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Northwest Rankin High School

VIEWS: 14 PAGES: 106

									   Putting
     the
   Pieces
  Together



  SENIOR VENTURE
ARMOUR HIGH SCHOOL




     2009-2010
                                 TABLE OF CONTENTS
                             SENIOR PROJECT FRAMEWORK
Introduction to Senior Projects
Rationale for Senior Projects ................................................................................ 5
Senior Project Overview ....................................................................................... 6
Elements of a High-Quality Senior Project Program ............................................. 7
Senior Project Guidelines .................................................................................. 8-9

Senior Venture Timeline
Senior Venture Timeline ..................................................................................... 10

Initial Documents and Forms
Senior Project Pledge Form................................................................................ 12
Letter to Parents ................................................................................................. 13
Parent Permission Form ..................................................................................... 14
Faculty Advisor/Administration Agreement ......................................................... 15

Senior Project Roles and Responsibilities
Senior Project Roles ...................................................................................... 17-18
Choosing a Mentor ............................................................................................. 19
Role of a Mentor ............................................................................................ 20-21
Mentor Agreement Form .................................................................................... 22
Mentor Proposal Draft Review Form .................................................................. 23
Mentor Verification and Evaluation Form ............................................................ 24

Topic Selection
Topic Selection Guidelines ............................................................................ 26-27
Topic Selection Guide ................................................................................... 28-29
Topic Selection Approval Form...................................................................... 30-31
Topic Change Form ............................................................................................ 32

PHASE I: The Research Paper
Research Paper Guidelines ................................................................................ 34
―Yes‖ Checklist .................................................................................................. 35
Plagiarism ........................................................................................................... 36
Assembling Research Information ................................................................. 37-38
Research Paper Student Editing Sheet .............................................................. 39
Research Paper Rubric ...................................................................................... 40

PHASE II: The Product
The Product ........................................................................................................ 42
Guidelines for the Product .................................................................................. 42
Project Rubric ..................................................................................................... 43




                                                           2
PHASE III: The Portfolio
Portfolio Checklist .......................................................................................... 45-46
Portfolio Requirements ....................................................................................... 47
Journal (Blog) ..................................................................................................... 48
Project Journal Log............................................................................................. 49
Letter to Judges .................................................................................................. 50
Reflection/Self Evaluation .............................................................................. 51-52
Portfolio Rubric ................................................................................................... 53

PHASE IV: The Presentation
Oral Presentation Expectations .......................................................................... 55
Guidelines for Oral Presentation......................................................................... 56
Tips for Successful Presentations ...................................................................... 57
Speech Preparation ....................................................................................... 58-59
Outlines for Presentations .................................................................................. 60
Tips for Reducing Anxiety ................................................................................... 61
Presentation Poise ........................................................................................ 62-63
Judges Evaluation Form/Presentation Rubric..................................................... 64

Final Grade Determination
Final Grade Point Distribution ............................................................................. 65


Appendix
A – Career Clusters and Majors ......................................................................... 67
B – Rubrics and Grading Forms .................................................................... 68-72
C – Timeline & Due Dates .................................................................................. 73
D – Forms ...................................................................................................... 75-87
E – Senior Venture Idea Lists ...................................................................... 88-106




                                                          3
INTRODUCTION TO SENIOR PROJECTS




               4
                 RATIONALE FOR SENIOR PROJECTS
This Framework was developed with the following quotation as its guiding theme:
―Enter to Learn; Leave to Achieve.‖

Senior Projects allow students the opportunity to consolidate and showcase the
learning from their high school years into a meaningful and relevant project. It is
their venue to connect with the world outside of school and to demonstrate they
have the skills to go on to further education and/or enter the workforce.

Senior Projects allow schools an avenue to promote the relevance and increase
the rigor of the high school experience. A question we often hear from students
is ―Why do I have to learn this?‖ Senior Projects allow students to see the
connections between what they are learning now and the application to their
future lives. They become an ―expert‖ in their chosen topic area and showcase
the skills and abilities they have gained through their high school experience.

Senior Projects add increased rigor to the Senior year. The Senior Project also
provides students with focused and structured learning, gives them experience
with the responsibility for meeting timelines, making decisions, doing research,
preparing a presentation and making presentations – all skills needed for
success in the workplace. Senior Projects provide an opportunity for students to
model the 3 R’s for schools – rigor, relevance, and results!




                                         5
                      SENIOR PROJECT OVERVIEW

The Senior Project is a high school capstone experience that requires students to
demonstrate not only what they know, but what they can do. States, school
districts, and high schools focusing on restructuring, raising high school
standards, and actively engaging all Seniors in a challenging and relevant
educational process incorporate the Senior Project.

The Senior Project consists of four phases. The first phase includes the
preparation of a research paper by each student. The research paper
contains a thesis that the writer proves (supports) or disproves through research
evidence. A student should carefully consider a possible product before
selecting a research topic. Selection of a topic takes considerable thought. The
paper exhibits the acquisition of knowledge through researching, writing,
interviewing, and synthesizing an application of the real-world skills of time
management, organization, self-discipline, persistence, and problem-solving.

The second phase includes the creation of a product that is an appropriate
and logical extension of the research paper. The product must demonstrate
the application of acquired knowledge through a reflective, physical, and/or
intellectual stretch. It is recommended that Projects be completed during the
school year. However, certain exceptions may be considered. For example,
agriculturally related projects may need to begin the summer prior to the Senior
year.

The third phase is the portfolio which includes specific writing throughout
the project period. These writings will include reflective and informative
journals, business letters, brochure, overviews, and a final Senior Project
reflection.

The fourth phase is a presentation before a Senior Project panel with a ten
to fifteen minute formal speech on the paper, the project, and personal
growth. A question and answer period will follow the presentation. The portfolio
will be provided to the panel of judges for review. The Senior Project panel can
be composed of teachers, mentors, parents, and community members, preferably
with knowledge or background of the project area. The panel and portfolio
experiences provide the student with an opportunity to synthesize the paper,
project, and self-growth journey using communication skills related to fluency,
knowledge depth, listening, explaining, defending, comprehending, and applying
real world skills.

Throughout this process, students will benefit greatly from the expertise of a
carefully selected project mentor and faculty advisor. They will serve as
resources to the student during all phases of the Senior Project.




                                         6
ELEMENTS OF A HIGH-QUALITY SENIOR PROJECT PROGRAM
1.   Clear and Aligned Purpose - Student learning outcomes are aligned with school,
     district, and state mission and goals.

2.   Explicit, Rigorous Criteria - Performance is assessed by application of established
     criteria.

3.   Student-Directed Learning and Youth Engagement - The student takes
     leadership for selecting, planning, and implementing his/her own learning goals.

4.   Clear Scaffolding of Skills - Students need instruction and practice for the skills
     required in the project. Some schools include a culminating project in elementary
     and middle school levels as well as high school.

5.   Learning Stretch - The project poses a challenge that requires significant new
     learning.

6.   Authentic Project - Students apply core academic knowledge and skills beyond the
     traditional classroom setting to address a real problem.

7.   Community Involvement - Members of the broader community play an important
     role in projects as mentors, panelists, advisors and/or resources.

8.   Authentic Audience - Expert individuals and community organizations are critical
     members of the audience to hear and review the project.

9.   Coordination and Comprehensive Communication - Students, parents,
     community members, teachers and administrators understand the purpose and
     processes of the project.

10. Adequate Staffing and Supervision - There is sufficient staff to coordinate the
    program and provide support to teachers, parents, and community partners.

11. Mechanism for Training Community Partners - Community partners are provided
    training to perform their role as co-educators and authentic partners.

12. Mechanism for Parent Involvement - Expectations are developed for parent
    involvement in the design, implementation, and celebration of the project.

13. Ongoing Professional Development and Program Improvement - School
    leaders and community partners organize formal training sessions, reflection
    activities and opportunities to continuously improve the program.

14. A Plan for Risk Management and Liability - Schools and communities ensure the
    project takes place in a safe environment and risk is managed.

15. Celebration and Recognition - All collaborators are provided opportunities to be
    recognized and celebrate the success of the project.




                                             7
                      SENIOR PROJECT GUIDELINES

The Senior Project is an integral part of the final year of high school. It integrates
skills, knowledge, and concepts learned into one culminating project. Here are
some guidelines to use in completing all project phases.

Topic Selection: The topic can be developed around a career cluster focus or
an area of interest. See sections of this Guide for forms and suggestions to help
with the process of determining a project topic.

Research Paper: The research paper is a formal document that encourages the
student to develop and demonstrate proficiency in conducting research and
writing about a chosen topic. Following are some basic criteria for the paper:
    1. Research-based with at least ten sources, one to be an interview.
       Examples of sources would be periodicals, library references, technical
       manuals, Internet, etc.
    2. Note cards to document relevant information and to help in preparing the
       outline for the presentation.
    3. Word processed and conforming to MLA (Modern Language Association)
       standards. Refer to an MLA handbook for information on this type of
       writing style. Or, you may use internet sources such as: EasyBib.com or
       Knightcite.com
    4. Eight to ten pages in length, not including the title page and works cited
       page. An appendix with other supporting information may be included.

Product/Project: This is a tangible creation based on choosing, designing, and
developing an item related to the research topic. A minimum of 15 hours should
be spent outside of class on the project. An approval form must be submitted for
the project before proceeding. A mentor and faculty advisor must be identified to
assist with the project.

Portfolio: A portfolio will be created in a 3-ring binder which will be made up of
the following sections. More detail can be found in the portfolio section of this
manual.

   1.   Proposal
   2.   Project Journal
   3.   Research
   4.   Evidence of Work
   5.   Personal Information
   6.   Evaluation
   7.   Appendix




                                          8
Journal: The journal is part of the portfolio. It should contain the following:

   1. A log of the hours spent on the Senior Project.
   2. Journal entries about experiences and knowledge gained. Use the forms
      (see the Portfolio section of this Framework) that are provided, but add
      thoughts and descriptions as well.
   3. Photographs or other visual documentation.

Presentation: A formal presentation describing all phases of the Senior Project
is the culminating event. A panel of judges will review and critique the
presentation. Speech content should include information about the research
paper, the product, and what was learned from this experience. This content
should be supported by appropriate presentation media (e.g. PowerPoint, display
with tri-fold boards, etc.) Following are some basic guidelines for the
presentation. See complete guidelines in the presentation section of this Guide.

   1.   8-10 minute overview of project
   2.   5-10 minute question and answer time
   3.   Multi-media must be included as a part of the presentation
   4.   Product
   5.   Portfolio




                                          9
Senior Venture Timeline
       2009-2010
 Activity                          Due Date

 Letter of Intent                  September 25

 Research Topic Identified         October 9
 Mentor Identified                 October 9
 Product Plan Submitted            October 9
 Product Plan Final Draft          October 16

 Research Outline                  October 30
 Research paper First Draft        November 20

 Product Checkpoint 1              December 10
 Research Paper Final Draft        December 17

 Product Checkpoint 2              January 14
 Product Checkpoint 3              February 25
 Portfolio Checkpoint              March17
 Product Complete                  April 7

 Student Work Day                  April 8
 Portfolio Complete                April 14

 Presentation Practice             April 19 (tentative)
 Presentation Day                  April 21 (tentative)




                              10
INITIAL DOCUMENTS AND FORMS




             11
                        SENIOR PROJECT PLEDGE
As a Senior, I have the opportunity to participate in the Senior Project program.
This program allows me to design an educational experience beyond the
classroom walls. I understand that my failure to comply with any of the following
may result in a failing grade and/or make me ineligible for high school graduation.

     I will attend all the meetings and workshops concerning the Senior
      Project.

       I will submit all materials and information requested of me on the date
        required.

       I will successfully complete all four phases of the project: Paper,
        Product, Portfolio, Presentation.

          o The research paper will meet the guidelines set by the English
            Teacher
          o The development of the product will include a minimum of 15
            hours of work outside of school.
          o I will keep a log of work and progress.
          o I will find an appropriate mentor who has expertise/experience
            with the topic.

       I will comply with the instructions given by the steering committee made
        up of faculty advisors and administration.

       I will faithfully comply with all school rules and policies that provide for
        mature and responsible behavior related the senior venture.

       I will attend all classes and maintain passing grades.



_______________________________________________ Date __________
Student Signature




                                          12
Senior Experience
Letter to Parents



Dear Parents or Guardians of Seniors:

This is a momentous year for your Senior. You have learned by now that our
school has set high expectations for our students. We believe each student
should have the opportunity to display his or her skills through a Senior Project.
As your student completes this Project, he/she will demonstrate the following
skills: reading, writing, speaking, accessing and processing information, thinking,
self-discipline, problem-solving, organization, and implementing technology.
These skills will be showcased through a four-phase process to include:

      a word-processed research paper,
      a related physical product or activity to demonstrate an aspect of the
       research and/or service to the community,
      a portfolio, and
      a presentation given before a review panel composed of educators and
       community members.

The Senior Project topic is based on new knowledge and provides growth
through a new learning experience.

The Senior Project involves parental and teacher support as well as student
initiative and self-discipline. Attached is a copy of the due dates for the Project
components.

Thank you for joining us on this exciting journey. If you have any questions,
please do not hesitate to call the school at 724.2153.

Sincerely,



Brad Preheim, Principal
Armour High School




                                         13
                         SENIOR EXPERIENCE
                       PARENT PERMISSION FORM



Student’s Name: _____________________________________


I have read through the Senior Experience materials and understand the
requirements of all phases of the Senior Experience. I acknowledge and give
permission for my son/daughter to participate.


My son/daughter will do the following as his/her project:




and will write a research paper on the following topic:




Parent or Guardian’s name: _____________________________________

Parent or Guardian’s signature: __________________________________

Date: ______________________________________________________




                                         14
                   SENIOR EXPERIENCE
       FACULTY ADVISOR/ADMINISTRATION AGREEMENT



Student’s Name: _____________________________________

Project Proposal: _____________________________________


Faculty Advisor

I have discussed the project proposed above with the student and am satisfied
that it is appropriate and meets the requirements necessary for a successful
senior experience.

Please do not sign below unless the following is true:

I accept the responsibility as Faculty Advisor for this student if his/her project is
accepted as proposed. I will expect regular progress reports from him/her during
project and I will be willing to assist this student as needed before the project
begins and during the project. I agree to perform all duties outlined on the Role
of Faculty Advisor form.

