ORANGE COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

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					                     ORANGE COUNTY

                  BOARD OF SUPERVISORS




                      Bill Campbell
                     Board Chairman
                      Third District




Janet Nguyen                                    John M. W. Moorlach
 First District                                   Vice Chairman
                                                  Second District



Shawn Nelson                                      Patricia C. Bates
Fourth District                                     Fifth District




         ORANGE COUNTY URBAN COUNTY PROGRAM


                 CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL
           PERFORMANCE and EVALUATION REPORT

                      Fiscal Year 2010-11


                     Karen Roper, Director
                    OC Community Services


                     OC Community Resources
                       1770 North Broadway
                     Santa Ana, CA 92706-2642
                                     COUNTY OF ORANGE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FY 2010-11 CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION REPORT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                                                       5

   I. Summary of resources and distribution of funds                    5
  II. General CAPER Narratives                                          6
      A. Five-Year Assessment of Consolidated Plan Goals & Objectives
      B. Continuum of Care Narrative
      C. Orange County Housing Authority (OCHA)
      D. Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing
      E. Leveraging Resources
      F. Citizen Participation and Comments
           1. Community Meetings
           2. Public Notice
      G. Monitoring and Compliance
           1. CDBG and ESG Contract Monitoring
           2. Affordable Housing
           3. Performance Measurements
           4. Assessment of Affirmative Marketing
      H. Performance Measurement and Outcome System
 III. Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Narrative Statements     37
      A. Comparison of CDBG Funds Goals and Objectives
           1. Public Services
           2. Preservation of Housing Rehabilitation
           3. Public Facilities and Improvements
 IV. Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) Narrative Statements                 43
      A.   Assessment of ESG Fund to Goals and Objectives
      B. Match Resources
      C. Activity and Beneficiary Data
      D. Housing Supportive Services
  V. HOME Investment PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM Narrative Statements           46
      A. Affordable Housing
      B. New Housing Activities

OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                        Page 2
                                    COUNTY OF ORANGE

      C. Affordable Housing Leveraging
      E. HOME Ownership Programs
  VI. Orange County Development Agency (OCDA)
 VII. Self Evaluation                                                                   55
VIII. Supplemental Organizational Profiles                                              56
      A. Office on Aging Division (OoA)
      B. Community Investment Division
      C. Veterans Services Office (VSO)
 IX. Questionnaire - HUD’s Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers                 65
      Comparison of Consolidated Plan Goals and Projected Actual OC
      Accomplishments

   X. Integrated Disbursement and Information System (IDIS) Reports                      67
           A.   Financial Summary (PR26)
           B.   Summary of Accomplishments (PR 23)
           C.   CDBG Activity Summary Report (PR 03)
           D.   CDBG Performance Measures Reprot (PR 83)
           E.   ESG Program Financial Summary (PR 1)
           F.   ESG Summary of Activities (PR 19)
           G.   Summary of Consolidated Plan Projects for Report Year 2010-11 (PR 06)
           H.   Status of HOME Activities Report (PR 22)
           I.   HOME Match Report and HOME Annual Performance Report
           J.   CDBG-R Report and CDBG-R Activity Summary Report (PR 03)


XI. Completed Affordable Housing Projects in FY 2010-11                                  50




OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                         Page 3
                                             COUNTY OF ORANGE


                                    COMMISSIONS, BOARDS AND COUNCILS
                                                                    SENIOR CITIZENS ADVISORY
                       H&CD COMMISSION                                 COUNCIL MEMBERS
Jim Palmer             Chair
Ron Garcia             Vice Chair                          Tony Rodella           Chair
Margie Rice                                                Don MacAllister        Vice Chair
Anthony Petros                                             Patricia McGuigan    David Sullivan
Greg Sowards                                               Yvonne Mitchell      Lillian Kammerer
Bruce Sonnenberg                                           Charles McVey        Frank Fry
Jim Righeimer                                              Mike Levitt          Jerry Margolin
Paris Merriam                                              Sherry Geyer         Barbara Barker
Jan Horton                                                 Charles Morse        Kathryn McCullough
Helen Smith-Gardner                                        Leonor Barajas       Herb Schwartz
Kathryn McCullough                                         Anna Boyce           Vince Agor
                                                           Dee Erman            Bobbie Day
    OC WORKFORCE INVESTMENT BOARD MEMBERS                  Jim Levy             Keith Nelson
                                                           Elizabeth Busick     Roy Uno
Peter Agarwal          Chair                               Frank Sun            Judy Huitt
Don McCrea             Vice Chair                          Dr. Irene Lange      Nancy Cheng
                        nd
Richard Sandzimier     2 Vice Chair                        Najma Quadar         Frank Van Nostrand
Euiwon Chough          Rob Claudio                         Andrew Nguyen        Dr. Patricia Adelekan
Jim Adams              Kenneth Howe                                 ORANGE COUNTY VETERANS
Ronald DiLuigi         Fred Flores                                     ADVISORY COUNCIL
Bob Bunyan             Bill Habermehl                      vacant               District One
Lauray Holland Leis    Alireza Jazayeri                    Angela Rigdon         District Two
June Kuehn             Sherry Kline                        Vacant                District Three
John Luker             Douglas Mangione                    Marilyn Harris        District Four
Darlene Le Fort        Gary Matkin                         Frank Tucker          District Five
Barbara Liddy          Scott McKenzie                      Lee Dorman            Member-At-Large
Janis Mantini          Kevin Landry                        John Henage           Member-At-Large
Ernesto Medrano        Bonny Perez                         Jack Issacson         Member-At-Large
Tom Porter             Adalberto Quijada                   Steve Vargas          Member-At-Large
Clarence Ray           Michael Ruane
Scott McKenzie         Paula Starr
Thomas Tassinari       Samantha Simonnet
Kay Turley-Kirchner    Ruby Yap
Janelle Cranch         Yasith Weerasuriya
Nancy Adams            Allan Woo
Jerry Fitch             Ed Tomlin
Maria-Jean Caterinicchio




      OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                        Page 4
                                           COUNTY OF ORANGE


Executive Summary

The Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) is an annual assessment report that
identifies the Urban County of Orange’s overall housing and community development accomplishments in meeting
the five-year Consolidated Plan strategy that establishes priorities for addressing the identified housing and
community development needs; and the FY 2010-11 Action Plan that outlines the intended use of federal
resources.

OC Community Services (County) is the recipient of federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME
Investment Partnerships (HOME), Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG), Community Development Block Grant–
Recovery (CDBG-R), Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) and Homelessness Prevention Rapid Re-
Housing Program (HPRP) federal funds. The County is required to provide the public and the U. S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) with an assessment of its accomplishments utilizing these funds at the
end of each fiscal year. OC Community Services prepared the CAPER in accordance with all applicable HUD
requirements. This document represents a comprehensive, consolidated year-end report of the County’s use of the
HUD Community Planning and Development (CPD) funds. The Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Program
(CoC) narrative explains the organizational structure, planning and housing services that are currently in place,
and outlines accomplishments relating to the Supportive Housing Programs (SHP).

This CAPER also includes activities and accomplishments the County has achieved in cooperation with other
funding programs, such as the HUD Section 8 Rental Assistance Program, local Housing Authority Operating
Reserve Funds, Housing Support Services (HSS), Orange County Development Agency (OCDA) and the State of
California CalHome funds. The County is not the grantee for regional Housing Opportunities for Persons with
AIDS (HOPWA) Program funds; therefore, this report will not be presenting HOPWA activities.

OC Community Services also receives Older Americans Act and Workforce Investment Act funding, State
subvention funds for Veterans and State grants for California Older Americans, as well as County General Funds.
Consistent with the revised format utilized in this CAPER, it is the intent of this report to provide the reader with a
comprehensive view of all the accomplishments achieved by OC Community Services.

This performance report will summarize the short-term goals and objectives set forth in the FY 2010-11 Action Plan
(AP) and present a comprehensive analysis of the County’s performance and accomplishments relative to those
goals and objectives. Furthermore, this report will analyze the performance and accomplishments of the first year
of the County’s 2010-14 Consolidated Plan (CP), and present a progress report on how effective the County has
been in meeting its projected long-range goals and objectives.

As stated in the overall goals of the Consolidated Submission for Community Planning and Development
Programs, the overall goal of Orange County Community Services is to develop viable urban communities by
providing decent housing, a suitable living environment and expanding economic opportunities principally for low
and moderate income persons. The primary means towards this end is to extend and strengthen partnerships
among all levels of government and the private sector, including for-profit and non-profit organizations, in the
construction and expansion of affordable housing, community development programs, and infrastructure projects.

I.      Summary of Resources and Distribution of Funds

The federal grant funds were expended on activities aimed at meeting the many challenges faced by the County,
to preserve and create a quality living environment for all residents, and to address the County’s community vision
as indicated in the FY 2010-14 Consolidated Plan. This CAPER reflects a strong emphasis on the part of OC
Community Services in pursuing the strategies and objectives stated in our vision statement:

                        "An unparalleled system of support for the human experience”
HUD requires that the County identify the federal funds that were used during the report year to further the
objectives of the County’s Consolidated Plan, and how these funds were committed and expended. The amount of
federal grant funds expended, by the County, during the FY 2010-11 report period are listed in the table below.


OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                     Page 5
                                              COUNTY OF ORANGE

                                                                                                    Expended
                       Table 1: FY 2010-11 Federal Grants                     Grant Award
                                                                                                    FY 2010-11
                 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)                      $      4,365,598       $   3,900,303
                          CDBG Reprogrammed Funds                              $      1,134,053       $     456,814
                             CDBG Program Income                               $        312,297       $     312,297
                       HOME Investment Partnership Grant                       $      1,734,317       $   2,815,941
                 HOME Reprogrammed Funds/Program Income                        $        245,667       $   1,078,688
                         Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG)                         $        165,631       $     166,812
      FY 2008 Community Development Block Grant-Recovery (CDBG-R)              $      1,035,535       $     961,244
               FY 2008 Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP)                $      2,647,246       $   2,332,939

 FY 2008 Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP)           $      1,075,603       $     526,521
                                                                   Total       $     12,715,947       $ 12,551,559

In addition, the County must identify the geographic distribution of federal funds. CDBG program funds were
distributed and expended based on program criteria. Housing rehabilitation programs were provided on a citywide
basis in each participating City and in the unincorporated County areas based on low and moderate-income
qualified residents. Fair Housing, street improvements, and community development programs were also funded.

II.   General CAPER Narratives

         A.       Five Year Assessment of Consolidated Plan (Fiscal Years 2010-14)

The County’s 2010-14 CP was approved and adopted by the Orange County Board of Supervisors (BOS) in May
2010. The Consolidated Plan (CP) combined into a single submission the HUD CPD requirements for the CDBG,
ESG and HOME Program funds and related Program Income. Included under the HOME program is the ADDI
program. The planning components of the CP also addressed the use of SHP, OCDA, and HSS funding to meet
its goals and objectives. The County concentrates its energy into pursuing these funding resources, as well as
other available sources.

The CP identified, within the five year reporting period, the County’s overall needs for Infrastructure, Public
Services (including Special Needs Populations) and Housing (Rental/Owner) for extremely low, very low, low and
moderate income persons and households, as well as homeless individuals. A major component of the CP is the
Strategic Plan that outlines the County’s long term goals and prioritizes its housing and non-housing needs. The
Strategic Plan also presented a comprehensive approach to address homelessness through a CoC System.

          B.      Consolidated Plan (CP) – Strategic Plan Priorities

                  1.        High Priority Funding

A major component of the CP is the assessment of needs by activity, affected population, and priority of need.
Table 2 below identifies the high priority needs cited in the CP, as well as the funding allocations within those
areas of need during the five-year period covered in the CP. The funding levels reflect only funds allocated
through the CDBG, CDBG-R, HOME, HPRP, ESG and NSP Programs. Since many projects funded meet
overlapping needs, these figures are not exact but are approximate funding in each category.

Acquisition, construction, and rehabilitation of affordable housing units were identified as the highest priority needs
in the CP. In addition to the federal resources shown below, in FY 2010-11 local OCDA funds were proposed to
leverage affordable housing activities. The 2010 SuperNOFA Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant
competition significantly enhanced the CDBG and ESG funding for homeless outreach assessment and
emergency and transitional shelters by more than $15,237,296. The SuperNOFA funds, however, are not eligible
for emergency shelters or for homeless prevention activities.



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                                                         COUNTY OF ORANGE

                                 Table 2: FY 2010-14 Federal Allocations for High Priority Needs

        Activities                              FY 2010          FY 2011          FY 2012         FY 2013        FY 2014              FY 2014
   Needs and Priorities 5 Year Plan              Year 1           Year 2           Year 3          Year 4         Year 5            Funds Needed
        Housing
     (Rental/Owner)     $ 13,628,425           $ 3,335,143       $ 3,079,686                                                          ($    7,213,596)
       Infrastructure       $ 7,932,357        $ 2,445,463       $ 1,822,388                                                          ($    3,664,506)

      Public Services       $ 3,283,088        $    635,563      $     833,849                                                        ($    1,813,676)
        Planning &
      Administration        $ 4,960,825        $ 902,000         $ 678,053                                                           ( $ 3,380,772)
           Total            $ 29,804,695       $ 7,318,169       $ 6,413,976                                                          ($ 16,072,550)

Table 3 below demonstrates the County dedicated both federal and local funding allocations for the 2010-14 CP. In FY 2010-11,
HUD allocated to the County Program $4,365,598 of new CDBG funds (including $294,551 for the Metro City of Yorba Linda),
$1,734,317 of new HOME funds, and $165,631 ESG funds. Additionally, the County program recaptured funds from prior year
projects and received PI from prior year HOME and CDBG investments. (Funds reprogrammed from prior year CDBG totaled
$1,134,053, and HOME funds $245,667. The Metro City of Yorba Linda does not receive separate HOME or ESG funding.

   Table 3: FY 2010-14 Funding Allocations
                                            FY 2010-11          FY 2011-12        FY 2012-13       FY 2013-14       FY 2014-15             Funding
   Federal Program Funds                        Year 1               Year 2         Year 3            Year 4           Year 5              Totals
   CDBG                                        $ 4,365,598      $ 3,635,618                                                           $ 8,001,216
   HOME                                    $     1,734,317      $ 1,522,759                                                           $ 3,257,076
   ESG                                     $       165,631      $ 164,935                                                             $   330,566

            Subtotal Federal Funds $ 6,265,546                  $ 5,323,312                                                           $ 11,588,858
   Reprogrammed /PI Federal Funds/CDBG-R
   CDBG Program Income             $   144,000                  $     240,736                                                         $   384,736
   CDBG Reprogrammed               $ 1,134,053                  $     607,795                                                         $ 1,741,848
   CDBG-R (FY 2009 balance
   forward)                        $ 1,035,535                  $      73,811                                                         $ 1,109,346
   HOME Program Income             $   172,000                  $     140,000                                                         $   312,000
    Subtotal Reprogrammed Funds            $    2,485,588       $ 1,062,342                                                           $ 3,521,415

           Total Federal Funding           $    8,751,134       $ 6,385,654                                                           $ 15,136,788
   Other Funds
   15U Housing Funds                       $       127,295      $             -                                                       $      127,295

                  Total Federal &
            Reprogrammed Funds             $    8,878,429      $ 6,385,654                                                            $ 15,264,083
   Recovery Act 2009 Funds
   HPRP (FY 2009 balance
   forward)                                $    1,075,603      $   290,000                                                            $ 1,365,603
   NSP (balance forward)                   $    2,647,246      $   523,492                                                            $ 3,170,738
   NSP 3                                                       $ 1,004,948                                                            $ 1,004,948
           Total Recovery Funds            $    3,722.849      $ 1,818,440                                                            $ 5,541,289
   Local Funds
   Redevelopment                           $    7,500,000      $ 13,216,089                                                           $ 20,716,089
                 Total Local Funds         $    7,500,000      $ 13,216,089                                                           $ 20,716,089

     Total Funding Allocations             $ 20,101,278        $ 21,420,183                                                           $ 41,521,461

   * Table 1 includes the Metro City of Yorba Linda , and the reprogramming of federal funds from projects funded in prior years.
   ** HPRP, NSP and Redevelopment funding are allocated under separate Board Action.


   OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                                             Page 7
                                           COUNTY OF ORANGE



Each year HUD provides formula allocations to Urban Counties, Entitlement Cities, and/or States based on
demographic and economic information such as low and moderate-income populations. The County qualifies as an
Urban County and consists of 13 participating cities, including 1 Metropolitan City (Yorba Linda), all unincorporated
areas. Although the City of Yorba Linda has entitlement status, the city elected to receive their entitlement funds
through the Urban County Program. The Urban County was awarded formula allocations of CDBG, HOME and
ESG program funds.

Certification for Consistency Requests
During the reporting year, OC Community Services received requests for nine (9) Certifications for Consistency for
Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Program proposals.

         2. Consolidated Plan Update

                 a.      Proposal/Application Process for FY 2010-11 Funding

 Fiscal Year 2010-11 represents the first year of the Five-Year CP and the second year of a three-year multi-year
 funding cycle for Public Service and Housing Rehabilitation activities. In September 2005, the County BOS
 approved OC Community Services Funding Allocation Policy & Process and Citizen Participation Plan
 (FAPP/CPP). Included in the FAPP/CPP was OC Community Services recommendation to approve a three-year
 funding cycle for Public Services and to introduce a new three-year funding cycle for Housing Rehabilitation
 activities. Public Facilities and Improvement activities will remain on a yearly application process.

 The Metro City of Yorba Linda although participating in the Urban County Program, does not compete for funding
 in the Application Competition process since HUD allocates their funding separately. However, in compliance with
 Citizen Participation requirements, the City held community meetings, received local proposals, and submitted
 those proposals to OC Community Services. These projects are included in the AAP.

 OC Community Services received applications from participating cities, organizations within targeted areas, non-
 profit and faith-based organizations, as well as county agencies. All applicants whose projects met the minimum
 threshold were submitted to the Application Review Committee (ARC) for further review. The ARC is made up of
 two separate evaluation teams (one for public services; one for public facilities and improvements, economic
 development, and housing rehabilitation). Each team is comprised of H&CD Commission members, community
 representatives, and other individuals knowledgeable about HUD activities.

                 b.      The Fiscal Year 2010-11 process also included the following:

 The priorities for the FY 2010-11 project selection:

 OC Community Services established the Five-Year Community Development High Priority Needs for the Urban
 County program during the development of the FY 2010-14 CP. The CP identifies, within a five-year reporting
 period, the County’s overall community development needs (i.e. Affordable Housing, Special Population Needs,
 etc.) for extremely low, low and moderate-income persons and households. Additionally, a major component of
 the CP is the Strategic Plan that outlines the County’s long term goals and prioritizes its housing and non-
 housing needs. The Strategic Plan also presents a comprehensive approach to addressing homelessness
 through a Continuum of Care System (CoC).

 To better understand local needs a comprehensive Housing and Community Needs Survey was distributed to
 residents living in participating jurisdictions in the Urban County Program by the following means:

        Made available and collected at community centers and public counters;
        Mailed to social service providers, unincorporated areas and city residents;
        Distributed at community meetings for input;
        Made available on the World Wide Web for general public input



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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE

In addition to resident surveys, interviews were also conducted with City and County staff, as well as non-profit
Service providers to further understand local needs.

The following are examples of projects and activity types that will be considered for funding although they did not
appear on the Housing and Community Needs Assessment. They are as follows:

       Public Services projects filling the gap in the Homeless CoC which were not filled by SuperNOFA
        Homeless Assistance funding;
       Public Facilities & Improvement projects which have been previously funded for design.

The process for the FY 2010-11 project selection:

    A. Competitive Funding Process

The Urban County program utilizes a competitive Request for Proposal (RFP) process to distribute both federal
and local funds. The following activities are funded through this competitive process:

       Public Services
       Public Facilities and Improvement
       Housing Rehabilitation

    B. Application Review Committee (ARC)

The Application Review Committee (ARC) is the evaluating body for all applications submitted in response to the
Urban County’s competitive RFP process. The ARC is comprised of two separate evaluation committees (one for
Public Services and one for Public Facilities and Improvements and Housing Rehabilitation). Each Committee is
comprised of H&CD Housing Commission members, community representatives, and other individuals
knowledgeable about community development, community services, and housing activities.

    C. Rental Housing Development and Homeownership

New housing construction/acquisition project proposals will be accepted in response to a separate Notice of
Funding Availability (NOFA) process. The Project Advisory Committee (PAC), a subcommittee of the H&CD
Commission, analyzes the main points of this program before recommended action is presented to the Board of
Supervisors.

Continuing in fiscal year 2010-11 the County in partnership with participating jurisdictions, currently operating
eligible first time homebuyer programs, will look to further explore the use of American Dream Down payment
Initiative (ADDI) funding.

    D. Multi-Year Funding

Public Services – Housing Rehabilitation Multi-Year Funding Process

As in prior years, staff is recommending that successful Public Services and Housing Rehabilitation projects be
funded on a 3-year funding cycle. Projects that are recommended to receive funds as the result of the
competitive process in Year 1 (2009-10) may receive funds in Year 2 (2010-11) and/or Year 3 (2011-12),
provided the organization successfully meets the following criteria:

       Project remains in compliance with contractual milestones:
        - All Public Services and Housing Rehabilitation projects must expend 50% of their contractual funds and
        complete 50% of their contractual accomplishments by December 31, of the contract year; 70% by
        January 31, of the contract year; and 80% by March 31, of the contract year.




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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE

         - Exceptions to these requirements include: contracts that spend their funding later in the fiscal year (i.e.
         cold weather shelters), recommendation of ARC, exemption from OC Community Services Director, and
         delays due to HUD or OC Community Services administration of contracts.

        Project continues to meet the priority status for which it was funded in Year 1.
        Project continues to leverage funds with other sources.
        All project accomplishments must be correctly reported on the Grantee Performance Reports (GPRs)
         and/or other documentation as described in current year contract.
        Project must receive a successful assessment of performance and progress from OC Community
         Services staff.

        Organizations that receive an unsuccessful assessment of performance will be reviewed and
         reevaluated by the ARC for future funding consideration.

Projects meeting the December 31, contract milestone will be included in the current year draft Annual Action
Plan; however, projects that fail to meet this deadline may be removed from the draft Annual Action Plan prior to
its presentation to the County Board of Supervisors at the second public hearing.

