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					                   Lancaster School District
             Early Childhood Education Program
                 Head Start/State Preschool
                    Self Assessment 2010


                               Table of Contents



Section 1: Health Services…………………………………………………..………....2

Section 2: Nutrition Services………………………………………………………….10

Section 3: Safe Environments………………………………………………………..22

Section 4 Transportation Services………………………………………………......42

Section 5: Disabilities Services…………………………………………………........54

Section 6: Mental Health Services…………………………………………………...72

Section 7: Family and Community Services………………………………………..86

Section 8: Education and Early Childhood Development Services……………..102

Section 9: Fiscal Management……………………………………………………..125

Section 10: Program Design and Management………………………………….143

Section 11: Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance…..181
                                Health Services
Health Services Question 1A

Has the program hired staff or consultants as content area experts to oversee
health services who have training and experience in public health, nursing, health
education, maternal and child health, or health administration? Does the program
assure that health procedures are performed only by a licensed or certified health
professional?
1304.52(d)(2)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: LVN license on file at HRS

   The LVN (Health Coordinator) has worked for Lancaster School District in the
    health service area for 18 years. She has past experience in labor & delivery,
    wellborn baby and NICU care. She has also worked 14 years in a General
    Practitioner’s office as the nurse in charge of patient care and teaching.

   Qualified nursing staff performs all medical procedures. Classroom staff is
    trained in CPR/First Aid and receive individual instruction on medication
    administration as needed.

Area of Concern – None

Health Services Question 2A

Does the program determine whether each child has an ongoing source of
continuous, accessible health care? 1304.20(a)(1)(i), 1304.20(a)(2)

Note: 1304.20(a)(2) applies only to Migrant and Seasonal programs and should
be cited in conjunction with 1304.20(a)(1)(i) for such programs.

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Confidential Medical Record Part 1-
pages 1,2 and 3- (Determines health insurance coverage, child’s health history,
food allergies, etc.) Physical/Dental forms, electronic file, Food Allergy Alert form,
List of Medical/Dental providers

   Children’s files are reviewed by the Health Coordinator at enrollment and as
    needed for health concerns and necessary follow-up. Food allergies and
    health concerns are documented on a health problem list per classroom site
    along with listing the child’s food allergy on the Food Allergy Alert which is
    posted on the classroom refrigerator in full view.




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    Children without medical coverage are determined and a verbal referral
    along with electronic communication is made to the Family Service Provider
    to assist parents.

Area of Concern – None

Health Services Question 2B

Has the program obtained from a health care professional a determination of
whether each child is up to date on a schedule of primary and preventive health
care, helped parents bring children up to date when necessary, and kept children
up to date, as required?

Note: 1304.20(a)(2) applies only to Migrant and Seasonal programs and should
be cited in conjunction with 1304.20(a)(1)(ii) for such programs.

The program is required to know which children are not current on required
primary and preventive health care, help parents bring their children up to date,
and have a system to ensure that children who are current stay current.

1304.20(a)(1)(ii),
1304.20(a)(1)(ii)(A),
1304.20(a)(1)(ii)(B),
1304.20(a)(2)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Health tracking binder, Power School,
Items for LACOE / Health Nurses (electronic file), Report binder, Tickler file,
IN/OUT lists, California EPSDT Periodicity schedule, Hearing & Vision binder,
Notification letter, and List of Medical/Dental Providers.

   Health tracking: Tracking of physicals and dentals begins at enrollment.
    Dates on physicals and dentals are reviewed and checked with EPSDT
    standards by the Health Coordinator. Children out of compliance are listed by
    site and needed service. Physicals are due in 30 days after enrollment.
    Dentals are due in 90 days after enrollment.
    Health tracking includes those with up- to date physical/dental at enrollment
    but will need follow-up due to expiration. (i.e. returning students).

   Physical/Dental follow-up: Initial contact is by letter, informing parent that
    physical and/or dental is still needed. Notification letters are mailed to the
    child’s home address and include a list of Medical/Dental providers that
    participate in either Medi-Cal or are low or no cost, along with coupons for
    dental exams. Those parents who do not respond are sent a second notice
    along with a phone call from the Health Coordinator. All information is
    updated as physicals and dentals are received to keep information current.



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   Immunization follow-up: Immunizations are verified at enrollment by the
    Health Coordinator. A “tickler” file is kept in the health office along with an
    updated student list. Letters are sent on a monthly basis for children who
    were conditionally enrolled with up-to-date immunizations. Parents are
    notified prior to the immunization due date.
    A waiver list is also on file. This allows immediate notification to parents of
    those children if an outbreak (i.e. measles) should occur in their child’s
    classroom.
    We also immediately notify the parents of children who are immuno-
    compromised.

   Hearing & Vision screenings: Screenings are provided to all students within
    45 days of enrollment.

   New Students: The registration clerk provides us with new student
    information via a weekly IN/OUT list. Files are reviewed as received.

   NON-Insured children: Families who do not have a medical home who are
    either new to our area or have no insurance are referred to the health office.
    The nurse and family service providers partner together to refer these families
    to Health Families, Care-A-Van, etc. Medi-Cal intake is also provided.

Area of Concern - None

Health Services Question 2C

Has the program, in collaboration with each child's parent, performed or obtained
the required linguistically and age-appropriate screening procedures to identify
concerns regarding children within 45 days of entry into the program, obtained
guidance on how to use screening findings, and used multiple sources of
information to make appropriate referrals?

Note: 1304.20(a)(2) applies only to Migrant and Seasonal programs and should
be cited in conjunction with 1304.20(b) for such programs.

1304.20(b)(1),
1304.20(b)(2),
1304.20(b)(3), 1304.20(a)(2)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: ASQ-SE (Ages & Stages
Questionnaire/Social Emotional) and the ASQ-3.

   Per interview with the Education Specialists, all children are screened using
    the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ-3) and ASQ: Social and Emotional



                                                                                      4
    Questionnaire (ASQ:SE). The teachers complete the screening with the
    parent or the parent completes it on their own. The Education Specialists get
    a copy of all questionnaires and information summaries. Children with
    ASQ:SE scores above the cut off are referred to the Mental Health Support
    Provider, who completes a follow-up form after consulting with the teacher
    and parent(s).

   Children with ASQ scores below the cut off are re-screened within four (4)
    months. If the child’s score is above the cut off then they are considered
    within the normal range; however, if the child’s score is below the cut off, then
    the child is referred to the Student Study Team for additional support.

Area of Concern - None

Health Services Question 2D

Does the program ensure that each child with a known, observable, or suspected
health, dental, or developmental problem receives further testing, examination,
and treatment from a licensed or certified health care professional? Does the
program ensure that appropriate follow-up actions are taken?
1304.20(a)(1)(iii),
1304.20(c)(3)(ii),
1304.20(c)(1)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Health Tracking binder, Health Problem
List, Power School (electronic file), Physical, Confidential Medical Record, Parent
Referral letters (physical, dental, immunization, anemia, lead, H/V), Daily Health
Log, Communicable Disease Book, Doctor’s Notes, Immunization follow-up List

   Screenings - Referral letter is mailed to the parent advising follow-up exam by
    physician. (i.e. failed vision screening) Status of follow-up is checked monthly
    by Health Coordinator through phone contact with parent.

   Health concerns listed on physical exam, Confidential Medical Record page
    1, 2, or 3 are reviewed with parent by Health Coordinator and Plan of Action
    or IHP is developed for student when at school.

   Daily health logs (by site) determine if a child was seen for follow-up (i.e.
    ringworm) Parent is contacted by phone by Health Coordinator and directly by
    teacher if a communicable disease is suspected. After diagnosis by a doctor,
    evidence is provided to program with a doctor’s note. Communicable
    reference letters are sent home to parents.

Area of Concern – None




                                                                                    5
Health Services Question 2E

Does the program implement ongoing procedures for identifying new or recurring
medical, dental, or developmental concerns so appropriate referrals can be made
quickly? 1304.20(d)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Parent Referral letters, Daily Health
Log (Documented daily contact with parents, teachers), Hearing/Vision binder,
Accident Reports, Booboo Reports, “Stoplight” Guidelines, Illness and Injury
Notification Policy.

   A daily health check is completed by staff for each child as he enters the
    classroom. Reference is made to the “Stoplight” guidelines.

   Signs of illness or injury are reported to the nurse.


   If an injury occurs while at school, staff follows posted procedures. All injuries
    are reported to the nurse and parent.

   Notification of screening results (needing follow-up) is mailed to the parent.

Area of Concern - None

Health Services Question 2F

Does the program involve parents, consulting with them immediately when child
health or developmental problems are suspected or identified, and informing
them immediately in the case of an emergency involving their children?
1304.20(e)(1),
1304.20(e)(2),
1304.22(a)(4), 1306.35(c)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Emergency card, Disaster card,
Communicable Disease Book, Injury and Illness Notification Policy, Emergency &
Non-Emergency Procedures.

    At enrollment, health concerns are identified and addressed by the nurse.
    Suspected illness/injury/communicable disease in the classroom result in
    contact with parents by the teacher and/or nurse.

   Emergency cards provide staff with current phone numbers for each child.
    The parent completes this during registration and the teacher updates it on a




                                                                                     6
    monthly basis. A disaster card is also completed. It lists individuals the child
    may be released to in time of a disaster.

   If an injury occurs while at school, staff follows posted procedures. All injuries
    are reported to the nurse and parent.

   Signs of illness are reported to the nurse and parent.

Area of Concern – None

Health Services Question 2G

Does the program maintain written documentation of instances when parents or
other legally responsible adults refuse to give authorization for health services?
1304.20(e)(5)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Health Services Consent Form,
Signed wavier for Immunizations, Tickler file

   A list is kept in the tickler file with student’s name and site.

Area of Concern - None

Health Services Question 2H

Has the program established procedures for tracking the provision of health care
services?
1304.20(a)(1)(ii)(C)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Health Tracking Binder, Hearing/Vision
Binder, Special Meals/ Accommodation form, Health Problem List, Individualized
Health Plan

   Children out of compliance with physicals/dental are monitored by site. A list
    is made up of child’s name, site and service needed and is kept in a health
    tracking binder. Other follow-up services are maintained in the same binder
    under different sub-titles (i.e anemia). Notification letters are mailed to the
    child’s home address. A list of Medical/Dental providers is included. If no
    response, a second notice is sent along with a phone call by the nurse. The
    nurse and FSP partner together to assist the parent in whatever area is
    needed to obtain services for the child.

   Children with health concerns have an IHP in place.




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Area of Concern – None

Health Services Question 3A

Does the program ensure that a child with a short-term injury (that cannot be
readily accommodated) or short-term contagious illness is temporarily excluded
from participating in program activities or group experiences while risk to the
health or safety of that child or others is present?
1304.22(b)(1)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Illness and Injury Notification Policy,
Communicable Disease reference letters, Communicable Disease Book, Doctor’s
Notes, Health Policies & Procedures

    Parents are required to provide a doctor’s note (before the child may return
    to school) that includes diagnosis when a child has a suspected
    communicable disease (i.e. ringworm.) District policy states child must be on
    medication (if required) for 48 hours before returning to the classroom.
    Communicable reference letters are sent home to parents if exposure has
    occurred.

    Injuries also require a doctor’s note before returning to school that includes
    restrictions or special equipment (i.e.crutches) if needed, while at school.
    There is excellent communication between the teaching staff and nurse in
    reporting any suspected injury/illness.

    Area of Concern - None

Health Services Question 3B

Does the program ensure that children are not denied admission (or if already
enrolled, they are not subjected to long-term exclusion) solely because of their
health care needs or medication requirements, unless reasonable
accommodations cannot be made to reduce the health or safety risk to that child
or others without altering the nature of the program fundamentally?
1304.22(b)(2)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: IHP (Individualized Health Care Plan),
Medication Request form, Medication Administration Review form,
Health Policies & Procedures

    Individual Health Care Plans provide instruction for the teaching staff and
    allow a safe environment for the child with special health care needs.




                                                                                      8
   The nurse trains staff members as needed regarding administration of
    medication. All classrooms have a locked medicine cabinet to accommodate
    children with medication needs. A locked box is kept in the refrigerator for any
    medication that may need refrigeration.

Area of Concern – None

Health Services Question 3C

Does the program ask parents about their children's health or safety needs and
ensure that appropriate staff is informed of needed accommodations, in
accordance with the program's confidentiality policy?
1304.22(b)(3)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Health Problem List, IHP,
Special Meals/ Accommodation form, Confidentiality District Policy,
Food Allergy Confidentiality Policy

    A parent interview takes place during registration with the nurse if health
    concerns are present. The nurse develops a healthcare plan for that child per
    his individual needs. Teachers are provided with a health problem list for their
    classroom.

Area of Concern - None

Health Services Question 3D

Are written procedures established and maintained to ensure proper
administration, handling, and storage of all medications for children, staff, and
volunteers?
1304.22(c)         1304.22(c)(1),
1304.22(c)(2)       1304.22(c)(3),
1304.22(c)(4),      1304.22(c)(5),
1304.22(c)(6)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Request for Medication form,
Medication Administration Review form, Lancaster School District Polices
& Procedures

   Our District policy is: Board Policy 5141.21 (a) R&R – C.E.C. 49423

   A locked box is located in the classroom refrigerator to accommodate
    medications that require refrigeration.




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   All classrooms have a locked medicine cabinet that is recognized by a red
    cross posted on the outside of the cabinet. A posted small red cross
    designates the cabinet key.

   The nurse provides training on medication administration at initial staff in-
    service (at beginning of school year) and individually with staff when
    medication is brought to site.

Area of Concern - None

*Questions 4A - 4C refer to Early Head Start and are not applicable to our
program.


                               Nutrition Services
Staff Qualifications - Nutrition
Nutrition Services Question 1A
Has the program hired staff or consultants as content area experts to oversee
nutrition services who are registered dietitians or nutritionists? 1304.52(d)(3)

Document Review
   The following documents were reviewed: copy of college degrees,
     certificates and commission on dietetic registration card.

       The program has hired a part-time nutrition consultant who is a registered
        dietitian. Her responsibilities include overseeing nutrition services.

       I have a Masters Degree in Food and Nutrition. I am a registered dietitian
        with over 26 years experience. I have pediatric experience in community
        nutrition through WIC (Women, Infants and Children programs in two
        states, Indiana and California. I have been with the Lancaster School
        District for approximately three years. In addition, I have a certificate in
        Childhood & Adolescent Weight Management from the American Dietetic
        Association.

       I complete nutrition assessment on all enrolled children within the
        recommended time frames. I also conduct classes for staff and families of
        students. I am apprised of any food or nutrition issues that arise. I review
        and determine the appropriate nutrition education materials for nutrition
        education. I review the menu that has been developed by the Lancaster
        School District for appropriateness for the Early childhood population.

       The Health Services Coordinator also shares some of these
        responsibilities.


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Areas of Concern:
    The Program has had difficulty recruiting a full-time registered dietitian to
      take all the responsibilities of overseeing the nutrition services.

       There does not seem to be adequate number of qualified candidates in
        the area to be recruited from.


Understanding Children's Nutritional Needs
Nutrition Services Question 2A

Does the program's nutrition program include a variety of foods and meet each
child's nutritional needs and feeding requirements, including children with
disabilities and children with special medical or dietary needs? 1304.23(b)(1)

Document Review
    The following documents were reviewed: Lancaster school District
     Breakfast and Lunch menus. ECE Modified breakfast menus, Special
     Meals Form, Policy and Procedure on Special Meals, Nutrition Screening
     Form (Form 3),Case File

       There are no children with special needs enrolled in the program.
        However, there are many children with food allergies or have religious
        preferences that involve food.

       The program’s breakfast and lunch menus include a variety of foods to
        meet each child’s nutritional needs and feeding requirements. Substitutes
        are provided for children with special medical and dietary needs.

       When a child has been identified with a food allergy or intolerance the
        information is shared with the Health coordinator, Nutritionist, Classroom
        teacher and District Foodservice director, Kitchen staff.

       Special Meals form are completed by the school nurse and given to
        parents for the child’s physician signature. Sections of this form state the
        food to be avoided and the planned substitute to be offered. With the
        physician’s approval, these substitutes are the ones offered to the
        children.

       Kitchen staff and teachers are emailed prior to child attending classes. A
        copy of the special meals form is forwarded to the kitchen and classroom.
        Neon pink colored signs are also sent to the classroom to be posted,
        warning teachers and other care givers and assistants about what foods to
        avoid and what to offer child instead.


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      In cases of severe allergies such as gluten –free diets, teachers are
       provided training and/or materials relating to the allergies. In other cases
       when the allergies are numerous and cannot be safely managed by the
       program, parents are allowed to bring meals from home.

      The parents are trained on how to safely transport food from home to the
       classroom while maintaining safe food temperatures.


Areas of Concern: None

Child Files (Student at DV3)

      Does the child have special dietary needs?
          Yes. Allergies to nuts, fish, shellfish and seafood.

      Has the program made the required accommodations to meet these
       needs?
             A medical statement to request Special Meals and/or
             Accommodations Form was completed. The Lancaster School
             District Child Nutrition Program kitchen has made available other
             protein sources to child when these foods are served. The program
             also makes lactose free or soymilk available to children who are
             lactose intolerant.

              With approximately 25 to 30 percent of enrolled children overweight
              or obese, the menu was modified to eliminate high calorie, sugar
              coated cereals and food items for example, we changed the menu
              from sugar coated cereals to Kix cereal and cinnamon rolls and
              other sweet breads to toast.


Areas of concern:
    It is difficult to make changes to the menu mid year, due to the food
      ordering system of the Child Nutrition Program kitchen. Food is
      purchased/ordered with specifications prior to the start of the school year.

      Kitchen managers do not vary the substitution food items, resulting in
       reduced variety of food for some of the children.




                                                                                      12
Nutrition Services Question 2B

Do preschool-age children in center-based settings receive the quantities and
kinds of foods that conform to recommended serving sizes and minimum
standards for meal patterns recommended in the USDA meal pattern or nutrient
standard menu planning requirements, including special attention to ensuring
that foods served are high in nutrients and low in fat, sugar, and salt? Note: Refer
to 7 CFR Parts 210, 220 (School Meal Initiatives for Healthy Children) and 226
(CACFP) for specific meal pattern and menu planning requirements.
1304.23(b)(1)(v), 1304.23(b)(1)(vi), 1304.23(b)(1)(ii)


Document Review:
   The following documents were reviewed: Lancaster School District Menus,
     USDA food requirements, Medical Statement to Request Special Meals
     and/or Accommodations Form

      LSD Head Start Program complies with the USDA requirement for meal
       planning. It receives food from the LSD Child Nutrition Program kitchens.

      The LSD Child Nutrition Program participates in the National School
       Lunch Program. The menu served is based on the Enhanced food Based
       Menu which meets the nutritional requirements for age set by the USDA.

      The nutrition information on the packaging of some of the food items on
       the menu is among the sources used to determine menu compliance.

       The food specifications requirement by the Lancaster School District
       Child Nutrition Program is another source of the information that ensures
       menu planning compliance. Preparation methods and knowledge of food
       and nutrition by the nutrition consultant is also used to determine whether
       a food is high in salt, fat or sugar. All children are offered meals and
       snacks.

      Full day students are offered breakfast, lunch and snacks daily.

      Half-day students are offered lunch and snacks daily.

      Meals planned by the Lancaster School Child nutrition Program, follow the
       USDA Enhanced Food Based Menu Plan, which meets the nutritional
       requirements for age set by the USDA. This meal pattern ensures that at
       least one third of the nutritional needs of the 3-5 year old age category are
       met for half day students and about half of the daily requirements for full
       day students.

Areas of Concern:


                                                                                  13
      Food substitutions made by cafeteria staff of foods that are high in calorie,
       fat and sugar.
      The program was cited last year for non-compliance by the Grantee
       because of high sugar foods served during breakfast. These were items
       were not part of the planned menu.

      Cafeteria staff not knowledgeable on nutrition content of foods resulting in
       non-compliance.

Nutrition Services Question 2C

Are children in morning center-based settings served a nutritious breakfast if they
have not received breakfast by the time they arrive at the Early Head Start (EHS)
or Head Start (HS) program? Note: A nutritious breakfast should be served to all
center-based children, regardless of arrival time. 1304.23(b)(1)(iii)

Document Review

      The following documents were reviewed: Policy and procedure, Breakfast
       menu, Power School

      Each child is offered breakfast every morning.

      When a child arrives after breakfast the meal count is submitted (usually
       at about 8:30 am), the parent is asked to stop by at the kitchen to inform
       the kitchen staff in the school cafeteria.

      They are provided with a sack lunch, which is comparable in nutritional
       content as food served to the other children.

      This sack meal contains cereal, milk, fruit or fruit juice.

Nutrition Services Question 2D

Do program staff communicate regularly with parents to ensure that children's
nutritional needs are met? 1304.23(a)(3)

Documents Review
   The following documents were reviewed: nutrition screening (form #3) and
     Nutrition Assessment forms (form 4). Nutrition Screening Criteria by
     LACOE, Parent logs (Power School)

      Information (medical diagnosis and symptoms) and nutritional risk factors
       derived from nutrition screening and assessment are shared with the
       parents via telephone, education materials and orally to ensure that
       children’s needs are met nutritionally.


                                                                                    14
      The degree of risk determines the route of communication and urgency of
       communication and/ or referral.

      Information concerning nutrition is also received from classroom teachers,
       for example when there are issues or concerns with eating, weight,
       allergies and other eating habits.

      Nutrition classes are offered to parents to address identified nutrition
       problem, for example, New beginnings Class was designed for parents of
       children who have been identified through nutrition assessment as
       overweight or obese.

Areas of Concern
    The part-time nutrition consultant is unable to communicate will all
      parents. The program has not been able to recruit qualified individuals to
      provide nutrition education.


Child Files (Student at DV4)
Review parent contact logs or daily child notes, if available. Is there
documentation that staff communicates regularly with parents about their child's
nutritional needs?

      There is documentation in Power School on contact with the family. There
       were two documented contacts with this family

Nutrition Services Question 2E

Do infants and toddlers in center-based settings receive food appropriate to their
nutritional needs, developmental readiness, and feeding skills, as recommended
in the USDA meal pattern or nutrient standard menu planning requirements?
Note: Refer to 7 CFR Parts 210, 220 (School Meal Initiatives for Healthy
Children), and 226 (Child and Adult Care Food Program [CACFP]) for specific
meal pattern and menu planning requirements. 1304.23(b)(1)(iv)

      The LSD Head Start program does not serve infants and toddlers.

Document Review: Menus

      The menu does not include food items that pose a high risk of choking to
       the children.




                                                                                15
Nutrition Services Question 2F

Do program staff and families work together to identify each child's nutritional
needs, including dietary requirements for children with disabilities, children with
nutrition-related health problems, and infants and toddlers? 1304.23(a)(2)


      Families and program staff work together to identify each child’s nutritional
       needs including children with nutritional related health problems.

      Families inform the teachers when there is food or nutrition related
       problems. The teachers in turn inform the health coordinator via telephone
       or e-mail for appropriate actions and policies to be implemented. For
       example, allergies that require Epi-pen due to possible anaphylactic
       reaction, are handled by the Health coordinator who ensures that
       appropriate forms are completed by the physician and training provided to
       the classroom staff prior to child entering or returning to the classroom.

      Physician prescription for special diets or diagnosis of allergy is another
       method by which children’s nutritional needs are identified.

      Information gathered from Nutrition screening and assessment is also
       used to work with staff, families to identify special dietary requirements.
       For example, parents of extremely obese children are offered one –on-
       one counseling.

      The consultant dietitian provides education to parents and staff on various
       issues related to nutrition. Discussion with families includes their personal
       food preferences for their children.

      Other agencies have been invited to provide nutrition education to
       parents.

      Teachers have received training on measuring and weighing children.

      Teachers and classroom aides received training on food thermometer
       calibration.

      Families are provided with education materials based on the identified
       nutrition risk during screening or assessment or nutrition related medical
       problems. Discussion on food allergies, intolerances and meals or
       substitutions to be offered are conducted with the parents. This is
       documented in the child’s file.

      Parents have been offered classes on childhood obesity. These classes
       are often offered twice a day at times close to drop off times in the


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       morning or pick –up times in the afternoon. Classes have been offered in
       the past on Saturdays to accommodate parents who work during the week
       and are unable o attend during the week.

      Flyers are developed several weeks in advance to advertise the classes.
       Letters are sometimes sent home or mailed to ensure that parents are
       informed of the classes.

      Sign in sheets are completed by the attendees of the classes. These
       documents are filed in a binder in the office of the Health Coordinator.

      Telephone and face to face communication are documented in children’s
       file or electronically.

Areas of Concern:
    Although there is documented diagnosis of extreme allergies by the
      physician, such as gluten allergy, some of the parents have been non-
      compliant. Some have brought in food items that are not allowed on the
      diets or poor or nutrient deficient foods.

Managing Nutritional Services

Interview: Nutrition Coordinator (Appropriate Foods)

How do you ensure that appropriate snacks and meals (e.g., formula, baby food)
are provided to infants and toddlers during socialization? . How do you work with
parents to plan and implement nutrition activities for group socializations?

The program does not serve infants and toddlers.


Integrating Nutrition into Early Childhood Development
Nutrition Services Question 4A

Is effective dental hygiene promoted among children in conjunction with meals?
1304.23(b)(3)

Document Review
   The following documents were reviewed. Policy and procedure

      After every meal, the teacher prepares a pea-sized fluoride toothpaste for
       each child using child’s own labeled toothbrush.

Areas of Concern: None




                                                                                  17
Nutrition Services Question 4B

Do nutrition services contribute to children's development and socialization by
providing sufficient time for each child to eat? Does the program ensure that food
is not used as punishment or reward? Is each child encouraged, but not forced,
to eat or taste food? 1304.23(c)(2), 1304.23(c)(3) PDM7H, 1304.52(i)(1)(iv)

    Children are allowed sufficient time for each child to eat.

    Children are not forced to eat or taste foods. They are encouraged to try
     foods offered.

    The district’s policy is to offer versus serve food. This allows child to
     receive food without being forced to eat any food.

    Meals are usually served family –style. This style of dining allows each
     child to serve themselves the amount or kind of food they are able and
     willing to eat.

    Children who finish their meals are allowed to get up from the table,
     dispose or clear plates from the table and/or to start teeth brushing. This
     process allows slow eaters ample time to finish their meals.

    Children are not offered extra food or denied food based on behavior.


Areas of Concern:
    The Lancaster School District does not have a School Nutrition Policy and
      as such food, sometimes high fat, high sugar foods are used in class
      celebrations.

Nutrition Services Question 4C

Do nutrition services contribute to children's development and socialization by
ensuring that all toddlers, preschool children, and assigned classroom staff,
including volunteers, eat together family-style, and share the same menu to the
extent possible?
1304.23(c)(4)

      Classroom teacher, staff and volunteers eat with children in family style to
       encourage socialization and development.

      Conversation during meal times sometimes include subjects or topics of
       study taught that day or week. For example, shapes, food groups, colors
       are discussed as it relates to the food served.



                                                                                  18
      Table manners and appropriate behavior are reinforced during meal times.

Areas of Concern: None


Management Systems Analysis

Interview: Nutrition Coordinator (Ongoing Monitoring and Oversight)

      Monthly reports are completed by the 7th of every month. The report that
       identifies numbers of screening or assessment completed, numbers of
       children who are overweight or obese, those with dental cavities, those
       that have lead poisoning, etc.

      Site visits to the classroom and kitchen are done to evaluate compliance
       with federal guidelines

      There are many different actions taken when problems are detected. For
       example, when the problem of high sugar cereals and breads being
       served on the menu was identified, the menu was rewritten. A meeting
       was held with the Child Nutrition Program food director and kitchen
       managers. The concern was shared and the need to make changes was
       also discussed due to its impact on the children’s health and program
       compliance.

       There was a big drop in food temperatures observed between the
       cafeteria and classroom. on To validate this observation, the
       thermometers needed to be accurate. The kitchen staff indicated that their
       thermometers were regularly calibrated but the same was not true for the
       classroom. Classroom aides were trained on how to correctly calibrate
       their thermometers. Changes were made to the time that the food was
       placed in the Cambro cart. The kitchen staff left food in the oven until the
       classroom staff comes to pick up the cart.

Interview: Nutrition Coordinator (Program Planning)
Describe how information from the annual self assessment is incorporated into
your program planning and implementation.

      The high number of children who were overweight or obese last year
       prompted the consultant dietitian to receive training in childhood obesity
       management. Attendance at the course helped in the identification of new
       nutrition education materials for the parents of children who are
       overweight.


Summary Analysis: Overall Service Summary


                                                                                  19
Strengths
    The timeliness of nutrition screening and assessments is one of the
      strengths of the nutrition services. The fact that there is a registered
      dietitian who the staff could communicate and use as a resource is a
      strength. Communication is accomplished via e-mail, telephone or face to
      face depending on the level of urgency.

      The Health Coordinator is strength of the nutrition services. She
       coordinates information from the parents, physician and teachers and
       communicates with the consultant.

      There is good communication between the consultant and other head start
       staff. Staff share nutrition and food observations or concerns with the
       health coordinator and nutrition consultant


Weaknesses
   The Head Start nutrition service does not have adequate nutrition
     personnel to complete the nutrition education for the families of students
     who have been identified with nutrition risk factors. The other part-time
     position planned was to be responsible for this aspect of nutrition services.

      The Lancaster School District does not have a School Wellness Program.
       The absence of this program allows the distribution and use of high fat,
       high sugar foods in the meals or in class celebration.


Summary Analysis: Communication among Staff
   There is a strong communication among staff in the program. For
    example, when the staff observed that meals served in different schools
    did not match the menu, they emailed their observations. This information
    resulted in the meetings with the Child nutrition food service director.



Summary Analysis: Communication with Parents

      There is two way communication with parents with coordination with the
       health coordinator. Meetings are held with parents especially those with
       food allergies or other food concerns. These are either face to face
       meetings or via telephone.

      Parents are generally not receptive to attending the classes that they have
       been invited despite attempts ranging from phone calls, mailed letters ,
       flyers etc. For example, the childhood obesity class had only had a total of


                                                                                  20
       eleven attendees despite over a hundred letters and flyers and phone
       calls made.



Summary Analysis: Ongoing Monitoring
Summarize the program’s process for ongoing monitoring of Nutrition services. A
comprehensive explanation of this system should include a description of each of
the following:

Monitoring measures, tools or instruments, materials and procedures
The following are some of the tools used in monitoring:
    Monthly reports
    Height/weight measuring analysis, BMI evaluations
    Growth charts
    Stadiometers
    Scales,
    Newsletters
    Observation of meals by school staff and family service providers

Staff responsibilities for ongoing monitoring of their respective service areas

      The nutritionist and health coordinator take responsibilities for portions of
       monitoring. There are areas that overlap in the care and management. For
       example, anemia, dental caries, lead poisoning.

Summary Analysis: Planning
Review the Nutrition Services area’s written plans so you understand the goals
the program intends to achieve and the strategies the program plans to use to
accomplish its goals. Summarize the program’s progress in implementing its
plans and achieving its defined goals. Your summary might reflect a potential
program strength, a concern, or general compliance.

      The program has written plans for the area of Nutrition.

      We strive to provide foods that reflect our ethnically diverse population.
       We want children to experiences food from different cultures and try foods
       that they have not tried before.

      We strive to provide food that is healthy and provide a balanced menu that
       allows children to learn about healthy eating and tasting food from all the
       food groups.

      Through our program monthly newsletter we provide recipes for children
       to take home to encourage their families to try cooking healthy meals.



                                                                                  21
      Our IMIL program encourages eating healthy and getting more exercise.
       We are encouraging children to balance their diet and be more active in
       their daily life.


Summary Analysis: Record-Keeping

      The program has an fairly effective record keeping system. The nutrition
       risks of each student is tabulated.

Summary Analysis: Service Specific Strengths

      Monthly newsletter with menu ideas for families.

      IMIL program for children.

      Recognition and adaptations for children with food allergies.

      Willingness of management in child nutrition services to work with the
       ECE program to make our meals healthy, nutritious, and desirable to
       young children.


                              Safe Environments

Facilities Material and Equipment
Safe Environments Question 1A

Do facilities used for center-based combination options, home-based group
socialization activities, or family child care complies with State and local licensing
requirements? 1306.30(c), 1306.35(d)

Document Review
Is the facility license current? Where licensing standards are less stringent than
Head Start program Performance Standards, or where no State or local licensing
standards exist, determine whether the grantee or delegate complies with all
standards under 1304.53(a).

The following documents were reviewed: licenses and permits, classroom files,
Health and Safety Logs, Work Order log, and grantee (LACOE) monitoring
reports.

      All classrooms/sites are licensed by the State of California and on a
       regular basis an analysis from Community Care licensing reviews each
       room/site.


                                                                                    22
      At a minimum the grantee reviews each room/site annually to ensure that
       our agency is complies with all Head Start Performance Standards.

      Classroom staff completes a Health and Safety Log daily to ensure all
       regulations are being met. All concerns are noted on the log and the ECE
       office reports the issue to the appropriate agencies and school district
       departments.

      Additionally our agency monitors each room/site twice a year using the
       OHS protocol.

   Based on the Grantee (LACOE) on-going monitoring/reviews:

             Our agencies facilities are appropriately licensed, maintained and in
              good working condition

       Concerns Include:

             All sites need to post a copy of the certified playground inspection
              and a copy must be provided to LACOE

             All sites must post current health permits

             The gap between the fences and gates that used a chain lock not
              exceed 4 inches

             All stains on carpets and tile need to be cleaned

             Light bulbs need to be replaced immediately

             All tall furniture (over 36” tall) must be secured to the wall

             Documentation of when filters in fans are replaced. Filters should
              be replaced annually

   Staff at the ECE office submitted work orders to the school district facilities
   department so they can correct/fix any concerns in a timely manner.


Areas of Concern

      All sites need to post a copy of the certified playground inspection and a
       copy must be provided to LACOE.




                                                                                     23
             All playgrounds are being inspected this year and we will receive
              copies of inspections that will be posted in the classrooms and sent
              to LACOE. A Program Improvement Plan (PIP) will be created to
              ensure correction is completed.

      All sites must post current health permits

             ServSafe Certificates have been distributed to sites and are posted
              in at least one classroom on site.

      The gap between the fences and gates that used a chain lock not exceed
       4 inches

             Staff has been trained on proper procedures on locking the gate.
              Service Area Coordinators and staff will monitor the gates during
              their on-going monitoring visits.
             Work Orders have been submitted to minimize the gap.

      Stains on carpets and tile need to be cleaned

             Every day the carpet is vacuumed and the tile is mopped. If there
              is a spill the area is sanitized. Twice a year the carpets are
              shampooed and tile waxed. The stains will be removed at that
              time.

      All tall furniture (over 36” tall) must be secured to the wall
            Work Orders have been submitted and facilities department is in
                the process of securing all tall furniture.

      Light bulbs need to be replaced immediately


      Documentation of when filters in fans are replaced. (Filters should be
       replaced annually.)

             A Program Improvement Plan (PIP) will be created to ensure
              correction is completed.

