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					     Telecom Research at Rutgers
             University




                           Fred S. Roberts
                           Director, DIMACS
                           froberts@dimacs.rutgers.edu
July 11, 2003   Commission on Jobs Growth and       1
                   Economic Development
                                    Outline
• What is Telecom?
• The research players and their background
• A selection of research topics suggested by Rutgers
  faculty
   – Short synopsis
   – Food for thought; aimed at stimulating discussion




  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and      2
                         Economic Development
                   What is Telecom?
The set of
technologies and        Communications                Information
sciences at the
intersection of
communications,
information, and                      Telecom
computing


                                        Computing



   July 11, 2003      Commission on Jobs Growth and                 3
                         Economic Development
                  What is Telecom?
• 20th century: transport, switching, and storage of
  narrowband voice and data
• 21st century? Reasonable goal: fully integrated
  and networked broadband multimedia including:
  –   data of all types
  –   text, images, audio, video
  –   virtual reality
  –   searchable, browseable multimedia documents
  –   shared reality tele-collaboration

  July 11, 2003      Commission on Jobs Growth and   4
                        Economic Development
                  What is Telecom?
So: telecom is all about networks:
• interconnections of networks (e.g., the Internet)
• operation and maintenance of networks
• things that make up networks (routers, hubs,
  switches)
• things that get moved around networks (data,
  text, voice, images, video, …)
• things that attach to networks (devices, sensors,
  monitors)
• services that run on networks
  July 11, 2003      Commission on Jobs Growth and   5
                        Economic Development
                                    Outline
• What is Telecom?
• The research players and their background
• A selection of research topics suggested by Rutgers
  faculty
   – Short synopsis
   – Food for thought; aimed at stimulating discussion




  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and      6
                         Economic Development
                  Major Hubs of Telecom
                   Research at Rutgers
CAIP (Center for Advanced Information
  Processing)
DIMACS (Center for Discrete Mathematics and
  Theoretical Computer Science)
WINLAB (Wireless Information Laboratory)
Computer Science Dept.
Statistics Dept.
  July 11, 2003      Commission on Jobs Growth and   7
                        Economic Development
                          CAIP
• Established by NJCST in 1985
• Mission: industrial applications of advanced computing
  technologies
• Industry partners:
  AT&T, Avaya, Cisco, Datacube, Fujitsu, General Motors, IBM,
  InfoValue, Intel, Iscan, Kodak, Lucent, NEC, NIST, Oracle, OSS
  Nokalva, Panasonic, Sarnoff, Siemens, SpeechWorks, SUN,
  Telcordia, Texas Inst., CECOM, Picatinny Arsenal, Verizon,
  Xybernaut
• University partners:
  UMDNJ, NJIT, Princeton, Stanford, MIT, Johns Hopkins, CMU,
  Colorado, Cal Tech, Columbia, New Mexico State
• 86 faculty, visiting scientists, staff, and students
  July 11, 2003      Commission on Jobs Growth and          8
                        Economic Development
                    Telecom-related Research at CAIP
•   Multimodal interfaces (NSF)
•   Image and speech pattern recognition (DOD)
•   VLSI design (NJCST)
•   Bio/nano mechatronics (NSF)
•   Applications to homeland security (DOD, CECOM)
•   SiC semiconductors (DARPA, Union Carbide)
•   Collaborative networking (DOD, NSF)
•   Distributed grid computing (NSF)
•   Data visualization (NSF)
•   Telemedicine/rehabilitation (NSF, Novartis)
•   Virtual environments (NSF)
•   Speech production (NIH)
    July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and   9
                             Economic Development
                    Telecom-related Research at
                    CAIP: Future Opportunities
•   Natural communication with information systems.
•   Virtual environments for collaboration
•   Internet delivery of rehabilitative therapies
•   Autonomic grid computing
•   Systems and sensors on a chip
•   Detection of radioactive materials
•   Human imaging for dosimetry analysis
•   Low bit-rate communication for security

    July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and   10
                           Economic Development
                   CAIP Cumulative Impacts:

