computers. Programs at the centers will include alternative education and career
development for at-risk teens and young adults, adult education, career development and
job preparation.

Primary Partners: Hampshire College; University of Massachusetts Extension; Holyoke
                 Youth Task Force; Holyoke Health Planning Commission; Puerto
                 Rican Cultural Center; Holyoke Chamber of Commerce; and the
                 Holyoke Economic Development and Industrial Council.

New Centers: (9) El Arco Iris/YouthBuild; Greater Holyoke Youth Services Corps; Girls,
                 Inc.; YMCA; Nuestras Raices; Jarvis Heights Apartments; Sargeant
                 West Apartments; Riverplace Apartments; Northeast Apartments

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $299,910.00
Total projected non-federal match: 1 year, $19,200.00

Okay Public Schools
P.O. Box 830
Okay, OK 74446

Project Director: Susan Clark & Marty Walker, 918/682-0371, okaynet@intellex.com

This program will serve approximately 364 residents of the Okay Schools District, a low-
income, rural community in Wagoner County, Oklahoma. It will offer classes in basic
computer skills, technology-based math and reading remediation, word processing and
access to the Internet for the adult community. The program also will provide a summer
computer camp for students entering the 7th, 8th, and 9th grade classes.
Primary Partners: Okay Schools Board of Education

New Centers: (1) Okay Public Schools Library

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $108,415.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $56,539.00

Orchard View Public Schools
2310 Marquette Avenue
Muskegon, MI 49442-1409

Project Director: Patricia Walstra, 231/760-1350, pwalstra@remc4.k12.mi.us

Two Orchard View Community Technology Centers will be established in the Orchard
View School District. The children, youth, adults, and families served at these centers
will represent a diverse population. A five-station “Computers to Go” program will be
developed with the goal of reaching senior citizens through existing senior citizen
programs within the Orchard View School District. Activities and services will include
an endless array of opportunities such as job searches, career pathway exploration, online
GED 2002 Preparation, high school and college courses, application of productivity
software, web page design, video production technology, e-mail, and instruction about
Internet access. It is anticipated that the program will serve 950 people.

Primary Partners: Muskegon Intermediate School District; Muskegon Township
                  Supervisor; Baker College; Muskegon County Mental Health Services;
                  Orchard View Schools’ Technology Department; Orchard View
                  Schools’ Business and Industry Program; Orchard View Schools
                  Superintendent; and the Orchard View School’s Workforce
                  Development Center.

New Centers:      (3) Orchard View Community Center, Orchard View Learning Center,
                  and Orchard View Early Childhood Center and a five station
                  “Computers to Go” center.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $137,540

PACER Center, Inc.
8161 Normandale Boulevard
Minneapolis, MN 55437

Project Director: Paula F. Goldberg, 952/828-9000, pgoldberg@pacer.org

This program will serve approximately 500 low-income residents of Minneapolis,
Minnesota. The program will expand on existing services at Banneker School and Waite
House to increase access to information technology and related educational programs. It
will provide training on basic computer skills, adult literacy and education, access and
use of the Internet and free workshops and meetings on technology in economically
distressed communities that could potentially reach hundreds more. Materials for some
of the programs will be available in Hmong, Somalian and Spanish.

Primary Partners: Banneker School; Minneapolis Public Schools; Pillsbury United
                  Communities; African American Family Services; YWCA; Lao Parent
                  Teacher Association; Phillips Community Initiative for Children;
                  Somali Community Services; Eden Women Shelter; Simpson Housing
                  Services; Centro Cultural Chicano; and Reuben Lindh Family Center.

New Centers: (2) Expand the services at Banneker School and Waite House

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $215,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $92,760.00

Pacific Business Insights, Inc.
89-1259 Mamalahoa Highway
Captain Cook, HI 96704

Project Director: Sajean E. Geer, 808/328-9981, jsgeer@shaka.com

This program will serve approximately 1,250 residents in five economically distressed
rural communities on the island of Hawaii. Technology-based educational materials will
be custom designed and developed to overcome participant retention barriers. The
program will provide access to technology and computers, technology-based self-
employment and/or employment opportunities, and the use of computers and the Internet
as a tool for learning.

Primary Partner: Simple Office Solutions

New Centers: (5) Puna Enterprise Zone; Ka’u Enterprise Zone; South Kona Enterprise
                 Zone; North Kohala Enterprise Zone; and Kamakua Enterprise Zone.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $298,950.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $317,507.00

Palmetto Project Inc.
P.O. Box 506
Charleston, SC 29402

Project Director: Stephen L. Skardon, Jr., 843/577-4122, palmpro@bellsouth.net

The Charleston County Community Technology Centers’ project will provide essential
computer competency skills to employable adults and their children at three sites. More
than 85% of the populations served by the sites are racial minorities. Participating adults
and their children in the fourth grade and above will be trained in generic computer
competency and a specially designed, 52-hour course in eight basic completer programs
including Word and Excel. Adult participants in the course will receive a free computer
for use in their homes. It is anticipated that 450 adults will graduate and find
employment upon completion of CTC computer literacy classes and that 2,000 youth
under age 18 will participate in some CTC activity.

Primary Partners: Trident Technical College; Agape Ministries in the Enterprise
                  Community; the Community Foundation Serving Coastal South
                  Carolina; the Volunteer Center of Charleston; the Charleston County
                  Family Court; Maritime Association (representing 150 local
                  businesses)

New Centers:      (3) CTC at Eastside Center for Human Concerns, CTC at Alice
                  Birney Middle School, CTC Site at Haut Gap Middle School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $179,881
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $197,500

Palo Alto College
1400 W. Villaret
San Antonio, TX 78224-2499

Project Director: Mike Flores, 210/921-5302, rmflores@accd.edu

The overall goals of El Pueblo CTC are expected to alleviate and/or fulfill the needs of
approximately 1,000 target area residents with regard to career, educational, health and
technological literacy. The program will provide training in computer literacy, adult
literacy classes (Adult Basic Education, English as a Second or Other Language, and
GED) with a health-specific content, and computer based training in the target area to
individuals interested in pursuing non-credit certification as a teacher’s aide. A Mobile
Computer Lab will be established to travel to various sites in the target area community.

Primary Partners: Palo Alto College; Bexar County Federal Teachers Credit Union;
Wesley Community Centers; Juvenile Outreach Vocational Education Network;
                  Jourdanton Independent School District; Floresville Independent
                  School District; Palo Alto Community Coalition

New Centers:      (1) El Pueblo CTC, located in the El Pueblo Community Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $274,787
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year $445,916

Passaic County Community College
One College Boulevard
Paterson, NJ 07505
Project Director: Janice Peters, 973/684-5656, jpeters@pccc.cc.nj.us

Through a network of six CTC sites located strategically throughout Passaic, the project
will serve 1,045 low-income residents. Local residents will participate in after-school,
ESL-literacy, and job skills training activities. The population will include at-risk
children and youth ages 6-16, single mothers, limited English proficient adults,
unemployed and underemployed adults, battered and abused women, welfare to work
participants, children and adults with special needs, and drug and alcohol dependent
youth and adults. The project will demonstrate the educational effectiveness of
technology in helping low-income residents achieve necessary skills in problem solving,
teamwork, communication, decision-making, and technology.

