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					MMO Game Development Database
        S511 – Database Design
          November 30, 2009

    Group Members of Game Crawler:

            Shanshan Chen
             Lillian Hergott
           Bobak Kechavarzi
           Sushmitha Paulraj
       I.       Project Description:

        In this day and age, Saturday nights are occupied with raiding, guild meetings, person-on-
person combat and excessive amounts of looting. This is not the description of some post-apocalyptic
dystopia, but rather a new culture that has emerged due to Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing
Games (MMORPGs, or MMOs). These online, persistent worlds have become a popular recreation
and general time-sink. Game developers are vying fervently to design the next World of Warcraft, the
most current popular “flavor” of MMOs. There are a multitude of factors to take into consideration
while designing these systems: gameplay focus, character progression, graphical style, and various
social components.
        This is where the implementation and utilization of a database can facilitate the design
process. Nick Yee and associates at the Daedalus Project (http://www.nickyee.com/daedalus) have
taken part in an ongoing study of the psychology and general social structure of gamers. In doing so,
they have collected data about individuals in this virtual society. The data itself consists of a wide
array of input. It covers facets such as player sociability, character aesthetic preferences, game world
preferences, time dedicated to playing, and group memberships, to name a few. The availability of
such information is a unique opportunity for game designers and developers.
        By conducting a demographic study of the wide and varied population of online gamers, there
has been a gargantuan amount of data collected. It can be refined into information that can allow one
to make educated conclusions about what gamers would like. Companies may like to have a database
designed that would allow them to perform queries across it to determine specific design parameters
for the next groundbreaking title. They may examine players that play within a particular threshold of
time a day and if they are interested in player versus player environments, or if they just enjoy
exploring the game world.
        This methodology allows a game company to remain intimately acquainted with their player
base. This may assist them delivering a product custom tooled to the populace that will embrace it.
Additionally, continuous surveys may be conducted over the lifecycle of the product to advice
developers on how to update or modify their content as time progresses. More importantly it allows a
continual contact and forges the way for more tooled and honed product for the target audience.

   II. List of Project Members/Description:

            Game Crawler is an organization that specializes in creating databases related to online
            gaming information and data. Here are the members of this organization and their job
            duties for this specific project:

       -       Shanshan Chen: wrote: database profile: narratives, business rules, Entity-Relationship
               Diagram (ERD), entities and relationship; involve in the database design and implement:
               created access survey forms and graphical reports in access database.

       -       Lillian Hergott: wrote: goals/weaknesses, edited major sections throughout project
               specification; created elementary structure of forms, designed logo, formatted
               database to have an aesthetic appeal
       -      Bobak Kechavarzi: wrote: project description, client profile, user profile, database
              assessment sections A and C; worked on building tables using C-Sharp to later be
              implemented, inserted data for table normalizations, imported and implemented menu
              system, implemented survey information functions on main menu.

       -      Sushmitha Paulraj: wrote: Database Information flow (before and after), database
              assessment section B; worked on pre populating the access database with 3000+
              records into individual tables; edited forms related to each table and designed the
              report after submitting the survey, created graphical reports in access database.


   III. Database Environment:

   A. Client Profile

    Video game companies often range from large conglomerations to small ventures. Developers,
programmers, PR specialists, artists, web developers, and even general systems administrators can
constitute a game company. All of these individuals work in concert to hopefully generate content
that their target audience finds desirable. They can all, in some way, interact with our database.
Employees can perform queries across the database that contains player preferences towards: game
aesthetics, group interactions, gameplay preferences (player versus player, player versus environment,
etc.), time dedication, and so on. Typically this information is done on a small scale and to target
audiences. By incorporating data across a large group of individuals, playing a variety of games, we
can widen the resolution of our target audience. Data would be updated on a fixed time schedule (bi-
monthly, annually, etc.) and similar queries could be conducted to observe the shifts in desires.
Game programmers would benefit from this system in a few ways:

   (1) It will provide a centralized location for all demographic information.
   (2) It will facilitate the development cycle for games, and generate those catered specifically to
       gamers.
   (3) Changes in data can be observed from every sampling date, noting changes in preferences.
   (4) Game mechanics can be optimized to fit the time constraints of player’s lives.