• External Contract Funding:                            $55M
($17M in current contracts)
• Ph.D.’s and MS’s graduated:                           213
• Patents filed:                                         80
• Startup companies assisted:                            20+
• CAIP spinoff companies created:                         3
• Small business outreach, new jobs:                    100+

   July 11, 2003        Commission on Jobs Growth and          11
                           Economic Development
                     DIMACS
• The importance of discrete math and theoretical CS
  (algorithm development) led Rutgers, Princeton, AT&T
  Bell Labs, and Bellcore to develop strong research
  groups
• In 1988, they joined to form DIMACS
• Telecommunications: AT&T Labs, Bell Labs,
  Telcordia, Avaya
• Computing: NEC Research, IBM Research, Microsoft
  Research, HP Labs (Princeton)
• 1989: prestigious NSF “science and technology center”
  award. $10M grant largest at Rutgers. NJCST played
  important role.
  July 11, 2003    Commission on Jobs Growth and   12
                      Economic Development
                    Telecom-related Research at
                            DIMACS
• next generation networks technologies
• computational information theory and coding
• communication security
• simulations of communication architectures
• computer-aided verification of software
• massively parallel computing
• massive data sets
• applications of large scale discrete optimization to
  communication networks
• cryptography
• complexity of interactive computing
    July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and    13
                           Economic Development
                  Telecom-related Research at
                         DIMACS - II
telecom researchers find new applications of their
   methods:
• homeland security research
• epidemiology/public health
• computational biology
• DNA computing




  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and   14
                         Economic Development
                  Telecom Research at DIMACS
• More than $50M in external funding for research and
  education program at DIMACS since its inception
• NSF, ONR, NSA, NIH, DARPA, ICMIC (intelligence
  community), Sloan Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome
  Fund, NJCST, numerous companies.
• Solution of Gilbert-Pollak conjecture led to highly
  efficient heuristics for design of communication
  networks.
• Pioneer in field of computer-aided verification;
  methods now used widely by Intel, Sun, Motorola,
  AT&T, Lucent.
• Simulation software for the global internet adopted by
  more than 40 companies/universities.
  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and   15
                         Economic Development
                  Telecom Research at DIMACS
• Work on error-correcting codes led to new techniques
  for the design of efficicient encoders and decoders.
• A remarkably simple on-line algorithm for bin packing
  small information packets of varying sizes into bins of
  fixed capacity.
• Powerful cryptographic methods for secure authorized
  access.
• The “players” at DIMACS
   – 230 scientists from partner universities and
     companies
   – partner company scientists directly involved in
     DIMACS projects
   – more than 1000 visitors a year
  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and   16
                         Economic Development
                      WINLAB
• Founded in 1989
• Broad experimental and theoretical expertise in wireless
  technologies
• Broad collaborative experience with industry:
   – about 20 industry sponsors
   – major partners brought into NJ include Intel, Nortel,
     Thomson, Samsung, NTT, Sprint, Motorola,
     Mitsubishi, …
• Implementing technology transfer through both sponsor
  companies and startups

  July 11, 2003     Commission on Jobs Growth and    17
                       Economic Development
                    Telecom Research at WINLAB
•   Freebits -- short range ultra high speed communications
•   NJ Center for Wireless Communication
•   4th Generation Radio Resource Management
•   Adaptive Networking for 3rd Generation Cellular
•   Security in Next Generation Wireless
•   Dynamic Spectrum Management
•   First Generation of MUSE sensor program
•   Research Wireless Testbed
•   Cognitive Network Management


    July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and   18
                           Economic Development
                  Telecom Research at WINLAB
• Pioneer in “hot spot” wireless networking technology
  now appearing at Starbucks, McDonalds, etc. through
  its “infostations” program. Going out to startups and
  Army STTR tech transfer.
• ~20 faculty/staff + ~40-50 students
• Currently over $2M a year in funding.
• This year won IEEE Marconi and William R. Bennett
  Awards