Primary Partners: Paterson Board of Education; Paterson Public Library System; Boys
                  and Girls Club of Paterson; Women in Transition; Paterson Education
                  Fund; Cisco Networking Academy; Paterson Public School #4, #14,
                  and #17; Eva’s Village; the College Bound Program of Passaic County
                  Community College; HOPE worldwide; Oasis, a Haven for Women
                  and Children

New Centers:        (6) Paterson CTC at Passaic County Community College (Hub Site);
                    Boys and Girls Club CTC; Northside CTC at School #4; Main Branch
                    CTC at the Paterson Library; South Paterson CTC at the Paterson
                    Library (local branch); and Great Falls CTC at the Paterson Library
                    (Totowa branch).

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $191,368
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $331,529

People Assisting the Homeless (P.A.T.H.)
340 Madison Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90004

Project Director: Martin A. Gordon, 323/850-4072, marting@epath.org

This program will serve approximately 750 homeless and very low-income individuals
each year, 7% of whom are veterans in Los Angeles County, California. It will provide
an introduction to computers, basic education classes, computer-based job search and job
training education and exposure to technology in the workplace. The program seeks to
provide access to computers for the homeless and at-risk individuals and help them find
permanent, stable employment, save money, secure housing and empower their lives.

Primary Partners:    Los Angeles Unified School District Hollywood Community Adult
                     School; CalWORKS GAIN and GR; Employment Development
                     Department; Department of Labor; and the Department of Housing
                     and Urban Development.
New Centers: (1) Technology Learning Center, The New Regional Homeless Center
                  under construction)

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $281,275.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $468,909.00

Pittsburg Pre-School & Community Council
1760 Chester Drive
Pittsburg, CA 94565

Project Director: Carla Piper, 925/439-2061, pscc1760@inreach.com

This program will serve approximately 3,000 low-income, at risk residents of two
communities, Pittsburg and Bay Point, in northern California. The program has three
components: 1) adult education and family literacy to assist adults in obtaining a high
school equivalency certificate; 2) after-school and summer programs to help children
through the use of technology to improve test scores; and 3) career development and job
preparation by developing computer skills.

Primary Partners: California State University at Hayward; Child Development Center;
                  Christ is the Answer; City of Pittsburg; Contra Costa County Board of
                  Supervisors; Contra Costa County Board of Education; Contra Costa
                  County Mental Health, Department of Social Services; El Pueblo
                  Housing; Employment Development Department; First Baptist
                  Church; Governor’s 15% Welfare-to-Work Program; Head Start; Los
                  Medanos Community College; Many Hands; Migrant Even Start
                  Family Literacy Program; Ministerial Alliance; NAACP; Pittsburg
                  Even Start Project; Pittsburg Police Department; Pittsburg Unified
                  School District; SHELTER, Inc.; Teen Pregnancy Challenge Project;
                  WTC; and the Youth Services Bureau.

New Centers: (2) El Pueblo Public Housing Development and the School
                 Street PSCC Community Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $295,394.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $449,399.00

Pocatello/Chubbuck School District #25
3115 Poleline Road
Pocatello, ID 83201-6119

Project Director: Kathy Collins, 208/232-3562, collika@d25.k12.id.us

This program in rural Pocatello Idaho, building on existing partnerships in the school
district and within the community, will extend after-school and summer access to a CTC.
An elementary school whose population is particularly disadvantaged will be targeted
specifically to come to the CTC after school where high school students will mentor and
tutor them. Services at the center will include academic tutoring and support using
CompassLearning software in language arts, mathematics and English language
development. Participants will learn how to use computer and the Internet. The center
will be open to students across the district as well as members of the community. The
program is expected to reach 600 students during the year.

Primary Partners: SouthEastern Idaho Community Action Agency (SEICAA); Idaho
                  State University; University of Idaho Cooperative Extension System;
                  CompassLearning; After School Adventures; and ECLIPSE

New Centers: (1) CTC, Pocatello High School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $194,561
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $237,375

Pueblo School District 70
24951 East Highway 50
Pueblo, CO 81006

Project Director: Ginger Andenucio, 719/542-0220, gandenucio@dist70.k12.co.us

This program will serve approximately 7,100 low-income residents in four rural
communities in southeast Colorado. The program will provide access to technology-
based literacy and learning opportunities for students and adults in communities that are
presently without access or are underserved. Access to the Internet will provide
additional information on resources and opportunities for career and job development and
training. The program also will provide skills training on the use of technology to
enhance the educational and family strengthening goals of the communities selected.

Primary Partners: University of Southern Colorado and four rural communities: Fowler,
                  Manzanola, Pueblo County and Rocky Ford.

New Centers: (4) Southeastern Colorado Community Technology Centers (main center
                 In Pueblo and 3 sub-centers in Fowler, Manzanola and Rocky Ford)

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $218,468.00

Pui Tak Center
2216 S. Wentworth Avenue
Chicago, IL 60616-2012

Project Director: David Wu, 312/328-1188, dwu@aol.com
The Pui Tak Center is a community center started by the Chinese Christian Union Church
in 1994 to serve new immigrants in Chicago’s Chinatown and Bridgeport community.
The Center opened its Computer Learning Center in April 2001 through contributions
from community members, technology companies and the Illinois State Board of
Education. The goals of the program are to1) use computer technology to complement
the Pui Tak Center’s educational programs; 2) offer affordable computer training classes;
and 3) provide access to computers and the Internet to low-income community residents.
Through the activities of the Computer Learning Center, 300 individuals will participate
in computer training classes, 1,000 participants in Pui Tak Center’s educational programs
will use the computer, and 400 individuals will use the computers during open lab
periods.

Primary Partners: None

New Centers:      (1) CTC at the Pui Tak Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $79,272
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $47,350

The Regents of the University of California
University of California, San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, Dept. 0934
La Jolla, CA 92093

Project Director: Joseph Watson, 858/534-3544, lthompson@ucsd.edu

This program will serve approximately 2,200 low-income residents of Chollas View, an
inner-city neighborhood in the San Diego Enterprise Community. The program will
include two 9th grade mathematics demonstration classrooms and will introduce
innovative software aligned with the California Mathematics Curriculum Framework. It
also will provide electronic homework assistance, computer classes, college entrance
exam preparation and Internet training.

Primary Partners: University of California, San Diego; Gompers Secondary School;
                  California Student Opportunity and Access Program; San Diego
                  Workforce Partnership’s Youth@Work Program; San Diego Urban
                  League; and Qualcomm.

New Centers: (1) Gompers Secondary School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $279,930.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $519,367.00

Regents of the University of California Berkeley
C/o Sponsored Projects Office
336 Sproul Hall, MC 5940
Berkeley, CA 94720

Project Director: Glynda Hull, 510/643-7452, glynda@socrates.berkeley.edu

This program will serve 200 residents of West Oakland, an economically depressed
community in the San Francisco Bay Area. The program will expand an existing
program and provide a “digital storytelling” curriculum for children, youth and adults.
Participants will be introduced to basic computer hardware and software, including tools
for sizing and manipulating photographs and other images and tools for assembling
multiple media. Using the digital story format, participants will learn to create brief
multi-media compositions.