   The database will store information on the following:

      Subject information – general information about those taking the survey: Age, sex, online
       game preference.
      Time Information—how much time is typically spent in a game in general, in group activities
       (raids), and solo.
      Character aesthetics—Do players like collecting items that only change appearances and not
       statistics, is appearing powerful important for character design, etc.
      Many other categories (game motivation, player identity, negative social effects, etc.)
   B. Database Information Flow


Before Database Implementation:


   Game Designer        Uses      t Inherent Knowledge,   To   Propose and design
   &                                experience, wild           a unique game
   Subject Matter                   guesses and small          concept based on the
   Expert                           scale surveys              assumptions made




                                                               Implementation of
                                                               the design by
                                                               programmers and
                                         Is Affected           developers
                                         By




                                                                     Testing




                                     Success/Failure
                                                                    Deployment
After Database Implementation:


                                      Web Developer
                                      and Programmer




                                                  Uses

   Game designer        Uses      t MMO database with        To   Propose and design
                                    thousands of survey           a unique game
                                    results on gamers             concept based on the
                                    and their behaviorUses        database results


                                                  Uses

                                     System
                                     Administrator
                                                                  Implementation of
                                                                  the design by
                                                                  programmers and
                                                                  developers


                               Is solely responsible
                               by



                                                                        Testing




                                          Success                      Deployment
   C. User Profile

    Developers— A group of programmers and designers directly interact with the final product. They
may perform specialized queries against portions of the database to get insight into design decisions.
Developers are responsible for programming and coding sections of the game, including graphical
styles, artificial intelligence, interfaces, etc. They are typically younger and, because of their vocation,
comfortable with computers and technology. However, these individuals should not be removing or
modifying data inside the database. Instead they only have the ability to perform queries or retrieve
entries.

    PR specialists and Web Programmers— These individuals interact with potential customers or
game users. They develop advertisements, web pages, forums, etc. They provide materials to
generate “buzz” for a new game, market it, or provide gateways to game information. Similar to the
developers, this group would be comfortable with some technical aspects of database interactions.
They would have more interaction with the database; they would be able to add new entries. A form
would be provided on the game web page, or the company page, to allow individuals to take the
survey and add to the given information.

    General Systems Administrators— They maintain the web servers and the databases. They would
maintain other systems that store user privileges. This would be the only group to actually remove
entries from the demographic database. Ideally, the data would be stored and associated with a
particular time period that could be used for comparisons at some point, as opposed to being
discarded.


   IV. Goals & Objectives:

   A. Client/User Goals
          a. Be able to use the database to enter, store and access information about each
             individual gamer
                  i. Age, gender, time information, character, game preference, emotions
          b. Be able to general a report of information that is requested/needed in order to assist in
             future design plans for online games
          c. To be able to generate reports that provide information about:
                  i. All gamers surveyed
                 ii. Type of games, preferences
                iii. Time involved with games played
                iv. Emotions involved with playing games in relation to amount played, type, etc.
   B. Client/User Requirements (in reference to gamers that were surveyed)
          a. Information on subject: age, sex, online game preference
          b. Information regarding time: how much time is spent playing game (solo, group)
          c. Information regarding character aesthetics: appearances, design, color
         d. Other information that would be useful to designers of these online games (emotions
            felt by players, other demographic information)
   C. Database Goals
         a. To create a database that provides efficiency and functionality for the user in the most
            effective way
         b. To be able to make all of the content (demographic, psychographic, etc) about the
            players survived fully retrievable on the database for the users, as well as have the
            ability to manipulate the data if needed
         c. Designs should be implemented with the thought of the user in mind at all times and
            flexibility in the design process should be possible during and after the database is
            formed
         d. To make the company we are working with (online game designer) money (or time)
            and/or to save the company money through the use of the database
         e. To create a database that reaches the needs of the users while maintaining our own
            Game Crawler professional identity and abilities