Additionally, all Public Service projects that serve homeless populations are required to participate in the
County’s Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) effort. For more information regarding HMIS
please contact Amber Killinger            of OC Partnership at: (714) 288-4007 ext. 115, or
Amber.Killinger@ocpartnership.net

The policies for the FY 2010-11 project selection:

In order to ensure integrity and reliability, the proposal review process is applied to each application on a
consistent basis. In addition, maximum flexibility has been built into the proposal review process in order to
ensure that federal and local resources are available to assist the County in meeting its Community
Development needs. Although OC Community Services staff does not participate in ARC’s proposal review
process, staff is available to provide any needed technical support.

    1.   Proposal Review Process

OC Community Services staff will review all proposals utilizing the following six (6) steps:

    1. Conduct an initial threshold review of all proposals submitted based on eligibility requirements
       established by HUD.
    2. Applications not passing the initial threshold review are eliminated without the opportunity to appeal.
       Proposals that successfully pass the initial threshold review are forwarded to ARC for review, scoring,
       and ranking.
    3. Applicants deemed as unsuccessful by ARC are afforded the opportunity to appeal.
    4. After addressing any appeals ARC provides a list of proposals recommended for funding.
    5. Projects recommended for funding are compiled and presented to the public for comment in the draft
       Annual Action Plan and later to the Board of Supervisors for approval and direction.
    6. Projects are preliminarily awarded until final approval from HUD.

    2. Key Policies

Renewal Applicants - Those applicants having been under contract with OC Community Services within the
past 3 years.

        OC Community Service Staff will review project performance from projects within the past 3 years.




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                                           COUNTY OF ORANGE

       Renewal evaluations will focus on, but is not limited to, subrecipient compliance with contractual
        obligations and meeting scheduled accomplishments as reported on the current year’s Grantee
        Performance Reports (GPR).

New Applicants- Applicants having not been under contract with OC Community Services within the past 3
years.

       Applicants must pass a site visit conducted by OC Community Services staff.
       Applicants must provide copies of any performance reports required by other funding organizations as a
        condition of funding.
       Applicant must have been in operation and been performing the activity proposed in their proposal for a
        minimum of one year from the date of submitting the application.
       Applicants that have not received funding from the Urban County Program in the previous 3 years may
        receive priority over all applicants.

Activity Specific Policies- the following requirements apply to all Public Services and Public Facilities and
Improvements projects and activities.

       Public Services
           -All projects and activities providing services to homeless individuals and/or families are required to
           be an active participant in the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS).
       Public Facilities and Improvements (PF&I)
           -Applicants cannot request funds in an amount that exceeds 35% of OC Community Services total
           funding available for PF&I activities.

During the 30-day public review and comment period the above referenced policies will be under review and may
change prior to the publication of the final FY 2010-11 FAPP.

Minimum Application Requirements

       A minimum grant amount is established at $15,000 per year for all projects.
       Only one application from any organization serving the same population with the same service, or
        providing the same program or product, will be accepted.
       If funded with CDBG funds, the project must meet a national objective as identified by HUD Regulations
        (24 CFR 570.208).
       Depending on funding source, the proposed activity must be eligible as defined by HUD Regulations.
       The population to be served or to benefit from the project must principally be low to moderate-income as
        defined by HUD.
       If the applicant is a current or past recipient of assistance under a HUD McKinney Act program (i.e.
        SuperNOFA) or the HUD Single Family Property Disposition Program, there must be no project or
        construction delay, HUD finding, outstanding Annual Progress Report (APR), or outstanding audit that
        HUD deems serious regarding the administration of HUD McKinney Act programs or the HUD Single
        Family Property Disposition Program.
       The applicant must be in compliance with applicable civil rights laws and Executive Orders. There must
        be no pending civil rights suits, outstanding findings of noncompliance with civil rights statues, Executive
        Orders, or regulations, unresolved Secretary (Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
        Development) charge of discrimination issued under the Fair Housing Act, no adjudications of civil rights
        violations on a civil action or deferral of processing of applications from the applicant imposed by HUD.
       Applicant must submit a copy of the organization’s most recent audit (within the last two years) by a
        independent certified CPA and a description of corrective action taken for any findings identified by the
        auditor, both of which will be reviewed by the OC Community Services Accounting Manager or
        designated staff.

Exempt from the competitive process are:



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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE

In addition to priority and non-priority ranked projects, the County also under takes certain activities that are
exempt from the competitive process:

       Administration – The County and the Metropolitan City of Yorba Linda utilize a percentage of their
        allocations to administer the CDBG program. The County also administers HOME, ESG, and HSS
        funded programs.
       County’s obligations to specific community centers within unincorporated areas.
       County of Orange Cold Weather Shelter Program (CDBG, ESG and 15U Housing funds)
       Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity related activities mandated by HUD.
       Funding associated with unincorporated areas that are anticipated to annex within the program year.

3. Action Plan Fiscal Year 2010-11

                 a.   Federal Funding Resources

HUD allocated Orange County $4,365,598 in new CDBG funds (including $294,551 for the Metro City of Yorba
Linda), $1,734,317 of new HOME funds, and $165,631 of ESG funds. Orange County also reprogrammed
$1,134,053 of CDBG, $144,000 CDBG program income and $172,000 in HOME program income from prior year
projects. The Metro City of Yorba Linda does not receive separate HOME or ESG funding.

                b.      Utilization of Local Funds

OC Community Services continued its long-standing practice of leveraging its federal and local resources in order
to help meet the goals and objectives established in the FY 2010-14 Consolidated Plan, and further supported by
the Fiscal Year 2010-11 Action Plan. Specifically, Redevelopment funds and Orange County Housing Authority
Operating Reserve (Operating Reserves) funds are used by the County to leverage with federal resources.
Typically, redevelopment funds are targeted for eligible housing or infrastructure projects in designated
redevelopment areas. In FY 2010-11, $1,906,317 in new and carry-over funds was proposed for Affordable
Housing, Public Facilities and Improvements, and Housing Rehabilitation activities. 15U Housing funds in the
amount of $127,295 were made available for countywide housing-related public service projects.

                c.      Economic Development

Based primarily on demand, need, performance, and readiness to implement programs and expend funds,
economic development activities were listed as a ―Medium Priority,‖ excluding technical assistance in the
County’s 2010-14 CP. As defined in the CP, medium priority activities may be funded provided that funds are
available; however, actions will be taken to locate other funding sources to assist these activities. The County of
Orange has several departments that are involved in some aspect of providing economic development
opportunities (e.g., job training, provision of jobs, adding value to communities) to their clientele.

The Orange County Business Council and the County Executive Office completed an inventory of county
resources and coordinated the provision of funds and services. The Comprehensive Economic Development
Strategy Committee is located within OC Community Services. New opportunities now exist to integrate job
training, job placement, and business expansion into a more effective economic development program. The
County will continue to reassess its current strategies relative to economic development activities and will attempt
to develop a more successful program.

The Orange County Workforce Investment Board (OCWIB) facilitates and coordinates workforce and economic
development programs and provides oversight to the employment and training programs associated with the WIA
funded One Stop Career Centers. The OCWIB is composed of representatives from business, education, and
public/non-profit organizations. The OCWIB has also been designated as the Comprehensive Economic
Development Strategy (CEDS) Committee for the County of Orange. (More detailed information is on page 58)

Funding for FY 2010-11:          Federal and Other sources, grants, etc. – $20,101,278

                d.        Program Income (PI)

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                                                COUNTY OF ORANGE


  PI is generated from previously funded CDBG and HOME activities, such as repayment of housing rehabilitation
  loans. These funds are available for reinvestment in projects or other eligible activities in the jurisdiction that
  generated the PI. During fiscal year 2010-11 a total of $312,297.46 in CDBG PI and $245,666.57 in HOME PI
  was received. Below is a summary of the Program Income receipts by source for the CDBG and HOME
  Programs.

                               Table 4:         2010-11 PROGRAM INCOME

                                                                                   CDBG Program
                              SUBRECIPIENT                                     Income Funds Received


   1   Housing Rehabilitation Loans – Deferred Loan Payoff                 $                  181,228.04
   2   Housing Rehabilitation Loans – Principle & Interest Payments                              4,475.79
   3   Participating City Program Income – City of Cypress                                                 -
   4   Participating City Program Income – City of Brea                                         48,696.75
   5   Revolving Fund – Lease Income from El Modena Center                                      10,864.20
   6   Revolving Fund – Lease Income from Midway City Center                                    62,398.00
   7   Interest                                                                                  1,024.18
   8   Miscellaneous Receipts/Refunds                                                            3,610.50
                                                          Total Receipts   $                  312,297.46


                                                                                   HOME Program
                              SUBRECIPIENT                                     Income Funds Received
   1   Participating City Program Income – City of Brea                    $                               -
   2   Developer Loans – Principle & Interest Payments                                        119,144.64
   3   Developer loans - Residual Receipts                                                    112,253.58
   4   Interest                                                                                  3,870.17
   5   Miscellaneous Receipts/Refunds                                                           10,398.18
                                                          Total Receipts   $                  245,666.57




           e. Participating Metropolitan Cities

The Orange County Urban County Program includes one incorporated city with entitlement status, the City of Yorba
Linda. Consistent with federal regulations, the City of Yorba Linda has chosen to remain in the Urban County
Program with Metropolitan City (or Metro City) status. The City of Yorba Linda receives a CDBG allocation based
on the HUD fair share formula.

Of the County’s overall CDBG funding, HUD formulated an allocation of $294,551 for the City’s use. Despite the
direct allocation to the City, overall CDBG Program administrative responsibilities remain with the County.
Therefore, the County retains ten percent (10%) of the City’s allocation to address the County’s costs for
administering their program.

Timely expenditure of HUD funds is a major requirement for participation in federal programs. In an effort to ensure
that the County achieves the mandated 1.5 expenditure ratio by April 30 of each program year and in accordance
with provisions contained in the Funding Allocation Policy & Process, OC Community Services monitors the
progress of funded projects in order to ensure timely expenditures of funds and viability of activities.

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                                                 COUNTY OF ORANGE

The County will maintain its strategy to optimize CDBG and HOME resources for activities that address local
objectives and priority needs identified in the CP. In addition to dedicating new resources for such projects, OC
Community Services periodically reviews the progress of activities for which CDBG and HOME funds have been
reserved in prior years. Such reviews are incorporated in the monitoring schedules to identify funds appropriate for
reprogramming as ―Amendments to the Action Plan.‖ Subrecipients may also initiate requests for reprogramming.
Unspent funds from previously planned projects may become available for reprogramming from:

             1.   Lack of scheduled accomplishments.
             2.   A substantial change in grant allocation.
             3.   An action results in the creation of a new activity.
             4.   A new project is created or an existing project is deleted.

  Amendments and Reprogrammed Funds
  During the FY 2010-11 AP process, the County took the following approaches to reprogram or transfer funds to
  meet performance standards:

  City of Brea, Ash Street Alley Improvement Project - This project was to reconstruct a deteriorated alley
  located in a low-income neighborhood. The City requested an amendment of the Scope of Services to capture
  eligible activities and reimbursable costs and a six-month extension to complete the project.

  City of Brea, Single-Family Rehabilitation – This project was to assist very low and low-income households
  with interior and exterior construction repairs to single-family housing and mobile home units. The City requested
  a six-month extension to allow for the expenditure of the entire contract amount.

  Colette’s Children’s Home, Placentia Hope Project - This project consists of three (3) CDBG Contracts
  KC10927, KC10928, and KC10929 to construct upgrades to a three (3) four-plex apartment buildings. Colette’s
  Children’s Home requested a six-month extension for all three contracts to allow time for the expenditure of all
  three contracts.

  City of Cypress, Delong/Watson/Crescent Sewer Capacity Improvement - The project was to replace
  approximately 2,150 linear feet of existing deficient sewer line facilities and install 400 linear feet of sewer pipe in
  a Low-Moderate Area, in the City of Cypress. The construction was near completion by June 30, 2011. The City
  of Cypress requested a six-month extension to address any unforeseen delays.

  City of Cypress, Lemon/Lime Rental Rehabilitation Project - This project was amended to reprogram $50,000
  in funds from this contract to KC10923, Single-family Rehabilitation. The City of Cypress received high demand
  for the Single-Family Rehabilitation Program. The reprogrammed funds allowed the City to fulfill its need.

  City of Cypress, Single-Family Rehabilitation - Due to the high demand for single family rehabilitation, the City
  requested to reprogram $50,000 of CDBG funds from Contract No. KC10922 - Lemon/Lime Multi Family Rental
  Rehabilitation, to their single family program. As a result of the reprogrammed funds, the City was able to
  increase the Home Enhancement Loan Program, which provides deferred payment and forgivable loans to
  income qualified homeowners from four (4) housing units to eight (8) units.

  City of Placentia, Neighborhood Facilities Improvements Project - This project consists of three
  neighborhood facilities: Gomez Community Center, Civic Center, and Backs Community Building, Although the
  City has made significant progress, including completing design and construction documents on the project and
  holding stakeholders meetings to review proposed improvements, the project could not be completed by June 30,
  2011. The City requested a six-month extension to complete the project.

A.   ASSESSMENT OF FIVE-YEAR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The fiscal year 2010-11 Action Plan reflects a strong emphasis on the part of the OC Community Services to pursue
the strategies and objectives stated in its CP.

        1.        Increasing Commitment to Rehabilitation and Development of Affordable Housing


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                                             COUNTY OF ORANGE

While working to achieve the goals and objectives of the CPP, the County has maintained its commitment to
increasing the supply of affordable housing. Continued population and job growth, appreciating rents, rising land
and development costs are all important factors that continue to impact the Orange County housing market.

Given the economic conditions in the Orange County region, demand for affordable housing continues to grow for
lower income households. County residents that fall in these income categories include teachers, peace officers,
fire fighters nurses, and service industry workers. To meet the growing demand for affordable housing in the
County, the BOS has approved a wide-range of policies and programs over the past several years. In June 2006,
the BOS approved an affordable housing implementation agreement for the development of 60 acres of land for
affordable rental housing.

In response to community needs assessments, the Community Participation Plan identifies affordable housing and
housing for the homeless as its top priorities. The FY 2010-11 AP dedicated $4,553,563 in Federal funding for
acquisition, construction, and rehabilitation of affordable permanent housing. The County has a strong commitment
to support these high priority activities with a variety of funding sources. In addition to Federal funding, local funds
were used to support housing rehabilitation, and for acquisition, construction, and rehabilitation of affordable
housing in the amount of $7,500,000 of new and carried-over Redevelopment funds.

B. CONTINUUM OF CARE HOMELESS ASSISTANCE

In 1998, the County of Orange developed a comprehensive, coordinated, and regional Continuum of Care strategy
that now includes all thirty-four cities in Orange County, County Agencies, the County’s Homeless housing and
service providers, and other community groups (including non-profits, local governmental agencies, faith based
organizations, the homeless and formerly homeless, interested business leaders, schools, and many other
stakeholders) to identify the gaps and unmet needs of the County’s homeless. This grassroots, community based
effort, in conjunction with a comprehensive needs assessment, resulted in the development of funding priorities
aimed to serve the most pressing, unmet needs of the homeless in Orange County.

Homeless needs and priorities continue to be identified through the County’s Continuum of Care System. It has
been noted that the financial situation that has occurred the past several years has deeply affected the County.
Housing foreclosures, job losses, and the recent economic downturn have increased the need for housing and
homeless prevention assistance. In recent years, more families and individuals found themselves homeless or at
imminent risk of losing their housing for the first time in their lives.

Due to the collaborative efforts of the Continuum of Care System and the public/private partnerships that have
developed, the County has been awarded over $139 million in SuperNOFA Continuum of Care Homeless
Assistance funds from 1996-2010. The chart below identifies the successful organizations that submitted an
application for the 2009 SuperNOFA and received a conditional award from HUD.

In the 2010 SuperNOFA competition the County CoC Homeless Assistance Program application had been awarded
a total of $15,237,296. The 2010 awardees are as follows:




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                                             COUNTY OF ORANGE


                         Table 5: 2010 SuperNOFA Continuum of Care Awardees
                                                                                    Project
               Organization                            Project Name                  Status    Award Amount
  American Family Housing                 American Family Housing Haven             Renewal      $ 419,662
  American Family Housing                 American Family Housing Collaborative     Renewal      $ 286,276
  American Family Housing                 Permanent Housing Collaborative           Renewal      $ 315,478
  Anaheim Supportive Hsg. Senior
  Adults                                  Tyrol Plaza Senior Apartments             Renewal       $     139,020
  Collette’s Children's Home              Collette’s Children's Home #1             Renewal       $     157,278
  Collette’s Children's Home              Collette’s Children's Home #2             Renewal       $     127,309
  Collette’s Children's Home              Ariel Place and Anaheim                   Renewal       $     163,898
  Collette’s Children's Home              Cypress St. #2 - Placentia                Renewal       $     163,898
  Collette’s Children's Home              Collette’s Children's Home                Renewal       $     137,882
  Eli Home                                Eli Home 2nd Step                         Renewal       $     524,275
                                          Transitional Housing & Career Education
  Families Forward                        Program                                   Renewal        $ 132,941
  Families Forward                        Transitional Housing Program              Renewal        $    73,819
  Friendship Shelter                      Project READY                             Renewal        $    68,136
  Fullerton Interfaith Emergency Shlt.    Childcare Collaborative                   Renewal        $ 252,000
  Human Options                           Second Step/Client Assistance             Renewal        $    30,793
  Human Options                           Second Step/Operating                     Renewal        $ 111,122
  Interval House                          Bi-lingual Supportive Ser.                Renewal        $    73,268
  The John Henry Foundation               Scattered Site Permanent Housing          Renewal        $ 146,369
  Mercy House                             Emmanuel House                            Renewal        $    90,240
  Mercy House                             Joseph House Regina House                 Renewal        $ 118,000
  OC Partnership                          HMIS                                      Renewal        $ 433,263
  Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter         Transitional Housing Program              Renewal        $ 283,129
  So.Cal. Alcohol & Drug                  Heritage House Cottages                   Renewal        $ 380,345
  South County Outreach                   Saddleback Community Outreach #12         Renewal        $ 175,959
  South County Outreach                   Transitional Housing Program              Renewal        $    50,191
  Thomas House                            Trans. Homeless Family Shelter 7&10       Renewal        $    87,833
  Toby's House                            Safe & Healthy                            Renewal        $ 119,545
  Veterans First                          Veterans Village I                        Renewal        $ 211,664
  Veterans First                          Veterans Housing Project                  Renewal        $ 254,804
  Veterans First                          Veterans Self-Determination Center        Renewal        $ 159,700
  WISEPlace                               Second Stage Housing                      Renewal        $ 100,593
  Women's Transitional Living Center      Independence from Dependence 90-Day       Renewal        $    42,083
  Women's Transitional Living Center      Step 2 Transitional Housing Program       Renewal        $    74,559
  YWCA                                    First Steps Transitional Housing          Renewal        $    93,880
  OCHA                                    #1 Consolidated                           Renewal       $ 3,100,644
  OCHA                                    2002 Renewal                              Renewal        $ 547,632
  OCHA                                    2003 Renewal                              Renewal       $ 1,007,556
  OCHA                                    2004 Renewal                              Renewal        $ 697,620
  OCHA                                    2005 Renewal                              Renewal        $ 502,788
  OCHA                                    Jackson Aisle                             Renewal        $ 408,900
  Jamboree Housing                        Stonegate                                  NEW           $ 400,000
  *Mercy House                            Francis Xavier                             NEW           $ 589,493
  American Family Housing                 AFH PH2                                    NEW           $ 935,491
  OCHA                                    OCHA/Mercy House                           NEW          $ 1,047,960
  Total                                                                                           $ 15,237,296
  Shelter Plus Care (S+C)* Award differences due to Fair Market Rent Adjustments
  * Amount in Board ASR is $724,494. Actual ESNAP request as stated above.

Orange County Continuum of Care System
Orange County has developed its CoC system in a comprehensive and coordinated effort to provide a service
delivery system for the at-risk and homeless population. The County’s regional planning process has been devised
to ensure a single well-coordinated system of care to end homelessness. This is accomplished by balancing
emergency, transitional, and permanent housing plus supportive services to address the needs of homeless
persons so they can transition from streets and shelters to independent living. In addition, the County’s CoC

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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE

system serves the needs of the homeless through diverse housing/service providers that include nonprofit
organizations (both faith-based and community-based); federal, state, and local governmental agencies; public
housing authorities; local businesses; law enforcement; school districts; private donors; homeless/formerly
homeless persons; and other stakeholders.

Orange County’s CoC is comprised of a network of public; private, faith-based, for-profit, and non-profit service
providers. County Agencies such as OC Community Services, Health Care Agency, Social Services Agency, and
other County agencies provide direct services to the homeless and/or significant resources for the agencies serving
the homeless. The region’s 34 municipalities also provide substantial resources for services that assist the
homeless and those at-risk of becoming homeless.

OC Community Services is primarily responsible for addressing the governmental challenges faced by the
Continuum of Care System through its Homeless Prevention Division. The function and vision of the Homeless
Prevention Division is to expand public/private partnerships and enhance the regional system of care. OC
Community Services works closely with other public and quasi-public entities to develop supplemental resources for
Orange County’s Continuum of Care. In addition, the Homeless Prevention Division works with county agencies to
maximize resources, eliminate duplication of effort, and to create new programs and partnerships that respond to
the changing needs of the homeless in Orange County.

In terms of strategic planning, OC Community Services and OC Partnership have shared leadership and
coordination of Orange County’s CoC planning process. Collectively, this partnership is known as the Community
Forum Collaborative. This public/nonprofit partnership helps ensure comprehensive, regional coordination of efforts
and resources to reduce the number of homeless and persons at-risk of homelessness throughout Orange County.

A solid partnership continues to exist between OC Community Services’ Homeless Prevention Programs and OC
Partnership to conduct Community Forums that focus on all issues relating to the management, education, legal
issues, transportation, supportive services, legislation, funding, and other related issues.

The Community Forum Collaborative is Orange County’s lead planning body that implements the regional homeless
CoC strategy and is the public/private mechanism to facilitate the CoC planning process. During the past year, the
Collaborative hosted four quarterly CoC Community Forums that provided regional and coordinated meetings that
focused on significant issues relating to affordable housing, health care, case management, transportation,
supportive services, legislation, funding, and other related issues. On an average, 100 public and private agencies
are represented at these meetings and approximately seventy percent of the Community Forum members are
nonprofit agencies.

The Orange County Continuum of Care System consists of the following basic elements:

 Advocacy on behalf of the homeless or at-risk of homelessness individuals and families and to uphold social justice
for all residents regardless of socio-economic status;



              A system of outreach, assessment and prevention to identify and address the needs and conditions
              of homeless or at-risk of homelessness individuals and families;
              Emergency shelters with appropriate supportive services to help ensure that homeless individuals
              and families receive adequate emergency shelter referral to appropriate service providers or housing
              finders and assistance in addressing areas of crisis;
              Transitional housing with appropriate supportive services to help those homeless individuals and
               families make the transition to permanent housing and independent living; and;
              Permanent housing, or permanent supportive housing, to help meet the long-term housing needs of
               homeless individuals and families.



