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					   UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER AND HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER
                Decision Sciences Discipline The Business School




   PROPOSAL FOR A MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN DECISION SCIENCES

        Peter Bryant, Ph.D., Professor, Decision Sciences, Business School, UCDHSC Murray
        Cote, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, UCDHSC
        Fred Hampel, M.S. Instructor, Decision Sciences, Business School, UCDHSC
Michael Harper, Ph.D., Senior Instructor, Decision Sciences, Business School, UCDHSC Deborah
   Kellogg, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Decision Sciences, Business School, UCDHSC Gary
Kochenberger, Ph.D., Professor, Decision Sciences, Business School, UCDHSC Marlene Smith,
        Ph.D., Assoc. Professor, Decision Sciences Director, Business School, UCDHSC



                                          11/1/2007


Prepared for:
    University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center Chancellor's Office
    University of Colorado President's Office
    University of Colorado Board of Regents
    Colorado Commission on Higher Education

Desired Program Timeline:
    First Students Admitted: Fall 2008
    First Graduating Class: Summer 2010
   UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER AND HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER
                Decision Sciences Discipline The Business School




   PROPOSAL FOR A MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN DECISION SCIENCES


Executive Summary

The Business School at UCDHSC proposes the development of a Master's degree in Decision
Sciences, a discipline that uses statistical and mathematical principles to propose solutions to
business-related problems. The degree will require 30 credit hours (10 courses) to complete. One
of those 10 courses will be a Decision Sciences Practicum course in which students, under the
supervision of faculty, will apply Decision Sciences methods to a workplace problem posed by a
local Denver organization. We expect our adult, working students to complete the program in two
years while attending school part time. No other institution of higher education in Colorado offers
a Master's degree in Decision Sciences.

We anticipate seventeen students will be enrolled in the program by the fifth year; full
implementation size is estimated to be 28 students, a moderately-sized Master's degree program
for the Business School at UCDHSC. Recruitment of students for the program will focus on three
primary populations: those with undergraduate degrees in business, science, engineering, or
mathematics, MBA students in the Business School interested in a dual degree option, and
metropolitan Denver area working adult students.

Projected workplace demand for graduates of the program is expected to be strong, as evidenced
by recent job postings for Decision Sciences professionals in the metropolitan Denver area. The
proposed Decision Sciences Practicum course will provide direct links with the metropolitan
Denver business community, keeping us in touch with business community needs for Decision
Sciences professionals. The proposed degree program aligns very well with the Business School's
mission, with the UCDHSC role and mission, and with AACSB (the Association to Advance
Collegiate Schools of Business) accrediting requirements. Activities involving recruitment and
retention of under-represented students will be conducted in compliance with university, state,
and federal guidelines and regulations.

We anticipate that the program will deliver an immediate revenue surplus to the university. After
accounting for costs of the program, we estimate that the program will generate a surplus of over
$26,000 in the first year of the program and more than $116,000 by the fifth year. The program
will be fully funded by student tuition revenue. Because many of the required and elective courses
for the proposed degree are already being offered as required and elective courses for other
Business School programs, additional space requirements for the new program are minimal; we
estimate the need for two additional classrooms per year after the first year. These need not be
specially-dedicated classrooms-they may be any existing classrooms on the Auraria campus.




                                                 2
A.I. Program Description
The Decision Sciences faculty in the UCDHSC Business School proposes to develop a Master of
Science (M.S.) degree in Decision Sciences. Decision Sciences involves the application of
mathematical models to business decision-making. It uses the language and methods of statistics
and operations management. This degree is targeted toward individuals who wish to:

   . acquire a comprehensive understanding of decision sciences models and quantitative
         methods used to assist business decision-making, and
   .   acquire working knowledge of current modeling practices and software used in business
         decision-making.

The program is designed to ensure that students receive training in a wide range of business-
related quantitative methods. To achieve this goal, students will undergo training in the
foundations of Decision Sciences via six required courses. Students then choose four electives
depending on their professional interests and career paths. Electives include current topics in
business decision-making such as supply chain management, data mining, and quality and
process improvement.

As a distinctive feature of this program, we propose the adoption of a required Decision Sciences
Practicum course (which will be part of the 30-credit-hour requirements) in which faculty will
solicit real-world problems from local Denver metropolitan area institutions. Students, under the
supervision of faculty, will propose solutions to the problem and present their findings to the
sponsoring institution in written and oral form. Details of this course may be found in Appendix C
of this document. The proposed Practicum course will benefit UCDHSC by providing immediate
and direct linkages with local area businesses and government institutions, thereby raising the
visibility of the university in the metropolitan Denver area.

We propose a 30-credit hour, la-course degree program. We anticipate that our typical working
adult student pursuing an education part-time will complete the degree in two years.

The proposed degree will be among the most interdisciplinary Master's degrees in the Business
School; applications of Decision Sciences methods can be found in all aspects of business from
operations (simulation modeling) and marketing (data mining) to health administration (Six
SigmaSM and outcomes measurement) and finance (forecasting and risk analysis). Our discipline
has already established an interdisciplinary link between the Business School at the Downtown
Denver Campus and the Health Sciences Center by hiring a part-time faculty member from the
Health Sciences Center to teach Decision Sciences courses. The formal establishment of an M.S.
degree will help further our teaching and research linkages with Health Sciences.

The Business School at UCDHSC offers the largest AACSB-accredited M.S. degree programs in
business-related disciplines to metropolitan Denver area residents. With existing M.S. programs in
accounting, finance, information systems, health administration, international business, marketing,
and management, the Business School lacks an M.S. degree in Decision Sciences relative to others
around the world that offer the complete line of master's level business-related degree programs.
Implementation of the proposed degree would fill that gap.


                                                 3
A.2. Student Learning Goals

M.S. in Decision Sciences students will undergo rigorous training via six required courses
(including the Practicum) and four elective courses. Although each of these classes teaches a
specific Decision Sciences methodology or application, common themes run throughout the vast
majority of them: identifying the need for a Decision Sciences technique in an organizational
setting, using appropriate mathematical models and Decision Sciences software to prepare a
solution, and communicating the results and methods to stakeholders within the organization.
Decision Sciences courses will use real-world examples or business-oriented case studies
designed to demonstrate the applicability of decision sciences tools in workplace settings. For
many of these courses, a final product will be a student-designed project that involves collection
of data, analysis, problem solution, and written or oral presentation of the results.

All students will be required to complete a Decision Sciences capstone course, which we call the
Decision Sciences Practicum. For this course, students will apply Decision Sciences
methodologies to a real-life business problem proposed by a local Denver organization. Under the
supervision of faculty, students engage in problem definition, analysis, and solution. Results are to
be presented in oral and written form to the sponsoring organization. (Appendix C of this
document provides a detailed description of the Practicum course.) By engaging with faculty and
local area business professionals, students will leave the program with experience in real-world
problem-solving using state-of-the-art Decision Sciences techniques.

Thus, we anticipate that graduates of this program will have learned, and be able to do, the
following:

   1. recognize situations that would benefit from the application of Decision Sciences
       techniques,
   2. propose an appropriate Decision Sciences model or solution method,
   3. prepare solutions by using current modeling techniques and software, and
   4. communicate solution options in a technical and non-technical manner to others in the
       organization.

The Business School at UCDHSC is fully accredited by AACSB. The proposed program will
comply with outcomes assessment of student learning as required for AACSB accreditation.

B.l. Bona Fide Need

Table 1 below provides a summary of projected enrollments for the first five years of the
program and estimated enrollments at full implementation. (A detailed version of Table 1
including assumptions and methodologies may be found in Appendix A of this document. To
derive enrollment estimates, we benchmarked Virginia Commonwealth University's graduate
business program in Decision Sciences.) Although enrollments are expected to be low initially,
we anticipate long-term program size of about 28 students per academic year. The long-term
steady state number of students is similar in size to several of the other smaller M.S. degree
programs in the Business School, such as the M.S. Management, M.S. Marketing, and M.S.
Health Administration programs.



                                                 4
Table 1: Enroll        t Proiect"
                   --- - --     - - ---


                                2008-09   2009-10    2010-11      2011-12     2012-13        Full
                                                                                          Implemen-
                                  AYI      AY2         AY3          AY4         AY5         tation
In-state headcount                 5         9          12           15          16           25
Out-of-state headcount             0        1           1            1           1             3
Program headcount                  5        10          13           16          17           28
In-state FTE                      2.5      4.5           6          7.5           8          12.5
Out-of-state FTE                   0       0.5         0.5          0.5         0.5           1.5
Proram FTE                        2.5        5         6.5            8         8.5           14
Program Graduates                  0         5           5            8           8


Potential Applicant Pool

We intend to recruit students from three primary sources: graduates from Denver-area
undergraduate business programs and those with undergraduate degrees in technical areas such
as engineering and mathematics, UCDHSC MBA students interested in an MBAIDecision
Sciences dual degree, and local metropolitan Denver organizations.

Master's degrees in the Business School at UCDHSC appeal to students who have a general
business background and want to pursue specialization and advanced coursework in a specific
area of business. Thus, natural candidates for the proposed degree in Decision Sciences are
undergraduate business students. Over the past five years, the Business School at UCDHSC has
awarded approximately 330 Bachelor's of Science business degrees per year, offering a
substantial applicant pool to tap. Other colleges and universities that offer undergraduate
business degrees to local students (e.g., CU-Boulder, Colorado School of Mines, and the
University of Denver) provide additional sources for potential applicants.