  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and   19
                         Economic Development
 WINLAB: Implications for the Future
• Wireless is fastest growing segment of telecom.
   – Almost 500M cell phones sold/year.
   – 1/3 of calls in US are already wireless, not wired (FCC).
   – 148M US subscribers,~ half the population. (FCC).
   – $76B Wireless revenues in 2002; 30% of telecom (FCC).
   – Wireless Data devices market expected to be $10B+ by end of
     2003.
   – 21M American users of Wireless Hot Spots by 2007 (IBM).
      • 6,300 global hotspots in 2001; expect 114,000 by 2006.
        (IBM).
• NJ needs a world-class center of expertise in all major
  areas of wireless communications.
  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and        20
                         Economic Development
Economic Impact of Wireless Research in NJ
 • 100’s of new high tech jobs/year via startups and
   partnerships.
 • Retain high tech talent in NJ.
 • Train and retain the best students.
 • Diversify the telecom industrial base in NJ
   through diverse wireless end-user applications, not
   just the traditional (and now stagnant) core
   infrastructure.

 July 11, 2003                                      21
                                    Outline
• What is Telecom?
• The research players and their background
• A selection of research topics suggested by Rutgers
  faculty
   – Short synopsis
   – Food for thought; aimed at stimulating discussion




  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and      22
                         Economic Development
                      Multimodal Integrated
Sensor          RF
                     Wireless Sensor on-Silicon
    Modem/CPU
                              (MUSE)
                     (WinLAB, ECE, BME, CS, UMDNJ, GaTech)
• Today, sensors are individual units as transistors once
  were.
   – Temperature, pressure, light, chemicals, etc.
   – Expensive controllers, readouts, and
     communications
   – Usually physically large and often hand-made.

• With new technology, we should be able to link
  sensors in complex networks to gather information in
  new ways.
    July 11, 2003        Commission on Jobs Growth and   23
                            Economic Development
                   Multimodal Integrated
                  Wireless Sensor on-Silicon
                           (MUSE)
• Networks of Sensors:
  – Applications to medicine, consumer, environment,
    security, military, etc.
  – Need new wireless networking technology
  – Need ultra-low cost sensors and controllers
     • New sensor technology that can measure many
       properties
     • Ultra low power electronics, algorithms, and
       protocols
     • All on one chip, reusing as much of integrated
       circuit technology as possible
  July 11, 2003     Commission on Jobs Growth and   24
                       Economic Development
                   Multimodal Integrated
                  Wireless Sensor on-Silicon
                           (MUSE)
• Low Cost, Wireless Networked Sensors
   – Strongly multidisciplinary program
   – Draws in all levels of technology from devices to
     networks to applications and security.
   – Build on strengths of the partners and ongoing
     programs.
   – Too large to tackle without cohesive program with a
     shared vision and strong core funding.


  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and   25
                         Economic Development
                   Multimodal Integrated
                  Wireless Sensor on-Silicon
                           (MUSE)
• Economic impact for NJ
   – Market for integrated sensors estimated at $3B in
     2005 and $10B in 2010
      • This is before security adders or changes in
        military needs.
   – Can build on existing industrial partnerships and
     experience to make the technology transfer happen.


  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and   26
                         Economic Development
                   Locating Mobile Users
• Estimating the location of wireless communications
  users attracts huge attention
• Applications include
   – location-aware services
      • finding the nearest vending machine or printer
      • finding the nearest buyer or seller in a market of
        buyers and sellers
      • in a museum setting, presenting artifact-specific
        descriptions on a handheld device
      • locating a misplaced handheld device


   July 11, 2003      Commission on Jobs Growth and     27
                         Economic Development
                   Locating Mobile Users
• Other applications:
  – emergency location
     • identifying the room location
       of a crime victim
     • in a prison setting, locating a
       distressed guard
  – access control
     • blocking access to a Wi-Fi
       network from outside a
       building
     • blocking access for specific
       users from specific locations

   July 11, 2003      Commission on Jobs Growth and   28
                         Economic Development
                Locating Mobile Users

 • Team from Rutgers (Statistics Dept.) and Avaya
   Inc. (wireless expertise) have developed novel and
   highly sophisticated statistical algorithms unlike
   any of the existing approaches
 • Substantially more accurate location estimation
   with dramatically less training data
 • Immediate application in enterprise settings


