Nath Sagar, Dam Water, Rotifiers, Biodiversity

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					                                 Vidya Pradhan et al., IJSID 2011, 1 (3), 320-326


                                                                                              ISSN:2249-5347
                                                                                                        IJSID
                         International Journal of Science Innovations and Discoveries              An International peer
                                                                                              Review Journal for Science


Research Article                                                   Available online through www.ijsidonline.info

  BIODIVERSITY OF POPULATION DYNAMICS AND SEASONAL VARIATION IN NATH
   SAGAR RESERVOIR AT PAITHAN (M.S) INDIA, WITH REFERENCE TO ROTIFIERS
                              Vidya Pradhan1, Ranjana Patel2 & Sudha G. Bansode3
1Dr.   Rafiq Zakaria College for Women, Aurangabad (M.S) India; 2Pratisthan College, Paithan, Aurangabad
                  (M.S) India; 3Shankar rao Mohite Mahavidyala, Akluj, Solapur (M.S) India.



 Received: 03.09.2011

 Modified: 16.10.2011

 Published: 29.12.2011
                                                                      ABSTRACT

                                            In the present paper we report herewith the 8 rotifers namely
 *Corresponding Author
                                    Monastyle (Lecane) bulla, Lecane clososterca, Lepadella Ovalis, Brachionus
                                    calyciflons,   Brachionus    forficula,   Brachionus     angulasis,      Euchlansis
                                    Chillatata, Testudinella patina from 3 different stations located in the Nath
                                    Sagar, Jaikwadi Project, Paithan, Dist. Aurangabad during the year 2008-
                                    2009.
                                    Keywords: Nath Sagar, Dam Water, Rotifiers, Biodiversity.

 Name:
 Dr Vidya Pradhan
 Place:
 Reader and Head,
 Dept of Zoology, Dr Rafiq
 Zakaria College for women,
 Aurangabad (M S) India
 E-mail:
 drvidyasp@gmail.com




                                                   INTRODUCTION


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                                                INTRODUCTION
       Zooplanktons are the most fascinating groups of microorganism found in aquatic body. It has been
used as an indicator for monitoring water quality, tropic status and population level. It also plays a role of
converting phytoplanktons into food suitable for fish and aquatic animals. Zooplanktons has been a
subject of study in India and several workers Ganapati (1943), Harikrishnan et al., (1999), Pawar et al.,
(2006). The zooplanktons in water belongs to four main taxonomic groups such as Rotifera, Copepoda,
Cladocera are the dominated present group of crustacean in the fresh water habitat. The occurrence and
abundance of zooplanktons in a pond depends on its productivity, which in term is influenced by
physicochemical parameters studied. The rotifers are being considered as the most important soft bodied
invertebrated, Hutchinson (1967), Edmondson (1965) and Usha Choubey (1997).
       Rotifers act as a basic food for fishes at early stages at their external feeding (Nikolsky 1963). It
constitutes an important link in micro food chain operating within the aquatic medium and therefore
acting as energy transducers. Rotifers act as an indicator of trophic status besides water quality of an
ecosystem.
       During the course of present investigation (June 2008 to May 2009) an attempt has been made to
study the several seasonal fluctuations in zooplanktons (Rotifers) population of the Nath Sagar reservoir.
The total number of zooplanktons were counted the different species were also identified. About 24
zooplanktons species, 3 Ostracoda species and 5 Cladocera species were found. The Rotifers, Branchionas
was dominant among the zooplanktons in the reservoir.
       Species emphasis on studies of zooplanktons (Rotifers) was done during the present study.
Present work revealed the occurrence of Rotifers species dominating qualitative amongst the total
zooplanktons communicating in habiting the reservoir. The zooplanktons (Rotifers) species identified
were Asplachana species, Brachionas durgae, Calyciflorous vandoreas, and (Haque N. Khan 1998).
       Paithan is located at latitude 1953 N and longitude 75.25E. The Nath Sagar is reservoir created
behind Paithan Dam. The reservoir has submerged 35,000 hectares of land having a catchment area of
21.750 sq. km. with a gross storage capacity of 2909 M cubic meter the existing water supply to
Aurangabad is supplemented by this reservoir.
                                         MATERIAL AND METHODS
       The present study was conducted for a period of one year is from June 2008 – May 2009 at the
three study station along the reservoir satiation 1 is the site of river, station 2 is lentil water site and
station 3 is the old well near the city. The sampling was done on monthly basis. The zooplankton net
(mesh size 0.03–0.4mm) by filtering 100 litres of water by plastic bucket of 20 liter capacity. The volume
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of sample was adjusted to 30ml in a tube and also preserved by adding 5% formalin. The present samples
were then brought for the taxonomic studies to the laboratory and analyzed under the microscope and
were identified following Pennak (1968), Edmonson (1959) and Adom (1985). A list of species from each
sample was prepared. The rotifers were then identified according to the keys from Ward and Whipple
(1958) and Battish (1992).
                                          RESULT AND DISCUSSION
       During the course of study eight species of four different families of rotifers were recorded. These
rotifers are recorded by various scientist from different parts of the world from which references are
Armengol & Micracle (2000), Nene (1985), Salorlcar (1996) and Somani (2002, 2003). Rotifers in the
reservoir are represented by 8 species in Monastyle (Lecane) bulla, lecane clososterca, Lepadella ovalis,
Brachionus Calyciflons, Brashionus forficula, Testudinella Pativer. The monthly variations in rotifers are
illustrated in the table-2. The annual rotifers population was 50.05% at S1, 41.63% at S2 and 40.60% at S3.
The quantitatively rotifers exhibited 3 peak periods in the months of October, August & September. This
peak has been recorded by Gupta and Sudan (1985). In October peak of rotifers observed during this
study was due to the contribution of lecance clososterca and lecane ovalis at station 1. The maximum
rotifers population was recorded during the months of August, September 2008 in rainy season. The
minimum rotifers population was recorded during summer season Mohd. Ahsan (1980) reported the
high population of rotifers during monsoon season. The dominance of rotifers may be attributed to their
dependence on abundant particulate organic matter (Sarwar and Pranee, 1995). Each of these peaks is an
outcome of the outburst of population of one or at the most two species of rotifers rather than a sum total
of similar patterns of rotifers population of fluctuations. Present observations showed that the maximum
diversity occurred during March 2009. Similar findings had been made Gupta & Sudan (1985) Maximum
quantitative diversity in the months of June and July was recorded. In the recorded observation has
shown that the least population of rotifers was in the months of January, February and March 2009,
Sehgal (1980), Kumar (1990), Balpatia (1998), Pradhan and Chakroborty (2006).
       In the present study the seasonal averages of various physic-chemical parameters were studied.
(Table 1) The water temperature ranged between 270C to 320C, Minimum months of June 2008 and it
was maximum in the months of May 2009. George (1966) reported that the temperature is the main
factor regulating the production of zooplankton, Salaskar observed negative co-relation of zooplankton
(Rotifers) with temperature.