The annual setting of priority needs and gaps for Orange County’s system of care is facilitated through the
Community Forum, and the results of annual homeless needs assessments and surveys. The matrix on the next

  OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                Page 17
                                             COUNTY OF ORANGE

page summarizes Year 2010 SuperNOFA CoC Project Priority Categories, that is, the priority ranking of projects,
subpopulations, and supportive services that fill the gaps in the current system of care.

Continuum of Care System Funding

The County has developed a comprehensive, coordinated, and regional Continuum of Care (CoC) strategy that
includes the participation of all thirty-four cities in the County, County Agencies, the County’s homeless housing and
service providers, and other community groups (including non-profits, local governmental agencies, faith-based
organizations, the homeless and formerly homeless, interested business leaders, schools, and many other
stakeholders) to identify the gaps and unmet needs of the County’s homeless.


Orange County’s Continuum of Care planning process is continually sustained with regular community wide efforts.
Throughout the year the Community Forum, representatives of service providers, the County, Cities, and other
interested parties, continue the process of identifying gaps and priority needs, and examining new strategies to
strengthen the current system of care. This planning process includes identification of the greatest needs facing the
homeless of Orange County and ranking these needs by relative priority. The input received during the community-
wide planning process coupled with data from the annual Needs Assessment Surveys is included in annual grant
applications to HUD.

Since 1996, this public/private planning process has resulted in the allocation of over $139 million in federal
SuperNOFA Continuum of Care funds for Orange County. HUD Continuum of Care funds are leveraged with federal,
state, and local resources allocated to Orange County’s CoC System. Although Orange County’s CoC System has
dramatically improved since 1996, there are still huge gaps at all levels of the system. While the dollar amount that
the County received is a notable amount, it does not provide enough to service all those that are in need. The 2009
Point in Time Count estimated 8,333 homeless persons in shelters and on the streets in Orange County on the night
of January 24, 2009. This represents an annual estimate of 21,479 unduplicated persons who experience
homelessness in Orange County over the course of one year.

 All applications submitted for funding consideration are evaluated using a set of standard criteria with the greatest
 number of rating points available for proposals that will fill priority gaps in the region’s system of care.


SuperNOFA funds are distributed for the following Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Programs:

       Supportive Housing Program —The Supportive Housing Program (SHP) is designed to develop supportive
        housing and services that allow homeless persons to live as independently as possible. Funding is available
        for providing transitional housing, permanent housing for persons with disabilities, supportive services only,
        safe havens, or an innovative supportive housing project that is outside the scope of the above categories,
        but still meets the goal of the SHP.

       Shelter Plus Care — The S+C Program provides rental assistance for hard-to-serve homeless persons with
        disabilities in connection with supportive services funded from sources outside the program. S+C was
        designed to give an applicant maximum flexibility by allowing the rental assistance to be tenant-, sponsor-, or
        project-based (with or without rehabilitation) or for SRO units. Participants in S+C units receive supportive
        services. These services may be provided by the applicant, funded by the applicant but provided by a third
        party, or both funded and provided by a third party.


  The Priority Information Table below was incorporated into the CoC Request For Proposals and was used by an
  outside application review committee to determine how each project would fill priority gaps in unmet needs in
  Orange County’s system of care.




  OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                   Page 18
                                                COUNTY OF ORANGE


                       Table 6: 2010 Priority Continuum of Care Project Priority Categories Table

         Priority Information, please check the box that applies to your application.

          Priority 1 Permanent housing project that serves the disabled and the chronically homeless
          15 Points
                        New Permanent Housing       Shelter Plus Care

                        Transitional, Safe Haven, SRO projects 30% to 100% Chronic Homeless
          Priority 2
                           Transitional, Safe Haven, SRO Projects that serve 30% to 100% Chronic Homeless
          10 Points
                           HMIS/CMIS Dedicated Projects
                        Transitional, Safe Haven, SRO projects 1% to 29% Chronic Homeless
          Priority 3
          8 Points
                           Transitional, Safe Haven, SRO Projects that serve 1% to 29% Chronic Homeless
                        Transitional, Safe Haven, SRO projects 0% Chronic Homeless
          Priority 4
          6 Points         Transitional, Safe Haven, SRO Projects that serve 0% Chronic Homeless




The Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness (The Plan)

The Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness (The Plan) in Orange County is the product of integrated community
collaboration. The Plan provides a roadmap of how to effectively end homelessness in Orange County within the
next ten years. Although the efforts to develop such a Plan started several years ago, that process began to earnest
in August of 2008, when a broad-based Working Group was established and charged with developing a plan.
Working Group members represented various stakeholder groups including the business community, non-profit
homeless service providers, technical consultants, philanthropic foundations, education, mental health, housing
shelter providers and local government.

Working Group members were nominated by the community of homeless service providers and selected on the
basis of their area and level of expertise, leadership ability, and willingness to commit the necessary time and effort
to engage in the planning process. This initial core of Working Group members was then augmented with members
from the broader Orange County community, representing entities critical to The Plan's success.

In addition to background information on the costs of homelessness and the extent of the need in Orange County,
this Plan outlines the mission, vision, core values, key goals, strategies, and many of the important implementation
actions necessary to successfully eliminate homelessness in Orange County. It will enable Orange County to
develop a more strategic, focused approach to ending homelessness. This Ten-Year Plan will lead to positive,
systematic changes in the way the community addresses homelessness.

The Board of Supervisors approved the draft Ten-Year Plan in January 2010

Client (Homeless) Management Information System (CMIS)

Orange County is part of a regional collaboration with the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) and
the cities of Glendale and Pasadena. CMIS implementation in Orange County is progressing and has experienced a
notable increase in usage over the last fiscal year. Currently, more than 88% of Orange County homeless shelters
participate in CMIS. OC Partnership will continue to encourage more widespread participation to ensures that a more
comprehensive picture of the services being provided to homeless and at-risk clients in Orange County. A total of
54,020 clients were entered into CMIS as reported by the 59 agencies participating in CMIS by June 30, 2011.
The largest challenge at present is to ensure that shelters are without exception entering all clients served into HMIS.
HUD has implemented a number of new processes that reiterate their commitment to the collection of complete data
and it is imperative that our CoC comply so that our continued funding is not compromised due to data collection

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                                           COUNTY OF ORANGE

issues. One of the newer requirements of HUD is participation in the Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR),
which measures the extent to which available shelter beds are utilized in the CoC. Orange County was unable to
participate last year because our shelter utilization numbers, as reported within HMIS, were below the minimum
participation threshold. Efforts have been made this year to provide agencies and OC Community Resources with
the information needed to ensure that service providers are entering data fully and in a timely manner.

The following matrix provides an overview of CMIS progress in terms of client data.

                                               Number of                    # Clients
                                 Clients in                  % Increase                   % Increase
                  Date                      Clients Entered over One Year Entered Since
                                   CMIS                                                 Since 2/28/2006
                                              in One Year                   2/28/2006

            February 28, 2006       197

              June 30, 2006        1,179         N/A           N/A            982          398.48%

              June 30, 2007        3,033        1,854         57.25%         2,836         1339.59%

              June 30, 2008       11,700        8,667        367.48%         11,503        5739.09%

              June 30, 2009       25,001       12,518         44.43%         24,804       12490.86%

              June 30, 2010       39,400       14,399         57.59%         39,203         19800%


              June 30, 2011       54,020       14,620         37.11%         53,823       27321.32%

                    CLIENT (HOMELESS) MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM (CMIS)

                                        Agencies Currently Using CMIS
         2-1-1 Orange County                              Interval House
         AIDS Services Foundation                         John Henry Foundation
         American Family Housing                          Laguna Winter Shelter
         Anaheim Interfaith Shelter                       Legal Aid Society
         Beach Cities Interfaith                          Mental Health Association
         Casa Teresa                                      Mercy House
         City of Anaheim                                  NDP/Help Me Grow
         City of Costa Mesa                               Olive Crest
         City of Fullerton                                Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter
         City of Garden Grove                             Orange County Rescue Mission
         City of Huntington Beach                         Precious Life Shelter
         City of Irvine                                   Public Law Center
         City of Orange                                   Salvation Army
         City of Santa Ana                                SCADP (Heritage House Cottages)
         City of Westminster                              Share Our Selves
         Colette's Children's Home                        Sisters of St. Joseph
         County of Orange                                 South County Outreach
         Eli Home                                         SPC Shelter Plus Care
         Families Forward                                 SPIN
         Family Assistance Ministries                     St Vincent De Paul
         First Presbyterian Church                        Thomas House
         Friendly Center                                  Toby's House
         Friendship Shelter                               Tyrol Plaza
         Fullerton Interfaith Emergency Services          Veteran's First
         Giving Children Hope                             Villa Center

 OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                            Page 20
                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE

        Grandma's House of Hope                               We Care of Los Alamitos
        HIS House                                             WISE Place
        Homes                                                 Women's Transitional Living Center
        Hope House Inc.                                       YWCA
        Illumination Foundation

Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS

The Urban County does not receive HOPWA funding. The City of Santa Ana is the recipient of HOPWA funds on
behalf of all Orange County jurisdictions and administers the program. For further information on this program,
please see the City of Santa Ana’s Consolidated Plan.

C.   ORANGE COUNTY HOUSING AUTHORITY (OCHA)

HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER RENTAL ASSISTANCE

The Orange County Housing Authority (OCHA) was founded in 1971 and has been designated as a Public
Housing Agency (PHA) #CA094 by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

The Orange County Board of Supervisors acts as the Board of Commissioners of OCHA and the Housing and
Community Development (H&CD) Commission is the advisory board for general policy direction and oversight of
housing related issues. This 11-member H&CD Commission includes two Housing Choice Voucher Program
participants, five appointees by the Board of Supervisors, two representatives from the League of California Cities,
and two members-at-large.

OCHA is a division within the organizational structure of the OC Community Services and its Director is the
Executive Director of OCHA. OCHA is staffed as the Housing Assistance Division of OC Community Services.
Under the direction of a Division Manager, OCHA is divided into three Sections:

     1) The Occupancy/Residency Section coordinates all phases of OCHA’s Wait List including initial opening,
        verification of preference status, processing initial eligibility, conducting program briefings and the issuance
        of a new Housing Choice Voucher. This unit also performs all eligibility-related activities that include
        annual re-certification and processing interim re-exams for reported changes.

     2) The Rental Assistance Section performs all HUD required leasing activities, which will culminate in moving
        an assisted family into safe, sanitary and decent rental housing. Field staff is responsible for contact with
        owners, resolving tenant/landlord disputes, negotiation of rents, conducting initial move-in and annual
        inspections of assisted units and preparation and processing of a Lease and HAP Contract to generate
        monthly rental payments to owners.

     3) Special Housing Programs (SHP) is an administrative unit responsible for the implementation and reporting
        requirements for specialized HUD programs           including Family Self Sufficiency, Family Unification,
        Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing and Shelter + Care. SHP also works in collaboration with outside
        agencies in coordinating inter-jurisdictional transfers for tenants moving between Housing Authorities
        under portability and mobility provisions, coordinates informal hearings, funding applications and other
        administrative functions.

Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP):
Overview: During 2010, an average of 9,613 households, were receiving assistance each month in the HCVP.
Approximately 46% of assisted households were elderly, 19% were disabled, and the remainder were very low or
low-income families and single persons. Almost all assisted households resided in OCHA’s jurisdiction,
encompassing 31 cities and the unincorporated areas within Orange County. Over 564 assisted households used
their Vouchers to receive assistance in a neighboring Housing Authority’s city under an Orange County Mobility
Agreement. OCHA also provided continued assistance for 31 participant households who used their Voucher to
move out of the county.



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                                           COUNTY OF ORANGE

Disaster Voucher Program (DVP):
In response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina, evacuated families and individuals residing in public
housing or receiving subsidized housing assistance were transitioned into HUD’s emergency Disaster Voucher
Program (DVP). OCHA was selected to administer DVP within Orange County and assisted two displaced families
who elected to move to the Orange County area. In January 2011, the two families received HCV vouchers from
Port Arthur Housing Authority and are currently being assisted by OCHA as portability tenants.

Shelter Plus Care:
Shelter Plus Care (S+C) is a HUD homeless assistance program designed to serve homeless persons with
disabilities, linking rental assistance with supportive services provided through the Orange County Health Care
Agency’s (HCA) network of service providers. OCHA and HCA established a collaborative partnership in which
OCHA provides rental assistance to eligible clients that HCA has determined to be both disabled and homeless
and has linked to supportive services. Currently, OCHA administers thirteen S+C grants that provide rental
assistance for over 600 disabled persons.

The S+C Program is funded through grants awarded to PHAs through HUD’s Continuum of Care homeless
assistance competitive application process. In 2010, OCHA received over $7,986,648 in grant funding that was
allocated between one new five-year grant and six expiring S+C projects which were renewed for an additional
twelve months.

Family Self Sufficiency and Family Unification Programs:
The Family Self Sufficiency Program (FSS) is designed to assist Housing Choice Voucher participants in obtaining
the education, job training, and other life-skills needed that will lead to an increase in household income and
eliminate continued dependency upon public assistance. OCHA has partnered with a number of service providers
who offer a variety of counseling and training programs to fit the needs of FSS clients that will help them reach
their established goals. As participants increase their income and pay a higher share of rent, OCHA places a
portion of the rental assistance that is saved into an escrow account. During 2010, ten FSS participants
graduated with an average escrow balance of $10,534 to start their own business, purchase a vehicle, or make a
down payment on a home. As of December 2010, there were 260 active FSS participants.

The Family Unification Program (FUP):
FUP provides the stability of affordable housing to help reunite separated families. For more than 10 years, OCHA
has worked in collaboration with the Social Services Agency (SSA) to administer 170 FUP Vouchers and in 2010,
OCHA was awarded an additional 37 FUP vouchers for families that are referred to receive rental assistance, as a
condition for reunification with their minor children.

This collaborative relationship has been a vital component to the success of FUP, which has been a viable asset to
the health, welfare, and stability of families that are in need of affordable housing. As of December 2010, OCHA
provided rental assistance for 174 families and more than 300 children

Portability and Mobility:
Federal regulations for the Housing Choice Voucher Program include Portability provisions that entitle participant
families with the right to move into the jurisdiction of another PHA and receive rental assistance. PHAs that
receive a portability transfer have the option of 1) administering the portable voucher and billing the initial PHA for
reimbursement, or 2) absorbing the portable voucher into their own HCVP and allowing the initial PHA to re-issue
the original voucher to another family. During 2010, OCHA received over 335 requests from portable families
requesting to move into OCHA’s jurisdiction to receive rental assistance.

The cities of Anaheim, Garden Grove and Santa Ana each operate their own PHA within Orange County. In order
to facilitate the transfer of tenants moving between jurisdictions, the four PHAs drafted a Mobility Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) that established common procedures and streamlined transfers. As of December 2010,
there were 432 OCHA tenants residing within the cities of Garden Grove and Anaheim. In 2009, the Santa Ana
Housing Authority elected to discontinue their participation in the Mobility MOU, and OCHA began to assist
approximately 900 assisted households formerly assisted by Santa Ana who were transitioned from mobility to
portability.



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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE

HUD Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH):
The HUD-VASH program provides permanent housing subsidies and case management services to homeless
veterans with disabilities through a collaboration of the Department of Housing and Urban Development and
Veteran Affairs.

OCHA received 70 VASH vouchers in 2009 and an additional 150 VASH vouchers in 2010. The VA Medical
Center of Long Beach California screens and selects veterans for participation in VASH and refers them to OCHA.

PROGRAM MAINTENANCE and ANNUAL ACTIVITIES:

The Occupancy / Residency Section:

The Occupancy / Residency section performed 9,553 annual recertification interviews during 2010, to review and
verify tenant income and family composition. Adjustments made in the tenant’s portion of rent insure that the family
pays at least 30% of their annual adjusted income as their portion of the rent. Interim interviews are scheduled for
tenants who report changes in income and family composition during the year. Over 5,200 interim interviews were
scheduled during 2010, resulting in a change in the tenant’s portion of rent and corresponding housing assistance
payment.

All tenant transactions processed resulting from an annual or interim recertification are electronically submitted to
HUD’s Public and Indian Housing Information Center (PIC) and are evaluated for timeliness and accuracy. The
results are included in an assessment that measures and ranks a PHA’s management performance in 14 key
areas of HUD’s Section 8 Management Assessment Program (SEMAP).

In 2010, OCHA scored 103%, out of a possible 100%, on HUD’s SEMAP ranking indicator. This achievement was
accomplished, in part; through special PIC projects to reconcile OCHA tenant information with data in PIC, along
with bonus points received for de-concentration. As a result, OCHA was rated as a ―High Performance PHA‖ for
the sixth successive year.

The Leasing Section:
The Leasing section was responsible for all leasing activities that generated a monthly Housing Assistance
Payment (HAP) to owners and provided rental assistance for over 9,00 Housing Choice Voucher participants each
month in 2010.

New Lease/HAP Contracts:
Leasing staff completed 1,400 new and transfer leases and contracts for tenants who moved into a rental unit
during 2010. In order to accomplish this task, staff scheduled and conducted a move-in inspection, and prepared
and processed the HAP Contract that generated a Housing Assistance Payment (HAP) to the owner.

Annual Re-inspections:
Housing Authorities are required to re-inspect each assisted unit annually to insure that it remains in safe and
sanitary condition. During 2010, leasing staff performed 11,429 annual re-inspections of assisted units located
throughout OCHA’s jurisdiction. In addition, more than 2,000 mobility inspections were performed on behalf of
Anaheim and Garden Grove for their tenants residing within OCHA’s jurisdiction.

Rent Increases:
In 2010 rents in Orange County began to stabilize. Leasing staff processed 1,219 rent increase requests from
participating owners in the Housing Voucher Program, which was about half the number of rent increases received in 2009.




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                                    COUNTY OF ORANGE


                           Consolidated Plan Goals and Objectives With
                                 Diverse Programs for OC Residents


                                       Community Development
                        Provide access and services to the disabled and elderly
                      Construct various street improvements and overlay projects
                 Repair, replace, and install curbs, gutters, storm drains, and sidewalks
                           Perform commercial and residential rehabilitation
                        Install or replace pedestrian crosswalks and streetlights
                      Increase Collaborations with Fair Housing Council Members
               Support community centers in providing various services for communities


                               Homeless Prevention/Assistance
                                 Increase Self Sufficiency Opportunities
                     Continue Participation in Regional Continuum of Care System
                                Support production of affordable housing
                                   Support shared housing programs
                         Increase housing advocacy and prevention programs
                                   Provide outreach to needy families
                           Provide emergency shelter facilities and programs
                                 Provide transitional housing programs
                       Provide permanent and supportive housing opportunities
                            Identify new resources to assist homeless needs


                                          Affordable Housing
                         Increase Funding for Affordable Housing Development
                            Implement Housing Opportunity Zoning Overlay
                               Support M.A.P. Homeownership Program
                              Increase Landlord Participation in Section 8
                            Establish Section 8 Waiting List (As Warranted)
            Increase Regional Collaboration with Housing Advocates, Non-Profits, and Cities




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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE


        D. Affirmatively furthering Fair Housing (This Section has not been updated)

The following annual service report covers Fair Housing Actions taken from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011
and lists some actions recommended to be taken in the year 2010-11 by participating jurisdictions in this regional
area in addressing the findings and recommendations made in the most recently updated Orange County Regional
Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (A.I.).

  1. The region has a well established and effective private fair housing council that provides dynamic and
  comprehensive educational and enforcement programs to the local jurisdictions it serves. This partnership is
  used as a model of public and private cooperation in other areas of the nation and is considered one of the most
  professional and efficient private fair housing council in the nation.

  RECOMMENDATION: Orange County jurisdictions support a continuation of fair housing services at the current
  level of effectiveness. CDBG funds allocated for fair housing services are equal to or greater than the service
  demand rate requested by FHCOC. This will insure that all Orange County residents are provided with the same
  appropriate level of services.

  Action: The Urban County contracted with the Fair Housing Council of Orange County (FHCOC), to provide
  comprehensive educational and enforcement programs to its residents.

  Milestone: Provide fair housing education, counseling and enforcement services within The Urban County to all
  current or potential residents.

  Implementation Details: During FY 2010-11 FHCOC provided the following levels of service.

  FAIR HOUSING COMMUNITY EDUCATION - Activities included conducting 54 educational activities involving
  over 5300 participants. These included 15 outreach events to the general public, 21 foreclosure prevention
  workshops and 18 other training or community events. Five of the activities occurred in County of Orange urban
  county jurisdiction and the City of Yorba Linda, although they were generally open to attendees from throughout
  the county. (None of the activities were specifically in the City of Yorba Linda.)

  FHCOC staff members spoke at public meetings on housing related matters, and held 1 to 3-hour training
  programs for consumers and also for professionals in the housing industry, such as real estate agents, property
  managers, owners, and lending institution staff. The agency also held a region-wide equal-housing opportunity
                                                                  th   th
  theme contest that was open to all Orange County grade school 5 & 6 grade classes.

  FAIR HOUSING ENFORCEMENT - Activities included responding within the region to 55 housing discrimination
  complaints that resulted in the opening of a case file, of which 14 involved the Urban County and the City of
  Yorba Linda. None of the discrimination complaints came from the City of Yorba Linda). Responses included, as
  appropriate, investigation, testing, ―portfolio testing‖ evaluation of the merits of fair housing claims, and when
  appropriate, conciliation and/or prosecution of meritorious housing discrimination cases.

  HOUSING DISPUTE EVALUATION & RESOLUTION - Activities included assisting more than 6,800
  unduplicated regional-households, making 7,154 requests for service that resulted in objectively evaluating or
  providing assistance for over 18,527 housing related issues, disputes or inquiries. Of these 865 unduplicated
  households, making 946 requests for service involving 2,461 issues, disputes or inquiries were from the Urban
  County and the City of Yorba Linda. Specifically, 18 unduplicated households with 21 service contacts and 57
  issues were from the City of Yorba Linda.

  2. This region studied and conducted testing, through FHCOC and a grant provided by HUD’s Fair Housing
  Initiatives Program (FHIP). The pre-application testing did not account for the high denial rate of loans to blacks
  and Hispanics. The Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) data continues to indicate a disproportionate
  number of loan denials to upper-income minorities as compared to white applicants.

