Slide 1 - Continuum Group by ewghwehws

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									                          Activity 1
Creative Arts
•   Creative arts projects using the countryside as a stimulus
    provide pupils with opportunities to express their own
    experiences and emotions in a direct way.
•   By recording, interpreting and representing their thoughts and
    experiences, pupils will begin to gain a better understanding of
    the importance of the landscape and environment.

Digital Designs
Ask the pupils to:
1) Take digital photographs of one feature in the countryside, e.g.
    a tree in a field or a hedgerow.
2) Take pictures at long, medium and close range.
3) Supplement with pictures, from below and all around, of a
    single leaf, branch, twig, trunk, bark, leaf litter, etc.
4) Bring the group together and discus their reasons for their
    choices of images, then decide on another photographic focus,
    say the farm animals. This gives two foci to work to be carried
    out as follow up activities.
                         Activity 1
                      Follow Up Activities

1) The images can be sorted, selected and then printed out to
    make a classroom poster.


2) Using a suitable computer graphics programme create a
    digital montage


3) Add captions or comments to make links with locations,
    wildlife or feelings


4) Make a short presentation to the group explaining why the
   images were chosen


5) Mount an exhibition of posters
                          Activity 2
Plant Species Hunt
• The objective of this activity is to interest the pupils in
  some or all of the following:

• The range of plant species in a small location

• The number of plants growing in a small location

• Comparisons between different locations within the farm
  site

•Develop an understanding that different habitats have a
 different range of plant species
                          Activity 2
Curriculum Links:
Literacy
• Speaking and listening, discussions about observations.
• Reading to a purpose, looking up plants in books and key
 for identification.
• Recording in a suitable form their findings
• Reporting back to their class or group

Mathematics
• Counting and recording, using suitable methods eg. Tallies,
 picto-graphs, tables etc.
• Use suitable graphs to analyse the findings

Science
• Plant classification
• Hypothesising as to the reasons for any diversities
• Testing their reasons
• Communicating their thoughts to other members of their
group

ICT
• Using digital cameras
• Using suitable programmes to display and present their
 findings
• Researching the internet to confirm plant identifications
                       Activity 2
                      The Activities

Species diversity
Using a 30 to 50cm2 quadrat, ask the pupils to count the
number of species (different types) of plants they can see
in five random locations along the edge of a field.
They don’t need to recognise all of them, just call them A,
B, C, etc.

Species Variation
Using the quadrats placed end to end from under a hedge
to about a metre away, record the number of different
types of plant species found here.
This shows the species variation created by shade
moving in to full light.
1) Where are there fewer species?
2) Which ones survive in the shady areas and which
    don’t?
If the pupils can’t identify the plants they can take photos
or make sketches to take back to school for identification
– but don’t let them pick the plants!
                Activity 2
                Results Table
Plant Species                   Number Found
                         Activity 2
                     Follow up Activities
Ask pupils to:

• Write a short paragraph about how, when and where this
  information can be used by gardeners, school grounds
  staff, town planners and farmers.

• Draw suitable graphs to show comparisons between areas
  studied.

• What can this tell us about how fragile plants and
  ecosystems are?

• Using suitable computer programmes write and deliver an
  illustrated talk describing their findings.

• Determine what effects light and shade have on the
  numbers and species of plants growing in their survey
  areas.

• Plan further surveys/ experiments that will prove their
  reasons.

• Create a large classroom display of their findings.
                          Activity 3

How Old is the Hedge?
It is said that every different species of tree in a one hundred
     metre length of hedge represents one hundred years!!!!!

So how old are our farm hedges?

Objectives:
• To identify different tree species
• To learn what 100 m looks like
• To learn why some species of tree are more suitable for
  hedges than others
• To speculate on the lives and times of the people who
  planted the hedges in the first place
• To question the statement above for truth

Curriculum Links:
Science:
• Observation of tree species
• Devising ways to test the statement
History:
• Historical inquiry
• Using primary sources ie. Enclosure maps
• Discovering “How we used to live”
                      Activity 3
                      The Activity

1) Walk the group around the perimeter of the farm to
   identify which hedges you are going to age.

2) Draw a sketch plan or map showing the areas to be
  studied

3) Practice pacing 100m

4) Walk each hedge count and map each species on
  your plan

5) Ask “How old is the hedge”?
         a) does the age seem reasonable?
         b) How do you come to that answer?