Primary Partners: Prescott-Joseph Center, University of California, Berkeley’s Graduate
                  School of Education; and Urban Voice.

New Centers: (1) Expand on existing program in the Prescott-Joseph Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $296,464.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $116,440.00

RESOURCE, Inc.
1900 Chicago Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55404-1903

Project Director: Sherry Glanton, 612/752-8822, sglanton@hotmail.com

Employment Action Center (EAC) in partnership with the Minnesota Resource Center
(MRC) will establish a CTC to serve low-income residents in the inner city of
Minneapolis. Objectives of the program are to increase access to computer technology
for disadvantaged, inner city residents, promote the use of technology for education by
low income youth, families and individuals, assist low income residents to become self-
sufficient by finding well paying employment, and establish a model program that
demonstrates the educational effectiveness of technology in an economically distressed
urban community. Activities will be provided to approximately 300 individuals and will
include training, employment preparation and placement services, after-school and
summer activities, home access to computers and technology (computer give-away),
adult education and family literacy classes, computer training for all interested
community residents and links to other community services.

Primary Partners: Minnesota Resource Center (the training division of RESOURCE. Inc);
                  the Minneapolis Public Schools; and businesses from the Information
                  Technology Business Advisory Council of the MRC.

New Centers:      (1) The Minneapolis CTC to be located in the inner city of
                  Minneapolis.
Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $217,062, Total projected non-federal funding: 1
year, $119,955

Salem City School District
51 New Market Street
Salem, NJ 08079

Project Director: Margaret McBride, 856/935-3800x219, mcbride@salemnj.org

This program will serve economically disadvantaged youth and their families in the City
of Salem, New Jersey. It will allow the continuation and expansion of programs
established under the Access-Collaboration-Equity (ACE) grant that set up community
technology centers in the neighborhoods of the poorest city residents. Each of the public
schools/centers will run after-school programs that will provide courses in power point,
word processing, research and informational retrieval and publication. The program also
uses laptops as portable labs to take the technology to residents that find it difficult to use
one of the centers. There is also computer literacy instruction for the disabled members
of the community and a GED Prep class for those wanting to complete their high school
education.

Primary Partners: Salem Housing Authority and the Lighthouse Youth
                  Center/Ministerium

New Centers: (3) Expand and continue services at Salem Middle School, Salem High
                 School and John Fenwick School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $206,809.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $99,428.00

San Diego State University Foundation
5250 Campanile Drive
San Diego, CA 92182

Project Director: Steven Spencer, 619/594-1950, Ipumpian@mail.sdsu.edu

This program will serve approximately 200 residents of City Heights, a low-income
community in San Diego, California, that was once plagued by violence and gangs. As
part of the revitalization of the community, the El Puente Family Technology Program
will extend and expand the services of the City Heights Community Technology Center.
The program will provide computer access and training to families that do not have
computers in the home, or have little or no training in the use of computers and the
Internet. Some residents who are in need of a computer in the home will be eligible to
receive a computer through the Home Acquisition Program. Parents will receive training
and certification as part of the family outreach, and mentors will be available to provide
on-going technical support.
Primary Partners: San Diego State University; San Diego Unified School District; San
                  Diego Education Association; Price Charities; Rosa Parks Elementary
                  School; Monroe Clark Middle School; and Hoover High School.

New Centers: (1) City Heights Community Technology Center

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $293,059.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $272,558.00

San Lorenzo Unified School District
15510 Usher Street
San Lorenzo, CA 94580-1623

Project Director: Georgeann Hardy, 510/317-4751, ghardy@sanlorenzousd.K12.ca.us

The centers will serve unincorporated segments of three adjacent urban communities with
traditionally underserved populations including the under-employed, unemployed,
immigrant, disabled and senior citizen populations. The center’s program will focus on
using technology as a tool for English Language Learners, GED preparation, homework,
academic assistance, and job skills acquisition. The Tri-Community Technology Centers
program will seek to break down barriers to technology access by providing child care,
transportation and a flexible schedule of classes and technology assistance. In excess of
250 people will participate in some part of the program

Primary Partners: San Lorenzo Unified School District: Adult School and Royal
                  Sunset Campus; Community Based English Tutoring State Program
                  (CBET); Center for Accessible Technology; One Stop Access; Work
                  Incentives Board; Spectrum Senior Services; San Leandro Chamber of
                  Commerce; Davis Street Community Center; San Lorenzo Rotary
                  Club; Digital High Schools and Interact Club; Safe Ashland
                  Neighborhood Organization

Expanded Centers: (2) “Tri-Community Technology Centers”: one located at San
                 Lorenzo Adult School and the second at the Royal Sunset Learning
                 Center campus.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $232,429
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, 244,655

Sanostee Day School
P.O. Box 159
Sanostee, NM 87461

Project Director: Jeanne G. Haskie, 505/723-2476, jhaskie@lab.bia.edu
This program will serve two economically depressed rural communities on the Navajo
Reservation in Sanostee, New Mexico and TeecNosPos, Arizona. The Northern Navajo
Technology Centers will provide access to computers and information technology for
low-income residents of the northern portion of the Navajo Nation. The program will
offer assistance with homework, Internet access, computer classes and web page design.
It also will provide literacy, adult education and entrepreneurial classes and make
available a computer-lending program.

Primary Partners: TiisNazbas Community School; Northern Navajo Medical Center;
                  Navajo Rural Systemic Initiative; and the Navajo Education
                  Technology Consortium.

New Centers: (2) Sanostee Day School and the TiisNazbas Community School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $294,864.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $132,600.00

School District #1 City and County of Denver
900 Grant Street
Denver, CO 80203

Project Director: Jenifer Federico, 303/764-3349, jenifer_federico@dpsk12.org

Denver Public Schools (DPS) will implement Technology Equality for Communities and
Households, or Project TECH. This initiative will provide formal and informal
opportunities for middle school students at six of the lowest performing Denver Public
Schools’ middle schools that serve families, most of whom are minorities in extreme
poverty. Learn and Earn provides 40-hours of instruction on computer refurbishing,
basic hardware/repair, software and the Internet. Participants earn donated computers
upon successful completion of the program. Funds from the CTC grant program will
establish youth and adult Learn and Earn programs at four new school sites, and expand
after-school technology programs at all six school buildings. Program activities will also
provide parents with instruction on using computers and supporting applying technology
to expand their career opportunities. Project TECH will annually engage 450 students
and 250 parents in technology education and information programs.