Safe Environments Question 1B

Does the program ensure that each facility or family child care home's space,
light, ventilation, heat, and other physical arrangements are consistent with the
health, safety, and developmental needs of children? 1304.22(a)(3),
1304.53(a)(10)(i)-(viii), , 1304.53(a)(10)(x)-(xiv), 1304.53(a)(10)(xvi),
1306.35(b)(2), 1304.53(b)(1), 1304.22(c)(1)



                                                                                    24
Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: care and supervision policies and
procedures, maps of room arrangement, fire and smoke detector logs, Health
and Safety Logs, and grantee (LACOE) monitoring reports.

       At a minimum the grantee reviews each room/site annually to ensure that
        our agency is providing appropriate facilities to meet the health, safety and
        developmental needs of the children.

       Classroom staff completes a Health and Safety Log daily to ensure the
        facilities are in good working order. All concerns are noted on the log and
        the ECE office reports the issue to the appropriate agencies and school
        district departments.

       Classrooms are cleaned daily. Each custodian completes daily run sheet
        to ensure rooms are clean and safe. Administrative staff from the Facilities
        Department periodically inspects classrooms/sites and completes
        Custodial Department Site Inspection Report.

       Additionally our agency monitors each room/site twice a year using the
        OHS protocol.

Observations
Service Area Coordinators (SAC) and staff complete a visual check of the room
during their monitoring visit. If there is a concern SAC or staff reports to the
teacher and the ECE office staff.

       Staff observed that our staff, classrooms and sites provide clean, healthy,
        safe and developmentally appropriate environment for our children.
           o There are no harmful chemicals, drugs or alcohol being kept on
               school grounds
           o There are no firearms or weapons being kept on school grounds
           o Students are supervised and kept in visual contact at all times
           o Staff and students followed care and supervision procedures

       Staff and LACOE specialists observed that some rooms do not have hot
        running water for every sink.

Areas of Concern
    Staff and LACOE specialists observed that some rooms do not have hot
      running water for every sink.

              Funds were set aside in the 2009-2010 program year to install hot
               water heater. Work Orders have been submitted to install heaters.
               PIP was created during the 2009 Self Assessment to ensure work



                                                                                  25
              will be completed. Installations began over Spring Break and will
              continue until project is completed.

Safe Environments Question 1C

Are mattresses used for infants firm, and is soft bedding, such as comforters,
pillows, fluffy blankets, or stuffed toys avoided? 1304.53(b)(3)

We do not service infants/Early Head Start.

Safe Environments Question 1D

Are all infant and toddler toys made of nontoxic materials and sanitized
regularly? 1304.53(b)(2)

We do not service infants and toddlers.

Safe Environments Question 1E

Does the program have adequate indoor and outdoor space? 1304.53(a)5,
1306.35(a)(3)

Observations
Are there at least 35 square feet of usable indoor space – excluding bathrooms,
halls, kitchen, staff rooms and storage space – and 75 square feet of usable
outdoor space per child?

Usable indoor and outdoor space is checked annually. This space is adequate to
allow children to be supervised and to participate safely in developmentally
appropriate activities and routines that foster their cognitive, socio-emotional, and
physical development.

Per licensing requirements:
    All rooms/sites have at least 35 sq. feet of usable indoor space. In
       calculating usable indoor space, bathrooms, halls, kitchen, staff rooms
       and storage space are excluded.

          During first visit using OHS protocol earlier in the year, measurements
           of each classroom were taken and rooms were found to have at least
           35 sq. ft of useable indoor space per child.


      All sites have at least 75 sq. feet of usable outdoor space

Areas of Concern




                                                                                  26
      None

Safe Environments Question 1F

Are outdoor play areas at center-based and family child care programs arranged
to prevent children from getting into both unsafe and unsupervised areas? Does
the program ensure that children en route to play areas are not exposed to
vehicular traffic without supervision? 1304.53(a)(9)

      All outdoor areas are designed to prevent children from getting into both
       unsafe and unsupervised areas.

      All playgrounds are fenced and part of the preschool and elementary
       school grounds.

      Staff receives ongoing training in care and supervision.

Interview (Teacher)
How do you ensure that children are supervised at all times?

      We position are ourselves in different locations, making sure we cover all
       sides of the playground. We place ourselves in areas where we can
       visually see all children and each other. We also move about in our
       location and are sure to count children frequently.

How do you prevent children from getting into unsafe areas?

      We stay close to areas we don’t want the children to go. We count
       children. We discuss with the children where they can and cannot go.

Are children exposed to vehicular traffic when en route to play? If so, how do
you keep children safe?

      No, our schools are fenced and therefore the children are not exposed to
       traffic.

Observations
Observe outdoor play areas when children are present. Are children supervised
on the playground at all times? How do staff work around any “blind spot” to
ensure they can see all of the children?

      Staff position themselves in areas where they can maintain visual
       supervision of all children.

      Staff were observed moving around to ensure the safety of all students.



                                                                                   27
      Staff regularly interact with children and move as they move about the
       playground.

Areas of Concern
    None


Safe Environments Question 1G

Does the program ensure that the indoor and outdoor space in Early Head Start
(EHS) or Head Start (HS) centers in use by mobile infants and toddlers is
separated from general walkways and from areas in use by preschoolers?
1304.53(a)(4)

We do not service Early Head Start / infants or toddlers.

Safe Environments Question 1H

Does the program provide for maintenance, repair, safety, and security of all
Head Start facilities and equipment? 1304.53(a)(7)

In providing for the maintenance, safety and security of all Head Start facilities
and equipment:

      Classroom staff completes a Health and Safety Log daily to ensure all
       regulations are being met. All concerns are noted on the log and the ECE
       office reports the issue to the appropriate agencies and school district
       departments.

      Additionally our agency monitors each room/site twice a year using the
       OHS protocol.

Interview
What is the budget allocation for ensuring that Head Start facilities and
equipment are maintained, repaired, safe and secure?

      The budget allocation for ensuring that facilities and equipment are
       maintained, repaired, safe and secure is approximately $58,993. There
       was $40,160 plus $10,833 and we received an additional $8000 for
       repairs.

An unsafe condition was observed at one or more centers. Describe the unsafe
condition observed to the Facilities Coordinator and ask: What is the system for
addressing facilities and equipment that are unsafe or need repair? Did your
process fail, or can you describe what happened in this circumstance?



                                                                                     28
      A work order is sent in. If the condition is an emergency it is called in and
       taken care of immediately. Otherwise, facilities receives the work order
       and then it is completed in a timely manner.

Interview Teacher
Whom do you tell when facilities and equipment are unsafe or need repair?

      If something is found to be unsafe or in need of repair, we write it on our
       weekly health and safety logs that are returned to the office and take that
       item out of use. If it is an emergency situation, we contact the office and
       report it right away.

Areas of concern

      Lincoln playground: During visit it was observed that the rain gutter on the
       northwest side of the building located on the east side of the playground is
       crushed at the bottom resulting in sharp, dangerous edges where children
       or staff could get injured.

        A work order to have the rain gutter replaced or repaired was
       generated on 3/01/10.


Safe Environments Question 1I

Do the program’s facilities provide adequately for children with disabilities to
ensure their safety, comfort, and participation? 1304.53(a)(10)(xvii),
1304.53(b)(1)(iii)

Document Review
Does the budget allocate funds for purchase and upkeep of equipment , toys,
materials, and furniture that are age appropriate, safe and supportive of children
with disabilities?

      According to the refunding application, GABI section (e) provides for
       disability supplies. We are under the Lancaster School District. As stated
       in the GABI, the majority of materials and supplies for students with
       disabilities are provided for by the Lancaster School District, Special
       Education Funds. The monies designated in the GABI are used to provide
       materials for parents (informational materials and books) and to support
       additional curriculum for the classroom.

Interview: ECD Coordinator and Disabilities Coordinator
What steps are taken to ensure that all equipment, toys, materials and furniture
are age appropriate, safe, and supportive of children with disabilities?
1304.53(B)(1)(iii)


                                                                                   29
      Materials purchased are age and developmentally appropriate. Furniture
       is child sized. Materials and furniture are purchased by those specializing
       in the field of child development and special education. Children who need
       materials based on their disability or their IEP goals are provided those
       materials. Materials are purchased that support a wide variety of abilities
       and skill levels.

Observation
Observe indoor and outdoor spaces, and describe how provisions are made for
children with disabilities to ensure safety, comfort and participation.
1304.53(a)(10)(xvii)

Safe Environments Question 1J

Does the program ensure that the environment is free of toxins, air pollutants,
and water contaminants? 1304.53(a)(8), 1306.35(b)(2)(i)

Interview
When was the last time the program’s environment was sprayed with herbicides
or pesticides? When did children return to the area after spraying?

      Spraying pesticides was done over Christmas break during the first week,
       district wide. Problem areas are usually hit on Friday night so the children
       are not exposed for at least 2 days and the usual notifications are posted.
       For the people that respond to the student handbook they are also notified
       by flyer sent home and/or if a phone number is given. Our chemical list is
       sent out with the district wide part of the student handbook and is available
       on line. If an infestation warrants the spraying it is done on an emergency
       basis after hours so people are not exposed for at least 12 hours.
       Herbicides were also sprayed over the break and that is an ongoing
       process as the rains have made weeds grow faster and in more locations.
       Herbicide sprayings are also posted and follow the same procedures as
       pesticide spraying. The pesticide spraying is done by licensed, certified
       applicators and is contracted out. Herbicide spraying is done by certified
       applicators or grounds men under the direction of a certified applicator as
       the regulations allow and is all done in house.

Has the center been tested for lead (e.g., paint, soil)? If so, were lead levels
considered safe? If lead levels are high, what steps have been taken to eliminate
children’s exposure to lead while in the center?

      Our sites have been tested for lead, asbestos, radon etc. and have all met
       current standards. We also monitor indoor air quality upon request or after
       serious leaks from rain or vandalism. When there is a problem the children
       are moved out of the offending room.


                                                                                  30
Observation

      All school campuses within our district maintain a smoke-free
       environment.
      During observations, it was observed that the smoke-free environment
       was maintained on center grounds.

Document Review

      Documents were not available for review, but it was noted in interview with
       facilities that there have been no environmental concerns that have not
       been addressed and corrected.

Areas of Concern

      None

Hygiene

Safe Environments Question 2A

Do staff, volunteers, and children wash their hands with soap and running water?
1304(e)(1)(i-iv), 1304.22(e)(2)(i-iii)

To ensure good hygiene practices, staff, children and volunteers routinely wash
their hands with soap and water.

      Procedures “When to wash” for Staff

        Before food preparation, handling, consumption or any other food-related
  activity

       After handling any body fluid from you or a child and after using latex
  gloves.

        After diapering, assisting a child with toilet use or personal hygiene.

        After coughing or blowing nose.

        Before and after giving medications.

        Before and after treating or bandaging a wound. ( Nonporous gloves
              should always be worn).




                                                                                   31
        Procedures “when to wash” for Children
              Upon arrival to school

              Before and after “group” water play

              After sneezing or coughing

              After wiping nose

              After touching contaminated area ( trash can lids, etc)

              Before and after cooking activity

              After playing with pets

              After cleaning up spills

              After outside play
              After gardening

              After “messy” play (painting or gluing)

              After using sand outdoors

              After toilet use

    How to Wash

           Wash with soap and running water for ONE MINUTE (Sing Happy
            Birthday song)
           Briskly rub in a downward motion when rinsing
           Dry hands first with dry paper towel and then turn off faucet.

    Hand sanitizer may be used when running soap and water are not
   available


Observations
Observations varied on the time of day and observer may not have had the
opportunity to observe hand washing.

       JO 2 – Staff and children washed hands prior to eating breakfast.

       JO 1 – Only the children washed their hands. Staff failed to wash hands
        before handling food, nor did staff wear gloves.


                                                                                  32
      MV – Staff and children were observed washing hands before
       handling/consuming food, and after toilet use.

      DV 2 – During visit, it was observed that the teacher was not wearing
       gloves while preparing/serving food to the children.

      SI 2 – Children were observed washing their hands as they woke up from
       nap/rest time.

      In classrooms where hand washing was not observed the observer asked
       the teacher about the procedure and if students and staff wash their hands
       following toilet use, before food handling/consumption, whenever hands
       are contaminated with bodily fluids, before and after handling medication,
       before and after wound care, and assisting a child with toilet use. Each
       staff member answered in the affirmative, stating that yes, they and the
       children do wash their hands routinely, especially after before mentioned
       situations.

Areas of Concern
    Staff may need more training on policies/procedures for food handling.

Safe Environments Question 2B

Are spilled bodily fluids cleaned up and disinfected immediately according to
professionally established guidelines? Are tools and equipment used to clean
spills disinfected promptly? Are blood-contaminated materials disposed of in a
plastic bag with a secure tie? 1304.22(e)(3-4)

Document Review
   As an agency, we follow the Lancaster School District’s Policies for spilled
     bodily fluids. Documents reviewed were found online at GAMUT. As
     stated in the board policy, “In order to protect employees from contact with
     potentially infectious blood or other bodily fluids, the Board of Trustees
     requires that universal precautions be observed throughout the district.
     Universal precautions are appropriate for preventing the spread of all
     infectious disease and should be used regardless of whether blood borne
     pathogens are known to be present..” These guidelines were established
     in accordance with Health and Safety Codes, Code of Regulations (Title
     8), Code of Federal Regulations (Title 29 – OSHA) and CDE Program
     Advisories. (BP 4119.43, BP 4219.43, BP 4319.43)

      Board Policy 5141.23 where it states, “To protect students from contact
       with potentially infectious blood or other bodily fluids and prevent the
       spread of infectious disease, universal precautions shall be observed
       throughout the district. Students shall be informed “of the precautions to


                                                                                    33
       be used in case of exposure to blood or other bodily fluids in case of
       exposure through injury, accident or classroom instruction.”

      Staff Development agendas and sign in sheets were reviewed and it was
       noted that Head Start staff receives universal precaution training annually
       that deals with spilled bodily fluids. Reminders are provided to staff
       throughout the year. New staff receive training during new staff
       orientation.

Interview
What would you do if a spill of bodily fluids occurred?

      One adult stays with the child while another gets gloves and is ready to
       work with the child. Then the gloved adult stays with the child while the
       other adult makes the necessary calls, i.e. home, nurse, custodian, 911 (if
       necessary). The area is sealed off to the other children. We may place
       paper towels on spill or vomit until the custodian has arrived to clean up
       and disinfect the area.

Do staff and volunteers wear nonporous gloves when in contact with blood or
other visibly bloody fluids?

      Absolutely, yes, staff wear gloves when in contact with blood or other
       bodily fluids. Also new in recent months, is the use of masks when
       dealing with some bodily fluids.

Observation
   Sierra 3: A child had a small blister on toe that needed tending to and it
      was observed that the staff member wore gloves while caring for this
      child’s injury and followed universal precautions.

Areas of Concern
None

Safe Environments Question 2C

Does the program adopt sanitation and hygiene practices for diapering that
protect children and staff’s health and safety adequately? 1304.22(e)(5)

      All staff receives universal precaution training annually that includes
       diapering guidelines.
      Guidelines are in place for diapering that adequately protect the health
       and safety of staff and children

Interview
What is the practice for changing children’s diapers?


                                                                                  34
       1. Get mat, paper covering, 2 plastic bags, wipes, diaper, clean clothes (if
           necessary) and latex gloves.
       2. Wash hands and glove.
       3. Lay mat down, with paper covering.
       4. Have child lie down and change them.
       5. If child prefers, have them stand, while you change them.
       6. If child has soiled their clothes, place clothes in bag and tie.
       7. Place in isolated area, with child’s name on bag.
       8. Have child wash hands.
       9. Put all soiled disposable items in other bag, including paper and tie.
       10. Spray mat with disinfectant and put up to air dry.
       11. Using one glove, remove the other one. Using inside tip of bag,
           remove second glove.
       12. Wash your hands.

Observations
Not observed at any of the sites.

Areas of Concern
None

Safe Environments Question 2D

Are potties emptied into the toilet and cleaned and disinfected after each use in a
utility sink for that purpose? 1304.22(e)(6)

We do not use training potties in our program.

Safe Environments Question 2E

Does the program ensure that first aid kits are well supplied, age appropriate,
and readily accessible to staff (but not to children) at each facility and while
offsite? 1304.22(f)(1-2)

      A well-stocked first aid kit provides access to necessary supplies needed
       for first aid, injuries, & emergencies on site or during field trips. Our
       agency’s First Aid Kits are monitored to ensure that all staff has access at
       all times to a well-supplied first aid kit.


Interview: Health Coordinator

When are the first aid kits restocked?

      The first aid kits are restocked when the teachers have turned them in at
       the end of the year and then as need be throughout the school year.


                                                                                   35
When is the inventory of first aid kits conducted?

      The inventory of first aid kits is conducted quarterly.

Observation

      First aid kit is maintained in a secure, closed container.

      First aid kit is stored on top shelf of medicine cabinet- accessible to all
       staff but is out of reach of children.

      Contents in the kit are arranged so items are easily reached without
       having to empty contents of kit.

      First Aid kits have items required by Community Care Licensing (**)

      The first aid kit includes:
       1. Antiseptic towelettes**
       2. Bandage tape**
       3. Band-aids ( ¾” and 3/8”)**
       4. Cotton balls
       5. Current First Aid Instructions**
       6. Disposable gloves
       7. Flexible or stretch roller gauze
       8. Non-glass thermometer (digital) with covers**
       9. Q-tips
       10. Plastic bag (secure items with contaminated body fluids)
       11. Safety pins (Assorted sizes)
       12. Scissors**
       13. Sterile gauze pads**
       14. Triangular bandage
       15. Tweezers**
       16. Vaseline

      Vehicles providing transportation, such as buses, have well-stocked first
       aid kits.

Areas of Concern
None

Food Safety and Sanitation




                                                                                     36
Safe Environments Question 3A

Does the program ensure that all applicable Federal, State, local and Tribal food
safety and sanitation laws are met and evidence of compliance, including
appropriate licenses and certificates, is posted? 1304.23(e)(1),
1304.53(a)(10)(xiii)

Interview
How do you ensure that food service vendors observe Federal, State, local, or
Tribal safety and sanitation regulations related to food handling?
     We only do business with state approved vendors. We belong to a co-op
        that does our food processing and part of the bid process is to supply that
        documentation.

Interview
Is the water supply adequate and approved by the State or local health authority?
Can you show me documentation of licensing inspection? Record the date of the
most recent inspection?

Documentation Review

      ServSafe Certificates have been distributed to sites and are posted in at
       least one classroom on site

      Copies of ServSafe Certificates are kept on file at both the ECE office and
       at the School District Office with the Director of Child Nutrition.

      Daily Checklist / OHS Protocol

Document Review: Vendor and School Licenses , Kitchen Manager sanitation
course certificates, food temperature logs, meal count logs

      All the kitchen managers located in each school have passed food safety
       courses approved by the state. Copies of these certificates are posted in
       the class.

      Other certificates and licenses by food vendors are located in the
       Lancaster School District Child Nutrition Program Office.


      To ensure food safety of refrigerated food in the classes, temperature logs
       are kept indicating refrigerator temperatures.




                                                                                   37
      Food thermometers are calibrated weekly or sooner if dropped to ensure
       that food temperatures are accurate and reflect accuracy in the monitoring
       of time/temperature controls.


      Food temperatures are recorded before the food leaves the kitchen and
       when it reaches the classroom.

Areas of Concern
None

Safe Environments Question 3B

Does the program ensure that facilities are available for proper refrigerated
storage and handling of breast milk and formula? 1304.23(e)(2)

We do not service infants and toddlers.

Class Size and Staffing

Safe Environments Question 4A

Does the program ensure appropriate group size? 1306.20(g)(1), 1306.20(g)(2)

Our program is not a family child care program.

Safe Environments Question 4B

Does the program ensure appropriate class size based on the age of the
predominate number of children in the class? 1306.32(a)(2-6)

Yes, the program ensures appropriate class size based on the age of the
predominate number of children in the class.

Document Review:
The following documents were reviewed: sign in/out sheets, attendance sheets,
Power School and GRS.

      All of our Head Start classrooms serve predominantly four old children.

      Our class size allows for 20 students to be enrolled in each class of the 15
       full day classes.

      Currently, there are 296 students enrolled in the program.




                                                                                 38
Observation

      The number of children varied from site to site during observations.
            JO 1 – 19
            JO 2 – 15
            SI 1 – 17
            SI 2 – 19
            SI 3 – 18
            DV 1 – 16
            DV 2 – 17
            DV 3 – 15
            DV 4 – 8
            LI 1 – 20
            LI 2 – 17
            MV – 12
            MA – 15
            JN – 20
            WW – 14

     All of our Head Start classrooms are staffed with four paid staff, three of
      which are present at all times.
Areas of Concern
None

Safe Environments Question 4C

Does the program ensure that no more than eight children are placed in an infant
and toddler room and no more than four children are assigned to each teacher?
1304.52(g)(4)

We do not service infants and toddlers.

Safe Environments Question 4D

Does each class have at least two paid staff in the classroom and, when
possible, a third person who is a volunteer? 1306.20(c), 1306.20(e)

Each class has at least two paid staff in the classroom.

Observation
   All of the classrooms within our program are staffed with four paid staff,
      three of which are present at all times.

      During the times of observations, there were no volunteers present in any
       of the classrooms.


                                                                                    39
Areas of Concern
None

Management Systems Analysis

Interview:
How do you monitor the program’s facilities, material’s, and equipment and the
program’s compliance with all Federal regulations?
     Daily inspections are conducted, reported and monitored to ensure the
        health and safety of all students using a daily checklist and weekly health
        and safety log.

      Periodic inspections are completed using the OHS monitoring protocol.
       Documentation of inspections is tracked and reviewed to ensure the
       health and safety of all students.

Show me the documents, systems and reports used in the implementation of the
ongoing monitoring of facilities, materials and equipment.

      The school district has an electronic work order system that tracks the
       request for correction, what was done and when it was completed. The
       administrative secretary submits, monitors and tracks all maintenance
       requests.

Interview:
Does the program review maintenance requests or reports of accidents and
injuries to identify trends and make needed improvements?

      We have a work order system that is monitored by an administrative
       secretary that submits and tracks all maintenance requests. Any
       trends/needs are addressed program-wide and modifications made as
       necessary. Unusual incident forms are completed and reviewed by our
       nurse and Health clerk for completeness and to determine whether or not
       the incident is reportable to licensing. The classroom staff members
       address issues as they arise through group lessons, role playing and
       individual instruction and guidance as necessary. Work orders are
       submitted to correct any safety and/ health issues immediately.

Interview:
Describe how information from the annual self-assessment is incorporated into
your program planning and implementation.

      The Management team meets and considers the findings that were
       discovered during the self assessment in creating goals for the following



                                                                                   40
       program year. This information along with DRDP findings are utilized to
       formulate the program goals.

Describe how information from the community assessment (and its updates) is
incorporated into your program planning and implementation.

      This information is considered by the management team when planning
       and creating program goals in the area of community and partnerships.

Summary Analysis: Overall Service Summary

Overall, our program provides a safe, clean, healthy and developmentally
appropriate environment for our children. Staff diligently monitor, document and
report concerns/issues that impact the health and safety of our children using the
ongoing monitoring measures already in place, such as: Monitoring, reports, self
assessment results, PIR, DRDP-R, ERSEA reports, refunding narrative, status
reports, and other data, (e.g., site visits, meeting observations, document reviews
and file reviews). These concerns/issues are handled in an appropriate and
timely manner. Facilities are appropriately licensed, maintained and in good
working condition. Our classroom staff members and support staff work to
effectively provide a safe environment for the children in our care.

Summary Analysis: Ongoing Monitoring

Summarize the program’s process for ongoing monitoring of Facilities. A
comprehensive explanation of this system should include a description of each of
the following:

      Monitoring measures, tools or instruments, materials and procedures

       Monitoring, reports, self assessment results, PIR, DRDP-R, ERSEA
       reports, refunding narrative, status reports, and other data, (e.g., site
       visits, meeting observations, document reviews and file reviews).

      Staff responsibilities for ongoing monitoring of their respective service
       areas

       It is written within our agency’s policies and procedures that every
       Service Area Coordinator will monitor their service area on an ongoing
       basis, to ensure compliance with all federal, state, county grantee and
       district regulations.

      How the program analyzes and documents progress toward achieving
       program goals and complying with performance requirements.




                                                                                   41
       Staff utilize monitoring reports, self-assessments results, PIR, DRDP-
       R, ERSEA reports, refunding narrative, status reports, and other data,
       (e.g. site visits, meeting observations, document reviews and file
       reviews) to develop a comprehensive ongoing monitoring plan with the
       support of the Grantee (LACOE).

      How follow up occurs for findings or problems identified through data
       collection, and how these findings are collected and documented.


Summary Analysis: Service Specific Strengths

Summarize program strengths noted in safe environments. Describe any
practices that were found to be new or innovative and had a positive impact that
helped the grantee overcome challenges and provided greater/improved service
quality or surpassed established performance indicators. Some examples of
broad categories of program strengths include (but are not limited to):

      Collaboration with local/community-based services

      Exemplary fiscal practices to ensure the safeguarding of Federal dollars

      Highly successful efforts to address and improve school readiness

      Expansion of the program and increased accessibility

      Extraordinary accommodations for children/families (e.g., children with
       disabilities)

      Innovative program design and management

      Staff receives training in care and supervision on a monthly basis

      Our program partners/collaborates with the school district on safety issues
       (i.e., fire drills, disaster drills)


                          Transportation Services
 Transportation Services Management
Our Head Start program is part of Lancaster School District and uses the school
district’s transportation company, (Antelope Valley School Transportation Agency
AVSTA). The bus company follows all the guidelines set by the state and school
district.




                                                                                  42
Currently our program only uses transportation for special education students.
All our families are able to transport their children to our Head Start program.
Our agency is also part of LACOE’s (grantee) transportation waiver. Our agency
is unable to have an additional driver on the bus to supervise students.

Transportation Services Question 1A

Does the program ensure that vehicles used to provide transportation services
are maintained in safe operating condition at all times? 1310.13(a), 1310.13(b),
1310.13(c)

Document Review: State Vehicle Inspections
Review the annual State inspection certificate of each vehicle provided by the
State licensing agency, if applicable. 1310.13(a)

During visit with the Antelope Valley Transportation Authority, the observer had
the opportunity to review the annual State inspection certificate of each vehicle
provided by the State licensing agency. Once each inspection is completed and
certified, they are valid for 13 months.
    Bus #32-98 was inspected on 05/07/2009
    Bus #20-98 was inspected on 06/12/2009
    Bus #4-90 was inspected on 06/12/2009
    Bus #10-06 was inspected on 12/11/2009
    Bus #01-08 was inspected on 03/26/2010
    Bus #21-98 was inspected on 03/26/2010

Interview: Bus Driver (Vehicle Maintenance and Inspection)

Can you describe the preventive maintenance done for each vehicle? 1310.13(b)

      Buses undergo preventative maintenance every 3,000 miles or 45 days by
       the shop, whichever comes first.

How often do you conduct a pre-trip inspection of the vehicle? What happens if
something does not pass the pre-trip inspection? Describe how the inspection
ensures that the vehicle is in safe operating condition. 1310.13(c)

      An inspection is completed daily and every time I get into a new bus. If
       something is found not to have passed the pre-trip inspection, I would be
       assigned a different bus by dispatch. The bus would never leave the yard
       if it did not pass the inspection.

Observation: Bus Inspection (Vehicle Maintenance and Inspections)
Describe the bus driver's pre-trip inspection. If the bus driver completes a pre-trip
inspection form, review a copy of the form.


                                                                                   43
      The bus driver began inside, checking to make sure the brake is engaged,
       seat is adjusted, and seat belt functions. She started the engine to allow it
       to warm up as she continued her pre-trip inspection. At the time she
       checked the gauges, indicators and warning devices, horns, heat and air.
       She opened the entrance door and began to make take a walk through of
       the interior of the bus, checking windows, latches, roof vents, interior
       lighting, seats, seat belts, car seats, etc. She opened and closed the
       emergency exit to make sure it opened, locked into place, and made sure
       the warning device functioned. She uncovered the wheelchair lift. She
       checked the fire extinguishers, first aid kit, CHP Inspection Certificate and
       then exited the vehicle for a walk around. Windshield wipers were tested,
       Glass and mirrors were checked, as were all exterior lights and indicators,
       including the 4 way hazards. Tires were checked, including a check to
       make sure the lug nuts were snug in place. The wheel chair lift was tested
       to make sure it was in working order. Brake lights tested. Observer at this
       point allowed the bus driver to continue on with pre trip inspection, and
       was given a copy of the Daily Condition Report used with every pre-trip
       inspection.


Transportation Services Question 1B

Do programs providing transportation services, either directly or through a
contract, have an applicant review process that advises applicants for driving
positions of the specific background checks required? PDM7E, 1310.16(b)

      Yes, before they even receive their driving certificate, they must clear a
       background check with the Department of Justice.

Staff Files: Bus Driver and Transportation Coordinator (Staff Hiring Procedures)
Review information in the file on background checks.

 Were background checks for the bus driver or the Transportation Coordinator
completed?

      Background checks are done prior to hire.

Indicate the date the background check was conducted.

      For the Transportation Coordinator, the background check was completed
       in August 2005

(Note to reviewer: Review information from the program's tracking system. Select
staff files to verify the staff background check information provided in the tracking



                                                                                    44
system. If a tracking system is unavailable, review staff files to determine
whether appropriate criminal record checks are conducted before hire date.)

Interview: Transportation Coordinator (Transportation Procedures)

What is the program's process for background checks on their contracted bus
drivers?

      Applicants who want to become a driver for AVSTA go through a review
       process which includes fingerprinting and a background check completed
       by the Department of Justice.

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Background Checks)

How do you ensure the specific background checks are conducted for contracted
drivers?

      Applies to: Programs providing transportation services The transportation
       contractor is responsible for interviewing, screening, hiring, and evaluating
       their drivers. They perform the necessary background checks for all
       employees.

Interview: Bus Driver (Background Checks)

Was a background check conducted when you were hired?

      Yes

Transportation Services Question 1C

Does each bus driver have a valid commercial driver's license (CDL)?
Note: This requirement only applies to bus drivers in States that grant CDLs.
1310.16(a)(1)

Staff Files: Bus Driver (Staff Hiring Procedures)
Does each bus driver have a valid commercial driver's license (CDL)?

• All CDLs were issued in the state of California.

• California DMV forms contain a non-disclosure act disallowing the release of
personal information. It can be assured that all licenses within our agency are
current.

Providing Transportation Services




                                                                                  45
Transportation Services Question 2A

Does the program ensure that each vehicle is properly equipped? 1310.10(d)(1-
4), 1310.12(b)(2), 1310.12(b)(1)
     AVSTA follows all state and CHP rules and regulations.

Observation: Bus Inspection (Vehicle Equipment)

Are vehicles equipped with reverse beepers? 1310.12(b)(2)
    Yes

Are vehicles equipped with height- and weight-appropriate restraint systems?
(Note to reviewer: Lap belts only are not acceptable for child restraints.)
1310.12(b)(1)

      Yes

 Does the vehicle providing transportation services have a seat belt cutter?
1310.10(d)(4)

      Yes

Does the vehicle providing transportation services have a well-stocked first aid
kit? SAF2E, 1310.10(d)(3)

      Yes

Is the vehicle equipped with a two-way communication system to call for
assistance? Is there a back-up plan if the two- way communication system is not
working (e.g., in drop zones)? 1310.10(d)(1)

      Yes, vehicles are equipped with a two-way communication system. There
       is no official back plan should the two-way communication system fail,
       though most drivers do carry cell phones. While not mandatory to carry
       them, the cell phones could be used in such cases where the two-way
       communication system fails.

Is there a fire extinguisher on the bus and is it fully charged (check the gauge)?
1310.10(d)(2)

      Yes




                                                                                     46
Transportation Services Question 2B

Are baggage and other items transported in the passenger compartment properly
stored and secured, aisles cleared, and doors and emergency exits unobstructed
at all times? 1310.15(b)

Observation: Bus Inspection (Bus Safety)
Are baggage or other items transported in the passenger compartment properly
stored?

      Students that ride the special education bus leave their bags in a specified
       area that the bus driver then secures.

Transportation Services Question 2C

Does the program adhere to the basic principles of trip routing? 1310.20(b),
1310.20(b)(1), 1310.20(b)(6), 1310.20(b)(7)

Interview: Bus Driver (Transportation Safety)

Does the bus monitor, or another adult, escort children when they have to cross
the street? 1310.20(b)(6)

      A waiver for the 2009-2010 school year for bus monitors (45 CFR Part
       1310.15(c) ) was granted to our agency

What is the average time each child is on the bus, each way? Which child has
the longest trip on the bus? How long is it? (Note to reviewer: If any child’s trip is
over 1 hour long, ask the bus driver whether an alternate route is available to
reduce the child’s transit time to under 1 hour.)

      The average time a child is on the bus, each way is 30 minutes. The
       longest would be fifty minutes.

Describe procedures for using alternate routes in case of hazardous conditions.
1310.20(b)(7)

      For a known hazardous condition, the scheduler would adjust the routes
       accordingly. For unknown hazardous condition, such as an accident, the
       driver would call in the situation and receive an alternate route.

Transportation Services Question 2D

DOES NOT APPLY TO: Programs with a waiver approved by ACF for this
requirement
Is at least one bus monitor onboard at all times?


                                                                                    47
Note: An approval letter from ACF is required for an exception from this
regulation.
1310.15(c)(1)

      A waiver for the 2009-2010 school year for bus monitors (45 CFR Part
       1310.15(c) ) was granted to our agency

Transportation Services Question 2E

Are children released only to a parent, legal guardian, or other individual as
designated in writing by the parent or legal guardian? Does the agency maintain
lists of the persons, including alternates in case of emergency, and up-to-date
child rosters at all times to ensure that no child is left behind, either at the
classroom or on the vehicle at the end of the route? 1310.10(g)

Interview: Transportation Coordinator (Transportation Procedures)

How does the bus driver receive up to date information on children, especially
when a contractor provides transportation services?

      When we receive the information by bus service request, we dispatch that
       information to the driver.

Interview: Bus Driver (Transportation Safety)

How do you receive up to date information on children?

      Up to date information comes through the supervisors.

What process do you follow if no parent is at a stop to meet a child exiting the
bus?

      Contact dispatch. Parent is then contacted by phone. If parent does not
       respond, the student is then transported back to the school.

How do you ensure that no child is left on the vehicle at the end of the route?

      After the last student is dropped off a walk through and visual inspection is
       completed on the bus. Dispatch is called with a “Child Check Empty.”
       The bus is returned to the yard where another walkthrough and visual
       inspection is completed and the “Bus Empty” sign is placed in the back
       window.

Interview: Bus Driver and Bus Monitor (Transportation Safety)




                                                                                   48
How do you know the people to whom each child can be released when he or
she exits the bus?
    By who is listed on the bus service request.

Transportation Services Question 2F

Does the program providing transportation services ensure that all accidents
involving vehicles that transport children are reported in accordance with
applicable State requirements? 1310.10(f)

Document Review: Driver Incident Reports
Are accidents reported in accordance with applicable State requirements?

      Yes, reported to the CHP, the school, School District Office and the
       parent.

Interview: Transportation Coordinator (Transportation Procedures)

How are families notified if a child is onboard a bus when an accident occurs?

      The supervisor makes the notification.

Interview: Bus Driver (Transportation Safety)

Have you ever been involved in an accident? If so, how was it reported?

      I’ve had no accidents.