The Business School has historically attracted students with technical backgrounds (e.g.,
engineering and mathematics) interested in pursuing the management side of technical industries.
The Decision Sciences degree would be a natural match for those individuals as well. Given the
experiences of our external evaluator, we will aggressively recruit those with undergraduate and
graduate degrees in engineering, sciences, and mathematics.

A second potential source includes students interested in a dual MBAIM.S. option with Decision
Sciences. The Business School at UCDHSC currently offers a Decision Sciences track within the
MBA program. That track, open to students since spring 2005, has attracted 7 students. Two of
those students have approached the Decision Sciences discipline director about their interest in the
proposed M.S. Decision Sciences degree. Both students were trained in engineering and are
pursuing management education via the MBA degree. A potential MBAIDecision Sciences dual
degree appeals to them because of the combination of the generalist overview of management
practices offered by the MBA and the modeling/technical Decision Sciences component. Thus,



                                                 5
the applicant pool for the Decision Sciences program will grow as interest in the MBA track in
Decision Sciences expands over time.

A final, and potentially lucrative, pool for applicants involves full-time employees with several
years of working experience who wish to pursue a more managerial career path while remaining
in the technical side of their business. The Dean of the Business School at UCDHSC has
extensive professional contacts with local Denver organizations. We intend to tap into that
resource to advertise the proposed degree to organizations that would benefit from Decision
Sciences professionals. Potential contacts in the metropolitan Denver area include Decisioneering,
Lockheed Martin, Coors, Kaiser-Permanente, Jeppesen, Sun/StorageTek, Ball, United, Frontier,
the City and County of Denver, the Colorado Department of Transportation, Level 3, IBM,
Prologis, Western Energy, Xcel Energy, CH2M Hill, and First Data, among many others.


The Decision Sciences faculty have had extended discussions over the last few years about the
viability of the Master's degree in Decision Sciences. Although we suspected that there would be
demand for the product, we had no hard evidence. For that reason, and in the spirit of data
collection, we began offering new graduate elective courses in Decision Sciences as resources
permitted. Demand for graduate-level Decision Sciences courses has been explosive. It has grown
from 57 students (headcount) in two graduate elective Decision Sciences courses in 200203 to 137
students (headcount) in six courses during 2006-07. We intend to offer eight sections of Decision
Sciences electives during the 2007-08 academic year. Understanding full well that student interest
in Decision Sciences courses is different from student interest in a Decision Sciences degree, we
believe that evidence of course demand for Decision Sciences topics bodes well for student
interest in a Decision Sciences Master's degree program.

Addressing the Needs of Part-Time Working Students

Current graduate students in the Business School at UCDHSC tend to be working adults who
attend school part-time. Thus, the Business School is already geared toward serving the needs of
part-time working adult students; e.g., classes are taught mostly in late afternoons and evenings,
student advising appointments can be made after hours, by phone, or by email, and many courses
are available online. The same accommodations and services will be offered to students accepted
into the M.S. in Decision Sciences program.

Retention of Under-Represented Groups

The Decision Sciences discipline in the Business School at UCDHSC currently employs a
remarkably diverse mix of under-represented groups in its faculty. Some propose that the best
way to retain under-represented students is via example and mentoring. As such, and given the
relatively small size of the proposed program, we believe that retention of under-represented
students enrolled in our program will be best accomplished by monitoring the progress of all
students by Decision Sciences faculty and the Decision Sciences program director. Students who
appear to be in academic jeopardy will be asked to participate in special advising and mentoring
sessions with faculty.




                                                6
We hope that the Decision Sciences Practicum course will put students in contact with business
community professionals who are themselves under-represented in their business groups. Should
we be in a position to offer scholarships to our students, we would hope to offer a mix of need-
based and merit-based scholarships to promising and continuing students. We will also make
students aware of university and other external scholarships targeted to under-represented
students, such as the American Association for University Women scholarship open to African
American applicants and the National Society of Hispanic MBAs scholarship.


Workplace Demand and Employment Opportunities

The M.S. degree in Decision Sciences will prepare a graduate to fulfill a spectrum of positions
depending on the person's interest and chosen career paths. Someone interested in data acquisition
or modeling could be part of a decision support team responsible for designing, implementing, or
evaluating decision models on either a routine basis or as part of large strategic decision projects.
A person interested in the culture and environment of critical thinking surrounding the decision
modeling process could fill middle to upper management positions in high-tech (or other)
companies where collaboration, solicitation, and communication of decision issues involving
technically-oriented personnel are essential. Employment positions for graduates might include
manager of manufacturing operations, manager of services operations, data analyst, consultant,
project manager, supply chain analyst, data mining specialist, decision support specialist, or other
administrative and executive positions requiring knowledge of decision sciences tools and
applications.

The importance of Decision Sciences tools and methods in organizational settings has recently
received prominent notice in the popular press. For example, Business Week) featured an article
touting the importance of mathematical models in the workplace, concluding that, "The
mathematical modeling of humanity promises to be one of the great undertakings of the 21st
century." Similarly, Competing on Analytici is filled with evidence regarding the importance of
using analytical thinking and mathematical models in business and government organizations.
Examples of successful applications of Decision Sciences methods come from prominent
organizations such as Netflix, the New York City Police Department, and Harrah's casino in Las
Vegas. The Graduate Management Admissions Councit3 recently reported that technical and
quantitative skills are among the top five skills of interest to employers.

Evidence closer to home comes from Level 3 Communications, Inc.: "All employees of Level 3
Communications Inc., a telecommunications company in Broomfield, Colo., are expected to have
basic knowledge of three disciplines: economics, finance and optimization [emphasis added].
Lorraine Lotosky, vice president of business optimization, says Level 3 has saved tens of millions
of dollars by applying OR [operations research] techniques to network design.,,4 Thankfully,
academic advances in mathematical modeling and Decision Sciences are finding

I Business Week, cover story, January 23, 2006, "Math Will Rock Your World".
2 Competing on Analytics, T.H. Davenport and J.G. Harris, Harvard Business School Press, 2006
3 www.gmac.comlgmac/ResearchandTrends/SurvevResearchlCofPorateRecruitersSurvev.htm
4 "Optimal Results: IT-powered advances in operations research can enhance business processes and boost the
   corporate bottom line," www.computerworld.com.


                                                              7
their way into the workplace. The demand for expertise in the use of these models, and in their
proper interpretation to shareholders within the organization, is at an all time high.

We have been asked to assess the local demand for graduates from the proposed program in
Decision Sciences. To do so, we undertook a search of job po stings on several well-known
internet career websites. On July 17, 2007, we conducted a 45-minute search using two online job
sites: hotjobs.yahoo.com and monster.com. Both allowed us to narrow job locations to those in the
metropolitan Denver area. The result of that search resulted in the following jobs for which
graduates from the proposed program may be qualified to apply, depending on their prior business
experience and chosen elective coursework.

   1. Supply Chain Specialist I (Raytheon, Aurora-based Space Systems group)
   2. Senior Principal Quality Assurance Engineer (Raytheon, Aurora)
   3. Assistant Operations Manager (GSI, Aurora)
   4. Project Manager (Baxa Corp, Englewood)
   5. Senior Analyst (T-Mobile USA, Thornton)
   6. Vice President, Supply Chain (unnamed food company, Denver)
   7. Supply Chain Management Senior Consultants (Deloitte, Denver)
   8. Supply Chain Manager (HEI, Boulder)
   9. Supply Chain Management (Oracle, Denver)
   10. Consulting Project Manager (Sterling Commerce, Denver)
   11. SPSS Clementine Expert/Data Mining (InterGlobe Technologies, Englewood)
   12. Data Analysis Specialist (Pro Build, Denver)
   13. Analytical Consultant (unnamed consumer product organization, Denver)
   14. Price Forecasting Analyst (Tri-State Generation and Transmission Assoc., Inc., Denver)
   15. Forecast Analyst (Tyco Engineered Products, Denver)
   16. Sales Forecast Analyst (Leggett & Platt, Inc., Aurora)
   17. Operations Analyst (ServiceMagic, Golden)

The search that uncovered these po stings was not at all exhaustive. Even so, we were able to find
17 career opportunities for our graduates in a very brief and limited search of just one day's job
postings. This suggests ample employment opportunities for graduates from the proposed
program. As anticipated, career opportunities available in the metropolitan Denver area span a
wide range of industries from engineering and construction materials to government and service
providers.

A segment of our graduate students in the Business School at UCDHSC are working adults whose
current employers send them to school under a tuition reimbursement or other costsharing
arrangements. Thus, some of our graduates are expected to face career advancement opportunities
at their current place of employment upon successful completion of the program. In these cases,
the proposed program will provide career advancement opportunities not measured by the usual
publicly-available job postings. One example includes those trained and employed as engineers
who wish to pursue managerial, rather than technical, careers at their current places of
employment.




                                                8
B.2. Role and Mission Criteria

The proposed degree in Decision Sciences supports the role and mission of both UCDHSC and
its Business School.

Business School Strategic Plan

The Business School at UCDHSC provides the largest and most extensive programs for business
professionals in the region. The addition ofthe M.S. degree in Decision Sciences will round out
the types of graduate business degrees typically available in business schools around the world.
Located in downtown Denver, the Business School is also well-positioned to cater to the needs of
working adults seeking convenient access to AACSB-accredited graduate business education.

The Business School last revised its Strategic Mission in August 2007. The proposed degree in
Decision Sciences coincides well with the strategic plans in that mission statement. Among other
things, that plan stipulates the following targets:

   . "Increase graduate enrollments."
   . "Support, expand [emphasis added], and continuously evaluate our graduate programs." .
   "Develop the M.S. DSCI [Decision Sciences] Program."