  RECOMMENDATION: Promote Fair Housing Education within the banking and lending industry. Local
  jurisdictions contract with a consultant to prepare and conduct training to encourage voluntary compliance with

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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE

 fair housing laws. The initial cost of curriculum preparation would be paid for by participants in the training over
 time and would allow for continuation of the educational programs.      Continue to monitor HMDA data to
 determine if the educational programs have a positive effect on loan denial rates for minorities. This approach
 would not prevent enforcement in cases involving identifiable discriminatory practices by a lending institution.

 Action: Increase awareness at lending institutions of fair housing requirements through outreach and include
 lending institutions in solicitations for participation in fair housing educational seminars and presentations, with a
 goal of increasing the participation of personnel from those institutions.

 Milestone: Development of a fair housing educational presentation that is geared towards providers, brokers and
 processors of home mortgages.

 Implementation Details: FHCOC attended numerous meetings at which lender representatives were present and
 highlighted fair housing issues when possible. FHCOC continued to solicit local banking and lending industry
 personnel to attend fair housing education that includes the coverage of home mortgage activities by fair housing
 laws. As resources permit, FHCOC will examine regional HMDA data to look for statistically significant indicators
 of discriminatory lending practices. FHCOC continues to investigate lending-related complaints of apparent
 instances of differential treatment on a protected class basis and, where possible, informs local jurisdictions of
 these occurrences. If resources are made available, FHCOC will develop a fair housing educational curriculum
 for banking and lending personnel that specifically and solely addresses lending related aspects of fair housing
 law.

 Additionally, throughout FY 2009-2010 particular attention was paid to the possibility of predatory and/or
 discriminatory practices that may be connected to the marked increase in mortgage default issues presented by
 clients, especially those with so-called ―sub-prime‖ loans. Through participation in the Orange County Home
 Ownership Preservation Collaborative (OC-HOPC), which includes participation by lender representatives,
 FHCOC highlighted the need to uncover and address these illegal practices.

 3. Orange County’s high cost of housing negatively impacts minorities, immigrants and families with children
 more often than white households or those without children. This results in high concentrations of minorities in
 low-income census tracts living in sub-standard and/or overcrowded housing conditions.

 RECOMMENDATION: Local jurisdictions enter into discussions with banking institutions located in Orange
 County to encourage the use of Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) funds in ways that will benefit minority and
 low-income neighborhoods. This can be accomplished by encouraging banks to support programs provided by
 FHCOC to increase financial literacy and the use of main-stream banking services as well as IDA’s to promote
 saving for home ownership, higher education or micro-businesses.

 This cooperative effort between public, private for-profit and non-profit entities would be a model program that
 could easily be replicated in other areas of the nation to improve housing conditions, earning potential and
 unemployment of local residents.

 Action: Local jurisdictions both utilize their influence as customers of banking institutions and the development of
 relationships with CRA-related banking personnel to enhance community reinvestment that facilitates the access
 of underserved groups to housing opportunities.

 Milestone: As a result of greater housing-focused CRA activities in the region FHCOC obtains funding for the
 implementation foreclosure prevention counseling and for financial literacy and banking education program
 targeted towards underserved groups, particularly minorities and immigrants.

 Implementation Details: As resources allow, FHCOC will develop, market and present a financial literacy and
 banking education program. The program will include assisting participants with Individual Development
 Accounts (IDA’s) that are intended to assist participants in accessing housing opportunities. The program will be
 marketed primarily to traditionally underserved groups, such as minorities and immigrants, especially those with
 limited English proficiency. The program will highlight the pitfalls that were found in many of the so-called
 ―innovative‖ mortgage products marketed to individuals with less than prime credit.


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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE

 In response to the surge of foreclosures, many of which involve sub-prime or so-called ―innovative‖ mortgage
 products, FHCOC obtained lender provided grant funds to specifically counsel distressed lower-income
 borrowers, many of whom are minorities and immigrants, in order to assist them in avoiding foreclosures. During
 FY 2009/2010 we provided counseling to more than 590 households facing issues of mortgage default and
 foreclosure. These activities will help with retention of newly achieved homeownership that has served to lessen
 concentrations of poverty.

 4. Local jurisdictions do not have formal fair housing educational systems in place for staff who impact fair
 housing issues, such as, planning/zoning staff, housing authority staff, code enforcement and CDBG monitoring
 staff.

 RECOMMENDATION: All employees in positions that impact fair housing issues attend formal fair housing
 training. The training can be conducted at the local jurisdiction level by contracting with a fair housing council or
 other training entity.
 A more cost effective approach would be to provide funds for individuals to attend regularly scheduled fair
 housing training provided by FHCOC and those provided as a partnership between FHCOC and the Apartment
 Association of Orange County. This option would allow all staff members to attend fair housing training within 6
 months of hire without the cost of conducting a private session.

 Action: During fiscal year 2010-2011 FHCOC will offer fair housing training sessions that are open to all local
 government staff.

 Milestone: City planning staff schedule and attend training session(s).

 Implementation Details: FHCOC will send notices to city staff. City staff will attend the training as appropriate
 and receive certification of attendance.

 5. Insurance Companies may be targeting certain census tracts or zip codes for higher rates or different terms
 and conditions in violation of fair housing laws. This was a finding in the Regional AI conducted in 2000 and it
 remains beyond the scope of this analysis.

 RECOMMENDATION: Local jurisdictions conduct or fund an audit of insurance practices in Orange County to
 determine if violations of fair housing laws are being complied with. If there were negative findings an
 educational program to encourage voluntary compliance would be the first step in correcting the problem.
 Enforcement action would remain possible in cases with direct evidence of illegal discrimination.

 Action: The local fair housing provider received extensive training to insure a valid audit could be conducted.
 Needed funding for this project remains unrealized.

 Milestone: Conduct an audit of selected zip codes during the next fiscal year if funding for such a project can be
 obtained.

 Implementation Details: Funding permitting, review demographic data to determine areas in which high numbers
 of minority populations live and conduct a testing audit of insurance carriers. Review and analyze the audit
 results.

 6. Recent immigrant populations do not have information necessary to understand fair housing laws. This
 results in immigrants experiencing illegal discrimination as well as discrimination by recent immigrants in
 positions impacting housing.

 RECOMMENDATION: Continue outreach to immigrant populations as FHCOC has done over the past 4 years.
 This service is both time and resource intensive. It requires information in many languages as well as
 professional staff members who are fluent in more than one language.

 Much of the illegal discrimination against immigrant populations is in the form of encouraging certain immigrants
 (and discouraging others) to apply and live in housing communities with sub-standard conditions.


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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE

  FHCOC has also found that some immigrant housing providers are not familiar with fair housing laws and as a
  result engage in illegal discrimination by discouraging persons not of their race or national origin. These cases
  must be handled in the same manner as any other discrimination case. FHCOC does not selectively enforce fair
  housing laws against only white or non-minority housing providers. FHCOC filed and recovered damages from a
  housing provider based upon discrimination against white applicants in favor of minority applicants. Education
  and enforcement are both necessary to eliminate fair housing violations.

 Action: The FHCOC provided educational materials in English, Spanish and Vietnamese for use by local
 jurisdictions and other service providers. It also made specific outreach efforts to immigrant populations in low-
 income neighborhoods to assist in informing and organizing such populations. It is estimated that more than
 1,000 limited English proficiency households were served during the past 12 months. FHCOC continued to
 implement activities under its current Fair Housing Initiatives Program (FHIP) grant to specifically provide fair
 housing services geared towards immigrant communities, especially involving those immigrants with limited
 English proficiency.

 Milestone: Continue to distribute written materials and community education services. Design and implement a
 fair housing testing program to involve members of immigrant populations with limited English proficiency as a
 vehicle to increasing outreach to those populations.

 Implementation Details: FHCOC will continue to distribute materials to service providers, the housing industry
 and the public. As part of its current FHIP project, FHCOC is acquiring a broader set of non-English fair housing
 outreach materials for distribution in various immigrant communities. Portions of past and current FHIP-funded
 testing activities were or are geared towards uncovering discrimination against individuals with limited English
 proficiency.

 Through its foreclosure prevention activities FHCOC is assisting individuals with limited English proficiency who
 have received loans with documents, all prepared in English, that have terms that are different from what they
 believed they were obtaining, or of which they had less than a full understanding. Materials are being made
 available in Spanish and other languages as resources allow, which explain how to avoid foreclosure and obtain
 assistance.

 7. Local jurisdictions have independent and distinct policies and programs that affect housing options. This can
 result in increased or decreased minority and low-income populations in any given area.

 RECOMMENDATION: Orange County entitlement jurisdictions coordinate their efforts to insure that all residents
 have decent, safe and affordable housing free from illegal discrimination. It is critical to work as a region to
 overcome the problems created by the very high cost of housing. Monitor local policies to insure there are no
 fair housing violations or neutral policies that have a discriminatory effect.

 Action: During the 2005 A.I. update, local jurisdictions monitored and reviewed land use and other policies to
 insure compliance with fair housing laws. Jurisdictions will work to ensure all potential recipients of government
 funds for housing related programs assist in affirmatively furthering fair housing.

 Milestone: Local governments will include a requirement for all recipients of federal funds to assist in
 affirmatively furthering fair housing, when engaged in activities that touch on issues of housing.

 Implementation Details: Local governments will include the requirement in all contracts involving federal money
 expended for housing related activities. This is of increased importance in light of the emerging initiative on the
 part of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to more rigorously define and enforce the
 obligation for federal entitlement jurisdictions to affirmatively further fair housing.

        E. Leveraging Resources

The County has continued to aggressively leverage its funding partnerships with public, private and non-profit
groups. A well-planned CoC for the homeless has already been created which is funded with SuperNOFA,
Emergency Shelter Grants funds. The County can also leverage HUD Section 202 and 811 funds in conjunction
with non-profit sponsors to expand the supply of housing for the senior and special needs populations.

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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE


In an effort to develop more public/private partnerships, the County continues to work with developers and
participating cities to leverage all available resources to build new affordable rental housing whenever possible.
The available resources include bond financing, low-income housing tax credits, California State Multi-Family
Housing Program, California Housing Finance Agency, Mental Health Services Act funds, State of California
Proposition 1C funding, conventional financing, and Federal Home Loan Bank Affordable Housing Program funds.
Since 1999, the County has leveraged over $504 million in local, Federal, State and private funds to create
affordable rental and home ownership opportunities.

OC Community Services funded projects are highly successful at leveraging other financing sources, as OC
Community Services loan commitments are usually the first source of funding committed to a development. In rare
cases, OC Community Services may commit funding to a development, which is later not needed. While OC
Community Services does not count these units when reporting accomplishments, these projects may not have
secured all the required financing without the initial support of OC Community Services. For more Housing
leveraging see HOME section.

The following is a brief description of how the various funds available to the County were used for leveraging:

Local Funds

       OCDA used as leverage and match towards HOME Program and New Housing Program (primarily
        administrative costs for leverage, project cost for HOME match).

       Housing Authority Operating Reserve Funds used to match and leverage HOME funds.

       Housing Supportive Services local funds used in leveraging public services.

Federal Funds

       CDBG used as leverage in a variety of projects to supplement multiple funded activities (i.e., public
        services, public facility improvements, and new housing).

       ESG federal regulations require matching funds for each project

       HOME used as leverage in new housing activities, 25% match required.

       SHP used in leveraging the acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction of new affordable housing units;
        also used in providing supportive services (federal regulations require matching funds for each project).

   F. Citizen Participation and Comments

It is the policy of the County to ensure consistent and ongoing citizen involvement in planning, implementation, and
performance of the County’s activities and programs.

OC Community Services has designed a Citizen Participation Plan (CPP) to encourage public participation in
developing strategies and as a plan of action to utilize the aforementioned funds. Opportunities for public
comment and/or citizen involvement are provided throughout the development of the Funding Year Plan,
amendments to the plan, the CAPER, and through on-going interaction with the public and sub-recipients. The
County's Five-Year CP, which is updated annually through the AP, provides a combined planning and reporting
document which presents strategies and goals developed as a result of the citizen participation.

The CPP outlines the County’s policies and procedures for citizen participation that are applied to all local, state
and federally funded programs. The County presented the CPP to the community for review and comment, and
then submitted it to HUD for approval in compliance with HUD requirements.

The participating cities conduct meetings/hearings and are held at times and locations convenient to actual or
potential beneficiaries. In addition, all location sites for meetings and hearings are accessible to persons with

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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE

disabilities. In an effort to ensure that extremely low, very low, and low income households are informed, notices
of meetings and hearings are provided through one or more of the following: local publications, flyers, established
resident mailing lists, civic group gatherings, and area community development committees.

The County and or cities publish notices at least 30 days in advance of a public hearing. The notices are prepared
in an easily readable format, in one or more newspapers of general circulation. These notices provide the date,
time, location, and format of the hearing and topics to be discussed which could be translated upon request.

Informal community meetings are held in the unincorporated areas. The purpose of these meetings is to obtain
community input on the use of funds for the respective jurisdiction, disseminate information regarding on-going or
proposed projects and discuss items of concern by residents. These meetings may be noticed through several
methods including community-wide mailers, postcards, flyers and postings at community centers, Internet postings
and community newspapers, among other means. Information mailings in the form of a newsletter are also sent
out to each community up to two times a year, detailing project information, HUD news and programs, local
programs, and use of funds. Likewise, each participating City adopts a citizen participation policy and plan that is
consistent with the County’s CPP.

             1. During fiscal year 2010-11 the following activities occurred:

The County followed the CP outreach, noticing, and hearing requirements. The Action Plan has been developed
through a collaborative process including participation of residents, service providers, and County staff. Four
primary methods were used to solicit public input:

Community meetings were held throughout the Urban County, the participants were informed of the Annual Action
Plan and RFP for community development and housing activities, the Consolidated Plan/Annual Action Plan
process and asked to discuss community needs. Twelve (12) community meetings were conducted.

A participating City survey was conducted to summarize housing and community development needs of our
participants and related issues that affected the Urban County’s 13 participating cities.

              2. Public Notice of Availability

A Notice to the Public regarding the availability of the Draft Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation
Report for fiscal year 2010-11 was published in the Orange County Register, Miniondas (Spanish), Vien Dong, and
the Viet Bao (Vietnamese) on September 1, 2011. The notice briefly describes the purpose and function of the
report, invites interested parties to review and comment on the report, and provides information on where to submit
any comments. A copy of the notice was sent to the 13 participating cities, the Fair Housing Council of Orange
County and to each of the three unincorporated County Community Centers. Copies of the draft CAPER were also
sent to the County Libraries for general public access on their web sites and review. Additionally, the Public
Notice was also posted on the County’s OC Community Services website. (See page 64 for Public Notice of
Availability.)

        G.     Monitoring and Compliance

For an effective CDBG and ESG program, activities must be monitored on a consistent basis. Monitoring visits in
part determine if the subrecipient is carrying out its program and activities within the timeline denoted in the
subrecipient contract. It also ensures that the required records are maintained to demonstrate compliance with
applicable regulations. OC Community Services staff conducts two monitoring site visits each year and a third if
requested or deemed necessary by manager for Community Development after review of monitoring reports by
staff. OC Community Services has continued to improve its monitoring activities with an emphasis on
documenting and measuring performance, program accomplishments, and program impacts (outcomes). On-site
visits to subrecipients and project locations have increased and standardization of the processes and reporting
documents has enhanced the results.

OC Community Services continues to move forward in its application of technology. At present, OC Community
Services maintains and tracks a wide variety of project and activity related data including allocations,
accomplishments, performance and overall project/activity status.
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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE


In addition to automation, OC Community Services also utilizes a comprehensive monitoring strategy called the
Subrecipient Monitoring Compliance Plan (SMCP). The SMCP defines the responsibilities of the OC Community
Services and the subrecipients in terms of record keeping and reporting to ensure program compliance.

        1.   CDBG and ESG Monitoring Compliance Plan

The following Performance Monitoring Plan was in effect during the administration of fiscal year 2010-11 contracts.
Once funds are awarded, Project leaders contact subrecipients to discuss allocations and reconfirm that the Scope
of Services and accomplishment data presented in the initial application are unchanged. During the contract
preparation phase, Project Leaders meet with subrecipient staff to review all contract requirements such as labor
standards; lead-based paint; payment processes based on performance; invoicing; Grantee Performance Reports
(GPR); insurance requirements; contract milestones; and expected accomplishment levels.

 All projects/programs funded through OC Community Services are subject to three official monitoring visits per
fiscal year and additional visits if requested or deemed necessary.

        1). August-September: Performance Monitoring
        2). November-January: Compliance Monitoring
        3). July-August: Exit Monitoring

Project Close-Out Process
In addition to the three required monitoring visits staff conducts, site visits to provide technical assistance (TA) at
the request of subrecipients. Additionally, TA is provided at the discretion of the project leaders should the
determination be made that the subrecipient will benefit from the additional training. TA is provided as often as
deemed necessary to ensure successful completion of the projects.

Community Development Monitoring Results
During FY 2010-11, OC Community Services staff conducted 78 site visits and reviewed 39 subrecipient contracts.
Overall, the majority of subrecipients met all applicable HUD guidelines by maintaining excellent records, project
eligibility, and achieving expenditures and accomplishment thresholds. There was one contract that received notice
of concern, however; it was resolved in a timely manner prior to the end of the 2010-11 program year.

        2. Monitoring Affordable Housing
Over the past year many changes were made within OCCS, Community Development (CD) section to expedite
project delivery. Specific to federal programs was the consolidation of contracts, compliance, grants management
and implementation under Community Development. Staff continues to coordinate with the Housing,
Redevelopment and Homeless Prevention sections.

Describe how and the frequency with which you monitored your activities
Community Development staff monitors HOME projects to confirm that residents meet HOME qualifications, and
that regulatory agreements for all housing projects are met. Each project is required to submit quarterly and/or
annual reports containing the number of units, client names, type of unit, income limit and actual family income,
gross rent, net rent, utility allowance (if any) and recertification dates. Monitoring visits are also conducted to
review a random selection of units for Housing Quality Standards and for compliance with affordability
requirements.

Describe the results of your monitoring including any improvements.
The results of our monitoring provide consistency in identifying whether the project is on track with eligibility
requirements. The monitoring process is also a tool to make sure that the management companies keep the units
in compliance with the Housing Quality Standards.




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                                           COUNTY OF ORANGE

 Self Evaluation - Monitoring

 Describe how activities and strategies made an impact on identified needs.
 Being part of the development process for affordable housing projects in Orange County, decent safe and
 affordable housing was provided to individuals meeting their housing needs making a suitable living environment
 for the low/moderate income community.

 Identify indicators that would best describe the results.
 The high cost of living in Orange County has resulted in a greater demand for affordable housing. Within the
 affordable housing projects, designated restricted affordable units are at full capacity, therefore addressing the
 low/moderate income housing demand.

 In the fall of 2005, OC Community Services initiated the monitoring of the County’s affordable housing
 developments to ensure that compliance with federal housing quality standards (HQS) and low-income eligibility
 were being maintained. During the 2010-11 fiscal year, OC Community Services staff visited thirty-four (34)
 properties, inspected over 143 units and audited 147 tenant files. These figures represent approximately 20% of
 the total number of units that have been restricted in accordance with OC Community Services funding
 agreements.

 During the HQS inspections some exterior and interior deficiencies were observed and noted. However, property
 management staff was able to rectify all issues in a timely manner. In regards to tenant file evaluations, income
 eligibility was thoroughly documented with a majority of tenants falling into the required income categories.

 Tenants who did experience an increase in income could be requalified by being placed into a more suitable
 income category. As part of the monitoring process, property managers are required to submit quarterly reports to
 OC Community Services.

 Throughout the 2009-10 monitoring cycle, several sites experienced a change in key staff, ownership, or major
 computer related problems, which prevented the completion of the quarterly reports in a timely manner. Program
 Compliance staff provided technical assistance to those sites by assisting new staff with the completion of the
 required documentation or extending deadlines when necessary. By the next reporting period all sites submitted
 their reports within the approved timeframe.

 Throughout the monitoring cycle several properties contacted OC Community Services requesting additional
 technical assistance. To assist those properties, staff created and implemented a new tenant file organization
 system, answered property manager’s questions related to funding sources specific to their complex, and provided
 additional guidance to a property new to the monitoring cycle.

 OC Community Services is looking forward to a new monitoring cycle for the FY 2010-11, as we will be inspecting
 a new sampling of units and auditing a new sampling of files. In addition, the department anticipates adding new
 affordable housing developments to our monitoring program for the next fiscal year.

         3. Assessment of Affirmative Marketing

As discussed in the 2005-10 CP, obstacles to meeting the under-served needs of households within the low and
moderate-income levels are generally based on available financial resources, construction costs, and citizen
support of the concept of affordable housing. The County has taken affirmative measures to improve on the
availability and use of resources by allocating funds to a variety of activities and organizations.

Another component of the Department’s marketing strategy is the function of its Community Development and
Rehabilitation Section. One of their responsibilities is to focus on community relations and to utilize the long-term
relationships this department has established within the unincorporated project areas to introduce and implement
federal regulations and guidelines associated with our funding programs, including the preparation of the mandated
Citizen Participation Plan.




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                                             COUNTY OF ORANGE

 The County continues to inform the public at-large of the Program’s many opportunities through its policy of
 marketing and advertising through the use of County Notices and Public Notices published in local newspapers,
 including Spanish and Vietnamese publications, as well as newsletters mailed directly to community residents.

 Examples of information presented to the public:

                 Solicit business from minority and women owned businesses
                 Announce Public Hearing to discuss and present the approved Annual Funding Allocation Process
                  and Citizen Participation Plan
                 Solicit input of neighborhood participating community residents

          4. Enhancing Coordination

The County continues to expand its relationships with a variety of groups and agencies in order to better meet the
needs of the community. Beyond maintaining its current role in funding and coordinating with local cities, non-profits,
developers, lenders, and property owners, the County has taken the initiative to develop more opportunities for these
entities to collaborate to discuss issues and work in partnership on possible actions and/or solutions.

OC Community Services continually presents workshops and conferences to provide technical assistance on NOFAs
and RFPs. Additionally, OC Community Services hosted a workshop on the development process and another
workshop on proforma analysis aimed to train project managers from cities, non-profits, and developers on
affordable housing development.

OC Community Services updated their list of affordable rental housing available throughout the County. They
continually coordinate with all of the cities to update the Affordable Rental Housing List. The list is available on the
County's web site and in a format available for everyone's use.

In addition, the County notified leaders in the development community and held round table conferences to discuss
pending regulations. The result of those meetings allowed the County to comment on pending regulations, thus
attempting to inform and recommend changes based on the needs of the County’s low-income families.