July 11, 2003      Commission on Jobs Growth and   29
                      Economic Development
                Locating Mobile Users

• Every major telecommunications company
  working on this problem
• Tremendous commercial potential
• Avaya team has significant experience with
  wireless technology and markets
• Rutgers has a long track record of funding and
  innovation in statistical methods
• Urgent need for seed funding for experimentation
  and software development

July 11, 2003     Commission on Jobs Growth and      30
                     Economic Development
                   Massive Data Analysis Lab
                         (MassDAL)
• Agenda: Gather,
  manage and process
  massive data logs----
  Web, IP/wireless
  traffic data, location
  trajectories of objects,
  sensor readings of
  physical world.

   July 11, 2003        Commission on Jobs Growth and   31
                           Economic Development
                     Massive Data Analysis Lab
                           (MassDAL)
• Key Challenges:
   – Scale: Beyond the traditional “human” scale. Eg., IP data
     at a single router interface for an hour exceeds total
     yearly worldwide credit card transactions!
   – Data Collection: probes/sensors with associated data
     quality and communication problems.
• Need breakthroughs in Mathematics, Algorithms, Systems
  and Engineering, to meet these challenges.
• Potential: Major impact in Telecom, Transportation and
  Society-at-large.

     July 11, 2003        Commission on Jobs Growth and   32
                             Economic Development
                  State of MassDAL
• Engineering:
  – Consulting in analysis of wireless network logs. Client: AT&T
    Wireless, 3rd largest in US, 20 Million customers.
    Terabytes/month. Current value: $3M per year. 5 pers. Fully
    operational, telco-grade! Interest from Cingular wireless.
  – Incorporated novel algorithms in operational IP network data
    analysis tools. Current partner: AT&T. Potential partner: Lucent.
• Mathematics and Computer Science.
  – Algorithms, Databases, Statistics, and Data Mining on novel
    models and algorithms.
  – Supported by NSF grants. Partners: Rutgers CS, DIMACS,
    MIT.
  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and          33
                         Economic Development
                  State of MassDAL (Contd)
• Science
   – Developing wearable sensors for
     tracking location of objects as well as
     “interactions” between objects.
   – Current partner: Telcordia. Their initial
     investment: $300K/3 months (est).
     Potential partner in works: Los Alamos
     National Lab.
   – Potential: Analysis of social networks
     for Epidemiology and Homeland
     Security.
  July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and   34
                         Economic Development
                   Future of MassDAL
• Research: Need breakthrough research in mathematics,
  systems, databases, algorithms, sensor networking.
• Expand data domains.
   – Potential partners: Google, NJ auto insurance fraud data, USPTO
     patent data, AWS location trajectories, etc.
• Build state-of-art facility at Rutgers.
   – Secure, 24x7, data hosting and analysis infrastructure capable of
     gathering and processing petabytes of data/month across
     domains, data sources, etc. Unique in the world!
• Potential.
   – Every wireless, telecom, internet service provider is looking to
     farm out this crucial piece of their operations. Estimated market
     for these services: 100’s of millions in US $ per year. Crucial for
     NJ State. Interest from multiple VCs now.
   July 11, 2003        Commission on Jobs Growth and            35
                           Economic Development
                   Visualizing, Monitoring, and
                    Analyzing Network Data
                     (Statistics Dept. and Avaya Labs)
• Communication networks are widespread.
• Typical data provides a partial view of flow-data (e.g.,
  on links)
• Analyzing network data is important in:
   – network planning and design
   – monitoring flaws
   – measuring reliability parameters
   – determining suitability of the network for different
     transmission functions (voice, data, voice over IP…)
   July 11, 2003          Commission on Jobs Growth and   36
                             Economic Development
                   Visualizing, Monitoring, and
                    Analyzing Network Data
                         Challenges
• Network data is complex and of high dimensionality.
• Statistical methods for analyzing network data are few
  and far between.
• Visualizing data helps us to spot trends quickly.
• Need is to develop high quality, practical, statistical and
  data analytic tools for understanding data from partial
  views and limited measurements.