UCDHSC Mission

Part ofUCDHSC's mission encourages schools and colleges to forge new relationships that make
us an indispensable partner with external communities. The mission also supports creation of a
vibrant, interactive and diverse learning community through unique educational experiences that
define UCDHSC as a first-choice university for students and faculty. This program will work
toward both of those goals. The Decision Sciences Practicum portion of this program will engage
partners in the external business community in the metropolitan Denver area. The Practicum also
speaks to the interactive and diverse learning community for both faculty and students. See
Appendix C for a detailed description of the Decision Sciences Practicum course.

B.3. Duplication with Other Institutions

No other institution of higher education in Colorado offers an M.S. degree in Decision Sciences at
either public (CU-Boulder, CU-Colorado Springs, University of Northern Colorado, University of
Southern Colorado, Colorado State University, and the Colorado School of Mines) or private
(University of Denver, Regis University, Phoenix University) institutions of higher education.
Indeed, the Business School at UCDHSC has historically been the largest provider of Master's
level education in business to the metropolitan Denver region and to the state of Colorado at large.
The proposed degree in Decision Sciences will allow us to round out the usual range of degrees
available to those interested in management careers.

Until recently, the University of Denver offered a Master's degree in data mining. That degree is
no longer being offered. The University of Colorado at Boulder and the Colorado School of
Mines offer Master's degrees in more technically-oriented fields such as operations research.


                                                 9
Those curricula have very little overlap with the coursework required for the proposed M.S.
degree in Decision Sciences at UCDHSC, as they serve different student interests and eventual
employment needs. Students interested in careers in operations research will not be attracted to
the more applied flavor of Decision Sciences, which typically sends graduates toward
management careers rather than highly technical careers in operations research groups.


B.4. Statutory Requirements

The proposed degree in Decision Sciences conforms to the 30 semester credit hour requirement
established for Master of Science programs within the Business School at UCDHSC. It conforms
to all other known statutory requirements, rules, and regulations. The current statutory role and
mission statement for the Denver campus is as follows:

       The Denver campus of the University of Colorado shall be an urban comprehensive
       undergraduate and graduate research university with selective admission standards. The
       Denver campus shall offer baccalaureate, masters, and a limited number of doctoral degree
       programs, emphasizing those that serve the needs of the Denver metropolitan area. The
       Denver campus has statewide authority to offer graduate programs in public administration
       and exclusive authority in architecture and planning.


C. Program Quality and Institutional Capacity

C.t. Admission, Transfer and Graduation Standards

Applicants to the M.S. Decision Sciences program will complete the same application materials
required of all other applicants to graduate programs at the UCDHSC Business School: resume,
optional letters of recommendation, official undergraduate transcripts, and a GMAT score (a test
whose possible outcomes range from zero to 800). All application materials are considered when
making an admission decision.

For admission, students will be measured against a set of four minimum standards listed below.
Students must meet all minimum criteria for consideration into the program. The minimum
requirements will include:

   . 450 GMA T minimum, and
   . A weighted combination of GMA T and undergraduate GP A (grade point average): 100 x
       GP A + GMA T 2: 750, and
   . 50th percentile minimum on the quantitative portion of the GMA T examination, and
   . 30th percentile minimum on the verbal portion of the GMA T examination. Students who
       are not native speakers will also be required to meet the university's English proficiency
       requirements. (Those university requirements, which are quite involved, may be found on
       the university's website at
       h :/ /thunder l.cudenver.edullntemationalAdmissions/ A lication%20F orms/Grad%20H
       oWO,lo20to%20applv%20and%20areas%20of%20studv%202007 .pdf.)


                                                10
Thus, applicants must meet standards based on multiple dimensions-overall GMA T
performance, measured verbal skills, measured quantitative skills, and undergraduate GP A.

The Business School has recently been re-accredited by AACSB. A portion of that accreditation
involved a careful review of our graduate programs, including admissions standards and, most
critically, assessment of student learning. The admissions standards and outcome assessment
processes proposed for the new M.S. Decision Sciences degree meet or exceed those of existing
Master's degree programs in the Business School. Thus, we are confident that the proposed
admissions standards will meet with approval of our accrediting agency. A detailed description of
proposed assessment of student learning may be found in section C.2. of this report.

Once students are admitted to the program, our curriculum is designed to continually improve
their written and oral communication skills. Twelve of the fourteen existing or proposed Decision
Sciences classes will require written assignments and/or oral presentations (see section C.2. of
this report). By continually challenging students to improve their communication skills
throughout the program, the Decision Sciences faculty will strive to ensure that our graduates
have well-developed written and oral communication skills.

Transfer requirements for Decision Sciences students will coincide with the transfer
requirements for existing graduate programs within the Business School: 9 semester hours of
transfer work from another AACSB accredited school may be accepted if a grade of "B" or
better was earned and the course was completed within the prior ten years.

We anticipate program size to be about 28 students at full implementation. In that regard, we see
no need to limit enrollment at this time.

We will apply existing UCDHSC Business School standards regarding continuation in Master's
programs to the M.S. Decision Sciences students: students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA
or face probation and/or suspension. Graduation requirements will also be identical to graduation
requirements for existing Master's programs in the Business School: students must achieve a 3.0
cumulative GP A or higher to be eligible for graduation and complete the entire required
curriculum.


C.2. Curriculum Description and Assessment Process

The proposed M.S. degree in Decision Sciences is a 30 credit-hour program. We expect our part-
time students to complete the program in two full academic years over six semesters. Thirty credit
hours will be achieved by completing ten 3-credit hour courses: six required courses and four
electives. The program will be delivered in a manner consistent with the needs of adult working
students; on-campus classes will be scheduled for late afternoon or evenings and several courses
will be offered online.

Program prerequisites are: knowledge of principles of accounting, satisfied by either two
undergraduate accounting courses taken within the last 10 years with a grade of "B" or better or


                                                11
successful completion of BUSN 6550 (Analyzing and Interpreting Accounting Information);
and, working knowledge of spreadsheet software.

The following courses are associated with the proposed M.S. degree in Decision Sciences. Only
two of the courses listed are new: DSCI 6460 (Decision Analysis) and DSCI 6910, the Decision
Sciences Practicum course. Complete course descriptions from the UCDHSC catalog are
available in Appendix D of this document.


             Required Courses                              Elective Courses (choose four)
   1. Data Analysis (BUSN 6530)                       1. Services Operations (DSCI 6822)
   2. Management of Operations (BUSN                  2. Quality and Process Improvement
       6630)                                              (DSCI6440)
   3. Project Management (DSCI 6820)                   3. Business Applications of Data Mining
   4. Business Forecasting (DSCI 6230)                    (DSCI 6828)
   5. Decision Analysis* (DSCI 6460)                 4. Supply Chain Management (DSCI
   6. Decision Sciences Practicum* (DSCI                  6826)
       6910)                                         5. Simulation Modeling (DSCI 6480)
                                                     6. Research Methods: Design and
       * New course, not previously offered.              Analysis (DSCI 6220)
                                                      7. Decision Sciences Special Topics
                                                          (DSCI 6800)
                                                     8. Marketing Research (MKTG 6050)
                                                     9. Financial Modeling (FNCE 6480)

A typical course sequence for newly-matriculated students, presumed to be part-time, is shown
below (and detailed in Table 4 of Appendix A ofthis document). No specialized tracks will be
initially available to students, although tracks may develop over time as we acquire knowledge
of student and workplace needs for specialization.

            Example of Course Sequencing for M.S. Decision Sciences Students

                    Year 1                                           Year 2

   Fall Semester: Data Analysis (BUSN 6530)          Fall Semester: Elective #1 and Elective #2
   and Project Management (DSCI 6820)

   Spring Semester: Management of                    Spring Semester: Decision Sciences
   Operations (BUSN 6630) and Decision               Practicum (DSCI 6910) and Elective #3
   Analysis (DSCI 6460)

   Summer Semester: Business Forecasting             Summer Semester: Elective #4
   (DSCI 6230)




                                               12
Similarities and Dissimilarities with Other Programs

The proposed curriculum is similar in program length and coursework to other Master's degrees
with a decision sciences flavor, such as those offered at Baruch College, Virginia
Commonwealth, and the University of North Texas.

Several universities, some among our peers and aspirants, offer a complete MBA degree with an
emphasis in decision sciences/operations management; e.g., University of Texas at Arlington and
Georgia State. Our proposed degree differs from them in that the MBA is a more generalist degree
requiring coursework in the full range of business courses such as finance, accounting, marketing,
and management; the proposed M.S. degree is a specialist degree requiring instead concentrated
coursework in Decision Sciences topics.

The proposed degree is substantially different from a degree in operations research. Operations
research degrees require more technical coursework in areas such as nonlinear programming and
stochastic methods; they concentrate less on the managerial and organizational implications of
quantitative methods than what we propose.

Assessment Plan

We expect that graduates of this program will have learned, and be able to do, the following (see
section A.2. of this document, above):

       1. recognize situations that would benefit from the application of Decision Sciences
           techniques,
       2. propose an appropriate Decision Sciences model or solution method,
       3. prepare solutions by using current modeling techniques and software, and
       4. communicate solution options in a technical and non-technical manner to others in the
           organization.

Embedded in each of the four learning goals are both general and management-specific goals as
required by AACSB accreditation. For the proposed program, general learning goals to be
acquired and assessed are communication and problem-solving abilities. These are embedded in
goals 1, 2 and 4 above. Management-specific goals are embedded in all four learning goals,
where students specifically learn Decision Sciences approaches to management problems.