Bus Driver Credentials, Qualifications, and Training

Transportation Services Question 3A

Does the program ensure that persons employed to drive vehicles receive the
required behind-the-wheel and classroom training before transporting children
and annually thereafter? Note: This compliance question applies to both hired
and contracted bus drivers. PDM7I, 1310.17(b)(1-7),

Staff Files: Bus Driver (Staff Training and Development)

At time of hire, bus driver receives 20 hours of classroom training, 20 hours of
behind the wheel training and 10 hours of training specifically dealing with special
needs children and mandatory reporting. Annually, each driver receivers a
minimum of 10 hours of in-service training based on program needs and
regulations. Every 5 years the written and behind the wheel test is administered.



                                                                                 49
Interview: Bus Driver (Training)

What type of classroom and behind-the-wheel training have you received?
1310.17(b)

      Initially, I received two weeks of classroom training and 40 hours of behind
       the wheel training.

Do you receive refresher behind-the-wheel and classroom training courses
annually? 1310.17(d)

      There is a minimum of 10 hours per year that is required.

Document Review: Training Plans and Policies
Describe the behind-the-wheel and classroom training procedures for bus
drivers, noting how often bus drivers are required to participate in such training.

      At date of hire bus drivers receive 20 hours of classroom training, 20
       hours of behind the wheel training and 10 hours of training on handling
       special needs children and mandated reporting.

      There are opportunities monthly for staff to receive training towards the
       minimum of 10 hours they need annually to maintain their driving
       certificate.

Transportation Services Question 3B

Do bus drivers receive annual evaluations, which must include an onboard
observation of road performance? Note: This compliance question applies to
both hired and contracted bus drivers. PDM7C, 1310.17(f)(1)

Staff Files: Bus Driver (Staff Training and Development)

Has the bus driver had an annual performance evaluation?

      Annual performance evaluations are done by the dispatch supervisor

• Did the annual review include an onboard observation?

      To renew their license, every 5 years the driver must take a written and
       behind the wheel test.

Interview: Bus Driver (Performance Reviews)

Do you receive an annual evaluation that includes an onboard observation?
When was your last evaluation? PDM7C


                                                                                      50
      I do receive an annual evaluation. Last one was May 2009


Transportation Services Question 3C

Has each bus monitor, before duty, been trained on child boarding and exiting
procedures, use of child restraint systems, required paperwork, emergency
response and evacuation procedures, use of special equipment, child pickup and
release procedures, and pre- and post-trip vehicle check?

Note: This requirement does not apply to programs with a waiver approved by
the
Administration for Children and Families (ACF) for this requirement. An approval
letter
from ACF is required for exception from this regulation. PDM7I, 1310.17(f)(2)

      A waiver for the 2009-2010 school year for bus monitors (45 CFR Part
       1310.15(c) ) was granted to our agency

Arranging for Transportation Services

Transportation Services Question 4A

Does the agency help as many families as possible obtain transportation who
need transportation for their children to attend the program? 1310.10(a)

Interview: FCS Coordinator (Support Services for Families)

      Our agency works with local agencies to help families that need to obtain
       transportation so their child can attend our program.

Transportation Services Question 4B

Are the specific types of transportation assistance being offered made clear to all
prospective families in the program’s recruitment announcements?

      During the enrollment process, parents complete a family assessment and
       at that time they are made aware of the types of transportation assistance
       available to them.

Transportation Services Question 4C

When special education and related services cannot be provided on site, has the
program arranged for or provided transportation for children with disabilities to
and from the program, special clinics, or other service providers?


                                                                                 51
Note: Transportation includes adapted buses equipped to accommodate
wheelchairs or
other such devices, if required. 1308.4(h)(6), 1310.22(a), 1310.22(b)

Interview: Transportation Coordinator (Transportation for Children with
Disabilities)

Are any special education or related services provided off site?

      In special circumstances, a child has been transported from one site to
       another to receive special education services. Currently, in this school
       year, there have been no children in need of transportation for such
       services.

Do you arrange for or provide transportation for children with disabilities to and
from services? 1308.4(h)(6)

      If deemed necessary, under special circumstances.

Does the transportation comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990?
1310.22(b)

    Yes
How do you ensure that the transportation is adapted to meet a child's special
needs?
1310.22(a)

      By complying with the information received on the bus services request.

Management Systems Analysis

Transportation Services Question 5A

This section lists a series of targeted questions not linked to a performance
standard at the service area level. These questions are designed to contribute to
a comprehensive analysis of the program’s management systems. Accordingly,
these questions appear in each protocol section and are completed for each
service area to provide insight into how key management systems function with
relationship to each service area.


Interview: Transportation Coordinator (Ongoing Monitoring and Oversight)

How do you monitor delivery of the program's transportation services and the
program's compliance with all Federal regulations?


                                                                                     52
Show me the documents, systems, and reports used in implementing the
ongoing monitoring of transportation services.

What do you do if you detect problems or weaknesses with the program's
transportation services?

      Contact transportation management to report/discuss the suspected
       problems and/ or weaknesses.

Interview: Transportation Coordinator (Program Planning)

Describe how information from the annual self assessment is incorporated into
your program planning and implementation.

Describe how information from the community assessment (and its updates) is
incorporated into your program planning and implementation.


Summary Analysis: Overall Service Summary

Summarize your general impressions of the program’s delivery of transportation
services. The summary should describe what the program does well, which
areas need improvement, and your overall level of confidence in the program’s
provision of transportation services. Your summary should not directly reiterate
the strengths and findings you identified through implementation of the protocol
but, rather, should reflect your overall analysis and impressions of the program’s
effectiveness in providing transportation services.

      We do not have on-going transportation services for our regular education
       preschoolers. We hold yearly bus evacuation training for our preschool
       sites but our preschool children are not transported by bus on a regular
       basis.

Summary Analysis: Ongoing Monitoring

Summarize the program’s process for ongoing monitoring of Transportation
services. A comprehensive explanation of this system should include a
description of each of the following:


      We do not have on-going transportation services for our regular education
       preschoolers. We hold yearly bus evacuation training for our preschool
       sites but our preschool children are not transported by bus on a regular
       basis.




                                                                                53
Summary Analysis: Service Specific Strengths

Summarize program strengths noted in transportation services. Describe any
practices that were found to be new or innovative and had a positive impact that
helped the grantee overcome challenges and provided greater/improved service
quality or surpassed established performance indicators. Some examples of
broad categories of program strengths include (but are not limited to):

      Our interaction with our transportation agency is limited to our yearly bus
       evacuation drills as our program does not utilize bus transportation during
       the school year. These questions are not relevant to our program as we
       do not have on-going bus transportation for our program


                                    Disabilities
Question 1A:

Has the program hired staff or consultants as content area experts to oversee
disabilities services who have training and experience in securing and
individualizing needed services for children with disabilities? 1304.52(d)(7)

Interview: Disabilities Coordinator (staff qualifications & expertise)

      The Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator has a MA in Counseling and a
       BS in Applied Developmental Psychology as well as 7 years working with
       children, four of those in Early Childhood Education. The Disabilities
       Service Provider is a credentialed School Psychologist with a PPS.

      The Disabilities Service Provider is a School Psychologist and is thereby
       fully trained and experienced in assessing for possible disabilities as well
       as securing individualized services for children with disabilities. She has
       worked with students with disabilities as Special Education staff for seven
       years. Her qualifications are documented in the Staff Qualifications
       binder in ECE office and the Personnel files in the HR department.

       The Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator (MH/DC) works under direct
       supervision of the Disabilities Service Provider (DSP) and has an MA.
       Although she is not directly trained in Special Education she does have
       experience in individualizing plans for children. She attends all Disabilities
       Service trainings offered by the delegate.

Staff Files: Disabilities content area expert (staff qualifications & expertise)




                                                                                   54
      The Disabilities Service Provider has been a credentialed School
       Psychologist since July 2003 and has extensive experience in education
       previous to that including an internship and substitute teaching.

      The Disabilities Service Provider holds a Nationally Certified School
       Psychologist Credential, Masters of Science in Counseling, Pupil
       Personnel Services Credential with Advanced Specialization in School
       Psychology and Child Welfare and Attendance, and a Bachelor of Arts in
       Psychology.

Question 2A:

Does the Disabilities Coordinator work with the Education Coordinator in ongoing
assessment and planning of activities for children with disabilities taking into
consideration the child’s health needs? 1308.6(d)

Interview: ECDC & DC (staff coordination)

      Changes or updates to program plans are shared at staff (EAC) meetings
       which occurred weekly and will be occurring monthly.

       Teachers are supported through classroom visits performed by the
       MH/DC and visits performed by an Educational Specialist. Both
       professionals are available ongoing to field phone calls and requests for
       support from teachers.

       When a change of plans is needed, the MH/DC facilitates contact
       between the teacher and service provider to collaborate on scheduling a
       special IEP meeting.

Interview: ECDC (staff coordination)

      The Education Coordinator and Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator
       (MH/DC) both attend weekly or monthly staff meetings. Children with
       IEP’s, and children who are in the student study process are discussed
       with the education coordinator/specialist as needed at Case study
       meetings scheduled to occur two times a month on Monday mornings.

       On-going communication between the disabilities coordinator, education
       manager, and classroom teachers regarding student-identified delays,
       recommended interventions, and modifications in the general education
       curriculum occur on a regular basis through phone calls, emails and direct
       face to face contact.

Observation: Children with Disabilities



                                                                                   55
      The MH/DC visits the classroom sites and will offer support as needed
       through site visits, collaboration with professionals and phone calls with
       teachers. Children with disabilities receive their services either through an
       SLPA coming to the classroom or through attending a special day class
       and/or speech and language lab.

      The MH/DC and/or DSP works closely with the health manager, School
       Nurse, on individual children’s health plans. Both the MH/DC or the DSP
       and nurse are members of the IEP team. A health representative and
       general education teacher are always invited to the Initial IEP where
       services are planned.

Interview: Teacher & Family Child Care Provider (staff coordination)

      People came at the beginning of the year and (Lesley and Margie)
       showed me the IEP. Margie gave me ideas on how to follow the IEP. Ms.
       Elaine was here too and helped me with some questions. I asked Lesley
       some questions & she helped me.

Document Review: Documentation of Disabilities Services

      Program utilizes the case study log and case study meeting notes to
       document collaboration between education and disabilities staff.
       Individual IEP’s also indicate collaboration between service areas. Case
       study logs and case notes are utilized for collaboration among applicable
       service areas.

Question 2B:

Does the Disabilities Coordinator work with health staff and teachers in the
assessment process to help them identify children with disabilities and to ensure
follow up so the health needs of children with special needs are being met?
1308.18(a)

      Every child receiving a Special Education assessment has their hearing
       and vision screened as part of the assessment. Additionally, children who
       may have health concerns are placed on the Case Study log which is kept
       in a central electronic location and used during case study meetings the
       health coordinator is invited to attend. Once a child receives an IEP, their
       health needs are tracked through the IEP team.

Interview: HC (children with disabilities)

      Every child who is identified as having a suspected disability is referred
       through the student study team process. Once interventions/modifications



                                                                                  56
       have been attempted and the child is still not progressing, an SST 2 is
       held.

      During the SST 2 the parent or caregiver is asked by the MH/DC if the
       child has any relevant health history or health needs including hearing or
       vision concerns. If concerns are indicated, they are recorded on the SST
       2.

      The SST 2 is used as a referral to Special Education where it is reviewed
       the Health Coordinator or her colleague, the RN. Every child receiving a
       Special Education assessment has their hearing and vision screened as
       part of the assessment.

      When a concern is identified, the child is placed on the Health problems
       classroom list. An Individualized Health Plan (IHP) is created by the
       Health Coordinator and reviewed with the teacher prior to beginning
       placement with an IEP. Children are monitored by the HC as part of
       ongoing monitoring on a quarterly basis.

      Once a child receives an IEP, their health needs are also tracked through
       the IEP team.

      Children who may have health concerns are placed on the Case Study log
       which is kept in a central electronic location and used during case study
       meetings the health coordinator is invited to attend. Information is shared
       with the Disabilities Coordinator through the case study list, meeting and
       at EAC meetings.

Interview: teacher (staff coordination)

      My student didn’t have an IHP this year. If he had a health situation, the
       nurse would give me a health plan.


Document review: Documentation of Disabilities Services

      The program utilizes staff meetings, Case Study meetings and the Case
       study log to document services for children with IEP’ and health needs.

Question 2C

Does the Disabilities Coordinator work with the staff person responsible for
mental health to help teachers identify children with mental health-related
disabilities 1308.18(b)

Interview: DC (staff coordination)


                                                                                    57
      The DC works closely with the MHC due to the fact that they are one in
       the same person.

       Within 45 days of attendance, students are given the Ages and Stages
       Questionnaire: Social Emotional. Children who score in the red flag range
       (high scores) are referred by the Education Coordinator/Specialist to the
       Disabilities/Mental Health Coordinator, who reviews the screen and
       contacts the parents. The MH/DC consults with the Disabilities Services
       Provider and or the Mental Health Service Provider regarding students
       who may require additional modifications and interventions to support their
       needs. The MH/DC then works with the classroom teacher and parents to
       provide interventions and modifications to be used in the classroom and at
       home.

Interview: MHC (children with disabilities)

      They are the same person.

Document review: documentation of Disabilities Services

      The program utilizes several logs to track the services of children with
       disabilities including the SST log, the speech & Language Referral Log,
       Case study log and case study meetings.

Question 3A

Does the program conduct outreach and recruitment activities to actively locate
and recruit children with disabilities, including children with severe disabilities?
1308.5(a) etc

Interview: ERSEA Coordinator (enrollment and recruitment)

      Yes we are currently servicing children with disabilities.

Interview DC & ERSEA coordinator (enrollment & recruitment)

      The Disabilities Service Provider, Mental Health Service Provider and
       Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator are in contact with Regional Center,
       Children’s Bureau, and the Department of Children and Family Services.

      The Disabilities Service Provider attends transition IFSP’s with Regional
       Center.

      The Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator attends transition meetings
       with Regional Center.


                                                                                       58
      Included in flyers that go out to the public is the statement “Children with
       disabilities welcome.”

      Additionally, local pediatricians servicing young children are contacted
       with letters and fliers explaining our program welcomes those with severe
       needs.

      Family Service Providers recruit children at community fairs, community
       agencies and all elementary school utilizing fliers which target children
       with disabilities.

Interview: ERSEA coordinator & DC (Enrollment & recruitment)

      When all enrollment requirements are completed, a slot is available and
       when the IEP team determines that the child’s needs can be met in a
       Head Start classroom, services have been provided in the Head Start
       classroom.
      Placement is not denied due to a disability or severity of a disability.

      The child’s placement depends on an IEP team decision based on where
       the child’s needs can best be met. The priority of the IEP team is for the
       best environment for optimum development. For children who need more
       structure or smaller group settings, they can be dually enrolled in Special
       Education classes and Head Start.

      Accommodations are made for children with disabilities.

Document Review: recruitment materials

      The recruitment materials always include children with disabilities
       including those with severe needs as part of the fliers and letters.

Question 4A:

Applies ONLY to programs serving infants & toddlers
Not Applicable

Question 4B:

Does the Disabilities coordinator refer preschool-age children suspected of
having a disability to the Local Education Agency for further, formal evaluation as
soon as the need becomes evident? (1308.6 (e)(1))

Child Files:



                                                                                      59
Reviewed 8 files: Children are being assessed within the 60 day timeline
required by the law. There were 3 Children who experienced a delay getting an
assessment once Special Education received the referral. Two of these delays
occurred because parent consent was not secured at the first try and one of them
was due to miscommunication.

Interview: Disabilities Coordinator

      The program has procedures for referring a child with concerns and/or
       suspected Disabilities. The program utilizes the Student Study Team
       (SST) process which is a multiple step, multidisciplinary format for getting
       assistance to children. If modifications are made and the child does not
       progress toward their goals, during the SST 2, the MH/DC will recommend
       a referral to Special Education for an assessment. When the parents
       have given their signed consent, the referral is given directly to the Special
       Education Administrative secretary who schedules the assessments.

      Every child who is referred to Special Education must be assessed within
       60 days of receiving parental consent. Special Education has had
       difficulties getting parental consent signed in a timely matter during the
       2009 –2010 school year.

      Another challenge for Special Education (LEA) has been scheduling.
       Some assessments took longer to complete due to an overloaded
       assessment schedule and lack of testing rooms.

Question 4C:

Does the program work with the LEA to ensure that parents are informed and
provide written consent before evaluations are conducted? 1308.6(e)(3)

Child Files:

      Four files were reviewed. All files contained a signed 202 dated for before
       the date of the first assessment.

Interview:

      Due to the federal laws regulating the need for parents informed, written
       consent, the LEA secures the written consent and it is documented in the
       child’s IEP. No assessments are allowed to be conducted without
       consent. If the Special Education staff need assistance getting this, the
       MH/DC can assist by calling or contacting the parents to explain the need
       for them to sign the form.




                                                                                  60
       A bilingual interpreter will be invited when needed to give informed
       consent in another language besides English. A bilingual Spanish/English
       Special Education professional works in the preschool Special Education
       office three days a week. If the language spoken is something other than
       English or Spanish (the primary languages in this program), the Special
       Education assessor can submit a request for an interpreter to the district.

Question 4D:

Does every child receiving services in Head Start, who has been evaluated and
found to have a disability and to be in need of special education, have an IEP
before special education and related services are provided? 1308.19(b)

      Yes, every child being serviced by Special Education has an IEP.

Child Files:

      4 files were reviewed and all four had an IEP with services provided after
       the IEP date. Each IEP have a creation date on them and were current.

Question 4E:

Is the approach to education and child development inclusive of children with
disabilities and consistent with their Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) or
Individualized Education Program (IEP)? 1304.21(a)(1)(ii)

Observation: children with Disabilities:

      Children were observed at Sierra 2, Sierra 3, DV4 and West Wind. At all
       four sites, students with disabilities were observed to be included in all
       activities including both large group and small group settings.

Interview: DC (child assessments):

      The Special Education Providers (i.e. full inclusion specialist, SLP, SLPAs)
       work with the Head Start Teachers to ensure that the goals and
       educational services are consistent with the child’s IEP. Students receive
       services either at a preschool communication lab or through the
       professional coming into the classroom.

      The Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator distributes copies of the IEP’s
       to the teacher. Teacher’s consults the child’s IEP when lesson planning.

      Teacher individualizes the lesson plans for each child by placing the
       initials of the child on the lesson plan in the areas pertaining to the child’s
       IEP goal.


                                                                                     61
      Teachers implement the child’s Individual Education Program goals into
       the classroom curriculum and make notes on a weekly basis regarding
       how they worked with the child to help the child meet their goals

      Children with disabilities actively participate in all activities within the
       classroom. The inclusion of children with disabilities into all social activities
       and interactions is supported by the teaching staff.

      The classroom environment is set up to be accessible to all children.
       Materials are purchased and placed in the classroom and are accessible
       to all children.

      The environment created with the Creative Curriculum allows all children
       to be successful, no matter where they are developmentally. The program
       uses the Creative Curriculum, which advocates setting up learning areas
       in the room that allow all children to succeed, regardless of their cognitive
       level, language, culture, or learning style through self directed activities
       that are monitored and supported by classroom teachers.

      The Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator’s collaboration with the Special
       Education staff and the Head Start teachers is ongoing to ensure that the
       appropriate services are delivered.

Interview: teacher (IFSPs & IEPs)

      “Oh yeah. Yes I am.”

      “We do modifications in the classroom. He had a second IEP that changed
       his IEP. Now he is attending a special needs class. I support what they
       are doing there- numbers, colors & social skills. He has goals in the
       classroom & individuals. His initials are put on the lesson plan to indicate
       what activities are being individualized to meet his goals.”

Question 5A:

Applies ONLY to programs serving infants & toddlers:
Not Applicable

Question 5B:

Does the Head Start program help families prepare for transitions regarding
disabilities service for children entering Head Start from infant and toddler
programs, as well as for children leaving Head Start for subsequent placements?
1308.21(a)(1) etc



                                                                                     62
Interview: DC (transitions)

The program utilizes many formats for assisting parents in transitioning their
children both into and out of Head Start.

For transitions from Transition from Regional Center to Head Start:
    Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator (MHDC) attends quarterly transition
       meetings hosted by North LA County Regional Center. Parents with
       children 2.9 and older attend the meetings. MHDC recruits and answers
       questions.

      Regional Center coordinates a transition meeting for children with IFSP’s
       turning three years old. A representative from the school district and/or
       Head Start attends when possible. Family is referred to LEA.

      The School District has an Early Start Coordinator (non Head Start) whom
       we collaborate with on children moving from Early Start to Preschool.
       Parents are given a copy of their rights under the IDEA act.

      The Family Service Provider contacts parents to set up goals for the family
       during enrollment.

      Head Start staff, such as the Disabilities Service provider, attend the IEP.

For transitions from Head Start to Kindergarten
    Every student leaving Head Start for Kindergarten has a Kindergarten
       Transition IEP meeting.

      Student’s case carrier coordinates and schedules the K-transition IEP by
       inviting the parent, IEP service providers, MH/Disabilities Coordinator and
       Child Development Teacher and staff from the receiving school.

      During the IEP meeting, the student’s progress toward goals and current
       services are discussed in order to develop an IEP reflecting appropriate
       services, progress and new goals for Kindergarten are discussed.

      Parent is informed about how to enroll student in Kindergarten continue
       services if appropriate.

      Records are transferred at the end of the program year to the receiving
       school.

      A Kindergarten Readiness Faire is hosted by the grantee in the spring.
       Information is provided to parents about how to prepare their children for
       Kindergarten and enrollment dates and procedures are distributed. The
       fair includes workshops, community booth vendors, door prizes and


                                                                                  63
       handouts. A special workshop is provided in English & Spanish for
       Parents of Children with Disabilities.

Additionally the student’s general education teacher also facilitates transitions:

    Transition is built into the curriculum program and is ongoing year round
     including: monthly transition activities in the Curriculum Guide and field
     trips around the school campus to experience the “big” school.

    In the spring, teachers read stories to children regarding going to
     kindergarten and what to expect in kindergarten.

    In the spring, teachers show children the video “Kindergarten Here I
     Come”. The video is provided in both Spanish and English.

    Teaching staff schedule field trips to a kindergarten classroom in the
     spring. Children get to meet kindergarten aged children and a
     kindergarten teacher, as well as see the kindergarten classroom. Parents
     are invited to attend.

    Teaching staff, with the assistance of office personnel (ex: program
     specialists, Family Service Providers etc.) provide transition information to
     parents.
        o Kindergarten Round Up Dates
        o School information
        o Information on how to help their child make a successful transition
        o Information on how to help their child be successful in kindergarten

    Teachers and parents have a transition conference in the spring to review
     the child’s progress, to discuss the transition process, review information
     on having a successful transition, and then to create goals for the child to
     help in the transition process. Activities to help meet this goal are created
     for both home and school

Parents are informed of their rights under IDEA when they sign the 202
assessment form and are reviewed at the Initial IEP meeting.

Interview: Parent (transitions)

Q: Has the program helped your child transition to Kindergarten?
“Partially yes. Umm. Well we’ve had one or two classes which give you
information. She hasn’t had her transition assessment yet. I wasn’t able to
attend the last class meeting. At the last parent/teacher meeting with Ms. Jenny
she talked about where she thinks D. will be for Kindergarten.”

Document review: transition plans



                                                                                     64
      IEP calendar: A transition IEP is held before the child leaves the program
       and enters Kindergarten. Dates for transition IEP’s range from February to
       April when this self-assessment was written. Some are scheduled for
       May.

      Calendar: General Education Parent/teacher transition meetings are
       scheduled for the end of April and beginning of May.

      Transition Fair agenda, schedule: A Transition Fair was held for families to
       provide information and guidance when transitioning out of Head Start.

      Transition policies and procedures: outline clearly transition procedures.

Question 5C:

Has the program made specific efforts to develop interagency agreements with
Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) and other agencies (Part C) within the service
area to enable children and their families effective participation? 1304.41(a)(4)

Interview: Disabilities Coordinator (community partnerships)

      Currently the program has an interagency agreement with the Lancaster
       School District. We also have an interagency agreement with Antelope
       Valley Selpa which includes other local districts.

      The agency has an informal agreement with the local Part C agency,
       North LA county Regional Center. An interagency agreement needs to be
       developed.

Documents review: CPA for Lancaster School District

Area of Concern:

An interagency agreement with North LA County Regional Center needs to be
developed.

Document review: Interagency Agreement

      Interagency agreement between the LEA and Head Start is in existence
       and was reviewed.




                                                                                    65
Question 5D:

Has the Head Start program developed a disabilities service plan and actively
used it to allocate resources as well as guide and integrate all aspects of its
efforts to serve children with disabilities? 1308.4(d) etc

Interview: Disabilities Coordinator (program planning)

      The service area has a Written Plan that outlines how services should be
       conducted and funded for children with disabilities.

      The Disabilities Written plan addresses all performance standards relating
       to Disabilities Services. It guides how the program screens children for
       possible concerns, makes referrals for suspected disabilities and engages
       parents in a multidisciplinary decision making process.

      The written plan also outlines assessment and provision of services as
       well as transitioning children with disabilities into and out of Head Start.
       Additionally, the plan addresses recruitment.

      Every year the plan is either modified or re-written. During this process the
       MH/DC considers how many referrals were made, where they came from
       and collaborates with the local regional center for estimating what the
       following year will bring.

      Policies and Procedures outline how the plan should be executed.

Document Review: Disabilities Service Plan

      Written plans are reviewed and revised at the end of every service year.
       The 2009-2010 written plan was approved June 9th, 2009 by PAC. The
       written plan addresses each performance standard but the step by step
       specifics on how Disabilities Services are executed is covered by the
       policies & procedures for the service area. Specific strategies are listed in
       the Procedures.

Question 6A:

This section lists a series of targeted questions not linked to a performance
standard at the service area level. These questions are designed to contribute to
a comprehensive analysis of the program’s management systems. Accordingly
these questions appear in each protocol section and are completed for each
service area to provide insight into how key management systems function with
relationship to each service area.

Interview: DC (ongoing monitoring & oversight)


                                                                                      66
There are several ways the MH/DC monitors service delivery. The primary tool
used is the disabilities tracking log. Also utilized is the Speech & Language
referral log, SST log, Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring checklist. A comprehensive
Monitoring plan as well as Ongoing Monitoring plan has been developed during
the 2009-2010 school year and has begun to be implemented. When a concern
is detected, a PIP is developed and submitted to the Coordinator and/or director.
The MH/DC executes the plan created in the PIP and the coordinator monitors
the completion. External monitoring occurs through visits from LACOE monitors.

Interview: Disabilities Coordinator (program planning)

Information from the annual self- assessment is incorporated into program
planning directly through PIP’s. Program Improvement Plans outline how the
findings will be corrected. Systemic problems are identified and addressed
through the PIPs. The PIP’s guide how the service area written plans and
procedures should be revised.

Summary Analysis: Overall Service Summary

The program is doing a good job of identifying children with suspected disabilities
and servicing those who have an IEP. The program strength is its relationship
with the LEA and the quality of services provided by the LEA. The Special
Education service providers are doing an excellent job of ensuring services are
provided in a timely, appropriate manner. Documentation is being kept on
student progress in their Special Education files and indicates provision of
services. Teachers are doing a good job of indicating on their lesson plans where
they are individualizing for the child with an IEP and every student with a
disability is included in all classroom activities. Another program strength is
transitioning the children into Kindergarten. Transition is handled on many
different levels by both the general education teacher and the Special Education
team.

The service area’s greatest weakness is communication. This school year the
MH/DC has been focusing on building communication between herself and the
Special Education Secretary who schedules IEP’s. There have been numerous
times throughout the school year that the MH/DC was unaware of a scheduled
IEP- sometimes for intials and sometimes for transition or special IEP’s. There
has been a lack of communication to the teachers about meetings as a result.
The MH/DC and Special Education Secretary are working together to create
efficient procedures for notification.

Communication between service providers who do not come into the classrooms
and the classroom teachers is another area of weakness. Often times the
teacher and professional are working independently of each other. There has
been no time scheduled or created to allow the two to collaborate on providing



                                                                                67
services. As all the students with IEP’s qualify as SLI, this has primarily been a
lack of communication between the Speech and Language Labs and the general
education teacher. This is a concern that needs to be addressed.

Area of Concern:
Communication between MH/DC & Special Education Secretary, communication
between providers and Head Start teachers

Summary Analysis: Communication among Staff

Communication between service areas while at times ineffective, is improving
and has potential to be a strength. There are two in person forums for
communicating with other service areas: staff meetings (EAC) and Case study.
Case study has been newly implemented this year and when implemented
completely, will greatly increase the communication between service areas. All
service area providers are invited to attend case study meetings every other
Monday morning. The MH/DC is striving to more effectively utilize both the case
study log and meeting. Case study has already made communication more
effective.

There are two electronic forums for communicating between service areas: the
child’s central electronic file and the Case study log which every service area can
see and make entries on. Progress notes are kept chronologically in each child’s
central electronic file and is an excellent resource for service areas. The case
study log is newly created to facilitate the case study meetings. The log is kept in
a central electronic location and can be accessed by any service area. Students
are imputed into that log with a 2-3 word description of the concern. Follow up
people and actions are indicated on the log. Additionally, the MH/DC emails
tracking logs (Disabilities Services Tracking log, SST log) to the FSP’s. This
allows the FSP to inquire how the child with disabilities is doing.

Informal communication happens frequently either in person or via email. The
MH/DC coordinator would like to shift the program a little from informal to more
formal modes of communication.

Summary Analysis: Communication with Parents

Communication with parents is strong throughout the identification and referral
process. Communication breaks down a little after the child is enrolled in Special
Education. When the MH/DC isn’t informed of meetings, it makes it more difficult
to attend and be a liason with the parents. Communication between the Head
Start teachers and the parents and the Special Education Service providers and
the parents is good however which is a strength. Once the MH/DC and Special
Education Secretary are able to create procedures on communication, this will
facilitate better communication between the MH/DC and parents.




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     The MH/DC returns phone calls or contacts a parent who has a concern within
     48 hours of the contact. Ongoing monitoring shows this is occurring. Progress
     notes indicate that parents who desire assistance from the MH/DC receive
     contacts and follow ups on a regular basis.

     Program could improve in the face to face contact between the MH/DC and
     parent. Due to the high level of work loads, it is often difficult for the MH/DC to
     be at all 15 classrooms geographically spread out at drop offs and pick ups. If
     this can change, the direct face to name connection may make it easier for
     parents to feel more comfortable calling or contacting the MH/DC directly.

     Summary Analysis: Ongoing Monitoring

     This is the first program year that a detailed ongoing monitoring plan for
     Disabilities Services has been developed. Because of the newness of this plan,
     adjustments are ongoing. A very detailed procedure has been written outlining
     the duties of the Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator to monitor the delivery of
     Disabilities services. Please see the below table for a summary and illustration
     of ongoing monitoring:

     Internal Monitoring
Performance Standard                    Activity
Written Plan                            MH/DC will monitor the updating of the written plan by
1304.51(a)(1)(iii);                     reviewing the previous written plan and contacting
1304.51(a)(2)                           involved parties. Monitoring dates and findings are
                                        documented on the Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring
                                        Checklist.
Budget and Resources                    MH/DC monitors budget twice a year by comparing
1304.51(a)(1)(ii);                      starting budget to current status. Dates and findings of
1304.51(a)(2)                           monitoring are indicated on the Disabilities Ongoing
                                        Monitoring Checklist.

Enrollment Opportunities                MH/DC monitors enrollment monthly, during the first 4
1305.6(c);                              months of the Delegate Agency’s program year and
1305.3(c)                               quarterly, thereafter utilizing the Disabilities Services
                                        Tracking log. Monitoring is indicated by dates and initials
                                        in the footer of the tracking.
Service Delivery                             MH/DC monitors individualization utilizing the
1304.51(i)(1);                                  Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring Checklist.
1304.52(a)(1);                               MH/DC monitors service delivering utilizing
1304.52(a)(2)(ii);                              Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring Checklist.
1304.52(d)(7);
1304.52(k)(3)
Sect. 504 of Rehab Act and              Students that are eligible under the Americans with
Americans with Disabilities Act         Disabilities Act (ADA) are monitored quarterly utilizing
(ADA)                                   the Disabilities Service Tracking log by the MH/DC to


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1301.10(a);                         ensure they are receiving services. Monitoring is
1304.23(b)(1);                      indicated by MH/DC initials and date of monitoring on the
1304.53(a)(2);                      Disabilities Service Tracking log.
1304.53(a)(10)(xvii);
1304.53(b)(1)
Interagency Agreements              MH/DC and program coordinator will monitor annually to
1304.41(a)(4)                       ensure the agreements are formed. MH/DC will monitor
                                    progress toward the agreements by contacting involved
                                    parties. Contacts will be indicated on the Disabilities
                                    Ongoing Monitoring Checklist.
Coordinated Services with LEAs      MH/DC will monitor coordination of services by utilizing
and Part C Agencies                 the Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring Checklist which
1304.40(a)(3);                      indicates the dates MH/DC meets with local agencies.
1304.41(a)(1);
1304.41(a)(2)(iv)

Coordinated Activities with Other   FSP and MH/DC will monitor partnerships annually.
Community Partners                  MH/DC will monitor meetings with FSP utilizing the
1304.41(a)(1);                      Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring Checklist which indicates
1304.41(a)(2)&(iv)                  the dates of meetings.

Program Policies and Practices            MH/DC monitors the staff training calendar
for Identifying Children’s Needs            annually to ensure training has been given to the
1304.20(f)(2)(ii);                          staff.
1304.51(g)                                MH/DC monitors SST log monthly to ensure
                                            referrals are being properly managed. Monitoring
                                            is indicated by the MH/DC initials and date in the
                                            footer of the SST log.
                                          MH/DC reports numbers of referrals weekly to
                                            EAC. EAC minutes are used to document
                                            reporting and monitoring.
                                          MH/DC and Education Specialist monitor ASQ
                                            tracking sheets monthly. Meetings between the
                                            MH/DC and Education Specialist are monitored by
                                            utilizing the Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring
                                            Checklist.
Screening Procedures and              MH/DC will monitor staff training log annually to ensure
Referral Process                    training is scheduled. Monitoring dates and findings are
1304.20(b)(1);                      documented on the Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring
1304.20(d)                          Checklist.
Addressing IEP/IFSP Objectives      MH/DC or service providers visit classrooms monthly to
1304.20(f)(2);                      monitor. Monitoring of classrooms is documented
1304.20(f)(2)(i)&(iv);              utilizing the “Classroom visits” log.
1304.21(a)(1)&(iv)
Communication Between Head          MH/DC will monitor annual IEP’s utilizing IEP calendar
Start, Partners and Parents         and Disabilities Tracking log. Monitoring is documented


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1304.21(c)(1)(i);                     on the footer of the Disabilities Tracking log with the
1304.41(a)(1)                         MH/DC initials & date.
Effective Inclusion of Children       MH/DC will utilize EAC and Case study sign ins &
with Disabilities                     minutes to monitor case management. Monitoring of
1304.20(c)(4);                        EAC & case study will be documented utilizing the
1304.21(a)(5);                        Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring Checklist.
1304.23(a)(2);
1310.22(c)
Parent Support and Parent             MH/DC will monitor parent education utilizing the Parent
Training                              training Calendar. MH/DC will indicate monitoring dates
1304.40(e)(3)                         and findings on the Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring
                                      checklist.
Promoting Families’ Self-             MH/DC and FSP will review progress notes to monitor.
Advocacy and in Role of               MH/DC will indicate monitoring dates and findings on the
Decision-Maker                        Disabilities Ongoing Monitoring checklist.
1304.20(f)(2)(ii);
1304.40(a)(3)
Assisting Families with               MH/DC will review IEP calendar and Disabilities Services
Transitions into Head Start and       Log quarterly to monitor children transitioning into/out of
into subsequent placements            the program. Monitoring is documented on the
1304.20(f)(2)(iii);                   Disabilities Services log with the MH/DC initials and date
1304.40(h)(1);                        of monitoring.
1304.41(c)(2)


     Additionally, the Head Start Coordinator monitors the monitoring of the Mental
     Health/Disabilities Coordinator (MH/DC). This Matrix along with the Disabilities
     Ongoing Monitoring Tool are utilized for monitoring. Please review the attached
     monitoring procedures for a detailed description of how monitoring occurs.