          5. Reducing Poverty Strategy

In the Urban County, 15,504 households (or 8 percent of all households) earned less than 30 percent of the Area
Median Income (AMI), according to CHAS. Of these, 76 percent experienced housing problems such as cost burden
or overcrowding. The challenges associated with poverty – stress, strained family relationships, substandard
housing, lower educational attainment, limited employment skills, unaffordable child care, and transportation
difficulties – make it hard for low income families to obtain and maintain employment, and therefore, housing and
basic needs.

Economic stability can have lasting and measurable benefits for both parents and children. The County seeks to
reduce the number of people living in poverty (extremely low-income households earning less than 30 percent of the
AMI) by providing a number of programs, including housing assistance, supportive services, economic development
assistance, and job training opportunities. The County will continue to leverage opportunities to support funding for
Community Based Development Organizations, cities, and other groups to provide training and employment
opportunities to extremely low-income persons. In collaboration with the County’s Workforce Investment Board
(OCWIB), the County will continue to offer outreach and training to poverty level families and individuals. Through the
CoC system, the County will work with the OCWIB job-training providers to ensure that low- and moderate-income
persons are trained with employable skills with the potential to earn higher wages. In addition, the County Section 8
Housing Choice Voucher Program provides assisted families an incentive for employment opportunities through its
Family Self Sufficiency (FSS) Program: The FSS Program participants receive resources and are taught job skills
that enable them to gain employment and become self-sufficient. The County of Orange has several departments
that are involved in some aspect of providing economic development opportunities (e.g., job training, provision of
jobs, adding value to communities) to their clientele. In addition, the Orange County Business Council and the
County Executive Office have completed an inventory of county resources and coordinate the provision of funds and
services.


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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE

The goals and strategies contained in this Consolidated Plan for funding for housing and human services programs
often directly address poverty issues. The County’s funding (CDBG and ESG) of human service programs for basic
needs, food distribution, and case management for homeless and those at risk of homelessness support the goals
and strategies of reducing poverty. In addition, housing costs often consume a large portion of lower-income
households’ monthly income. This creates a housing cost burden, leaving less money accessible for other
necessities. As such, the County’s efforts to create new affordable housing, both permanent and transitional, and
rehabilitate existing housing contribute to curbing poverty in the County.

Successful results in these components should reduce the number of individuals and families that fall below the
poverty level. In the area of housing, the County, in partnership with other governmental agencies, private non-profit,
and for profit agencies, has been successful in addressing the areas of affordable housing needs.

          6. Reducing Lead-Based Paint

Estimates show that approximately 93,077 housing units within the County’s jurisdiction were constructed prior 1978.
Although the level of hazardous incidents involving lead-based paint is relatively low compared to other urban areas,
the County still takes a proactive approach in lead-based paint removal. Under the guidance of HUD’s Lead Safe
Housing Regulations, OC Community Services works closely with state certified service providers and homeowners
participating in housing rehabilitation programs to safely and effectively identify, evaluate, and remove lead-based
paint hazards.

          7. Public Housing Improvements and Resident Initiatives

 Not applicable. The County of Orange does not have public housing.

          8. Relocation

 In FY 2010-11, there were no requests for funds to be allocated to relocation activities. County staff has attended
 relocation training and is prepared to provide technical assistance relating to the Uniform Relocation and Real
 Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970, as amended, (URA) Final Rule, which became effective February 3, 2005.

 H. PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT AND OUTCOME SYSTEM

  In accordance with HUD Notice CPD-03-09 and HUD Bulletin CPD-2003-020, OC Community Services has been
  continually working to develop a system that measures productivity and program impact. Below is a description of
  the methodology OC Community Services has put into place to track performance outcomes.

  Productivity
  As defined in the above referenced HUD Notice, productivity reflects the level of efficiency with which a grantee or
  subgrantee undertakes its activities. This can be measured by the quantity, quality and pace that a project or
  activity is managed. During the last 10 years, the County has had in place mechanisms that have been utilized by
  our subrecipients and by staff to report the productivity of funded activities. One such tool has been a Grantee
  Performance Report Information (GPR) Form that is completed by subrecipients and submitted as supporting
  documentation for requests for reimbursement. This information is keyed into HUD’s IDIS and subsequently used
  by OC Community Services staff to evaluate future funding applications, and to assist our application review
  committees in recommending how entitlement funds are to be allocated.

  Program Impact
  HUD Notice CPD-03-09 also determined that the appropriate performance measurement system would also
  include a component that measures program impact. Program impact reflects the extent to which activities yield
  the desired outcomes in the community or in the lives of the persons assisted. A means of determining impact is
  through the effects of output and outcome.

         Outputs are direct products of a program’s activities: They are typically measures in terms of the volume
          of work accomplished, such as number of low-income household served, number of items processed, or
          number of units constructed or rehabilitated. The process described above provides the department with
          the necessary level of information to satisfy the ―outputs‖ component.
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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE


         Outcomes are benefits that result from a program or activity: Outcomes typically relate to a change in
          condition, skills, knowledge, status, etc. Outcomes could include improved quality or quantity of local
          affordable housing stock, improved or revitalized neighborhoods or improved quality of life for program
          participants. It was this component of the Performance Measuring System that the County developed
          further in FY 2010-11. The process of integrating a means of measuring outcomes is described below.

  Process
  During the initial application submittal phase, each subrecipient of federal funds is required to expand their
  presentation of proposed goals and outputs by including a narrative of their activity’s outcomes. This new piece
  describes how their programs and/or activities will provide a more comprehensive, far reaching level of
  improvement to each individual benefiting from the use of our federal funds. Outputs and Outcomes identified in
  the County’s Action Plan are subsequently incorporated into the Department’s funding agreements and are viewed
  as additional performance milestones. All projects and activities are administrated through these agreements.
  Community Development staff evaluate the progress of their projects based on the funded agency’s ability to meet
  the goals, outputs and outcomes set forth by the AP.

 III. CDBG NARRATIVE STATEMENT

          A.   Comparison of CDBG Funds Goals and Objectives

The Federal Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 determined that the County receives annual
entitlement funding based on a statutory formula related to demographic and economic information, such as low and
moderate-income populations within the County. The County participates as an Urban County and represents 13
cities with populations of less than 50,000 (participating cities), the County unincorporated areas and one
Metropolitan City with a population of over 50,000. The participating cities include Aliso Viejo, Brea, Cypress, Dana
Point, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Laguna Woods, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Placentia, Seal Beach, Stanton and
Villa Park. The City of Yorba Linda is a participating Metropolitan City.

Programs and activities funded through the CDBG Program must meet one of three national objectives. Items
categorized as Public Services meet the national objective test by benefiting individuals whose incomes fall within
the low and moderate-income levels as defined by HUD. Many of these individuals are also included in a limited
clientele category, which places certain population groups into a presumed benefit sub-category. This determination
indicates that HUD recognizes the population in those groups to include, but are not limited to, seniors/elderly, the
disabled and homeless.

OC Community Services staff is responsible for the administration of these activities and follows a Monitoring Plan to
insure that our sub-grantees are serving individuals and families that are of low and moderate income. Policies and
Procedures have been established which provide controls to assure compliance with all federal CDBG regulations.
The Plan is utilized with each and every sub-grantee regardless of whether the groups served are a presumed
benefit population or not. During the monitoring visits assessments are made on the progress of each funded
activity. Agency files and records are reviewed to ensure that client-related data and documentation are included
and that assisted clients are eligible to receive the services provided as well as verifying compliance with the
appropriate national objective.

The process involving year-round monitoring allows staff the opportunity to provide as much technical assistance as
necessary. This results in a strengthened partnership with our sub-grantees and assures complete compliance with
national objectives. In addition, all OC Community Services standardized funding agreements that are executed
prior to disbursement of funds include language that specifically identifies the level of client data that each sub-
grantee will be expected to compile and maintain on site. OC Community Services staff also provides tools such as
written guides, web based items, and other tools, which assist them to identify, request and secure proper income-
related documentation from their clients.




  OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                 Page 35
                                                 COUNTY OF ORANGE

                                         Table 7: FY 2010-11 CDBG Funded Activities
                                                                            Program       Reprogrammed
     Categories of Projects                               CDBG              Income            CDBG                     Totals


Public Services*                                    $        654,840   $        21,660    $               0     $        635,563

Housing Rehabilitation*                             $     1,441,458    $              0   $       178,000       $      1,619,458

Acquisition & New Housing Development               $             0    $              0   $               0     $               0

Public Facilities and Improvements                  $     1,396,180    $        93,460    $        956,053      $      2,445,693

Commercial Rehab/Economic Development               $             0    $              0   $               0     $               0

Administrative/Planning*                            $       873,120    $        28,880    $              0      $         902,000
                                   TOTAL            $     4,365,598     $     144,000     $      1,134,053       $      5,643,651

*Includes City of Yorba Linda allocations. These are actual amounts as indicated in IDIS.

The County was awarded a total of $ 4,365,598 in CDBG funds for FY 2010-11. These funds include $294,551
allocated specifically for the City of Yorba Linda. The County uses CDBG funds for a wide variety of housing,
neighborhood improvement and infrastructure improvement projects. These include neighborhood revitalization,
improvement of community facilities, and various housing projects designated for very low and moderate-income
individuals and families. The funding allocated for Yorba Linda is included in the total amount for CDBG funds listed
in the table below. The County used 100% of CDBG funds to address the needs of low and moderate-income
persons.

                    1.    Public Services

The County allocated $673,253 in CDBG, $127,295 in 15U Housing Funds, and $166,050 in ESG funds for a total of
$850,548 for Public Service activities. These projects met, and in some instances, surpassed their proposed goals
for the year. They provided numerous services for very low and low-income individuals such as children, youths,
abused and battered women, seniors, disabled, mentally ill, and the homeless. Services provided include child-care,
parent education, substance abuse prevention, domestic violence prevention, employment assistance, transportation
assistance, health seminars, meals, various types of counseling, referral services, and assistance to the homeless in
securing permanent housing. No activities were undertaken that served limited clientele outside the list of categories
cited in CDBG regulations as presumed low-moderate income.

                    Table 8: FY 2010-11 Public Services Activities


                                                                               Funding        Contract        People          Funds
       Organization Name                        Project Name
                                                                                Source        Amount          Served        Expended

  1 Abrazar, Inc.              Midway Community Center Services                 CDBG       $    50,000         1331         $   50,000
  2 Council on Aging           Linkages Case Management Program                 CDBG       $    19,876          42          $   19,800
    Community Action
  3 Partnership of OC          El Modena Community Center                       CDBG       $    50,000         1570         $   50,000
    Community Action
  4 Partnership of OC          Anaheim Independencia Community Center           CDBG       $    50,000         5849         $   50,000
  5 City of Laguna Beach       Center for Families and Children                 CDBG      $       7,228        134          $       7,228
  6 Serving People In Need     Continuum of Care Coalition                      CDBG      $ 153,590            2439         $ 153,590
  7 Mercy House                Armory Shelter Program                        CDBG/15U         $ 428,918        1526         $ 428,918
  8 City of Yorba Linda        Senior Nutrition Program                         CDBG       $    40,936         385          $   40,936
                                                  Total:                                      $ 850,548       13,276        $ 800,472



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                                                COUNTY OF ORANGE

                        2. Rehabilitation - Preservation of Existing Affordable Housing

The preservation of existing affordable housing stock within the County is accomplished primarily through housing
rehabilitation activities. The County’s Neighborhood Preservation Program provides financial assistance to
qualified property owners for the rehabilitation of owner- occupied residential properties.

During the 2010-11 program year OC Community Services had a combined total of $1,441,458 in new federal
CDBG funds and $178,000 reprogrammed plus $243,100 carried forward from FY 2009 for housing rehabilitation
activities. The major financial support grants utilized for housing rehabilitation improvements include CDBG and
CDBG PI funds.

The following chart identifies the budgeted amount and the expenditures that were incurred during fiscal year
2010-11. The chart also reflects the number of housing units rehabilitated throughout the same period of time. The
following accomplishments represent the total number of 373 housing rehabilitation units completed and 16 units
underway during FY 2010-11:


  Table 9: FY 2010-11 CDBG Rehabilitation Activities (including FY 2009 activities)
                                                                                           Units      Units
   IDIS              FY 2010 Subrecipients                 Funded         Expended       Underway   Completed
  1921    City of Brea (Single-Family)               $    210,000    $     149,029                     18
  1923    City of Cypress (Single-Family)            $    157,000    $     156,742                      8
  1919    City of Laguna Hills (Aliso Meadows)       $    210,000    $     209,974          16         15
  1922    City of Cypress (Lemon/Lime Rental)        $    109,000    $      45,431                      4
  1924    City of Laguna Woods (Energy Efficient)    $    133,750    $     129,570                     48
  1917    County of Orange (Neighborhood Preserv.) $      402,907    $     402,907                     41
  1920    City of Placentia (Housing Rehabilitation) $    159,000    $      61,467                     17
  1918    City of Seal Beach (Leisure World ADA)     $    210,000    $     208,843                     84
  1916    City of Stanton (Single-Family)            $     80,250    $      75,250                     11
  1925    City of Yorba Linda (NIP)                  $     75,000    $      64,532                     17
  1926    City of Yorba Linda (Multi-Family)         $     15,000    $           0                     52

                                 FY 2010 Subtotal: $     1,761,907   $   1,503,745          16         315

                                                                                           Units      Units
   IDIS           FY 2009 Subrecipients                    Funded     Expended In 2009   Underway   Completed
  1840 City of Brea (Single-Family)                 $      17,457    $       17,457                    23
  1793 City of Cypress (Lemon/Lime Rental)          $      24,714    $       24,714                    4
  1795 City of Laguna Hills (Aliso Meadows)         $     200,929    $      200,929                    31
                                 FY 2009 Subtotal: $      243,100    $      243,100                    58
                                 FY 2010-11 Total: $     2,005,007   $    1,746,845         16         373

The OC Community Services works in collaboration with cities in administrating Housing Rehabilitation projects
throughout the County. The funding made available is used for Single Family Rehabilitation programs, Multi-
Family Rehabilitation programs and the rehabilitation of Mobile Home Units. Some programs provide assistance
to mobile home residents, while others provide a rebate program to focus on emergency housing code violations.

The Cities of Brea and Yorba Linda utilize federal funds to administer Housing Rehabilitation Programs
independent of the programs administered by the County. During fiscal year 2010-11 housing rehabilitation
programs were implemented and administered by the Cities of Cypress, Laguna Woods, Laguna Hills, Stanton,
Seal Beach and Placentia. Brea provided CDBG loans and grants for single-family residences. Yorba Linda had
several grant programs for seniors and the disabled, external code violations and a home paint program. Yorba
Linda also continued the rehabilitation of Evergreen Villas, a 52-unit senior housing project. Cypress initiated a



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                                             COUNTY OF ORANGE

single-family rehabilitation loan program, using CDBG funds and City redevelopment funds. Laguna Woods gave
grants for energy-efficient improvements to senior occupied units in Leisure World. Placentia offered loans and

grants for exterior improvements. Stanton continued to implement the housing rebate program and matched up to
$5,000 of CDBG with City matching funds, totaling up to $10,000 per housing unit, Seal Beach implemented
housing grants for interior repairs for seniors including ADA bathroom improvements.




                                                                                   BEFORE REHABILITATION




Within all unincorporated areas, OC
Community Services performs all
application and intake services and
construction management for the
mobile home rehabilitation, the single-
family roof replacement program, and
ADA grants. Construction management
for the single-family rehabilitation
program is contracted. OC Community
Services is also involved in servicing all
rehabilitation loans. OC Community
Services developed the guidelines for
the rehabilitation programs and also
markets the programs to the low and
moderate unincorporated areas and all
participating cities that choose not to
administer their own programs.

                                                     HOME AFTER HOUSING REHABILITATION (ROOF,
                                                         STUCCO, PAINT) AND LANDSCAPING




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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE




The emphasis of the rehabilitation programs is to first address health and safety items and to improve the exterior
appearance of the home, to systematically revitalize the community. Improvements typically include, but are not
limited to, lead-based paint remediation, painting, new roof, dual-paned windows and fence replacement. Lead-
based paint issues are first determined by testing. All lead-based paintwork is addressed through grants to the
homeowner.

        3. Public Facilities and Improvements (PF&I) Projects Completed

  City of Placentia – Van Buren Street Improvement Project
  KC10930 - The City of Placentia was awarded $133,750 in CDBG funds for preparing plans and specifications,
  and construction of 1200 linear feet of rubberized asphalt, Engineering and inspection. The project was
  completed and 1200 linear feet of rubberized asphalt was constructed.

  City of Stanton - Residential Street Improvements
  KC10935 – The City of Stanton was awarded $278,250 in CDBG funds and $80,000 in City matching funds for
  street improvements throughout the City with focus in three target areas. The project included design and
  construction of 7,020 lineal feet of which, 2,315 lineal feet counted for Jane Way, Pickens Ln. and Pine Tree
  Lane, 1,860 lineal feet counted for Santa Rita Ave. and Santa Cruz Avenue, 2,845 lineal feet counted for
  Briarwood Street, Shadow Lane, Autumn Lane and Brittany Lane. The project included and addressed safety
  issues dealing with re-striping crosswalks due to street being heavily used by school age children and senior
  citizens. The project was completed and as a result, 7,717 people of which 4,701 low income people will benefit
  from the improvements.

  City of Laguna Woods – Phase III Design of Exterior ADA Improvements at City Hall/Library Site
  KC10936 - The City of Laguna Woods was awarded $29,960 in CDBG funds to identify exterior architectural
  barriers at the Laguna Woods City Hall/Library site and develop the design plans necessary for their removal and
  replacement with ADA compliant improvements. The project was completed as described.

  City of Los Alamitos – Apartment Row Alley Street Improvement Project
  KC10937 - The City of Los Alamitos utilized $210,000 in CDBG funds and $48,945 in matching funds to remove
  and replace the deteriorated alley between Green Avenue and Howard Avenue. The project was completed and
  accomplished: 1) 95 cubic yards of excavation. 2) Removal of 12,285 square feet of AC pavement. 3) Removal
  of 7,900 square feet of PCC pavement and gutter. 4) Construction of 17,100 square feet of 6‖ PCC Pavement.
  5) Construction of 1,126 linear feet of PCC. 6) Construction of 430 square feet of PCC alley intersection. 7)
  Replacement of 25 water meter, 2 water valve box frames and cover. 8) Construction of 4 access ramps and 100
  feet of PCC sidewalk. 8) Construction of 190 square feet of AC.

  City of Cypress - La Salle/Belmont /Lincoln Sewer Improvement
  KC10938-The City of Cypress used $169.600 in CDBG funds to repair the damaged sewer lines. Funding was
  used for construction of the project and implementing, the installation of approximately 1,000 linear feet of sewer
  lines. Target areas benefiting from the project included 330 linear feet of sewer improvements to the 8600 block
  of LaSalle Street, 330 linear feet of sewer improvements to the 6200 block of Lincoln Avenue and 350 Linear feet
  of sewer improvements to the 8500 block of Belmont Street area. Construction and rehabilitation of sewer
  capacity improvements encompassing approximately 1,000 linear feet of serer facilities were completed. Overall
  1,681 individuals benefited directly from the project.

  City of Laguna Hills - Florence Sylvester Senior Center Rehabilitation
  KC10939 - The City of Laguna Hills was awarded $55,640 for improvements to the Florence Sylvester Senior
  Center. The project was completed and provided upgrades to the interior of the facility; removed and replaced
  1200 square feet of carpet; removed existing interior wall and installed one 12’ x 16’ Hufcor wall; removed
  ceramic base in lobby and activity room and replaced it with wood base, and painted the Senior Center.

  City of Laguna Aliso Viejo – Iglesia Park Community Center Renovation


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                                           COUNTY OF ORANGE

KC10940 - The City of Aliso Viejo was awarded $367,500 in CDBG funds for the construction and renovation of
public restroom for ADA compliance, plumbing, interior building, including replacement of existing stall partitions,
ceramic wall and floor tile, urinals, toilets, sinks, lighting, built-in kitchen equipment, built-in window shades,
electrical upgrades, installation of countertop workspaces, repair and replacement of door frames and office and
kitchen modifications at the community center. The project was completed per described accomplishments.

City of Stanton – Linear Park Construction Project
KC10941 - The City of Stanton was awarded $69,550 in CDBG funds and $159,000 in City matching funds for
design and construction of the Linear Park Improvement Project. The Improvement was considered as a priority
due to the sever lack of parkland in the City. The City utilized the CDBG funds, constructed 266 lineal feet of 6’-8‖
block wall with beveled block cap, 12 precast concrete bollards, and 8 precast concrete pilasters with
architectural ornament. A total of 1499 people would be benefitting from the improvements.

PF&I Projects Underway, and granted a six month extension

Colette’s Children’s Home a Nonprofit Organization
KC10927 $56,500 Placentia Hope Project 1038-1044
KC10928 $54,300 Placentia Hope Project 1046-1052
KC10929 $86,360 Placentia Hope Project 1062-1068

Colette’s Children’s Home, was awarded $197,160 for (3) three separate Homeless Facilities. All three projects
are within the City of Placentia’s low-income neighborhoods. The construction project focused on major exterior
and interior repairs including, the installation of security lighting, stucco work, repairs to the laundry rooms,
installation of new fencing and block walls, trash container enclosures, the construction of new concrete slabs in
the patio areas, the installation of new garage doors throughout the units, and fumigation of the apartment
structures. A six-month extension was granted for the projects to be completed.

City of Brea – Ash Street Alley Improvement Project
KC10931 – The City of Brea was awarded $224,793 to remove and replace approximately 730 linear feet long
and 20 linear feet wide of deteriorated alley, level the base, install new 4‖ aggregate base level and construct a
new asphalt concrete road and a longitudinal concrete V-gutter for drainage, redwood header, and 8‖ PCC
pavement. A six-month extension was granted for the project to be completed.

City of Cypress - DeLong/Watson Sewer Capacity Improvements
KC10932 - The City of Cypress was awarded $225,750 in CDBG funds to replace approximately 2,150 linear feet
of existing deficient sewer line facilities that traverse the 5300-5400 blocks of Delong Street 8700—8900 blocks
of Watson Street and installation of 400 linear feet of sewer pipe along the 5200 block of Crescent Avenue. The
construction of sewer capacity improvements commenced with the upgrade and replacement of 651 linear feet of
10‖ vitrified clay pipe (VCP) and the construction of 412 linear feet of new 10‖ VCP. A six-month extension was
granted for the project to be completed.