6) Repeat for the other hedges and form an idea as to
  when the field boundaries were planted
                        Activity 3
                     Follow up activities
These activities are suggestions as to what may be good
follow up lessons or even longer themes when you are back
at your schools.
Which species of tree is most suitable for hedging and why?

• Is the statement that each species represents one
  hundred year true? How can you find out and test the
  statement?
• Choose hedges in your own area and repeat the
  experiment to find their ages.
• Can you find copies of the enclosure maps for your area
  and what do they tell you about the hedges?
• Discover how people lived when the hedges were planted
• What are the advantages of a “natural” hedge over a
  wire fence if any?
• Using a suitable computer programme make a
  presentation
• of your views on one of the above. Then give it to an
  audience of either your class or a group invited specially.
                         Activity 4
                      Looking after pigs

On the farm we have two pigs, find out using the display board
   information the following:
1) What breed of pig are they?
2) What do they eat?
3) How much do they eat?
4) What shelter do they need?
5) How many man hours do the pigs need each day?
6) What would be the daily/weekly costs of rearing the pigs?
7) Take as many photos as needed to make a display.
8) Using the internet to do any other research, that adds to
   and enhances the field work.

Record all the findings and plan a display for the classroom
   wall or using suitable computer programs design and
   make a five minute presentation for an audience who
   know nothing about pig rearing.
                          Activity 4
National Curriculum Links

Literacy
     • Reading for information
     • Writing for an audience
     • Speaking and listening

Mathematics
• Data handling
• The four rules in real situations

ICT
• Use the internet to research
• Using suitable computer programs
• Producing a presentation
                       Activity 4
                    Follow Up Activities

To compare a commercial pig farm with Walnut Tree Lodge
    Pig Farm
Using the Internet, Yellow pages or Trade Directories, find
    the addresses of any local pig farms. Write to or
    telephone the owner/manager and arrange a visit.

Visit one or more pig farms and find out:
      • The breed of pigs
      • The husbandry plans
      • The weight gain per week
      • The time from piglet to slaughter
      • Where do the pigs go for slaughter
      • Who buys them ie. Supermarkets, local butchers or
          meat wholesalers
      • What is the profit/loss per pig
                         Activity 4
                     Follow up Activities

Using the information found compare the commercial unit with
Walnut Tree Lodge Farm .


1) Note down any similarities and differences between the two,
   try to account for them.
2) Discuss your findings with other members of your group and
   work on a joint presentation using a suitable computer
   programme.
3) What improvements could you make to the Walnut Tree
   Lodge Pig Farm?
4) Produce a group action plan to implement your
   improvements
5) Present your plan to Richard the Farmer and persuade him
   with good arguments that your plan is worthwhile.
                     Activity 4
                  Follow up activities

National Curriculum Links

Literacy
     • Reading for meaning
     • Speaking and Listening
     • Writing , composition

Mathematics
• Representing
• Analysing
• Use appropriate mathematical procedures
• Communicating and reflecting

ICT
• Communication and collaboration
• Exploring ideas and manipulating information
• Critical evaluation
                         Activity 5
                     Looking after hens
Activity
On the farm we five hens, find out using the display board
    information the following:
1) What breed of hen are they?
2) What do they eat?
3) How much do they eat?
4) What shelter do they need?
5) Where are the eggs collected from?
6) How many man hours do the hens need each day?
7) What would be the daily / weekly costs of rearing the
    hens?
8) Take as many photos as needed to make a display.
9) Using the internet to do any other research, that adds to
    and enhances the field work.
Record all the findings and plan a display for the
classroom wall or using suitable computer programs design
and make a five minute presentation for an audience who
know nothing about hens and their upkeep.
                       Activity 5

National Curriculum Links

Literacy
     • Reading for information
     • Writing for an audience
     • Speaking and listening

Mathematics
• Data handling
• The four rules in real situations

ICT
• Use the internet to research
• Using suitable computer programs
• Producing a presentation
                          Activity 5
                   Follow Up Activities
To compare a commercial chicken farm with Walnut Tree Lodge
    hen farm.

Using the Internet, Yellow pages or Trade Directories find the
   addresses of any local chicken farms. Write to or telephone
   the owner/manager and arrange a visit.