     If a noncompliance item is found during ongoing monitoring, the MH/DC will
     create a Program Improvement Plan (PIP) outlining action to be taken and due
     dates, to correct the noncompliance. The PIP will be given to the Program
     Director/coordinator. MH/DC and all necessary staff members will implement
     the PIP and the Program director will monitor completion of the PIP.

     Summary Analysis: Planning

     The agency has implemented the written plan fairly well this year. Children are
     receiving services as they should and are being identified as having suspected
     disabilities. Class lesson plans and activities are modified individually for
     students with concerns or those with IEP’s. Transition planning and
     implementation is efficient and ongoing. Recruitment has been difficult and one
     obvious area of concern is the fact that the service area has not reached the 10%
     enrollment required by Head Start.



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Summary Analysis: Record-Keeping

Record keeping is compliant. Every classroom with a Disabilities Student has
the IEP in their class file. The MH/DC keeps progress notes in the child’s central
electronic file and the teachers keep anecdotal notes in the child’s file. Special
Education Service providers have documentation of services in the Special
Education file.

Summary Analysis: Service Specific Strengths

A strength of the Disabilities Service area is the informal partnership with the
local Regional Center. Two psychologists, both Head Start service providers as
well, attend IFSP meetings for children transitioning into Head Start. One of
these providers and or the MH/DC also attends the Quarterly Transition
Fairs/meetings hosted by North LA County Regional Center for parents. This
has been a good partnership for facilitating transitions, building rapport with case
managers and parents as well as recruiting.

A potential strength is the previously described and newly implemented Case
Study meetings and log.


                                 Mental Health

Question 1A

Has the program hired staff or consultants as content area experts to oversee
mental health services who are licensed or certified mental health professionals
with experience and expertise in serving young children and their families?
1304.52(d)(4)

Interview:

      LSDHS has contracted with two certified School Psychologist who serve
       as Mental Health Service Providers (MHSP) for a total of around 10 hours
       a week. Both individuals have experience and expertise relating to early
       childhood mental health and development. The grantee ensures that
       mental health services are supported by qualified staff. All of the
       professionals including the Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator
       (MH/DC) and the MHSPs are highly qualified individuals with Master’s
       degrees in counseling.

      One Mental Health Service Provider (MHSP) supervises the Mental
       Health/Disabilities Coordinator (MH/DC) and serves as a consultant to the
       program.


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      Duties of the MHSP include: Attending SST meetings and providing
       recommendations, modifications and accommodations to help support the
       student within the school setting. Reviewing and collaborating with the
       MH/DC on results of ASQ:SE reports. Conducting Head Start parent and
       staff trainings. Designing and implementing Behavior Support Plans, when
       necessary.

      The second MHSP serves strictly as a consultant every Thursday. Duties
       include observations, recommendations, modeling interventions and
       parent trainings.

      The mental Health Service area is managed and coordinated by the
       Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator (MH/DC).

      Duties include: Coordinating, monitoring and tracking the multidisciplinary
       team process -Student Study Team (SST) -for at risk students
       reviewing and following up with results of social emotional screenings:
       Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social Emotional, including providing
       recommendations to teaching staff.
       Conducting Head Start parent and staff trainings.

Staff Files:
    MH consultants both hold PPS credentials (Pupil Personnel Services for
       School Psychology) and Masters.
    MH/DC has a MA in counseling


Question 2A

Does the program collaborate with parents on issues related to parent education
on child mental health? 1304.24(a)(1)(i)

Interview Parent (parent involvement):
      Martina: “We’ve had meetings and phone calls. Thanks for checking up
       with me and following up. I have Lesley’s phone number & extension if I
       need to call for anything.”

Interview: parent (child assessments):
      Martina: “Ms. Jenny tells me at pick up. Sometimes we have meetings
       and we talk about how to help Angelina. She was really excited to go
       back to school after the break.”

Interview: ECD coordinator & MHC (parent involvement):



                                                                                 73
      Staff share observations with parents both informally at drop off and pick
       up.

      Formal means occur during parent/teacher conferences and home visits.

      Parents are solicited for information through the screening tools (ASQ &
       ASQ:SE), during parent-teacher conferences and through the Student
       Study Team process beginning with the SST level 1.

      The MH/DC and other specialists, such as the MHSP, Disabilities Service
       Provider (DSP), and/or Education Specialists provide recommendations
       as well as resources in order to support the child’s mental health needs
       during SST meetings. Plans of action are co-created with the parent at
       the end of the SST meeting.

      The Parent Board in each child’s classroom also provides parents with
       information and resources related to supporting the development of their
       child’s mental health. Trainings and workshops are scheduled at least
       three times a year and address topics such as child abuse, domestic
       violence and chemical dependency. Articles are included in the parent
       newsletter supporting social emotional health.
      Parents are educated about appropriate behaviors individually during
       meetings and the SST process and through group workshops and
       trainings.

Interview: MHC/ECD (parent involvement)
      In addition to the parent trainings, parenting board and parenting
       newsletters already described, our staff help parents understand how to
       strengthen home environments through parent site meetings.

Interview: teacher, MHC (parent involvement)

      Parents’ input and concerns are solicited for each child within 45 days of
       entry into the program with the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) and
       the Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social/Emotional (ASQ:SE).

      The teacher reviews the completed questionnaires and they are submitted
       to the Program Specialists. If results of the questionnaires meet cut off
       levels for possible concerns the ASQ:SE is reviewed by the MH/DC.

      The teachers hold a parent/teacher conference during which they present
       the results of the screening tool and ask for feedback or questions.



                                                                                    74
      The MH/DC contacts the parent to discuss responses on the ASQ:SE as
       well as other concerns the parent may have regarding their child’s mental
       health. The MH/Disabilities Coordinator provides suggestions as well as
       resources to the parent on an as needed basis.

      Parents are also solicited for information during parent-teacher
       conferences and through the Student Study Team process beginning with
       the SST level 1.

      If modifications chosen at the SST 1 are not successful in changing the
       child’s behavior, then an SST 2 is held. Goals for the child are developed
       jointly with the parents during the SST Level 2. At the SST Level 2 the
       MH/Disabilities Coordinator and other specialists, such as the Mental
       Health Service Provider, Disabilities Service Provider, and/or Education
       Specialists provide recommendations as well as resources in order to
       support the child’s mental health needs.

Interview teacher:

      LB: “I record observations with anecdotal notes daily, weekly, for each
       child. After this information is collected the information is then shared with
       the parents through parent conferences and home visits and as needed
       throughout the school year. We discuss supportive environments and the
       importance of parent-teacher relationships. Daily communication and
       prompts of how their child is doing as well as the home environment is
       another way I solicit information from parents.”

Question 2B:

Does onsite mental health consultation involve training and education on how to
design and implement program practices responsive to the behavioral and
mental health concerns of an individual child or group of children?
1304.24(a)(3)(i)

Interview: MHC (identifying MH concerns)

      The Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator (MH/DC) learns about a
       teacher’s concern usually over the phone or in person. Teachers are
       welcome to call at all times to report concerns. The MH/DC and MHSP
       are on call to receive calls directly from the staff.

      Staff also report concerns when the MH/DC is at the site or classroom or
       during staff meetings.



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      The formal referral process is a documented method of receiving
       concerns. Teachers with significant concerns submit an SST level 1. The
       MH/DC is available to assist the teachers in filling out the SST 1 and
       follows up through class visits, observations and written
       recommendations. The MH/DC advises other service providers about the
       concerns utilizing the Case Study list. Every child who is reported as a
       concern is placed on that list and is available to all service areas for their
       use and perusal.

Interview: MHC (addressing MH concerns)

The following program practices that are responsive to the behavioral and mental
health needs of children are currently in place:

      Yearly staff trainings on Student Study Team Process, which includes
       detailed discussion on accommodations and modifications that can be
       implemented to support students’ needs. Mental Health/Disabilities
       Coordinator conducts follow up with staff for students in the SST process,
       as well as maintains and updates SST logs.

      A minimum of Tri-annual staff trainings on mental health, social skills and
       behavior related topics. This year trainings were held on the following
       dates: August 6-7; November 4-5; January 20-21; February 10-11; March
       31 & April 1.
      Further trainings are scheduled for the following dates: April 14 & 15; May
       12 & 13

      Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator and Mental Health Service Provider
       offer on site support for staff pertaining to individual students and/or
       classroom management. Support includes suggestions for modifications,
       creating supportive modifications conjointly with staff and modeling.

      On an as needed basis, case study meetings are held between
       appropriate specialists, i.e., MH/Disabilities Coordinator, Mental Health
       Service Provider, Disabilities Service Provider, Program Specialists,
       Speech Pathologists and Program Coordinator to discuss cases. A formal
       case study meeting is scheduled every two weeks on Monday at
       10:00am. Any service area is welcome to attend.

      Every child with a referral to the SST process has had support from the
       MH/DC in designing program responses. The case study minutes and
       logs also indicate support offered for children or groups of children.

      Case in point: The MH/DC along with other key staff members such as
       the Education Specialists and program coordinators were instrumental in
       assisting two classrooms in modifying their program to accommodate a


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       large quantity of varying and intense needs. Case study team meetings
       were held and assignments given to support staff. Two staff were
       assigned to work directly with the classrooms for several hours daily
       modeling and assisting staff to modify. Written and verbal directions were
       given to staff members. Student Study teams were held to assist the
       individuals with the highest needs.

Interview: teacher (staff coordination)

LB:
“There are steps to get to the point of receiving services for a child. After voicing
concerns, observations, assessments, anecdotal notes and accommodations, I
discuss the concerns with the families, then a referral for services is written and
submitted to the proper professional, ie: Mental health professional. Another
meeting is set-up with the family to discuss findings and recommend services
and/or interventions. After services are set-up they are provided on a scheduled
basis or as needed to be determined between professional and parent. Also, to
ensure that goals are being supported within my classroom I add mental health
topics and individual goals on my weekly lesson plan. I am personally able to
contact my mental health professional at anytime with any concerns about my
students. I am supported with prompt responses and visits as well as training
throughout the school year.”

Question: 2C

Does the certified or licensed mental health professional have a schedule that
enables timely, effective identification of and intervention in family and staff
concerns about a child? 1304.24(a)(2), 1304.24(a)(3)(iii)

Interview: DC (staff coordination)

      Because the Mental Health Coordinator and the Disabilities Coordinator
       are, in fact one in the same, coordination between services is immediate
       and ongoing.

Interview: Health Coordinator (screenings)

      The Health Coordinator is primarily involved in the Hearing & vision and
       Heights & weights screenings. She would be involved in a mental health
       or suspected disabilities student if their concerns were related to or
       possibly related to a health issue.

      Example: A child with speech or communication concerns who has a
       history of a cleft palate. The health coordinator becomes involved once the
       child has been screened, received modifications and been referred to the




                                                                                    77
       SST process or Special Education. The health coordinator is not directly
       involved in the ASQ or ASQ:SE screenings.

Interview: MHC (implementing MH services)

      LSDHS policies and procedures indicate a mental health professional
       visits each classroom once a month.

      Regular is defined as “monthly” the exceptions being during the months of
       august, December and March due to vacation and holidays.

      The MH/DC maintains monthly visits of each classroom. Additional visits
       are completed as needs arise. Case study meetings are scheduled to
       occur every two weeks or more frequently as needed.

      A Mental Health Service Provider is available every Thursday to give on
       site support and assist MH/DC with Mental Health Services.

      The MH/DC and MHSP are available on a daily basis to speak with and
       consult with staff and parents as concerns and needs arise.

Interview: MHC (identifying MH concerns)

      The MH/DC plays a significant role in screening and in identifying staff or
       family mental health concerns. The MH/Disabilities Coordinator reviews
       ASQ:SE’s that meet cut off levels indicating possible at-risk behaviors.
       After interviewing staff members and parents, a written report completed
       by the MH/DC is shared with the teaching staff and with MHSP, DSP and
       Program Specialists. Reports include recommendations on how to
       address the identified needs when appropriate.
      The Student Study Team (SST) process is recommended by the MH/DC
       when additional support and/or follow up is appropriate. During this
       Student Study Team process, various specialists including the MHSP,
       Education Coordinator/Specialists and the Disabilities Service Provider
       (DSP) offer direct assistance in selecting and implementing modifications
       and interventions that are appropriate to the child’s needs. MH/DC may
       model how to implement the modifications in the classroom.
      The MH/DC monitors and follow-ups with all students in the SST process
       on a monthly basis and more frequently when appropriate.

      Other ways the MH/DC becomes aware of concerns is through phone
       calls or in person conversation with teacher or parents, classroom visits
       and occasionally, other service providers. If the MH/DC becomes aware
       of a concern, she arranges an observation of the child and/or an SST
       meeting.


                                                                                   78
      Example of working with staff and parents : A.B.: For this student, the
       MH/DC was notified by the CDT that the student has difficulty controlling
       her anger and often lashes out unprovoked against other children. The
       MH/DC contacted the parent who shared family history which includes
       domestic violence. The MH/DC offered referrals to outside agencies
       which the parent accepted. Shortly afterwards, the MH/DC received the
       ASQ:SE which had a red flag score. The MH/DC advised the teacher to
       begin the SST process. This process was put on hold because the child
       was making progress in the class. A few months after that AB began to
       have extreme outbursts which included hitting and kicking other children
       and throwing things off the shelves. This MH/DC contacted the parent
       again who stated she had been unable to enroll the child in outside mental
       health services but felt a need for them. This MH/DC helped facilitate a
       referral to a partner agency, CB. Child is now receiving outpatient
       services two times a week and the parent reports she is pleased with the
       therapist. The child is scheduled to begin therapeutic preschool in two
       weeks. The MH/DC has both GroupWise and confidential progress notes
       on AB.

Document review: contract or memorandum of agreement:

      The interviewer was unable to locate a contract or memorandum of
       agreement. The head Start coordinator was in charge of creating the
       document but she left the program in February and the document cannot
       be located. The MHSP is also employed by Lancaster School District as a
       School Psychologist so she serves dual roles. As such, her job duties are
       listed as part of her employment.

Community Assessment Summary:

      The community assessment did not include findings on Mental Health.
       The findings targeted health related concerns, education levels and
       learning English as a second language as primary areas of concern.

      Given all the different ways concerns about a child can be identified
       (parent report, teacher concern, other service area provider concern,
       ASQ, ASQ:SE screening, parent teacher conferences, home visits,
       Student Study team meetings, case study meetings etc) monthly visits
       from a mental health professional seem appropriate.

Question 3A

This section lists a series of targeted questions not linked to a performance
standard at the service area level. These questions are designed to contribute to
a comprehensive analysis of the program’s management systems. Accordingly


                                                                               79
these questions appear in each protocol section and are completed for each
service area to provide insight into how key management systems function with
relationship to each service area.

Interview: MHC (ongoing monitoring and oversight)

The Mental health/Disabilities Coordinator utilizes several tools to assist with
ensuring delivery of mental health services. Those tools include: Mental
Health/SST referral log, ongoing monitoring checklist, and case study list. The
MH/DC adheres to the mental health procedures which indicate specific timelines
for monitoring each performance standard. If a problem is detected, a PIP is
written and submitted to the program director. See SST log, ASQ:SE log, case
study list and ongoing monitoring checklist.

Interview: MHC (program planning)

Information from the annual self assessment is incorporated into program
planning directly through PIP’s. Program Improvement Plans outline how the
findings will be corrected. Systemic problems are identified and addressed
through the PIPs.

Document review: community assessment summary

The community assessment did not include findings on Mental Health. The
findings targeted health related concerns, education levels and learning English
as a second language as primary areas of concern.

Given all the different ways concerns about a child can be identified (parent
report, teacher concern, other service area provider concern, ASQ, ASQ:SE
screening, parent teacher conferences, home visits, Student Study team
meetings, case study meetings etc) monthly visits from a mental health
professional seem appropriate.

Summary analysis: overall service summary

Overall the Mental Health Service area is strong. Children are being identified,
serviced and monitored, staff and parents are receiving training and thorough
records are being kept. The MH/DC has developed new tools to make the
service area more effective and is conscientious about servicing children.
Ongoing communication is occurring between service areas, between staff and
the MH/DC and between staff and parents. Overall impression is that the Mental
Health Service area, while having a few weaknesses, is strong especially
considering the person coordinating the areas is also responsible for Disabilities
Service area as well and must divide time and attention between service areas.
Active problem solving is occurring to rectify the items where service area is
weak.



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Summary analysis: Communication among staff

LSDHS is developing strengths in communication. One obvious strength is the
availability of the MH/DC to speak with teachers and parents. Review of notes
indicates that calls are returned in a timely manner (within 48 hours). Teachers
feel able to call when they need assistance or guidance. Another developing
strength is the case study log and case study meetings. This year the MH/DC
created a Case study log and has been advocating for regularly schedule Case
Study meetings to address communication and teamwork among staff. The
Case study log has greatly improved the ability for other service areas to know
what students the MH/DC is working with. The log is intended to be used by any
service area member who has contact with a parent or child about a concern. All
service areas are able to view the log and revise it. Students are imputed into
that log with a 2-3 word description of the concern. Follow up people and actions
are indicated on the log. In conjunction with that case study meetings are
scheduled to occur every Monday currently although this schedule has been
difficult to maintain. The team is working to find a frequency and time that will
accommodate members and address concerns in a timely manner. All service
area providers are also invited to attend case study meetings. The MH/DC is
striving to more effectively utilize both the case study log and meeting.

LSDHS had weekly staff meetings (currently monthly) where information can be
exchanged. The MH/DC emails the Mental Health log to the Family Service
providers and informs them in person or electronically when resources or
referrals are given to families. Due to busy schedules, the MH/DC has not always
disseminated this information in a timely manner. This needs to be addressed in
the following school year.

Email is developing as a way to communicate with teaching staff. Until this year,
most of the teachers did not have email access in their classrooms. Due to the
geographic spread of the class locations, disseminating information has been a
large challenge for LSDHS. This school year is the first year at least 95% of the
teachers have email access. This is allowing the MH/DC to be more efficient and
effective in her two way communication.

The next goal for the program is to create a central electronic calendar which
would allow service areas to be kept abreast of activities in an ongoing manner.
Developing this calendar would greatly facilitate communicating information
about events, workshops, vacation days etc.

 Communication is improving through the implementation of the case study log
and the case study meetings and has great potential to be a program strength.

Summary Analysis: communication with parents




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     The program is improving in the area of communication with parents. An area of
     improvement is how communication occurs between parents and staff about the
     ASQ:SE results. This year was the first year to implement a new plan regarding
     ASQ:SE results. This year teachers formally reviewed the ASQ:SE with parents
     at the first parent/teacher conference. This gave the parents information about
     the screening and informed them of the next steps. Having the parent/teacher
     conference makes it a much smoother process when the MH/DC calls the parent
     regarding the scores. The parent understands what the MH/DC is calling about.

     Parents are kept involved with students of concern through the Student Study
     Team process. This process is used to get assistance to children whether the
     concerns arise from parents or teachers. Their participation is integral to this
     process.

     The MH/DC returns phone calls or contacts a parent who has a concern within
     48 hours of the contact. Ongoing monitoring shows this is occurring. Progress
     notes indicate that parents who desire assistance from the MH/DC receive
     contacts and follow ups on a regular basis.

     Program could improve in the face to face contact between the MH/DC and
     parent. Due to the high level of work loads, it is often difficult for the MH/DC to
     be at all 15 classrooms geographically spread out at drop offs and pick ups. If
     this can change, the direct face to name connection may make it easier for
     parents to feel more comfortable calling or contacting the MH/DC directly.

     Summary Analysis: ongoing monitoring

     This is the first program year that a detailed ongoing monitoring plan for mental
     health has been developed. Because of the newness of this plan, adjustments
     are ongoing. A very detailed procedure has been written outlining the duties of
     the Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator to monitor the delivery of mental health
     services. Please see the below table for a summary and illustration of ongoing
     monitoring:

     Internal Ongoing Monitoring
Performance Standard                                     Action
Program Planning and Management for Quality              Mental Health/Disabilities Coordinator
Mental Health Services                                   tracks all referrals through the SST log
1304.24(a)(2);                                           which is monitored on a weekly basis.
1304.24(a)(3)(i)-(iv)                                    MH/DC initials and date are placed in the
                                                         footer to indicate monitoring has
                                                         occurred.
Coordination with Community Mental Health                MH/DC contacts FSPs quarterly
Resources                                                regarding community resource list and
1304.24(a)(3)(iv); 1304.24(a)(2)                         meets with FSP in May to ensure the
                                                         survey has items related to mental


                                                                                           82
                                                         health services. MH/DC utilizes the
                                                         Mental Health Ongoing Monitoring
                                                         Checklist to indicate dates of meetings.
Early Identification of Children’s Mental Health         MH/DC meets with Education Specialist
Needs                                                    prior to the Monthly report to LACOE and
1304.20(b)(1)-(3)                                        reviews ASQ:SE tracking sheets to
                                                         ensure students are being screened.
                                                         MH/DC utilizes MH/DC utilizes the
                                                         Mental Health Ongoing Monitoring
                                                         Checklist to indicate dates of meetings.
Parent Involvement in Children’s Mental Health           MH/DC monitors SST’s weekly
1304.24(a)(1)(i)-(vi)                                    utilizing the SST Log. MH places
                                                         initials and date of monitoring on
                                                         the footer to indicate completion of
                                                         monitoring.
Mental Health Education and Intervention for             MH/DC monitors SST log weekly and
Parents                                                  places initials and date in footer. MH/DC
1304.40(b)(1)(ii); 1304.40(c)(1)(iii); 1304.40(c)(2)     monitors case study log monthly and
                                                         places initials and date in footer.
Special Help for Children’s Individualization Mental     MH/DC monitors SST’s weekly utilizing
Health Needs                                             the SST log & reporting at EAC
1304.24(a)(3)(i)                                         meetings. MH/DC places initials and
                                                         date in footer of SST log to indicate
                                                         monitoring. EAC minutes indicate
                                                         MH/DC reports.



      Additionally, the Head Start Coordinator monitors the monitoring of the Mental
      Health/Disabilities Coordinator (MH/DC). Please review the attached monitoring
      procedures for a detailed description of how monitoring occurs.

      Summary Analysis: planning

      LSDHS is making progress toward accomplishing its goals listed in the Mental
      Health Written Plan. Evidence clearly demonstrates that teachers, children and
      classrooms are receiving assistance/ in contact with a mental health
      professional. Teachers are referring children, parents receive calls from the
      MH/DC, the MH/DC is piloting the Second Steps program, communication
      among service areas is improving and ASQ:SE screens are given to every child.
      Both parents and staff have received training on mental health topics.

      There are at least two areas of service delivery that are needing revision: the first
      is follow up reporting on ASQ:SE and the second is completing classroom visits.




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Firstly, the MH/DC received 46 ASQ:SE surveys with scores at 70 or above,
however only 6 follow up reports, required by the written plan, have been
generated by the MH/DC. Although those numbers look poor, they do not
indicate that no follow up has occurred for those children. Three moved before
contact with the parent could be made; one was referred to the SST process &
Special education before an ASQ:SE report could be written and is currently
receiving SDC services; 4 students have current IEP’s & their needs are being
addressed through those legal documents; 4 students have been referred to the
SST process; one was assessed by Special Education and did not qualify; 5
were referred to outside mental health agencies; 3 parents were contacted
directly and given parenting resources or other referrals for their families needs;
10 children have received support through classroom management systems
supported by several professionals including the MH/DC and Education
Specialists, modeling and direct intervention from a mental health professional or
Education Specialist; 9 parents were contacted but unable to be reached for
various reasons; 7 other parents, when contacted, indicated they did not have
any significant concerns; teachers were contacted about 7 children with no
social-emotional concerns (2 were speech concerns). Two rooms received
additional support for classroom management. This concern has been identified
through ongoing monitoring and action is being taken to re-write policies and
procedures to correct this issue.

Obviously needs are being addressed in different manners. However, there
appears to be challenges with the current procedures for following up on
ASQ:Ses. It is recommended that the process be examined and possibly
modified to allow follow up to occur more effectively. Observations about the
process: ASQ:SE surveys arrive in large batches. Often many reports are due
on the same date; parents do not return phone calls which might require site
visits or a delay in follow up; the MH/DC did not see the parent/teacher
conference forms which indicate what the parent was told and what was
discussed for the child; the process can be a bit redundant in contacting the
parent; parent/teacher conferences were sometimes held after the MH/DC made
follow up contact and parent hadn’t been informed of screening results; Spanish
speaking children/families take twice as long to follow up on because MH/DC
must find a translator; most of the time children with scores right at or close to 70
do not require intervention but much time goes into writing the report and doing
follow up contacts. The MH/DC has so many other responsibilities, the time
required for this follow up is very demanding.

Secondly, site visits are not always happening monthly for every classroom.
Scheduling a regular visit has been challenging for the MH/DC because triage
situations occur frequently and the scheduled time needs to be interrupted. The
MH/DC is evaluating what other options there might be for scheduling and
keeping to consistent site visits in a way that is beneficial for the children, staff
and parent and yet time efficient. Other factors involve: the MH/DC is also the
SST coordinator & MH professional for state classrooms, also the Disabilities



                                                                                    84
Coordinator; a lot of paperwork and writing has been required this year;
professional development days; vacation days etc.

Area of Concern:

ASQ:SE reports are not occurring according to the requirements of the Mental
Health Service area Written plans. This concern has already been identified
through ongoing monitoring and action is being taken to re-write policies and
procedures to correct this issue.

Summary Analysis: Record-keeping

The Mental Health Service area has excellent record keeping as demonstrated
by the contact logs on Powerschool and the confidential progress notes kept.
Services are tracked through several progressive, clear methods. Every child
with a high ASQ:SE log is entered into a track log; every child with a mental
health concern who receives an internal referral is entered onto another log.
Confidential and central notes are kept on every child the MH/DC has contact
with. This year the MH/DC created a Case study log which tracks students who
have been brought to the team’s attention

Summary Analysis: Service Specific Strengths:

LSDHS has four main strengths in the area of Mental Health Service Delivery.
The first developing strength is in communication among service areas. The
MH/DC has worked hard to implement the utilization of a centralized case study
log and case study meetings.

The second strength is the availability and response time of the MH/DC to speak
with teachers and parents. Review of notes indicates that calls are returned in a
timely manner (within 48 hours). Teachers feel able to call when they need
assistance or guidance. Parents are contacted promptly and follow up occurs.
The MH/DC is on call daily to field phone calls and help teacher problem solve.
Direct interventions are given through observations, site visits and emergency
visits to classrooms. Mental Health support of teachers and classrooms is very
strong.

The third strength for the Mental Health Service area is excellent record keeping
as demonstrated by the contact logs on Powerschool and the confidential
progress notes kept.

The last strength is the MH/DC proactive approach to implementing a
standardized social-emotional skills curriculum. Two classrooms are currently
piloting the program and the MH/DC hopes to implement the program called
Second Steps Violence Prevention Curriculum.




                                                                                85
                    Family and Community Services

Family and Community Services Question 1A

Has the program hired staff or consultants as content area experts to oversee
family and community services who have training and experience related to
social services, human services, or family services?
1304.52(d)(5)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Family Service Providers degrees,
certificates, job description and organizational chart.

•     All Family Service Providers & Bilingual Family Service Providers have
      experience, knowledge, skills and education in the field related to social
      services, human services and family services.

•     All Family Service Providers have a Degree in Social Science or at least 2
      years experience in related field.

•     Family Service Providers have the opportunity to participate in various
      workshops and trainings in the area of family and community to improve
      their expertise.

•     Adriana Escalera, Bilingual Family Service Provider: Bachelor in
      Sociology/multiple subject credential

•     Sonia Fonseca, Bilingual Family Service Provider: Associate Human
      Services/CDT Permit

•     Wanda Harris, Family Service Provider: Bachelor Health Science

•     Michael Lewis, Lead Family Service Provider: Associate Psychology, who
      provides ongoing support for all Family Service Providers

•     Diana Luna-Miller, Family Service Provider: Bachelor in Social Work/12
      Units in ECE/30 Quarter Units in the Master’s in Social Work Program.

Area of Concern - None




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Family and Community Services Question 1B

Are parent involvement services supported by staff or consultants with training,
experience, and skills in helping parents advocate and make decisions for their
young children and families?
1304.52(d)(6)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Request for conference attendance
sheet, training logs, performance standard and certificate of completion.

•     Staff and consultants are involved in providing services to parents, in the
      areas of but not limited to education, support group through referrals and
      advocacy.

•     Each Family Service Provider has at least (3) plus years of experience
      working in the social service industry.

•     All staff has been trained on the Head Start Performance Standards and
      receives ongoing training from community agencies and technical
      assistance from the Grantee office as needed.

•     All Family Service Providers attend meeting/trainings with community
      agencies in the area of health, mental health, and disabilities throughout
      the year.

Area of Concern - None

Family and Community Services Question 2A

Are opportunities for interaction between staff and families made available to
parents throughout the year? Are they respectful of each family's cultural, ethnic,
and linguistic diversity?
1304.40(a)(4), 1304.40(a)(5)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Master Calendar, Parent Survey,
Monthly Newsletter, and workshop flyers.

•     Various methods are used to communicate with families: initial contact at
      the time of registration, ongoing follows up contacts and face-to-face visits
      at sites or at the home.

•     Each follows up, and posted materials are respectful of the family’s home
      language.




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•      Forms are given to families according to each family’s cultural, ethnic and
       linguistic diversity.

•      We offer different activities such as; site meetings, parent committee, and
       various workshops, which are accommodating for all families.

•      We offer a survey/questionnaire for families to fill out and return with their
       responses regarding their availability for the various workshops/activities.

•      We rotate according to events in the community on workshops offered by
       us. Parents with special needs are considered when planning meetings
       and activities. Topics of interest are presented to help families and
       education them in areas of special need.

•      All information sent to our families is in both languages, English and
       Spanish. Also, we have staff who speak more than one language and
       assist in translations when needed.

•      A Master Calendar of activities is created at the beginning of the school
       year.

•      A survey with different topics is given to the parent’s at the time of
       Orientation. Both parent and staff plan scheduled activities.

•      Monthly newsletters are provided each month for parents to interact with
       their children at home.

•      Whenever a training/workshop is offered, event flyers are distributed to all
       families.

Area of Concerns: - None

Family and Community Services Question 2B

Are classroom staff and home visitors able to communicate with families they
serve either directly or through an interpreter? Are they familiar with the families'
ethnic backgrounds?
1306.20(f)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Performance standard, Monthly
Newsletters, Parent meetings, agendas, minutes, flyers, and parent handbook.

•      All written materials are dispensed in both English and Spanish, which are
       the two most common languages in LSD.




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•     All staff has experience working with ethnic backgrounds different from
      their own.

•     If staff cannot communicate directly with a family in their home language a
      translator will be provided for them with their own program or through the
      school district.

Parent Interview
 Interviewed parent (L.A) stating that activities have been planned at different
   times and dates to accommodate her needs, so she can participate. Meetings
   and interactions always have been respectful of my family cultural and ethnic
   background and communication has always been available


Area of Concern – None

Family and Community Services Question 2C

Does the program initiate appropriate support for families whose children have
been absent (unexcused) for 4 or more consecutive days?
ERSEA 2A, 1305.8(b)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Attendance policy & Procedure,
(ERSEA), Attendance form (Registration), Home Visit Notice, Case file.

•     Contacts with the families emphasize the benefits of regular attendance,
      while at the same time remaining sensitive to any special family
      circumstances that may have influenced the student’s attendance pattern.

•     All documentation of the contacts is located in the electronic file (Power
      school) and/or individual case notes (office drive).

•     If the parent/guardian fails to communicate with the teacher after three
      consecutive days of absence, the teacher will call to verify the absences. If
      the teacher is unable to reach the family by telephone, the teacher will
      begin calling the emergency contacts listed on the student’s Emergency
      Card. If the parent/guardian fails to communicate with the teacher after
      four consecutive days of absence and the teacher is unable to
      communicate with anyone on the student’s Emergency Card, the Family
      Service Provider assigned to that site will make a home visit.

•     During the home visit, if contact is made with the family, the FSP will ask
      the reason for the child’s extended absence from the program, offer
      assistance and or resources. The FSP keep two sets of notes to
      document this process. One set is their individual case note and the other



                                                                                   89
       is found on the child’s centralized electronic file (Power School). If the
       Family Service Provider is unable to locate anyone at home, a letter
       advising the parent/guardian of the home visit will be left at the door. If the
       parent/guardian fails to contact the Lancaster School District’s Early
       Childhood Education (ECE) office within 24 hours of the date on the home
       visit notice, the student will be dropped from the program.

Area of Concern:-None

Child File
 Family Service Provider made attempt to contact parent at home after four
   consecutive days of absence.
 Parent was not at home
 Home visit notice was left at the door
 Parent failed to communicate within 24hrs.
 Resulted in child’s termination from the program

Family and Community Services Question 3A

Is a strength-based and family-driven, collaborative partnership-building process
in place so all families have the opportunity to participate and, if parents choose,
to develop and implement an individualized partnership agreement?
1304.40(a)(1), 1304.40(a)(2), 642(b)(7)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Family Assessment form, FPA Form,
case file, FPA policy & Procedure, and Family Partnership Flow chart.

•      The collaborative partnership building process begins at the time of
       registration to ensure that all families have the opportunity to participate.

•      The family fills out the Family Needs Assessment form, where the family
       identifies their individualized needs, strengths etc. The Family Partnership
       Agreement is developed with families at the time of registration.

•      The Family Service Providers assist families to develop goals that are
       appropriate to the families needs and to identify responsibilities, timelines
       and strategies for achieving their goals.

•      The Family Service Providers track the family’s progress in achieving their
       individualized goals, which are based on the level of service requested:
       Level (III) - 3 business days for crisis/emergency (Severe, chronic, critical
       issues impacting on family life)
       Level (II)- 7 business days for immediate/urgent (High “vulnerability” to
       crisis)



                                                                                       90
      Level (I)- 60 business days for request for information (Crisis does not
      threaten the integrity of family)

•     If a parent chooses not to participate in the Family Partnership Agreement
      the parent will be contacted quarterly to make sure the family is doing well
      and to check if there are additional services needed at that time.

•     Monitoring will occur quarterly to ensure that goals are created within 30
      business days of the first day of attendance and that other than
      crisis/emergency need (72 hours), immediate/urgent need (7 business
      days), follow-up will occur every 60 business days by reviewing the Family
      Partnership Agreement forms and electronic case notes of families.