   V. Database Profile:

Narratives:

      Survey respondent checks the description of the survey, including the purpose of these surveys
       and information about how their answers will be used.
      Each survey respondent completes basic demographic information survey and is assigned one
       respondent id.
      Survey respondent continues to answer survey information, including questionnaires that are
       designed to gather information about online gaming activities and preferences.
      Survey respondent finishes all the questionnaires included in the survey, and generates (at the
       completion of the survey) one summary of their answers.

Business Rules:

      One SURVEY has many QUESTIONS.
      Each QUESTION belongs to many SURVEYS.
      One RESPONDENT completes many SURVEYS.
      Each SURVEY is completed by many RESPONDENTS.
Entity-Relationship Diagram (ERD)




The ERD illustrates that a survey may contain any or all the question sets (Time_info,
Outside_game_tools, etc.). Each question set may be included in none, one, or more surveys. The
bridging entity of “contains” lists the information of what questions are in the survey(s).


Entities and relationship:

This database is based on the collection of data from a survey. Each respondent that takes the survey
will acquire a respondent ID number, which will be linked to all portions of their survey. There are a
total of nine different parts of this survey, covering a plethora of topics about online gaming and user
preferences. Each respondent will complete the survey to his/her ability, allowing the database to
collect vital information about online games and help designers make decisions about future projects.
The very first portion of the survey (Respondent table) is considered the ‘entrance’ to this survey
because that is where the respondentId (primary key) is initially introduced. This respodentId is
uniquely assigned to one specific respondent. In future surveys, the returning respondent would be
able to acquire their same respondentId from previous surveys.


Survey table

This table contains the surveyId and date on which the survey is designed. It stores all the survey
information as a pool. When a new survey is designed, it will be inserted into this table. Depending on
the time the respondent is taking a survey, a certain survey will be selected to be completed.

* Primary key in this table

FIELD                  DESCRIPTION                                 TYPE
surveyID*   Indicating which survey he/she is taking           Text


Data        Indicating the date when this survey is            Date/time
deployed    designed



Completes

This is a bridging entity. It stores the data of survey respondentId and surveyId, indicating who
complete which survey.

FIELD                  DESCRIPTION                                 TYPE
surveyID*         Indicating which survey he/she is taking       Text


RespondentId* RespondentId (assigned number)                     (auto Number)




Part 1 of Survey: Respondent table:

The respondent table is the initial table in this database design, which connects all the survey
information together. Each respondent received a respondentId number (primary key) which is then
combined with surveyId and linked to all of their answers for the survey. For this first table, personal
and demographic data of the respondents, such as gender and age, is stored. Also it requests the
information of favorite game played mostly for each respondent.

The RESPONDENT table has a many to many relationship with SURVEY, considering a person may take
future surveys and a survey is taken by multiple people.

FIELD             DESCRIPTION                                       TYPE
RespondentId* RespondentId (assigned number)                     (auto Number)


Gender            Male/Female                                    Male/Female


Age               How old are you?                               (respondent enters age)


Preferred         What game do you play?                         (select game from drop-down list)
Game
Other (Game)      Please enter game played if not in list.       (respondent enters game played)
Part 2 of Survey: Time_info table

This portion of the survey stores the information about time spent on game playing. The respondentId
serves as the only one unique id in this database design (which is not shown for repetitive purposes,
as stated above) and here primary key for table Time info is the combination of respodentId and
surveyId. This table also includes the attributes of hours, hours10, hours6, raid4, raid8, limittime,
spendtime, and their meanings as well as the possible answers are listed as below.