We will undertake two distinct assessments of these learning goals: an internal course-based
assessment by the department and an external assessment conducted by the business community.

Because most required and elective courses for the proposed program are already being taught, we
have undertaken a preliminary course-based audit for the purposes of this proposal. Those results
are shown in the table below, which indicates by checkmark in which courses students are
currently exposed to the learning goals. The table does not reflect a complete, well-defined
assessment of the proposed learning goals. Rather, it is our first step in thinking about how
existing individual courses might fit together to achieve the learning objectives of a larger degree
program in Decision Sciences.



                                                13
Audit of Learning Goals by Course--Existing and Proposed Decision Sciences Courses
                                              Recognize     Propose        Prepare      Communi
                                               Possible     Model or      Solutions       -cate
                                              Situations    Solution                     Results
                                                            Methods
             Existing Courses                     #1          #2              #3           #4
Data Analysis              BUSN 6530              X                           X            X
Operations Management BUSN 6630                                               X            X
Project Management         DSCI 6820              X             X             X            X
Business Forecasting       DSCI 6230              X             X             X            X
Services Operations        DSCI 6822              X             X             X            X
Quality and Process
Improvement                DSCI 6440              X             X             X             X
Data Mining                DSCI 6828              X             X             X             X
Supply Chain Mgmt.         DSCI 6826              X             X             X
Simulation Models          DSCI 6480              X             X             X
Research Methods           DSCI 6220              X             X             X             X
Marketing Research         MKTG 6050              X             X             X             X
Financial Modeling         FNCE 6480              X             X             X             X
     New Courses (Not Yet Taught)
Dec. Sciences Practicum     DSCI6910              X             X             X             X
Decision Analysis           DSCI 6460             X             X             X             X
The audit table above also indicates our intentions with regard to the two new courses that will be
developed should the program be approved for implementation. Those courses (DSCI 6910 and
DSCI 6460) will be delivered in such a way that they address all four of the student learning
goals.

Secondly, we propose an external assessment be conducted by the business community. For this
purpose, we intend to engage organizational sponsors of the Decision Sciences Practicum course.
(That course is described in more detail in Appendix C.) In particular, after the final written and
oral reports have been delivered to the sponsoring organization, we will ask them to fill out a
detailed survey indicating their perceptions of each of the learning goals.

Assessment and Continuous Improvement Activities: Timelines

The UCDHSC Outcomes Assessment process requires annual assessment and reporting. That
reporting process imposes continuous improvement activities. We intend to be fully engaged in
the assessment and continuous improvement activities required of the university and AACSB, the
Business School's accrediting body.




                                                14
We will begin the process by conducting a preliminary analysis of the course-based learning goals
in the spring semester of2008, the semester prior to the anticipated roll-out of the degree. At that
time, and in consultation with Dr. Kenneth Wolf, Interim Director of Outcomes Assessment, we
will more carefully consider how best to define and measure the four learning goals. We will
discuss course content, delivery methods, and possible assessment options; we will collect and
examine course syllabi. We will then be in a position to understand how course design might
ensure and measure competency in the four learning goals. Finally, we will identify specific
course assignments or other methods to use in the course-based portion of the assessment plan.
This initial course-level analysis will be undertaken with an eye toward outcomes at a
programmatic level in the sense that not all courses will address or assess all four learning goals.


The next step for a new program is to prepare a plan for assessment. That initial Outcomes
Assessment Plan will be prepared by the Decision Sciences faculty after the spring 2008 course-
based assessment has been completed. The UCDHSC Outcomes Assessment Planning Report
will be submitted to Dr. Kenneth Wolf for critique. Suggestions for improvements will be
incorporated when feasible.

The first external assessment by the business community will be conducted in spring 2010 with
the first offering of the Practicum course (See Appendix A, Table 5.)

Thereafter, data will be reviewed and any changes will be incorporated as needed on an annual
basis. In subsequent semesters, instructors will assess their courses for the particular learning
goals to be measured and report the results to the Decision Sciences faculty. During fall semesters
beginning fall 2010 (after the first offering of the Practicum course), the Decision Sciences faculty
will meet to consider the results of the business community survey and the course-based
assessment reports. We will examine where learning occurred and how and where it was
reinforced. We will consider information about the need for new courses and new directions
required by our business constituents. Areas in need of improvement or change will be discussed.
The results of those discussions will be used to prepare the required annual Outcomes Assessment
Report. That report will include a section for instituting programmatic changes. For example, if
we discover that students are not adequately prepared to communicate results to constituents, we
might use the course audit table to consider what types of courses might add a writing assignment
and what form it should take.


C.3. Professional Requirements or Evaluations

The Business School is fully accredited by AACSB (the Association to Advance Collegiate
Schools of Business). AACSB accreditation requires, among other things, that business schools
align their actions and goals with that school's strategic mission. The proposed M.S. program in
Decision Sciences fits in very well with the current UCDHSC Business School strategic plan, as
outlined in section B.2. of this report.

AACSB accreditation also requires rigorous documentation of assessment of learning outcomes.
That requirement has shaped the assessment of learning outcomes of the proposed degree in


                                                 15
Decision Sciences as detailed in section C.2 of this document. AACSB accreditation does not
stipulate specifics such as program length, content, or mode of delivery. We anticipate that
AACSB staffing needs will be fully met for this program, as all classes in the program will be
taught by full-time faculty.


Faculty Qualifications

The following seven faculty members are associated with the Decision Sciences discipline in the
Business School at the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Their
abbreviated curriculum vitae are available in Appendix B of this proposal.

   Peter Bryant, Professor, Ph.D. in Statistics from Stanford University. Dr. Bryant conducts
      research in MDL (minimum description length) statistical methods and has been
      recognized for teaching excellence. He teaches the graduate and undergraduate statistics
      courses, the graduate course in data mining, and the graduate course in research methods.

   Murray Cote, Associate Professor, Ph.D. in Management Science from Texas A&M. Dr.
     Cott~'s research involves applications of operations management and operations research
     methods to health care settings. He has been awarded numerous teaching awards.
     Certified by ASQ, he teaches the graduate courses in operations management and the
     graduate quality course.

   Fred Hampel, Instructor, M.S. in Agricultural Economics and Master of Accountancy from
      Kansas State University. Mr. Hampel has taught at a number of colleges and universities
      in a wide range of business courses; he also has extensive business and consulting
      experience. Mr. Hampel currently teaches the undergraduate and MBA business statistics
      courses.

   Michael Harper, Senior Instructor, Ph.D. in Operations Research and Statistics from
      Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Harper has extensive background in teaching and
      consulting, with interests in applications of statistics and operations research methods to a
      wide variety of application areas. He teaches the graduate and undergraduate courses in
      operations management, supply chain management, and project management.

   Deborah Kellogg, Associate Professor, Ph.D. in Business Operations Management from the
      University of Southern California. Dr. Kellogg specializes in applications of operations
      management techniques to services settings, most notably in health care. She teaches
      graduate and undergraduate operations management classes and the graduate course in
      service operations.

    Gary Kochenberger, Professor, Ph.D. in Management Science from the University of
       Colorado at Boulder. Dr. Kochenberger is an internationally recognized researcher in
       operations research techniques and methods. His more recent work includes topics such
       as optimization efficiency using Tabu search. He teaches courses in graduate and




                                                16
       undergraduate operations management and discrete-event simulation. He will take the
       initial lead in the Decision Sciences Practicum course.

   Marlene Smith, Associate Professor, Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Florida. Dr.
     Smith conducts research in applied statistics and econometrics with recent applications to
     human resource management and educational outcomes assessment. She has received
     several teaching awards; she teaches the required graduate and undergraduate business
     statistics course and the graduate course in business forecasting.


C.4. Institutional Factors

Business School and Campus Diversity Goals

The proposed M.S. degree program is consistent with the other Master of Science programs at the
Business School. Policies for recruiting, training and placement of Decision Sciences students will
be consistent with Business School and University policies on diversity. The proposed M.S.
program will adhere to the University policy on inclusion, non-discrimination and equal
opportunity; e.g., "The University of Colorado is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer
and institution and does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, age, national
origin, individual handicap, or veteran status in any aspect of employment or services. The
institution's educational programs, activities, and services are administered on a nondiscriminatory
basis subject to the provisions of all civil rights laws and statutes."

As we recruit students we will attempt to recruit a diverse population while maintaining the
university policy on inclusion of all populations. Because the program faculty members are
diverse, it is our expectation that retention of under-represented students will be accomplished
through mentoring and modeling.

Effect on Other Programs and Campuses

No other institution of higher education in Colorado offers an M.S. degree in Decision Sciences.
As such, no students will be attracted away from other institutions' Decision Sciences degree
programs. Undergraduate students from other campuses around the region may elect to enroll in
the UCDHSC Decision Sciences program rather than another graduate program in business,
according to their professional interests and career paths. We expect impacts of this sort to be
small and in the best interest of Colorado students, as those students will be attracted to an
otherwise empty niche.

The Decision Sciences Practicum course is modeled after a similar course called the math clinic
offered by the Math Department at UCDHSC. We expect to partner with the Math Department on
joint offerings of the Practicum course/math clinic when feasible. Decision Sciences students may
elect to take the Math Clinic in lieu of the Practicum course when approved by the Decision
Sciences program director. We expect a cooperative arrangement with the Math Department will
enhance both the math clinic and the Decision Sciences Practicum course offerings and course
SIze.