Child File
    The Family Service Provider has written document, which includes
       timeline, and strategies for achieving the family goals and partnership
       agreement.

Parent Interview
    Interviewed parent (L. A.) stated that her Family Service Provider is
      constant communication with her that helps in working together. Parent
      states, “We started working together in creating my goals since
      enrollment”. L.A. stated her goals have been achieved because of the
      opportunities that the program offered such as trainings and workshops,
      which have also helped in working towards completing her goals.

Areas of Concern -none

Family and Community Services Question 3B

Does the program provide, either directly or through referral, resources
responsive to families’ identified needs and interests?
1304.40(b)(1), 1304.40(b)(1)(i), 1304.40(b)(1)(ii), 1304.40(b)(1)(iii)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: FPA policy & Procedure, and Family
Partnership Flow chart, PAC Minutes, which identify approval of CPA, Family
Assessment form, FPA form, and Case file.

•     Family Service Provider (FSP) reviews Family Assessment (FA) to
      determine families’ needs.

•     Resources available in the community are given to families to meet their
      needs. Community Partnership Agreements (CPA) are established with
      community agencies to assist families with services and resources.




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•      FSP will contact families receiving referrals for crisis/emergency
       (homeless, food, shelter, domestic violence, children’s bureau etc.) within
       72 business hours.

•      Once a family receives an immediate/urgent need referral, FSP will
       contact the family within 7 business days of referral provided.

•      For families who are requesting general information such as; education,
       mental health (IEP), nutrition, health, employment, transportation etc.,
       FSP will follow up within 60 business days of receiving requested
       information.

•      The FSP will discuss if the referral met the family’s needs. If the family
       was not satisfied with the services, then the FSP will provide additional
       resources that are available in the community.

•      The Lead Family Service Provider will review files quarterly to ensure that
       current informal community partnerships have been reviewed and formal
       community partnerships have been approved by the Policy Committee
       (PAC) and reviewed by the School Board of Trustees through
       documentation of reports, minutes and PAC recommendations.

Parent Interview
    Interviewed Parent (L.A) “resources given to me has helped me to meet
      my needs”. The program has offered access to CPR Training, Nutrition,
      Healthy Eating Habits Class, Job Fair and Child Abuse Training all of
      which the parent has attended.
      Child File#2
      Emergency need identified (homeless)
      FSP provided a resource to meet the family’s immediate needs such as:
      American Red Cross, Salvation Army and Grace Resource.
      FSP conducted follow up with the parent until the family was relocated.

Area of Concern-none

Family and Community Services Question 3C

Does the program provide, either directly or through referrals, opportunities for
parents and children to participate in family literacy services?
1304.40(e)(4), 1304.40(e)(4)(i), 1304.40(e)(4)(ii)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Partners in Print ( flyers), ECE Bulletin,
Family Literacy Night flyer, Monthly Newsletter, Site meeting (agenda, flyer &
minutes) (Phonemic Awareness).




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•      The program provides either direct or through referrals, opportunities for
       parents and children to participate in the family literacy services (partners
       in print, family literacy night, phonemic awareness).

•      Parents are provided information and opportunities through parenting and
       child development trainings, parent meetings, and written material.

•      Parents receive monthly newsletters that provide information on child
       development, activities to do at home, and ideas to develop parenting
       skills.

•      By the third quarter parents will be provided with training that lead to
       economic self-sufficiency and financial literacy.

Parent Interview
    Interviewed Parent (L.A.) and parent said that the program has given her
      the opportunity to participate in the family literacy services motivating her
      and family to read more and to be more creative in activities that they can
      do at home. Parent stated that her child is already reading and writing her
      name and other short words. Parent said that she is very happy with the
      Head Start Program.

Area of Concern – None

Family and Community Services Question 4A

Are parents encouraged to participate in staff-parent conferences and home
visits to discuss their child's development and education?
1304.40(i)(1), 1304.40(i)(2), 1304.40(i)(3), 1304.21(a)(2)(iii)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Home Visit Policy and Procedure for
Education, Home visit Form (Education), SST Forms/Case Notes.

•      Developmental screens are completed within the timeline and a
       conference is held between the teaching staff and the parents to discuss
       the findings.

•      Parent information is gathered as part of the assessment process for both
       the screening and for the ongoing assessments completed throughout the
       school year.

•      Desired Results assessments are completed within the timeline and
       individual development plans are completed with parents that include
       goals for the child’s development, and ideas for how to achieve the goals
       at home and at school.



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•     Concerns about individual children are discussed with parents and then
      brought to the Education Coordinator and the Mental Health Support
      Provider.

•     Children for whom there are immediate concerns due to assessment,
      observations, or parental concerns are referred to the Student Study
      Team level 1. Parents are included in the level one process. Statements
      of strengths, statements of need, and a plan of action are created.

•     When children’s needs are not an immediate concern, they are observed
      to watch for development within the preschool setting, and are re-
      screened within four months.

•     Two Parent conferences per year are scheduled with families. The
      schedule is created to coincide with assessments and major milestones in
      the preschool year.

•     Two Home Visits per year are scheduled with families. Parent permission
      for a home visit is obtained before the teacher goes to the child’s home.
      Teachers inform parents of the importance of a home visit. If parents
      decline a home visit, then a conference at a different location is held in its
      place. The Home Visit schedule is created to coincide with assessments
      and major milestones in the preschool year.

•     All Conferences and Home Visits are scheduled at a time that is
      convenient for both parents and staff.

Parent Interview
    Interviewed parent (L.A) stated that teacher visits them twice during the
      school year and they get together to work according to her schedule.

Area of Concern-none

Family and Community Services Question 4B

Are parents invited to become integrally involved in the approach to their
children’s development and education?
1304.21(a)(2)(i), 1304.21(a)(2)(ii), 1304.40(d)(2)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Site Meeting Minutes, Monthly
Newsletter (Calendar of Activities), SST Procedure & Weekly Lesson Plans,
Involving Parents in Curriculum (Policy & Procedure), & PAC Minutes & Agenda.




                                                                                  94
•     Parents are encouraged to volunteer in their child’s classroom once they
      have a TB test on file. Every parent is given a Handbook, which identifies
      ways in which parents can volunteer at preschool. If there is no TB test on
      file then parents are limited to 20 minutes visit per school district policy.

•     Parents participate in special programs with their children attending class
      performances, and special theme days in the classroom.

•     Parents also participate by bringing in items or activities from their families
      culture to share with the class.

•     Parents report that they are excited and willing to participate in their child’s
      education.

•     Staff encourages parents to collaborate with the teachers in implementing
      the curriculum.
•     During the Parent Orientation, parents receive information from the
      teachers about the curriculum, how the children learn, and how the
      parents can get involved in the process.

•     The Education Coordinator/Specialists give a presentation to the parents
      on the Creative Curriculum at a PAC meeting once during the school year
      to be approved on. The presentation includes information on how the
      classrooms are set up, how children will be learning new information, and
      how parents can help.

•     Parents receive a monthly newsletter from the program that includes ideas
      for discipline, cooking, nutrition, child development, and ideas for learning
      activities to do with their child at home to support the school curriculum.

•     During the preparation of the Individual Development Plan parents are
      asked to contribute ideas for goals, and ideas for how they can work to
      help the child meet that goal at home.

•     Teachers provide parents with the curriculum’s theme of the month and
      learning goals and solicit ideas from the parents.

•     Parents participate in the child’s assessment via the screening tool, ASQ
      and ASQ: SE.

•     Parents also participate in the Student Study Team process, if more
      observation or assessment is necessary.

Parent Interview
    Interviewed parent (L.A) and she said that she works with teacher
      planning activities for the children and she motivates other parents from



                                                                                   95
      the classroom to participate too. Also state, “I have been observing my
      child in the classroom and talking to the teacher everyday to make sure
      that everything is going well regarding my child progress”. Every week
      parent states that she receives a verbal report and when the teacher goes
      to the house she gives her a written progress report.

Area of Concern-none

Family and Community Services Question 5A

Has the program taken affirmative steps to establish ongoing collaborative
partnerships with community organizations?
1304.41(a)(2)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: CPA Form, Contact Logs, Community
Partnerships Policy & Procedure and Flow-Chart.

•     The program has established ongoing collaborative formal and informal
      partnerships with health and mental health providers such as:

Formal CPA’s
1.   AV Partners for Health
2.   AV Community Clinic
3.   American Dental Center
4.   Children’s Bureau
5.   Tarzana Treatment Center
6.   Molina Health Care
7.   AV Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependency

Informal CPA’s
1.    Kaiser
2.    Save-A Smile
3.    Valley Child Guidance
4.    Pueblo Y Salud
5.    Department of Mental Health
6.    Department of Public Health
7.    AV Pregnancy and Counseling Center
8.    AV Family Focus Resource and Empowerment Center
9.    American Cancer Society
10.    Alcoholism Anonymous
11.   Independent Living Center
12.   Regional Center

•     The Community Partnerships support family’s needs through referrals,
      trainings/workshops and improving services for families.



                                                                              96
•       All partnerships are reviewed annually via phone or in person. If there is a
        change in services, a new CPA will be created.

•       The FSP updates and reviews the “Community Resources” list annually. A
        selected community resource list is printed in the parent handbook.

•       When events or trainings occur the agencies contact the FSP so they can
        disseminate the information to the families.

•       Monitoring will occur annually to ensure that the agency has current
        informal and formal community partnerships on file that reflects the needs
        of families currently enrolled in the Head Start/State Preschool program.

Family and Community Services Question 5B

Has the program established and maintained Health Services Advisory
Committees (HSAC) that includes parents, professionals, and other community
volunteers?
1304.41(b)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Agenda, Minutes & Flyers (Health
Advisory Committee).

       The delegate co-sponsors the Health Advisory meetings with the
        Palmdale Head Start. This partnership fosters relationship with Palmdale
        and community members.

       All parents are invited to the Health Advisory meeting via fliers that are
        distributed to every child and posted on the parent board at each site.
        Minutes are available upon request.

       If a need arises, the Health Advisory Committee also has a board
        comprised of dentists and doctors in the community who serve in an
        advisory capacity and referral source.

       The Health Advisory Meeting consists of the following:

           o The Agency will select a topic relation to medical, dental, mental
             health or nutrition.

           o A date is selected early in the program year for the Health
             Advisory Meeting. The Health Coordinators from Lancaster and
             Palmdale Agencies partner in this selection.



                                                                                     97
           o The Agency will select a guest speaker to address issues relation
             to the topic. Information may include handouts or other materials
             related to the topic being discussed.

           o    Invitations are extended to all parents, staff, and community and
               board members.

           o A chairperson and secretary are voted on by those attending and
             serve a two-year term.

       The Health Advisory Committee supports the needs of the children and
        their local communities by providing services and referrals resulting in
        successful program implementation throughout the year.

       Monitoring will occur annually to confirm that Palmdale and Lancaster
        Head Start/State Preschools work in collaboration to promote information
        on health issues to the families of both agencies by reviewing agendas,
        minutes, and flyers of the meetings.

Area Of Concern – none

Family and Community Services Question 5C

Does the program have procedures to support successful transitions for enrolled
children and families that provide coordination with other agencies as well as
outreach to encourage communication between Early Head Start, school
principals, and others involved in supporting children and families through
transitions, including joint transition meetings?
1304.41(c)(1), 1304.41(c)(1)(i), 1304.41(c)(1)(ii), 1304.41(c)(1)(iii),
1304.41(c)(1)(iv), 1304.40(h)(1), 642A(a)(5)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: K-Transition Flyers, Vendor List &
Letter, Donation List, K-Transition Policy & Procedures, Goals Sheet Form
(Teacher-Parent Conference).

•       Transition is built into the curriculum and is ongoing year round and
        includes: Monthly transition activities in the Curriculum Guide, Children
        take field trips around the school campus to experience the “big” school,
        Teaching staff identify students ready to transition to elementary school,
        Teaching staff, with the assistance of office personnel (ex: Program
        Specialists, Family Service Providers, Education Coordinator/specialist,
        School Psychologists, Mental Health/Disability Coordinator, LVN
        Coordinator, etc.) provide transition information to parents.




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•     Transition information includes but is not limited to: Kindergarten Round
      Up Dates (LSD), Elementary School information, Information on how to
      help their child make a successful transition, Information on how to help
      their child be successful in kindergarten.

•     Teachers read stories to children regarding going to kindergarten and
      what to expect in kindergarten.

•     Teachers show children the video “Kindergarten Here I Come”.

•     Teaching staff schedules field trips to a kindergarten classroom in the
      spring.

•     Teachers conduct a transition conference with parents annually to provide
      families with information to make the transition more successful. The
      family and the teacher create goals together for the family to support the
      transition process. Parents are provided with information on how they can
      help their child through the transition process and what they can do at
      home to help the child’s transition to kindergarten.

•     Each spring a Kindergarten Transition Fair is held to provide families with
      information and services for the transition to kindergarten.

•     Staff involved in planning may include but are not limited to: Family
      Service Providers, School Psychologists, Mental Health/Disability
      Coordinator, teachers, program Coordinator and Education
      Coordinator/Specialists.

•     ECE staff collaborates with community agencies in planning and executing
      the K-Transition Fair.

•     ECE staff and collaborating agencies meet on a regular basis to delegate
      responsibilities and coordinate efforts.

•     Informational fliers are passed out by teaching staff to parents and posted
      in local organizations around the city.

•     Team contacts local business for donations for door prizes and invites
      community agencies to host displays at the fair.

•     K-Transition fair includes presentations, workshops, community booth
      displays, door prizes, food & refreshments, & child-care.

Parent Interview
Interviewed parent (L.A) she stated that everything taught in the classroom is
preparing the children for the next stage in their lives that it is to go to



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Kindergarten. Parent stated that the teacher’s prepare the parents in the
transition process by attending field trips into “the bigger school”.

Area of Concern-none

Family and Community Services Question 6A

        The Lead Family Service Provider and Program Coordinator establish and
implement a system of ongoing monitoring to ensure there is an effective
implementation of Family and Community Partnership Building throughout the
program. Ongoing monitoring is done through internal and external monitoring.
Internal monitoring includes reviews of case files, Community Partnership
Agreements, services and resources offered to families, and opportunities for
parents to participate in all aspects of the Head Start program. External
monitoring is done by the grantee (LACOE) through agency visits quarterly. The
Program Design Consultant and Family and Community Partnerships Specialist
do visits.
        During the first Quarterly review, the Lead Family Service Provider and
Program Coordinator conduct a file review of the Family Service Providers
cases. During the review, staff ensures that: families that participated in the
Family Partnership Agreement were completed within 30 days of the first day
of attendance, goals are developed using a strength-based approach, and
follow-ups with families are based on the level of service requested. The Lead
Family Service Provider reviews current Community Partnership Agreements
(CPA) and makes sure they are established with community agencies to assist
families with services and resources quarterly. During the first quarter, the
Lead Family Service Provider ensures that all available resource information
for parents is in English and Spanish. Documentation is reviewed quarterly by
the Lead Family Service Provider to ensure that parents are given the
opportunity to participate in various workshop, trainings, site meetings, and
parent conferences throughout the school year. Family Service Providers
ensure family and community resources/information are available to parents in
the Head Start classrooms.
The Lead Family Service Provider reviews the Family and Community
Partnership Building service area with the LACOE Ongoing Monitoring
Instrument and service area monitor twice a year. Results are shared with the
Program Design Consultant and Program Coordinator as part of monitoring and
reporting service area reviews. The Coordinator’s review is shared with grantee
(LACOE) as part of Ongoing monitoring and reporting. Any areas of concern/non
compliance are reported to the grantee (LACOE) via Program Improvement Plan
(PIP).
A Self-assessment is a tool that the program uses to gather information of how
each service area is functioning. Once service areas are reviewed findings will be
shared with Evaluation and Advisory Committee (EAC) members, Parent
Executive Board Sub-Committee and the Board of Trustees for input, analysis
and Program Improvement Plan (PIP) development. Grantee (LACOE)



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consultant will be notified of areas of concern and for possible training and
technical assistance in creating PIPs. At the March Parent Policy Committee and
the School Board meetings the self-assessments and final PIPs will be reviewed
and/or approved. Approved PIPs will be shared with EAC members and
corrective actions will be reviewed. At the beginning of every month PIPs will be
reviewed and verified as resolved.

    The program is effective in keeping up to date and accurate Family and
community service records. Once the child is placed at the identified school site
a Family Service Provider (FSP) will be in contact with the family (face-to-face or
by phone) within 45 business days of the child’s first day of school to complete
the family & assessment agreement forms. The FSP will provide information,
resources and/or referrals, to the parent based off of their goal/assessment within
three weeks of initial request.
   Follow-ups with families are based on the level of service requested such as:
          a. Level (111)- 3 business days for crisis/emergency (Severe, chronic,
             critical issues impacting on family life)
          b. Level (11)- 7 business days for immediate/urgent (High
             “vulnerability” to crisis)
          c. Level (1)- 60 business days for request for information (Crisis does
             not threaten the integrity of family)
If a parent chooses not to participate in the Family Partnership Agreement the
parent will be contacted quarterly to make efforts in establishing goals. All
contact is tracked in the FSPs case notes, electronic data to be imputed within 7
business days from the initial contact and a hard copy will be placed in the child’s
file twice a year. Child’s files are located in the Early Childhood Education main
office.


Summary Analysis: Service Specific Strengths

       Based on the grantee (LACOE) ongoing monitoring review our agency
was in compliance in the areas of Family Partnerships, Parent Involvement,
and Record Keeping and Reporting. The items reviewed and discussed were
family files that include progress notes, documentation showing evidence of
Lancaster School District communicating with staff and parents, evidence of
record keeping and reporting, and families accessing community resources.
Family Partnerships documentation reviewed was compliant with Head Start
Performance Standards 1304.40(a)(1) and 1304.40(a)(2). Documentation
included identified goals, strengths, necessary services, other supports,
responsibilities, timetables, and progress in achieving goals. Files also
document evidence of staff working collaboratively with parents to identify
access of referrals, services, and resources responsive to their interests and
goals, Head Start Performance Standard 1304.40(b)(1). Staff assisted families


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locate resources for employment, education, and health. Under Community
Partnerships, Head Start Performance Standard 1304.41, involved parents in
the transition process and made families aware of community resources
through parent training that focused on health and mental health. In the area of
communication, Head Start Performance Standard 1304.51(b) and 1304.51(e),
there is documented evidence of interaction amongst staff and families. Staff
held multi-disciplinary team meetings to address issues and concerns
concerning families and their children. Staff also communicates with families
via meetings, reports, and notices on a daily, weekly, monthly basis. Next
steps are to continue monitoring visits to assess for compliance with Head
Start Performance Standards.




       Education and Early Childhood Development Services
Teacher Credentialing and Qualifications
Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 1A

Has the program hired staff or consultants as content area experts to oversee
education and early childhood development services who have training and
experience in theories and principles of child growth and development, early
childhood education, and family support? Do they also meet the qualifications for
classroom teachers, as specified in section 648A of the Head Start Act?
1304.52(d)(1) and 648A(a)(3)(A)

Interview ECD Coordinator

      The Early Childhood Development Coordinator has a Bachelor’s degree in
       Child Development, a Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential, a Severely
       Handicapped Teaching Credential, an Early Childhood Special Education
       Teaching Credential, and a Masters in Early Childhood Special Education.

      The Early Childhood Development Coordinator supports the Head Start
       teachers through ongoing assistance with curriculum, classroom
       management, assessment, and monitoring. This assistance is provided
       through classroom visits, training of staff, conferencing with staff, and any
       support requested by program staff.

Staff Files: ECD Content Area Expert

      Bachelor’s degree in Child Development
      Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential
      Severely Handicapped Teaching Credential
      Early Childhood Special Education Teaching Credential
      Masters in Early Childhood Special Education.


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Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 1B

Do teachers have the required qualifications and experience? 648A(a)(3)(A),
1304.52(f), 1304.52(h)(1), 648A(a)(3)(A)

Interview: ECD Coordinator (Staff Qualifications and Expertise)

The program works to provide each classroom with a bilingual staff member.
Currently, 13 of the 15 classrooms have Spanish speaking staff, and all but one
classroom have at least one bilingual member.

File Review

Languages spoken by site:

   Site             Language spoken (other than English)
   DV-1             Spanish-1
   DV-2             0
   Dv-3             Spanish-1, Tagalog-1
   DV-4             American Sign Language-1, Hebrew-1
   JN               Spanish-1
   JO-1             Spanish-1
   JO-2             Spanish-2
   LI-1             0
   LI-3             Spanish-1
   MA               Spanish-1
   MV               Spanish-1
   SI-1             Spanish-1
   SI-2             Spanish-3
   SI-3             Spanish-1
   WW               Spanish-2

Child Development Teachers:

      All CDT’s have at least the CDT Permit
      8 of the 15 CDT’s have their A.A.
      6 of the 15 CDT’s have their B.A.

Child Development Associate teachers:

      7 of the 16 CDAT’s have their A.A.
      1 of the 16 CDAT’s has their B.A.
      1 of the 16 CDAT’s has their M.A.

   Staff hold the following permits and degrees:


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   Site             CDT                  CDAT                Degrees Held

   DV-1             CDT permit           CDAT permit         AA-1

   DV-2             CDT permit           CDT permit          BA-2, AA-1

   DV-3             CDT permit           CDT permit          BA-1, AA-2

   DV-4             CDT permit           CDAT permit         AA-1

   JN               CDT permit           CDAT permit         BA-1

   JO-1             CDT permit           CDAT permit         AA-3

   LI-1             CDT permit           CDT permit          AA-2

   LI-3             CDT permit           CDAT permit         MA-1, BA-2

   MA               CDT permit           CDT permit          AA-1
                                         CDAT permit

   MV               CDSS permit          CDAT permit         BA-1, AA-1

   SI-1             CDSS permit          CDAT permit         AA-1

   SI-2             CDT permit           CDAT permit         AA-1

   SI-3             CDSS permit          CDAT permit         AA-2

   WW               CDPD permit          CDT permit          BA-2, AA-1


Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 1C

Do home visitors have the required knowledge and experience in child
development and early childhood education; principles of child health, safety, and
nutrition; adult learning principles; and family dynamics?

Lancaster School District does not have a home-based program.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 2A

Does the written curriculum include the required elements?
1304.3(a)(5)




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Document Review

      The curriculum used is the Creative Curriculum. This is a research based,
       developmentally appropriate curriculum that has proven to be effective in
       providing children with the knowledge and preparation they need to enter
       kindergarten. The Creative Curriculum focuses on children learning
       through exploration of classroom interest areas with teachers providing
       learning experiences based on each child’s individual developmental
       needs and the developmental needs of each classroom as a whole.
       Children are able to succeed, regardless of their cognitive level, language,
       culture, or learning style through self directed activities that are monitored
       and supported by classroom teachers.

      Goals for children’s development and learning are provided through the
       Creative Curriculum and the California Department of Education’s
       Learning Foundations. All classrooms have a copy of the Learning
       Foundations and have received training on them.

      Supplemental curriculum used is Adventures in Peacemaking which is a
       curriculum helping teachers promote social and emotional development
       Assessment is completed using the Desired Results Developmental
       Profile Revised for monitoring children’s progress, and the Early
       Childhood Environmental Rating Scale for assessing the classroom
       environment.

      The Head Start Performance Standards are integrated into the classrooms
       and are monitored through the ongoing monitoring system set up in the
       program’s policies and procedures.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 2B

Are all educational aspects of the health, nutrition and mental health services
integrated into the curriculum? 1304.21(c)(1)(iii), 1304.22(d)(2), 1304.23(c)(7)
1304.23(c)(7), 1304.22(d)(2)

Observation: Curriculum

      Classrooms provide safety awareness for children within the first 30
       calendar days of school for children and provide ongoing lessons in safety
       throughout the rest of the school year.

      The program creates a curriculum guide each school year that helps
       teachers with their monthly curriculum. In the curriculum guide there are
       activities provided for teachers to give them ideas to implement in class for
       ongoing safety awareness training.



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      Drills occur at least monthly to allow children experience with fire drills,
       drop and take cover, and practice with classroom evacuation. Classrooms
       participate in drills with the entire school campus to be practiced in
       campus procedures for safety during emergencies.

      Safety awareness is taught to children through stories, songs, and
       activities that are developmentally appropriate. The Early Childhood
       Development Coordinator is consulting with a local publisher in an attempt
       to have a book created that will provide pedestrian safety training for
       children that can be presented in a fun and exciting way.

      All classrooms participate in family style dining. Teachers sit at tables with
       the children eating meals with the children and modeling healthy food
       choices.

      Teachers received training this school year on I Am Moving I Am Learning
       including nutrition and discussing food choices with children. Teachers
       received a Lakeshore Choosy Kit for their classrooms that includes
       nutrition games and activities. Teachers list on their lesson plans their
       cooking activity for the week. The program is providing ingredients for
       cooking of healthy snacks for the classrooms.

      One classroom this school year is the pilot for a mental health curriculum
       called Second Step. The program will be purchasing and implementing
       this curriculum into all other classrooms for the next school year.
       Currently classrooms use the Adventures in Peacemaking Curriculum.

      Nutrition, Social skills, pedestrian safety, and health and safety ideas are
       provided for staff in the monthly curriculum guide.



Interview: ECD Coordinator (Curriculum Development and Implementation)

      The Early Childhood Development Coordinator works together with the
       Mental Health Support Provider by providing trainings for teachers,
       attending Student Study Team meetings, reviewing case study, and
       consulting with classes.

      The Early Childhood Development Coordinator and the Mental Health
       Support Provider team up to provide teachers and individual children with
       the support they need based on their individual needs.


      The Early Childhood Development Coordinator and the Mental Health
       Support Provider and the Program Nurse all meet bi-monthly at the EAC


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       meetings to discuss program, classroom, and individual teacher and
       children needs and how to best meet these needs.

Interview: Teacher (Curriculum Development and Implementation)

      Teachers provide activities during circle time, mealtimes, and dramatic
       play that provide children with information about nutrition and healthy food
       choices.

      Teachers model healthy eating during breakfast and lunch.

      Cooking activities are provided that demonstrate healthy snack
       alternatives.

      Teachers provide children with activities including stories, songs, and role
       playing activities that teach children about their social and emotional
       development including taking turns, labeling and recognizing emotions in
       themselves and others, and using words to communicate.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 2C

Does the program use information from screenings, ongoing observations,
evaluations, and insight from parents to determine how the program can best
respond to each child’s individual characteristics, strengths, and needs?
1304.20(f)(1), 1304.21(c)(1)(i)

Child Files

      File reviews were performed in 73% of the Head Start classrooms. In
       these files Anecdotal notes were found on the children enrolled in the
       classrooms. Classroom staff have been taking notes and documenting
       the information on the anecdotal notes forms provided by the program.
       Notes are kept monthly and are dated to reflect growth over time.

      All children have a screen completed with the first 45 calendar days of
       school. The screening tool gathers information from parents in the areas
       of communication, fine motor, gross motor, personal social, and problem
       solving skills, social emotional skills, and adaptive skills.

      All children have the Desired Results Developmental Profile Revised
       completed within the first 20 – 30 days of school and then two more times
       during the school year. This assessment reviews areas of gross and fine
       motor, self help, safety, literacy, math, cognitive skills, expressive and
       receptive language, adaptive skills, and social skills.

Interview: Teacher (Curriculum and Individualization)


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      Each child as they enter the classroom is screened using the ASQ3 and
       ASQ:SE completed by the parents.

      Within the first 30 school days the children are assessed by the teacher
       using the Desired Results Developmental Profile.

      Observation and anecdotal notes are taken on each child as the child
       enters the program and throughout the school year.

      The information gathered on the child from the class assessment, the
       parent completed screen, and the anecdotal notes are utilized to complete
       an Individual Development Plan for each child.

      On the IDP, the child’s strengths and needs are identified. Based on the
       child’s needs, goals are generated for the child.

      Each child’s strengths and needs are identified, and goals are created
       with, and reviewed with, parents.

      Activities to support development of these needs both at home and at
       school are identified by the teacher and parent.

      Individual needs are integrated into the weekly lesson plans by the
       teacher.

      Children are targeted during specific activities for the concepts to be
       taught so that their goals are addressed during daily activities. Children
       are then continually observed and anecdotal notes are taken on an
       ongoing basis so that development over time is monitored.

Interview: ECD Coordinator (Curriculum and Individualization)

      The Creative Curriculum classroom environment provides an environment
       in which teachers are able to individualize the learning to match the
       children’s needs. Activities are open ended and child focused so that
       children can approach projects at their own level and teachers are able to
       scaffold children’s learning.

      Children’s individual learning and development is observed and monitored
       through anecdotal observations and desired results assessment. Parents’
       insight is gathered using the screening tool, through formal and informal
       conferences, and through observations of the child in class. Parent review
       the curriculum guide pages posted on the parent board each month and
       give feedback and suggestions to the classroom staff.



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Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 3A

Does the program support social and emotional development by encouraging
trust-building? 1304.21(a)(3)(i)(A)

Observation: CLASS Observation, Building Trust

      Teachers in the classroom create a positive climate with their relationships
       with each other and their relationships with children. Teachers address
       children by name, they smile at children as they enter the classroom, they
       listen to children when approached for a question, and they sit on the floor
       with children to read and play games.

      Teachers are respectful of children and use positive communication with
       them. Teachers use positive behavior management with children including
       positive messages for children. Teachers give positive messages to
       children to encourage the behavior they want to see.

      Teachers are aware of children’s needs and remain flexible to them. For
       example: the classroom schedule will be altered to fit the interests of the
       children as needed.

Interview: Teacher

      Children are allowed to be a part of their own self chosen groups.
       Children are not grouped according to ability or need. Children’s needs
       may be addressed through individual activities or small groups; however,
       children are not required to participate in an activity if they are already
       involved in another activity.

      Teachers take time to talk to children daily and to listen to their thoughts
       and feelings.

      Teachers spend time with children individually to promote a positive
       relationship between children and teachers.

      Activities planned to help children learn about emotions and work
       cooperatively with others.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 3B

Does the program support social and emotional development by fostering
independence? 1304.21(a)(3)(i)(B), 1304.21(a)(1)(v)

Observation: CLASS Observation, Fostering Independence



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      Children were observed to be actively involved during the school day.

      Children independently access materials they wish to play with during free
       choice time which is 1/3 of the school day, as required by the Early
       Childhood Environmental Rating Scale.

      Children are able to choose the length of time they spend with materials,
       and talk with teachers about their activities.

      Few teacher-directed activities are provided and those teacher directed
       activities are open ended activities.

      During free choice time children are able to move about the room following
       their interest.

      Children have assigned jobs to do daily and they are encouraged to talk to
       each other and to the teachers to express their ideas and their needs.

      Materials are located on child size shelves with labels on most shelves to
       allow children independence in accessing materials and in cleaning up.

Interview: Teacher

      Children are encouraged to use the bathroom independently. Children are
       given reminders during the day to use the potty if needed. Children who
       are not yet toilet trained will be taken on a schedule as needed.
       Assistance is provided as needed for the individual child.

      Children are encouraged to be independent through taking care of their
       own self help needs. For example: Children take off their own coats and
       put them on themselves. Children choose the activities they want to
       participate in and the length of time to spend in those activities. Children,
       serve themselves at meals as well as set the table and clean up afterward.
       Children have jobs that contribute to the classroom environment running
       smoothly.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 3C

Does the program support social and emotional development that enhances
each child's strengths by encouraging self-control through setting clear,
consistent limits and having realistic expectations? 1304.21(a)(3)(i)(C)

Observation: CLASS Observation, Encouraging Self-Control




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      Teachers utilize a social emotional curriculum called Adventures in
       Peacemaking. Teachers have received training on how to help children
       learn to express their emotions and express their needs to each other.

      Teachers help children express their emotions and limit conflict by
       approaching children who are having a conflict and helping the children to
       talk through their issue. Each child is encouraged to tell their feelings and
       what they need from the other child.

      Teachers tell children what the expectation is, what the next activity is and
       what the children need to do to transition or follow directions so that
       children can do so independently.

Interview: Teacher

      Teachers create a set of class rules with the children that are then posted
       in the classroom for regular review with the children.

      Limits are set for children with teachers using positive messages to tell
       children what to do (“keep your feet on the floor”) rather than what not to
       do (“don’t climb”).

       Teachers try to be proactive rather than reactive. By observing children’s
       behavior and predicting where the “problems” will be, teachers can help to
       keep them from happening to begin with.

      When behavior does escalate, teachers use the experience as a teaching
       tool to talk with children about their choices and how they can do things
       differently next time.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 3D

Does the program support social and emotional development by encouraging
respect for others’ feelings and rights? 1304.21(a)(3)(i)(D)

Observation: CLASS Observation, Encouraging Respect

      Teachers encourage children to be respectful of each other. When
       children need to express themselves to another child, teachers support
       the children in expressing themselves, and in listening to their peers.

      Teachers work to be sensitive to children and to be aware of their needs.
       When education monitoring staff observe in classrooms, classroom staff
       are given feedback regarding their sensitivity to children and whether
       children’s needs are being met.



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      Children were able to get a response from the teacher on their first
       attempt to get a question answered or to obtain help.

Interview: Teacher

      Teachers report that they model respect for other’s feelings by having
       positive interactions with each other as staff members

      Teachers show respect for children through demonstrating concern for
       children’s feelings and thoughts and spending time listening to them

      Teachers show respect for children by responding to children’s requests
       for help.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 3E

Does the program support and respect the home language, culture, and family
composition of each child? 1304.21(a)(3)(i)(E)

Observation: Culture and Diversity

      Children and adults communicate regularly and freely. Conversation
       occurs as a hum in the classroom. There are many peer conversations,
       many instances of children answering adult questions. The instances of
       back and forth exchanges between adult and children are not occurring as
       often as peer conversations are.

      Puzzles, books, posters, and other classroom materials reflect children
       from different cultures, ethnicity, languages, level of ability, and different
       family composition.

      Music used in the classroom reflects the variety of cultures represented in
       the class.

      Activities are provided for children to coincide with special celebrations
       from their cultures and home experiences.

      Parents are asked to come to class and share experiences, events, and
       activities from their culture with the students and the children. Parents can
       share information about their families’ holidays, cultural events, recipes,
       and language.

Interview: ECD Coordinator (Culture and Diversity)

      13 out of the 15 classroom have staff that can speak a language other
       than English.


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      The primary language, other than English, spoken by children within our
       program is Spanish. There are 3 classes that do not have a Spanish
       speaking adult in them. These classes are all on sites that have multiple
       classes on the same campus. The other Head Start classes on the
       campus have a Spanish speaking adult that supports the class with no
       Spanish speaking adult.

      For scheduled conferences and meetings, an interpreter is hired to
       support the teacher in communicating with the parent.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 3F

APPLIES ONLY TO: Programs serving infants and toddlers

Lancaster School District does not serve infants and toddlers.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 3G

APPLIES ONLY TO: Programs serving infants and toddlers

Lancaster School District does not serve infants and toddlers.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 3H

Does the program support social and emotional development by planning for
routines and transitions so they occur in a timely, predictable, and unrushed
manner according to each child's needs? 1304.21(a)(3)(ii), 1304.23(c)(5)

Observation: CLASS Observation, Daily Routines and Transitions
   Classrooms have a schedule so that children know what is coming next in
      the routine. Many classrooms have a visual schedule for children to read
      what the daily schedule is.