   July 11, 2003        Commission on Jobs Growth and    37
                           Economic Development
                   Visualizing, Monitoring, and
                    Analyzing Network Data
• Results potentially useful for other kinds of networks:
  transportation, social, …
• Such tools of great importance in telecom.
• Research in this area already funded through NSF and
  NSA
• New methods/products should be very useful to NJ
  companies.



   July 11, 2003        Commission on Jobs Growth and   38
                           Economic Development
Self-Healing Dependable Computing
• Computer, Heal Thyself
  – Scientific American, July 2003
• We need systems that
  – monitor themselves
  – adjust hardware and software
    configurations to match demand
  – predict and diagnose problems and
    effect repairs
  – defend against hacker attacks
 July 11, 2003   Commission on Jobs Growth and   39
                    Economic Development
                   Self-Healing Dependable Computing
                                   Key Concerns
• Susceptibility to attack
   – Do denial-of-service attacks and viruses cause problem?
• Performability
   – Is system available with adequate performance when
     needed?
• Dependability
   – Can you rely on correct and predictable behavior?
• Self-awareness and autonomy
   – Does your system monitor and repair itself?
• Fail-safe uses
   – Would you trust your computer with a mission-critical
     task?
   July 11, 2003          Commission on Jobs Growth and   40
                             Economic Development
                Self-Healing Dependable Computing
State of the Art needs to be refocused!
• Information Technology is predicated on
  well-behaved, interacting machines
• but spam, viruses, and attacks are epidemic
• To combat these problems we are
  pouring valuable resources into firewalls
     • however firewalls restrict interaction!



July 11, 2003          Commission on Jobs Growth and   41
                          Economic Development
                   Self-Healing Dependable Computing
                              Solutions
• Be realistic about computing environments
   – Errors, both human and computer, will always be
     present
   – Machines are only as well-behaved as their owners
   – Viruses, spam, and attacks ARE part of the
     environment
• Design systems that are self-aware and self-healing
  – Hardware is fast enough and affordable
  – Establish self-administered distributed policies
  – Continuously monitor, diagnose, and adapt
   July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and   42
                            Economic Development
                   Self-Healing Dependable Computing:
                             Economic Impact
• On the global IT sector
   – System downtime will become increasingly costly
   – Without self-healing systems salaries will dominate IT
     costs
• On New Jersey – build on strengths
   – Two of the six NJ growth clusters are related to IT
   – NJ is center of telecom industry
   – NJ has the largest number of scientists/engineers per
     capita
        • Experienced workforce is available for new initiatives
   July 11, 2003          Commission on Jobs Growth and            43
                             Economic Development
               Self-Healing Dependable Computing:
                         Rutgers Expertise
• Active research in several related areas
   – autonomous agents, change analysis for OO languages,
     component-based scalable networks, database mining,
     distributed systems, fault tolerance, peer-to-peer computing,
     secure services, modeling and simulation
• 7 CS faculty are currently working on relevant research
• $3.5M in external grants awarded over last few years
• Active industrial collaboration
   – Panasonic (Peer-to-peer computing)
   – IBM (change analysis for OO languages)
   – Telcordia and Rutgers CS are developing a joint initiative in
     this area

   July 11, 2003       Commission on Jobs Growth and           44
                          Economic Development
            Multimodal Human-Machine Interface




July 11, 2003                             45
                Multimodal Human-Machine Interface
                   Real-world trial with NJ National Guard
                                                  Microphone
                                                 Array




                                  Gaze Tracker



                                     Force Feedback Glove




July 11, 2003                                                  46
                  User interface for interaction and
                collaboration with robots and humans




                 NSF Equipment Grant EIA#98-18313 Center for Advanced Information Processing,
                                  Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854.
July 11, 2003                PI: J.L. Flanagan, co-PIs: J. Wilder, I. Marsic, M. Krane          47
    Portable Interactive Command Console (PICC)
                    Internet