 ________________________________________                _____________________
Signature of Faculty Advisor                             Date


 ________________________________________                _____________________
Signature of Faculty Advisor                             Date




Administration

I have discussed the project proposed above with the student and am satisfied
that it is appropriate and meets the requirements necessary for a successful
senior experience.

 ________________________________________ _____________________
Signature of Principal                Date




                                         15
     SENIOR PROJECT
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITES




            16
                         SENIOR PROJECT ROLES
Role of the Student
It is the responsibility of the student to meet all guidelines and timelines for the
Senior Project.
     1. Complete requirements of the Project in accordance with the
         pre-established checklist and timetable.
     2. Select a Senior Project Mentor.
     3. Maintain copies (paper and electronic) of all work in progress, rough
         drafts, final draft, etc.
     4. Submit a rough draft of the research paper to the English teacher.
     5. Document product/process selection with the Faculty Advisor.
     6. Keep a project log or journal.
     7. Develop copies of the oral presentation outline for the evaluation panel.
     8. Develop a portfolio to display work.
     9. Write and distribute teacher-approved thank you letters to the Mentor and
         members of the Senior Project panel. Complete and return a Senior
         Project evaluation concerning the experience.

Role of the Faculty Advisor
All professional staff members (teachers, counselors, and administrators) are
available as advisors.
    1. Act as a consultant to the student, providing assistance with selection of
        the Project topic and final approval of Project scope.
    2. Assist and advise the student in the technical portion of the Project.
    3. Serve as the liaison with the student and the Mentor.
    4. Oversee student work in accordance with Project guidelines.
    5. Reporting to the Coordinator and/or English teacher any Senior who is not
        meeting timelines or requirements.
    6. Review the rough draft of the research paper and advise the student about
        needed revisions.
    7. Allocate related class time to work with students regarding their Senior
        Project.
    8. Evaluate the product/process according to the Project guidelines.
    9. Coach the student in preparation for the oral presentation and verify
        technical accuracy of the presented materials
    10. Administer an end-of-project student evaluation survey form for the
        purpose of Project improvement.
    11. Reviewing the completed project and evaluation form before submission
        to the committee.
    12. Assist with the role of the English teacher that follows.




                                         17
Role of English Teacher
The English Teacher is responsible for monitoring the research phase of the
project.
   1. Instruct the student in the proper form and process of the research paper.
   2. Collect and evaluate all documentation pertaining to the Senior Project.
   3. Review the rough draft of the research paper and advise the student as to
       where revisions may be needed.
   4. Evaluate the final draft of the research paper.
   5. Coach the student in appropriate methods of giving an oral presentation.
   6. Conduct a post presentation discussion with the student for the purpose of
       Project improvement and implementation.

Role of Senior Project Mentor
The role of the Project Mentor is essential to the success of the Senior Project.
Each student must have a Mentor who has expertise/experience with the topic.
   1. Assist and advise the student in technical aspects of the research paper
      and/or product/process.
   2. Serve as a resource to the student in all stages of the product/process
      project development.
   3. Allocate time and make arrangements to work with student on the Project.
   4. Sign and return the Mentor Agreement Form.
   5. Provide accurate and honest verification of the student's work.
   6. Document the hours spent with the student working on the Senior Project.
   7. Additional assistance could be provided by:
          a. reviewing student research materials,
          b. evaluating the product/process,
          c. advising student in planning the oral presentation, and
          d. attending the oral presentation.

Role of Senior Project Coordinator
Schools should have one person designated as the Coordinator. This could be a
paid position with release time provided. Specific duties are as follows:
   1. Serve as the Chair of the Senior Project.
   2. Prepare a yearly calendar with timelines for the Project.
   3. Organize the panel of judges for student presentations.
   4. Coordinate assignments of students with Faculty Advisors.




                                       18
              CHOOSING A SENIOR PROJECT MENTOR
A Senior Project Mentor is someone who has experience and an understanding
of your Project topic and will take a sincere interest in guiding you to successful
completion of your product.

What does the Mentor do?
  • Provides expertise in the product area
  • Gives suggestions and advice
  • Supports your efforts
  • Gives you feedback

What do you need to do before choosing a Mentor?
  • Clearly define your product
  • Be specific about what you expect from your Mentor, including time
      commitments
  • Be able to show how the mentorship will benefit the Mentor

How do you choose a Mentor?
  • Brainstorm possible experts within your chosen field of study
  • Talk to parents, friends, and teachers about possibilities
  • Look for someone who has the expertise and is interested in mentoring
     you through completion of your product/process

Once you have a Mentor - what should happen?
  • Meet with your Mentor
  • Determine how often you will meet with your Mentor
  • Decide what areas of your project the Mentor will assist with (i.e. project
      details, review speech)
  • Ask the Mentor to be part of your review team




                                         19
           THE ROLE OF THE SENIOR PROJECT MENTOR

This page is to be given to the Project Mentor at the time you discuss with
him/her what his/her duties will be. Be sure that your Mentor reads your
finished written proposal and understands the commitment before signing
the proposal.

The role of the Project Mentor is essential to the success of the Senior Project at
Armour High School. As responsible men and women in the community, the
Project Mentors play an active part in the students’ learning experience.

As Project Mentor, you will be asked to accept the following
responsibilities:

   1. To help the student organize his/her Project and then indicate approval by
      signing the appropriate statement at the bottom of the proposal form.
   2. To supervise the student as he/she follows through on his/her Project
      proposal.
   3. To sign time sheets to indicate that he/she has completed the required
      hours.
   4. To complete an evaluation form at the close of the Project.

Following is additional information which you will find useful:

1. The Senior Project begins in September and continues through April.
   Students are to meet with you a minimum of three times.
2. A student may not be paid for his/her Project work.
3. No parent may be in a direct line of supervision for the student.
4. Each student will also be assigned a Faculty Advisor who acts as a consultant
   for the student when writing the research paper and again during the
   process/product development. Because the Faculty Advisor may or may not
   have expertise in the Project area, your assistance is especially important to
   the student. The Advisor will further act as a liaison between the Mentor and
   school.
5. The student is bound by a set of guidelines which he/she should share with
   you.
6. The student will keep a journal and write a final evaluation of his/her Project.
   These are not to be done during his/her meetings with you.
7. In a pre-Project conference with the student, please establish a mutual
   understanding of what will be expected during project time.

We trust that the student’s work will be beneficial not only to him/her, but also to
you as the Project Mentor and that you will both gain satisfaction. Thank you for
your support of the Senior Project program.




                                         20
       WHAT IS A MENTOR? WHAT DOES A MENTOR DO?
It is common to hear Mentors described as:
      teachers
      trainers
      sponsors
      role models
      advocates
      coaches
      openers of doors
      friends

What are the benefits of having a personal Mentor?
   Skills and knowledge relating to careers
   Positive role model of a professional in the field
   Connections with other professionals in the industry
   Knowledge of how school and work interrelate
   Learn what it takes to be successful in the industry
   Expanded resources to help advance your care

What will your Mentor expect from you?
   Good work habits
   Punctuality - be on time
   Dress appropriately
   Maintain and demonstrate a positive attitude
   Come prepared
   Be alert and enthusiastic, try to make a good impression
   Be willing and eager to talk; be willing and eager to listen
   Be honest. Don't brag or exaggerate
   Look at the Mentor and other adults when speaking to them




                                      21
                      MENTOR AGREEMENT FORM

Student Name ___________________

Project _________________________

In order for students to complete a Senior Project, the student must work with a
Mentor who has expertise in the area being explored. The Mentor must be
willing to verify the student’s efforts and time spent. A student should meet a
minimum of three times with the Mentor. While there are no time restrictions on
the length of these meetings, they need to be meaningful and worthwhile. If you
are willing to serve as this student’s Mentor, please complete the form below.


I will meet with this student a minimum of three times during the course of his/her
Senior Project to advise and monitor progress. We will have our first meeting
before he/she begins the hands-on or service related project to set a reasonable
time schedule so that the project will be completed on time. At this initial
conference, we will also schedule at least two future meetings with each other. I
understand that the student may request additional meetings or contacts to
request assistance.

I agree to serve as a Mentor for the above named student for the Senior Project.


Mentor Name ___________________________________________


Address _______________________________________________


Phone _________________________________________________


E-mail _________________________________________________


Relationship to Student___________________________________


___________________________________                     __________________
                  Signature


                                        22
                 MENTOR PROPOSAL DRAFT REVIEW
Student Name ____________________________________________________

Mentor Name _____________________________________________________

Project Title ______________________________________________________


Please read the first draft of your student’s proposal and give the following
feedback:

1. Do you see anything in this proposal that could be problematic for the student
   in completing this project?




2. Does the student need to make additions to the process described in this
   proposal in order to complete a quality product?




3. Has the student been too ambitious? Are the expectations realistic? Can this
   project be completed in the required 40 hours?



4. Comment on the timeline. What adjustments would you advise?




5. What, if any, additional research would you advise?




6. Are there clear and specific standards set for the product?




________________________________________________________________
Mentor Signature                                 Date

                                         23
MENTOR’S FINAL PROJECT VERIFICATION & EVALUATION
FORM
Student’s Name: __________________________________________

Project Description: ________________________________________


1. How many times did the student meet with you? ______

2. What successes have you seen this student achieve?




3. What problems specifically did this student encounter and overcome?




4. After having worked with the student, please explain how you feel about the
   effort expended, and evaluate the final outcome or product.




Please rate the students effort, attitude, and success (1-poor to 5-excellent)

                     1      2      3      4      5



Mentor’s Name: _______________________________________________

Signature: ____________________________________________________

Phone: ___________________________ Date: _____________________


                                        24
TOPIC SELECTION




      25
                      TOPIC SELECTION GUIDELINES

A Senior Project is about doing and learning something that you want to do and
learning more about! This is your chance to choose a topic that will be interesting
and worthwhile and will extend your knowledge. However, making the decision
may not be easy. Choose carefully, consult with your Faculty Advisor, and
remember to keep your project manageable. Carefully choose a product or
process that you can build or produce or a community-based service you can
provide. Answer these questions as you decide your topic:


        Is there a clear connection between the research topic and the
         product/process you want to produce?
        Does the product/process represent significant amounts of time, effort,
         and appropriate complexity? Does it go beyond what you already know
         how to do?
        Is the project something you will do outside of your regular class or co-
         curricular requirements?
        Will the product involve tangible evidence of your work – either something
         physical that can be seen and touched, a community-based service that
         can be documented as beneficial or something that can be written,
         produced, taped, or presented?
        Is the project related to your chosen career cluster?



The following guidelines may assist in choosing the subject to be explored.

1.       The research topic should be one in which the student is interested,
         but not one about which the student is already an expert.

         If a student has been a diabetic for ten years, worked closely with the
         Juvenile Diabetes Association, and has been a volunteer in the children’s
         diabetic ward in a local hospital, he or she probably knows a great deal
         about the subject juvenile diabetes. Unless that student pursues a new
         approach to diabetes, that topic might not yield much new learning.

2.       The research topic may be one that requires cumulative knowledge
         across grade levels and content area.

         It should be a natural outgrowth of interest and combined skills of all, or
         most content areas. For example, a student who researches the changes
         in the ozone layer is using cumulative knowledge from at least English,
         math, science, and history.



                                          26
3.   The research topic should be one that is challenging to the student
     academically and creatively.

     The student should take care not to choose a topic that is limited to
     relatively simple ideas or one that has little application or extension
     possibilities. The topic should require an academic and creative
     stretch/risk.

4.   Students should avoid choosing topics that might involve expenses
     they are not prepared to handle.

     For example if the research involves travel or long distance calls, the
     student may want to make another choice. If the product that grows out of
     the research will require materials, the student may want to make another
     choice. Remember, the student is not required, encouraged, or advised to
     spend money in order to complete the project. Expenditures will not
     enhance the evaluation of the project.

5.   Primary research is a valuable component of any inquiry.

     It may be wise, therefore, to explore the possibilities for personal
     interviews, informal surveys, empirical observation, etc., before making a
     final topic selection.

6.   Students should avoid choosing topics that might endanger
     themselves or others.

     For example, experiments which are potentially explosive or activities
     such as handling poisonous snakes are not appropriate.

7.   Students should use good judgment to be certain that the topics
     they choose are appropriate for presentation to a review panel and
     the general public.

     Remember that the student must have Project Proposal approved by the
     Senior Project Coordinator and Faculty Advisors prior to beginning the
     Project.

8.   The research topic should be one that is broad enough to allow the
     student access to enough information, yet narrow enough to make
     the research scope reasonable.

     For example, a student choosing the career cluster Health Science would find it
     impossible to include everything about health science (home remedies, history of
     emergency services, the treatment of burns, how to stop bleeding, evolution of
     first aid courses, etc.) On the other hand, a student choosing to research The
     Application of Band-Aids to Skin Abrasions probably will not find enough
     information. A better choice would be Bandaging for Sports Injuries.

                                        27
                        TOPIC SELECTION GUIDE
Your project will probably fall into one of the following categories: Career
Exploration, Design a product system or service, Event/activity planning,
Investigation, Learn a new skill or improve an existing skill, or Research. Use the
information below to guide you in designing your scoring tool.


Career Exploration

      Research: Conducts research into required education, professional
         responsibilities, ethical issues, salary, employment outlook, and
         opportunities for advancement.
      Networking: Develops contacts within the chosen field.
      Career Plan: Creates a professional career plan.
      Application: Applies the information acquired about a chosen career to
         the development of a quality product or activity.

Design a Product System or Service

      Research: Conducts research into similar work done by others.
      Fine Tuning: Makes appropriate adjustments as necessary.
      Evaluation: Evaluates the quality of the design by gathering information
         from sources such as impact studies, product testing, or market
         research. Makes adjustments as needed to conform to specified
         standards of quality and/or safety.

Event/Activity Plan

      Research: Conducts research into relevant precedents, laws and/or
          regulations. Considers similar work done by others. Understands
          what made similar events successful or unsuccessful.
      Publicity: Takes appropriate measures to insure that the target audience
          takes part in the event or that the event is attended.
      Efficiency: Makes efficient use of time, money, people, resources and
          facilities. Makes contingency plans for unexpected circumstances.
      Evaluation: Evaluates the success.