                                                 17
The Decision Sciences Practicum course may well suggest avenues of research for faculty in the
Decision Sciences discipline. We have already established an interdisciplinary research and
teaching relationship with a faculty member in the Health Sciences Center as a result of pursuing
the initial phases of the proposed degree program. In that regard, the proposed degree has already
positively impacted the research agendas of several Decision Sciences faculty members.

Effect on Existing Resources

The proposed degree is, to a large extent, already in place in the Business School through the
delivery of required and elective courses for other Business School graduate programs. Thus,
existing resources already provide the vast majority of resources to implement the proposed
degree program. The exception is the need to teach two additional courses (nine new sections)
over the first five years of the program. Otherwise, we anticipate that existing resources will be
minimally impacted by the implementation of the new degree program.

The Business School currently has sufficient full-time staff to teach the program; see Table 3 and
associated narrative in Appendix A. Full-time teaching faculty will be redirected from other
programs (most notably the MBA program) to teach in the M.S. Decision Sciences program. This
will have little effect on accreditation needs for full-time faculty teaching in the MBA program, as
the Decision Sciences-staffed courses in the MBA program are well above minimum staffing
needs dictated by our accrediting agency, AACSB.

Existing library resources are more than adequate to suit the needs of the proposed program; we
anticipate no additional costs to the Auraria library as the result of implementing the program and
consider existing library resources to be adequate. A large proportion of the graduate business
students satisfy their computing needs by running required course software on their own personal
computers. We see no need for large capacity servers or additional computers beyond those
already available in the Business School computing labs; existing computing resources will be
adequate to cover the needs of the proposed program. Given the small projected size of the
program, we expect any impact on existing computing resources to be minimal.

The university will need to assign university-mandated email addresses to new M.S. Decision
Sciences students; given the enrollment projections, we presume that the marginal cost of doing
so will be very small.

Formal Relationships with Other Parties

The Decision Sciences Practicum course will involve formal relationships with local Denver
organizations. An organization will sponsor an applied research project relevant to the needs of
their organization; the research will be conducted by Decision Sciences students under the
direction of a Decision Sciences faculty member. See Appendix C of this document for more
details on the Practicum course.

The resources provided by the sponsoring organization will vary from semester to semester as
the application problem dictates. Some problems may require the purchase of specialized
computer software; when that is so, the agreement will stipulate. Some applications may benefit


                                                 18
from research assistance of a UCDHSC student; when needed, that expense will be added to the
agreement. A draft copy of an agreement that will cover anticipated situations is shown in
Appendix C of this document following the description of the Decision Sciences Practicum
course. That agreement is similar to the one currently used by the Math Department at UCDHSC
as regards the math clinic.


C.S. Physical Capacity and Needs

Table 2 below summarizes the physical capacity needs for the proposed program. (Details
including extended narratives may be found in Appendix A of this document). The new program
will require nothing more than a very few classroom slots on the Auraria campus classroom
schedule during late afternoon or evening time periods. No capital construction is needed; no new
laboratories are requested; no additional office or special use facilities are anticipated. In
particular, we expect to need 2 classrooms per year after the first year of the program. Only one
additional classroom will be needed the first year. These classrooms need not be specially-
dedicated to the program; they can be any of the existing classrooms anywhere on the Auraria
campus with suitable capacity.

Table 2 below provides the requested details for the first five years of the program. During those
five years, additional classroom needs are: one classroom in the first year, and; two classrooms in
each of years two through five, totaling nine classrooms during the first five years of the program.


Table 2: Physical Capacity Estimates (First Five Years of the Program)
 Assignable Square         Total       Available      Renova-       New         Lease/    Revenue/
   Feet: Type of          Needed                        tion      Construc-      Rent      Source
       Space                                                        tion
Classroom                    9              9            0            0           0            NA
                        classrooms     classrooms
Instructional Lab            0              0            0            0           0            NA
Offices                      0              0            0            0           0            NA
Study                        0              0            0            0           0            NA
Special/General              0              0            0            0           0            NA
Use
Other                        0              0            0            0           0            NA
                Total        9              9            0            0           0            NA
                        classrooms     classrooms



C.6. Cost Description and Source of Funds

The new M.S. degree in Decision Sciences is a low-costilow-risk proposition that is expected to
generate an immediate revenue surplus for the university. The cost to the University of offering


                                                 19
  the new degree is so small because of this fact: among the 14 required and elective courses
  associated with the proposed degree, all but two courses will be offered regardless of whether the
  M.S. degree in Decision Sciences is approved. Twelve of the 14 courses will continue to be
  offered because they serve as required or elective courses in existing graduate business degree
  programs at DCDHSC.

  Furthermore, since we anticipate a small number of students in the proposed degree program,
  and since graduate credit hours have been declining recently in the Business School, we
  anticipate that new M.S. in Decision Sciences students can readily be accommodated within the
  twelve existing courses with no need for further sections. Thus, the largest cost to the university
  will be faculty compensation to hire part-time lecturers over the first five years of the program.
  We are not requesting new faculty positions at this time. We face no capital, construction, or
  laboratory expenses. We require only at most two additional classrooms per year. Should there
  be no space on the Auraria campus for these classrooms, we will seek off-campus alternatives
  such as conference rooms in the CD-Denver building. Administrative costs are estimated to be
  minimal.

   Appendix A provides extensive details, narrative, and verification of the information contained
   in Table 3 below.

   Table 3. Projected New Expenses for New Program and Revenue

                                      2008-09     2009-10         2010-11       2011-12       2012-13
                                      AYI           AY2            AY3           AY4           AY5
Revenue
  Student Tuition (Resident)            $35,300         $63,540      $84,720      $105,900     $112,960
  Student Tuition (Non-resident)                        $16,768      $16,768       $16,768      $16,768
              TOTAL REVENUE             $35,300         $80,768     $101,488      $122,668     $129,728
Operatine: Expenses
Faculty                                  $4,292          $8,584       $8,584        $8,584        $8,584
Financial Aid to specific program            0               0             0             0             0
Instructional Materials                      0               0             0             0             0
Program Administration
   Faculty Compensation                $3,000        $3,000         $3,000        $3,000       $3,000
   Staff Compensation                   $180           $360           $468          $576        $612
   Operating Expenses                 $1 ,227        $1,051         $1,057        $1,057       $1,227
            Total Program Admin.         $4,407         $4,411         $4,525        $4,633      $4,839
Rent/Lease                                    0             0               0            0            0
Laboratory and Other Operating                0             0               0            0            0
Program Start-up Expenses                     0             0               0            0            0
             TOTAL EXPENSES              $8,699         $12,995      $13,109       $13,217       $13,423
           PROGRAM SURPLUS            $26,601       $67,773        $88,379      $109,451      $116,305


                                                   20
e.7. Other Relevant Information


e.S. Reviewers Comments

Professor W. David Kelton served as the external reviewer of this proposal. Dr. Kelton is a
Professor in the Department of Quantitative Analysis and Operations Management in the College
of Business at the University of Cincinnati. He received a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from the
University of Wisconsin in 1980.

Professor Kelton is an internationally recognized expert in simulation modeling (one of the
elective courses in the proposed degree program). He has an impressive research record; his
graduate-level textbooks on discrete-event simulation modeling are recognized as among the best
in the field. Thus, Dr. Kelton is professionally qualified to assess the current academic state of the
field and to judge whether the proposed degree has academic merit and rigor.

Although Dr. Kelton has advanced degrees in industrial engineering, he has spent a significant
amount of his academic career in business schools. Most importantly, Dr. Kelton has just recently
directed the M.S. degree in Quantitative Analysis program in the Business School at the
University of Cincinnati, a publicly-funded urban research university. ("Quantitative Analysis"
and "Decision Sciences" are different names for similar degree programs: those that use statistics
and operations management/research principles to model and find solutions to business problems.)
As the program director, Dr. Kelton has current working knowledge of required coursework,
admissions and accreditation standards, outcomes assessment, employment demand and other
issues surrounding an existing Decision Sciences-type Master's degree program.

Finally, Dr. Kelton has extensive business consulting experience, so that he is ideally situated to
comment on the workplace needs for students with degrees in Decision Sciences.

Dr. Kelton was approved to serve as the external reviewer by the Decision Sciences faculty, the
Business School dean's office, Associate Vice Chancellor for Faculty Affairs Goodwin, and
Provost Heckler.

Dr. Kelton's review begins on the next page of this document. The dean's office response to it
follows.