      Children are provided with a reminder of what is coming next and are
       provided with time to finish what they are doing before they transition to
       the next activity.

      Children’s work is saved if they want to complete it later.

      Transition time is also a learning time during which songs, fingerplays,
       IMIL activities, and stories are shared.

      The schedule is flexible enough that transitions can be delayed if children
       are deeply involved in an activity.



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      Transitions occur in both large and small groups.


Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 3I

Is each child provided opportunities for success to help develop feelings of
competence, self-esteem, and positive attitudes toward learning?
1304.21(c)(1)(vi)

Observation: CLASS Observation, Self-Esteem

      Teachers are positive with children as they compliment their efforts and
       accomplishments.

      Teachers stop and get on a child’s level to listen to them when they have
       something to say to the teacher.

      Teachers stop and look at a child’s creation when the child has something
       to show them. Teachers take time to listen to what the child has to tell
       them about their creation, as well as to ask questions regarding what the
       child is showing to them.

      Teachers follow a child’s lead if they show interest in something other than
       the planned activity.

      There are times when teacher talk predominates, but when this is pointed
       out to staff they work to change their communication skills with children.

      Activities are open-ended to allow al children to experience success.

      Teachers encourage children to ask questions, solve problems, and make
       decisions.

      Teachers plan activities that encourage children’s development at al
       levels. Activities are planned to be modified for children who are at lower
       and higher levels of learning.

      Teachers create a schedule that provides free choice time for children to
       follow their own interests and explore provided activities at their own pace.

Interview: Teacher (Social and Emotional Development)

      Teachers report that they provide children with choices to encourage
       competence.




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      Teachers provide children with many opportunities to start and work
       through a project to completion to encourage competence and a love of
       learning.

      Teachers provide children with opportunities to learn about topics that are
       of interest to them to promote a love of learning.

      Teachers provide children with activities that are appropriate for their age
       level to allow for their success which promotes self-esteem.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 3J

Are children provided individual and small group experiences both indoors and
outdoors? 1304.21(c)(1)(vii)

Observation: Curriculum

      Indoor small groups occurred during free choice time, meal time, as staff
       were reading books to children, as children were brushing their teeth.

      Indoor individual experiences occurred during many of the same activities
       as small group experiences occurred- free choice time, meal time, as staff
       were reading books to children, as children were brushing their teeth.

      Outdoor small group activities occurred as some classes took their
       children out to the playground in small groups during free choice time to
       read stories, play in the sand table, or complete art experiences.

      Outdoor small group activities occurred as children participated in small
       group games and IMIL activities set up by the adults or requested by the
       children.

      Outdoor individual activities occurred when individual children chose to
       bring an activity outdoors from the classroom or from the outdoor
       materials. Children were allowed to request materials that they wanted to
       participate in outdoors.

Interview: Teacher (Social and Emotional Development)

      Teachers set up a space for privacy (an ECERS requirement) in the
       classroom for children to have a place to go to be by themselves.

      Teachers set up areas in the classroom for small groups of children by
       having small tables with only 2 or 3 chairs. A place for one or two children
       is provided to allow children to work alone if desired.



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      Teachers allow children to play individually as they choose.

      Teachers set up activities/games for small groups of children both indoors
       and outdoors.


      During the daily scheduled free choice time, children are able to be in self
       chosen groups, with the option of choosing a large group, a small group,
       or independently.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 4A

Does the program provide for development of each child's cognitive and
language skills by supporting his or her learning with various strategies, including
experimentation, inquiry, observation, play, and exploration? 1304.21(a)(4)(i)

Observation: CLASS Observation, Cognitive Development

      Observation in one class included children tasting different flavors of Kool
       aid and then graphing their favorite taste.

      Observations include children building with a variety of blocks and using
       toys to enhance their play. The toys added to blocks included people,
       animals, cars and trucks, etc.

      Sand tables in the classroom contain a variety of materials for exploration
       including sand, rice, “snow”, etc

      A science center in one class contains numerous growing plants,
       magnifying glasses, books, games, collections of objects all for
       exploration.

Interview: Teacher
     Teachers report encouraging experimentation, inquiry, observation, play,
        and exploration by providing children with materials that are of interest to
        the children.

      Teachers provide materials that the children can be actively involved with;
       items that children can handle and manipulate so that the children can
       learn by doing.

      Teachers interact with the children as they use the materials to provide a
       language model and help the children develop their language skills.




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Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 4B

Does the program provide for development of each child's cognitive and
language skills by ensuring opportunities for self-expression through art, music,
and movement? 1304.21(a)(4)(ii)

Observation: Art, Music, and Movement

      Children participate in many art experiences. Observed activities include:
       easel painting, finger painting, car painting, marble painting, painting
       indoors and outdoors, collage, 3-d building of robots using bottles, theme
       art including a theme of animals in which children made a variety of
       animals by painting or otherwise decorating cut out animals.

      Each class has art materials accessible to the children. These areas
       include paper, crayons, markers, pencils, scissors, watercolors, etc.

      Classes offer many types of music materials to children. Children have
       access to musical instruments, different types of music, scarves, rhythm
       sticks etc.

      Classes participate in I Am Moving I Am Learning activities daily. Many
       teachers incorporate the movement activities into their daily activities while
       other plan IMIL time during their circle time.

      Classes participate in yoga activities with children. They have yoga cards
       that show different poses to make and they do these activities with the
       children.

Interview: Teacher

      Teachers report planning art activities that support the current classroom
       theme.

      The activities that teachers provide are open ended to allow children to
       choose how to complete the project and how long they want to spend on
       the project.

      Teachers report that having the art area available to children during free
       choice encourages children to utilize the materials on their own and to be
       creative with what they want to make.

      Teachers explore different types of music with the children to discover
       what they like. Music that is of interest to children is repeated to
       encourage a lot of active involvement for the children.



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      Teachers plan a lot of dance and active play with music to encourage
       children to move to the music. Children are encouraged to share their
       favorite “moves” and dances with the other children.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 4C

Does the program promote interaction and language use among children and
between children and adults? 1304.21(a)(4)(iii)

Observation: CLASS Observation, Language Development

      Children participate in many back and forth conversations throughout the
       day, both with peers and with teachers.

      Teachers repeat what children say to them and extend the child’s
       communication providing a model of more elaborate language.

      Teachers ask a mixture of open ended and closed ended questions.

      During mealtimes children and adults sit together and have conversations
       together.

      Teachers begin conversations and encourage children to continue them
       by communicating with each other. Children were seen in frequent
       conversations with a peer.

Interview: Teacher

      Strategies reported by teachers include extending children’s
       verbalizations, using hands-on objects to help develop vocabulary,
       repeated reading of stories for concept and vocabulary development, and
       asking many questions including open-ended questions.

      Most classrooms have a staff member to help with translation of a child’s
       needs, and to provide understanding of concepts covered in class.

      Teachers use both English and the child’s home language to
       communicate with dual language learners to provide vocabulary
       development in both languages.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 4D

Is each child's literacy and early math development supported through materials
and activities according to his or her developmental level? 1304.21(a)(4)(iv)

Observation: Early Math Development


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      The calendar is completed daily with counting of the days of the month.

      Children are counted daily as part of care and supervision, and with
       children helping to count it is also a counting activity.

      Children participate in setting the tables for meals where they must count
       the number of plates, cups, etc. required for each table, and decide if they
       have too many or need more.

      Children learn about quantity through sharing of materials (give him 3
       blocks) and time (play for 5 more minutes).

      Children participate in cooking projects that encourage them to measure
       materials and count quantities.

Observation: Early Literacy Development

      All classes have a classroom library that is accessible for more than the
       required substantial portion of the day.

      Many classes have an identified writing center where children can write
       with a variety of writing utensils and types of paper.

      Children are read to in large groups, small groups, and individually.

      Children have access to flannel board stories, puppets, listening centers,
       stories with props, and big books.

      Teachers create a print rich environment.

      Books are placed in many centers around the classroom, not simply the
       library.

Interview: Teacher

      Teachers report making graphs of children’s interests and other thematic
       topics to promote math skills and understanding. Graphs are posted for
       children to revisit and discuss.

      Teachers participate with children during block and manipulative play to
       model math and measurement vocabulary with children.

      Teachers make classroom books that are meaningful to the children in the
       classroom.



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       Teachers encourage children to write stories after they have created either
        a drawing or some artwork by having the child dictate their story to the
        teacher. Dictation is posted in the classroom for children to read.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 4E

Does the program's approach to child development and education provide
balanced daily opportunities for child-initiated and adult-directed activities,
including individual and small-group activities? 1304.21(a)(1)(iv)

Observation: Child and Teacher Directed Activities

       The classroom schedule provides a balance of child initiated and adult
        directed activities since each class has a minimum of 2.5 hours of free
        choice time. Free choice time allows children to choose their own activity,
        peers, and duration of activity.

       Adult directed activities occur during circle time and some small group
        activities to meet a child’s RTI needs.

       Children learn in small groups during the day as they eat, play, and read.

       Children participate in individual activities as part of the free choice time.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 5A

Is physical development promoted by providing sufficient indoor and outdoor
space, equipment, materials, and adult guidance for active play and movement?
1304.21(a)(5)(i), 1304.21(b)(3)(i)

Observation: Gross Motor Skills

       Enough materials are available to provide children with multiple items so
        that more than one child has access to bikes, balls, climbing equipment,
        etc.

       Materials are provided for children to have access to gross motor
        movement indoors as well as outdoors. A large area for active play is
        available to children in the classroom and materials such as soft mats,
        music, streamers, scarves, etc. are available for use indoors.

       Adults maintain ratio indoors and outdoors to provide enough supervision
        and to be able to interact with the children.

       Teachers implement I Am Moving I Am Learning indoors and outdoors.



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       Outdoor spaces include climbing equipment, bike paths, room for sand
        tables, and most have grass areas as well. Children have room to
        explore the materials and to run.

Interview: Teacher and Family Child Care Provider (Physical Development)

       Teachers provide activities for children that are engaging so that the
        children want to participate in them.

       Teachers set up indoor and outdoor activities for children to choose to
        participate in.

       Teachers actively participate in children’s games and activities indoors
        and outdoors so children are more likely to get involved.

       Teachers plan group I Am Moving I Am Learning activities to explore what
        our bodies can do.

       Teachers play group games indoors and outdoors that encourage physical
        movement and development of skills.

       Teachers talk about the importance of physical activities to our bodies and
        their development.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 5B

Does the program provide appropriate time, space, equipment, materials, and
adult guidance for developing fine motor skills according to each child's
developmental level? 1304.21(a)(5)(ii), 1304.21(b)(1)(iii)

Observation: Fine Motor Skills

       A large variety of fine motor activities are available to children. Children
        utilize manipulatives, play dough, scissors, pencils, crayons, markers,
        games, musical instruments, paint brushes, sand, etc.

       Children have access to the above in teacher directed activities as well as
        free choice activities daily for a minimum of 1/3 of their school day.

Interview: Teacher and Family Child Care Provider (Physical Development)

       Teachers provide activities that are of interest to the children, often ones
        that match up with the classroom theme.




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      Teachers set up meaningful ways for the children to use their fine motor
       skills, for example, writing their name, cutting out an item for an art project,
       cutting out name cards for the class etc.

      Teachers participate with the children in the fine motor activities so they
       are motivated to try and receive positive feedback.

      Teachers model for children the appropriate way to use materials, such as
       how to hold scissors, write with a marker, string beads, roll play dough into
       a snake etc.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 5C

Are parents encouraged to appreciate the importance of physical development,
provide opportunities for children's outdoor and indoor active play, and guide
children in the safe use of equipment and materials? 1304.21(a)(6),
1304.21(b)(3)(i), 1304.21(b)(3)(ii)

Lancaster School District does not have a home-based program.

Education and Early Childhood Development Services Question 6A

This section lists a series of targeted questions not linked to a performance
standard at the service area level. These questions are designed to contribute to
a comprehensive analysis of the program’s management systems. Accordingly,
these questions appear in each protocol section and are completed for each
service area to provide insight into how key management systems function with
relationship to each service area.

Interview: ECD Coordinator (Ongoing Monitoring and Oversight)
     The Education Coordinator completes a yearly monitoring tool that tracks
        over the year the completion of required activities and monitoring events
        during the entire school year.

      The LACOE ongoing monitoring Instrument is completed two times per
       year.

      Policies and Procedures are checked quarterly to determine if they are
       addressing the program needs and to determine if the program is following
       through on the policies and procedures.

      Written plans are checked quarterly to determine if they are meeting the
       programs needs and if the program is following through on the written
       plans.

      The ECERS is completed on each class one time per year.


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      Classroom files are monitored/reviewed 2 times per year.

      LACOE classroom review tool is completed on each class one time per
       year.

      Classrooms are visited a minimum of 2 times per month to assure the
       quality of the educational services provided.

      When problems or weaknesses are discovered, they are addressed based
       on the issue found. If it is a training issue, then training is provided. If it is
       a support issue, then support is provided. If it is a policy issue, then the
       policies are rewritten to include the needed information.

Interview: ECD Coordinator (Program Planning)

      Self assessment information provides us with a view of what is working
       and what needs improvement. When areas of weakness are identified,
       they are addressed as appropriate to improve the quality of the program.
       Training is provided, policies or plans are rewritten, or support is provided.

      Information gathered from the community and from parents is used to
       determine the focus and goals of our program. If needed, parent services
       are altered to meet the needs identified. If needed, policies are changed
       and teachers trained on the changes to meet the needs identified.

Summary Analysis: Overall Service Summary

      Overall this is a very positive preschool program. The classrooms are
       inviting places to be and the staff seem to enjoy the children. Children
       appear to enjoy school and the learning activities provided to them. All
       classrooms had a positive energy to them and children who were actively
       involved in the classroom.

Summary Analysis: Communication among Staff

      Staff communicate through emails to all other staff members, including
       staff in other service areas.
      Staff have access to experts in the fields of Mental Health, Disabilities,
       Speech and Language, and Health as these individuals are on staff and at
       the ECE office.
      Some staff such as the nurse have a cell phone so that they can be
       reached when needed by classroom teachers.
      Communication through emails and phone calls is constant and staff
       expressed the ability to talk to or leave a message for others when they
       need to reach someone.


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      A program newsletter goes out to all staff every two weeks to inform staff
       of important information.
      This is a program strength.

Summary Analysis: Communication with Parents

      Parents have daily conversations with classroom staff. Staff were
       observed taking the time to converse with parents and to answer
       questions.
      The program provides a monthly newsletter to parents to provide
       information on child development and nutrition. This includes a homework
       calendar.
      Parents are involved in the PAC and have access to discuss issues with
       the staff members that attend the meetings.
      This is a program general compliance.


Summary Analysis: Ongoing Monitoring

      Monitoring tools used: LACOE Ongoing monitoring Tool, LACOE
       classroom Review Tool, Early Childhood Environmental Rating Scale, File
       Reviews, Biweekly classroom observations by Education Specialists.
      Education staff are responsible to individual sites and also support each
       others sites with their areas of expertise.
      Staff track their monitoring on their quarterly monitoring plan. These are
       collected quarterly by the Education Coordinator.
      The Education Specialist reviews quarterly the progress on the goals
       created for the year to determine if the plan for the rest of the year needs
       to be altered to provide for the meeting of these goals.
      Education specialists track the children as they enter the program to
       determine that all required assessments, trainings, conferences, etc. are
       completed for each child within the required timeline.
      Any findings that show a non compliance or missed deadline are corrected
       by the follow through of the person responsible for its original completion.

Summary Analysis: Planning

      The overall goal of the program is to provide a developmentally
       appropriate program where children are provided with the most optimal
       education for their individual needs.
      This is a program strength.

Summary Analysis: Record-Keeping




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      The Education Specialists keep detailed notes on the individual children
       and how they are progressing. They are aware of the scores of each child
       on the ASQ and when conferences are held.

      The Education Specialists keep records of overall monitoring of the
       program, monitoring of individual classrooms, communication between
       Education Specialists and the classroom staff, paperwork submitted by
       classroom staff, and visits to all the classrooms.

      This is a program strength.

Summary Analysis: Service Specific Strengths

      The program is working with an outside agency to provide donated
       gardens to their preschool sites.

      The program provides an inclusion specialist to support the children with
       disabilities that are enrolled in the Head Start classrooms.

      The program provides outside trainers for staff development. Recently all
       CDTs and CDATs attended a two day training on I AM Moving I Am
       Learning from nationally certified trainer. In the spring, all staff will be
       attending a two day on site training by a Licensed Mental Health
       professional who consults and trains at major conferences, Ronald Mah.

      All staff that wish to attend the spring Best Arts conference will be
       reimbursed their registration fee.


                              Fiscal Management
Governance and Internal Controls
Fiscal Management Question 1A

Do the program's governing body members meet the conflict of interest
requirements? 642(c)(1)(C)(i), 642(c)(1)(C)(ii), 642(c)(1)(C)(iii), 642(c)(1)(C)(iv),
642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(X)(aa)



• Governing body members are not employees of the program, or related to
employees, and not vendors to the grantee or delegate;

• Governing body members have no financial conflict of interest with the grantee




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• Governing body members receive no compensation for serving on the
governing body.

• Governing body members operate as an entity independent of staff employed
by the grantee.


Fiscal Management Question 1B

Does the program's governing body have at least one member with a
background and expertise in fiscal management or accounting or, if one is not
available, has the program used a consultant or other individual with relevant
expertise? PDM1A, 642(c)(1)(B)(i), 642(c)(1)(B)(vi)

      The Board of Trustees for the Lancaster School District are elected by
       public election to oversee our district.

Fiscal Management Question 1C

Has the program's governing body delegated by contract, or other arrangement,
governance or fiscal responsibilities for the Head Start grant to an entity
unrelated to the local grantee? 642(c)(1)(A), 642(c)(1)(E)(i)

      No.

Fiscal Management Question 1D

Has the program secured the regularly scheduled, ongoing services of a qualified
fiscal officer?
1304.52(d)(8)

      Leona Smith is the Director of Budget and Accounting for Lancaster
       School District. Ms. Smith oversees all budgets. She has a Bachelor’s
       degree in Business Administration.

      Susan Caffey, B.S., Supervisor of Budget & Accounting, Lancaster School
       District is our acting Fiscal Officer. Ms. Caffey has an M.B.A. in
       Accounting.

      Trish Walter, Budget Technician, Early Childhood Education, six years
       with the Head Start program, 18 years with Lancaster School District. Ms.
       Walter has worked with budgets with the Lancaster school district for 16 of
       her 18 years with the school district.

Document Review
  Person(s) Responsible:


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      Mick McClatchey-Assistant Superintendent of Business Services

      Lexy Conte-Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources Department


Has the grantee or delegate been without the services of a fiscal officer during
the last 2 years? If so, for how long?

      No. Leona Smith, Director of Budget & Accounting has been over-seeing
       our reports and budgets. She is our acting Fiscal Officer.

      Michele Bowers, Assistant Superintendent of Educational Services meets
       with our management and fiscal personnel on a regular basis.


Fiscal Management Question 1E

Does the program have a written code or standards of conduct governing the
performance of its employees engaged in awarding and administering contracts?

45 CFR Part 74 for nonprofit organizations and educational institutions
(universities and colleges);
45 CFR Part 92 for State, local, and Tribal governments.
PDM1D, 74.42, 92.36(b)(3)

Document Review

      The Lancaster School District must receive formal competitive bids for
       equipment, materials, supplies, no construction services and maintenance
       to be furnished that exceed the current bid threshold of $62,400. The
       District must also receive formal competitive bids for a public project
       involving an expenditure of $15,000 or more.

      Bids must be presented under sealed cover and shall be advertised once
       a week for two consecutive weeks.

      Contracts are drawn down for services. Contracts that are required to be
       reviewed by the Los Angeles County Office of Education are forwarded as
       soon as possible to the Commercial Warrants Audit unit.



   Person(s) Responsible:

          Giovanni Simi, Director of Purchasing



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          Dean Fourr, Director of Facilities

          Mick McClatchey, Assistant Superintendent Business Services

Fiscal Management Question 1F

Do the program's financial management systems provide for effective control
over and accountability for grant funds, property, and other assets and ensure
they are used solely for authorized purposes?
45 CFR Part 92 for State, local, and Tribal governments. 74.21(b)(3), 92.20(b)(3),
74.21(b)(4), 92.20(b)(4)

      The Budget Technician has a copy of the narrative to the G.A.B.I. and
       follows the plan as written.

      The purchase orders are prepared by the Budget Technician based on
       funds available in the general ledger. The purchase orders are reviewed
       first by the Director of Early Childhood Education, then they are reviewed
       and approved by the Asst. Superintendent of Educational Services. After
       approving, the Assistant Superintendent of Educational Services sends to
       Purchasing for approval and preparation to vendor. The budget is
       checked and approved.

      Deliveries of all purchase orders come to the Early Childhood Education
       office and are checked in by the Budget Technician as the Lancaster
       School District does not have a warehouse.


      The staff from the various sites are called to come and pick up their
       merchandise.

      A copy of all items purchased (packing slips and purchase orders) are
       placed in an inventory book at the Budget Technician’s desk at Early
       Childhood Education office for L.A.C.O.E. review.

Fiscal Management Question 1G

Has the program conducted an annual audit in accordance with OMB Circular A-
133? A-133(200)(a), A-133(400)(d)(4), A-133(320)(a)

      The annual audit was conducted by Dennis & Hart Accountancy Partners
       for Fiscal year ended June 30, 2009. This report was received by
       L.A.C.O.E. on December 8, 2009 before the deadline of December 15,
       2009.




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             With respect to the Head Start program, the auditors did not identify
              any financial or federal award findings or questioned costs that
              represented reportable conditions, material weaknesses, and/or
              instances of non-compliance that were required to be reported in
              accordance with Government Auditing Standards and OMB Circular
              A-133.

Current Year-LACOE Finding-letter from L.A.C.O.E. dated 3/11/2010

Page 51 of the audit report, “Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards” does
not comply with the standard found in OMB Circular A-133, .310(b)(2) relating to
pass-through entity, LACOE is not properly identified for the District’s Head Start
grant. Lancaster School District has 30 days to respond.

      March 26, 2010 a letter was sent to L.A.C.O.E. from Lancaster School
       District, Director Budget & Finance addressing the finding. There was a
       corrected “Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards” completed by
       independent auditors, Dennis & Hart. L.A.C.O.E. Head Start is identified
       as the pass-through entity for our district’s Head Start program.

Fiscal Management
Use of Head Start Grant Funds

Fiscal Management Question 2A

Has the program implemented procedures to determine allowability, allocability,
and reasonableness of costs as required?

       Our school district has procedures for bidding on equipment, supplies,
       repairs, and consultants.


Document Review

      Agreement for Services is used for consultants.

      Purchase Orders are used for purchasing materials and equipment.

      Work orders are generated by secretaries and tracked until completion.

   Person(s) Responsible:

      Agreement for Services-Estela Ayala, Administrative Secretary

      Purchase orders: Trish Walter, Budget Technician, Stephanie Lester,
       Director-Early Childhood Education, Michele Bowers, Assistant



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       Superintendent of Educational Services, G. Simi, Director of Purchasing,
       Leona Smith, Director of Budget & Accounting all examine purchase
       orders, consultant agreements.

Fiscal Management Question 2B

If the program has shared costs with other programs, have they used an
allocation base that best measures the relative degree of benefit for all benefiting
functions?

      Head Start-State Preschool program is funded by both Head Start and
       State Preschool funds. Costs are split between the two programs based
       on time spent in the classroom. Students spend 3.5 hours as Head Start
       and 3 hours as the State Preschool. The school district also provides
       services to support Early Childhood Education department: custodial,
       facilities, school psychologist and accounting support.

      Lancaster School District Head Start program is a Child Care Partner and
       does not need a formal Cost Allocation Plan at this time.

      Currently items that are purchased with Head Start funds are marked with
       Head Start stamp and included in a binder for Head Start inventory.

Document Review

      Contract

Person(s) Responsible:

      Director of Early Childhood Education
      Assistant Superintendent Educational Services

Fiscal Management Question 2C

If the grantee charges indirect costs, are those costs supported by a current
negotiated indirect cost rate?

      Lancaster School District does not charge our program Indirect costs via a
       percentage at the present time.

      Ms. Sasaki, our former Coordinator with Head Start’s permission has an
       agreement that the Early Childhood Education program will pay for their
       work orders for the 2009-2010 school year. Each program within the Early
       Childhood Education program pays its own share: Head Start, State, and
       Special Education.




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   Document Review

      Work order listing and billing-Copies of actual work orders can be provided
       by Facilities at Lancaster School District.

Fiscal Management Question 2D

Does the program have procedures for minimizing the time elapsing between the
advances of funds from the Payment Management System and disbursement of
those funds? Has the program avoided drawing down Head Start funds in excess
of documented cash requirements?

      N/A

Fiscal Management Question 2E

Have program funds been used to cover costs normally paid by other funding
streams (i.e., inter-fund borrowing)?

      Lancaster School District actually pays the Head Start preschool salaries
       out of the General Fund until the Invoice for Reimbursement is processed
       and funds sent to the Lancaster School District from L.A.C.O.E.

Document Review

      Invoice for Reimbursement

      Transfer of Funds letter from L.A.C.O.E.

   Person Responsible:

          Trish Walter-Budget Technician prepares all Invoices for
           Reimbursement to L.A.C.O.E. which include the following:
           Basic, Training & Technical Assistance, A.R.R.A. Quality Improvement,
           A.R.R.A. COLA and Program Improvement Funds (5) on a monthly
           basis.

Fiscal Management Question 2F

Did the grantee comply with the limitation on development and administrative
costs? Note: The limit on costs for developing and administering a Head Start
program is no more than 15 percent of the total grant unless the Regional Office
has required a lesser percentage of the grantee.
1301.32(a)(1), 1301.32(a)(2), 1301.32(b)(2), 1301.32(d)




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Document Review

          Final cost report (Invoice for Reimbursement) for 2008-2009 shows
           Administrative cost at 8%. Fiscal year 2009-2010 (Invoice for
           Reimbursement) currently shows Administrative cost at 6.7% through
           March 31, 2010.

Area of Concern-None

Fiscal Management Question 2G

Did the grantee's reported use of Federal funds in its last budget exceed 80
percent of the total cost without a written waiver?
1301.20(a)(1)

      Our agency did exceed the 80% of the total cost for Personnel and Fringe.
       It is the largest expense of our program. We are a Child Care Partner so
       the 80% does not technically apply.

Document Review

      Final Cost Report 2008-2009 (Invoice for Reimbursement).

Fiscal Management Question 2H

Is grantee- and delegate-claimed non-Federal participation verifiable from
documentary records?
74.23(a)(1), 74.23(d), 74.23(h)(2), 74.23(i)(1), 74.23(i)(2), 92.24(c)(1),
92.24(b)(6), 92.24(d), 74.23(h)(1), 74.23(h)(3), 92.24(g)

   Document Review

      Multi-funded time logs are submitted monthly by staff members. These
       logs are checked by the Administrative Secretary (time-keeper) for
       accuracy. Budget Technician keeps these in a binder at her desk.
      Parent Volunteer Hours are kept in a binder at the Budget Technician’s
       desk according to site of Head Start classroom. Each log contains the
       child’s name, parent’s name, teacher’s signature, date of service and
       service provided.
      Donated items to the classroom are verified by the teacher for accurate
       cost claimed and checked again by Budget Technician.

   Person Responsible-Trish Walter, Budget Technician and Estela Ayala,
   Administrative Secretary (time keeper), Stephanie Lester, Director of Early
   Childhood Education signs the multi-funded time logs after they are checked
   by time keeper.



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Fiscal Management Question 2I

Can the program demonstrate that its claimed non-Federal match through third-
party contributions of volunteer services, goods, or supplies is allowable under
the applicable cost principles and reasonable for accomplishing program
objectives efficiently?
45 CFR Part 74 for nonprofit organizations and educational institutions
(universities and
colleges);
45 CFR Part 92 for State, local, and Tribal governments.
74.23(a)(3), 74.23(d),
74.23(f), 92.24(a)(1),
74.23(a)(4), 92.24(b)(7)(i),
92.24(c)(1)

Document Review

          Lancaster School District uses Multi-funded time logs for each
           classroom employee and Support Staff whom are funded from both
           Head Start and State of California Funds.

          Lancaster School District also has Parent Volunteer logs which are
           kept by site, signed by parent and teacher, added and reported to
           L.A.C.O.E.

          Lancaster School District also has donation forms which are used
           when goods are donated for classroom use.

Person Responsible:

      Trish Walter, Budget Technician tracks and reports Parent Volunteer
       hours and donations made to the Head Start classrooms.

Fiscal Management Question 2J

Does the program have written procurement procedures that provide, at a
minimum, all requirements specified in the applicable Federal statutes?
92.36(c)(3), 74.44(a)


      Yes.

Fiscal Management Question 2K




                                                                                133
Are procurement transactions conducted in a manner that provides for open and
free competition?

      When formal bidding is not required, informal bids are taken from several
       possible vendors. The informal bids may be obtained by mail, telephone,
       fax or electronic mail.

      Purchases in excess of the formal competitive bid threshold of $59, 600
       (equipment, materials, supplies, non-construction services and repairs and
       maintenance and $15,000 or more for a public project must be furnished,
       sold or leased from vendors/contractors who participate in the formal
       competitive bidding process.

   Document Review

      Informal Bid and Formal Bid

      Construction and lease purchase bids and contracts are executed on
       documents approved by county counsel or district counsel.

   Person Responsible:

      Mick McClatchey, Asst. Superintendent Business Services, Lancaster
       School District

      Dean Fourr, Director, Facilities, Lancaster School District

      Giovanni Simi, Director, Purchasing, Lancaster School District

Fiscal Management Question 2M

Are the program's contracts with a delegate as well as with childcare
partnerships, transportation services, and professional services current,
available, signed, and dated?


Document Review

      Contracts from L.A.C.O.E., California Department of Education, and Los
       Angeles Universal Preschool.
      Agreement for Services

Person(s) Responsible:

      Director of Early Childhood Education
      Administrative Secretary



                                                                              134
      Assistant Superintendent of Business Services

Fiscal Management Question 2N

If the grantee or delegate owns any of the facilities used by the Head Start
program that were not purchased with Federal funds, are occupancy charges
limited to depreciation or use allowance?
 225, App B(11), 230, App B(11), 220, App A(J)(14)

      Lancaster School District did purchase 2 sets of modules for the Head
       Start Classrooms. The Head Start program pays for the portables based
       on depreciation cost annually.

Document Review

      Fixed asset report

      Depreciation schedules

Person Responsible:

      Leona Smith, Director of Budget & Accounting, Lancaster School District


                              Fiscal Management

Grant Property

Fiscal Management Question 3A

If the program owns facilities purchased or constructed using Head Start grant
funds or made major renovations with Head Start grant funds, is documentation
available to show that the facilities transactions were approved and complied
with Federal regulations?

1309.21(d)

N/A
      Our agency has not purchased, leased or renovated facilities within the
       last three years.

Fiscal Management Question 3B

Does the program have a process to ensure all contracts exceeding $2,000 for
constructing, renovating, or repairing buildings used by Head Start programs
comply with the Davis-Bacon Act?



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        The Lancaster School District complies with all State and Federal
        regulations.


Fiscal Management Question 3C

Does the program make appropriate use of insurance to manage risks?

       Lancaster School District does provide all the necessary insurance based
        on State and Federal Regulations.

Document Review

       Insurance Policy

Person Responsible:

       Assistant Superintendent of Business

Fiscal Management Question 3D

Does the program meet property management standards for equipment
purchased using Head Start funds, including conducting a physical inventory
every 2 years and maintaining vehicle titles?

       Lancaster School District hired Asset Works, Inc. during the 2008-2009
        school year, to conduct a physical inventory of all sites within the
        Lancaster School District.



Fiscal Management Question 3E

Does evidence exist that the program did not obtain approval before
encumbering, mortgaging, or putting up as collateral property acquired or
improved with Head Start funds?

       N/A

       Lancaster School District does not encumber, mortgage, nor put up for
        collateral Head Start property.

Fiscal Management Question 3F




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Did the program properly account for property rental transactions with related
parties?

Document Review

      There are copies of Review of Donated Space FY 2008-2009 located in
       the Early Childhood office.

Person Responsible:

      Leona Smith, Director Budget & Accounting, Lancaster School District
       has provided L.A.C.O.E. with documents showing Review of Valuation of
       Donated Space used for our classrooms. It is based on depreciation.


Fiscal Management
Compensation

Fiscal Management Question 4A

Are the program's original time records prepared properly and approved properly
by a responsible supervisory official having knowledge of the work performed?

Document Review

      Employees of the Lancaster School District use E-time, Kronos Workforce
       Central, version 5.2 time-keeping system.

      Each employee enters his/her own time daily. At the end of the pay period,
       the employee approves.

      The second approval is done by the Administrative secretary whom
       checks for accuracy according to her time records.

      The third approval is done by Director of Early Childhood Education.

      Payroll checks for accuracy prior to allow the payroll to run.


Person(s) Responsible:

      Employee

      Administrative Secretary

      Director of Early Childhood Education, Lancaster School District



                                                                                 137
Fiscal Management Question 4B

Are program staff charged to the grant compensated (salary and other forms of
compensation) at a rate at or below Executive Level II ($177,000 through
December 31, 2009)?

      Lancaster School District Head Start program does not have any one
       employee that exceeds the Executive Level II for salary and fringe
       benefits.

Document Review:

      Payroll ledgers-monthly C1 cycle for Administrators, C2 and C3 cycle for
       Certificated staff.
      All Employee Pay-Lancaster School District

Person Responsible:

      Janis Filomia, Supervisor, Payroll Department, Lancaster School District.

      Lori Cooper-Kuriyama, Account Clerk IV, Budget & Accounting, Lancaster
       School District (All Employee Pay).


Fiscal Management Question 4C

If the grantee and delegate have received a cost of living adjustment (COLA) or
Quality Improvement Funds, or both, did the award comply with the terms of their
grant application? 2 CFR Part 230 for nonprofit organizations
2 CFR Part 225 for State, local, and Tribal governments
2 CFR Part 220 for educational institutions
230, App A(A)(2)(b), 225,
App A(C)(1)(d), 220, App
A(C)(2), 653(b)(1),
653(b)(2)(A), 653(b)(2)(B)

      Yes.

      Total $69, 130 COLA Permanent 2009-2010 school year.

       $36,171 used for Head Start staff step increases.
       $7,241 Fringe benefits
       $10, 714 Supplies
       $15,004 Building Maintenance for classrooms


                                                                              138
Fiscal Management Question 4D
Are program staff wages charged to the grant reasonable and supported by
appropriate wage comparability data?
2 CFR Part 230 for nonprofit organizations;
2 CFR Part 225 for State, local, and Tribal governments.
230, App B(8)(c), 225, App
B(8)(b)

      According to the Lancaster School District Human Resources Department,
       there was a wage study done in 2006 with the local school districts.
       Early Childhood Education has never been provided with the copies of
       wage comparability data.

Document Review

      Please contact Human Resources Department, Lancaster School District.
       They should be able to provide Classified Employee Compensation
       Survey Results 2006.