FIELD             DESCRIPTION                                    TYPE
RespondentId* RespondentId (assigned number)                  (auto Number)


surveyID*        Indicating which survey he/she is taking     Text


Hours            I spend about __ hours each week playing     (respondent enters amounts number)
                 the game.
hours10          Have you ever played continuously for 10     yes/no
                 hours?
hours6           Have you ever played continuously for 6      yes/no
                 hours?
raid4            Have you ever been in a raid / dungeon       yes/no
                 group that lasted for at least 4 hours?
raid8            Have you ever been in a raid / dungeon       yes/no
                 group that lasted for at least 8 hours?
limittime        How difficult would it be for you to limit   1:Not Difficult At All, 2:A little
                 your playing time?                           difficult, 3:Somewhat difficult, 4:Very
                                                              difficult, 5:Extremely difficult
spendtime        Do you spend more time than you think        1:Definitely not, 2:Probably not,
                 you should play the game?                    3:Maybe, 4:Probably, 5:Definitely
questionID       As one part of composite key; it represent   number
                 question group information




Part 3 of Survey: Outside_game_tools table

This table stores the information about the use of outside tools during the game playing, such as
whether players buy the virtual currency or items, or 3rd party macro, or character builder or
template. RespondentId with surveyId are still the primary key for this table. This table might be of
great significance for game design companies to make profits from games. The specific meanings for
each attribute in this table are listed below.


FIELD             DESCRIPTION                                     TYPE
RespondentId* RespondentId (assigned number)            (auto Number)

surveyID*        Indicating which survey he/she is      text
                 taking
buy              Have you ever bought virtual           yes/no
                 currency or items?
macro            Have you ever used a third-party       yes/no
                 macro in an MMORPG?
template         How often do you use a character       1:Never, 2: Seldom, 3:Sometimes,
                 builder or a template to plan out      4:Often, 5:Always
                 your character's advancement at
                 an early level?
questionID       As one part of composite key; it       number
                 represent question group
                 information



Part 4 of Survey: Character_aesthetics table

This table investigates the character information about the role that game players play in the game.
For example, desirability to change roles, how to customize the looks of the character, and similar
question about the character/game roles are stored in this table.

FIELD             DESCRIPTION                                     TYPE
RespondentId* RespondentId (assigned                 (auto Number)
              number)

surveyID*        Indicating which survey he/she      Text
                 is taking

oppgen           Has your main character ever        yes/no
                 been a character of the
                 opposite gender?
collecting       How much do you enjoy               1:Not at all, 2:A little, 3:Some, 4:A
                 collecting distinctive objects or   lot, 5:A great deal
                 clothing that have no
                 functional value in the game?
customize        How much time do you spend          1:Not at all, 2:A little, 3:Some, 4:A
                 customizing your character          lot, 5:A great deal
                 during character creation?
lookunique       How important is it to you that   1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly
                 your character looks different    important, 3:Moderately important,
                 from other characters?            4:Very important, 5:Tremendously
                                                   important
matchcolor        How important is it to you that 1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly
                  your character's armor / outfit important, 3:Moderately important,
                  match in color and style?        4:Very important, 5:Tremendously
                                                   important
roleplay          How often do you role-play       1:Never, 2: Seldom, 3:Sometimes,
                  your character?                  4:Often, 5:Always
roles             Trying out new roles and         1:Not enjoyable at all, 2:Slightly
                  personalities with your          enjoyable, 3:Moderately enjoyable,
                  characters.                      4:Very enjoyable, 5:Tremendously
                                                   enjoyable
explore           Exploring every map or zone in 1:Not enjoyable at all, 2:Slightly
                  the world.                       enjoyable, 3:Moderately enjoyable,
                                                   4:Very enjoyable, 5:Tremendously
                                                   enjoyable
optimize          How important is it to you that 1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly
                  your character is as optimized   important, 3:Moderately important,
                  as possible for their profession 4:Very important, 5:Tremendously
                  / role?                          important
questionID        As one part of composite key; it number
                  represent question group
                  information
Part 5 of Survey: Player_interaction table

This table summarizes all the possible interaction between game players in the game process. It covers
both mental and physical interactions. This portion of the survey questions both positive and negative
emotions/actions that players interact with other players through game play. It offers designers and
researchers a perspective of communication between the game players during the game playing
process.