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                                       Table 1: Physico chemical properties

      month             Station 1                        Station 2                       Station 3
               Temp   pH DO Cl          NO3    Temp    pH DO Cl         NO3    Temp    pH DO Cl         NO3
      Jun 08   27     8.2 3.5 444       4.8    27.2    8.9 4.2 487      4.7    27.2    8.7 5.2 499      4.8
      Jul 08   28.1   7.9 4.8 234       3.5    27.6    7.2 4.5 276      3.8    27.7    7.7 4.6 292      3.8
      Aug 08   27.9   7.7 5.3 321       3.6    27.9    6.8 5.5 345      3.3    28.3    7.2 5.2 328      3.7
      Sep 08   28.8   7.9 4.9 134       4.1    28.6    7.5 6.4 198      4.8    28.1    6.7 7.4 188      4.5
      Oct 08   27.2   8.1 5.2 99        5.5    27.8    7.9 6.2 124      5.0    27.9    7.4 6.5 143      5.7
      Nov 08   27.4   6.9 5.8 167       4.2    28.2    7.7 4.8 190      4.6    28.9    7.9 4.2 165      4.8
      Dec 08   28     7.3 6.9 232       4.7    29.1    8.1 7.5 276      4.2    28.5    8.0 6.5 298      4.3
      Jan09    28.3   7.6 5.7 324       2.1    29.5    8.1 6.1 370      2.6    29.6    6.8 6.0 345      2.8
      Feb 09   27.8   7.8 6.7 326       3.6    29.9    7.5 6.5 376      3.9    29.9    7.9 6.7 320      3.9
      Mar 09   29.4   7.5 4.7 389       3.3    30.6    7.9 4.5 389      3.5    31.2    7.2 4.6 345      3.4
      Apr 09   30.3   7.7 3.8 347       3.9    30.9    7.2 5.4 397      3.8    31      7.1 5.8 356      3.5
      May      32     7.9 3.9 334       4.1    31.5    8.5 4.2 399      4.3    31.9    7.6 4.2 389      4.6
      09
                               (Units; temp 0C, DO mg/dm3, Cl mg/dm3 NO3 µg/dm3)

       The pH of the reservoir ranged 6.9 to 8.2. It was alkaline the value of alkalinity was observed
throughout the study period. In also showed negative co-relation with the rotifer. pH is also considered to
be the most important factor regulating the population density of rotifers.
       Dissolved oxygen (DO) is other vital parameters regulating the survival of aquatic life. It was found
to be maximum in the month of December and minimum in the month of June. It shows inverse relation
with temperature of water.
       The chloride concentration was recorded to be maximum in the month of June 2008 while
minimum during October 2008.
       The nitrate level was maximum in the month of October 2008 and minimum in January 2009.
Nutrients like phosphates and nitrates play important role in the biological activities Singh (1981). In the
present study negative co-relation was observed between rotifers.
       Seasonal distribution of rotifers station 1 shows Monastyle (Lecane) bulla showed the highest
population of July, August and September (Table 2). Population of rotifers occurred June, November,
January, February and the species of rotifers was in the month of April – May and the rotifers species
Brachionus Calyciflons at station 1. Even station 2 the population rotifers was highest in July & August,
least in October & November. An average again in March the species of rotifers Lepadella ovalis and the
least in station 2.
       It shows at station 3 the presence of rotifers species. Monastyla (Lecane) bulla in the month of July
but the population of rotifers compare to station 3 it also showed that the population dynamics of rotifers


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at station 1, 2 & 3 showed that it was more in July and least in October, November, December and average
in the month of April and May.
       Table No. 1: List of rotifers species identified from 3 sampling station during 2008 – 2009
       Sr. No.     Rotifers                                    Station-I      Station-II     Station-III
           1             Monastyle (Lecane) bulla                    +              +               -
           2                Lecane clososterca                       +              +               +
           3                 Lepadella ovalis                        +              +               -
           4              Brachionus calyciflons                     +              +               +
           5               Brachionus forficula                      -              +               +
           6              Brachionus angulasis                       +              +               +
           7               Euchlanis chillatata                      +              +               +
           8               Testudinella patina                       -              +               +




                                                 CONCLUSION
       We observed that in the month of October Rotifier population was maximum and it’s minimum in
the month of January I t was because of the low temperature of the surface water. At site of river (station
1) more rotifer population was observed whereas minimum was observed at old well (station 3).
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