Visit one or more chicken farms and find out:
      • The breed of chickens
      • Are they for eggs or the table
      • The husbandry plans
      • Number of eggs laid per bird per day
      • The weight gain per week
      • The time from chick to slaughter
      • Where do the chickens go for slaughter
      • Who buys them ie. Supermarkets, local butchers or
          meat wholesalers
      • What is the profit/loss per chicken
                      Activity 5
                  Follow Up Activities

Using the information found compare the commercial unit
   with Walnut Tree Lodge Farm .

1) Note down any similarities and differences between
   the two, try to account for them.

2) Discuss your findings with other members of your
   group and work on a joint presentation using a suitable
   computer programme.

3) What improvements could you make to the Walnut Tree
   Lodge hen Farm?

4) Produce a group action plan to implement your
   improvements

5) Present your plan to Richard the Farmer and persuade
   him with good arguments that your plan is worthwhile.
                    Activity 5
                Follow Up Activities

National Curriculum Links

Literacy
     • Reading for meaning
     • Speaking and Listening
     • Writing , composition

Mathematics
• Representing
• Analysing
• Use appropriate mathematical procedures
• Communicating and reflecting

ICT
• Communication and collaboration
• Exploring ideas and manipulating information
• Critical evaluation
                         Activity 6
                     Looking after sheep

On the farm we two sheep, find out using the display board
   information the following:
1) What breed of sheep they are?
2) What do they eat?
3) How much do they eat?
4) What shelter do they need?
5) When are they sheered?
6) How many man hours do the sheep need each day?
7) What would be the daily/weekly costs of rearing the
   sheep?
8) Take as many photos as needed to make a display.
9) Using the internet to do any other research, that adds to
   and enhances the field work.

Record all the findings and plan a display for the classroom
wall or using suitable computer programs design and
make a five minute presentation for an audience who know
nothing about sheep and their upkeep.
                     Activity 6
National Curriculum Links

Literacy
     • Reading for information
     • Writing for an audience
     • Speaking and listening

Mathematics
• Data handling
• The four rules in real situations

ICT
• Use the internet to research
• Using suitable computer programs
• Producing a presentation
                        Activity 6
                     Follow Up Activities
To compare a commercial sheep farm with Walnut Tree
    Lodge sheep Farm
Using the Internet, Yellow pages or Trade Directories find the
    addresses of any local sheep farms. Write to or
    telephone the owner/manager and arrange a visit.

Visit one or more sheep farms and find out:
      • The breed of sheep
      • Are they for wool or the table
      • The husbandry plans
      • T he weight gain per week
      • The time from lamb to slaughter
      • Where do the sheep go for slaughter
      • Who buys them ie. Supermarkets, local butchers or
          meat wholesalers
      • What is the profit/loss per sheep
                      Activity 6
                  Follow Up Activities

Using the information found compare the commercial unit
with Walnut Tree Lodge Farm .

1) Note down any similarities and differences between
   the two, try to account for them.

2) Discuss your findings with other members of your
   group and work on a joint presentation using a suitable
   computer program.

3) What improvements could you make to the Walnut Tree
   Lodge sheep Farm?

4) Produce a group action plan to implement your
   improvements

5) Present your plan to Richard the Farmer and persuade
   him with good arguments that your plan is worthwhile.
                         Activity 6
                      Follow Up Activities

National Curriculum Links

Literacy

    •      Reading for meaning
    •      Speaking and Listening
    •      Writing , composition

Mathematics
• Representing
• Analysing
• Use appropriate mathematical procedures
• Communicating and reflecting

ICT
• Communication and collaboration
• Exploring ideas and manipulating information
• Critical evaluation
                        Activity 7
                      Growing Produce

At Walnut Tree Lodge Farm there is a patch for growing
    vegetables and a bed for growing flowers.

Draw a plan of each bed and then decide the following:
1) Are the beds in full sun, part shade, sheltered from the
   prevailing wind or not?
2) Is it necessary to do a soil test to determine pH and
   fertility?
3) Are the beds to be Organic or None Organic?
4) Investigate which vegetables and which flowering plants do
   well in this location, visit garden centre 500m down the
   road to ask about local conditions.
5) Draw up a planting scheme for the two beds.
                     Activity 7
National Curriculum Links

Literacy
     • Reading for meaning
     • Speaking and Listening
     • Writing , composition

Mathematics
• Representing
• Analysing
• Use appropriate mathematical procedures
• Communicating and reflecting

ICT
• Communication and collaboration
• Exploring ideas and manipulating information
• Critical evaluation
                          Activity 7
                      Follow up Activities

Organic or None Organic?
Using the internet try to discover the pros and cons of Organic
and None Organic farming. Try to check that the sites you use
for information are reliable!!!!!