Investigation

      Focus: Develops a central question.
      Procedure: Designs an appropriate procedure to gather information.
      Objectivity: Objectively observes, measures, and records results.
      Generalization: Generalizes about the data by comparing and
         contrasting and noting trends.




                                        28
Learning a New Skill or Improving an Existing Skill

       Research: Conducts research into current methods and practice.
       Documentation: Determines a way to measure and document progress.
       Evaluation: Establishes qualitative measurable standard for skill level
          based on expert advice. Demonstrates acquisition of new skill or
          measurable skill improvement.

Research

       Focus: Develops a central question of social, economical, environmental,
          political, historical, or scientific significance.
       Research: Investigates a variety of primary and secondary resources and
          formulates a thesis.
       Writing: Write a paper building and developing an argument using logical
          thinking and data from research to support the conclusion.
       Application: Applies the information acquired about the topic to the
          development of a product or activity.


                 SENIOR PROJECT TOPIC PROPOSAL

Here are some areas to think about before preparing the Topic Proposal on the
following page.

      Can you describe the scope of your Project or the steps you need to do in
       completing it?

      What subject(s) or topic(s) do you expect to learn about through your
       Project?

      What skills and understanding will you develop and/or demonstrate?

      What kind of product/process do you envision?

      Is the topic related to your career cluster? If so, how?

      Who is the person(s) with expertise in your area of interest that could
       serve as your Senior Project Mentor? If you do not know of a person,
       write down some ideas about how you might find a mentor.

      What do you hope your Project will contribute to your school and/or
       community?

      What do you hope to learn about yourself?

      What most excites you about your proposed Project?
                                         29
           SENIOR PROJECT TOPIC APPROVAL FORM


Student Name___________________________________________


Product/Process Title____________________________________



Product/Process Proposal

     Description:




     Steps for Product/Process Completion:




     Special Equipment/Facilities/Environment:




Cost Analysis
     Materials List:



     Budget:




                                    30
Your proposal should include the following:

      What is the topic or area of study that will be the focus of your senior project?
      Why did you choose this topic? What previous knowledge or experience in this
      area do you have?




      What will be the focus of your research paper? Describe your topic, discussing
      any preliminary areas of exploration or questions you have identified.




      What will your project be? How will you make your research ―come alive‖? Who
      can serve as a mentor to you to complete the project and what is their
      experience or expertise in your chosen field? What resources (time and/or
      money) do you anticipate this will require?




      What is the connection between your research paper and your project? How are
      these components related and how do they together show a concerted effort to
      explore your topic or area of study?




                                              31
              SENIOR PROJECT TOPIC CHANGE FORM
As sometimes happens, a student may need to modify the original Senior
Project. If that happens, a student should address the following questions as
he/she modifies the original proposal and secures the required signatures.

   1. How do you wish to change the proposed project?


   2. What is the purpose of the changes?


   3. How will these changes help to further explore an area of interest?


   4. How will these changes allow better demonstration or representation of
      learning?


   5. Have the proposed changes been discussed with others, such as parents,
      Faculty Advisor, and Senior Project Mentor? What were the responses
      about the proposed change?


   6. How will these changes affect the Project time line?


Student                                        Date


Faculty Advisor(s)                             Date

Faculty Advisor(s)                             Date

Faculty Advisor(s)                             Date


Parent/Guardian                                Date


Senior Project Coordinator Approval: _____ yes _____ no



Coordinator                                    Date


                                       32
 PHASE I

RESEARCH




   33
                    RESEARCH PAPER GUIDELINES

Length: Eight pages minimum

Paper Submission: All students must submit a hard copy accompanied by an
electronic copy in Microsoft Word submitted through email.

Format: MLA format, 12-point font, Times New Roman, all double-spaced.

              Header:
                   Your name              Course        Date (day month year)

Works Cited: This is an alphabetical listing of the sources cited in the paper to
prove, support, or disprove the thesis statement. A minimum of five sources is
required.

Parenthetical (In-text) Documentation: Any fact you use to back up the central
point of your paper must be documented, whether the fact is directly quoted or in
your own words. Paraphrasing does not mean changing every third word of the
original language of the source. If you do not document a fact that supports your
central point, you are guilty of plagiarism. If you use a writer’s exact words but
do not give credit and/or do not place the exact words in quotation marks, you
have committed plagiarism.

Quotations: The only reason you need to use exact quotations is if the
language of the original resource is very unusual and cannot be paraphrased or
the exact quote supports or gives an example of the thesis statement already
established. If you think the original language must be used, please follow
these guidelines:

Never use a quotation without introducing who gave the quote and/or the
significance of the quote. A quote by itself, even punctuated correctly, makes
little sense if it is not worked smoothly into the context of your own sentence
structure and into what your paper is trying to prove.

For quotations that are four lines long or longer, indent each line of the
entire quote one inch and single space the material. Do not use
quotation marks. Use parenthetical documentation as necessary.




                                        34
                             “YES” CHECKLIST

Before your English teacher will read and grade your research paper, it must
pass the YES list test below. If any category earns a ―NO‖ check, your paper will
be returned. Since there are no papers accepted late, it is imperative that you
turn your paper in before the final date, so that if needed you have time to
complete revisions to your paper.



      YES                                                          NO

      ____                 Eight pages minimum                     ____

      ____                 Word-processed in Microsoft Word        ____

      ____                 Parenthetical documentation             ____

      ____                 Works cited page                        ____

      ____                 Five sources minimum                    ____


      ____                 Pages are numbered                      ____

      ____                 Rough draft                             ____

      ____                 Note cards and source cards             ____

      ____                 Outline and thesis page                 ____
                                PLAGIARISM
Plagiarism is cheating or stealing another author's words and ideas without
giving appropriate credit. If you do not give credit to the person or persons
who wrote the information you receive when researching, you are stealing the
information. Colleges or businesses can and will terminate you because of
plagiarism. It is more of a moral and ethical issue than a legal one. Most of
the problems occur outside of copyright infringement. Plagiarism will cause
many problems nonetheless-from failure of the course to expulsion in college.

Avoiding plagiarism is easy to incorporate into your research. Plagiarism
will result in loss of credit, a lower grade, and will require additional
paperwork to be done to achieve credit.

   Keep careful notes. Differentiate in the manner in which you write ideas,
    paraphrases or quotes.
   Give credit to the author's ideas, arguments, or thinking. Be safe-cite it.
    All information must be documented, not just what you have copied word
    for word.
   Documenting sources also helps you as a researcher evaluate what you
    believe about a subject.
   You do not have to document information that is common knowledge, such
    as dates of well-known events in history.
   If the information is a little-known fact, be sure to document it to give you
    credibility as a writer.
   Always document statistics, charts, maps, or graphs-the author prepared
    them, so he/she must be given the credit.
   DO NOT turn in a paper that has already been graded for another class or
    another teacher or the same teacher but a different year, without the
    teacher's permission.
   DO NOT change the order of a sentence or replace just a few words
    without citing the sources. You are still using the author's ideas.
   If a person or persons are quoted in your source, then you MUST quote
    the information within your text.
   "Cutting and Pasting" downloaded articles from the Internet is plagiarism if
    you do not cite the source immediately after the information.
   Downloading an essay from an Internet site, changing the wording or
    allowing the computer to change it for you is plagiarism.


                    When in doubt, ask the teacher, and
         always, always, always accurately document your sources.




                                        36
              ASSEMBLING RESEARCH INFORMATION
Checklist for a Research Paper
   Construct a thesis and complete a working outline to do research
   Construct a working bibliography
   Make note cards and source cards
   Organize the note cards and make an outline
   Write rough draft
   Revise to final draft
   Complete final paper

Making Note Cards
   Use a separate card for each source card and note .
   Place the source number in the upper right corner of each card
   Use a separate note card for each main idea
   Write a label in the upper left corner of the note card
   Write the page number at the bottom of each note card
   Use only one side of the card
   Be sure to indicate quoted or paraphrased materials
   Be sure all notes exist within context and are accurately recorded
   Reread the notes to make sure you understand them


Organizing Note Cards
    Use label topics (from upper left corner) to organize the cards
    Discriminate between main and subordinate ideas
    Arrange cards in the order they will appear in the paper
    Complete your outline integrating the researched material


Writing a Rough Draft
An introductory paragraph is:
    A general statement of information
    A transition sentence using works directly related to the thesis
    A thesis statement and explanation that:
           1. Contains a one-sentence statement of the topic being examined.
           2. States an opinion.
           3. Narrows the topic so it may be adequately supported in research.
The body of the paper contains:
    The weakest pro-argument or least important reason/example in support
       of the thesis.
    A secondary strongest point.
    The strongest pro-argument or most important reason/example in the
       support of the thesis.
    Proper documentation of the sources.


                                       37
The conclusion:
    Restates the thesis.
    Paraphrases or summarizes ideas supporting the thesis.
    Takes the topic one step beyond and predicts the future of the problem.
The works cited page:
    Is an alphabetical list.
    Contains all sources used in the paper.
Miscellaneous:
    Follow either MLA style
    Avoid plagiarism - presenting someone else’s words or ideas as your own
          1. Borrowing someone’s words or ideas is acceptable as long as you
             give appropriate credit.
          2. Common knowledge does not require documentation

Writing the Final Paper
    Revise and edit the evaluated rough draft.
    Make a copy to share with your Mentor.




                                      38
          RESEARCH PAPER STUDENT EDITING SHEET

Name: __________________________________________________________

Thesis Statement:



  1. Content/Organization
        Length appropriate                    Yes   _____   No   _____
        All sections support thesis           Yes   _____   No   _____
        Clearly written                       Yes   _____   No   _____
        Well-phrased sentences                Yes   _____   No   _____
        Good transitions                      Yes   _____   No   _____
        Conclusion restates thesis            Yes   _____   No   _____
        Conclusion offers solution            Yes   _____   No   _____

  2. Use of Sources
        Correct number of sources             Yes _____ No _____
        How many:
             o Works cited ________
             o Works consulted _____
        Paraphrased information
           correctly documented                Yes _____ No _____
          No paragraph citations              Yes _____ No _____
          Number of citations in paper        Yes _____ No _____

  3. Mechanics
      Underlined publication titles           Yes _____ No _____
      Quotation marks around magazine
         articles                              Yes _____ No _____
        Parentheses around citations          Yes _____ No _____
        Periods follow parenthesis            Yes _____ No _____
        End punctuation mark before closing
         quotation marks in a direct quote     Yes   _____   No   _____
        Corrected all spelling errors         Yes   _____   No   _____
        Eliminated fragments                  Yes   _____   No   _____
        Eliminated run-on sentences           Yes   _____   No   _____
        Eliminated contractions               Yes   _____   No   _____
        Mechanical/grammatical errors         Yes   _____   No   _____


                                     39
??????????????????????????????????????????????????
                        ??

                      RESEARCH PAPER RUBRIC

Rough Draft (keyboarded)

Final Draft (keyboarded)

Format: 20 points
Correct title page                           4   3   2   Revise
Correct outline                              4   3   2   Revise
Correct subheadings and titles               4   3   2   Revise
Correct numbering                            4   3   2   Revise
Correct margins                              4   3   2   Revise
Structure: 20 points
Appropriate title sheet                      4   3   2   Revise
Thesis statement                             4   3   2   Revise
Well developed body (adequate information)   4   3   2   Revise
and clear method of development
Adequate conclusion                          4   3   2   Revise
Adherence to outline                         4   3   2   Revise
Documentation: 20 points
Correct parenthetical documentation          4   3   2   Revise
Correct works cited page                     4   3   2   Revise
Variety of sources                           4   3   2   Revise
All required citations included              4   3   2   Revise
Five sources (minimum) referenced            4   3   2   Revise
Mechanics: 12 points
Spelling                                     4   3   2   Revise
Capitalization                               4   3   2   Revise
Punctuation                                  4   3   2   Revise
Usage: 28 points
Parallel structure                           4   3   2   Revise
Sentence variety                             4   3   2   Revise
Consistency in tone and voice                4   3   2   Revise
Tense consistency                            4   3   2   Revise
Pronoun and antecedent agreement             4   3   2   Revise
Transitions                                  4   3   2   Revise
Subject and verb agreement                   4   3   2   Revise

Total 100           Points Earned __________ Grade __________

?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????
                              ??
                                     40
  PHASE II

THE PRODUCT




     41
                               THE PRODUCT
The physical product gives you the chance to explore your career cluster or your
area of interest in greater depth than possible during the normal course of your
busy senior year. Frequently, students begin knowing what they want to do for
their Senior Project, yet are unsure what to produce as a product. Your Mentor is
an invaluable resource for feedback and ideas.

The product can be oriented around performance of a skill, the development of
some physical product, or the study of a profession. Whatever the product, you
must keep in mind that during your oral presentation, you will be required to
illustrate your activities in some way. Products that have been built should be
photographed at various stages of completion. Other fields of study must be
illustrated in the same way. Problem-solving your way to a well-documented
presentation is a vital part of putting together a dynamic speech.

The product is an appropriate and logical outgrowth/extension of the research
paper. The product shows evidence of inventiveness/creativity in its concept(s).
The student-generated product demonstrates care and attention to detail in its
design.




                   GUIDELINES FOR THE PRODUCT

1.    The product must be student-generated. It must be a showcase of the
      student’s skills – not a parent’s, friend’s, or mentor’s.

2.    The product should show evidence of application and synthesis of the
      research paper.

3.    The product should be tangible evidence that reflects the academic
      stretch/risk, which the student has experienced during completion of the
      Project.

4.    Students are not expected to spend a lot of money in order to complete
      the Project. Expenditures will not enhance the evaluation of the Project.

5.    Research for the product should reflect one or more of four primary areas:
      personal experience, experiment, survey and/or interview.