Primary Partners: (for one or more of the centers) Dell Computers; Microsoft; Qwest
                  Communications; Rose Community Foundation; Mile High United
                  Way; The Urban League of Metropolitan Denver; the District
                  Attorney’s Community Justice Council; Colorado Trust; The
                  Northwest Coalition for Better Schools; the University of Denver;
                  Community Justice Council; the Southwest Denver Improvement
                  Council

New/Expanded Centers:
                  (6) Denver Middle Schools: Cole; Horace Mann; Kepner; Martin
                  Luther King, Jr.,; Morey; and Smiley

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $155,303
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $490,868

Science Museum of Virginia/Walter R.T. Witschey, Ph.D., Dir.
2500 West Broad Street
Richmond, VA 23220-2054

Project Director: Mano Talaiver, 804/864-1416, mtalaiver@smv.org

The AEIOU: Access, Equity, Innovation, Opportunity, Ubiquity CTC Project integrates
these themes to provide a range of programs in community centers/organizations and
schools: community technology learning activities tied to classroom instruction;
technology training for adults and children; tutoring and homework help using
technology tools; literacy achievement: verbal, numerical, visual, scientific; and
technological literacy, exploration and understanding of innovative technology tools;
work force skills development; and family technology exploration experiences on
Saturdays. An estimated 750 people will be served by this project.

Primary Partners: The Science Museum of Virginia Foundation, Richmond City Schools
                  Department of Parks and Recreation - City of Richmond; Metropolitan
                  Educational Research Consortium; Salvation Army; Southside
                  Ministries Alliance; Greater Richmond Business Education
                  Partnership and Lightspan

Centers:          New: (1 ) AEIOU Community Technology Centers Project, Blackwell
                  Community Center, Annex Building. Expanded: (2) the George
                  Wythe High School mobile technology center that will travel from
                  location to location, and the Community Technology Exploration
                  Studio in the Science Museum of Virginia, Richmond

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $284,471
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $177,018

Sonoma State University
1801 East Cotati Avenue
Rohnert Park, CA 94928

Project Director: Julie McClure, 707/664-4232, Julie.mcclure@sonoma.edu

This program will serve approximately 1,200 children and adults in the City of Vallejo,
California, a low-income, economically distressed community. The program will provide
technology literacy and skills instruction for children and adults, technology-based
vocational/occupational training for youth and adults, computer aided homework
assistance for students, a resource for community organizations to meet their technical
needs and increased access to technology for all members of the community.

Primary Partners: Continentals of Omega Boys/Girls Club; MIT Academy; Solano
                  Community College; Solano County Office of Education ROP; and
                  Wiedenmann/Loma Vista Schools.

New Centers: (1) Continentals of Omega Boys/Girls Club

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $249,891.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $277,625.00

Southern California Tribal Chairmen’s Association
P.O. Box 1470
Valley Center, CA 92082

Project Director: Jack Ward, 760/742-8600, jackw@simplyweb.net

This program will serve 900 Native Americans of the San Pasqual, Rincon and Pala
tribes in San Diego County, California. Building on an existing program, it will provide
these communities with access to educational technologies and online resources. The
program will offer instruction in family literacy, vocational training, academic
improvement, employment opportunities and training, as well as small business services.

Primary Partners: Even Start Family Literacy; Hewlett-Packard Technology Grant
                  Program; TANF Welfare Reform Program; Head Start; Palomar
                  College; California State University-San Marcos; University of
                  California-San Diego; as well as three Indian Education Centers.

New Centers: (9) Three centers will be located in each of the three communities served.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $296,937
Total projected non-federal funding:

Southwestern Oregon Community College
1988 Newark Avenue
Coos Bay, OR 97420

Project Director: Mike Gaudette, 541/888-7210, mgaudett@southwestern.cc.or.us

This program will serve approximately 1,500 low-income residents of rural communities
in Coos and Curry Counties in southwestern Oregon. The target audience includes the
Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians. The program will
increase access to technology and provide basic computer and Internet training,
workshops in creating and maintaining web sites, multimedia technology and career
database searches. It also will provide adult education and family literacy programs.
Primary Partners: Southwestern Oregon Community College Curry County; Brookings
                  And Gold Beach; The Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua
                  and Siuslaw Indians; Coquille School District; and the Newmark
                  Career and Opportunity One Stop Partnership.

New Centers: (4) Southwestern Brookings; Southwestern Gold Beach; Confederated
                 Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw; and Coquille School
                 District

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $284,859.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $85,829.00

Spartanburg Technical College
P.O. Box 4386
Business I-85 & New Cut Road
Spartanburg, SC 29305

Project Director: Cliff Hower, 864/591-3627, howerf@spt.tec.sc.us

This program will serve a low-income, urban, primarily African American community in
the Southside neighborhood of the City of Spartanburg, South Carolina. It will provide
technology to an area that has been underserved and has had little or no access to
computers and the Internet to use as a tool for educational and career enhancement. The
program will provide after-school and summer technology programs for students, career
development and job preparation for adults as well as adult education, GED and basic
literacy training. There also will be small business classes that will include basic
computer literacy, keyboarding, web site design and computer training for entrepreneurs.

Primary Partners: Spartanburg Housing Authority; Bethlehem Center; Adult Learning
                  Center; Piedmont Community Action, Inc.; The City of Spartanburg;
                  Spartanburg County Libraries Systems; Mount Moriah Baptist Church;
                  Comprehensive One-Stop Career Center; Spartanburg County School
                  District 7; and Mary Wright Elementary School.

New Centers: (5) Southside Neighborhood Technology Center (main center), and four
                 Satellite centers: Piedmont Community Actions, Inc.; Adult Learning
                 Center; Bethlehem Center; and downtown branch Spartanburg County
                 Library.

Projected federal funding: 1 year, $207,896.00
Projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $226,225.00

Spoon River College
23235 N CO 22
Canton, IL 61520-9801
Project Director: Jody McCamey, 309/649-6225. jmccamey@src.cc.il.us

CTCs will be established in Canton and Macomb. These centers will support 1,000
adults and children in order to boost the use of technology to enhance literacy and basic
skills. Desired outcomes for clients include, but are not limited do, increased self-
sufficiency; increased job skills and improved access to employment opportunities;
increased technological literacy; and enhanced community and social connections.
Programs will include: Adult Education, Family Literacy Instruction/Activities; After-
School Activities; Career Development/Job Preparation/Computer Training; Small
Business Activities.

Primary Partners: IL Department of Human Services (Canton and Macomb); Local
                  Workforce Investment Act Office (Canton and Macomb); Spoon River
                  College Literacy Program; Spoon River College Community
                  Education; Canton Public Schools; Spoon River College Departments
                  of Adult Education and Career Services; Macomb Area Industrial
                  Development Corporation (MAIDCO);Western Illinois University
                  Small Business Development Center; Macomb Area Chamber of
                  Commerce; Fulton County Economic Development Organization;
                  University of Illinois Extension; Canton Chamber of Commerce;
                  Mayor of Macomb; Mayor of Canton; Spoon River College Adult
                  Education Program; Spoon River College Community Education &
                  Workforce Development offices

New Centers:       (2) Spoon River Community Technology Program, Canton and the
                   Spoon River Community Technology Program, Macomb, IL

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $209,982
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $90,015

Springfield-Greene County Library District
4653 South Campbell
Springfield, MO 65810-1723