FIELD             DESCRIPTION                                     TYPE
RespondentId* RespondentId (assigned number)             (auto Number)

surveyID*        Indicating which survey he/she is       text
                 taking
Flirt            Have you ever flirted with              yes/no
                 someone in the game that you
                 didn't know in RL?
Help             Helping other players.               1:Not enjoyable at all, 2:Slightly enjoyable,
                                                      3:Moderately enjoyable, 4:Very enjoyable,
                                                      5:Tremendously enjoyable
Know             Getting to know other players.       1:Not enjoyable at all, 2:Slightly enjoyable,
                                                      3:Moderately enjoyable, 4:Very enjoyable,
                                                      5:Tremendously enjoyable
Chatting         Chatting with other players.         1:Not enjoyable at all, 2:Slightly enjoyable,
                                                      3:Moderately enjoyable, 4:Very enjoyable,
                                                      5:Tremendously enjoyable
competing        Competing with other players.        1:Not enjoyable at all, 2:Slightly enjoyable,
                                                      3:Moderately enjoyable, 4:Very enjoyable,
                                                      5:Tremendously enjoyable
Killing          Dominating/killing other players.    1:Not enjoyable at all, 2:Slightly enjoyable,
                                                      3:Moderately enjoyable, 4:Very enjoyable,
                                                      5:Tremendously enjoyable
Annoy            Doing things that annoy other        1:Not enjoyable at all, 2:Slightly enjoyable,
                 players.                             3:Moderately enjoyable, 4:Very enjoyable,
                                                      5:Tremendously enjoyable
converse         How often do you find yourself       1:Never, 2: Seldom, 3:Sometimes, 4:Often,
                 having meaningful conversations      5:Always
                 with other players?
personal         How often do you talk to your        1:Never, 2: Seldom, 3:Sometimes, 4:Often,
                 online friends about your personal   5:Always
                 issues?
Support          How often have your online friends   1:Never, 2: Seldom, 3:Sometimes, 4:Often,
                 offered you support when you had     5:Always
                 a real life problem?
provoke          How often do you purposefully try    1:Never, 2: Seldom, 3:Sometimes, 4:Often,
                 to provoke/Irritate other players?   5:Always
questionID       As one part of composite key; it     number
                 represent question group
                 information

Part 6 of Survey: Game_design table

This table focuses on the game players’ perception on the game design mechanism. With this kind of
information, both of the designers of game and researchers who conduct this study identify more
about game players and unique patterns associated with particular games. The specific meanings for
each attribute in this table are listed below. The primary key is still the Respondent ID number with
surveyId.

FIELD             DESCRIPTION                                    TYPE
RespondentId* RespondentId (assigned number)                       (auto Number)
surveyID*        Indicating which survey he/she is taking            text


percents         How interested are you in the precise numbers       1:Not interested at all,
                 and percentages underlying the game                 2:Slightly interested,
                 mechanics? (i.e, chance of dodging an attack,       3:Somewhat interested,
                 the math comparing dual-wield to two-handed         4:Very interested,
                 weapons, etc.)                                      5:Extremely interested
findstuff        How much do you enjoy finding quests, NPCs or       1:Not at all, 2:A little,
                 locations that most people do not know about?       3:Some, 4:A lot, 5:A great
                                                                     deal
mechanics        Knowing as much about the game mechanics            1:Not important at all,
                 and rules as possible.                              2:Slightly important,
                                                                     3:Moderately important,
                                                                     4:Very important,
                                                                     5:Tremendously important
questionID       As one part of composite key; it represent          number
                 question group information




Part 7 of Survey: Group_preference table

This table surveys on a person’s group preference, their leadership tendency when playing in a group
and their attitude to their performance in a group. The specific meanings for each attribute in this
table are listed below. This information is quite crucial to game designers, allowing insight to
preferences towards completing quests in groups players or by themselves (solo). The primary key is
still the Respondent ID number with surveyId.