                                                 21
                                                                    Department of Quantitative Analysis
                                                                        and Operations Management
                                                                    College of Business

    UNIVERSITY OF                                                   University of Cincinnati Cincinnati,
                                                                    Ohio 45221-0130, USA
         Cincinri'atj
W. David Kelton                                                     Carl H. Lindner Hall Phone 1-
david.kelton@ue.edu                                                 513-556-7140 Fax 1-513-556-
http://www.eba.ue.edulfaeultylkeltonwdl Phone                       5499
1-513-556-6834


August 10, 2007

Dr. Sueann Ambron, Dean
Business School
University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
Campus Box 165, PO Box 173364
Denver, CO 80217
303.556.5801
sueann.ambron@cudenver.edu

Dear Dean Ambron:

Thank you for your August 7, 2007 e-mail inviting me be to be an external reviewer of your proposed MS
degree in Decision Sciences at the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Only about
a week ago I stepped down from the Directorship of our MS program in Quantitative Analysis here
(http://www.business.uc.edu/msqa).afteroverfouryearsinthatposition.soIthink I have some recent relevant
experiences and perspectives.
         I've read through the proposal and feel that it makes a very strong case for instituting this degree at
this time. I have no problem endorsing it for implementation, for several reasons:
  1. Most importantly for me, the content of the curriculum is is exceptionally well thought out and
      articulated. While there is substantial overlap with our MSQA program, there are important differences
      that set it apart, yet not so far afield that it would risk being seen as a limited-appeal boutique program.
      Our MSQA program is a combination of statistics and operations research, while the proposed program
      is a combination of statistics and operations management, an important distinction as the latter is
      decidedly more applied, which should broaden its appeal. The capstone Practicum in the proposal is
      very attractive for both curricular and placement reasons, and is something our program lacks (though
      we require a thesis), and is very consistent with the proposal's more applied orientation.
  2. Related to the first point, 1 can attest that the job market for graduates of such programs is strong and
      sustained. We admit (and graduate) about 25 students per year, with a total enrollment at any given time
      of 35-55, about 1/4 of them part-time students holding down full-time jobs in the Cincinnati area.
      During my Directorship, there has been absolutely no problem placing students; indeed, I probably
      overstate my importance by saying that we "place" graduates since I had to do almost nothing in this
      regard, as the jobs came to me. Probably once a week on average I received e-mails from employers
      with a job ad, and I simply forwarded these to all students (and a few interested recent graduates) with
      instructions that the apply directly if qualified and interested, and all I did was get out of the way.
      Students also used more traditional job searches, but I honestly never had to get involved at all in that.
      All of our graduates (not just the top of the class) have been




                                                          22
     w.o. Kelton to S. Ambron                         August 10, 2007                                       Page 20(2



            able to get good, relevant jobs, often with multiple offers, and they are overwhelmingly happy with our
            program. Several of our part-time students have reported back that they were able to get significant
            promotions due to the degree, or jump-shift to better jobs. I think that one reason for this success is that
            we do not try to train managers, but rather analysts who can go into an organization and start solving
            real, complex, and important problems immediately; I see the focus of your proposed degree to be very
            similar. And our placements have been national, not just in the Cincinnati area, though we're proud of
            our local placements at, e.g., Procter & Gamble, GE Aircraft Engines, Lexis-Nexis, Duke Energy,
            dunnhumby Marketing, GE Capital, and USBank; recent national placements include eBay (San Jose),
            FedEx (Memphis), USAirways (Phoenix), Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu (Washington, DC), Wal-Mart
            (Bentonville), Information Resources Inc. (Chicago), HSBC Bank (Chicago, Portland, and Buffalo),
            Yahoo! (Swmyvale), Frontline Systems (Incline Village, Nevada, and the vendor of the Solver
            optimization add-in for Excel), and Best Buy (Minneapolis). Strong placement themes in recent years
            have been marketing research (due to the statistics), financial credit-risk modeling (due to probability
            and simulation), and logistics (due to supply-chain management), along with a few in health care and
            more traditional manufacturing analysis. I believe that students in your proposed program would have
            every reason to expect
          . strong placement and promotion.
       3. Internally, the proposal indicates that the resource implications would be minimal, as nearly all the
            curriculum would be composed of courses that you're already offering anyway (the Practicum being an
            exception); p. 19 states that only two of the 14 program courses would not be offered anyway in the
            absence of the MSDS program. Speaking only in terms of tuition revenue, this makes the program a
            very good bet to do well. Clearly, your existing faculty in the area are very well qualified and of
            sufficient numbers to deliver the coursework in the program (as noted, they almost do already anyway
            in a non-programmatic way).
       4. The analysis of the local competition is complete and compelling, especially in view of the recent
           termination of the MS program in data mining at the University of Denver. There is clearly a gap in the
           greater Denver area that this program would fill nicely. I would not be surprised to see the program
           grow more rapidly than projected in the proposal.
     I believe I've addressed your specific questions across the above points. In my view, the proposed program has
     excellent prospects for success.
                Should the program go forward, I do have a few suggestions based on my experience here with a
     similar program. First, I would shift the recruiting emphasis more toward people with undergraduate degrees
     in engineering, science, and mathematics, as such appear to be more natural raw material; this has certainly
     been true in our case. Second, while not suggesting that larger numbers be a commitment, I feel that the
     program could well grow more rapidly than projected in the proposal, due to lack of competition and Denver's
     high-tech workforce. Third, I think it might be tough to pull off the dual MBNMS joint degree program
     described on p. 5 due to differing goals of such programs, and the simple fact that most MBA programs
     (though I'm not familiar with yours) tend to be fairly rigid and lock-step, leaving but few degrees of freedom
     for working in MSDS coursework on a concurrent basis; of course, there's almost zero cost of giving it a try
     initially.
              I hope you and others involved in the review process might fmd these observations useful. If you
     think I might be able to supply further information, please feel free to contact me.


     Sincerely,
     J>a..- id K'.L1~. W.
     David Kelton
     Professor




                                                               23


/'
Dean's Office Response to the External Reviewer

We are pleased to see that Professor Kelton has only positive comments to relay about the
proposed degree program and this proposal. In his report, Dr. Kelton makes several general
comments indicating his enthusiasm for the proposal. For example, he states that, "[the proposal]
makes a very strong case for instituting the degree at this time." He then goes on to say, "In my
view, the proposed program has excellent prospects for success."

Dr. Kelton was asked to provide his assessment of any aspects of the proposal, but with specific
emphasis on four academically-related areas: the quality of the proposed curriculum, the quality
of the faculty that will be offering the program, the adequacy of resources to support the program
in general and especially as they relate to numbers of faculty available to deliver it, and
perceptions of employment opportunities for graduates from the proposed degree program. These
are taken in turn.

Dr. Kelton praised the quality of the proposed curriculum. He described it as, "exceptionally
well thought out and articulated." He especially noted the proposed Practicum course and its
value to an applied program such as this one. He also remarked on the Practicum course's ability
to provide links with the business community that may initiate useful placement contacts.

Regardingfaculty qualifications and numbers, Dr. Kelton finds that, "Clearly, your existing
faculty in the area are very well qualified and of sufficient number to deliver the coursework in
the program. . ." His view of the adequacy of resources to support the program mirrors the facts
provided in the proposal: that twelve of the fourteen courses needed for the degree will be taught
regardless of approval of the program. As a result, he finds that, "the resource implications would
be minimal. . . "

Dr. Kelton's recent experience with workplace demand for the degree was particularly insightful.
He states that, in his experience, "the job market for graduates of such programs is strong and
sustained." At the University of Cincinnati, they have had, "... absolutely no problem placing
students.. ..All of our graduates (not just the top of the class) have been able to get good, relevant
jobs, often with multiple offers..." Dr. Kelton finds that employment opportunities can be found
both local to Cincinnati and nationally. Thus, our proposal that looked specifically at local Denver
employment needs undoubtedly underestimates the overall workplace demand for graduates from
our program. Dr. Kelton's remarks suggest that we can expect even better job prospects for our
graduates than are outlined in this proposal.

Dr. Kelton has not suggested that we make any changes to the program as proposed. However,
he made three specific suggestions as they relate to program management activities.

  1. Dr. Kelton suggested that we expand our recruiting activities to include undergraduates with
      technical degrees such as engineering and mathematics. This comment was based on his
      experience with successful recruitment and placement of students with more technical
      backgrounds at the University of Cincinnati. As a result of his observations, this version of
      the proposal specifically indicates our intention to recruit students in these areas, as




                                                     24


                                         ..~. ----------------- --. ...... ...-
                                         .......
      indicated in the Potential Applicant Pool narrative in section RI. (Bona Fide Needs) of this
      report.

  2. Dr. Kelton suggests that enrollment projections in Table 1 should be easily achieved because
      of, ".. .lack of competition [from other local degree programs] and Denver's hightech
      workforce." Indeed, he suspects that enrollment might grow more rapidly than projected. We
      have chosen not to change the Table I projections in light of these comments for two reasons.
      First, the Regents' 4J document specifically recommends conservative projections to avoid
      program cancellation in the third year of the program. Secondly, even with the projections
      used in Table I, we estimate an immediate revenue surplus for the university as a result of the
      program. Thus, if the program grows faster than anticipated, we will still be enjoying a
      positive revenue stream as a result of the implementation of the program.


  3. Dr. Kelton questions whether a dual MBA/M.S. degree in Decision Sciences will be viable.
      That view is based on the assumption that MBA programs are lock-step. Indeed, ours is not.
      Evidence suggesting the feasibility of a dual degree arrangement with the MBA degree
      comes from two of our students who have approached the Decision Sciences Discipline
      Director in the Business School at UCDHSC with interest in a dual degree option.
      Regardless, as Dr. Kelton notes, ".. .of course, there's almost zero cost of giving [the dual
      degree option] a try initially."

In summary, Professor Kelton has enthusiastically endorsed the proposed program. His
comments have required few changes to the proposal, although including technically-oriented
people in the potential applicant pool populations has been included in the current version of the
proposal.




                                                25
                                                                 Appendix A
                         Supporting Documentation, Calculations, and Assumptions

  Table 1: Enrollment Projections

  Name of Program: Master of Science in Decision Sciences, Business School Name of
  Institution: University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center

  Definitions
       .
      Academic year is the period beginning July 1 and concluding June 30
       .
      Headcount projections represent an unduplicated count of those students officially admitted to the program and
       enrolled at the institution during the academic year.
       .
      FTE is defined as the full-time equivalent number of those students majoring in the program, regardless of the
       classes enrolled, during the academic year.
       .
      Program graduate is defmed as a student who finishes all academic program requirements and graduates with a
                                                                      .
       formal award within a particular academic year. Special Notes: To calculate the annual headcount enrollment,
   add new enrollees to the previous year headcount and subtract
       the number who graduated in the preceding year. Adjust by the anticipated attrition rate.
       .
      To calculate FTE, multiply the number of students times the projected number of credit hours students will be
       typically enrolled in per year and divide by 30.
       .
      The data in each column is the annual unduplicated number of declared program majors. Since this table
       documents program demand, course enrollments are not relevant and shall not be included in the headcount or
       FTE data.