Project Director: Carol L. Grimes, 417/874-8120, carolg@mail.sgcl.org

THE EDGE: the CTC at the Midtown Carnegie Branch Library plans to provide a
program that integrates computers and technology to promote individual growth.
Activities will include: instruction in information retrieval skills for adults and youth;
after-school mentoring and tutoring; participation in special technology projects;
instruction in the use of leading edge technologies; subject related labs for adults and
business people; job searching skills; and school class visits. It is estimated that about
1,000 people will take part in THE EDGE programs.
Primary Partners: Springfield Public Schools; University of Missouri Extension;
                  Midtown Neighborhood Association; Adult Basic Education Program

New Centers:      THE EDGE: The CTC, Midtown Carnegie Branch Library

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $220,037
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $0

St. Martin, Iberia, Lafayette Community Action Agency, Inc.
P.O. Box 3343
501 St. John Street
Lafayette, LA 70502

Project Director: Arnold Watson, 337/234-3272, smilecaa@net-connect.net

This program will serve approximately 800 residents of St. Martin and Iberia Parishes,
two rural and economically distressed communities in Louisiana. The program will
provide after-school tutoring to improve students English, math and reading skills. It also
will introduce low-income families to computers and the Internet and provide basic
training on its uses. Courses during the fall will target the unemployed to provide job
skills training and access to employment opportunities on the Internet. The Agency will
coordinate its other programs to serve as a support mechanism for clients of the CTC and
its satellite office.

Primary Partners: Lafayette Parish School System; St. Martin Parish School System;
                  Iberia Parish School System; United Way; Office of Community
                  Services; FIND Work Program; Lafayette Parish Health Unit; St.
                  Martin Parish Health Unit; and the Iberia Parish Health Unit.

New Centers: (2) Main center – Breaux Bridge; satellite center – New Iberia

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $275,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $117,857.00

St. Paul Community Literacy Consortium (SPCLC MLC)
Tom Cytron-Hysom
1318 Stanford Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55105-2811

Project Director: Ginny Heinrich, 651/645-2277, gheinrich@themlc.org

The St. Paul Community Literacy Consortium (SPCLC) includes 13 community-based
non-profit organizations, St. Paul Public Schools Adult Education, and the St. Paul Public
Library. Organized seven years ago, SPCLC has the mission of increasing the quality
and quantity of adult literacy in St. Paul. Through the Multicultural Community
Technology Project, Saint Paul is in a unique position to use SPCLC expertise to address
the needs of the many refugees who have arrived in recent years, and other identified
populations, as well as to provide leadership in the community use of technology.
SPCLC will expand community access to four computer access labs developed by
community-based organization members in the four quadrants of the city. Programs will
include Adult Education and Family Literacy, After-school Activities for Children and
Career Development and Job Preparation. It is anticipated that 1,153 refugees,
immigrants, and other identified populations throughout St. Paul will be served by the
project.

Primary Partners: SPPS Hubbs Center for Lifelong Learning; Jewish Family Service;
                  Lao Family Community of Minnesota; Neighborhood House; the St.
                  Paul Public Library; and the Minnesota Literacy Council

Expanded Centers: (4) The St. Paul Public Schools Hubbs Center for Lifelong Learning,
                 Jewish Family Service, Lao Family Community and Neighborhood
                 House, St. Paul

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $219,099
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $298,195

Starkville School District
402 Greensboro Street
Starkville, MS 39759

Project Director: Dr. Joan Butler, 662/324-4063, jbutler@starkville.k12.ms.us

The Oktibbeha County CTC at the Emerson Family School, will offer year-round
services to more than 300 low-income minorities, and/or non-English speaking children
and adults from the community. Classes and self-directed technology-based educational
services and activities provided will include: 1) for adults: adult basic education, GED,
English as a second language, job searches, resume writing, career information, computer
skill development, and Internet access; 2) for children: tutoring/mentoring, homework
assistance, technology projects, coordination with school work; 3) for Family Literacy:
Internet searches, games, graphic design, card making, and letter writing (e-mail).

Primary Partners: National Bank of Commerce; Oktibbeha County Families First
                  Resource Center; Mississippi State University; Kiwanis Club;
                  Oktibbeha County Head Start; Even Start; Adult Basic Education;
                  Oktibbeha County Health Department; Oktibbeha County Human
                  Resources; Ministerial Association; Oktibbeha County Professional
                  Development Center; Americorp Vista

New Centers:      (1) Oktibbeha County Community Technology Center located at
                  Emerson Family School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $215,704
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $100,785

State of Oregon Commission for the Blind
535 S.E. 12th Avenue
Portland, OR 97214

Project Director: Linda Mock, 503/731-3221, linda.mock@state.or.us

This program will serve individuals who need/benefit from the use of assistive
technology in 7 extremely rural, economically distressed counties in the State of Oregon.
The program will include classes in adult education, career development and job
preparation, as well as basic computer instruction. It will determine what assistive
technology is needed and how work and education sites can be modified to become more
user friendly. The program also will provide information and referral to individuals and
employers who would benefit from assistive technology.

Primary Partners: Southern Oregon Goodwill, Vocational Rehabilitation Division;
                  Southern Oregon Regional Program for the Visually Impaired;
                  Independent Living Centers; Southern Oregon University; Rogue
                  Community College; Jackson County Mental Health Development
                  Disabilities Program, Senior and Disabled Services Division;
                  Disability Services Office; and Network Inc.

New Centers: (9) Expand on existing facilities in Medford (hub site at Rogue Valley
                 Mall One Stop and satellite at Rogue Community College); Klamath
                 Falls; Lakeview; Grants Pass; Wolf Creek; Cave Junction; Brookings;
                 Coos Bay; and Roseburg.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $202,367.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $93,600.00

Sun Ridge Associates, L.P.
C/0 Landex Corp.
575 South Charles, Suite 506
Baltimore, MD 21201

Project Director: Ms. Juanita Marbury, 410/234-0111, jmarbury@aol.com

This program will serve the residents of a 478 unit low-income housing complex in
Bladensburg, Maryland. Forty (40) percent of the residents are children under the age of
18 and approximately twenty (20) percent of the residents speak Spanish as their native
language, some of whom have limited English proficiency. The program will offer basic
computer literacy courses as well as some advanced courses that will lead to certification.
There also will be computer-based workshops in mediation and conflict resolution and
the after-school program will be enhanced by computer-based tutorials in core academic
areas.
Primary Partners: Housing Opportunities Unlimited; and The Town of Bladensburg.

New Centers: 0

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $180,402.00
Total projected non-federal match: 1 year, $130,000.00

Taylor County School District
318 North Clark Street
Perry, FL 32347-2930

Project Director: Chris B. Olson, 850/223-3153, chris.olson@taylor.k12.fl.us

PROJECT GO (GO On-line) will provide, within Taylor County a sparsely populated
rural district located in the Big Bend area of Florida, a rotating schedule of the following
workshops: Basic Computer Skills; Word Processing; Resume Writing; Exploring the
World Wide Web; Web Page Design; and Technology in Small Business. Individuals
will be able to put their new skills to use at five established satellite labs. The program is
expected to have an impact on over 325 residents.