City of Placentia - Neighborhood Facilities Improvements Project
KC10933 - The City of Placentia was awarded $262,500 in CDBG funds to renovate and improve three (3)
neighborhood facilities in Placentia’s low-income neighborhood: Backs Community Building, Gomez Community
Center, and Civic Center Community meeting rooms. Improvements include, upgrade to restroom facilities,
improved lighting, new doors and entryways, and replace flooring. A six-month extension was granted for the
project to be completed.

El Modena Community Center Improvements - OC Community Services
KC10934 - The project was awarded $210,000 in CDBG funds for the construction of the interior and exterior of
the Community Center: Handicapped access pathways, new sidewalks, new energy efficient windows, exterior
painting and exterior fencing for safety reasons. The improvements included reconstruction of the facility rooms,
replacement of flooring, remodeling the receptionist area and the installation of a drop ceiling in the main lobby
area to conserve energy. A six-month extension was granted for the project to be completed.

4. Commercial Rehabilitation/Economic Development


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                                             COUNTY OF ORANGE

In recent years the County has, with a positive and optimistic vision, promoted job creation and/or retention by
awarding CDBG funds to participating cities within the County Program. However, economic development related
activities have not demonstrated acceptable progress towards meeting their projected goals. This pattern of ―slow
spending‖ under economic development related activities has historically been a significant concern to the County.
Although there is a need for economic development, the demand from participating jurisdictions to utilize CDBG to
fund this activity has been low. Economic Development was not recommended for funding in FY 2010-11. The
County provides the residents with economic programs under the OC Community Services Community
Investment Division.


       5. Administration of CDBG

The County was allocated a total of $873,120 in new CDBG Administrative funds during FY 2010-11 and PI funds
$28,880 for a total of $902,000 for Administration. These funds were expended for overall program administration
and implementation of the CDBG program. The responsibilities associated with the planning and administration of
the program; include the provision of technical support, solicitation of new projects through public meetings,
administration of contracts and certification and monitoring of programs. Program and support costs included
salaries, benefits, supplies, materials, utilities and insurance. The County does not utilize an approved
Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy.

As a general practice, OC Community Services includes language in all of its NOFA, Requests for Proposals (RFP),
standardized funding agreements and standardized loan documents advising prospective fund awardees that they
must satisfy federal requirements related to minority businesses and women owned businesses. Furthermore, OC
Community Services has in place Policies and Procedures detailing guidelines that define what recommended
actions sub-grantees are expected to obtain to be in compliance.

         6.   Community Development Block Grant Recovery (CDBG-R)

CDBG-R enables local governments to undertake a wide range of activities intended to create suitable living
environments, provide decent affordable housing and create economic opportunities, primarily for persons of low
and moderate income. Current guidance from HUD indicates the full range of CDBG-R eligible activities and
projects may generally be funded; however, the Recovery Act directs that grantees are to use these funds to
maximize job creation and economic benefit. In addition, certain types of activities are prohibited from receiving
Recovery Act funding including casinos or other gambling facilities, aquariums, zoos, golf courses, or swimming
pools.

The County received $1,091,220 in new CDBG-R funds that constitute a special allocation of FY 2008-09 CDBG-
Recovery funding. The County gave priority to projects that could award contracts by mid-June 2009.

To date OC Community Services has expended $867,119


                                 Table 10:     FY 2010-11 CDBG-R Expenditures
             Subrecipient                        Project                      Allocation         Expended
  City of Stanton             Flood Prevention Program                    $        299,460     $    247,312
  City of Stanton             Street Improvement Program                  $         80,000     $      80,000
  City of Stanton             Drainage Improvement Program                $        100,000     $     100,000
  City of Brea                Madrona Avenue Alley Improvement Project    $        186,463     $     134,354
  City of Placentia           Pedestrian Accessibility Project            $        250,000      $    250,000
  City of Yorba Linda         Citywide Wheelchair Ramp Retrofit Program   $         66,175                 0
  County of Orange            Administration                              $        109,122     $      55,453
                                                                  Total: $       1,091,220     $       867,119

CDBG-R Public Facilities and Improvement Accomplishments
The County is utilizing CDBG-R funds for public facilities and improvements in the participating Cities of Stanton,
Brea, Placentia and the metro City of Yorba Linda for the following activities.

  OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                               Page 41
                                              COUNTY OF ORANGE

   City of Stanton- Flood Prevention Program
   The City of Stanton was awarded $299,460 for the Flood Prevention Program. The program will reduce flooding in
   the City. The 1st phase included the design of the project and estimates for cost of construction. The 2nd phase of
   the project is the actual construction of the storm drains. The project will complete the installation of 1,600 lineal
   feet (lf) of eighteen-inch pipe and 4 catch basins. The City concentrated in 3 residential areas in addressing the
   flooding prevention issues. The project has been completed and City Public Work Inspectors are in the process of
   making the last construction inspections prior to approving the Notice of Completion. A total of 4,051 people will
   benefit from the improvements. 20 persons were hired, and this created 1.58 FTE. The project will be reported
   complete October 2011.

   City of Stanton-Street Improvements
   The City of Stanton was awarded $80,000 for Street Improvements. The project included design and construction
   on Fern Avenue between Cerritos and Chanticleer Street. The construction of 750 lf on Fern Avenue is complete.
   The project included the removal of existing asphalt road and the total reconstruction of the street. Added for safety
   is additional lighting in the area, pedestrian crossing signs and the landscape pop-outs to slow vehicle speed. The
   project created approximately .75 FTE jobs. The project will be reported complete October 2011.

   City of Stanton-Drainage Improvements
   The City of Stanton was awarded $100,000 for a Drainage Improvement Program. The project included design and
   construction of curbs, gutters and sidewalks along Santa Rosalia Avenue between Chapman Avenue and Santa
   Catalina Avenue. The project included the removal of 2,000 lineal feet of rolled curb, gutters, and sidewalk. The
   redesign and new construction allows the City to properly engineer the curb, gutters and sidewalk to alleviate the
   poor drainage in the area. The project created approximately .57 FTE. The project will be reported complete in
   October 2011.

   City of Brea - Madrona Avenue Alley Improvements
   The City of Brea was awarded $186,463 for the City’s Madrona Avenue Alley Improvement Project located in
   South Brea between Madrona Avenue and Walnut Avenue, running from Elm Street north to Date Street. The
   project will reconstruct a deteriorated alley by replacing asphalt, adding a V-gutter along the center of the alley,
   adjusting the grade to improve drainage and reconstruct the driveway approach on Date and Elm Streets. This
   project created approximately 1.71 FTE jobs. The project will be reported complete October 2011.

   City of Placentia -Pedestrian Accessibility Project
   The City of Placentia was awarded $250,000 for the Pedestrian Accessibility Project. The project included
   construction of curb ramps, sidewalks and other appurtenant street improvements along travel routes frequently
   utilized by disabled persons and near several Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) bus stops. The City
   constructed 33 curb ramps, 18,842 sq ft. of sidewalk, 282 ln. ft. of curb & gutter constructed, creating 13 new hires.
   The project is complete and created approximately 4.72 FTE construction jobs. The project will be reported
   complete October 2011.

   City of Yorba Linda - Citywide Wheelchair Ramp Retrofit Program
   The City of Yorba Linda was awarded $66,175 for the Citywide Wheelchair Ramp Retrofit Program. The project
   includes construction of wheelchair ramps throughout the City to be in compliance with the American with
   Disabilities Act (ADA). 23 access ramps constructed. The remaining balance of $5,695 invoice was submitted.
   The project is completed, and final invoice to be submitted. 15 people hired, creating 1.55 FTE
   The project will be reported next quarterly report in October 2011.

   Administration
   The County will utilize 10% of CDBG-R funds for eligible planning and general administration activities as defined
   in 42 U.S.C. 5305(a)(12), 5305(a)(13) and 530(d)(3), and in 24 CFR 570.205 and 24 CFR 570.206.

   IV. Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG)

a. Assessment of ESG funds to Goals and Objectives

 Per program regulations, ESG funds can only be used in conjunction with an emergency shelter. During the
 subject-reporting period, the County committed its full allocation of FY 2010-11 ESG Program funds to one non-

   OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                   Page 42
                                               COUNTY OF ORANGE

profit agency that met the housing needs of a variety of homeless and near-homeless individuals and families. The
agency expended $166,812 for maintenance/operations and related expenses. The agency targets services toward
homeless families and individuals.

The County’s ESG Program was successful in meeting the priorities and objectives of the CP relative to the
homeless housing needs and general public services. This program consistently proves to be a significant part of
the County’s overall CoC strategy. Included among the services provided are emergency, and transitional shelter
for the homeless, services to assist the disabled, victims of domestic violence and families with children, and
assistance to single homeless men and women.

      The ESG Program is designed to improve the quality of existing emergency shelters with opportunities to
       provide specialized homeless services. This is consistent with the County’s goal is to promote the continued
       development of services and programs to aid the homeless through the cooperation of various governmental
       agencies and private non-profit organizations that provide shelter and services.

A one hundred percent (100%) match is required for these funds. Eligible uses include renovation, conversion of
buildings, rehabilitation, and operating costs. ESG regulations call for a 30% cap on essential services and
homeless prevention. Also, a maximum of ten percent (10%) of the grant can be allocated to program
administration. The County used 100% of ESG funds for low and moderate income persons needs.


                                      Table 11: Emergency Shelter Grant Activities

     Service Provider - Project   Proposed Persons
                                                      Accomplishments/Type     Funds Allocated   Funds Expended Match/Type
            Description                Served

     Armory Emergency Shelter           414           Operations/414 persons     $ 158,471         $ 158,471      $158,471

           Administration                                                         $   8,342         $   8,342
       Total ESG Funds and
                                        414                414 persons            $ 165,631         $165,631      $158,471
        Accomplishments


           B.    Match Contributions

 Per program regulations, ESG funds can only be used in conjunction with an emergency shelter. In 2010-11, the
 County committed $158,471 ESG funds to one non-profit agency that met the housing needs for a variety of
 homeless and at risk of homelessness individuals and families. The non-profit matched the amount 100%.

 To ensure compliance with matching requirements, the County requires verification of matching funds by service
 providers who submit an OCCS ESG Match Form as documentation for reimbursement of expenditures. Service
 providers solicit and provide matching funds through: private donations, fundraisers, foundations, and United Way
 grants. Redevelopment funds, fee reductions, other local funds, and monetary or in-kind incentives are also used
 to match Federal funds for rehabilitation or new construction. The Matching funds requirement for the agency was
 met, identified and verified by supporting documentation submitted with invoices for reimbursement. (See table 11
 above)

           C.         Activity and Beneficiary Data
                                                                                Armory Emergency Shelter Program

                                                        The Armory Emergency Shelter Program, established in 1987,
                                                        is a collaborative effort between the County, the State of
                                                        California Army National Guard, the participating cities of
                                                        Fullerton, Santa Ana, and Anaheim, Mercy House Transitional
                                                        Living Centers, Inc. and other non-profit service providers. The
                                                        mission of this collaboration is to provide emergency shelter,
                                                        food and supportive services to homeless men, women and
        Armory Emergency Shelter
                                                        children throughout the County.


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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE


  OC Community Services contracted with Mercy House Transitional Living Centers, Inc. to provide services at the
  Santa Ana and Fullerton National Guard Armories from the period of December 6, 2010 through March 24, 2011.
  During the 109-day program, the Armory program provided 25,509 bed nights and served 1,391 unduplicated
  men, women and children.

                                              Locations

          Fullerton National Guard Amory                          Santa Ana National Guard Armory
          400 South Brookhurst Road                               612 East Warner Avenue
          Fullerton, CA 92632                                     Santa Ana, CA 92706
          17,786 Bed Nights Provided                              14,224 Bed Nights Provided

                        Fund sources utilized to support the program for another year were:
                           CDBG, ESG, 15U funds (County)                $ 936,267
                           ESG (City of Santa Ana)                      $    24,000
                           ESG (City of Fullerton)                      $    10,000
                           CDBG State                                   $    25,000
                           EHAP                                         $         0
                                                             Total       $    995,267

OC Community Services continued to address the concerns of local police departments, businesses, and residents
by implementing the ―Good Neighbor Policy‖ created during the prior winter. The ―Good Neighbor Policy‖ provides
for increased security staff, increased shelter staff, taxi service, and supportive services, as well as increased
busing services.



               During FY 2010-11 the Armory Emergency Shelter program provided 25,509 shelter bed nights
               to 1,391 unduplicated homeless individuals and families. In addition to shelter, other services
               such as meals, showers, hygiene items, and clothing were offered. Through public/private
               partnerships that involve a variety of agencies, on-site services such as mental health
               counseling, legal services, medical evaluation/ referrals, and case management were also
               provided.



During FY 2010-11 Mercy House Transitional Living Centers, Inc. established the Family Redirection Program (FRP)
that redirected families who came to the Armories into motels. The FRP assisted 1,186 total individuals (358
households) of which 78 families obtained some sort of permanent housing.

          D.     OCHA Operating Reserve Funds

 Since 2000, the Housing Supportive Services (HSS) Program has been supported with $3,418,000 in OCHA
 operating reserve funds. For FY 2010-11, $210,000 was allocated to the Armory Emergency Shelter Program. The
 HSS Program funds housing-related services to supplement other federal funding. HSS funds are accumulated
 OCHA administrative fees provided by HUD to operate its rental assistance programs. These operating reserve
 funds are primarily used to leverage the financing of new, affordable housing projects for rental housing,
 homeownership assistance, special needs housing, and leadership/education programs and supplement public
 service activities.




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                                       COUNTY OF ORANGE


     E.      Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP)

     Summary:

      Substantial Amendment for $1,556,026 in HPRP funding approved by the Board on May 5, 2009 and
       subsequently approved by HUD on June 30, 2009.

      HPRP Request for Proposals released on June 30, 2009 with a due date of July 14, 2009.

      The RFP solicited proposals for funding under five programs:
            o General Financial Assistance
            o Post Hospital Recuperative Beds Pilot Program
            o Centralized Housing Locator
            o Centralized Intake
            o Multi-Service Center

      A total of twelve proposals were received:
             o 9 - General Financial Assistance
             o 1 - Post Hospital Recuperative Bids
             o 1 - Centralized Intake
             o 1 - Multi-Service Center
             o No proposals were received for the Centralized Housing Locator. The funds allocated for this
                  category were added to the General Financial Assistance Category to fund additional
                  proposals.
             o All proposals passed threshold review and were forwarded to the outside review committee
                  for evaluation and scoring.

     Recommended Awards:

      General Financial Assistance - $859,772
      Post Hospital Recuperative Beds Pilot Program -$235,993
      Multi-Service Center - $202,222
      Centralized Intake - $117,998
      Data Collection and Evaluation - $77,800
      OCCS Administration – $62,241
      The Data Collection and Evaluation project was exempt from the RFP process, as participation in the
       Client Management Information System (CMIS) is, required by HUD.

      The total 5% Administration amount of $71,801 was split with agencies on a pro rata share of $15,560
       (1%) administration allocation based on the recommended funding amount for their agency with OCCS
       retaining the balance of $62,241 (4%)

      Notifications of Award letters were sent out July 31, 2009. No appeals were received.

      Recommendations approved by the Board of Supervisors on September 22, 2009.

      To date HPRP has expended $ 526,521




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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE

 V. HOME NARRATIVE STATEMENTS UPDATES FOR THE HOUSING SECTION WERE NOT AVAILABLE FOR THE DRAFT

In an effort to develop more public/private partnerships, the County continues to work with developers and
participating cities to leverage all available resources to build new affordable rental housing whenever possible.
The available resources include bond financing, low-income housing tax credits, California State Multi-Family
Housing Program, California Housing Finance Agency, Mental Health Services Act funds, State of California
Proposition 1C funding, conventional financing, and Federal Home Loan Bank Affordable Housing Program funds.
Since 1999, the County has leveraged over $504 million in local, Federal, State and private funds to create over
2,444 affordable rental and home ownership opportunities.

The County has committed over $53 million to affordable housing developments since FY 1999/00. The types of
funds committed to affordable housing development during this time include HOME Program funds, OCDA
Housing Set-Aside funds, 15U Strategic Priority Affordable Housing funds, OCHA Operating reserve funds, and
Mental Health Services Act One-Time funds. Under the Affordable Rental Housing NOFA, OC Community
Services has financed projects since FY 1999-00 to leveraging over $504 million in financing awards from local,
state, federal governments, as well as conventional sources. Specifically, these sources include Federal Low-
Income Housing Tax Credits, tax-exempt bonds, and conventional loans.

The following is a brief description of how the various funds available to the County were used for leveraging:

   A.     Assessment of Relationship of HOME funds to goals and Objectives
The focus of the HOME grant program is to improve and /or expand the affordable housing stock. In FY 2009/10,
Orange County committed its HOME allocation and HOME PI, a total of $2,024,045 toward promoting the
development of up to 151 additional affordable housing units and maintaining existing affordable housing in
participating cities, target areas, and countywide.

      1.      Evaluate progress made toward meeting goals for providing affordable Housing using
HOME funds, including the number and types of households served.

In FY 2010-11 OCCS also committed $13,522,536 for the development of 5 new affordable housing developments,
a total of 325 new units serving families with incomes at or below 60% of AMI. In July 2010, the County provided
$2,000,000 in HOME funds for construction of one site.

The 2005-10 CP identifies the acquisition, construction, and rehabilitation of affordable housing as the highest
priority. To support this, in FY 2010-11 over $5.9 million in local OCDA funds were allocated for the development
of two affordable housing projects. Furthermore, the Orange County BOS continues to identify affordable housing
as a top strategic priority.

In an effort to maximize production efforts and leverage scarce County affordable housing funds, OC Community
Services encourages projects to identify financing plans that consider leveraging additional funding sources, such
as tax credits, State Multi-Family Housing Program (MHP) funds and State Proposition 1C funds. The County has
funded numerous new developments with multiple layers of financing that have maximized both housing
production and the leveraging of Federal funds.

In addition OC Community Services funded 7 loans totaling $280,000 (181,780 in HOME funds and 98,220 in
ADDI funds), under OCCS Mortgage Assistance Program (MAP). The MAP provides a silent second mortgage of
up to $40,000 for households earning at or below 80% AMI.

         2.      Eliminating Barriers to Affordable Housing

The County continues to face several key constraints that hinder affordable housing development efforts. The
lack/high cost of land, development costs, development fees, and neighborhood opposition continue to make it a
challenge for developers to build affordable housing.

The County is actively working in several areas to address these barriers. The County’s Rental Housing NOFA is
revised each year based on a wide range of public comments, including the changes in the real estate market.
The County also proactively addresses Article 34 of the State Constitution, which requires voter approval of

OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                  Page 46
                                           COUNTY OF ORANGE

affordable housing projects with government funding. If a jurisdiction does not have Article 34 authority, the
County cannot restrict more than 49% of the units in a development. To address this, OC Community Services
works directly with developers to structure project financing in a manner that addresses the affordability restrictions
of other funding sources while also meeting the requirements of Article 34.

The County continues to facilitate regional discussions on the issues of affordable housing.


→ Collaboration with Orange County cities to invest in affordable housing developments by matching the
County’s financing commitment.

→ Collaboration with County Health Care Agency on leveraging Proposition 63 funding for the mentally ill
homeless for the development of affordable housing for this population.



                     a. Available Land

Due to a lack of land suitable for housing development, the County continually experiences some of the highest
land costs in the nation.

OC Community Services is working with the OC Planning Department to address land use barriers to affordable
housing development in unincorporated areas of the County through the implementation of the Affordable Housing
Opportunity Overlay Zone. This overlay zoning is part of the County’s efforts to remove regulatory barriers and is
part of the County’s response to HUD’s ―Questionnaire on Removal of Regulatory Barriers‖ (See Attachment A).
The purpose of the overlay zone is to facilitate the development of affordable housing in the unincorporated County
by providing opportunities to develop residential units on non-residentially zoned land, increasing allowable
densities, and establishing alternative design guidelines. The overlay zoning ordinance was adopted by the
County BOS on January 10, 2006. Since its implementation, OC Community Services staff has received
applications for seven (7) separate developments located in the Affordable Housing Opportunity Overlay Zone.

                    b.   Costs

High development costs in the County can stifle potential affordable housing developments. High development
costs are directly impacted by land costs, government fees, permits fees, construction costs and costs associated
with delays in obtaining the required discretionary use permits and other entitlements. The challenges facing non-
conforming in-fill sites, especially smaller properties, can add to costs as well.

In terms of rehabilitation, it often requires expensive temporary or permanent relocation costs. Mandated by the
use of Federal or State funds, these regulations can add an additional $20,000 per unit to the development budget.

The payment of prevailing wages remains an issue in the County, which can add 15-20% to construction costs.
The use of affordable housing funds from the State of California, such as MHP and MHSA, triggers the payment of
prevailing wages. In an effort to address state prevailing wages for affordable housing developments that are not
financed in part with State funds such as MHP and/or MHSA funds, the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR)
issued two determination letters on February 25, 2005, ruling that federal tax credits and tax-exempt bonds do not
trigger the payment of state prevailing wages. While DIR decisions may help to address the challenges with state
prevailing wages with respect to these two funding mechanisms, it is not necessarily the final word.

                   c.    Neighborhood Concerns

Neighborhood concerns or NIMBY (―Not In My Back Yard‖) sentiments continue to impact affordable housing
development in the County. Neighborhood concerns include general misconceptions about affordable housing,
and the impacts of proposed developments, such as crime, drugs, parking, and overcrowding. Neighborhoods are
also concerned about preserving property values and the quality of life in their communities. Unfortunately, many
residents equate affordable housing with lowering property values and are not aware that well-built, attractive, and
well-managed affordable housing developments can, and have, improved neighborhoods. There is also a lack of
awareness about who lives in affordable housing, which includes:
OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                    Page 47
                                           COUNTY OF ORANGE


                 Teachers                                        Police officers
                 Small-business owners                           Health Workers
                 Entertainment industry workers                  High-tech employees

To address neighborhood resistance to affordable housing, OC Community Services encourages all developers to
work closely with local residents and community groups. In efforts to educate the public about OC Community
Services and affordable housing, the County also participates with the Kennedy Commission, a non-profit
organizational vehicle for advocacy and education related to affordable housing in the County. The following is a
summary of the County’s Geographic/Demographic Market Conditions.

         In 2009, the average rent in the County was $1482.
         Over half of renter households in the County pay more than the recommended 30% of their income for
          shelter.
         Orange County’s vacancy rate is under 6.5%.
         As of June 2009, over $504 million in local, private, federal, and state funds were leveraged for the
          creation of new rental affordable units and first time homebuyer programs.