6.    The product can be community service oriented.

7.    A group/community could benefit from the product.

8.    There will be no pairing or sharing of products.

                                       42
                                         PROJECT RUBRIC

1. 15 hours minimum (determined by portfolio, 2 points per hour)                   30 points

2. Project presents an extension of the research                                   10 points

3. Documentation (in portfolio)                                                    10 points
       Journal or log entries                            2   points
       Letter of recommendation                          2   points
       Research paper                                    2   points
       Papers/notes/flyers/charts                        2   points
       Copies of all required forms                      2   points

4. Reflection/self-evaluation                                                      15 points

4. Signed mentor sheet (minimum of 3 meetings)            10 points                10 points

5. Care and attention to detail, a quality product (also includes the quality of   25 points
   the portfolio)
       Advisors – 10 points
       Mentor – 5 points
       Administrator – 5 points
       Student Self-Evaluation – 5 points

Total Possible                                                                     100 points




                                                    43
  PHASE III

THE PORTFOLIO




      44
                        THE PORTFOLIO
PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS
The portfolio is where you make your project come alive. It is also the portion
where you get to display your creativity: How well can you paint a picture in
words describing your experiences? How cohesive a story can you build with
your pictures? Your research paper is factual writing—your opinion and
experiences have no place in it—but in the portfolio you are graded on how well
you explain your experiences and share your insights—the things you learned
from being there, not just from your reading.

The portfolio is similar to a scrapbook, although there are specific requirements
for the elements.

Use the following checklist and instructions to complete your portfolio.


PORTFOLIO CHECKLIST
A portfolio is a good way to strengthen learning. It enables you to reflect on new
information and to apply that knowledge in new and creative ways. A Senior
Project portfolio should include all forms, references, and activities associated
with the Project: proposals, research information, logs, journals, etc. Portfolio
items should be accurate, clean, neat, in sequence, assembled, labeled, and
filed in a three-ring binder (or in some other organizer) for future reference.

This is the first impression the panel will get of you and your project—make sure
that you create a positive one. Your notebook must meet the following guidelines
and must include all of the sections and components listed below.


Required Components in This Order

Notebook and Paper: Obtain a ½‖ (or 1‖) white view binder that includes a clear
     cover slot into which a cover page can be inserted. All pages in your
     presentation notebook must be 8-1/2‖ x 11‖ in size. Use only Arial and
     Times New Roman fonts or equivalents.
    Notebook Cover: Create a notebook cover page that includes 1) your
     project title, 2) your name, 3) a centered picture or graphic that
     represents your project, 4) school name, 5) your senior project teacher’s
     name, and 6) the presentation date. Insert it in your cover clear slot.
    Title Page: Organize similar to your Cover Page but do not include your
     graphic.
    Table of Contents Page: Organize it similar to the checklist below.


                                        45
Section 1 divider labeled: Proposal
   Your Project Approval Form and signatures (if not included on your
      proposal cover page)
   Your actual Original Approved Proposal
   Your Addendum, if needed
   Your Senior Project Contract
   Your Parental Approvement Form
   Your Mentor Agreement Form

Section 2 divider labeled: Project Journal or Learning Log
   Your complete Project Journal in 8-1/2‖ x 11‖ 3-hole paper format

Section 3 divider labeled: Research
   Your Research Paper
   Your Annotated Bibliography
   All research documents gathered regarding your project are included
      here.

Section 4 divider labeled: Evidence of Work
   Photos showing progress and completion of your project
   Materials collected
   Other project documentation created, such as project notes,
      conclusions, graphs, charts, etc.

Section 5 divider labeled: Personal Information
   Personal Resume’
   Letters of Recommendation

Section 6 divider labeled: Evaluation
   Research paper evaluation
   Mentor evaluation form
   Project evaluation form
   Product self evaluation form
   Reflection/self-evaluation
   Insert other evaluation forms (portfolio, presentation) when available.

Section 7 divider labeled: Appendix
   Your Budget Page with a list of expenditures and the total cost of your
      project
   Thank you letters
   Your required class assessments
   All class handouts
   Other records or learning experiences
   Optional: Rough Drafts, Outlines, etc.




                                      46
                   PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS


1. Daily Entries – There will be one log for each mentor or supervisor
   with whom you spent time. In these logs you will write down the date
   and times you did your hours, and the tasks you performed.

2. Pictures and visuals of your project – This is where you show the story
   of your service hours. It is the only opportunity your advisor will have to
   ―see‖ what you did. If the story doesn’t ―prove‖ that you were there and
   accomplished something, you may have to start over.

   Mount the pictures on 8-1/2 x 11 paper and caption them (explain each
   picture). A general rule to follow is that 5 pictures is too few and 50 is too
   many. Twenty or thirty pictures is about average. If your project
   demands confidentiality, talk to your advisor. Pictures must still be
   provided—your creativity will be useful here! It is also wise to use more
   than one camera or more than one roll of film to allow for breakage or
   processing errors. You are advised to place your pages of pictures inside
   page protectors.

3. Mentor’s evaluation – Your mentor’s evaluation(s) and your portfolio
   grading sheet need to be included in a pocket of your portfolio.

4. Reflections page – On these two to three typewritten, double-spaced
   pages, we are looking for eloquent writing that summarizes what you did.
   Discuss such topics as where you were, what your duties were, what you
   saw, what you noticed about your surroundings, how your presence was
   helpful, who worked with you, what interested you, what surprised you,
   what affected you, and a more in-depth explanation of what your feelings,
   observations, insights, and experiences were. Show:

   ●   What you learned—about other people and especially about yourself.
   ●   What attitudes or opinions were strengthened or changed.
   ●   What challenges you faced and how you overcame them.
   ●   What affected you the most.
   ●   What surprises you found.
   ●   What you could or would do differently next time.

   Expand on your daily entries. This is your opportunity to look at your
   whole service and what it accomplished. This will serve as the basis for
   your formal Board presentation.




                                     47
           THE SENIOR PROJECT JOURNAL (BLOG)

1. All students must complete a Journal (Blog) as a part of their Senior
   Project. The Journal (Blog) is a component of the Project portfolio.

2. Students should record at minimum of three entries each week during the
   project period.

3. Include the following information in each Journal (Blog) page: the date
   and the number of hours that you worked on the project during that
   particular week.

4. Each entry should cover the following:

      a. Describe what you did on the Senior Project.
      b. Write your personal reaction or evaluation of what you did. Some
         things you may wish to include:
              i. Did you like what you were doing? Why or why not?
             ii. Did everything happen exactly as you expected, or were
                 there some surprises?
            iii. How will you benefit from what you are learning?
            iv. What frustrations did you experience?
             v. What successes did you achieve?

   Please note: Even if your Project is repetitive in nature, your Journal
   (Blog) must meet these minimum requirements.

5. Remember that your Journal (Blog) will be read by your Faculty Advisor
   and the Senior Project Steering Committee.

6. It is your responsibility to have your Faculty Advisory check your Journal
   (Blog) each week.




                                    48
                   PROJECT JOURNAL LOG
Name: _________________________________________________________

Project: ________________________________________________________


 Date    Time            Activity                Comments




                                    49
                            LETTER TO THE JUDGES

Format:     Block (see format for Letter of Intent)

Purpose:    To satisfy the requirement of an autobiographical essay and to inform and
            thank the judges.

Content:    The first paragraph should briefly introduce you; tell what you think about
            topics that interest you, and in general, give a sense of the person whom
            they will hear during the presentation.

            The second paragraph should explain the subject of your Project and what
            you think you have accomplished.

            Finally, in the third paragraph, thank the judges. They have had to schedule
            time away from work to be a part of your Senior Project.

Length:     One page

Reminder:   This letter will be the first text that the judges will see in your portfolio, and
            you only have one chance to make a first impression. Although this is a
            formal business letter, you may use ―I‖ references as you explain to the
            judges who you are, what you have done, what your Project is about, and
            what you think about your achievement with this Project.




                                             50
                      SENIOR PROJECT REFLECTION


Directions: Using the format below, type the corresponding topic and answer by
writing complete sentences. This must be word processed for your portfolio.


Your Name

Faculty Advisor’s Name(s)

English Teacher’s Name

Mentor’s Name

Date (Month Day, Year)

                                    Reflection

What were the total hours spent on the project? (This calculation does not
include class time.)

      A.     Research
             Using this paragraph format, respond to each heading/question in
             complete sentences. This is an example of the proper format.
      B.     Product
      C.     Mentoring


What were at least two of the biggest problems you encountered as you worked
on the project?
      A.
      B.




What did you do to manage your time?




What did you learn from the experience of working with other people?




                                        51
What personal satisfaction was gained from this Project experience?




Briefly describe the “risk” you took in completing this Project. Include what you
consider to be the “stretch” in this Project for you.




How were your original plans for the Project the same or different from the final
outcome of your Project?




Assess the success of your product.




What did the Project teach you about yourself?




What would you do differently now that you have finished?




What grade would you give yourself for the Project? Give your justification.




                                       52
          SENIOR PROJECT PORTFOLIO SCORING RUBRIC


(15)_____ Section 1 Proposal
                Project Approval Form
                Original Approved Proposal
                Senior Project Contract
                Parental Approvement Form
                Mentor Agreement Form

(15)_____ Section 2 divider labeled: Project Journal or Learning Log
                Project Journal

(15)_____ Section 3 Research
                Research Paper
                Annotated Bibliography
                Research documents

(15)_____ Section 4 Evidence of Work
                Photos
                Materials collected
                Other project documentation

(15)_____ Section 5 Personal Information
                Personal Resume’
                Letters of Recommendation

(15)_____ Section 6 Evaluation
                Research paper evaluation
                Mentor evaluation form
                Project evaluation form
                Product self evaluation form
                Reflection/self-evaluation

(10)_____ Section 7 Appendix
                Budget Page
                Thank you letters
                Other



                     ________ Total Points – 100 possible




                                       53
    PHASE IV

THE PRESENTATION




       54
                        THE PRESENTATION

ORAL PRESENTATION EXPECTATIONS

When:        __________, 20____

Where:       Armour High School

Who:         Panel of three members

What:        You will be evaluated on preparedness, your professionalism, your
             ability to communicate and to think on your feet, and on the overall
             quality of both content and organization of your presentation

Contents of the presentation should cover what you have learned from doing the
research, from writing the paper, and from completing the Project. Also include what
worked and what did not work, how you solved the problem, and the nature of your
personal growth. Let your personality shine through! Show insight and depth of
thought. Sound intelligent! (This means you must rehearse!)

Presentations will follow this procedure: Each presentation will be scheduled every
thirty minutes. The first five minutes will be used for setup. The speech should be
between eight to ten minutes. YOU must speak at least eight minutes. The additional
five minutes may be used to show a video, to do a demonstration, to play an
instrument, etc. The next five minutes will be question/answer time. The judges will
ask you questions, ask you to clarify a point, or ask you to elaborate on a point made
in your speech. The following five minutes will be time for judges to evaluate and to
score your presentation. The remaining minutes are used for the set up of the next
presentation.

You must inform your teacher of any equipment needed (monitor, projector, computer,
etc.) for your presentation. Remember your product is not your visual aid. This
moment is a time of academic focus on one person--YOU. You have worked hard --
let your judges know this.




                                          55
         STUDENT GUIDELINES FOR THE ORAL PRESENTATION
The Senior Project presentation is the culminating event, which must include the entire learning
experience. It should reflect elements of the product, paper and the portfolio.

  1.    Prior to the presentation (planning the event), confirm the time and place. Also confirm with the
        Faculty Advisor that the judges have been invited.

  2.    Plan the presentation using the presentation rubric: Check the speech itself – Do you have an
        introduction (attention-getting device)? Is your outline completed? How are you going to
        conclude your presentation (a concluding device)?

  3.    Prepare audio / visual materials that you will need. Check the technology to make sure it’s
        working and ready to use.

  4.    Practice and time the presentation using the audio/visual materials.

  5.    On the day of the presentation, arrive early to check that everything is in order and functional.

  6.    Keep these tips in mind when answering questions following your presentation:
         a.    Answer with confidence.
         b.    Request clarification when necessary.
         c.    Admit when you don’t know the answer.
         d.    Pack up and remove product/presentation materials.

  7.    Bask in success — show appreciation to your Mentors, Faculty Advisors, and judges with thank
        you notes sharing personal reflections.

  8.    Remember that you will be making a formal presentation. Please dress according to
        presentation guidelines. If you are not sure what constitutes appropriate dress, consult your
        Senior Project Faculty Advisor.

  9.    Do not chew gum.

  10.   Be aware of your body language. Avoid nervous gestures that may adversely affect your
        presentation.

  11.   Maintain eye contact with the judges.

  12.   Do not read your presentation.

  13.   Practice your presentation several times until you feel comfortable with its format and content.
        Also, time your presentation to be sure that you speak for a minimum of ten minutes and do not
        exceed the fifteen-minute maximum.

  14.   Proof of a product is required as a part of your oral presentation.

  15.   Be sure that your presentation covers the following: subject of the research paper, subject of
        the physical product, connection between the paper and the product, the stretch for you, and a
        self-evaluation.

Try to anticipate what questions your audience might ask you (or ask a parent or a friend to compose
questions for you) and plan the answers you would give. The judges may not ask these exact
questions, but this will give you an opportunity to practice answering questions. Remember that
questions should address a clarification or extension of your topic.



                                                    56
               TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL PRESENTATIONS
Preparation

     Practice your presentation and know your subject well.
     Prepare handouts for your audience that highlight the main points of your
      presentation.


Format

     Think ―multi-media!‖ Use a variety of formats, including video images, slides,
      overheads, computer graphics, 3-D models, and 2-D presentation boards. Plan
      carefully to make sure you have all of the equipment you need.
     Use materials such as poster board, markers, colored paper, and cardboard to
      prepare ―professional style‖ presentation boards.


Standards

     Set high standards for your presentation; check all written work for grammar
      and spelling errors; create a clear graphic layout; and thoroughly label all
      products and exhibition board.
     Ask your Mentor to review the materials before your presentation.


Speech Organization

     Introduction: Introduce your topic and try to capture the audience’s attention.
     Body: List and explain five key points that you want to make:
          o Point 1: How did you become interested in the topic?
          o Point 2: How does the topic relate to your career cluster?
          o Point 3: What did you learn from the research?
          o Point 4: What did you learn from the Project?
          o Point 5: What did you learn about yourself and how has this information
             affected your plans for the future?
     Connect the introduction, learning, and possible plans for the future.