Project Partners: Taylor County Extension; Taylor County Senior Services; Taylor
                  County School District; Lockheed Martin; Taylor County
                  Development Authority; Taylor County Boy’s and Girl’s Club; Taylor
                  County Chamber of Commerce; Taylor County United Way; Buckeye
                  Florida Human Resources; Taylor County School Board; Taylor
                  County Extension; RDS Manufacturing; and a retired vocational
                  school Director

New Centers: (1) The CTC will be located on the campus of Taylor Technical Institute

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $294,984
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $140,887

Tolani Lake Elementary School Academy
HC61-Box 300
Winslow, AZ 86047

Project Director: Rich Garcia, 520/686-6101, osoruns@netscape.net

This program will serve approximately 361 Native Americans on the Navajo reservation
in Tolani Lake, Arizona, current population 763, with a workforce of 233. Expanding on
an existing program to bring educational resources and employment information and
opportunities to the community through technology, this program will provide access to
computers and offer training in keyboarding, introduction to computers and the Internet,
basic reading and employment opportunities.
Primary Partners: Northland Pioneer College; Tolani Lake Chapter House; The Navajo
                  Nation, Regional Training Center; and Arizona State University.

New Centers:      Expand an existing program at the Tolani Lake Elementary School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $132,004.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $47,811.00

Umpqua Community College
1140 College Road
P.O. Box 967
Roseburg, OR 97470

Project Director: Terry Swagerty, 541/440-4669, swagert@umpqua.cc.or.us

This program will serve 800 residents of rural communities in southern Douglas County,
Oregon. It will provide access to communities where geography, income and distance act
as barriers to limited and dated technological resources. The program will offer GED
classes, basic computer skills classes and the use of the Internet, job preparation and
training to include, keyboarding, telephone, fax and copier use and overall job
preparation. There also will be classes targeted to small businesses to provide training in
marketing and graphic design, e-mail, the Internet, basics of e-commerce and web page
design.

Primary Partners: South Umpqua School District; Umpqua Training and Employment,
                  Adult and Family Services; Oregon Employment Department; City of
                  Myrtle Creek; City of Cayonville; South Umpqua Valley Economic
                  Development; Myrtle Creek Chamber of Commerce; Coos-Curry-
                  Douglas Resource Development; and Umpqua Economic
                  Development Partnership.

New Centers: (1) South Umpqua Valley Community Technology Center/Tri-City
                 Elementary School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $236,108.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $113,953.00

Union Chapel CDC
209 Wainwright Street
Newark, NJ 17112

Project Director: Ruby Baskerville, 908/964-6657, rwbask@aol.com

The United Community Network Collaborative (UCNC) is a collaborative comprised of
three faith-based non-profit corporations, two from Newark and one from Irvington, New
Jersey. The project expects to serve between 150 and 225 individuals per week by
offering 1) Computer Literacy for Young Adults; 2) Open Computer Time and Access to
the Information Superhighway (Internet); 3) Career Development and Job Preparation; 4)
E-mail addresses; 5) Educational Enhancement Tools via an After-School Computer Lab;
6) Computer Training and Intergenerational Activities for Seniors; and 7) Organizational
Capacity Development for non profits.

Primary Partners: Newark Branch of the NAACP; Educational Committee: Phi Delta
                  Kappa Sorority Inc., Delta Pi Chapter, Newark; Community Block
                  Grant Funds; State of New Jersey Faith-Based Program Funding;
                  Division of Community Action

New Centers: (3) Two in Newark and one in Irvington, NJ

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $205,262
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $64,209

Union County College
1033 Springfield Avenue
Cranford, NJ 07016

Project Director: Charles Tracy, 908/965-6077, tracy@ucc.edu

This program will serve approximately 400 educationally and economically
disadvantaged residents of the cities of Elizabeth and Plainfield, New Jersey. These
communities are predominately low-income African American and Hispanic residents.
Expanding on existing services, the program will provide additional access to technology
for residents of two underserved areas. The program will provide courses in computer
basics, uses of the Internet, literacy programs, ESL for the beginner to advanced levels
and MS Office. The centers also will afford residents an opportunity for distance
learning and exploration of employment training opportunities.

Primary Partners: County of Union and PROCEED, Inc.

New Centers: (2) Elizabeth and Plainfield

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $190,375.00

United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta, Inc.
100 Edgewood Avenue, NE
Atlanta, GA 30303-3026

Project Director: Dan Williams, 404/527-7166, dwilliams@unitedwayatl.org
GATE: Georgians Accessing Technology Education a community-based partnership will
extend Family Technology Resource Centers (FTRCs) to four new locations. FTRCs are
community-supported learning centers for all ages, educational levels and economic
status. The only requirement for participation is residence in the area in which the center
is located. By providing equal access to technology-based education and educational
support such as basic literacy and ESL, PC skills, job and career development, and after-
school tutorials, GATE will make significant strides toward closing Georgia’s digital
divide. GATE will provide technical access to more than 1,500 children and adults in
low-income communities.

Primary Partners: Georgia Tech; Doraville, DeKalb County School District; Gainesville
                  City Schools; Hall County; Calhoun (Calhoun City Schools in Gordon
                  County); Peoplestown; Fulton County (includes Peoplestown
                  Revitalization Corporation, D. H. Stanton Elementary School and The
                  Study Hall)

New Centers:       (4) FTRCs will be opened in Doraville, Peoplestown (inner-city
                   Atlanta), Gainesville, and Calhoun

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $298,971
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $404,750

University of Hawaii
Office of Research Services
2530 Dole Street, Sakamaki D200
Honolulu, HI 96822

Project Director: Peter Dowrick, 808/956-8741, dowrick@hawaii.edu

This program will serve approximately 1,000 low-income residents of Kalihi Valley, a
community on the island of O`ahu that has a high rate of unemployment and poverty with
low rates of literacy and a high incidence of crime. The program will upgrade equipment
and software at existing centers and increase access to technology. It will provide basic
computer and Internet education, technology-based courses in typing and word
processing, website design and graphics. The program also will provide English and
adult literacy courses, GED preparation, career development and skills training and home
access to technology through a computer lending library.

Primary Partners: Assistive Technology Resource Center; Creating Futures; Family
                  Investment Center; Fern Elementary School; Goodwill Industries;
                  Honolulu Community Action Program; Kalihi Valley District Park;
                  Kokua Kalihi Valley; `Ohana Komputer; Parents and Children
                  Together Samoan Service Provider Association; and the Center on
                  Disability Studies, University of Hawaii.

New Centers: (8) Expanding on existing programs at the Family Investment Center;
                  Fern Elementary School; Honolulu Community Action Program;
                  Kalihi Valley District Park Recreation Center; Kamehameha IV
                  Housing Learning Center; Kuhio Park Terrace Housing Parents and
                  Children Together Learning Center; and two locations at Samoan
                  Service Providers.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $195,555.00

University of Tennessee
615 McCallie Avenue
Chattanooga, TN 37403

Project Director: Dr. Galan Janeksela, 423/755-4133, galan-janeksela@utc.edu

This program will serve approximately 300 low-income, predominately African
American residents of the community of Westside in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The
community is characterized by high unemployment, low incomes and all residents live in
public or government subsidized housing. The program will target adults, ages 17-35,
and provide access to technology and basic instruction on computers and the use of the
Internet. It also will provide opportunities for high school degree completion, higher
learning opportunities, technology certification programs and job preparation and skills
training.