          3.     Affordable Housing List

The Affordable Rental Housing List was created to bridge an information gap for lower income individuals and
families to assist them in locating affordable housing opportunities in the County. The list contains properties in
Orange County cities and unincorporated Orange County that have deed restrictions recorded against the
properties from various jurisdictions including the County, cities and/or the state and federal government. The list
is made available through the OC Community Services website or in hard copy upon request. The list is updated
annually. Individuals or families that income-qualify are eligible to reside in available units.

          4.     Funding

The County’s Multi-Family Affordable Rental Housing Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) is the primary funding
vehicle for affordable rental housing. OC Community Services funds are provided to non-profit and for-profit
housing developers on a first-come, first-served basis. As shown in the table below, since FY 1999, OC
Community Services has initiated or participated in a number of developments to further the goals of the County to
create new affordable housing opportunities for low-income individuals, families, seniors, and persons with special
needs.

   Table 12: Recent Multi-Family Rental Housing NOFA Remove years 5-08/09 per HUD use CP years
                                                     OCCS
        Fiscal Year            Funds              Restricted       Total Units      Total Development
                            Committed               Units                                   Cost
     2009-2010              $ 13,522,536            151                 325               $ 98,547,012
     2010-2011



               TOTALS       $                                                                   $

In FY 2010-11, OC Community Services issued the 2010 NOFA making $8 million in OCDA and HOME funds
available for the development of affordable rental housing in the County. Nine (9) applications were received
requesting funding for proposed new developments. Three (3) new developments received loan commitments for
funding under the 2010 NOFA.

The number of extremely low, low, and moderate-income renter and households assisted during the
reporting period (and) Narrative describing your efforts to address worse case needs;


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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE

Through the County’s Multi-Family Affordable Rental Housing Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) administered
by OC Community Services utilizing HOME Investment Partnership Act Program (HOME) funds, Orange County
Development Agency’s (OCDA) Housing funds, CDBG funds, County of Orange Strategic Affordable Housing
funds and Orange County Housing Authority Operating Reserve funding sources as below market rate ―gap
financing‖ to qualified developers to assist in the development of affordable rental housing for low, very-low, and
extremely-low income households. All the units created during the period of FY 2009 through FY 2010 benefited
low, very low, and extremely low-income renter households.
OC Community Services utilizes HOME and CalHome funds for eligible low-income first-time homebuyers under
the County’s Mortgage Assistance Program (―MAP) benefited low, and moderate-income income owner
households.

Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds are available for households at 120% Area Median Income (AMI) or
below, with 25% of total funding targeted to households at 50% AMI or below. All the units created during the
period of FY 2009 through FY 2010 benefited extremely low, low, and moderate-income renter and households.



Actions taken to address obstacles to meeting underserved needs;

Aligning County resources through the Multi-Family Affordable Rental Housing Notice of Funding Availability
(NOFA) to leverage local, state, and federal resources to for development of deeply affordable units supports the
Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness and MHSA by providing housing to extremely low-income renters and
populations eligible for MHSA services, including formerly homeless or households at risk of homelessness with
mental illnesses.

Mortgage Assistance Program (MAP)
OC Community Services administers a Mortgage Assistance Program (MAP), which provides a silent second
mortgage up to $40,000 for households earning 80% or below Area Median Income (AMI). OC Community
Services utilized HOME and American Dream Down payment Initiative (ADDI) funds for the MAP program. In FY
2010-11, OCCS funded 7 MAP loans totaling $280,000 ($181,780 in HOME funds and $98,220 in ADDI funds).

   B.   NEW HOUSING ACTIVITIES

        1.   Completed Projects from Prior Year’s Funding (FY 2005-2010)

Since 2005 the OC Community Services has been an active and dedicated partner in the development of
affordable housing in the County. With a variety of funding sources available, the County has committed funds to
projects within all regions of the County.

Provided below is a summary of affordable housing developments completed, with funds expended, during the
subject-reporting year. All developments were funded through OC Community Service from local and federal
funding programs. In FY 2010-11 the County provided a total of 39 HOME assisted units, 22 rental units and 7
homeownership units. The rental units consist of 6 extremely low-income units and 16 low-income units. All of
the 7 homeownership units are moderate-income households.




OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                Page 49
                                             COUNTY OF ORANGE




                                         Granite Court Apartments - 71 Units
The Granite Court Apartments, located in the City of Irvine, consists of 71 units designated for families earning at or
below 60% AMI. The County provided $1,800,000 in HOME funds and $715,200 in OCDA funds to the
development. The development is fully leased. County HOME funds were drawn down August 2008 and County
                                     th
OCDA funds were drawn down in the 4 quarter of 2009.




  Table 13: FY 2005-2010 Affordable Housing Developments Completed
                                                  County      Total
                                                 Restricted Restricted                Amount     Funding
  IDIS     Development                 Type        Units      Units      Location County Funded Source
  1348    AbilityFirst             Special Needs     11         24         Irvine   $    341,000 HOME
  1351    Casa Alegre              Special Needs     22         23       Anaheim    $    345,000 HOME
          Diamond Aisle            Special Needs     24         25       Anaheim    $  1,029,600 MHSA
  1781   Dorado                       Senior        114        150      Buena Park $   1,000,000 HOME
                                                                                    $    200,000 OCDA
  1781   Granite Court                Family         35         71         Irvine   $  1,257,000 HOME
                                                                                    $  1,258,200 OCDA
  1260   Linbrook Court               Senior         80         81       Anaheim    $    800,768 HOME
  1507   Montecito Vista              Family         79        162         Irvine   $  1,390,000 HOME
                                                                                    $  1,761,895 OCDA
  1259   Solara Court                 Senior        132        132       Anaheim    $    802,485 HOME
  1343   Sterling Court               Senior         33         34       Anaheim    $    300,537 HOME
         Stratford Court & Windsor Family/Senior     85         86     Westminster $     375,600 OCDA
         Cornerstone                  Family         48         49       Anaheim    $  1,167,186 OCDA
                                                                                    $  1,289,700 HOME
  1261   Talega I                     Family        124        124     San Clemente $    500,000 HOME
                                                                       San Clemente $  2,423,384 OCDA
         Talega II                    Family         62         62     San Clemente $    728,176 OCDA

  1258   Vintage Shores                   Family          11         122     San Clemente $           472,578    HOME
         Windrow                          Family          47          96         Irvine   $         1,708,015    OCDA
  1579   Woodbury                         Family          73         150         Irvine   $         2,100,000    HOME
                                                                                         $            218,070     OCDA



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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE

2. Projects Currently Underway Need Updates

The following is a listing of affordable housing developments that are still underway, at various stages of
development. The OC Community Services Department has committed funding towards these developments.

                                  Stonegate Apartment Homes I - IDIS 1696

Payne Development, LLC, (Developer), responded to the County’s 2008-B Multi-Family Affordable Rental
Housing Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) with a funding application for a thirty-eight (38) unit affordable
rental housing development, Stonegate Apartment Homes.

Stonegate Apartment Homes is a proposed 38-unit affordable housing development located in unincorporated
Orange County, adjacent to the City of Stanton, for families whose incomes are at or below 60% of the Area
Median Income. The proposed project will be new construction and will address the housing priorities identified
in the County’s Consolidated Plan by providing deed restricted permanent affordable housing for families at very-
low, and low-income levels for 55 years. Under the proposed permanent financing structure, the County will
leverage HOME funds with over $2 million in conventional financing and over $7 million in tax credit equity.

Payne Development received a letter of interest for the permanent financing for the proposed project and has
obtained all required discretionary approvals (entitlements) to develop the proposed project on the site. Payne
Development also applied for, but did not secure, a reservation of tax credits for the proposed project in 2009.

In order to maintain site control and to preserve the opportunity to develop the proposed project, the County
provided $2,029,500 in HOME funds to Payne Development to acquire the site.

Payne Development also applied for, but again did not secure, a reservation of tax credits in 2010. Since the
proposed project has yet to receive a reservation of tax credits, Payne Development will be applying for tax
credits in future rounds. Payne Development is also working on alternate financing strategies for the proposed
project.

                                 Stonegate Apartment Homes II – IDIS 1643

Payne Development, LLC, (Developer), responded to the County’s 2008-B Multi-Family Affordable Rental
Housing Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) with a funding application for a twenty-six (26) unit affordable
rental housing development, Stonegate Apartment Homes II.
Stonegate Apartment Homes II is a proposed 26-unit affordable housing development located in unincorporated
Orange County, adjacent to the City of Stanton, for families whose incomes are at or below 60% of the Area
Median Income. The proposed project will be new construction and will address the housing priorities identified
in the County’s Consolidated Plan by providing deed restricted permanent affordable housing for families at very-
low, and low-income levels for 55 years. Under the proposed permanent financing structure, the County will
leverage HOME funds with over $1.5 million in conventional financing and over $5 million in tax credit equity.

Payne Development has received a letter of interest for the permanent financing for the proposed project and
has obtained all required discretionary approvals (entitlements) to develop the proposed project on the site.
Payne Development also applied for, but did not secure, a reservation of tax credits for the proposed project in
2009.

In order to maintain site control and to preserve the opportunity to develop the proposed project, the County
provided $1,440,000 in HOME funds to Payne Development to acquire the site.

Payne Development also applied for, but again did not secure, a reservation of tax credits in 2010 for the
proposed project. Since the proposed project has yet to receive a reservation of tax credits, Payne Development
will be applying for tax credits in future rounds. Payne Development is also working on alternate financing
strategies for the proposed project.




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                                           COUNTY OF ORANGE

                                        Habitat for Humanity - IDIS 1310

 This activity is being closed out and funds will be reprogrammed to a new Habitat project, Habitat for Humanity
 Cypress. HOME funds along with other funds will be used to acquire a site in the City of Cypress for the
 development of 15 single-family dwelling units. Habitat will be selling the 15 single-family dwellings to low-
 income households. County funds will be drawn down at the close of the acquisition of the proposed project
 site. Habitat anticipates closing the land acquisition in December 2010 or January 2011.




              Table 14: Affordable Housing Developments Currently Underway
                                        County     Total
                                       Restricte Restricted                Amount County
      Development           Type        d Units    Units      Location        Funded              Funding Source
       Stonegate I          Family        38        38      Unincorporated   $ 2,029,500              HOME
                                                                                $       891,900        OCDA
       Stonegate II         Family         26         26      Unincorporated    $     1,440,000        HOME
                                                                                 $     565,200         OCDA
                          Family/MHS
     Stonegate Irvine          A           66        134           Irvine       $     2,003,700        HOME
                                                                                $     1,000,000        MHSA
      Avenida Villas        Family         46         47      Unincorporated    $     2,174,400        HOME
                                                                                $     1,620,000        OCDA
       Tonner Hills         Family         93         94           Brea              $2,000,000        HOME
                                                                                     $2,000,000        OCDA
      Picadilly Way         Family         2          2          Anaheim               $153,000        CDBG


       Buena Vista           TBD           17         17      Unincorporated         $4,329,536    HOME/OCDA

     Harper’s Pointe
        Seniors             Senior         11         52        Costa Mesa            $742,500         HOME


  San Clemente Seniors      Senior         11         75      San Clemente           $1,652,400        HOME


                            Totals:       310        485                             $22,602,16


      C. Leveraging for Affordable Housing

The County has continued to aggressively leverage its funding partnerships with public, private and non-profit
groups.   A well-planned CoC for the homeless has already been created which is funded with SuperNOFA,
Emergency Shelter Grants, and State EFSP and EHAP funds. The County can also leverage HUD Section 202 and
811 funds in conjunction with non-profit sponsors to expand the supply of housing for the senior and special needs
populations.

OC Community Services funded projects are highly successful at leveraging other financing sources, as OC
Community Services loan commitments are usually the first source of funding committed to a development. In rare
cases, OC Community Services may commit funding to a development, which is later not needed. While OC
Community Services does not count these units when reporting accomplishments, these projects may not have


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                                              COUNTY OF ORANGE

   secured all the required financing without the initial support of OC Community Services. The following is a brief
   description of how the various funds available to the County were used for leveraging:

     Local Funds
         OCDA used as leverage and match towards HOME Program and New Housing Program.
         Housing Authority Operating Reserve Funds used to match and leverage HOME funds.
         Housing Support Services funds used in leveraging public services.

     Federal Funds
         HOME used as leverage in new housing activities.
         SHP used in leveraging the acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction of new affordable housing
            units; also used in providing supportive services (federal regulations require matching funds for each
            project).

   The County has committed over $53 million to affordable housing developments in FY 2005-10. The types of funds
   committed to affordable housing developments include HOME Program funds, OCDA Housing Set-Aside funds,
   15U Strategic Priority Affordable Housing funds, OCHA Operating reserve funds, and Mental Health Services Act
   One-Time funds. Under the Affordable Rental Housing NOFA, OC Community Services has financed projects since
   FY 1999-2004 to leverage over $504 million in financing awards from local, state, federal governments, as well as
   conventional sources. Specifically, these sources include Federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, tax-exempt
   bonds, and conventional loans. See Affordable Housing Leveraging Table 15 below.



     Table 15: FY 2010-14 Affordable Housing Leveraging Table
                                          OCCS         Amount          %      Total Restricted Funding
     Projects             HUD Funds Subsidy/Unit     Leveraged     Leveraging Units   Units    Source
     AbilityFirst       $      341,000 $    31,000 $     5,310,598      6.42% 24        11      HOME
     Casa de Esperanza $       350,000 $    87,500 $     2,239,961    15.63% 10          4      HOME
     Dorado             $    1,000,000 $    90,909 $    28,334,356      3.53% 150       11      HOME
     Escalones Nuevos $        389,321 $    64,887 $     2,180,905    17.85%   6         6      CDBG
     Granite Court      $    1,257,000 $   114,273 $    30,807,043      4.08% 71        11      HOME
     Montecito Vista    $    1,390,000 $   126,364 $    23,422,114      5.93% 162       11      HOME
     Solara Court       $      802,485 $     6,079 $    15,632,760      5.13% 132      132      HOME
     Sterling Court     $      300,537 $     9,107 $     5,624,662      5.34% 34        33      HOME
     Summercrest        $    1,289,700 $   117,245 $    14,991,215      8.60% 49        11      HOME
     Talega I           $      500,000 $    45,455 $    19,237,425      2.60% 124       11      HOME
     Tonner Hills       $    2,000,000 $   181,818 $    24,688,254      8.10% 94        11      HOME
     Woodbury           $    2,100,000 $   190,909 $    31,361,512      6.70% 150       11      HOME
     Stonegate I        $    2,029,500 $   184,500 $    13,376,773    15.17% 38         11      HOME
     Stonegate II       $    1,440,000 $   130,909 $     9,124,914    15.78% 26         11      HOME
     Stonegate Irvine   $    2,003,700 $    35,780 $    37,075,872      5.40% 134       56      HOME
     Avenida Villas     $    2,174,400 $   197,673 $    16,876,647    12.88% 47         11      HOME
     San Clemente       $    1,652,400 $   150,218 $    23,525,916      7.02% 75        11      HOME
     Harper’s Pointe    $      742,500 $    67,500 $    15,285,133      4.86% 52        11      HOME
                         $   21,762,543 $ 1,832,127 $      319,096,060       8.39% 1378         374

Economic Development

In the area of economic development, the County has leveraged opportunities by supporting funding for Community
Based Development Organizations, cities, and other groups to provide training and employment opportunities. To
address this issue, the County partnered with the Orange County Business Council (OCBC) to prepare the Orange

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                                               COUNTY OF ORANGE

County Economic Development Assessment. In September 1999, the final strategic assessment was prepared. In this
document, specific recommendations and strategic initiatives were presented that aim to meet the goals of the County
and the needs of the County economy as a whole. Key strategic initiatives, which are applicable to the 2005/10 CP,
include:

            Support incubators that meet the needs of the regional economy.
            Target at least one existing or new affordable housing program to sectors where there is a critical
              lack of employees.

            Target the County’s economic development program, code enforcement and CDBG activities to
              pockets of poverty and neglect in the County.

            OCWIB’s Business Services Centers provided business services to over 5,000 Orange County
             companies. The Centers assisted over 500 businesses with screening applicants for open
             position, helped over 12,500 job seekers find new employment and hosted 149 job fairs.

     Homeownership Programs

     The County administers a variety of homeownership programs to low and moderate-income households using a
     variety of funding sources. Examples of County homeownership programs and resources made available to the
     public include:

            Mortgage Assistance Program (MAP) provides a silent second mortgage loan in the amount of $40,000
             for qualified first time homebuyers at or below 80% of the AMI using various funding sources including
             Community Development Block Grant, HOME Investment Partnership Program, American Dream Down-
             payment Assistance (ADDI), Orange County Redevelopment and State CalHOME funds.

            Mortgage Credit Certificate (MCC) Program enables homebuyers to take a credit in the amount of
             federal income tax owed each year for the life of the mortgage.

            Mortgage Revenue Bonds (MRB) Program, provides 30-year mortgages at below-market interest rates
             to qualified first time homebuyers.

     In addition to the above, OC Community Services is currently working to build an affordable homeownership
     development on county-owned land in the City of Anaheim (previously in County unincorporated area prior to
     annexation). The purpose of the proposed project is to provide affordable ownership housing to individuals or
     families whose income is at or below 80% of Area Median Income (AMI).

     The Orange County BOS has approved the Disposition and Development Agreement (DDA) for the sale of the
     property to the developer. The County has transferred the land to the developer and the developer is in the
     process of closing the construction financing. Construction, marketing and sale of the homes are anticipated to
     be done in fiscal year 2009-10.

     OC Community Services administers a Mortgage Assistance Program (MAP), which provides a silent second
     mortgage up to $40,000 for households earning 80% or below Area Median Income (AMI). OC Community
     Services utilized HOME and American Dream Down payment Initiative (ADDI) funds for the MAP program. In
     fiscal year 2009-10, OCCS funded 7 MAP loans totaling $280,000 ($181,780 in HOME funds and $98,220 in
     ADDI funds).

     In addition, the County of Orange anticipates using ADDI funds in conjunction with HOME funds for the next 5 to
     6 first-time homeownership MAP loans.

     Recapture Restrictions

     The County administers a Housing Rehabilitation Homeownership and Mortgage Assistance Program utilizing
     HOME and CDBG funds, whereby the County makes grants and loans available to income-qualified applicants.

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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE


 As a condition of receiving HOME and CDBG grant or loan funds, the County requires the applicant to enter into
 a covenant agreement that is recorded against the property and runs with the land. The agreement contains a
 recapture restriction stipulating that during the affordability period if the unit is sold, the grant or loan must be
 paid in full.

 Additionally, should a default occur during the affordability period, the County reserves the right to purchase the
 property at the restricted sales price, less the amount of assistance originally provided by the County plus
 interest. The restricted sales price is calculated using a formula that takes into account the purchase price, the
 change in consumer price index, and improvements made to the property.

 Section 215 Affordable Housing

  In FY 2010-11 a total of 34 households (22 rental and 12 homeownership) were assisted with housing that meets
the
   Section 215 definition of affordable housing for rental and home ownership

 VI. FY 2010-11 Orange County Development Agency (OCDA)

 Initially the Orange County Development Agency (OCDA) estimated expending $2,003,439 for high priority
 housing and community development projects for FY 2010-11. However, the OCDA Board of Directors authorized
 the expenditure of $8,077,080 for community development projects that included the undergrounding of utility
 lines, improvements to sewer systems, funding for an Animal Control Facility, an engineering assessment, and a
 land use study of Midway City.

 Under California Community Redevelopment Law (CRL), redevelopment agencies must incur debt in order to
 receive and use Tax Increment funds. The Tax Increment funds collected, over the life of a redevelopment plan,
 are then used to make pass-through payments to other taxing entities, pay debt service (bonds), and otherwise
 fund projects benefiting the redevelopment project area(s). However, legislation passed in 2001 limits the ability
 of redevelopment agencies to incur debt and use Tax Increment funds 20-years after the adoption of their
 respective Redevelopment Plan. For the Neighborhood Development and Preservation Project (NDAPP), the 20-
 year deadline was June 28, 2008.

 Recent changes to CRL, known as SB 211, allow for the removal of the 20-year deadline for Redevelopment
 Plans adopted prior to January 1, 2004. In order to remove the deadline, the Board of Supervisors (the Board)
 must adopt an ―SB 211 Ordinance" repealing the previous time limit and deleting it from the previous
 Redevelopment Plan.

 In June of 2009, the Board amended the Redevelopment Plan for the Neighborhood Development and
 Preservation Project (NDAPP). In doing so, the Board has authorized OCDA to utilized tax increment funds for
 infrastructure, community improvements, affordable housing, regional projects, public safety, planning, and code
 enforcement activities benefiting the Project Area.




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                                             COUNTY OF ORANGE


VII. SELF EVALUATION

The County’s activities and accomplishments during this 12-month reporting period once again demonstrate our
continued commitment to meeting the goals set forth in the 2010-14 CP. Among the County’s many goals, the
County BOS placed providing affordable housing units to the County’s very low and low-income population,
opportunities to obtain homeownership, and creating affordable rental housing within the County’s top strategic
priorities. The County is committed to the goal of improving the lives of its low and moderate-income residents
through the provision of decent housing and a suitable living environment, and encourages strategic planning and
the development of a long-term vision to meet these goals.

The County has a well-established and successful Rental Assistance Program that utilizes Section 8 Housing
Choice Vouchers to assist renters to meet their monthly rental obligations. During this reporting period, the
County had Annual Contribution Contracts (ACC) to continue assisting 9,613 very low and low-income
households. This program meets our primary goals in two ways. Besides addressing the cost burden issue, it
also serves to assist in maintaining the current level of available affordable housing stock. Approximately 47% of
assisted households were elderly, 22% were disabled, and the remainder are very low or low-income families and
single persons. Almost all assisted households resided in OCHA’s jurisdiction, encompassing 31 cities and the
unincorporated areas within Orange County. Over 564 assisted households used their Vouchers to receive
assistance in a neighboring Housing Authority’s city under an Orange County Mobility Agreement. During 2010,
ten FSS participants graduated with an average escrow balance of $10,534 to start their own business, purchase a vehicle, or
make a down payment on a home. As of December 2010, there were 260 active FSS participants.

Complimenting OCHA’s ability to provide affordable rental assistance, OC Community Services has aggressively
leveraged local, federal, and state funds; increased the number of potential developers; and updated the
affordable housing list of rental units. OCHA was selected to administer DVP within Orange County and currently
assists two displaced families who elected to move to the Orange County area. HUD projected that there is
sufficient DVP funding remaining to continue DVP assistance for current participants through at least December
31, 2010. OCHA identified four DHAP families that were eligible to convert their DHAP vouchers to the HCVP,
effective March 1, 2009.