                                         57
                            SPEECH PREPARATION


Step 1: What are you going to talk about? Answer the following questions.
   1. How do your paper and project connect?
   2. What emotions did you experience as you worked through the paper and
      product/process? (anger, excitement, pride, frustration)
   3. What problems did you encounter? (money, time management, skill) Explain.
   4. What personal growth did you gain from the paper and product/process? What
      self-knowledge did you gain? What knowledge of your topic did you gain?
   5. How did the Project relate to your career cluster?
   6. How did the Project affect your plans for the future? Explain.
   7. What Project advice would you pass on to next year’s seniors?



Step 2: How am I going to say this? Use the answers to the questions above as
references.
   1. Organization – jot down your ideas on separate 3 x 5 index cards and arrange
       them into an order that is logical.
   2. Slip blank cards into spaces where a visual aid is needed.
   3. Add blank cards for the introduction and conclusion.
   4. If you have a product that can be displayed, jot down your ideas for that display
       on another card, e.g., photographs.
   5. Plan your introduction. The introduction should:
           a. Grab the audience’s attention.
           b. Make the topic’s thesis clear (be sure to mention both paper and
              product/process).
           c. Take no more than 60 seconds.
   6. Plan your conclusion. A good conclusion should:
           a. Restate topic/thesis.
           b. Leave the audience thinking.
           c. Take no more than 30 seconds.
   7. Plan the display of your Project. Will it be an on-going, integral part of your
       speech, such as a slide show? Part of your introduction? Happen after your
       conclusion? Will you wear it? Sit on it? Serve up samples? (Avoid distributing
       items during your speech – this causes too much distraction.)
   8. Plan your visual aids. Two types should be included.
   9. Make sure your Faculty Advisor knows what equipment you will need.
   10. Look at each idea card and fill in details, colorful anecdotes, and factual
       information.
   11. Place all cards back in order and begin practicing your speech.




                                          58
Step 3: Speech techniques to remember.
   1. Eye contact – This is extremely important. Practice often enough so that you
      rarely need to look at your cards. Remember this is a friendly audience. Your
      peers and your judges are pulling for you. You need the reinforcement that
      their encouraging expressions will give you. Look at them. True
      communication happens with the eyes. A speech without eye contact is only
      half a speech.
   2. Posture – Stand proud. You have a right to be. You have accomplished a
      great deal. Avoid:
          a. Gripping the podium.
          b. Locking your knees – you’ve come too far to faint now.
          c. Twitching, wiggling, and shaking.
   3. Voice – your voice needs to:
          a. Be loud enough to be heard.
          b. Vary appropriately in pitch and tone.
   4. Gesture – Use your hands to help you make your point. Gestures should be
      natural and spontaneous, not choreographed and mechanical.
   5. Props (audio-visuals) – Plan and practice using any prop or audio-visual you
      will need during the presentation.



Step 4: Prepare for questions.
Of course, there is no way to know for sure what the panel members will ask you, but
you can make some educated guesses and that process will provide you with the
confidence and clear-headedness to take on any question. Answer the following
brainstorming questions.
   1. If you were a judge listening to your speech, what would you want to know?
   2. What would you like people to ask?
   3. What unusual qualities does your Project have that might spark interest?
   4. What part of your paper might make people curious?
   5. What controversial topics, if any, do you touch on?
   6. What possessed you to choose this topic?
   7. Who helped?
   8. How did you finance it?
   9. How much time did you spend?
   10. Does the Project double as credit for another class?


Your Senior Project presentation should be the peak of your high school career. Your
audience will be small and supportive. You will be well prepared. This is your chance
to show off, to shine. Enjoy!!




                                         59
           OUTLINE FOR SENIOR PROJECT PRESENTATION

Introduction:

      Attention getter:

      Main points of presentation (briefly describe your topic and product)

Research paper discussion:

      Presentation of the Senior Paper and Project Activity

      A.     Describe thesis research paper
      B.     Connect content of paper to project activity

Product explanation and discussion:

      C.     Explain your product/project
      D.     Explain what you learned about the overall topic and about yourself
      E.     Describe whether the project affects your future plans and how you can
             use what you learned from this project later on in life.

Career cluster connection:

Professional Development Portfolio
      A.    Personal Statement
      B.    Best Works: Highlight sections of the portfolio as evidence of both
            academic and employability skills that support the Personal Statement
            including but not limited to the following areas:
            1.     Investigative Planning/Problem Solving
            2.     Technology Information
            3.     Teamwork
            4.     Written Communication
      C.    Accomplishments and activities highlights
      D.    Post High-School Plan

Conclusion: (Time: ______)

Miscellaneous:
      "This concludes my presentation. Are there any questions?" (Q & A period)

Post speech:
      Thank the judges, shake hands, and exit while scoring takes place. Return to
      the room once scoring sheets are removed. Collect tri-fold, PowerPoint,
      portfolio, and any other items.



                                          60
                      TIPS FOR REDUCING ANXIETY

1.   Organize

     Being well organized gives you more confidence, which allows you to focus on
     the presentation. Prior planning prevents poor performances.

2.   Visualize

     Mentally rehearse walking into the room, delivering your presentation with
     enthusiasm, fielding questions with confidence, and sitting down after a great
     job.

3.   Practice

     Practice by standing up, as if audience were in front of you, and rehearse your
     presentation aloud. Practice with your visual aid. (Example: Senior Project
     PowerPoint)

4.   Breathe

     Take deep, slow cleansing breaths. This will help with your relaxation.

5.   Focus on Relaxing

     As you breathe, tell yourself on the inhale, ―I am‖ and on the exhale, ―relaxed.‖

6.   Release Tension

     Unreleased energy may cause hands and legs to shake. Try an isometric
     exercise, such as clenching your fists for 10 counts, relaxing, clenching your
     fists again for 10 counts, relaxing, until you feel calmer.

7.   Move

     If you stand in one spot and never gesture, you will experience tension. You
     can’t gesture too much if the actions are natural.

8.   Eye Contact With The Audience

     Relate and connect with your audience. This should help you relax because
     you are less isolated and learn to respond to their interest in you.




                                         61
                            PRESENTATION POISE

Posture
         Stand up straight, but not stiff.
         Point your feet toward the audience with your weight evenly distributed.
         Don’t place your weight on one hip and then shift to the other.
         Shifting can distract the audience.

Movement
      Move to the side or front of the podium to get nearer the audience.
      When no podium is available, stay within 4-8 feet of the front row.
      Don’t stay in one spot but don’t pace either. An occasional step to either
       side, or even a half step towards the audience for emphasis, can enhance
       your presentation.
      Stay close, stay direct, and stay involved with your audience.

Shoulder Orientation
      Keep your shoulders oriented toward the audience. This becomes critical
         when using visual aids.
      You will have to angle away from the audience sometimes, but it should not
         be more than 45 degrees.
      Don’t speak unless you have eye contact with the audience.
      Don’t talk to your visual aid.

Gestures
      Learn to gesture in front of an audience exactly as you would if you were
         having an animated conversation with a friend-nothing more, nothing less.
      Using natural gestures will not distract from a presentation; however, doing
         one of the following certainly will, so avoid:
            1. Keeping your hands in your pocket
            2. Keeping your hands handcuffed behind your back
            3. Keeping your arms crossed or flapping
            4. Wringing your hands nervously

Eye Contact
      The rule of thumb for eye contact is 1-3 seconds per person. Try not to let
        your eyes dart around the room.
      Try to focus on one person, not long enough to make that individual feel
        uncomfortable, but long enough to pull him or her into your presentation.
        Then move on to another person.
      Good eye contact helps establish and build rapport. It involves the
        audience and reduces the speaker’s feeling of isolation.




                                          62
Voice
           Learn to listen to yourself; stay aware not only of what you are saying but
            also how you are saying it. A suggestion would be to videotape your
            presentation and critique it.
           Monotone: Anxiety usually causes monotone voices. The muscles in the
            chest and throat tighten up and become less flexible, and airflow is
            restricted. The voice then loses its natural animation and monotone results.
            You must relax and release tension. Upper and lower body movement is
            vital.
           Talking too fast: When we become anxious, the rate of speech usually
            increases. Articulation is what is important. Sometimes when you talk too
            fast you trip over words. Breathe and slow down. Listen for the last word of
            a sentence, and then proceed to your next sentence. Pausing can be very
            effective in a presentation. This allows important points to sink in.
            Sometimes the audience needs a period of silence to digest what you are
            saying.
           Volume: Practice will solve most problems in volume. Have a person who
            will give you a straight answer listen to your presentation from the back of
            the room. Ask that person if you can be heard, if you trail off the end of a
            sentence, if lack of volume makes you sound insecure, or if you are
            speaking too loudly.




                                           63
                    JUDGES PRESENTATION EVALUATION
                                Senior Project Presentation Rubric

Name _______________________          Project ___________________________

CONTENT (35 points)
Introduction – personal introduction; reason for choosing topic;     1     2    3    4    5
       purpose of product/project clearly stated or implied
       attracts attention
Body – clearly states main points; accurate, appropriate             6     7    8    9    10
       supporting details
Organization – logical flow of ideas                                 1     2    3    4    5
Conclusion – summarizes; reflects personal growth/learning           1     2    3    4    5
Language Usage – transitions; avoids slang; appropriate word         1     2    3    4    5
       choice
Relation to Learning – relates research to project and product       1     2    3    4    5
       to presentation

                                                                   CONTENT TOTAL __________
DELIVERY OF SPEECH (15 points)
Non-verbal – eye contact, poise, posture, appropriate/natural                   1    2    3
       gestures
Verbal – volume, rate, clarity of speech                                        1    2    3
Dress/Appearance/Demeanor – neat, appropriate dress;                            1    2    3
       courteous, punctual and prepared
Audio/Visual Aids – support speech and enhance presentation;         2     3    4    5    6
       limited use of information on note cards

                                                                   DELIVERY TOTAL __________
QUESTION AND ANSWER SESSION (15 points)
Impromptu Skills – fluent, confident; answers questions easily       1     2    3    4    5
Quality of Responses – evidence of knowledge; responds               6     7    8    9    10
       directly to questions

                                                                         Q & A TOTAL __________
PRODUCT (35 points)
Quality of Product/Project–shows evidence of time spent; well        16    17   18   19   20
planned and constructed
Evidence of Research – product relates to research and to            11    12   13   14   15
        presentation
IF NO PRODUCT IS EVIDENT – give 0 points. Do not mark
        any points in the criteria above.
if product is poorly developed, you may give less than the
        points in the boxes in the criteria above.

                                                                   PRODUCT TOTAL __________

                         TOTAL POINTS: __________ (100 possible)

Comments:



                                                64
   SENIOR PROJECT FINAL GRADE

                     POINT DISTRIBUTION

Final grades will be based on the following scale.

        Research Paper     100 points
        Product            100 points
        Portfolio          100 points
        Presentation       100 points



Grade         Percentage   Points            Grade       Percentage   Points
A        =    94-100%      374-400           C+      =   77-79%       306-317
A-       =    90-93%       358-373           C       =   74-76%       294-305
B+       =    87-89%       346-372           C-      =   70-73%       278-293
B        =    84-86%       334-345           D+      =   67-69%       266-277
B-       =    80-83%       318-333           D       =   60-66%       240-265




                     _____       Research Paper
                     _____       Product
                     _____       Portfolio
                     _____       Presentation


             Total   _____/400 = _____%



Final Grade ______
                                        65
Appendix




   66
Appendix A: CAREER CLUSTERS AND EXAMPLES OF CAREER MAJORS
 Agricultural and Natural            Finance                    Information Technology
 Resources                              Stockbroker                Software engineer
   Food scientist                       Banker                     Network administrator
   Environmental engineer               Insurance agent            Web designer/developer
   Agriculture teacher                  Financial planner          Database manager
   Animal scientist                     Loan officer               Technical writer
   Biochemist                           Tax examiner               Multimedia producer
   Veterinarian assistant
                                     Government and Public      Law and Public Safety
 Architecture and Construction       Administration               Attorney
    Contractor                         Legislator                 Firefighter
    Architect                          City manager               Police officer
    Electrician                        Policy/budget analyst      Judge
    Heavy equipment operator           Recreation/parks           Paramedic
    Carpenter                              director               Paralegal
    Plumber                            State/federal agency
                                           director             Manufacturing
 Arts, A/V Technology and              Urban/regional planner     Machinist
 Communications                                                   Manufacturing engineer
    Actor                            Health Science               Automated process
    Video producer                     Pediatrician                   technician
    Journalist                         Physical therapist         Production engineer/
    Audio engineer                     Radiology technologist         technician
    Telecommunications                 Occupational therapist     Welding technician
        technologist                   Medical assistant          Quality technician
    Printing/graphics technologist     Hospital administrator
                                                                Retail/Wholesale Sales and
 Business and Administration         Hospitality and Tourism    Service
   Human resources                     Lodging manager             Sales associate
       administrator                   Chef                        Interior designer
   Administrative specialist           Travel and tourism          Marketing director
   Financial Analyst                       manager                 Buyer
   International trade manager         Food service manager        Real estate broker
   Entrepreneur                        Restaurant manager          Customer service
   Accountant                          Leisure and                     representative
                                           entertainment
 Education and Training                    manager              Scientific
   Teacher                                                      Research/Engineering
   Principal                         Human Services                Chemical engineer
   School counselor                    Social worker               Mathematician
   College professor                   Psychologist                Biotechnologist
   Corporate trainer                   Child-care worker           Electrical engineer
   Coach                               Substance abuse             Biologist
                                           specialist              Oceanographer
                                       Employment specialist
                                       Psychotherapist          Transportation, Distribution
                                                                and Logistics
                                                                   Pilot
                                                                   Automotive technician
                                                                   Logistics manager
                                                                   Flight attendant
                                                                   Warehouse manager
                                                                   Truck driver



                                                   67
                     Appendix B
               Rubrics & Grading Forms
??????????????????????????????????????????????????
                          ??