                                      2008-09      2009-10        2010-11     2011-12      2012-13           Full
                                                                                                          Implemen-
                                          AYI        AY2              AY3       AY4          AY5            tation
I-a        In-state headcount              5           9               12        15           16              25
I-b        Out-of-state headcount          0          1                1         1            1                3
2          Program headcount               5          10               13        16           17              28
3-a        In-state FTE                   2.5        4.5                6       7.5            8             12.5
3-b        Out-of-state FTE                0         0.5              0.5       0.5          0.5              1.5
4          Program FTE                    2.5          5              6.5        8           8.5              14
5          Program Graduates               0           5                5        8            8                             ~JfVf

  The next page explains the specific source data for projecting the program headcount and ot~ ~~
  Table 1 assumptions and calculations.                                                         _   J. \, i :J(f' ~J.
                     erson who 0 pleted the Enrollment Table, Title, Date ~ \\~I.(".I t1 \ ~L\J\v1 tQ 0\ 1D\ \ ;\~

                  ~
                                                                                           ~(\~~
       .         ~               ..r2~                     ////07..                 .         ...
                                                                                            Si~             ',~'.

  Assoc. Professor 0 Quanl1tatIve Methods and Director of DecIsIOn SCIences Dlsclplwe, ~':'                     \\h~a1
  Business School, UCDHSC, ma.smith@cudenver.edu,                                                    I\   :t 1/        "\
      Signature of Governing Board Information Officer/Date


                                                         26
Table 1. Enrollment Projections (continued)

Methodology

To determine headcount projections, we undertook a nationwide study of Business Schools that
offer similar programs. The Virginia Commonwealth University was used as our benchmark.
Like UCDHSC, Virginia Commonwealth:

   . is a publicly-funded urban university in a moderately-sized urban area (Richmond
       population: 826,000),
   . is a large university (30,000 students) with a two-campus structure including university
       hospital, clinics, and health sciences center,
   . has a Business School that is accredited by AACSB International (the Association to
       Advance Collegiate Schools of Business), and
   . has an M.S. degree in Decision Sciences in its Business School.
We contacted the Business School at Virginia Commonwealth and inquired about the number of
total M.S. students in their Business School (40) and the number ofthose students who are M.S.
Decision Sciences majors (3). Given this information, M.S. Decision Sciences students are 7%
(3/40) of all Master of Science students at Virginia Commonwealth. The Business School at
UCDHSC had 399 M.S. students in Spring 2006. Applying the 7% figure from Virginia
Commonwealth to UCDHSC suggests that we can anticipate 28 (7% of 399) M.S. Decision
Sciences students in the UCDHSC Business School program at full implementation.

Given the specialized nature of the degree, we anticipate needing eight to ten years to reach full
implementation headcount of 28 students.

Years 1-5 Student FTE Assumptions

   1. Annual New Enrollees: Given the highly specialized nature of the proposed degree, we
       anticipate that the program will initially grow slowly, but reach full implementation of28
       students by year ten. For the first five years, we assume that we will admit: 5 new students
       in years 1-2; eight new students in years 3-4, and; ten new students in year 5.
   2. Graduates: Our graduate students are working adults going to school part-time. We
       anticipate they will complete the 10-course degree in two years (2 courses in two fall terms,
       2 courses in two spring terms and 1 course in each of two summer semesters).
   3. Attrition: Because we will have a smaller program with strong faculty/student contact and
       mentoring, we anticipate losing only one student to attrition during the first five years of
       the program. This has been allocated in A Y5.
   4. In-State Percentage: We estimate that about 10% of our students will be non-resident. This
       figure is the average percentage of non-residents over the past five academic years in three
       existing Business School programs: the MBA, the M.S. in Finance, and the M.S. in
       Accounting. We included the two M.S. programs in our comparison because, like the
       proposed M.S. in Decision Sciences, they tend to be more quantitatively oriented.




                                                 27
     Table 2: Physical Capacity Estimates


     Name of Program: Master of Science in Decision Sciences, Business School Name
     of Institution: University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center

     Purpose: This table documents the physical capacity of the institution to offer the program and/or
     the plan for achieving the capacity. Complete A or B

     Part A

    I certify that this proposed degree program can be fully implemented and accommodate the
    enrollment projects provided in this proposal without requiring additional space or renovating
    existing space during the first five years.


    Governing Board Capital Construction Office/Date

    Part B

    Assignable          Total     Available     Renovation        New          Lease/Rent   Revenue/
   Square Feet:        Needed                                  Construction                  Source
  Type of Space
Classroom                  9          9              0               0              0            NA
                      classrooms classrooms
Instructional              0          0              0               0              0            NA
Lab
Offices                   0            0             0               0              0          NA
Study                     0            0             0               0              0          NA
Special/General           0            0             0               0              0          NA
Use
Other                      0          0              0               0              0            NA
              Total        9          9              0               0              0            NA
                      classrooms classrooms

    The next page contains the narrative justifying the values found in Table 2, Part B.


    Signature of Person who completed the Institutional Physical Capacity Table, Title, Date

      .~~~ III,/a?
    Assoc. Professor of Quantitative Methods and Director of Decision Sciences Discipline,
    Business School, UCDHSC, ma.smith@cudenver.edu




                                                    28
Table 2: Physical Capacity Estimates (continued)



Explanation of Physical Capacity Estimates

The estimates in Table 2 on the prior page show additional space needs for the total of the first
five years of the proposed program.

Classroom Needs: Appendix A, Table 4 of this report displays a typical sequencing of courses for
our students. Using Table 4, we constructed Table 5 (Appendix A) of this report, which shows a
tentative schedule of required and elective courses to be taught during the first five academic
years of the program. Among the 91 sections of courses displayed in Table 5, eightytwo of those
sections will be offered regardless of approval of the program (please see the footnotes to Table 5
for a detailed explanation). Therefore, only 9 new sections will be offered during the first five
academic years of the program. We anticipate that the 9 new sections can be taught in small (10-
15) to moderate (20-45) capacity classrooms.

We anticipate needing 1 additional classroom in A Yl (2008-09) and two additional classrooms in
each of the second through fifth years of the program. Given the large number of online courses
now offered by the Business School, we hope that these nine classrooms will be available from the
space vacated by classes now offered online. In the event that classroom space remains tight on
the Auraria campus, we will offer some of these sections off-campus as needed and when feasible.
For example, we anticipate that the Decision Sciences Practicum course will have a small number
of enrolled students and might easily fit within one of the conference rooms in the CU-Denver
building.

Offices: We are not requesting additional full-time faculty lines for this program. We intend to
staff the additional sections with part-time faculty. We have a large part-time faculty office in the
Business School that can accommodate any new part-time lecturers. No new office space is
needed or requested.

Instructional Lab, Study, Special/General Use, and Other: We require none of these spaces for
the proposed program.




                                                 29
  Table 3. Projected New Expenses for New Program and Revenue



                                      2008-09     2009-10         2010-11      2011-12       2012-13
                                      AYI          AY2             AY3          AY4           AY5
Revenue
  Student Tuition (Resident)            $35,300         $63,540      $84,720     $105,900      $112,960
   Student Tuition (Non-resident)                       $16,768      $16,768      $16,768       $16,768
              TOTAL REVENUE             $35,300         $80,768     $101,488     $122,668      $129,728
Operating Expenses
Faculty                                  $4,292          $8,584       $8,584       $8,584        $8,584
Financial Aid to specific program             0              0             0            0             0
Instructional Materials                       0              0             0            0             0
Program Administration
   Faculty Compensation                $3,000       $3,000          $3,000       $3,000        $3,000
   Staff Compensation                    $180         $360            $468         $576          $612
   Operating Expenses                  $1,227       $1,051          $1,057       $1,057        $1,227
             Total Program Admin.        $4,407        $4,411         $4,525        $4,633        $4,839
Rent/Lease                                    0            0               0             0             0
Laboratory and Other Operating                0            0               0             0             0
Program Start-up Expenses                     0            0               0             0             0
              TOTAL EXPENSES             $8,699         $12,995      $13,109     $13 ,217       $13,423
           PROGRAM SURPLUS            $26,601       $67,773        $88,379     $109,451      $116,305




   Explanation of Costs and Sources of Revenue in Table 3

   Student Tuition: We expect our part-time students to take two 3-credit hour courses each spring
        and fall semester and one 3-credit hour summer course. Using 2007-2008 graduate Business
        School tuition rates, a resident student is estimated to pay $2,824 for 6 credits hours (2
        courses) each spring and fall semester and $1,412 for one 3-credit hour summer course for a
        total of $7,060 tuition revenue per resident student per academic year. Analogous
        calculations for non-resident students estimate tuition revenues from nonresident students
        of$16,768 per academic year. Multiplying per student revenue estimates by Table 1, line 2
        (projected student headcount) generates the student tuition revenue figures shown in Table
        3. Revenue figures will be higher with tuition increases or if fulltime students enroll in the
        program. All anticipated costs of the program are expected to be covered by new tuition, as
        indicated in the Program Surplus line in Table 3.