Primary Partner: Westside Community Development Corporation

New Centers: (1) Westside Technology (WesTech) CTC

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $180,136.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $81,546.00

University of Utah
1901 E. South Campus Drive #2175
Salt Lake City, UT 84112

Project Director: Terri Winkler, 801/585-0543, twinkler@aoce.utah.edu

Utah’s Access to Community Technology Integration Outreach Network (UACTION) is
a network of stakeholder organizations collaborating with University of Utah Educational
Technology (Ed Tech). UACTION will provide initial training and ongoing educational
support for 60 CTC staff from 20 projects in comprehensive CTC management, resource
acquisition, and curriculum development, resulting in meaningful education outcomes for
7,000 youth and 3,000 adult learners. In addition to increasing education attainment and
economic outcomes for CTC patrons, improved educational opportunities and career
paths will be created for CTC staff and volunteers, most of whom will come from the
economically distressed neighborhoods they serve. Following completion of initial
training, Ed Tech will provide mentoring, on site CTC consultations and specialized
educational programs for adult and youth learners in their CTCs.

Primary Partners: Salt Lake County Economic Development; Boys and Girls Clubs of
                  Greater Salt Lake; Utah Education Network; Utah State Extension
                  Service ;Klass Strategies; Learning.com; Murray Public Library;
                  Northwest Multipurpose Center; Salt Lake City Mayor’s Office; Salt
                  Lake City Public Library; Salt Lake Community Action Program; Salt
                  Lake County AmeriCorps Program; Salt Lake County Parks and
                  Recreation; Salt Lake County Public Library; Salt Lake County Youth
                  Services; Salt Lake Neighborhood Housing Services; Sellers
                  Management Group; Sorenson Multicultural Center; University of
                  Utah College of Education; University of Utah Professional Education;
                  Waterford Institute; Family Support Center; HUD

Centers:       Programs will be offered at 20 CTC sites.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $293,548
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $92,583

University of Washington
320 Mary Gates Hall
Box 352820
Seattle, WA 98195

Project Director: Louis Fox, 206/685-4745, lfox@u.washington.edu

This program will serve approximately 1,600 tribal members on the Colville and Yakama
Indian Reservations, both of which are located in geographically isolated, economically
depressed areas of Washington State. The program will provide increased access to
computers and information technology, access to online tutorials and educational
programs, on-site support to help develop Internet research skills, training in job search
and preparation, basic computer skills and Internet-based small business resources.

Primary Partners: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; and the Confederated
                  Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Indian Nation

New Centers: (2) Yakama Reservation and the Colville Reservation

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $299,995.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $239,234.00

Valencia Community College
190 South Orange Avenue
P.O. Box 3028
Orlando, FL 32802
Project Director: Joyce Romano, 407/299-5000, jromano@valencia.cc.fl.us

This program will serve approximately 1,750 low-income residents in economically
distressed communities in Orange County, Florida. It will provide access to computers
and the Internet, technology based assistance and tutoring in reading and math, basic
computer classes, career planning and access to employment and training databases. The
program will offer assistance for student preparation for high school/GED attainment and
preparation for entering college.

Primary Partners: Orange County Public Schools; Orange County Citizen’s Commission
                  For Children and Neighborhood Centers for Families; ESTEEM, Inc.;
                  and Orlando Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Florida.

New Centers: (7) Expand upon existing programs at 6 Neighborhood Centers for
                   Families sites (Ivey Lane, Winter Park, Apopka, Bithlo/Christmas,
                   Oak Ridge and Union Park) and a lead site at Cheney Elementary
                   School.
Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $299,474.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $120,380.00

Vermont Adult Learning
50 Green Street
Brattleboro, VT 05301

Project Director: Jeanie Crosby, 802/257-9449, jcrosby@vtadultlearning.org

“Town Tech” will provide the capacity for ESOL practice for the increasing number of
immigrants in this rural Vermont town, for study related to the GED and Adult Diploma
programs for the large group of teenage dropouts, and for computer-assisted practice of
learning tasks by community members with learning disabilities. Individuals will be able
to improve job skills, families can strengthen literacy while integrating generations, and
community members can work together using computer technology to help resolve
problems. It is estimated that over 1,000 people will be served by this project.

Primary Partners: Windham Southeast Supervisory Union; Southeastern Vermont Career
                  Education Center; Early Education Services; Community Action
                  Brattleboro Area; Brattleboro Housing Authority; Marlboro College
                  Technology Center; The Gathering Place; Departments of
                  Employment + Training; Vocational Rehabilitation and PATH

Expanded Centers: (1) “Town Tech”, Vermont Adult Learning’s Brattleboro Center,
                 Brattleboro

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $182,481
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $114,757
Virgin Islands Resource Center for the Disabled, Inc.
P.O. Box 308427
74B&75 Kronprindsens Gade
Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, 00803-8427

Project Director: Carolyn K. Smith, 341/777-2253, vircd@islands.vi

The Virgin Islands Resource Center for the Disabled, Inc. (VIRCD) was established in
1999 and funded in 2000 to establish a territory-wide CTC/Partnership to expand access
to computers and educational, informational and assistive technology to disadvantaged
adults and children, including individuals with disabilities. The program will now be
expanded to serve new economically distressed urban and rural predominately Hispanic
communities. Programs will include: 1) community-based, after school computer
technology and arts programs; 2) adult education and family literacy; 3) career
exploration and development and job preparation; 4) small business and entrepreneurship
and home access activities; and 5) ADA accessible awareness training. Two hundred
people are expected to take part in the programs.

Primary Partners: The project is designed to establish expanded formal partnerships
                  between the VIRCD including its existing partners (Julius E. Sprauve
                  Public school; Ricardo Richards Elementary Public School; the Virgin
                  Islands Housing Authority;) and Projecto Sol; The Village; the Aureo
                  Diaz Height Housing Community and John’s Folly Learning Institute.

Centers:          Existing (5) five: VIRCD, St. Thomas, Oswald Harris Court, St.
                  Thomas, Paul M. Pearson Gardens, St. Thomas, Michael J. Kirwan
                  Terrace, St. Thomas, and Sprauve School, St. John. New (1) one:
                  John’s Folly Learning Institute, St. John

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $175,412
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $375,322

W.E.B. DuBois Learning Center
5501 Cleveland
Kansas City, MO 64130-4016

Project Director: Harrison C. May, 816/363-1297, Hmay2@hallmark.com

The DuBois Learning Center Telecommunications Hub will be expanded to include three
additional satellites (CTCs). The objectives are to 1) Provide opportunities for residents
to access computers and the Internet; 2) Maximize and distribute limited computer
resources (equipment and expertise); 3) Assist children to improve reading and other
academic skills; 4) Provide adults with knowledge and skills needed to obtain high
technology jobs. Approximately 1,000 individuals will be served during the coming
year.
Primary Partners:      The Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church; The Lee A. Tolbert
                       Community Academy; Move Up; The Division of Family
                       Services; The Family Resource Center; the Kansas City Summer
                       Food Service Program; the Girl Scouts; Junior Achievement;
                       YWCA; Red Cross; Junior Golf Foundation