Person(s) Responsible:

      Penny Baker, Administrative Secretary-Classified Personnel

      Lexy Conte, Assistant Superintendent-Certificated Personnel


Financial Reporting
Are program financial reports and accounting records current, accurate, and
available? Do they contain information pertaining to grant or sub-grant awards
and authorizations, obligations, unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, outlays
or expenditures, and income? 45 CFR Part 74 for nonprofit organizations and
educational institutions (universities and colleges); 45 CFR Part 92 for State,
local, and Tribal governments. 74.21(b)(2), 92.20(b)(2), 74.21(b)(1), 92.20(b)(1)

      Budget Technician receives weekly reports from the Accounting
       Department at the District office that shows current budget,
       encumberances and expenditures. Budget Technician compares the
       purchase orders to line item budget to ensure charges are reasonable and
       match purchase orders. If there is a price change, freight change, Budget
       Technician is notified by Account Clerk in Accounting at District office prior
       to payment.

      Budget Technician receives all Payroll ledgers relating to the Head Start
       program. The percentages are checked to be sure they are in line with




                                                                                 139
       the G.A.B.I. The payroll ledgers are compared to the printouts from the
       general ledger to ensure accuracy.

Document Review

      L.A.C.O.E. Exhibit B2

      Contracts from L.A.C.O.E., California Department of Education, and Los
       Angeles Universal Preschool.

      Payroll ledgers

      General ledgers from Accounting


      All Employee Pay

   Person(s) Responsible:

          Trish Walter-Budget Technician
          Stephanie Lester-Director Early Childhood Education

          Michele Bowers-Assistant Superintendent Educational Services



Fiscal Management Question 5B

Has the program established and maintained efficient, effective reporting
systems that have generated: • Internal Revenue Service (IRS) 941 (Employer's
Quarterly Federal Tax Return); • IRS 990 (Return of Organization Exempt from
Income Tax); • IRS 5500 (Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan); and
• Other official Federal, State, and local reports as required by applicable law?
1304.51(h) (2), 92.41(b) (4), 74.52(a) (2) (iii), 92.41(c) (4), 74.52(a) (1) (iv),
647(c) (2)

Review:

      Yes. All required fiscal reports are completed and on file with the school
       district.

Person(s) Responsible:

      Leona Smith, Director-Budget & Accounting, Lancaster School District




                                                                                 140
Fiscal Management Question 5C

Are periodic financial status reports provided to program governing bodies, policy
groups, and staff to advise them and to control program quality and maintain
program accountability?
1304.51(h) (1)

Document Review

      Yes. The Budget Technician posts at the end of each reporting period,
       the Head Start Basic budget in the staff hallway and in the Budget
       Technician’s office.

      The Parent Committee is given a report each month of the Head Start
       Basic expenditures and balances.

      The Lancaster School District Board of Trustees are given a copy of all
       Invoice for Reimbursements for the various grants from L.A.C.O.E. Basic,
       Training & Technical Assistance, A.R.R.A. COLA and Quality
       Improvement and Program Improvement funds each month.

Person Responsible:

      Trish Walter, Budget Technician, Early Childhood Education

Management Systems Analysis
Fiscal Management Question 6A

This section lists a series of targeted questions not linked to a performance
standard at the service area level. These questions are designed to contribute to
a comprehensive analysis of the program’s management systems. Accordingly,
these questions appear in each protocol section and are completed for each
service area to provide insight into how key management systems function with
relationship to each service area.

Targeted Question for Fiscal Management Question 6A

Interview: Fiscal Officer (Program Planning)

How is information from the annual Self Assessment incorporated into your
program planning and implementation?
Describe how information from the Community Assessment (and its updates) is
incorporated into your program planning and implementation.

      The information gathered in the Self Assessment is considered when
       writing the plans and goals for the new year.



                                                                               141
      If a classroom needs new supplies, carpet, computer or any items it is
       brought to the attention of the Director of Early Childhood Education. It is
       discussed with the Parent Committee and other staff members to see
       which direction the program will take.


Summary Analysis: Reporting

Based on your notes from FIS5A, FIS5B, FIS5C, prepare a summary that
describes whether the program maintains and implements efficient, effective
reporting systems that:

• Are current and accurate,

• Contain appropriate information, and

• Are made available to the appropriate groups to ensure program quality and
accountability.

      The Budget Technician for the Head Start program maintains binders by
       each Resource that she tracks. Example: Head Start Basic, Training and
       Technical Assistance, A.R.R.A. Q.I and A.R.R.A. C.O.L.A. and P.I.F.
       Each binder contains all purchase orders for that resource. It also
       contains copies of packing slips to match to the purchase orders.

      There is also a binder which contains copies of the packing slips,
       purchase orders to show items purchased for the Head Start program for
       that school year.

      There are binders which contain the Payroll Ledgers from the Lancaster
       School District to ensure proper reporting of all salaries and benefits
       charged to the Head Start program and all programs within Early
       Childhood Education. These ledgers are used for the reports.

      There is a binder which contains budget printouts from Budget &
       Accounting, Lancaster School District that reflects all resources within the
       Early Childhood Education program. These printouts contain the
       information necessary to prepare the monthly Invoice for Reimbursement
       to L.A.C.O.E.

      Budget Technician maintains a Head Start file cabinet which contains all
       reports generated for fiscal piece. It is well organized, easy to find any
       specific monthly Invoice for Reimbursement for all of the five resources
       within the Head Start budget.




                                                                                142
             In conclusion, the Early Childhood Education Budget Technician
              ensures that records and reports are easily accessible for
              management, parent committee, monitors from L.A.C.O.E. and
              governing Board of Trustees.

             The Early Childhood Education program at Lancaster School
              District does very well with its Fiscal management and reporting.

             The Board of Trustees is kept up to date on the Head Start
              program’s budget, expenses, current balance.

             Federal funds are safe-guarded by the several checks in place
              when any funds are expended. Please note section Fiscal
              Management Question 1F.

             The Head Start program has a contract that deals with
              reimbursement from L.A.C.O.E. for Federal funds expended.
              Lancaster School District is not given cash up front to implement
              program.

             The Director of Budget and Accounting addresses any findings
              from independent auditor in at timely manner.


                   Program Design and Management
Program Design and Management Question 1A

Does the composition of the governing body reflect the following:
• At least one member has a background and expertise in fiscal management or
accounting;*
• At least one member has a background and expertise in early childhood
education and development;
• At least one member is a licensed attorney familiar with issues that come before
the governing body;
• Additional members who reflect the community and include parents of formerly
or currently enrolled Head Start (HS)
children; and
• Other members selected for their expertise in education, business
administration, or community affairs?
*The Fiscal Reviewer will monitor for program compliance with this requirement.
 642(c)(1)(B)(ii), 642(c)(1)(B)(iii), 642(c)(1)(B)(iv), 642(c)(1)(B)(vi)

Document Review: Governing Body Membership Roster



                                                                                  143
      There are 5 elected members of the governing board.

      The school board is elected by members of the community.

      No member of the school board has an expertise in fiscal management
       and accounting however they are advised by the Lancaster School District
       Assistant Superintendent of Business.

      No member of the school board is an attorney, but the school board is
       advised by an attorney group representing the Lancaster School District.

      No member of the school board has expertise in early childhood but
       consults with the Assistant Superintendant of Education Services as well
       as the Program Director.

Interview: Governing Body Members (Composition)

      No member of the school board has an expertise in fiscal management
       and accounting however they are advised by the Lancaster School District
       Assistant Superintendent of Business.

      No member of the school board is an attorney, but the school board is
       advised by an attorney group representing the Lancaster School District.

      No member of the school board has expertise in early childhood but
       consults with the Assistant Superintendant of Education Services as well
       as the Program Director.

      The members of the school board are elected from the community, by the
       community. No Head Start parents are currently serving on the school
       board.

Program Design and Management Question 1B

Have current governing body members received appropriate training and
technical assistance to ensure they understand the information they receive and
can oversee and participate in the program effectively? 642(d)(3)

Document Review: Training Plans and Policies

      A governing body member attended the LACOE annual board training this
       school year.

      The refunding application was reviewed by a governing body member.




                                                                             144
      Governing body receive monthly board reports that include budget
       updates, policies and procedures updates, events and training updates,
       and any other pertinent information.

Interview: Governing Body Members (Training)

      The governing body member that attended the LACOE annual board
       training reports that the training was very helpful and allowed a better
       understanding of the policies and procedures for the Head Start program.

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Training)

      The last training offered for the governing body was the LACOE annual
       board training.

      Individual trainings for governing board members have been provided by
       the program coordinator.

Program Design and Management Question 1C

Do governing body members receive the following information or reports:
• Monthly financial statements, including credit card expenditures;
• Monthly program information summaries;
• Program enrollment reports, including attendance reports for children whose
care is partially subsidized by another public agency;
• Monthly reports of meals and snacks provided through USDA programs;
• Financial audit;
• Annual Self Assessment, including findings related to such assessment;
• Community-wide strategic planning and needs assessment (i.e., Community
Assessment) of the Head Start agency, including applicable updates;
• Communication and guidance from the Secretary; and
• Program information reports?
642(d)(2)(A), 642(d)(2)(B), 642(d)(2)(C), 642(d)(2)(D), 642(d)(2)(E), 642(d)(2)(F),
642(d)(2)(G), 642(d)(2)(H), 642(d)(2)(I)

Interview: Governing Body Members (Reporting)

      Reports are received monthly at the Governing Board meetings. These
       reports include: monthly budget status, program information summaries,
       program enrollment reports, any updated policies and procedures, Policy
       council information, executive policy council information, community-wide
       activities and partnerships, and calendar of events.

      Questions regarding these reports are asked of the director or the
       coordinator at the monthly board meetings, or through phone or email.



                                                                                145
      Reports provide information regarding the progress the program is making
       in all the areas listed above.

Document Review: Governing Body Reports

      The Governing Board receives the above information electronically, in
       hard copy, and the information is posted on the Lancaster School District
       website.

      The director and executive committee member are present and available
       during the monthly governing board meeting to answer any questions and
       address any concerns.

Program Design and Management Question 1D

Does the governing body perform the following activities to support program
administration and implementation:
• Selecting delegate agencies and the service areas for such agencies;
• Establishing procedures and criteria for recruiting, selecting, and enrolling
   children;
• Developing procedures for selecting Policy Council members;
• Establishing, adopting, and periodically updating written standards of conduct
   that determine how complaints are disclosed, addressed, and resolved,
   including investigations; and
• Reviewing all applications for funding and amendments to applications for
  funding? 642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(I), 642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(II), 642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(III),
642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(VI), 642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(X)

Document Review: Governing Body Meeting Minutes

      The Governing Body for our school district reviews and approves policies
       and procedures for recruiting, selecting, and enrolling children, and written
       standards of conduct.

      The Governing Body for our school district reviews and approves the
       refunding application.

      The governing body does not select policy council members.

Document Review: Code of Conduct

      The Governing Body (School Board) minutes contain evidence of the
       review and approval of the policies, procedures, and refunding application.




                                                                                146
      The program follows the standards of conduct for the Lancaster School
       District and the complaint procedures for all licensed programs within
       California.

Interview: Governing Body Members (Governing Body Responsibilities)

      Members are invited to policy council meetings.

      Members are invited to meet with the coordinator and program
       representatives to review and approve of the refunding application.

Program Design and Management Question 1E

Does the governing body review and approve all major policies of the grantee,
including the following:
• Annual Self Assessment and financial audit;
• Program's progress in carrying out the grant application provisions, including
implementation of corrective actions;
• Personnel policies regarding hiring, evaluation, termination, and compensation;
• Policies and procedures regarding hiring, evaluation, compensation, and
termination of the Executive Director, Head Start Director, Director of Human
Resources, Chief Financial Officer, or other person in an equivalent position; and
• Results from monitoring, including appropriate follow-up activities?
642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(V)(aa), 642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(V)(bb), 642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(V)(cc),
642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(VIII), 642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(IX)

Document Review: Governing Body Meeting Minutes

      Board Action Items were reviewed regarding the Self Assessment
       completed in the 08-09 school year and it was found to have gone to
       Board and a motion was made on May 5, 2009 recommending the request
       for approval of the annual self assessment for the Head Start program.

      Financial Audit was completed January 14, 2009 and went to the
       Governing Board for approval on January 20, 2009.

      Board Action Items were reviewed regarding the Grant Application for the
       09-10 school year and it was found to have gone to Board and a motion
       was made on December 16, 2008 recommending the request the consent
       of the application for refunding be made.

      The Grant Application for the 10-11 school year went to Board on
       December 15, 2009 as a Board Action Item and was reviewed and found
       that a motion was made requesting the consent of the application for
       refunding to be made.



                                                                                147
     Personnel Policies regarding recruitment and selection were adopted on
      August 4, 2009

     Policies and Procedures regarding Suspension/Disciplinary Action were
      adopted on August 4, 2009

     Policies and Procedures regarding evaluations were adopted on
      November 6, 2007

     Policies and Procedures regarding hiring, evaluations, compensation, and
      termination of the Executive director, Head Start Director, or other person
      in equivalent position adopted on August 4, 2009.

     Grant Application Provisions: Program Improvement Plans that have been
      addressed:

         o Hired a consultant to provide nutritional services July 21, 2009.

         o Updating policies and procedures for ongoing monitoring.

         o Creating new job descriptions that include management functions
           and list of job duties specific to Family Service Providers and
           Education Coordinator and Education Specialist.

         o Developed monthly tracking log for pedestrian safety training for
           parents/students.

         o District Accounting Department provided necessary documentation
           to ensure federal regulations were followed.

         o    Process developed to give applicants Health Examination
             “physicians form” to ensure document is completed prior to hire
             date.

         o Fencing replaced at El Dorado.

Interview: Governing Body Members (Governing Body Responsibilities)

     All the policies and procedures are reviewed and approved by the policy
      council, executive board, and then submitted to the governing body for
      approval.

     Reviewing, monitoring, and appropriate follow up activities are a part of
      the monthly report received by the governing body.




                                                                                  148
      The annual audit is reviewed by the executive policy committee and then
       submitted to the governing body for approval.

      The annual self assessment is reviewed with the representatives from the
       early childhood program including a parent representative and is then
       submitted to the Governing Body for approval.

Program Design and Management Question 1F

Does the governing body approve financial management, accounting, and
reporting policies, including:
• Grantee’s major financial expenditures;
• Grantee’s annual operating budget;
• Selection (except when a financial auditor is assigned by the State under State
law or is assigned under local law) of independent financial auditors who report
all critical accounting policies and practices to the governing body; and
• Monitoring of the agency's actions to correct audit findings and monitoring of
other action necessary to comply with applicable laws (including regulations)
governing financial statement and accounting practices?
642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(VII)(aa), 642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(VII)(bb), 642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(VII)(cc),
642(c)(1)(E)(iv)(VII)(dd)

Document Review: Governing Body Meeting Minutes

      In reviewing Board Action Items, it was found that on March 17, 2009 the
       Board approved a major expenditure for facilities expenditures and
       repairs.

      The contract for operation of the Head Start Program, including the
       budget, for the period of 07/01/2009 to 06/30/2010 went board and was
       approved on o6/16/2010.

      Contract for ARRA monies approved on 10/06/09.

      Board Action Item contract with California Department of Education for
       facilities, renovation and repair funds for 08/09 through 09/10 approved
       3/17/09.

      All budget items are required to be approved through the Governing body
       before release of funds.

      Governing Body minutes are available for review in hard copy form or
       online.




                                                                               149
      Last Audit dated January 14, 2009 by Moss, Levy & Hartzheim LLP,
       completed on the Early Childhood Education Program as well as the entire
       Lancaster School District.

Interview: Governing Body Members (Governing Body Responsibilities)

      The school district is monitored by an independent financial auditor who
       reports periodically to the governing body any findings or actions that are
       necessary to comply with applicable laws governing financial statements
       and accounting practices.

      Any actions necessary to be corrected within the program are addressed
       in collaboration with the budget technician and the LACOE fiscal monitor
       and team. The budget technician will address any findings and make the
       needed changes.

Program Design and Management Question 1G

Has the governing body fulfilled its major responsibilities, including legal and
fiscal administration and oversight; assuring active, independent, and informed
governance; and ensuring compliance with applicable laws and regulations?
642(c)(1)(E)

Summary Analysis: Program Governance

      They are invited to collaborate with the program on application processes
       and implementation of program goals.

      The governing body approves all major policies.

      The governing body is made aware of all monitoring and compliance
       issues.

      The governing body provides support for the refunding application process
       and provides feedback in the form of attending meetings and make
       suggestions as to the needs of the program.

Policy Committee
Program Design and Management Question 2A

Has the program established a Policy Council or Policy Committee and a Parent
Committee in accordance with Head Start requirements? 642(c)(2)(B)(ii)(I), (II),
1304.50(a)(1)(iii), 642(c)(2)(B)(i), 642(c)(3)(A)


Document Review


                                                                                150
The following documents were reviewed: Policy Committee Bylaws, Procedures
for Composition and Formation of Policy Committee for Policy Committee
Officers, October, 16, 2009 Policy Committee Minutes, and Lancaster School
District Head Start 2009-2010 Policy Committee Roster.

      The Lancaster School District Early Childhood Education program has
       established Parent Committees at all Head Start sites in the month of
       September during the program school year.

      In addition, the Policy Committee is established during the month of
       October in the same program school year.


Interview: Policy Committee Member
     Yes, the Head Start Parent Committees were established in September of
        the 2009-2010 school year at site.

      51 percent are currently enrolled Head Start parents. Yes, because we
       have parents that are involved from the state preschool program.

      Yes, once every school year and when parents leave the Policy
       Committee. Elections occur during the month of October of every school
       year and when a member of the Policy Committee resigns or is
       terminated.

Program Design and Management Question 2B

Does the program have a Policy Council or Policy Committee responsible for the
Head Start program’s direction, including program design and operation, and
long- and short-term planning goals, taking into account the annual Community
Assessment and Self Assessment? 642(c)(2)(A)

Document Review

The following documents were reviewed: Policy Committee Bylaws, Policy
Committee meeting schedule, Executive Committee/Parent Representative
Rooster, and Policy Committee Approval Contracts.

      The program has established a Policy Committee responsible for the
       Head Start program early in the school year.

      The Policy Committee is responsible for approval and disapproval of
       identified personnel, policies, and funding applications.




                                                                               151
      The Policy Committee members attend work sessions with the school
       board members, and together they approve/disapprove the Annual Work
       Plan, Community Assessment, Self-Assessment, and all other funding
       request.

Interview: Policy Committee Member
     The program helps me become more involved in making
        recommendations regarding program activities during school days and
        vacations days by reviewing and having input on the Community and/or
        Self Assessment.

      Recommendations are made to the Policy Committee to have parents
       approve and/or disapprove program activities and documentations

Program Design and Management Question 2C

Are Policy Council or Policy Committee members free of financial or other conflict
of interest? 642(c)(2)(C)(ii), 1304.50(b)(6), 642(c)(2)(C)(i), 642(c)(3)(B)

Interview: Policy Committee Member

      Neither my immediate family nor I are employed by the Los Angeles
       County Office of Education Head Start-State Preschool Program or
       Lancaster School District Early Childhood Education Program.

      As a Policy Committee member, I do receive mileage reimbursement to
       various meetings and conferences.

Document Review

The following document were reviewed: Policy Committee Bylaws

      Policy Committee members who have received Policy Committee training
       are reimbursed for mileage to meetings and conferences.

      As stated in Policy committee Bylaws, members are free of any financial
       responsibilities and conflict of interest is addressed.

Interview: Head Start Director

      The last date Policy Committee members received training was February
       23, 2010. During this training, Parent Representative from Desert View 1
       received the training. Training remains ongoing and as needed throughout
       the 2009-2010 program year. Training plans and materials are available
       on request from the Lancaster School District Early Childhood Education
       Governance staff.


                                                                              152
Program Design and Management Question 2D

Have the Policy Council or Policy Committee members received orientation and
ongoing training and technical assistance to ensure that they can oversee and
participate in program administration effectively? 1304.52(l)(4)

Document Review

The following documents were reviewed: Policy Committee Bylaws, Policy
Committee Training agenda, Executive Officer Training agenda, Governance,
Personnel Policies, Parliamentary Procedure guidance documentation, and
Parent Representative Roster.

      Policy Committee members receive orientation and ongoing training
       throughout the program school year.

      Executive Officers receive technical assistance from Grantee (LACOE) to
       ensure that they can oversee and participate in program administration
       effectively

Interview: Policy Committee Member

      I received Policy Committee training on October 29, 2009. I learned about
       the task and functions of each Executive Officer, the policy group structure
       which consist of Policy Council (LACOE), Policy Committee, and Parent
       Committee and how they work in collaboration with each other.

      The topics that the training consisted of were Shared Governance,
       Personnel policies, Parliamentary Procedures, and Open Communication
       Procedures. This training assisted me in conducting a public meeting and
       communicating the issues and concerns of our program to our governing
       body.

Interview: Head Start Director

      The last date Policy Committee members received training was February
       23, 2010. During this training, Parent Representative from Desert View 1
       received the training. Training remains ongoing and as needed throughout
       the 2009-2010 program year. Training plans and materials are available
       on request from the Lancaster School District Early Childhood Education
       Governance staff.




                                                                               153
Program Design and Management Question 2E

Do the Policy Council or Policy Committee members receive the following
information or reports:
• Monthly financial statements, including credit card expenditures;
• Monthly program information summaries;

• Program enrollment reports, including attendance reports for children whose
care is partially subsidized by another public agency;
• Monthly reports of meals and snacks provided through USDA programs;
• Financial audit;
• Annual Self Assessment, including findings related to such assessment;
• Community-wide strategic planning and needs assessment (i.e., Community
Assessment) of the Head Start agency, including any applicable updates;
• Communication and guidance from the Secretary; and
• Program information reports? 642(d)(2)(A), 642(d)(2)(B), 642(d)(2)(C),
642(d)(2)(D), 642(d)(2)(E), 642(d)(2)(F), 642(d)(2)(G), 642(d)(2)(H), 642(d)(2)(I)

Interview: Policy Committee Member

       As the Vice Chairperson of the Policy Committee, I along with the other
        officers of the Policy Committee review monthly budget reports and
        programmatic reports a week prior to the Policy Committee meeting. The
        reports reviewed informs us as parents how much is being spent in the
        different areas of the program and that the program is staying on budget.
        If we have any questions regarding the reports that we review, we would
        address our questions to the Head Start Budget Technician of the
        Lancaster School District Early Childhood Education Program.

Document Review

The following documents were reviewed: Executive Committee minutes, Policy
Committee agenda, Policy Committee Approval Contract, Ad Hoc Committee
minutes, Head Start Basic Budget Report, Self Assessment, Community
Assessment, and monthly program information reports.

       Policy Committee members receive monthly Head Start basic budget
        reports, monthly program information summaries from
        Director/Coordinator.

       During monthly Policy Committee meetings, the Director/Coordinator
        report addresses enrollment, attendance, and meals provided through
        USDA programs are discussed.




                                                                                154
      Financial audit and budget adjustment and request for advance approvals
       are provided to Policy Committee members when audits and budget
       adjustments occur.

      Annual Self Assessment and Community Assessment are also provided
       to Policy Committee members.



Program Design and Management Question 2F

Has the Policy Council or Policy Committee approved and submitted to the
governing body decisions about each of the following activities:
• Program recruitment, selection, and enrollment priorities;
• By-laws for Policy Council operations;
• Applications for funding and amendments to applications for funding for
programs before application submission;
• Budget planning for program expenditures, including policies for reimbursement
and participation in Policy Council activities;
• Program personnel policies and decisions regarding employment of all program
staff, including standards of conduct for program staff, contractors, and
volunteers and criteria for employment and dismissal of program staff;
• Developing procedures for electing Policy Council members; and
• Recommendations for selecting program agencies and service areas for such
agencies? 642(c)(2)(D)(ii), (iii), (iv), (v), (vi), (vii), (viii)

Document Review

The following documents were reviewed: Policy Committee Meeting minutes,
Criminal Records Check Policy and Procedures, Staff and Consultants
Qualifications Policy and Procedures, Standard of Conduct Policy and
Procedures, District Board Policy Dress Code, and District Board Policy
Personnel Suspension/Disciplinary Action.

      During this program school year, the Policy Committee has approved the
       Head Start Refunding Application, which included program recruitment,
       applications for funding, and budget planning for program expenditures.
       Head Start Refunding Application was then submitted to the Lancaster
       School District Board.

      Throughout the program school year, the Policy Committee has approved
       and submitted Policy Committee Bylaws, Personnel Policies, and Policy
       and Procedures for electing Policy Committee Members to the Lancaster
       School District Board.

Interview: Policy Committee Member


                                                                             155
      Once items have been approved by the Policy Committee, these items
       and program activities are then presented and discussed at the Lancaster
       School District Board meetings monthly.

Program Design and Management Question 2G

If necessary, does the program provide reimbursement for reasonable expenses
to enable low-income Policy Council, Policy Committee, and Parent Committee
members to participate fully in their group responsibilities? 1304.50(f)

Interview: Policy Committee Member

      Policy Committee members are reimbursed for travel to meetings and
       conferences and any other expenses that have been documented on the
       Request for Conference Attendance Form that has been approved by the
       Lancaster School District Board.

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Policy Committee Bylaws

Program Design and Management
Planning
Program Design and Management Question 3A

Does the program conduct an annual Self Assessment of program effectiveness
and progress in meeting local program goals and objectives and in implementing
and complying with Federal requirements? 641A(g)(1), 641A(g)(2)(B),
641A(g)(2)(A)

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director and Policy Council or Policy
Committee Member (Self Assessment and Program Planning)

      Self assessment is completed yearly through a collaborative effort with all
       program service areas. Staff work to support each other in the gathering
       of evidence and completion of documentation.

      Service area leads and other supporting staff take an area for completion.
       Research and evidence gathering is completed and the self assessment
       questions are addressed. Service area leads and other staff review the
       completed areas.

      The completed self assessment is reviewed and approved by the policy
       council and the governing body then submitted to LACOE.




                                                                               156
Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director, Policy Council or Policy
Committee Member, and Governing Body Members (Self Assessment and
Program Planning)

      Any areas of non compliance are assessed as to whether they can be
       immediately made compliant or whether it requires more time. For items
       that can be immediately taken care of, they will be fixed at that time. For
       items that require more time a PIP is completed as well as district work
       orders as needed.

      For areas of non compliance a PIP is created with the needed change and
       a timeline to complete it.


Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Self Assessment and Program
Planning)

      The program creates goals based on the needs that are determined by the
       self assessment, DRDP-R results, ECERS findings, and parent survey
       results. The program creates goals that will increase the programs
       effectiveness for both parents and children.

      The program creates goals that support teachers in improving children’s
       knowledge and preparation for kindergarten, to support children’s learning
       of the outcomes in the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework. These
       goals will be met through staff development and classroom support.

Presite Review: Self Assessment and Program Planning

      The last two self assessments were completed in March of 2008 and April
       of 2009.

      These self assessments were approved by the PAC and the governing
       body.

      PIPs were created to strengthen areas that needed to be brought into
       compliance.

Summary Analysis: Self Assessment and Program Planning

      The self assessment allows staff from all service areas to see their own
       areas of strengths and weaknesses. It allows staff to identify areas that
       need to be brought to compliance through writing of policies and
       procedures, or more thorough monitoring, or staff training.




                                                                                157
Program Design and Management Question 3B

Does the program use the Community Assessment for program planning,
including formulation of both long-range program goals and short-term program
and financial objectives?
Note: The 2007 Head Start Act refers to the community assessment as a
community-wide strategic planning and needs assessment.
1304.51(a)(1)(ii), 1305.3(c), 1305.3(d), 1305.3(e)

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Program Planning)

      Our program completed its first Community Assessment in 2009 for the
       years 2009 – 2011.


      The Community Assessment, as required by federal regulation 1305.3, is
       a process using shared decision making structure, collects, gathers, and
       analyzes data and information for the purpose of making key
       organizational, programmatic, and fiscal decisions about the program.



      Education Advisory Committee conducts an annual update for the
       community assessment that includes staff collecting data through
       collaborations/community partners regarding local trends, i.e. health
       issues, increase in numbers of children with special needs, and growing
       concerns/needs of the community. Once data is collected it is reviewed
       and analyzed to identify specific needs in the community. Based on the
       information, goals and objectives are developed to meet the needs
       identified in the Community Assessment.


Presite Review: Community Assessment

      Over the past year unemployment rate has doubled in Lancaster. In
       January of 2008 the unemployment rate was at 8.9%. As of October 2009
       the unemployment rate was at 17.6%.


      The cities population grew at an annual rate of 2 % over the last 2 years,
       yet there has been a significant decline in the number of students
       attending Lancaster School District.




                                                                               158
   Children in Lancaster continue to face a multitude of health care
    challenges such as obesity, asthma and prenatal care. In comparison to
    the county, there are a higher percentage of families that are overweight
    and have diabetes in the Antelope Valley.



   The implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) model has affected
    the number of referrals to special education because those children who
    would have typically been referred, assessed, and received special
    education services went through a series of interventions before being
    assessed for special education eligibility. Subsequently our program
    experienced a greater challenge meeting the mandated 10%.



   Adult education level, skill training, adult literacy and English as a second
    language training for parents is a continued area of need for our parents
    and a critical component for many of our families in improving their
    economic status.



                 Lancaster Population by Race
                  1.07%

                 4.40%

           5.05%
                                           Causians
        12.40%
                                           African Americans
                                           Other
                                           Bi/Multi-racial
                              57.82%
        19.27%                             Asian/Pacific Islander
                                           Native Americans




                                                                              159
   An estimated 41.37% of Lancaster residents receive some type of public
    assistance. Cal-WORKS participants account for 20% of persons
    receiving public assistance; 2% general relief, 41% medical assistance
    only, 32% food stamps, and 5% In-home supportive services (2007 Zip
    Code Data book).

   The number of families living in poverty in Lancaster is an estimated 5,112
    of which 25% are married couples with children, 7% are married with no
    children, 9% are male householders with children, 3% male householders
    with no children, 52% are female householders with children, and 4 % are
    female householders with no children.
                                          Families Living Below Poverty


                                                                                       52%




        25%



                                           9%
                        7%
                                                                3%                                             4%
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                                                                                                                                                      160
     The need to serve the “working poor” is still very evident. A significant
      number of families in poverty are unable to work due to a lack of child
      care. Currently, only 30% of the three and four year olds in Lancaster are
      attending to preschool.

     The need to provide adult education level, skill training, adult literacy and
      English as second language training for parents is a continued area of
      need for our parents and a critical component for many of our families in
      improving their economic status. More than half of Los Angeles county
      residents speak a language other than English at home. An estimated
      24% of the residents in Lancaster speak a language other than English.
      Within Lancaster School District, 49% of the students speak a language
      other than English..

     The need to provide our families information and support regarding
      making healthy life style choices is still a major concern. Children in
      Lancaster continue to face a multitude of health care challenges such as
      obesity, asthma and prenatal care. In comparison to the county, there are
      a higher percentage of families that are overweight and have diabetes in
      the Antelope Valley.

Summary Analysis: Community Assessment and Program Planning

     Based on the community assessment that is conducted every three years,
      staff incorporates its findings into program planning and implementation
      for three program years. Over the past 2 year Lancaster School District
      has been working with Dr. Alan Daley in implementing Appreciative Inquiry
      to help develop long-term goals and refocus the District. During the 2007-
      2008 school year a team of district staff crafted a new mission statement
      and created the “Great Eight” areas of focus. The preschool staff was
      included in determining both the statement and focus areas. The school
      district is also working with Spring Board, a consultant group, to help
      improve student achievement.



     The Community Assessment document was developed by the Preschool
      Evaluation Advisory Committee (EAC). Once the EAC members complete
      a draft of the community assessment it is reviewed and approved by the
      School Board and Parent Advisory Committee (PAC).



     Community assessment information is used to determine the priority of
      selection for children entering the program as well as the location of
      classrooms around the school district. Information is also used to


                                                                                 161
       determine parent trainings, offers of services, and any changes that need
       to be made to the program.

Program Design and Management Question 3C

Has the program developed and implemented a systematic, ongoing process of
program planning? 1304.51(a)(1)

Presite Review: Service Plans and Program Plans

      Program goal for this year is to improve the health and nutrition of the
       children and families in our program by strengthening the classroom
       curriculum and parent education. Staff development and training has
       been provided on an ongoing basis to improve staff knowledge of I Am
       Moving I Am Learning for implementation in the classroom. Parent
       information on healthy eating has been provided through training from our
       nutritionist as well as information in the monthly parent newsletter.

      Program goal for this year is to promote ways to promote conflict
       negotiation skills among children thereby creating a peaceful community in
       the classroom. Staff training has been ongoing throughout the school year
       for teachers to improve their skills at supporting children’s development of
       conflict negotiation skills.


      Program goal for this year is to increase program funding through
       collaborations and partnerships. Staff has contacted outside agencies to
       collaborate with program needs. A local church group provided painting
       labor for some classrooms and another local agency is providing the
       materials for classroom gardens. A partnership was established with
       M.E.N.F.O.L.K. to encourage/support father involvement, AV Community
       Clinic provided a workshop on healthy eating at all of our site meetings.

      Program goal for this year is to develop an age appropriate curriculum in
       the areas of literacy and math. Staff development and ongoing training are
       provided for teachers on improving their classroom curriculum in literacy
       and math. Math curriculum has been enhanced through the addition of
       Mathline, a district-wide math program. Materials and training have been
       provided to all staff for Mathline. The literacy curriculum has been
       enhanced through the addition of parent libraries and check out systems
       for books to read at home.

Summary Analysis: Planning

      Needs are identified through the Self assessment process, the DRDP
       findings, the ECERS results, the parent survey results, through PAC


                                                                               162
       concerns. Identified needs are prioritized and addressed through goals on
       the refunding application, California Department of Education-State
       preschool goals. Goals are then reviewed and implementation of the
       goals is scheduled on the yearly program calendar to ensure that goals
       are met within the program year.


Program Design and Management
Ongoing Monitoring
Program Design and Management Question 4A

Has the program established and implemented procedures for ongoing
monitoring of its Early Head Start (EHS) and Head Start (HS) operations at the
grantee and delegate level? 1304.51(i)(2)

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Ongoing Monitoring and
Oversight)

      Content area coordinators provide ongoing monitoring of their areas and
       state recommendations, concerns, and areas of success in EAC and to
       the Policy Committee.

      Areas of non compliance and correction actions are recorded on Program
       Improvement Plans (PIP).


      All service areas have ongoing monitoring as a part of their policies and
       procedures. To monitor the various service areas the coordinator reviews
       each areas policies and procedures, along with ongoing monitoring
       documentation, to determine if services are being monitored effectively.

Summary Analysis: Ongoing Monitoring

      The agency has established a policy for systematic ongoing monitoring of
       the program and service areas to be completed by the program
       coordinator.


      All service areas have ongoing monitoring as a part of their policies and
       procedures. To monitor the various service areas the coordinator reviews
       each areas policies and procedures, along with ongoing monitoring
       documentation, to determine if services are being monitored effectively.




                                                                             163
      Grantee (LACOE) staff provides ongoing monitoring of each of the
       different service areas. Grantee consultants review/visit either at least
       quarterly.


      Grantee has established and implemented a systematic procedure for
       monitoring our agency and citing compliant/strengths and non
       compliances.


      This are is a general compliance for the program.


Program Design and Management Question 4B

Does the program inform delegate governing bodies of deficiencies in delegate
operations identified in the monitoring review and help them develop plans,
including timetables, for addressing problems? PDM4A, 1304.51(i)(3)

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Ongoing Monitoring-Delegates)

      Identified deficiencies are communicated to LACOE through PIPs.