FIELD             DESCRIPTION                                     TYPE
RespondentId* RespondentId (assigned             (auto Number)
              number)
surveyID*        Indicating which survey         text
                 he/she is taking
group1           Would you rather be grouped     1:Much rather solo, 2:Rather solo, 3:In-Between,
                 or soloing?                     4:Rather group, 5:Much rather group
group2           How important is it to you      1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly important,
                 that your character can solo    3:Moderately important, 4:Very important,
                 well?                           5:Tremendously important
group3           How much do you enjoy           1:Not at all, 2:A little, 3:Some, 4:A lot, 5:A great
                 working with others in a        deal
                 group?
leadgroup         How much do you enjoy              1:Not at all, 2:A little, 3:Some, 4:A lot, 5:A great
                  leading a group?                   deal
takecharge        How often do you take charge       1:Never, 2: Seldom, 3:Sometimes, 4:Often,
                  of things when grouped?            5:Always
cguild            Being part of a friendly, casual   1:Not enjoyable at all, 2:Slightly enjoyable,
                  guild.                             3:Moderately enjoyable, 4:Very enjoyable,
                                                     5:Tremendously enjoyable
sguild            Being part of a serious,           1:Not enjoyable at all, 2:Slightly enjoyable,
                  raid/loot-oriented guild.          3:Moderately enjoyable, 4:Very enjoyable,
                                                     5:Tremendously enjoyable
questionID        As one part of composite key;      number
                  it represent question group
                  information


Part 8 of Survey: Player_identity table

This table is about the identity of the game player (respondent) in the real world (nongame world).
Thus, some kind of comparative study on people in real-world and virtual game world may be
conducted. This portion of the survey allows respondents to provide insight on how the user’s feel and
are established through their character. The specific meanings for each attribute in this table are listed
below. The primary key is still the Respondent ID number with surveyId.


FIELD              DESCRIPTION                                        TYPE
RespondentId* RespondentId                 (auto Number)
              (assigned number)

surveyID*         Indicating which         Text
                  survey he/she is
                  taking
level             Leveling up your         1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly important,
                  character as fast as     3:Moderately important, 4:Very important,
                  possible.                5:Tremendously important
powerful          Becoming powerful.       1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly important,
                                           3:Moderately important, 4:Very important,
                                           5:Tremendously important
accumulate        Accumulating             1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly important,
                  resources, items or      3:Moderately important, 4:Very important,
                  money.                   5:Tremendously important
recognition       How important is it      1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly important,
                  to you to be well-       3:Moderately important, 4:Very important,
                  known in the game?       5:Tremendously important
selfsufficient    Having a self-           1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly important,
                  sufficient character.    3:Moderately important, 4:Very important,
                                           5:Tremendously important
questionID        As one part of           number
                  composite key; it
                  represent question
                  group information

Part 9 of Survey: Game_motivation table

This table mainly focuses on game players’ motivation to play the game. Based this information, game
designer could know the reason why their games attract so many players. Essentially, improved
designs could be derived and some cues to deal with game addiction might be revealed. The specific
meanings for each attribute in this table are listed below. The primary key is still the Respondent ID
number with surveyId.