                      RESEARCH PAPER RUBRIC

Rough Draft (keyboarded)

Final Draft (keyboarded)

Format: 20 points
Correct title page                           4   3   2   Revise
Correct outline                              4   3   2   Revise
Correct subheadings and titles               4   3   2   Revise
Correct numbering                            4   3   2   Revise
Correct margins                              4   3   2   Revise
Structure: 20 points
Appropriate title sheet                      4   3   2   Revise
Thesis statement                             4   3   2   Revise
Well developed body (adequate information)   4   3   2   Revise
and clear method of development
Adequate conclusion                          4   3   2   Revise
Adherence to outline                         4   3   2   Revise
Documentation: 20 points
Correct parenthetical documentation          4   3   2   Revise
Correct works cited page                     4   3   2   Revise
Variety of sources                           4   3   2   Revise
All required citations included              4   3   2   Revise
Five sources (minimum) referenced            4   3   2   Revise
Mechanics: 12 points
Spelling                                     4   3   2   Revise
Capitalization                               4   3   2   Revise
Punctuation                                  4   3   2   Revise
Usage: 28 points
Parallel structure                           4   3   2   Revise
Sentence variety                             4   3   2   Revise
Consistency in tone and voice                4   3   2   Revise
Tense consistency                            4   3   2   Revise
Pronoun and antecedent agreement             4   3   2   Revise
Transitions                                  4   3   2   Revise
Subject and verb agreement                   4   3   2   Revise




                                     68
           Total 100            Points Earned __________ Grade __________

           ???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????


                                         PROJECT RUBRIC

1. 15 hours minimum (determined by portfolio, 2 points per hour)                   30 points

2. Project presents an extension of the research                                   10 points

3. Documentation (in portfolio)                                                    10 points
       Journal or log entries                            2   points
       Letter of recommendation                          2   points
       Research paper                                    2   points
       Papers/notes/flyers/charts                        2   points
       Copies of all required forms                      2   points

4. Reflection/self-evaluation                                                      15 points

4. Signed mentor sheet (minimum of 3 meetings)            10 points                10 points

5. Care and attention to detail, a quality product (also includes the quality of   25 points
   the portfolio)
       Advisors – 10 points
       Mentor – 5 points
       Administrator – 5 points
       Student Self-Evaluation – 5 points

Total Possible                                                                     100 points




                                                    69
        SENIOR PROJECT PORTFOLIO SCORING RUBRIC


(15)_____ Section 1 Proposal
                Project Approval Form
                Original Approved Proposal
                Senior Project Contract
                Parental Approval Form
                Mentor Agreement Form

(15)_____ Section 2 divider labeled: Project Journal or Learning Log
                Project Journal

(15)_____ Section 3 Research
                Research Paper
                Annotated Bibliography
                Research documents

(15)_____ Section 4 Evidence of Work
                Photos
                Materials collected
                Other project documentation

(15)_____ Section 5 Personal Information
                Personal Resume’
                Letters of Recommendation

(15)_____ Section 6 Evaluation
                Research paper evaluation
                Mentor evaluation form
                Project evaluation form
                Product self evaluation form
                Reflection/self-evaluation

(10)_____ Section 7 Appendix
                Budget Page
                Thank you letters
                Other



                   ________ Total Points – 100 possible




                                     70
                 JUDGES PRESENTATION EVALUATION
                             Senior Project Presentation Rubric

Name _______________________          Project ___________________________

CONTENT (35 points)
Introduction – personal introduction; reason for choosing topic;      1   2    3    4    5
       purpose of product/project clearly stated or implied
       attracts attention
Body – clearly states main points; accurate, appropriate              6   7    8    9    10
       supporting details
Organization – logical flow of ideas                                  1   2    3    4    5
Conclusion – summarizes; reflects personal growth/learning            1   2    3    4    5
Language Usage – transitions; avoids slang; appropriate word          1   2    3    4    5
       choice
Relation to Learning – relates research to project and product        1   2    3    4    5
       to presentation

                                                           CONTENT TOTAL __________
DELIVERY OF SPEECH (15 points)
Non-verbal – eye contact, poise, posture, appropriate/natural           1   2    3
       gestures
Verbal – volume, rate, clarity of speech                                1   2    3
Dress/Appearance/Demeanor – neat, appropriate dress;                           1    2    3
       courteous, punctual and prepared
Audio/Visual Aids – support speech and enhance presentation;          2   3    4    5    6
       limited use of information on note cards

                                                          DELIVERY TOTAL __________
QUESTION AND ANSWER SESSION (15 points)
Impromptu Skills – fluent, confident; answers questions easily   1  2   3   4    5
Quality of Responses – evidence of knowledge; responds                6   7    8    9    10
       directly to questions

                                                                   Q & A TOTAL __________
PRODUCT (35 points)
Quality of Product/Project–shows evidence of time spent; well        16   17   18   19   20
planned and constructed
Evidence of Research – product relates to research and to            11   12   13   14   15
        presentation
IF NO PRODUCT IS EVIDENT – give 0 points. Do not mark
        any points in the criteria above.
if product is poorly developed, you may give less than the
        points in the boxes in the criteria above.

                                                           PRODUCT TOTAL __________

                      TOTAL POINTS: __________ (100 possible)

Comments:



                                             71
 SENIOR PROJECT FINAL GRADE

                POINT DISTRIBUTION

Final grades will be based on the following scale.

        Research Paper     100 points
        Product            100 points
        Portfolio          100 points
        Presentation       100 points



Grade         Percentage   Points            Grade       Percentage   Points
A        =    94-100%      374-400           C+      =   77-79%       306-317
A-       =    90-93%       358-373           C       =   74-76%       294-305
B+       =    87-89%       346-372           C-      =   70-73%       278-293
B        =    84-86%       334-345           D+      =   67-69%       266-277
B-       =    80-83%       318-333           D       =   60-66%       240-265




                     _____       Research Paper
                     _____       Product
                     _____       Portfolio
                     _____       Presentation


             Total   _____/400 = _____%



Final Grade ______
                                        72
                    Appendix C

Senior Venture Timeline 2009-2010

 Activity                          Due Date

 Letter of Intent                  September 25

 Research Topic Identified         October 9
 Mentor Identified                 October 9
 Product Plan Submitted            October 9
 Product Plan Final Draft          October 16

 Research Outline                  October 30
 Research paper First Draft        November 20

 Product Checkpoint 1              December 10
 Research Paper Final Draft        December 17

 Product Checkpoint 2              January 14
 Product Checkpoint 3              February 25
 Portfolio Checkpoint              March17
 Product Complete                  April 7

 Student Work Day                  April 8
 Portfolio Complete                April 14

 Presentation Practice             April 19 (tentative)
 Presentation Day                  April 21 (tentative)




                              73
Appendix D

  Forms




    74
                        SENIOR PROJECT PLEDGE
As a Senior, I have the opportunity to participate in the Senior Project program.
This program allows me to design an educational experience beyond the
classroom walls. I understand that my failure to comply with any of the following
may result in a failing grade and/or make me ineligible for high school graduation.

     I will attend all the meetings and workshops concerning the Senior
      Project.

       I will submit all materials and information requested of me on the date
        required.

       I will successfully complete all four phases of the project: Paper,
        Product, Portfolio, Presentation.

          o The research paper will meet the guidelines set by the English
            Teacher
          o The development of the product will include a minimum of 15
            hours of work outside of school.
          o I will keep a log of work and progress.
          o I will find an appropriate mentor who has expertise/experience
            with the topic.

       I will comply with the instructions given by the steering committee made
        up of faculty advisors and administration.

       I will faithfully comply with all school rules and policies that provide for
        mature and responsible behavior related the senior venture.

       I will attend all classes and maintain passing grades.



_______________________________________________ Date __________
Student Signature




                                          75
Senior Experience
Letter to Parents



Dear Parents or Guardians of Seniors:

This is a momentous year for your Senior. You have learned by now that our
school has set high expectations for our students. We believe each student
should have the opportunity to display his or her skills through a Senior Project.
As your student completes this Project, he/she will demonstrate the following
skills: reading, writing, speaking, accessing and processing information, thinking,
self-discipline, problem-solving, organization, and implementing technology.
These skills will be showcased through a four-phase process to include:

      a word-processed research paper,
      a related physical product or activity to demonstrate an aspect of the
       research and/or service to the community,
      a portfolio, and
      a presentation given before a review panel composed of educators and
       community members.

The Senior Project topic is based on new knowledge and provides growth
through a new learning experience.

The Senior Project involves parental and teacher support as well as student
initiative and self-discipline. Attached is a copy of the due dates for the Project
components.

Thank you for joining us on this exciting journey. If you have any questions,
please do not hesitate to call the school at 724.2153.

Sincerely,



Brad Preheim, Principal
Armour High School




                                         76
                         SENIOR EXPERIENCE
                       PARENT PERMISSION FORM



Student’s Name: _____________________________________


I have read through the Senior Experience materials and understand the
requirements of all phases of the Senior Experience. I acknowledge and give
permission for my son/daughter to participate.


My son/daughter will do the following as his/her project:




and will write a research paper on the following topic:




Parent or Guardian’s name: _____________________________________

Parent or Guardian’s signature: __________________________________

Date: ______________________________________________________




                                         77
                   SENIOR EXPERIENCE
       FACULTY ADVISOR/ADMINISTRATION AGREEMENT



Student’s Name: _____________________________________

Project Proposal: _____________________________________


Faculty Advisor

I have discussed the project proposed above with the student and am satisfied
that it is appropriate and meets the requirements necessary for a successful
senior experience.

Please do not sign below unless the following is true:

I accept the responsibility as Faculty Advisor for this student if his/her project is
accepted as proposed. I will expect regular progress reports from him/her during
project and I will be willing to assist this student as needed before the project
begins and during the project. I agree to perform all duties outlined on the Role
of Faculty Advisor form.

 ________________________________________                _____________________
Signature of Faculty Advisor                             Date


 ________________________________________                _____________________
Signature of Faculty Advisor                             Date




Administration

I have discussed the project proposed above with the student and am satisfied
that it is appropriate and meets the requirements necessary for a successful
senior experience.

 ________________________________________ _____________________
Signature of Principal                Date




                                         78
           THE ROLE OF THE SENIOR PROJECT MENTOR

This page is to be given to the Project Mentor at the time you discuss with
him/her what his/her duties will be. Be sure that your Mentor reads your
finished written proposal and understands the commitment before signing
the proposal.

The role of the Project Mentor is essential to the success of the Senior Project at
Armour High School. As responsible men and women in the community, the
Project Mentors play an active part in the students’ learning experience.

As Project Mentor, you will be asked to accept the following
responsibilities:

   5. To help the student organize his/her Project and then indicate approval by
      signing the appropriate statement at the bottom of the proposal form.
   6. To supervise the student as he/she follows through on his/her Project
      proposal.
   7. To sign time sheets to indicate that he/she has completed the required
      hours.
   8. To complete an evaluation form at the close of the Project.

Following is additional information which you will find useful:

1. The Senior Project begins in September and continues through April.
   Students are to meet with you a minimum of three times.
2. A student may not be paid for his/her Project work.
3. No parent may be in a direct line of supervision for the student.
4. Each student will also be assigned a Faculty Advisor who acts as a consultant
   for the student when writing the research paper and again during the
   process/product development. Because the Faculty Advisor may or may not
   have expertise in the Project area, your assistance is especially important to
   the student. The Advisor will further act as a liaison between the Mentor and
   school.
5. The student is bound by a set of guidelines which he/she should share with
   you.
6. The student will keep a journal and write a final evaluation of his/her Project.
   These are not to be done during his/her meetings with you.
7. In a pre-Project conference with the student, please establish a mutual
   understanding of what will be expected during project time.

We trust that the student’s work will be beneficial not only to him/her, but also to
you as the Project Mentor and that you will both gain satisfaction. Thank you for
your support of the Senior Project program.




                                         79
       WHAT IS A MENTOR? WHAT DOES A MENTOR DO?
It is common to hear Mentors described as:
      teachers
      trainers
      sponsors
      role models
      advocates
      coaches
      openers of doors
      friends

What are the benefits of having a personal Mentor?
   Skills and knowledge relating to careers
   Positive role model of a professional in the field
   Connections with other professionals in the industry
   Knowledge of how school and work interrelate
   Learn what it takes to be successful in the industry
   Expanded resources to help advance your care

What will your Mentor expect from you?
   Good work habits
   Punctuality - be on time
   Dress appropriately
   Maintain and demonstrate a positive attitude
   Come prepared
   Be alert and enthusiastic, try to make a good impression
   Be willing and eager to talk; be willing and eager to listen
   Be honest. Don't brag or exaggerate
   Look at the Mentor and other adults when speaking to them




                                      80
                      MENTOR AGREEMENT FORM

Student Name ___________________

Project _________________________

In order for students to complete a Senior Project, the student must work with a
Mentor who has expertise in the area being explored. The Mentor must be
willing to verify the student’s efforts and time spent. A student should meet a
minimum of three times with the Mentor. While there are no time restrictions on
the length of these meetings, they need to be meaningful and worthwhile. If you
are willing to serve as this student’s Mentor, please complete the form below.


I will meet with this student a minimum of three times during the course of his/her
Senior Project to advise and monitor progress. We will have our first meeting
before he/she begins the hands-on or service related project to set a reasonable
time schedule so that the project will be completed on time. At this initial
conference, we will also schedule at least two future meetings with each other. I
understand that the student may request additional meetings or contacts to
request assistance.

I agree to serve as a Mentor for the above named student for the Senior Project.


Mentor Name ___________________________________________


Address _______________________________________________


Phone _________________________________________________


E-mail _________________________________________________


Relationship to Student___________________________________


___________________________________                     __________________
                  Signature


                                        81
                 MENTOR PROPOSAL DRAFT REVIEW
Student Name ____________________________________________________

Mentor Name _____________________________________________________

Project Title ______________________________________________________


Please read the first draft of your student’s proposal and give the following
feedback:

7. Do you see anything in this proposal that could be problematic for the student
   in completing this project?




8. Does the student need to make additions to the process described in this
   proposal in order to complete a quality product?




9. Has the student been too ambitious? Are the expectations realistic? Can this
   project be completed in the required 40 hours?



10. Comment on the timeline. What adjustments would you advise?




11. What, if any, additional research would you advise?




12. Are there clear and specific standards set for the product?




________________________________________________________________
Mentor Signature                                 Date

                                         82
             MENTOR’S FINAL PROJECT VERIFICATION
Student’s Name: __________________________________________

Project Description: ________________________________________


5. How many times did the student meet with you? ______

6. What successes have you seen this student achieve?




7. What problems specifically did this student encounter and overcome?




8. After having worked with the student, please explain how you feel about the
   effort expended, and evaluate the final outcome or product.