• How have you made your choices?
• Design a presentation using a suitable IT package to argue
  your case
• The group decides on the evidence presented on Organic or
  None Organic.
• The group makes a classroom display to illustrate the
  reasons for their decision.
                 Activity 7
 Follow up Activities – Organic or non-organic

National Curriculum Links

Literacy
     • Reading for meaning
     • Speaking and Listening
     • Writing , composition

Mathematics
• Representing
• Analysing
• Use appropriate mathematical procedures
• Communicating and reflecting

ICT
• Communication and collaboration
• Exploring ideas and manipulating
    information
• Critical evaluation
                          Activity 7
                      Follow up Activities

Sowing seeds
In the tables following you will find listed many vegetables that
can still be grown from seeds planted in June, July and August.
Read through the list and using suitable reference materials; the
internet, books and magazines:

1) Find out about any vegetables that are unknown to you.
2) Decide what you are going to sow having regard to space left
   in the bed.
3) Cost out the seeds and get “Best Value” by obtaining price
   lists from a variety of sources.
4) Will you sow directly into the ground or into modules for
   transplanting later?
5) Using suitable computer programs devise a presentation to
   explain your planting scheme or to illustrate the vegetables
   you had not heard of before.
M      Beetroot        Early and main crop; until July


M      Chinese         Until end of August. Do not transplant from a seedbed - either
       Cabbage         sow direct or in modules. Some varieties, such as Tatsoi, should
                       not be sown before the end of June, or they will quickly go to
                       seed. Others, such as Joi Choi, can be safely sown in June.
M     Calabrese        Until end of July
        Carrots        Early; until end of July
                       Try some in a container if you've run out of space in the garden.
                       Choose a short rooted variety such as Chantenay or Parabel.
        Carrots        Main crop; until end of June. Sowings made in June should miss the
                       main flight of the carrot root fly.
M     Cauliflower      Mini - until early July
    Chicory, witloof   Until end of July; to grow for forcing to produce 'chicons' in the early
                       spring.
     Chicory, red      Until end of August
    and sugar loaf
M    Courgettes,       Choose courgettes and marrow varieties that are resistant to
     marrows and       cucumber mosaic virus (Defender F1 and Badger Cross F1) where
      pumpkins         this is a regular problem. Pumpkins tend not to suffer from this
                       disease. Minimum soil temperature 13°C
M   Florence Fennel    For sowing before mid June, choose a cultivar listed as suitable for
                       early sowing; some cultivars are very sensitive to day length and will
                       bolt if sown before the longest day (21st June); sow until early
                       August
M    French Beans      Until end of June, or July for a late crop of dwarf beans under
                       cloches
    Runner Beans       Until end of June
M      Kohl rabi       Until August
M       Lettuce        Loose-leaf, Cos, crisp head and butter head. Lettuce, apart from
                       crisp head varieties, germinates poorly when the soil temperature
                       goes above 25°C. This can happen in summer. To avoid this risk in
                       hot weather, sow into well watered soil between 2 and 4pm, then
                       cover with some form of shading material for the first 24hrs.
     Salad onions      To mid June; sow winter varieties from August onwards
M       Pak Choi       Until end of August
         Peas          Main crop, mange tout and sugar snap [ to end of July]. Where pea
                       moth is a problem, delay sowings until mid May, so they will be
                       flowering after the pea moth lays its eggs.
M       Pumpkin        Until mid June
     Radish, mooli     Until end of August
M     Sweet Corn       Minimum soil temperature 10°C; sow until early June
M        Swede         Until Early June
         Turnip        Early varieties until end August; main crop varieties until August
M         Kale         Until early August
       (borecole)

M = may also be raised in modules for transplanting

National Curriculum Links
Literacy
     • Reading for meaning
     • Speaking and Listening
Mathematics
• Use appropriate mathematical procedures
• Communicating and reflecting
ICT
• Communication and collaboration
• Research
• Exploring ideas and manipulating information
• Critical evaluation
Science
     • Practical and enquiry skills
     • Communication
     • Organisms behaviour and health

								
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