FIELD             DESCRIPTION                                      TYPE
RespondentId* RespondentId (assigned number)                 (auto Number)

surveyID*         Indicating which survey he/she is taking Text

immersed          Being immersed in a fantasy world.         1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly
                                                             important, 3:Moderately important,
                                                             4:Very important, 5:Tremendously
                                                             important
escaping          Escaping from the real world.              1:Not important at all, 2:Slightly
                                                             important, 3:Moderately important,
                                                             4:Very important, 5:Tremendously
                                                             important
exploreworld      How much do you enjoy exploring the        1:Not at all, 2:A little, 3:Some, 4:A
                  world just for the sake of exploring it?   lot, 5:A great deal
avoid             How often do you play so you can avoid     1:Never, 2: Seldom, 3:Sometimes,
                  thinking about some of your real-life      4:Often, 5:Always
                  problems or worries?
relax             How often do you play to relax from        1:Never, 2: Seldom, 3:Sometimes,
                  the day's work?                            4:Often, 5:Always
questionID        As one part of composite key; it           number
                  represent question group information



Part 10 of Survey: Negative_social_effects table

This portion surveys all kinds of possible negative social effects (in the real world not game world) that
could result from these types of games. The details of this survey and possible choices for each
question are listed as below. The primary key is still the Respondent ID number with surveyId.

FIELD                 DESCRIPTION                                 TYPE
RespondentId*              RespondentId (assigned               (auto Number)
                           number)
surveyID*                   Indicating which survey he/she is   text
                            taking
agitated                    How agitated do you get if the      1:Not agitated at all, 2: A little
                            servers go down unexpectedly?       agitated, 3:Somewhat agitated,
                                                                4:Very agitated, 5: Extremely agitated
complain                    How often do your friends or        1:Never, 2: Seldom, 3:Sometimes,
                            family members complain about       4:Often, 5:Always
                            your game play behavior?
happiness                   How much of your happiness in       1:None of it, 2:A small amount, 3:A
                            life currently is derived from      moderate amount, 4:A large amount,
                            playing the game?                   5:All of it
socialsuffer                Have your personal relationships    1:Not at all, 2:Mildly, 3:Somewhat,
                            suffered because of your game-      4:Strongly, 5:Severely
                            play?
worksuffer                  Has your work/school                1:Not at all, 2:Mildly, 3:Somewhat,
                            performance suffered because of     4:Strongly, 5:Severely
                            your game play?
tryquit                     Have you tried to quit the game     yes/no
                            but was unsuccessful?
questionID                  As one part of composite key; it    number
                            represent question group
                            information


List of Database tasks to be performed:

            o Allow users to complete the full survey, starting from one form (table) and proceeding
              to next form (table) until all data is captured (all forms are completed)
            o Create a survey through a series of forms (categorized by subject manner) that
              respondent’s are able to complete
            o Create formal reports that provide data that is relevant for game designers
            o Allow game designers to access the database and retrieve specific information from the
              collected data that is relevant to their needs




   VI. Database Assessment:
A. Validation of Database against client/user/database Objectives

     a. Database have the ability to store and access information about each individual
        gamer that was surveyed
     b. System is capable of generating reports that are relevant to the client’s needs as
        game designers, and will help in decision-making processes for game designs
     c. System has eliminated the need for client to tediously look through surveyed
        information to extract data that is needed, the database is able to do this for
        them
     d. Database offers efficient and uniform method of storing and accessing gamer
        information
B. Weaknesses and Limitations of current implementation:

       a. The database is of utmost use only during the initial phase of the Game
          development where the database information could help in conceiving the
          Game Genre and design.
       b. The database is restricted only to the specific Game development company
          even though the data within the database are not specific to the company.
       c. Only the system administrator has the right to modify/delete/update the
          database information.
       d. As the database information comes from random survey of Gamers the
          credibility of the data may be of concern.

C. Future Changes and Upgrades

   a. Shift database to postgres or MySQL. Database size would eventually become
      inefficient in Access
   b. Provide a web portal that allows any individual or researcher to see available data.
   c. Provide interactive data representations.
   d. Add regional information to the database:
          o Country of origin, state, etc.
          o Time zone
   e. Add more demographic/personal information:
          o Education
          o Career/Job title
          o Income range
          o Relationship status (single, married, in a relationship, divorced, etc.)
          o Location (city, state, country)
          o Other types (non-online) games interested in

   f. Expand model to incorporate information from multiple genres of video games
      and/or multiple surveys

				
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