Please rate the students effort, attitude, and success (1-poor to 5-excellent)

                     1      2      3      4      5



Mentor’s Name: _______________________________________________

Signature: ____________________________________________________

Phone: ___________________________ Date: _____________________

                                        83
           SENIOR PROJECT TOPIC APPROVAL FORM


Student Name___________________________________________


Product/Process Title____________________________________



Product/Process Proposal

     Description:




     Steps for Product/Process Completion:




     Special Equipment/Facilities/Environment:




Cost Analysis
     Materials List:



     Budget:




                                    84
Your proposal should include the following:

      What is the topic or area of study that will be the focus of your senior project?
      Why did you choose this topic? What previous knowledge or experience in this
      area do you have?




      What will be the focus of your research paper? Describe your topic, discussing
      any preliminary areas of exploration or questions you have identified.




      What will your project be? How will you make your research ―come alive‖? Who
      can serve as a mentor to you to complete the project and what is their
      experience or expertise in your chosen field? What resources (time and/or
      money) do you anticipate this will require?




      What is the connection between your research paper and your project? How are
      these components related and how do they together show a concerted effort to
      explore your topic or area of study?




                                              85
              SENIOR PROJECT TOPIC CHANGE FORM


As sometimes happens, a student may need to modify the original Senior
Project. If that happens, a student should address the following questions as
he/she modifies the original proposal and secures the required signatures.


   7. How do you wish to change the proposed project?


   8. What is the purpose of the changes?


   9. How will these changes help to further explore an area of interest?


   10. How will these changes allow better demonstration or representation of
       learning?


   11. Have the proposed changes been discussed with others, such as parents,
       Faculty Advisor, and Senior Project Mentor? What were the responses
       about the proposed change?


   12. How will these changes affect the Project time line?



Student                                        Date


Faculty Advisor                                Date



Parent/Guardian                                Date


Steering Committee Approval: _____ yes         _____ no




                                       86
                   PROJECT JOURNAL LOG
Name: _________________________________________________________

Project: ________________________________________________________


 Date    Time            Activity                Comments




                                    87
       Appendix E

Senior Venture Ideas


 On the pages that follow is an
 accumulation of suggested senior
 venture ideas from a variety of sources.
 It is neither complete nor are you
 required to choose from these lists.
 Moreover, the fact that an idea is
 included in this list does not ensure that
 it will be acceptable by the senior
 project committee in Armour High
 School. What follows is just numerous
 ideas to help you in your brainstorming
 of ideas for your topic, project, and
 research.




                     88
SAMPLE IDEAS: RESEARCH AREA to PRODUCT
REQUIREMENT: Both the Research and the Product MUST be a “LEARNING STRETCH” for you.

RESEARCH PAPER AREA POSSIBLE PRODUCT

Fashion and social change ⎬                  Design and construct a 20’s era gown
Vietnam veterans ⎬                           Volunteer work with vets
Robotics ⎬                                   Construct a robotic hand
Aluminum welding ⎬                           Construct a model (or actual) river boat
Musical arranging ⎬                          Write an orchestration for school band or
                                             orchestra
Adoption laws ⎬                              Find biological parent
Art of silk screening ⎬                      Design and create a T-shirt logo for school club
Waste disposal and the environment ⎬         Organize group to pick up trash in town
Importance of fathers in the home ⎬          Form a fatherhood club; create agendas for
                                             meetings
Historical sites in Tiverton ⎬               Create a walking tour of Tiverton; with a brochure
Progression of 20th Century architecture ⎬   Design a modern building; make a model
History of sailing vessels ⎬                 Make a model of a sail boat; take sailing lessons
Stained glass through the ages ⎬             Take stained glass lessons; create a project
Golf course management ⎬                     Design and make a model of an 18 hole golf
                                             course
History of ―belts‖ in the martial arts ⎬     Learn karate with a goal of reaching a belt level
Harmonica in blues music ⎬                   Learn to play the harmonica
Crimes against women ⎬                       Take a self-defense class
History of the VW Beetle ⎬                   Remodel/Rebuild a 1964 VW
Health benefits of Yoga ⎬                    Take Yoga lessons and chart progress w/ photos
Marine biology ⎬                             Set up and maintain a salt-water aquarium
Illiteracy in Rhode Island ⎬                 Teach an adult to read
Vincent Van Gogh ⎬                           Learn to oil paint
Homelessness ⎬                               Volunteer at a homeless shelter
Astronomy ⎬                                  Build a telescope
Financial Planning ⎬                         Create a financial plan for your future
The filmmaking of Stanley Kubric ⎬           Create and edit an original film
Braking devices on automobiles ⎬             Make a brake rebuilding video
Sports medicine ⎬                            Learn to wrap and treat sports injuries
Obesity ⎬                                    Design/monitor a weight loss program for an adult
Sports and Asthma ⎬                          Volunteer to work with asthmatic child in a sport
The poetry of William Blake ⎬                Write and bind a book of personal poetry
Illustration as a career ⎬                   Write and illustrate a children’s book
Head trauma                                  Make and label a model of the brain
Radio communication ⎬                        Build a radio or become a ham radio operator
Wildlife art ⎬                               Make a book or video of wildlife in Georgia
Drunk driving and MADD ⎬                     Create a school program against drinking/driving
Horticulture ⎬                               Construct a greenhouse
Hearing impaired ⎬                           Learn sign language
Child development ⎬                          Volunteer at a Day Care Center; make a book




                                                  89
Research Paper             Senior Project

Animals
Orphan wild animals        Animal rehab. Volunteer
Endangered animals         Animal rehab. Volunteer
Horse training             Train a horse
Deer population            Wildlife study
Animal abuse               Humane Society volunteer
Art
Picasso                    Paint a mural
Cartooning                 Design a cartoon character
Architecture               Draw blueprints/make model
Architectural art          Model home
Murals                     Paint mural
Floral design              Make floral arrangements
Impressionist artists      Paint impressionistic art
Commercial art             Commercial art advertising
Business
Public relations           Work Mt. Hood Jazz Festival
Stock market               Chart stock
Japanese Restaurant        Learn Japanese cooking
Small business             Plans for one-hour photo
Medical secretary          Shadow medical secretary
Emergency room medicine    Shadow emergency room doctors
Veterinary medicine        Shadow veterinary doctor
Child Abuse
Child abuse                Program design prevention
Sexual abuse Molestation   Volunteer with group sessions
Computers
Computer Programs          Write a bulletin board service
Computers                  Design accounts
Computer components        Design Electric Motor
Education
Elementary education       15 hours of Kindergarten
Hearing impaired           Learn sign language
Child Care                 Teach baby-sitting classes
Fashion
Fashions 1940-1990         Fashion show
Fashion                    Sew prom dress
Dress design               Sew "flapper" dress




                              90
Homeless
Homeless                       Volunteer at shelter
Homeless                       Food-clothing drive
Math/science
Hydropower                     Create a model
Cruise missiles                Build a model
Weather forecasting            Forecast weather for a week
Water pollution                Examine Lacamas Lake
Medicine
Dentistry                      Work at dental clinic
Emergency medicine in US       Shadow emergency room doctors
Performing Arts
Women in theater               Belle of Amherst performance
William Shakespeare            Shakespearean monologues performance
Victorian designs              Design set for Belle of Amherst
Radio broadcasting             Take part in a broadcast
Drugs
Crack babies                   Community Awareness Program
Drug testing                   Work in health care facility
Drugs in elementary schools    Present program in schools
Teens and drugs                Write and perform one-act play
Photography
Silent films                   Make silent movie
Recreation/Sports
Shooting                       Design trap thrower
Holsters                       Design and make holster
Karate                         Take lessons/demonstrate
Religion/philosophy
Pow-wows                       Make wing dress
Social Issues
Care of elderly                Volunteer retirement/nursing home
Student rights when arrested   Handbook on what to do
Handicapped housing            Design barrier-free house
Teen Peer Pressure             Write/direct/perform play
Teen pregnancy                 Volunteer at Crisis Center




                                  91
          10-song grind core CD                             12-hr fast & fundraiser

     2D animation-Macromedia Flash                              3-D modeling

      Afghanistan school supply drive          Coordinate mentors for authors, publish magazine

       Bali orphanage care packages                             Band website

       Bat habits, behaviors, biology                      Book: interviews on love

       Book: poetry, art, short stories                  Bound book of short stories

        Bound book: autobiography                      Brochure layouts/graphic design

            Build a board game                              Build bench, planters

       Build concrete slab and shed                       Build foundation & gazebo

             Build kitchen table                        Build new school entrance sign

      Build terrarium from big screen                   Build Trek deck & steel railing

       Build TV entertainment center                         Build, program robot

       Campus project-picnic tables                           Candy Cane Dash

         Cater a community dinner                             Cello audition prep

          Ceramic dinnerware set                           Charcoal family portraits

      Cheer camp-elementary school                           Coach youth soccer

               Comedy show                               Compose movie soundtrack

     Compose, perform songs on piano                         Computer animation

      Conduct Ridgecrest talent show                     Construct backyard fireplace

        Construct chest w/ drawers                            Construct deck bar

      Construct entertainment closet                     Construct semi-formal dress

       Construct Victorian doll house                         Create art therapy

        Create art/hold gallery show                    Create ceramic dinnerware set

          Create ceramic tea set                             Create library/study

            Create Linux system                                  Create quilt

Create recipes, birthday/wedding style cakes           Create regular ed/special ed club

       Create SC weight room mural                         Create skating costumes

       Create, record original songs                      Cross stitch family picture


                                               92
   Current events pod casts                      Customize shoe artwork

        Design clothing                             Design, build desk

 Design, build mosaic-top table                   Design, plant garden

 Design/construct formal dress                Direct feature-length comedy

   Documentary-gymnastics                         Documentary-racism

 "Drawing Jam" event-planning                     Explore game of golf

       Expressive writing                       Film trailer, script, poster

     Football highlight film                  Formal dinner/etiquette course

  Foster dog/create pamphlet                      Germany presentation

         Glass blowing                                Glasses drive

Gospel choir competition/Korea                        Guitar theory

   Gymnastics documentary                         Half-marathon training

Half-marathon fundraiser-Mexico                   Hip hop instrumentals

  Hmong history/culture event                      Hospital internship

   Humor/drama comic book                        Interior design portfolio

   Internship w/ youth pastor                  Internship with construction

  Internship-UW Athletic office              Islam presentations-World Geo

Japanese version of SC website                     Jewelry silversmith

        Kidney seminar                                 Landscaping

  Learn and research boxing                    Learn art of French cuisine

  Learn different dance types                  Learn guitar scales, chords

    Learn Russian language                         Learn Tae Kwon Do

      Learn to glass blow              Long board graphic design, build long boards

  Lymphoma cancer research                      Mock interview workshop

  Movie advertising/marketing                Musical soundtrack composition

  Organize tennis tournament                    Posada Safe Haven drive

  Photography + gallery show                       Plan trip to Australia

 Plan youth dance performance                 Plan, teach skills to preschool


                                  93
       Pole-you documentary                   Preschool fieldtrip + scrapbook

   Produce, host "Mr. Shorecrest"               Puppy training, grooming

 Research, experience raw food diet                  Rebuild sailboat

       Reconvert 1753 cello                         Record CD-drums

     Recreate 1940's rationing                 Red Cross lifeguard training

       Redecorate bedroom                  Refurbish hydroplane/outboard motor

         Refurbish sailboat                     Remodel inside of camper

   Remodel room, refinish floors              Research French-Algerian war

   Research suicide, depression                  Research yoga & styles

Research/photograph rugs, ceramics                Reshape dog behavior

          Restore dirt bike                       Ridgecrest talent show

        Run 4-H rabbit show                  Salsa dance performance/history

    SC environment assessment                 School of the Americas movie

    Screen print original artwork                   Senior slide show

Snowboard video; winter photography            Stock portfolio management

      Talent showcase event                 Teach French-Room 9 Community

  Teach Hang Time hip hop class                        Teach tennis

  Teach/direct choir-Chinese song            Teach/inform about hearing loss

     Technology "how to" book                 Teen pregnancy presentation

         Train for triathlon                  Triathlon-special needs youth

     Truck ethanol conversion                     Turbo car mechanics

       United Way fund raiser                         Unity Festival

        Video of senior year                  Video-playing covers of songs

            Violin recital                       Voter information booth

   Writing, drawing, photography                   Writing/art collection

       Youth basketball camp                   Youth basketball tournament




                                      94
Project Ideas

Help for the Hungry/Homeless
 1. Help cook and/or serve a meal at a homeless shelter
 2. Gather clothing from your neighbors and donate it to a local shelter
 3. Make "I Care" kits with combs, toothbrushes, shampoo, etc. for homeless people
 4. Help with repairs at a local homeless shelter
 5. Make a care package with mittens, socks, t-shirts, long underwear, etc. for a child at a homeless
shelter
 6. Collect grocery coupons to give a local food bank
 7. If your community doesn't have a food bank, work with local officials to start one
 8. Pack and hand out food at a food shelf
 9. Organize a neighborhood group to plant, tend and harvest a vegetable garden
 10. Donate the produce to a food shelf

Senior Citizens
1. Adopt a "grandfriend"
2. Visit a nursing home
3. Rake leaves, shovel snow, clean gutters, or wash windows for a senior citizens
4. Pick up medicine for an elderly person
5. Write your "grandfriend" a letter, or write letters for an elderly person
6. Go for a walk with a senior citizen in your community
7. Hold an afternoon dance for your local nursing home
8. Teach them your dances and ask them to teach you theirs
9. Deliver meals to homebound individuals
10. Offer to pick up groceries with/for a senior citizen
11. Help senior citizens in your neighborhood obtain and install locks or smoke alarms
12. Teach a senior friend hot to use a computer or the Internet
13. Get a group together to sing or present a play at a nursing home

School Activities
 1. Paint a mural over graffiti
 2. Organize and invite local police officers to present a drug awareness or bike safety assembly
 3. Form volunteer teams for a campus safety escort service
 4. Tutor a student that needs help learning English or some other subject
 5. Organize a canned goods drive in conjunction with a school dance and donate the goods to a food
shelf

Neighborhood Enhancement
 1. Help neighbors paint and repair their homes
 2. Clean up a vacant lot
 3. Organize a campaign to raise money to purchase and install new playground equipment in an area
park
 4. Campaign for additional lighting along poorly lighted streets
 5. Paint a mural or clean up in a local park
 6. Plant flowers in public areas that could use some color