Previous Affordable Rental Housing NOFA’s from FY 2005 to 2009 resulted in OC Community Services
committing HOME Program and OCDA funds to construct new affordable rental housing developments that will
create one, two, and three bedroom units for low-income families. Those projects are still in varying phases of
development. Our involvement in the provision of new housing provides the County with an opportunity to
address specific needs relative to the type and size of units to set aside for long-term restrictions. In addition to
committing almost half of the County’s HOME funds for affordable housing development activities, over the past
nine years, OCHA has contributed millions in operating reserves towards the development of 325 units of
affordable rental housing. Due to the long-range nature of these new housing developments, these projects have
the potential to produce additional affordable rental units for many years.

During the program year, the County also demonstrated an excellent effort in meeting its goals to reach and
assist the homeless sector of the population. Utilizing all available funding resources, the County was able to
provide temporary and permanent housing to homeless households, as well as provide a variety of supportive
services. Persons with special needs, including, but not limited to, elderly, persons who are mentally,
developmentally and physically disabled, persons with chemical dependence, whether homeless or non-
homeless, were also assisted with housing and/or supportive services. The Orange County region was
successfully awarded $15,237,296 during the nationwide 2010 SuperNOFA competition. In addition, the County’s
Armory Emergency Shelter program received $301,623 in County CDBG funds; $24,000 in ESG funds from the
City of Santa Ana, and $165,631 ESG Orange County funds, $127,295 in 15U Housing funds, and $25,000 in
CDBG State funds. The shelter assisted 1,391 unduplicated homeless individuals and families (equals 25,509
shelter bed nights). The County also approved a draft Ten-Year Plan to End Homelessness.

Also during the reporting period, the County’s CDBG housing rehabilitation programs were successful in assisting
504 units this year. Housing rehabilitation is an excellent opportunity to preserve and maintain affordable housing
stock and improve and upgrade communities.


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                                         COUNTY OF ORANGE

OC Community Services annually hosts workshops, seminars and conferences to assist groups and individuals in
better understanding the programs and services available through the OC Community Services. (Examples
include, but are not limited to, OCHA briefings; NOFAs for housing development, homeless grants and other
funds for community development improvements.) Staff also uses these workshops as an opportunity to instruct
potential participants on how to apply for funds and to explain what performance milestones will be used by staff
in monitoring accomplishments relative to allocated funds.

Accountability & Performance

With a change in the term of funding commitments to a multiple year format, the RFP Application Review Process
places an even greater emphasis on accountability and performance. The Year 2 Grant Application required that
all proposals be accompanied by a summary of the project’s past performance in terms of drawing down funds
and meeting its proposed accomplishments. For years 2 and 3, funding is predicated on each applicant
demonstrating to the County that the development or progress of their proposal clearly shows that first and
second year funds have been disbursed or committed and that anticipated levels of performance have been met.
This approach is consistent with the BoS approved Multi-Year Grant Program policies and emphasizes
accountability and performance.

The need to determine progress and evaluate performance is amplified by the HUD policy relating to timely
expenditure of CDBG funds. Under the policy, HUD will reduce future grant amounts by a certain percentage if
the County’s line-of-credit exceeds 1.5 times its annual grant allocation. The County is required to be below the
1.5 ratio level by April 30 of each program year. During FY 2010-11, the County exceeded the required 1.5%
ratio with an expenditure ratio of 1.13% ratio before the deadline.




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                                            COUNTY OF ORANGE


VIII. Supplemental Organizational Profiles

 The activities detailed below are funded primarily with non-HUD-related federal funds, State funds and local
 funds. However, the benefits derived from these activities are significant and do often fill the gaps that cannot be
 addressed through the Community Development Block Grant, HOME Investment Partnership nor the Emergency
 Shelter Grant Programs. It is the intent of this component of the CAPER to make available to parties normally
 focused on HUD-funded activities, information and additional sources of other forms of assistance that can have
 positive effects on their quality of life.

 A.      Office on Aging Division (OoA)

      1. Purpose

 The Office on Aging carries out the mandates of the Older Americans Act and the Older Californians Act by
 serving as the primary advocate for older adults in the County. This is accomplished through developing area
 plans for services, administering service contracts, providing staff support to the Senior Citizens Advisory Council,
 developing a continuum of community-based long term care services, publicizing and disseminating information
 on available resources, identifying service gaps and barriers, and providing limited direct services. The Office on
 Aging is the State-designated Area Agency on Aging for Orange County.

 The Office on Aging is primarily federal and state grant funded, but also receives County General Funds to
 augment grants to the contractors providing critical services to the County’s older adults and their caregivers.

 Primary Funding Sources (FY 2010-11):             State - $1,086,255
                                                   Federal - $10,218,015
                                                   County General Fund - $974,812
                                                   Tobacco Settlement Revenue - $2,182,834


                    In view of the growing and increasingly diverse population of older adults, the following
                    issues are of the most pressing concern to the Office on Aging:

                    ·   Access to information and services for older adults, their families, and caregivers
                    ·   Nutrition services for older adults
                    ·   Transportation for older adults
                    ·   Health care for older adults
                    ·   Accessible and affordable housing for older adults
                    ·   Awareness among policy makers and within the community concerning the rapid growth of
                         the older adult population and the need for more services

      2. ACCOMPLISHMENTS

 The Office on Aging administered contracts to provide the following Older Americans Act and Older Californians
 Act services in FY 2010-11:

         Adult Day Care –                       92,964 hours of service
         Case management –              13,942 hours
         Community Services –           139,258 units of service
         Elder abuse prevention –               725 hours of activities supporting prevention
         Elderly Nutrition Program –    448,196 congregate, 1,348,400 home-delivered meals
         Family Caregiver Support Program:
                 Information Services   61 Activities, estimated audience of 69,757
                 Access Assistance      6,100 contacts
                 Support Services       1,888 hours
                 Respite (Total)        10,983 hours

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                                          COUNTY OF ORANGE

                Supplemental Services            398 occurrences
        Health Insurance Counseling & Advocacy Program (HICAP) – 4,706 persons counseled
        In-home services:
                2,086 hours personal care
                9,207 hours homemaker
                599 hours chore
        Legal Assistance –      8,895 hours
        Linkages –              205 clients received case management services
        Medication Management – 4,406 individual health assessments and education, referral, follow-up
        services to seniors.
        Ombudsman – 983 cases closed
        Senior Mobility Program Transportation –        156,635 one-way trips
        Senior Non-Emergency Medical Transportation –            57,197 one-way trips
        Information and Assistance Call Center (Direct Service) – 40,245 call activities

The activities detailed below are funded primarily with non-HUD-related federal funds, State funds and local
funds. However, the benefits derived from these activities are significant and do often fill the gaps that cannot be
addressed through the Community Development Block Grant, HOME Investment Partnership nor the Emergency
Shelter Grant Programs. It is the intent of this component of the CAPER to make available to parties normally
focused on HUD-funded activities, information and additional sources of other forms of assistance that can have
positive effects on their quality of life.

   B. Community Investment Division:

        1. Purpose

        The Community Investment Division (CID) manages a wide array of programs such as: employment and
        training, workforce development, economic development, dispute resolution, domestic violence and
        specialized grant-funded programs.
             The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) represents the nation’s commitment to create a workforce
             investment system that responds to the needs of employers, job seekers and students. Its purpose is to
             consolidate and streamline numerous federal employment programs and provide states and localities
             with more discretion to design workforce development strategies that meet local labor market needs.
             Key objectives of this workforce development system are to increase employment, retention, earnings
             and occupational skill attainment of job seekers and to improve the productivity and competitiveness of
             national, state and local economies. WIA officially establishes the One-Stop System as the unified
             service delivery method for this consolidation of numerous employment and training programs.

        One-Stop Career Centers are the foundation of the workforce investment system. They provide skills
        assessment, education and training, employment assistance, and unemployment services in an integrated
        environment for adults, veterans, dislocated workers, and youth. In addition to assistance for job seekers,
        One-Stop Career Centers also provide services for business. Business services respond to the needs of
        Orange County employers by providing job matching with skilled job seekers, recruitment screenings, and, if
        necessary, assistance with reductions in staff. All the services at the One-Stop Career Centers are provided
        at no cost to the job seeker and the local businesses. The federally funded One-Stop Career Centers
        contribute positively to the Orange County economy, in particular during an economic downturn.

        The Orange County Workforce Investment Board (OCWIB) facilitates and coordinates workforce and
        economic development programs and provides oversight to the employment and training programs
        associated with the WIA funded One Stop Career Centers. The OCWIB is composed of representatives from
        business, education, and public/non-profit organizations. The OCWIB has also been designated as the
        Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) Committee for the County of Orange.

        Funding for FY 2010-11:          Federal and Other sources, grants, etc. – $22,613,993


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                                         COUNTY OF ORANGE


       2. Accomplishments

       The Community Investment Division achieved many accomplishments this past year. They are
       categorized as: Workforce Development & Community Services, New Resources, Innovations, Business
       Services, and Economic Development.


Workforce Development and Community Services

      The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was signed by President Obama on February 17,
       2009, and is intended to preserve and create jobs, promote the nation’s economic recovery, and assist
       those most impacted by the recession, including disconnected youth. Orange County received over $13
       million in funds to provide WIA employment and training services for Adult, Dislocated Workers, and
       Youth ages 16-24, including a Summer Youth Employment Program. A majority of the funding was used
       in fiscal year 2009/10. The remaining dollars will be used in fiscal year 2010/11 for short-term classroom
       and work-based training (on-the-job training) programs in high-demand occupations, including healthcare
       and ―green‖ jobs, and a summer youth employment program.

      Young Offender Planning Grant was awarded in 2009 to develop a comprehensive "blueprint" for re-
       entry strategies targeted at youth and young adult offenders, ages 14 - 24 returning to the community.
       Two key activities are at the center of this project:1) the development of a communitywide re-entry team,
       and 2) the development of a blueprint that will lead organizations in Orange County in a positive direction
       when effectively serving youth returning to local communities.

New Resources

      Veterans Employment Assistance Program (VEAP) – OCWIB was awarded $989,983 from the State
       of California to assist transitioning veterans to high-wage high-growth green occupations using their skill
       sets obtained in the military. This is OCWIB’s fourth grant award received for working with veterans, and
       was a regional application submitted with Pacific Gateway Workforce Investment Network.

      Community Trade Adjustment Assistance Program Co-Application with The East Los Angeles
       Community Union (TELACU) – OCWIB was awarded $500,000 from the US Economic Development
       Administration. Orange County is eligible for this unique funding because it is designated as a community
       that has experienced, or is threatened by job loss resulting from international trade impacts. The project
       grants will be aimed at helping to create and retain jobs.

      California Gang Reduction Intervention and Prevention (CalGRIP) Initiative – OCWIB was awarded
       nearly $490,230 from the State of California to implement intervention and prevention strategies,
       including job training, supportive services, education and placement for youth ages 14 to 24 that are
       either at risk of gang involvement, gang involved or a current gang member in Orange County.

      TANF/ ECF for Summer Youth Program – OCWIB was awarded $650,000 from the State of California
       to service up to 300 youth ages 17-24 in our community ($150,000 was subcontracted to the City of
       Santa Ana). This program will be referral based, and priority of services will be for youth who are foster,
       emancipated, veterans or children of veterans, from domestic violence shelters and/or homeless. OCWIB
       will also be providing necessary supportive services, conducting assessment and service planning,
       providing and overseeing work experience, and follow-up services to these youth.

      Community Action Partnership for Summer Youth Program – OCWIB was awarded $200,000 from
       the Community Action Partnership of Orange County to service up to 118 youth ages 17-24 in our
       community. This program will be referral based, and priority of services will be for youth who are foster,
       emancipated, veterans or children of veterans, from domestic violence shelters and/or homeless. OCWIB
       will also be providing necessary supportive services, conducting assessment and service planning,
       providing and overseeing work experience, and follow-up services to these youth.

OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                Page 60
                                        COUNTY OF ORANGE


Innovations

      18+ Program – California received a waiver to extend the 2009 Summer Youth program for Out-of-
       School Youth (18 and older) through March 31, 2010 for work experience and work readiness training.
       The total enrolled for the 18+ program was 118.

      OCWIB released the WIA Youth Request for Proposals (RFP) - On December 17, 2009, the WIA
       Youth Employment Program Request for Proposal (RFP) was released. The RFP solicited proposals that
       address employment, training needs and skill deficiencies of economically disadvantaged ISY and OSY
       ages 16 to 21 in the County, with the exception of the cities of Santa Ana and Anaheim. The following
       providers were approved for funding and contracts have been executed for PY 2010-11: Orange County
       Asian and Pacific Islander Community Alliance (OCAPICA), Orange County Conservation Corps, City of
       La Habra, and Irvine Unified School District.

      OCWIB, under partnership with the Orange County Business Council, conducted a series of forums
       addressing the workforce trends and challenges in the Healthcare, Energy & Environment, Creativity,
       Information Technology, and Biotechnology industries.

      Creativity Overlay & Cluster - On March 15, 2010 the OCWIB participated in The Creative Edge:
       Innovation, Education, and the Changing World of Work, a presentation by Daniel Pink, the author of A
       Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future charts the rise of right-brain thinking in modern
       economies and describes the six abilities individuals and organizations must master in an outsourced,
       automated age, and of Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, which uses 40 years of
       behavioral science to overturn the conventional wisdom about human motivation and offer a more
       effective path to high performance. After the presentation, the OCWIB supported a breakout session
       titled Put the SteAm into STEM- Science, Technology, Engineering, ARTS and Math.

Business Services

      OCWIB Business Services worked with 6,117 Orange County companies to provide assistance on
       recruitment, hiring, and employee training; outplacement of separating employees; made referrals to
       business resources, incentives, and other public assistance programs such as the Trade Adjustment Act;
       and helped companies comply with labor laws and regulations. The Business Service Centers helped
       connect 2,985 job seekers with new employers and hosted 11 job fairs with 157 participating
       employers and 7,900 job seekers.

      OCWIB's Business Services provide much-needed resources for downsizing and distressed businesses
       in this economic downturn by providing and outreaching to Rapid Response Services and Seminars,
       assisting over 80 downsizing companies and nearly 7,400 laid-off workers throughout the year.

      OCWIB recently completed a series of business service with partners California Manufacturing
       Technology Consulting (CMTC), Coastline Community College, and the Irvine Chamber of Commerce,
       resulting in 450 jobs created or retained, and generating $4,281,000 in economic impact.

      OCWIB has continued the drive towards leading the region in Green resources; provided LEED training
       for building designers, builders, and owner/operators, and developed a series of green resource guides
       for best practices in both industry and government.

  Economic Development

      OCWIB continues to act as the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS)
       committee for Orange County. The Orange County 2008/13 CEDS was approved by EDA on September
       19, 2008. The strategy provides analyses of our challenges, and presents our assets to respond properly
       to the future, and provides strategies for distressed communities in Orange County to diminish chronic
       economic issues and engender long-term community economic health.

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                                              COUNTY OF ORANGE

            When needed, the OCWIB reviews Orange County projects that wish to compete for the U.S. Department
            of Commerce's EDA grant funds and acts as a facilitator and technical resource for project proponents.
            The OCWIB helps promising economic development projects become more competitive. Since 1997,
            projects from Orange County have successfully competed for over of $18 million in economic
            development grant funds.

           Orange County 2009-2010 State of the Workforce Indicators Report: Orange County has come to
            expect the prosperity that follows with a strong business community and sustained economic growth, but
            it is essential to focus on the tools that drive growth for this journey. The 2009-10 Workforce Indicators
            Report, a partnership between OCWIB and Orange County Business Council, provides a roadmap for the
            journey – it shows us where we have been and where we need to go.

           Economic Indicators customized to Orange County is now available on www.oceconomy.org, where
            visitors can look up indicators in demographics, employment, housing, transportation, and social services.
            Indicators are updated monthly.


C. Veterans Service Office (VSO)

 1.     Purpose

             The Veterans Service Office (VSO) provides regional advocacy services and assistance to OC Veterans,
            their survivors and dependents, focusing on the Federal Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) disability
            benefits and survivor’s benefits. The Office also provides assistance with State of California Veterans
            Benefits, in addition to being involved in the OC Veteran community through our association with the OC
            Veterans Advisory Council. This program’s continued funding from the County’s General Fund represents
            the BOS’s commitment to the Veteran community.

        The estimated Veteran population in Orange County is:

        Age Group           Population

        17 – 44             21,710
        45 – 64             55,019
        65 – 84             58,139
        85+___            ___ 9,221
        Total              144,089

        One of the prerequisites for a person to be considered a Veteran is to have served in the active military,
        naval, or air service. While National Guard and Reserve duty is not considered active service, they normally
        would not be considered a Veteran for Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits.

        However, the war in Iraq and Afghanistan has resulted in many National Guard and Reserve members being
        ordered to active duty and this will earn them Veteran status for VA purposes. Therefore, the current Veteran
        population may increase in the 17 – 44 age group.

            The typical Veterans Service Office client has been a wartime service Veteran with a service-
            connected disability. Dependents of these Veterans are often eligible for a tuition and fee waiver
            at any California Community College, Cal State, or University. Therefore, our clientele runs the full
            adult age range.

        Primary Funding Source FY 09-10:       State - $155,000 +/-
                                               Local General Fund - $1,349,909

        2. Accomplishments



      OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                              Page 62
                                        COUNTY OF ORANGE

  Many of the tasks performed in the VSO for the Veteran community cannot be benchmarked, measured or
  quantified. Our work involves sensitive and complex issues that are often very personal in nature. We are fact
  finders and problem solvers and endeavor to be alert, sensitive and compassionate to the needs and
  concerns of our clients. Some of VSO accomplishments include:

                                FY 09-10 Client Services
                  Office Visits/Clients                                  6,261
                  Incoming Phone Calls                                   19,315
                  Claims (Auditable for Revenue Purposes)                3,962
                  Claims (Auditable & Non-Auditable)                     14,644
                  California Dependent College Fee Waivers               751

              FY 09-10 Awards Obtained and Reported to the State
  Number of Veterans who received new, increased, or one time lump sum 953
  benefits
  Retroactive Amount of Benefits Paid                                  $4,025,813
  Monthly Amount of Benefit Payments                                   $553,233
  Annualized Value of Monthly Benefit Payments                         $6,638,796
  One Time/Lump Sum Benefits Paid                                      $185,406
  California Dependent College Fee Waiver Value/Savings for the $2,818,601
  Student/Veteran

  In order to meet the growing demand for services, the VSO has implemented the following strategies:

         Maintain current levels of client services and claim activity.
         Continue to coordinate with SSA and PA/PG, to ensure Veterans receive benefits due them;
         Veterans Claims Officer will continue to attend state sanctioned training which provides continuing
          education units needed to maintain their federal VA accreditation.
         Expand outreach services and participate in community programs with the Orange County Veterans
          Advisory Council;
         Collaborate with and support the efforts of other divisions in OCCS.




OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                              Page 63
                                         COUNTY OF ORANGE

PUBLIC NOTICE/PUBLIC COMMENT


                                   PUBLIC NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY

                                                    DRAFT
                                   ORANGE COUNTY
               CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION REPORT
                               FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010-11


       Date: September 1, 2011

       TO ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS, AND PERSONS:

       The County of Orange, in compliance with Title I of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable
       Housing Act of 1990 and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) directive
       CPD-98-018 dated March 6, 1998, has prepared a draft Consolidated Annual Performance and
       Evaluation Report (CAPER) for Fiscal Year 2010-11. The purpose of this notice is to provide the public
       a 15-day review period, beginning September 1, 2009 and ending September 16, 2009, to express
       their concerns and comments regarding the CAPER. The County of Orange is required to submit the
       Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report for FY 2010-11 to HUD by September 29,
       2011.

                   The Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER)
       The Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report outlines the progress made in carrying
       out the goals and objectives set forth in the FY 2010-11 OC Consolidated Plan. It also provides an
       analysis of program expenditures, project accomplishments, subrecipient’s performance and an
       assessment of what changes to policy or strategy may be in order.

       The FY 2010-11 Action Plan identified the County of Orange’s overall needs for affordable and
       supportive housing for moderate-income, low-income, and very low-income families. It also included
       the needs of homeless individuals and families, and outlined a short-term strategy to address those
       needs.
                                                      Comments
       All interested agencies, groups, or individuals are invited to review the draft Consolidated Annual
       Performance and Evaluation Report for FY 2010-11 and submit written comments for consideration.
       Copies of the draft Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report are available for review
       at the OC Community Services office. Email request to: anna.plank@occr.ocgov.com. Reports are
       also available at Orange County Libraries, on the World Wide Web at: www.occservices.org and at
       three OC Community Centers in Midway City, Anaheim and El Modena. Comments postmarked on or
       before September 16, 2011 will be received at:

       OC Community Services
       Anna Plank, Manager
       1770 North Broadway
       Santa Ana, CA 92706

       The County of Orange will consider all written comments received by September 16,2011.

       Publish: September 1, 2011in the:

       Orange County Register, Miniondas, Vien Dong and Viet Bao




OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                                     Page 64
                               COUNTY OF ORANGE




               No comments were received during the 15-day Public Review.




OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                       Page 65
                                      COUNTY OF ORANGE



IX. Questionnaire of HUD’s Initiative on Removal of Regulatory Barriers (Attachment A)



                                          ATTACHMENT A




OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                                    Page 66
                                  COUNTY OF ORANGE


   Comparison of Consolidated Plan Goals and Projected/Actual County of Orange
   Accomplishments (Attachment B)


                                      ATTACHMENT B




OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                            Page 67
                                        COUNTY OF ORANGE



X. INTEGRATED DISBURSEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM (IDIS) REPORTS and HOME REPORTS

     A.   Financial Summary (PR26)
      -   Part I – CDBG Resources
      -   Part II – CDBG Expenditures
      -   Part III- Low/Mod Credit
      -   Part IV- Low/Mod Benefit for Multi-Year Certifications
      -   Part V – Public Services (PS) CAP Calculation

     B. Summary Of Accomplishments (PR23)

      C. CDBG Activity Summary Report (PR03)

     D. CDBG Performance Measures Report (PR83)

     E. ESG Program Financial Summary (PR12)
     F. ESG Summary of Activities (PR19)
     G. Summary of Consolidated Plan Projects for Report Year 2009-10 (PR06)

     H. Status of HOME Activities Report (PR22)

     I. HOME Match Report and HOME Annual Performance Report

     J. CDBG-R Report

     K. CDBG-R Activity Summary Report (PR03)




OC COMMUNITY SERVICES                                                          Page 68

				
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