      PIPs include a plan and timeline for correction of the deficiency.

      LACOE monitors work with the agency to establish a schedule to correct
       the deficiency identified in the PIP.

      The Governing Body is informed of deficiencies in the monthly report
       presented at the School Board meetings.

Program Design and Management
Communications
Program Design and Management Question 5A

Does the program have mechanisms for regular communication among all
program staff to facilitate high-quality outcomes for children and families?
1304.51(e)

Interview: ECD Coordinator (Staff Coordination)

      Teachers receive support through monthly training and inservices during
       which they have an opportunity to ask questions and share concerns.




                                                                                   164
      Support staff is available by phone and email for all classrooms to ask
       questions or request classroom support.


      Support staff available to staff are: Mental Health Support Provider,
       Disabilities Coordinator, School Psychologists, School Nurses, Speech
       and Language Pathologists, Family Support Providers, Regular Education
       Teachers, Special Education Teachers, Inclusion Specialist, and
       Education Specialists.


      Regular visits to the classrooms by the education specialist ensure that
       teachers are provided with the support they need to ensure a high-quality
       education for children.


      The grantee provides regular visits to our agency to help facilitate high
       quality outcomes for our children and families.
      Our LACOE consultants keep regular contact and our service coordinators
       come at least quarterly.

Interview: FCS Staff/Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Staff Coordination)

      Policy or operational changes regarding the Head Start program are
       communicated to the LSD ECE program through LACOE (email
       notifications, GIMS)


      Policy or operational changes regarding our school district are
       communicated to the LSD ECE program through School Board meetings,
       minutes from School Board meetings, emails, and weekly cabinet
       meetings.


      Staff from the different service areas meet monthly for an “EAC”
       (Evaluation Advisory Committee) meeting to communicate policies,
       changes, program needs


      Our agency attends one school board meeting every month to review the
       program and answer questions with the Board of Trustees.

Summary Analysis: Communication among Staff




                                                                                 165
      Staff is able to effectively communicate with each other during the monthly
       EAC meetings as well as at times of need due to close proximity and
       access to each other through phone and email.

      Staff communicate to other through the weekly bulletin which is emailed
       and sent through district mail to all staff members.

      Program announcements are made to employees through Connect-Ed
       phone calls sent out to the staff for which the information applies.

      This area is a strength for the program.

Program Design and Management Question 5B

Is effective two-way communication between staff and parents carried out
regularly throughout the Head Start program year? 1304.51(c)(1), 1304.51(c)(2),
1304.20(e)(2)

Summary Analysis: Communication with Parents

      Our agency provides a monthly newsletter to the parents to keep them
       updated on events and changes in the program.


      Parents are encouraged to attend the PAC (policy council) meetings and
       share any comments, questions, and concerns.

      The classroom staff is in constant contact with the parents and provides
       updates on our program. The classroom staff shares parent concerns
       with the program director.

      Each classroom is provided a comment box where parents can write
       questions or concerns. The box is checked regularly by the PAC
       representative or teacher.

Program Design and Management
Record-Keeping and Reporting
Program Design and Management Question 6A

Does the program establish and maintain a record-keeping system that provides
accurate and timely information regarding children, families, and staff and ensure
appropriate confidentiality of this information? 1304.51(g)

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Record-Keeping)




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      Files are maintained in the office and are confidential as they are kept in a
       private office and locked when not in use.

      Only authorized office staff have access to the confidential files.

      Files are updated as needed and as new information is presented by
       parents or teachers.

      Files are updated monthly to add new children and delete those who have
       dropped.

Summary Analysis: Record-Keeping

      Record keeping summaries are kept as spreadsheets to track children in
       the program, attendance, children leaving the program, and families on
       the waiting list.

      Service areas each maintain their own record-keeping system to ensure
       that all due dates and timelines are maintained. Record-keeping systems
       are kept confidential.

      Staff and parent communication is recorded in Powerschool so that
       records are maintained throughout the child’s enrollment and passed on to
       the school the child attends for kindergarten.

Program Design and Management Question 6B

Are periodic reports of financial status and program operations provided to
program governing bodies, policy groups, and staff to advise them and to control
program quality and maintain program accountability? 1304.51(h)
What financial and programmatic reports do you receive and when do you
receive them? FIS 5C
What information do the reports you receive include? Are then clear and
comprehensive? FIS 5C
How do the reports help you keep track of the program’s progress? FIS 5C

Interview: Budget Technician

      Accounting sends budget reports which include the budget expended and
       encumbered and balance at least monthly. The budget technician also
       gets the following payroll ledgers: C1, C2, C3 (Certificated), H1, twice
       monthly for hourly and an E4 on time monthly for classified employees.
       Monthly knowing where the program should be percentage wise with
       balance remaining in budget. For example, If six months into the year,
       the program should have used 50% and have 50% left. LACOE is also
       provided with projected expenditures for the entire year.


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Summary Analysis: Reporting

      A very detailed report of the financial reporting system was reviewed. It
       defines the system and procedures, along with due dates, for reports,
       program improvement funds, training and technical assistance, payroll,
       budget lines, in-kind, multifunded timelogs, supply orders, and quarterly
       reports. All of these areas are implemented by the budget technician and
       reported to both the program director and LACOE.

Program Design and Management Question 6C

Does the program publish and make available to the public an annual report?
644(a)(2)

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Reporting)

      A monthly report is prepared and made available to the public on the
       Lancaster School District website.

Document Review: Annual Report to the Public

      The monthly public report includes budget information, policies and
       procedures information, current events information, agendas of policy
       council, executive committee, and PAC meetings, Directors meetings
       agendas, unusual incidents information, and monitoring reports.

      The program is adding curriculum information to this public report.

Program Design and Management
Human Resources
Program Design and Management Question 7A

Does the program’s organizational structure support the required program
management functions to ensure the accomplishment of program objectives?
1304.52(a)(1), 1304.52(a)(2)

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Organizational Structure)

      The programs organizational structure has been created to meet the
       objectives.

      Our objective to provide a high quality educational program is supported
       by our staffing requirements which include having two permitted people
       per classroom along with a para-educator who has 6 ECE units.



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      The organizational chart has been created to provide the necessary
       leadership and support for children and families enrolled in the program. It
       includes:
       Program Director
       Program Coordinator (position is currently vacant)
       Education Coordinator and Specialists
       Health Coordinator (medical and dental)
       Mental Health Coordinator
       Nutrition consultant
       Disabilities Coordinator
       Lead Family Service Provider
       Fiscal Lead

Document Review: Organizational Chart

      Each position has a list of assigned duties and requirements for the
       position.

      Program management functions are provided by the program director and
       the program coordinator. The fiscal management is provided by the fiscal
       lead. These positions work together to make decisions that will work best
       to support the program.

Program Design and Management Question 7B

 Has the program hired staff or consultants who meet the required qualifications
to provide regularly scheduled, ongoing content area expertise and oversight?
1304.52(b)(2)

Summary Analysis: Staff Qualifications and Expertise

       Program Director

                    Masters Degree in Education in curriculum and instruction.
                    Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential.
                    Program Director Permit.
                    Administrative Services Credential.
                    Has been an elementary school classroom teacher for 15
                     years.
                    Taught preschool for 12 years.
                    Has been an administrator for 4 years.
                    Parent Education Credential and has worked with the Los
                     Angeles Correctional Facilities teaching parenting.
                    Is an author of educational texts.
                    Teaches college courses in early childhood.



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Program Coordinator (position is currently vacant)

Education Coordinator
          Bachelor’s degree in Child Development
          Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential
          Severely Handicapped Teaching Credential
          Early Childhood Special Education Teaching Credential
          Masters in Early Childhood Special Education.

Health Coordinator (medical and dental)
          Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN)
          Worked for Lancaster School District in the health service
            area for 18 years.
          Has past experience in labor & delivery, wellborn baby and
            NICU care.
          has also worked 14 years in a General Practitioner’s office
            as the nurse in charge of patient care and teaching.

Mental Health Coordinator
          BA in Interpersonal Communication
          BS in Applied Developmental Psychology
          MA Counseling
          Member of National Board of Certified Counselors
          Has over 7 years of experience working with children and
             families.

Nutrition Consultant
            Registered Dietician
            Masters in Nutrition
            Also works for the State of California as the Registered
             Dietician.

Disabilities Coordinator
            BA in Interpersonal Communication
            BS in Applied Developmental Psychology
            MA Counseling
            Member of National Board of Certified Counselors
            Has over 7 years of experience working with children and
              families.

Lead Family Service Provider
         Currently has 110 units in the field of Psychology and
            completes B.A. in psychology in Spring of 2011.
         15 years of experience in the social services field.



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                    Has worked as a Mental Health Aide, Behavioral Health
                     Technician, Child Professional III, Assistant Supervisor, and
                     Therapeutic 1:1 Behavioral Aide.
                    Has worked for YMCA, Frederick Douglas Head Start,
                     Devereux Foundation, Alternative Behavioral Services, and
                     Care Resources Inc.
       Fiscal Lead
                  Budget Technician for the school district for 6 years.
                  Categorical Program Specialist for the school district for 7.5
                   years.
                  Oversees reports for Head Start and State Preschool, as
                   well as LAUP and Pre K.

Program Design and Management Question 7C

Does the program conduct annual performance reviews of all staff and are
results used? Note: 1310.17(f)(1) applies only to transportation staff.
1304.52(j), 1310.17(f)(1)

Staff Files: Nutrition Coordinator, Transportation Coordinator, Facilities
Coordinator, Health Coordinator, Disabilities Coordinator, FCS Coordinator,
Mental Health Coordinator, Preschool Teacher, Infant and Toddler Teacher,
Family Child Care Provider, Home Visitor, Head Start/Early Head Start Director,
ERSEA Coordinator, Fiscal Officer, FCS Staff, and ECD Coordinator (Staff
Training and Development)

For hourly employees:

      All new hires are considered probationary employees and are evaluated at
       3 months, 6 months, and 9 months. At their 9 month evaluation, the
       evaluator determines whether to continue their employment as a
       permanent employee.

      Promotional is different. Employees are considered promotional if they go
       from one job classification to another. These employees are evaluated at
       2 months and at 6 months. At 6 months the evaluator determines if
       permanent status for this employee is recommended.

      For permanent employees an evaluation is completed yearly.

      The date of a person’s evaluation is the anniversary of the date they were
       hired into the district.

      The evaluations are required to be completed within 30 days of the
       anniversary of their hire date.



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For salary employees:

      Evaluations are completed yearly with an employee becoming permanent
       after two years.

Interview: Teacher, Family Child Care Provider, ECD Coordinator, Fiscal Officer,
Facilities Coordinator, Health Coordinator, Nutrition Coordinator, Transportation
Coordinator, FCS Staff, FCS Coordinator, Disabilities Coordinator, Mental Health
Coordinator, Head Start/Early Head Start Director, ERSEA Coordinator, and
Home Visitor (Performance Reviews)

      Within 30 days of my last anniversary date of hire.

      Used to create goals for professional development and to identify
       strengths and weaknesses.

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Performance Reviews)

      There are 7 standards that are evaluated for classified employees:

          o   Job skill level
          o   Productivity/ Quality of work
          o   Observance of work hours
          o   Communication Skills
          o   Working relationships
          o   Adaptability/Flexibility
          o   Observance of safety/health standards

For salaried staff there are standards to the teaching profession that are used to
develop goals.
                   Engages and supports all students in learning

                    Creates and maintains effective environments for student
                     learning

                    Understands and organizes subject matter for student
                     learning

                    Plans instruction and designs learning experiences for all
                     students

                    Assesses student learning

                    Develops as a professional educator




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The administrator meets with the employees to go over their evaluation, develop
their goals and objectives, and discuss strengths and needs.

Program Design and Management Question 7D

Does the program ensure that all full-time Education and Early Childhood
Development Head Start employees who provide direct services to children have
a professional development plan that is evaluated regularly to assess its impact
on teacher and staff effectiveness? 648A(f)

Staff Files: ECD Coordinator, Preschool Teacher, Infant and Toddler Teacher,
Family Child Care Provider, and Home Visitor (Staff Training and Development)

      Preschool teachers with child development permits create goals and work
       to meet those goals with projects and coursework as a part of their
       renewal process.

      As a part of their yearly evaluation employees create a goal and objectives
       to develop their skills and increase their effectiveness.

      Each year the program creates goals for staff development that are based
       on classroom needs program wide. Goals are implemented throughout
       the school year in monthly staff development meetings.

Interview: Teacher and Family Child Care Provider (Professional Development
Plans)

      Teachers created their own goals for their permit renewal.

      Teachers participate in the creation of goals for their annual evaluation.


Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Professional Development
Plans)

      Teachers create their own professional development plan as needed
       based on the schedule of their permit renewal.

      Education Specialists support staff as their professional growth advisors.

Program Design and Management Question 7E

Does the program obtain:
• Federal, State, or Tribal criminal record check covering all jurisdictions where
the grantee provides Head Start services to children;



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• Federal, State, or Tribal criminal record check as required by the law of the
jurisdiction where the grantee provides Head Start services; or
• Criminal record check as otherwise required by Federal law?
Staff Files: Bus Driver, Health Coordinator, Transportation Coordinator, Facilities
Coordinator, Disabilities Coordinator, FCS Coordinator, Mental Health
Coordinator, Preschool Teacher, Infant and Toddler Teacher, Family Child Care
Provider, Home Visitor, Head Start/Early Head Start Director, ERSEA
Coordinator, Fiscal Officer, ECD Coordinator, FCS Staff, and Nutrition

Coordinator (Staff Hiring Procedures)

      Live scans are on file for all employees and new hires are required to have
       a cleared live scan prior to beginning work.


Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Background Checks)

      All employees complete a criminal record statement required by licensing.

      All new hires have a live scan completed prior to starting work.

Document Review: Staff List of Criminal Record Check and Initial Health Exam
(Background Checks)

      Director has a spreadsheet listing each employee (classroom teachers,
       paraeducators, and support staff) which has dates for each employee’s
       criminal record form, health screening, live scan, and employee
       orientation including employee rights and awareness of policies and
       procedures.

Program Design and Management Question 7F

Does the program have documentation on each staff member's initial health
examination (including screening for tuberculosis) and periodic reexaminations
(as recommended by his or her health care provider or as mandated by State,
local, or Tribal laws)? 1304.52(k)(1)


Staff Files: Health Coordinator, Nutrition Coordinator, Transportation Coordinator,
Facilities Coordinator, Disabilities Coordinator, FCS Coordinator, Mental Health
Coordinator, Preschool Teacher, Infant and Toddler Teacher, Family Child Care
Provider, Home Visitor, Head Start/Early Head Start Director, ERSEA
Coordinator, Fiscal Officer, FCS Staff, and ECD Coordinator (Staff Hiring
Procedures)

      The health screen is a condition of employment for the district.


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      The health screen is currently held by all with some employees receiving
       notification that theirs needs to be renewed.

      All employees have their TB screening every 4 years. Those with positive
       results are required to receive a chest x-ray.


Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Initial Health Exams)

      Director has a spreadsheet containing each employee that has dates for
       each person’s criminal record form, health screening, live scan, employee
       orientation including employee rights and awareness of policies and
       procedures.

      Director has coordinated with Human Resources and provided the
       necessary forms so that as new employees are hired the needed forms
       will be completed.

Document Review: Staff List of Criminal Record Check and Initial Health Exam
(Initial Health Exams)

      The program director maintains these records and has a spreadsheet
       documenting the date of each employee’s health records.

      Copies of the employee health screening are kept at Human Resources in
       the district office.


Program Design and Management Question 7G

Is the Head Start Director or Early Head Start Director qualified for the position
through having demonstrated skills and abilities relevant to human services
program management? 1304.52(c)

Staff Files: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Staff Qualifications and
Expertise)

The Lancaster School District Director:

                    has a Masters Degree in Education in curriculum and
                     instruction.
                    has a multiple subjects teaching credential.
                    has a Program Director Permit.
                    has an Administrative Services Credential.



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                    has been an elementary school classroom teacher for 15
                     years.
                    taught preschool for 12 years.
                    has been an administrator for 4 years.
                    has a Parent Education Credential and worked with the Los
                     Angeles Correctional Facilities teaching parenting.
                    is an author of educational texts.
                    currently teaches college courses in early childhood.

Program Design and Management Question 7H

Does the program ensure that all staff abide by established standards of conduct
and address violations of these standards? 1304.52(i)(1), 1304.52(i)(1)(i),
1304.52(i)(1)(ii), 1304.52(i)(1)(iii), 1304.52(i)(1)(iv), 1304.52(i)(3)

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Standards of Conduct)

      The program das developed policies and procedures for standards of
       conduct and care and supervision. These policies and procedures include
       consequences for violations of these standards of conduct.

Interview: Teacher and Family Child Care Provider (Meals and Nutrition)

      Teachers report that they encourage children to taste new food and model
       tasting food for the children.

      Teachers report they do not require children to eat all of the offered food
       items.

      Teachers report that food is not used as a reward or as a punishment.

Observation: Health and Safety Center-based Observations and Health and
Safety Family Child Care Observations (Meals)

      Teachers model tasting new foods and talk about the taste and how good
       it is to encourage children to taste the food.

      Teachers talk about how the foods are good for their body to encourage
       children to try foods.

      Teachers do not use food as a punishment or as a reward.

Document Review: Code of Conduct

      Yes. The program has care and supervision policies and procedures that
       provide standards for conduct and consequences for violations.


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Program Design and Management Question 7I

Does the program provide opportunities for ongoing training and development for
all staff? 1304.52(l)(2), 1304.52(l)(3), 648A(a)(5), 1304.52(l)(5)

Staff Files: Health Coordinator, Nutrition Coordinator, Transportation Coordinator,
Facilities Coordinator, Disabilities Coordinator, FCS Coordinator, Mental Health
Coordinator, Preschool Teacher, Infant and Toddler Teacher, Family Child Care
Provider, Home Visitor, Head Start/Early Head Start Director, ERSEA
Coordinator, Fiscal Officer, FCS Staff, and ECD Coordinator (Staff Training and
Development)

      Trainings have been provided on math, literacy, conflict negotiation,
       science, I Am Moving I Am Learning, and social development.

Staff Files: Preschool Teacher, Infant and Toddler Teacher, and Family Child
Care Provider (Staff Training and Development)

      Teachers received 20 hours of classroom-focused professional
       development during the school year.

      In addition there were 4 full days of staff training also in classroom-
       focused professional development (IMIL and Social Development).

Interview: Teacher Interview (Social and Emotional Development)

      There has been ongoing training on Social skills and conflict negotiation
       led by the program Director who is also a local college instructor.

      The focus of trainings has been to provide children with positive
       messages.

Document Review: Training Plans and Policies

      The training that occurs before the school year starts includes Head Start
       performance standards and their job responsibilities. All staff attend this
       training.

      Representatives from the service areas attend LACOE meetings to be
       trained on any requirements.

Interview: Family Child Care Provider, ECD Coordinator, Fiscal Officer, Facilities
Coordinator, Health Coordinator, Nutrition Coordinator, Transportation
Coordinator, FCS Staff, FCS Coordinator, Disabilities Coordinator, Mental Health


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Coordinator, Head Start/Early Head Start Director, ERSEA Coordinator, and
Home Visitor (Training)

      LACOE monitors provide information and informal training on their
       monitoring visits to the program.

      LACOE trainings provide information and training on new requirements.

      Outside conferences and events are attended to provide knowledge and
       training to keep staff up to date on current and best practices.

Interview: ECD Coordinator (Training)

      A training schedule is created at the end of the prior year for the next
       school year.

      Trainings are scheduled based on goals for the program (refunding
       application goals, state DRDP goals, and teachers identified goals.

      Trainings include classroom-focused trainings, trainings on requirements,
       regulations, and compliance issues, and new employee trainings.

      All staff are trained at the start of the school year on universal precautions.

      Family service providers provide training for teachers on communicating
       with families.

      All teachers attend a minimum of 15 hours with the program providing 20
       hours during the work day, and an extra 4 paid full days of training during
       vacation breaks.

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Training)

      All staff require training to stay current with best practices. As a small
       program we utilize outside sources as well as sources within our program
       to keep everyone current. Employees are encouraged to attend outside
       conferences that are applicable to their field. Employees are also
       encouraged to attend LACOE meetings that provide them with vital
       information to their service area.

Program Design and Management Question 7J

Has the program established staff training that includes methods that comply with
applicable State and local laws for identifying and reporting child abuse and
neglect? 1304.52(l)(3)(i)



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Staff Files: Health Coordinator, Facilities Coordinator, Nutrition Coordinator,
Transportation Coordinator, Bus Driver, Disabilities Coordinator, FCS
Coordinator, Mental Health Coordinator, Preschool Teacher, Infant and Toddler
Teacher, Family Child Care Provider, Home Visitor, Head Start/Early Head Start
Director, ERSEA Coordinator, Fiscal Officer, FCS Staff, and ECD Coordinator
(Staff Training and Development)

      All staff receives training in child abuse reporting as they begin their
       employment with the program.

      All staff receive refresher training in child abuse at the start of each school
       year (August 10, 2009).

Document Review: Training Plans and Policies

      All staff are trained by the Mental Health and Disabilities Coordinator, or a
       school psychologist.

      Staff are trained regarding the law and what the specific requirements are
       for them to do when they have a suspicion.

      Staff are provided with the forms and needed guidelines to complete a
       report.

      Staff are provided with the phone number of the Mental Health and
       Disabilities Coordinator to call with any concerns and to discuss actions
       they need to take when they need to make a call or when they are unsure
       if they should make a call.


      The Mental Health and Disabilities Coordinator provides support for
       teachers throughout the process of making a child abuse report.

Interview: Bus Driver, Bus Monitor, Teacher, Family Child Care Provider, ECD
Coordinator, Facilities Coordinator, Health Coordinator, Nutrition Coordinator,
Transportation Coordinator, FCS Staff, FCS Coordinator, Disabilities
Coordinator, Mental Health Coordinator, Head Start/Early Head Start Director,
ERSEA Coordinator, and Home Visitor (Training)

      Staff received their training before the beginning of the school year and
       are able to describe the steps necessary to filing a report.

Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Training)

      Teachers are supported in making child abuse reports. Making child
       abuse reports can be a very upsetting experience for a teacher. The


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       Mental Health and Disabilities Coordinator supports teachers through
       phone calls and follow-up to help ease the tension they feel when they
       have to report a family. The Mental Health and Disabilities Coordinator
       and Family Service Providers will also follow up with families to help
       provide them with the support that they need whether it is parenting
       classes, support groups, or access to more services.


Program Design and Management
Program Strengths
Program Design and Management Question 8A

Describe grantee's strengths.
The PDM Reviewer is responsible for capturing information about potential
strengths from the grantee, regional office, and the review team by creating a
finding under PDM 8A (i.e., answer the compliance question PDM8A as “YES”).
All reports should have a potential area of strength identified. Please note that
verification of a strength does not require two modes of inquiry or evidence.


Interview: Head Start/Early Head Start Director (Program Strengths)

      The program has a strong support staff available to classroom staff to
       support them with curriculum development, behavioral issues, health
       concerns and issues, and family involvement.
      The program has a strong staff development plan for their staff and has
       provided in-service days bringing in outside nationally known speakers.

      Our director’s vast knowledge and experience. She has tremendous
       teaching experience and is able to provide quality training and support for
       teachers.

      We are aware of the need for working toward better coordination with our
       elementary school to improve that area of our program,

      We have strategic and structured personal development with a focus on
       meeting our programs goals and objectives.

      Our CDTs are In a true leadership role and develop their skills as a
       teacher by experience with providing leadership at their sites.

      We have a lot of community support for our agency with our kindergarten
       transition fair. Our fair is attended by the families in our program whose
       children are going to kindergarten the following year.




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      We have a child centered and developmentally appropriate curriculum.
       The leadership is devoted to providing a child centered program in which
       all children experience success.

      Our classrooms are located at our elementary school providing a bridge
       for children in the transition from preschool to kindergarten.

      We are building our parent literacy component through classroom
       libraries, parent literacy classrooms, parent backpacks, and parent
       checkout libraries.

      We are creating professional learning communities among our staff
       members.

Summary Analysis: Program Strengths

      The program has a great desire to provide a developmentally appropriate
       classroom environment to all children. The curriculum focus is on open
       ended activities that provide children with success in their learning and
       encourages them to develop of love of learning.

      The program has a very knowledgeable and experienced staff that are
       accessible to the classroom teachers. There are many special education
       professionals on staff to support children with special needs and children
       that are requiring the support of the R&R process.
      Although currently lacking a program coordinator, the program has a new
       Director that has a lot early childhood experience and knowledge. The
       Director is also a college instructor and able to provide very focused staff
       training to the employees.



 Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance
Eligibility and Enrollment
Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question 1A

Has the program enrolled children who were not 3 years of age at the time of
their enrollment or did not meet the eligibility requirements determined by the
local school district? 1305.4(a)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Program’s eligibility and enrollment
policy and procedures, Lancaster School District’s policy to determine eligibility
for public school entrance and policy on migrant families.


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      Based on the agency’s eligibility and enrollment policy the program has
       enrolled children who meet the age criteria for 3 & 4 year olds for the
       program year.
      Based on the community assessment, the agency’s refunding application
       does not outline specific services to migrant families.
      Agency does not operate an Early Head Start program option.

Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question1B

Does program staff verify each child's eligibility and include in each file a
statement signed by a program employee identifying the child's eligibility
category and the documents examined to determine eligibility? 1305.4(c),
1305.4(d), 1305.4(e)

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: eligibility policy and procedures, in-
house age/income eligibility review of children files, income calculation form and
grantee (LACOE) monitoring reports.
    Program’s policy and procedures includes the process of verification of
       families’ income.
    All Head Start files will maintain a signed statement from a Head Start
       employee verifying income and the documents used.
    All Head Start files will maintain appropriate documentation of age.
    Program will conduct an in-house file review at a minimum once a
       program year.
    Program monitors area by using the OHS protocols twice a year.



Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question 1C

Has the program enrolled children who are not categorically eligible or who fall
outside of the defined income eligibility requirements stated below? A child is
categorically eligible to participate in the Head Start program if the: • Child's
family income is below the poverty line, • Child's family is receiving public
assistance, • Child's family is homeless, or • Child is a foster child. Additional
income eligibility requirements include the following: • Ten percent of children
enrolled in the program may be over income. • An additional 35 percent of
children who are not categorically eligible may be from families whose income is
between 100 percent and 130 percent of poverty. 645(a)(1)(B)(iii)(II),
1305.4(b)(1), 1305.4(2)(b)(3)

Document Review


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The following documents were reviewed: Program’s eligibility policy and
procedures and the 2007 Head Start Act-Section 645. Grantees (LACOE)
procedures for the 130% poverty guidelines.
    The programs’ rational form is completed for all families enrolled in our
       Head Start Program.
    The Federal Income Guidelines are used annually to determine income
       eligibility.
    The programs’ policy and procedures are reviewed annually to ensure
       compliance with the Head Start Performance Standards.

Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question 1D

If the agency serves children whose family income falls between 100 percent and
130 percent of poverty, has it established and implemented outreach and
enrollment policies and procedures to first ensure it is meeting the needs of
children who meet one of the following criteria? • The child's family income is
below the poverty line. • The child's family is receiving public assistance. • The
child's family is homeless. • The child is a foster child. 645(a)(1)(B)(iii)(II)(aa),
645(a)(1)(B)(iii)(II)(bb), 1305.5(a)(b)(c)

Document Review/Interview
   To assure that the program is meeting the needs of children below the
     poverty line, recruitment strategies have been developed to actively recruit
     in areas of the most need. Priorities have been established for children,
     who are categorical eligible.
         o Agency’s Recruitment Policy and Procedures
         o Agency’s Enrollment Policy and Procedures.
         o Agency’s Eligibility Policy and Procedures.
   Children who are on the waiting list are enrolled as soon as an opening is
     available. The policy for ranking is followed for wait listing just as it is for
     enrollment.

Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question 1E

Do American Indian or Alaska Native grantees that enroll more than 10 percent
of over-income children meet the requirements in 1305.4(b)(3)(i), 1305.4(b)(3)(ii)
and 1305.4(b)(3)(iv)?

Document Review
This agency currently does not serve this particular population based on the
Community Assessment.




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Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question 1F

Does actual program enrollment include at least 10 percent children with
disabilities? 640(d)(1), 1305.6 (c)

Interview
     The percentage of children that are identified as having a disability (having
        an IEP) as well as children that are receiving intervention services is 39
        which is 13% of our enrolled children.

Document Review
The following documents were reviewed: Recruitment documentation, enrollment
records, children files, mental health referrals record, speech referrals record and
disabilities services tracking log.
    Agency is actively recruiting children with disabilities.
    We have enrolled children with disabilities and children who are receiving
        intervention services.
    We are continuing to revise our program to better meet the needs of
        children with disabilities within our community.

Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question 1G

Does the program have documentation to support monthly enrollment data
submitted to the Office of Head Start?
641A(h)(2)(A), 641A(h)(2)(B)

Document Review:
Yes based on the review of the following documents:
    Funded Slots to grantee
    GRS Vacancy reports
    Centralized computer system tracking vacancy
    GRS center based monthly reports submitted to LACOE

Attendance and Participation
Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question 2A

When monthly average daily attendance in center-based programs falls below 85
percent, are the causes of absenteeism analyzed? 1305.8(a)


Interview/Document Review:
Absenteeism is analyzed on an ongoing basis with changes to the policies and
procedures made as needed.


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The following documents were reviewed:
    Attendance Records weekly and monthly from teachers
    GRS attendance daily, weekly, monthly
    GRS center based monthly reports are reviewed and sent to LACOE.
    The agency is currently working to increase their averaged daily
       attendance to maintain the 85% threshold.

Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question 2B

Has the program ensured that no child's enrollment or participation in the Head
Start program is contingent on payment of a fee?

Interview: (Parent)
     Parent’s are not required to pay a fee to participate in the Head Start
        Program.

Document Review: ERSEA Policies and Procedures
   Our agency does not collect any payments or fees.

Program Options
Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question 3A

Does the program operate one or more of the approved program options in
accordance with applicable regulations? 1306.33(a)(1), 1306.33(a)(2), 1306.36,
1306.31(a), 1306.34(a)(2), 1306.32(b)(3), 1306.32(b)(2), 1306.35(a)(1)

Interview/Presite Review: Service Plans and Program Plans

At this time the agency does not operate a Home-base program option.
The agency chooses not to continue with its home base program option after 07-
08 program years. The agency operates a Center-based program option with no
more than 20 children enrolled in any one class.

Management Systems Analysis
Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and Attendance (ERSEA)
Question 4A
 This section lists a series of targeted questions not linked to a performance
standard at the service area level. These questions are designed to contribute to
a comprehensive analysis of the program’s management systems. Accordingly,
these questions appear in each protocol section and are completed for each
service area to provide insight into how key management systems function with
relationship to each service area.




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Targeted Question for Eligibility, Recruitment, Selection, Enrollment, and
Attendance (ERSEA) 4A

Interview: ERSEA Coordinator (Ongoing Monitoring and Oversight)

Currently the office assistant in charge of Head Start maintains records that
include prescreened children and families, completed registration packets,
waiting lists, transfer lists, and currently enrolled children. Recruitment is the
responsibility of the Family Service Providers who develop and maintain
community partnerships as a vehicle for recruiting families within the community.
Attendance is also monitored on an ongoing basis by the Administrative
Secretary.

      ERSEA policy and procedures,
      ERSEA Plan
      Written plan
      Spread sheets
      Our eligibility, recruitment, selection, enrollment, and attendance practices
       are monitored on an ongoing basis. If problems or weaknesses are
       discovered the person assigned to this area are corrected.

Summary Analysis: Reporting

      We are in the process of developing and refining our reporting systems.
       We use the following data management systems: GRS, Powerschool,
       CEL, as well as specific spreadsheets to track specific data for ERSEA.


Summary Analysis: Overall Service Summary

      We have great confidence in our staff and in their ability to oversee the
       ERSEA process.

Summary Analysis: Ongoing Monitoring

   We monitor recruitment, registration, enrollment, family needs through our
    various data management systems. The appropriate person follows up
    when an area is determined to need extra support.
Summary Analysis: Planning

      Based on the community assessment that is conducted every three years,
       staff incorporates its findings into program planning and implementation
       for three program years. Over the past 2 year Lancaster School District
       has been working with Dr. Alan Daley in implementing Appreciative Inquiry
       to help develop long-term goals and refocus the District. During the 2007-
       2008 school year a team of district staff crafted a new mission statement


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    and created the “Great Eight” areas of focus. The preschool staff was
    included in determining both the statement and focus areas. The school
    district is also working with Spring Board, a consultant group, to help
    improve student achievement.



   The Community Assessment document was developed by the Preschool
    Evaluation Advisory Committee (EAC). Once the EAC members complete
    a draft of the community assessment it is reviewed and approved by the
    School Board and Parent Advisory Committee (PAC).



   Community assessment information is used to determine the priority of
    selection for children entering the program as well as the location of
    classrooms around the school district. Information is also used to
    determine parent trainings, offers of services, and any changes that need
    to be made to the program.

   Program goal for this year is to improve the health and nutrition of the
    children and families in our program by strengthening the classroom
    curriculum and parent education. Staff development and training has
    been provided on an ongoing basis to improve staff knowledge of I Am
    Moving I Am Learning for implementation in the classroom. Parent
    information on healthy eating has been provided through a training from
    our nutritionist as well as information in the monthly parent newsletter.

   Program goal for this year is to promote ways to promote conflict
    negotiation skills among children thereby creating a peaceful community in
    the classroom. Staff training has been ongoing throughout the school year
    for teachers to improve their skills at supporting children’s development of
    conflict negotiation skills.

   Program goal for this year is to increase program funding through
    collaborations and partnerships. Staff has contacted outside agencies to
    collaborate with program needs. A local church group provided painting
    labor for some classrooms and another local agency is providing the
    materials for classroom gardens. A partnership was established with
    M.E.N.F.O.L.K. to encourage/support father involvement, AV Community
    Clinic provided a workshop on healthy eating at all of our site meetings.

   Program goal for this year is to develop an age appropriate curriculum in
    the areas of literacy and math. Staff development and ongoing training are
    provided for teachers on improving their classroom curriculum in literacy
    and math. Math curriculum has been enhanced through the addition of


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       Mathline, a district-wide math program. Materials and training have been
       provided to all staff for Mathline. The literacy curriculum has been
       enhanced through the addition of parent libraries and check out systems
       for books to read at home.

      Needs are identified through the Self assessment process, the DRDP
       findings, the ECERS results, the parent survey results, through PAC
       concerns. Identified needs are prioritized and addressed through goals on
       the refunding application, California Department of Education-State
       preschool goals. Goals are then reviewed and implementation of the
       goals is scheduled on the yearly program calendar to ensure that goals
       are met within the program year.

Summary Analysis: Planning

      We are in the process of updating and refining our ERSEA plans to better
       meet the needs of our families and community.

Summary Analysis: Record-Keeping

      We are in the process of refining the ERSEA process. We are improving
       to keep more thorough and accurate records for ERSEA.

Summary Analysis: Service Specific Strengths

      Using a visual chart provides us with accurate data that allows us to stay
       aware of our current enrollment status.
      The data management systems provide valuable information that is used
       by our personnel to fulfill the record keeping requirements for ERSEA.




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