                                                   95
For Those with Special Needs
1. Volunteer to help at a Special Olympics event
2. Set up a buddy system for kids with special needs at your school
3. Raise money for Braille or large print books for the visually impaired
4. Volunteer at an agency that works with emotionally disturbed children
5. Read books or the newspaper on tape for visually impaired people
6. Bring toys to children in the cancer ward of the a hospital

Politics and Government
 1. Contact your local League of Women Voters or voter registration office
 2. Ask what you can do to help people register to vote
 3. Identify a local issue you are concerned about and contact someone in local government with your
ideas on what to do about it
 4. Organize a public issues forum for your neighborhood
 5. Volunteer at a poling booth the day of an election
 6. Offer to pass out election materials

The Environment
 1. Plant a garden or tree where the whole neighborhood can enjoy it
 2. Set up a recycling system for your home and participate in your neighborhood curbside recycling
pick-up
 3. Organize a carpooling campaign in your neighborhood to cut down or air pollution
 4. Adopt an acre of a rainforest
 5. Clean up trash along a river or in a park
 6. Create a habitat for wildlife
 7. Create a campaign to encourage biking and walking
 8. Test the health of the water in your local lakes, rivers, or streams




Based on past experience, these topics are difficult to research and find a product:

      Advertising/Marketing
      Architecture
      Construction
      Fitness
      Insurance
      Law Related
      Pharmacy
      Photography
      Real Estate

Topics to be avoided completely:

      Auto mechanics
      Coaching
      Cosmetology
      Massage Therapy
      Military Service/Recruiting


                                                  96
Community Web page
Organize Community Events
Restore a Vehicle – Bodywork
Restore a Vehicle – Engine
Restore a Vehicle – Interior
Build a Football Sled
Knitting
Quilting
Learn a musical Instrument
Design and Sew an Outfit
Raise an Animal
Build an Aluminum Boat
Build a wood/fiberglass canoe
Scrapbooking
Jewelry Making
Fix an unknown auto problem
Bio-diesel production or engine
Model Remote Control Airplane
Senior Photography
Professional Framing / Matte Cutting
Video or Digital Yearbook
Create a Video Game
Develop a unique Barbeque Sauce
Build a Smoke house for making Jerky
Build a Go-Cart
Write and Illustrate a Children’s Book
Create an animated character and movie
Ink a comic book
Create Sports Trading Cards




TOPIC IDEAS FOR BRAINSTORMING


Music
• Learn a musical
instrument
• Compose a piece of
music
• Perform a Dance
Education
• Learning Styles
• Early Childhood
Education
• School Reform
Business
• Entrepreneurship
• Trends
• Mock Investments
• Job Shadowing

                                         97
Physical Fitness
• Diet
• Physical goals
• Careers
• Learn a new sport
Religion, Philosophy
• Comparative Studies
• Develop a Personal
Religion/Philosophy
Travel
• Vacations
• Language
• Explorations
Health
• Volunteer opportunities
• Alternative health
• Drug Abuse
Space
• Exploration
• Extraterrestrial
Theories
• New Discoveries
Careers
• Job Market Research
• Job Shadowing
• Personal Goals
Social Studies
• Historical Study
• Cultural Study
• Political Involvement
Home Economics
• Cooking
• Gardening
Technical Arts
• Wood
• Metal
• Cars/Motorcycles
• Book Illustration
• Fine Arts, Crafts
• Sewing
• Pottery
• Jewelry
• Stained Glass
Social Issues
• Child Abuse
• Volunteer Work
• Homelessness
• Teen Suicide
Photography, Film
• Make a Movie
• Learn photography
• Animation

                            98
Math, Science
• Computers/Internet
• Mathematics theory
• Astronomy
• Environmental Issues
Literature
• Creative Writing
• Folklore
• Children’s Literature
• Poetry
Outdoors
• Scientific field research
• Hiking/Orienteering
• Mountain climbing
Acceptable Paper Topics and Projects
ACCEPTABLE PROJECT EXAMPLES
The following sample projects reflect Stretch and Challenge. Only finished projects
reflecting quality will be accepted:
Paper Topics Related Projects
• Planning an effective advertising campaign
• Design an effective sustained advertising campaign for a product (more than a
poster or recording)
• The causes and effects of pollution on tide pools
• Learn to scuba dive
• Down Syndrome
• Coach a Special Olympics participant
• Effective strategies for teaching reading
• Design a lesson and work as a teacher’s aid for an elementary school teacher
• Industry standards and E-coli bacteria
• Test and monitor E-coli bacteria in local groundwater
• Elizabethan drama: clothing and culture
• Design and produce an authentic Elizabethan garment
• Prevention of alcohol abuse
• Design and implement a Red Ribbon campaign for an elementary school
• Effects of high-impact exercise
• Develop and choreograph a low-impact exercise program and teach a class


ADDITIONAL IDEAS FOR SENIOR PROJECTS
• CAREER-RELATED
o Train for fire fighting
o Become EMT certified
o Wildlife forensics
o Explore nursing or medical career
o Teach an elementary, middle or high school class
o Design and draft architectural plans
o Learn cosmetology skills
o Journalism: write an article for a local paper
o Law enforcement: participate in ride-alongs
• LEARN OR DEVELOP SKILLS OR INTERESTS
o Become certified and teach an aerobics class
o Learn massage or physical therapy skills

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o Sew a quilt or dress
o Create a stock portfolio and invest
o Learn kick-boxing or scuba-diving, etc…
o Direct or assist-direct a school play
o Compose and/or perform a piece of music
o Learn to play an instrument
o Create art (learn oil painting, create a portfolio, etc…)
o Coach a sports team
o Learn photography
o Break or train a wild horse
o Build a wood or welding project
• VOLUNTEER WORK OR COMMUNITY SERVICE
o Organize an Agriculture Day for elementary schools, a Health Fair, or a Business
Day for high schools in our area
o Work with Alzheimer patients
o Become a crisis hotline worker
o Become a hospice volunteer
o Tutor a child or adult who needs help
o Organize a program, such as Adopt-a-Grandparent or Big Brother/Sister\

SENIOR PROJECT IDEAS

Community Webpage
Organize Community Events
Restore a Vehicle – Bodywork
Restore a Vehicle – Engine
Restore a Vehicle – Interior
Build a Football Sled
Knitting
Quilting
Learn a musical Instrument
Design and Sew an Outfit
Raise an Animal
Build an Aluminum Boat
Build a wood/fiberglass canoe
Scrapbooking
Jewelry Making
Fix an unknown auto problem
Bio-diesel production or engine
Model Remote Control Airplane
Senior Photography
Professional Framing / Matte Cutting
Video or Digital Yearbook
Create a Video Game
Develop a unique Barbeque Sauce
Build a Smoke house for making Jerky
Build a Go-Cart
Write and Illustrate a Children’s Book
Create an animated character and movie
Ink a comic book
Create Sports Trading Cards


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                   PROJECT GOALS AND ACTIVITIES SAMPLES
Following are examples of workable goals and activities for Senior Projects. Goals are what
you want to accomplish by doing the Project; activities are what you do (action) to accomplish
your goals. The activity grows out of the goals.


For a career-related Project: being an aide in a fourth grade classroom

Goal 1:            to teach science to fourth grade students

Goal 2:            to learn the responsibilities of a teacher in a fourth grade
                   classroom

Activity 1:        design and implement a science demonstration for a fourth
                   grade science class

Activity 2:        help the teacher with the daily clerical tasks (collecting milk
                   and lunch money, taking attendance, grading papers)

Career Cluster:    Education and Training


For an academic Project: learning about Asian literature

Goal 1:            to study literature from various Asian cultures

Goal 2:            to compare these Asian cultures as they are depicted in the
                   literature

Activity 1:        read Chinese, Japanese, East Indian, and Korean authors

Activity 2:        look at the various works for similarities and differences in
                   the cultures

Career Cluster:    Education and Training


For a creative Project: painting a large mural in an office

Goal 1:            to research modern murals

Goal 2:            to use a new medium in creating the mural

Activity 1:        go to the library and read about modern mural painting




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Activity 2:        experiment with various mediums used in painting murals

Career Cluster:    Arts, A/V Technology and Communications


For a service-learning Project: getting involved in political campaigning

Goal 1:            to learn the workings of a political campaign

Goal 2:            to learn the persuasive techniques needed to elect a
                   candidate

Activity 1:        work for the election of candidate X at his campaign
                   headquarters

Activity 2:        listen and watch a seasoned campaigner as he does
                   telephone work

Career Cluster:    Government and Public Administration




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                      EXAMPLES OF SENIOR PROJECT TOPICS
                             BY CAREER CLUSTER
The following list is a sampling of topics that could be used for Senior Projects. It is not an all-
inclusive list, but is intended to serve as a starting place when beginning the process of topic
selection.

 Career Cluster        Research Paper           Project
                       Animal Abuse             Humane Society volunteer
                       Crop                     Planting a new crop, measuring
                                                yield results
                       Deer Population          Wildlife study
                       Floral Design            Make floral arrangements and
                                                market them
                       Horse Training           Train a horse
 Agricultural
                       Horticulture             Build a greenhouse
 and Natural
                       Landscape Design         Create and prepare a landscape
 Resources
                                                design for a house
                       Organic Farming          Analyze organic versus regular
                                                farming techniques by planting test
                                                lots
                       Orphan Wild              Animal rehabilitation volunteer
                       Animals
                       Veterinary Medicine      Shadow veterinary doctor
 Architecture and      Home Building            Help build a Habitat for Humanities
 Construction                                   house
                       Architecture             Draw blueprints, make a model
                       Art Show                 Organize an art showcase of your
                                                photography work
                       Cartooning               Design a cartoon character
                       Commercial Art           Commercial art advertising
 Arts, A/V
                       Impressionist Artists    Paint impressionistic art
 Technology and
                       Murals                   Paint mural
 Communications
                       Plays                    Write a play, coordinate its
                                                presentation
                       Poetry                   Write a selection of poetry for
                                                possible publication
                       Silent Films             Make silent movie
                       Business Ownership       Start a small business which
                                                markets or produces a product or
                                                service
 Business and
                       Marketing and            Prepare/implement a business
 Administration
                       Promotion                marketing plan
                       Medical Secretary        Shadow medical secretary
                       Stock Market             Chart stock


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Career Cluster   Research Paper        Project
                 Coach                 Serve as a coach for a sports or
                                       fine arts group
                 Elementary            15 hours aiding in a Kindergarten
                 Education             classroom
                 Hearing Impaired      Learn sign language, teach it to a
                                       group of elementary school
Education
                                       students
and Training
                 Karate Skill          Learn karate, do a demonstration of
                 Demonstration         techniques and a report on the
                                       history and origins.
                 Sports Broadcasting   Announce at a sports event,
                                       coordinate broadcasting
                                       arrangements with the radio station
                 Children’s Book       Research and write a children’s
                                       book on a health topic. Read the
                                       book to an elementary school class.
                 Crack Babies          Community Awareness program
                 Dentistry             Work at a dental clinic
                 Drug Testing          Work in health care facility
                 Drugs in Elementary   Present program in schools
                 Schools
                 Emergency Room        Shadow emergency room doctors
Health           Medicine
Science          History of Diseases   Research changes in different types
                                       of diseases from the 1900’s to
                                       present
                 Nutritional Cooking   Prepare and sell a cookbook with
                                       recipes of nutritious foods
                 Teens and Drugs       Write and perform a one-act play
                 Tobacco (Substance    Conduct a school awareness
                 Abuse)                program that could include
                                       presentations, guest speakers,
                                       brochures, posters, etc.
                 Dance                 Organize a dance team, prepare a
                                       program to present at a Senior
                                       Citizens Center or during half time
                                       at a sporting event
                 Music                 Coordinate/present a piano recital,
Hospitality
                                       proceeds for charity
and Tourism
                 Music Arranging       Write a composition for an
                                       orchestra
                 Radio Broadcasting    Take part in a radio broadcast
                 William               Shakespearean monologues
                 Shakespeare           performance
Human            Babysitting           Offer a series of classes in
Services                               babysitting

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Career Cluster     Research Paper       Project
                   Care of Elderly      Volunteer in a retirement/nursing
                                        home
                   Child Abuse          Design a prevention program
                   Handicapped          Design a barrier-free house
                   Housing
                   Homeless             Coordinate a food and/or clothing
                                        drive
Human
                   Homeless People      Food-clothing drive
Services
                   Homeless People      Volunteer at a shelter
                   Preschool Learning   Serve as a student teaching aide for
                                        a preschool
                   Student Rights       Handbook on What to Do
                   When Arrested
                   Teen Peer Pressure  Write, direct, and perform a play
                   Teen Pregnancy      Volunteer at a Crisis Center
                   Programming         Create a record-keeping program
                                       for a business
Information
                   Web Page            Design and maintain a web page for
Technology
                                       your school or a community
                                       organization
                   Community Safety    Survey/analyze the community for
                                       safety issues. Prepare a written
Law and Public                         analysis to present to the city
Safety                                 commission. Select one issue,
                                       such as vacant buildings, as the
                                       focus of your project.
                   Design              Research fashion design in history,
                                       create a dress/suit for a particular
Retail/Wholesale                       period
Sales and          Fashion             Sew prom dress
Service            Fashions 1940-1990 Fashion show
                   Modeling            Study modeling techniques, model
                                       fashions for an event
                   Hydropower          Create a model
                   Water Pollution     Examine and test water nearby,
                                       compile statistics, compare to
Scientific
                                       reports from some time ago
Research/
                   Weather             Study and report on the changing
Engineering
                                       weather patterns for a certain time
                                       period or region
                   Weather Forecasting Forecast weather for a week
Transportation,    Car Restoration     Restore an antique car
Distribution and
Logistics



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Career Cluster   Research Paper      Project
                 Individual Career   Prepare a career plan for your
                 Plan                interest area, arrange for job
                                     shadowing in your career area
                 Job Certification   Select an occupational area and
All Clusters                         attain certification – child care,
                                     computers, nurses aide, etc.
                 State/Community     Research, analyze, and predict the
                 Analysis            current job/occupational outlook for
                                     your community




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