Expanded Centers:      (5) Current: Swope Parkway Church of Christ; Covenant
                       Presbyterian Church; Swope Parkway United Christian Church; St.
                       Louis Academy; and The Bridge Home for Children (3) New: CTC
                       Satellites located at: the Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church;
                       the Lee A. Tolbert Community School; and Move Up.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $0

Washington County Public Schools
802 Washington, Street
Plymouth, NC 27962

Project Director: Julius Walker, Jr., 252/793-5171, jwalker@washingtonco.k12.nc.us

Project CONNECT (Connecting Our Neighborhoods by Networking through Education,
Culture and Technology) is a project based on the needs of Washington County children
and adults. With the collaboration of the school system and other multiple agencies and
organizations in the community the Washington County Schools’ Community
Technology Learning Center will provide extended learning opportunities to students,
parents and community members. However, the main focus for this project will be on
serving 5th – 8th grade students in meeting and exceeding state and local standards in
reading, writing, math, and computer skills. Project CONNECT will address individual
student needs as identified by each student’s Personalized Education Plan (PEP). The
program anticipates the potential of reaching all students in the school system, 2,500 and
many of the 13,913 citizens.

Primary Partners: Sylvan Learning Center; Town of Plymouth Police Department;
                  Washington County Agricultural Extension Service; Tideland Mental
                  Health; Washington County Arts Council; Beaufort Community
                  College; JobLink Career Center; Soundside Group, Inc.; Martin
                  Community College; Washington County Sheriff’s Department;
                  Weyerhauser Company; Washington Co. Center for Human Services;
                  Washington County Library; Washington County Historical Society;
                  Elizabeth City State University; Washington County Even Start
                  Program

New Centers:        (1) The Washington County Schools’ Community Technology
                    Learning Center, Washington County Union School, Roper
Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $200,000
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $0

Washoe County Library
P.O. Box 2151
Reno, NV 89505

Project Director: Christie Thissen, 775/327-8364, cthissen@mail.co.washoe.nv.us

This program will serve approximately 7,400 low-income and economically underserved
residents of Washoe County, Nevada. It will provide seven-day access to technology for
adult basic education students, as well as free use of computers. The program will help
expand on an existing youth development program and offer employment opportunities
for low-income teens.

Primary Partners: Washoe County Library System; Northern Nevada Literacy Council;
                  Washoe Library Foundation; Truckee Meadows Literate Community
                  Project; and Washoe County.

New Centers: (3) Northern Nevada Literacy Council; Downtown Reno Library; and
                 Sierra View Library.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $150,865.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $102,951.00

Weingart Center Association
566 South San Pedro Street
Los Angeles, CA 90013

Project Director: Cynthia Heard, 213/689-2114, Cynthia@weingart.org

The program will serve 3,024 residents of homeless shelters in the Skid Row area of Los
Angeles, California, operated by a partnership for the homeless and displaced.
Expanding upon existing programs, it will provide access to computers, employment
searches, information on educational and employment training programs and assist
residents in developing basic computer skills. It also will provide an opportunity to
develop literacy, writing and social skills.

Primary Partners: Skid Row Housing Trust; SRO Housing Corporation; and Chrysalis

New Centers: (25) Located at various sites throughout the Central City East area.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $300,000.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $154,655.00
Wesley Housing Development Corp.
5515 Cherokee Avenue, Suite 204
Alexandria, VA 22312

Project Director: Katherine Morton Paal, 703/642-3830, kmorton@whdc.org

This program will serve approximately 780 low-income residents of HUD assisted
housing units in Northern Virginia and the District of Columbia. The program will
provide access to technology and instruction and training in basic computer skills, office
job training, GED preparation and ESL classes. There will be additional adult basic
education classes as well as job skills training and searches for employment
opportunities. The after school programs will offer homework assistance, computer
training and classes to improve reading, math and writing skills

Primary Partners: Community Preservation & Development Corp.; Interstate Realty
                  Management; and Edgewood Management Corp.

New Centers: (5) Expand on existing services at: The Gateway at Buckman Road;
                 Lincolnia Community Resource Center; Wexford Manor Community
                 Resource Center; Garrison Woods Apartments; and Frederick
                 Douglass Gardens Apartments.

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $186,967.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $384,016.00

West Hardin County Consolidated Independent School District
P.O. Box 128
Hwy 105 and FM 770
Saratoga, TX 77585

Project Director: Cindy Cummings, 936/274-5061, ccummings@esc5.net

The purpose of the West Hardin County CTC is to increase the employability of all
people living in the towns of Batson, Saratoga, Thicket and Votaw. Programs will be
offered for students and adults and will include creating a job bank, GED courses using
technology, and courses on developing small businesses using the Internet, and distance
learning. In addition, Distance Learning will be enhanced and upgraded. During the
coming year well over 250 people will be instructed and supported by the CTC.

Primary Partners:     Lamar University System

New Centers: The West Hardin County CTC

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $253,329
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $97,350
Wewoka Public School
PO Box 870
Wewoka, OK 84884-0870

Project Director: Dr. Betsy Graham, 405/257-5475, bgraham@yahoo.com

Wewoka is the tribal headquarters for the Seminole Indian Nation. Located in Seminole
County, it is the most racially diversified and one of the most economically depressed
counties in the state. The Wewoka Educational CTC’s (WEC TECH) will serve an
estimated 300 adults and 350 students in the next year. It will offer opportunities to
improve education levels, gain job-related skills, and build personal and community
capacity. It will provide a place where participants gather together and link with the
entire community. Focus areas of the program include: Public Access or Open Lab
Time; Afterschool Activities; Adult Education; Elder Services; Internet Access; Career
Development and Job Preparation; Job Placement; Electronic Publishing (including video
or multi-media) and Electronic Commerce.

Primary Partners: Seminole State College; the Oklahoma Department of Human
                  Services; Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service; AmeriCorps;
                  Seminole County Youth Promise Foundation; Oklahoma Parents as
                  Teachers; the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma & Seminole Nation
                  Alcohol and Abuse Program; Wewoka Economic Development
                  Authority; Retired & Senior Volunteer Program; Wewoka Public
                  Library and the City of Wewoka.

New Centers: (1) The WEC TECH will be located at Wewoka Public School

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $292,070
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $142,710

Yurok Tribe
1034 Sixth Street
Eureka, CA 95501

Project Director: Peggy O’Neill, 707/444-0433, PO'Neill@Yuroktribe.nsn.us

This program will serve approximately 334 Native Americans of the Yurok Tribe in
California. The program will provide access to computers and education enhancement
programs, communication forums, job skills training, online college curriculum, small
business development training and distance learning curriculum. Both technology
centers will offer Internet access.

Primary Partners: College of the Redwoods; Klamath-Trinity Joint Unified School
                  District; Arcata Economic Development Corporation; North Coast
                  Technology Center; Happy Camp Community Computer Center; and
                  the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe.
New Centers: (2) Jack Norton Elementary School and the Yurok Tribe’s office complex

Total projected federal funding: 1 year, $205,537.00
Total projected non-federal funding: 1 year, $99,980.00

				
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