                                                   30
Table 3. Projected New Expenses for New Program and Revenue (continued)

Faculty: Over the first five years of the program, we will need to offer only 9 additional
     sections. Please see Table 5 with accompanying narrative and the explanatory notes
     accompanying Table 2. Those additional nine sections will be taught by existing faculty.
     We will hire part-time lecturers to teach the nine sections that would otherwise have been
     taught by existing faculty. A part-time lecturer for the Business School currently receives
     $4,292 per graduate course. We anticipate needing one lecturer (one section at $4,292) for
     the first year of the program, and two per academic year thereafter at $8,584.

Financial Aid to specific program: We currently have no financial aid dedicated exclusively to
     the proposed program

Instructional Materials: Laptop computers for instructional purposes are already provided by
      the university or Business School. Any new software needed is purchased by students, as
      are books and other course-related instructional materials. No new instructional material
      expenses are anticipated.

Program Administration Faculty Compensation: One faculty member will be designated to
     oversee the academic administration of the program. That faculty member will be
     compensated $3,000 per academic year for these duties.

Program Administration Staff Compensation: Staff compensation will involve additional time of
     the Business School advising staff. The Assistant Dean in the Business School estimates that
     each student requires three hours of advising, degree maintenance, and email/phone
     consultations each academic year. We will hire part-time graduate student assistants to fulfill
     the needs of the new students for the proposed degree; the current rate for a part-time
     assistant is $12/hour (no benefits). Therefore, we estimate additional staff time to be $36 per
     student per year. Multiplying $36 by Table 1, line 2 (student head count) generates the staff
     compensation figures shown in Table 3.

Program Administration Operating Expenses: These include the cost to print brochures to
     advertise the new program and miscellaneous office supplies (copy paper, folders, etc.).
     Cost estimates come from current expenses for existing Business School programs; it is
     estimated that 1500 brochures will be needed per year.

Rent/Least: Not needed. See Table 2 narrative for explanation

Laboratory and Other Operating Expenses: No lab space is required for the proposed program.
    No other operating expenses are anticipated.

Program Start-up Costs: No new construction or equipment is needed. The Auraria library
     currently has academic journals and data bases needed for the program; no new library
     acquisitions are anticipated.




                                                31
Table 3. Projected New Expenses for New Program and Revenue (continued)



Dean's Statement

The statement from the Dean verifying adequacy of resources to support the new program and
confirming that the projected resources and reallocations are reasonable is attached as hard copy
to the end of this report.




                                               32
Table 4. A Typical Course Sequencing for M.S. in Decision Sciences Students

 Year 1

 Fall Semester                  Spring Semester                   Summer Semester

  . BUSN 6530 (Data               . BUSN 6630 (Operations           . DSCI 6230 (Business
       Analysis)                       Management)                     Forecasting)
  .   DSCI 6820 (Project          .   DSCI 6460 (Decision
       Management)                     Analysis)

 Year 2

 Fall Semester                  Spring Semester                   Summer Semester

  . Elective #1   .               . DSCI 6910 (Decision             . Elective #4
  Elective #2                          Sciences Practicum)
                                  . Elective #3



Explanation of Table 4

Graduate Business students are typically working adults who attend school part-time. Therefore,
Table 4 displays a typical sequencing for students attending our program part-time. We see no
difficulties accommodating full-time students, should any apply to our program. Appendix D of
this document provides full course descriptions.




                                               33
    Table 5. Tentative Schedule of Required and Elective Courses for Years 1-5 of the Program (continued)
Course #        Course Name       Instructor      Course #     Course Name       Instructor    Course #  Course Name      Instructor
        A Y 4: 2011-2012 Fall Semester                  AY4: 2011-2012 Sprin Semester             AY4: 2011-2012 Summer Semester
BUSN 6530      Data Analysis Hampel              BUSN 6530 Data Analysis      Hampel          BUSN 6530 Data Analysis Hampel
BUSN 6630      OP. Mgmt.       Harper            BUSN 6630 Op. Mgmt.          Harper          BUSN 6630 OP. Mgmt.      Harper
DSCI 6820      Proi. Mgmt.     Harper            DSCI 6460    Dec. Analysis   Hampel          DSCI6230   Forecasting   Smith
DSCI 6822      Services Ops. Kellogg             DSCI6910     Practicum       Kochenbere:er DSCI 6826 Supply Chain Harper
DSCI 6440      Quality         Cote              DSCI 6828    Data Mining     Bryant
FNCE 6840      Fin. Modeling Daley/Morris*       DSCI 6220    Res. Methods    Bryant
MKTG 6050      Mktg. Res.      Parathasarathy*   FNCE 6840    Fin. Modeling   Daley/Morris*
                                                 MKTG 6050 Mktg. Res.         Parathasarathy*



                                                        A Y5: 2012-2013 S rin
BUSN 6530                                                     Data Anal sis
BUSN 6630                                                     o . M mt.
DSCI 6460                                                     Dec. Anal sis
DSCI6910                                                      Practicum
DSCI 6440                                                     Quality
FNCE 6840                                                     Fin. Modelin
MKTG 6050                                                     Mkt . Res.


Appendix D of this document provides complete course descriptions and prerequisites

Table 5 Notes and Additional Commentary
    *
1. John Daley is an Instructor of Finance. James Morris is a Professor of Finance. Madhavan Parthasarathy is an Associate Professor of
     Marketing. The courses FNCE 6840 (Financial Modeling) and MKTG 6050 (Marketing Research) are elective courses for the
     proposed M.S. in Decision Sciences degree. These courses will be offered regardless of approval of the M.S. in Decision Sciences
     degree because they fulfill degree requirements in the M.S. Marketing and M.S. Finance programs. FNCE 6840 and MKTG 6050 are
     tentatively scheduled to be offered every fall and spring semester to meet student needs in their respective programs and have
     additional capacity to readily absorb new Decision Sciences students.


                                                                     35
Table 5. Tentative Schedule of Required and Elective Courses for Years 1-5 of the Program
         (continued)

Table 5 Notes and Additional Commentary (continued)

2. BUSN 6530 (Data Analysis for Managers) and BUSN 6630 (Operations Management) are
    required courses in the MBA program. They will be offered every semester regardless of
    approval of the proposed M.S. degree in Decision Sciences to meet the needs of the MBA
    program.

3. All DSCI courses in Table 5 except DSCI 6460 (Decision Analysis) and DSCI 6910 (Decision
    Sciences Practicum) have been offered in the past as elective courses in the MBA, M.S.
    Finance, and other M.S. degree programs. They will be offered regardless of approval of the
    proposed M.S. in Decision Sciences in order to fulfill known, documented student demand
    for these courses.

4. Only two new courses will need to be developed for the proposed M.S. degree in Decision
    Sciences: DSCI 6460 (Decision Analysis) and DSCI 6910 (Decision Sciences Practicum).
    Over the first five years ofthe proposed M.S. in Decision Sciences program, only nine new
    sections will be delivered as shown in Table 5. We will staff those nine sections with existing
    faculty members who will be replaced by hiring lecturers to teach undergraduate and MBA
    sections that would otherwise have been taught by the faculty shown in Table 5 for DSCI 6460
    and DSCI 6910.

5. Teaching loads for the Decision Sciences faculty (fall and spring contracted semesters) are
    listed below. Faculty whose full course loads are not met by teaching courses shown in Table
    5 will satisfy their required course loads by teaching in other Business School degree
    programs as indicated.

      . Peter G. Bryant, Professor, teaching load of 4 courses. Professor Bryant also teaches
            in the undergraduate, MBA, and Ph.D. in CS/IS programs.
      .   Murray Cote, Associate Professor, teaching load of2 courses Goint appointment with
            the Health Sciences Center). Dr. Cote also teaches in the MBA program.
      .   Fred Hampel, Instructor, teaching load of 7 courses. Mr. Hampel also teaches in the
            undergraduate and MBA programs.
      .   Michael Harper, Senior Instructor, teaching load of7 courses. Dr. Harper also teaches
            in the undergraduate and MBA programs.
      .   Deborah Kellogg, Associate Professor, teaching load of 4 courses. Professor Kellogg
            also teaches in the undergraduate and MBA programs.
      .   Gary Kochenberger, Professor, teaching load of 4 courses. Professor Kochenberger
            also teaches in the undergraduate and MBA programs.
                . Marlene Smith, Associate Professor, teaching load of2 courses (download for
            Decision Sciences Discipline Director). Professor Smith also teaches in the
            undergraduate, MBA, and M.S. Finance programs.

     Abbreviated curriculum vitae for these faculty are shown in Appendix B of this document.


                                                 36
                                           Appendix B
                         Decision Sciences Faculty Vitae (Abbreviated)



The following seven faculty members are associated with the Decision Sciences discipline in the
Business School at the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Their
abbreviated curriculum vitae follow.

      . Peter G. Bryant, Ph.D. in Statistics from Stanford University
      . Murray Cote, Ph.D. in Management Science from Texas A&M
      . Fred Hampel, M.S. degrees in Agricultural Economics and Master of Accountancy
            from Kansas State
      .   Michael Harper, Ph.D. in Operations Research and Statistics, Rensselaer Polytechnic
            Institute
      .   Deborah Kellogg, Ph.D. in Business Operations Management, University of Southern
            California
      .   Gary Kochenberger, Ph.D. in Management Science, University of Colorado at
            Boulder
      .   Marlene Smith, Ph.D. in Economics, University of Florida




                                                37

				
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