                               Flatpanel              Loudspeakers
HQ/VEHICLE
                                  display             Source locator microphone
                                                      Gaze tracker

                                                      Stereo face tracking cameras
                                                      Steerable microphone array
                                                      element
                                                      Light pen




                                            Sensors




    July 11, 2003
                                      Robotic Vehicles                                   Field
                                                              Emergency Responder in the 48
                Pervasive and Autonomous
                        Computing
                           WinLAB, ECE, CS




July 11, 2003      Commission on Jobs Growth and   49
                      Economic Development
                Pervasive and Autonomous
                       Computing
                      WinLAB, ECE, CS

• Communication and computing cost and
  performance have been improving by 2x every 18
  months or less for decades.
• Wireless now makes it possible to complete the
  last link to people, machines, sensors, etc.,
  everywhere.
• Great opportunity (and challenge) to move from
  point-to-point communication to pervasive
  communication, computing and knowledge access.
July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and   50
                         Economic Development
Pervasive and Autonomous Computing
• Computing and communication can be
  integrated in the environment
     – Knowledge, information, communication always
       available, but less obtrusive
           • Your personal “Radar O’Riley” is there to help,
             wherever you are (and gone when you want privacy)
           • Sensors bring realtime data that matters
               – From your heartbeat to traffic jams and afternoon
                 weather
           • The world’s knowledge is always available when
             needed.
July 11, 2003           Commission on Jobs Growth and           51
                           Economic Development
  Pervasive and Autonomous Computing
• Massive (and interesting) Research Challenges
   –   Flexible system integration
   –   New approaches to networking at all levels
   –   Information-centric parallel and grid computing
   –   Energy efficiency at all levels
   –   Context awareness for communication and applications
   –   Location awareness in routing and computing
   –   Effective and user friendly security at all levels
• Integrating of Computing and Communication
  (especially wireless) is already a major corporate
  thrust at Intel, Microsoft, IBM, and many others.
   July 11, 2003        Commission on Jobs Growth and         52
                           Economic Development
     Pervasive and Autonomous Computing
• Rutgers has expertise and ongoing programs in
  these areas.
• Communications and computing affect every
  aspect of the economy and every individual
• Recent events show the limitations of the existing
  models for Telecom. NJ could take the lead in
  changing the landscape.
       New Jersey has the right combination of people,
       expertise, facilities to make it happen.

  July 11, 2003     Commission on Jobs Growth and   53
                       Economic Development
      Trusted Computing/Authentication
                   Rutgers – Camden (CS)

• Security is the fastest growing sector of the
  telecommunications market today
• Security involves: encryption, authentication, access
  control, identity management, user provisioning, …
• Telecom often involves access to remote resources,
  requiring authentication of users and monitoring of
  users’ access privileges
   July 11, 2003      Commission on Jobs Growth and   54
                         Economic Development
                   Trusted Computing/Authentication
       Some Research Themes
•Authentication of remote users is
usually done by passwords.
•Traditional (alphanumeric)
passwords are not user-friendly
and lead to security problems and
increased IT costs.
•Graphical passwords: user-
friendly; provide an extremely
large password space (similar to a
cryptographic key space) and thus
are inherently more secure.
•Human-factors analysis of new
password schemes
   July 11, 2003          Commission on Jobs Growth and   55
                             Economic Development
                  Trusted Computing/Authentication
                       Impact of Research:
•Passwords are the most common method for
authentication, but also one of the most vulnerable to
cyber as well as physical attack.
•Improved authentication will impact human-computer
interface, security.
•Will allow users to directly use passwords as
cryptographic keys
•Collaborations: Drexel, Brooklyn Poly., Minnesota
•Collaborations: Unisys
•Password research is of great interest to software and
telecommunications industries.
  July 11, 2003          Commission on Jobs Growth and   56
                            Economic Development
                Trusted Computing/Authentication

                Other Research Challenges:

• Location-aware authentication/provisioning
• Dynamically changing access control and
  inference management
• Biometrics




July 11, 2003                                  57
                  Telecom and Homeland Security
• Communication security
  – wireless security
  – sharing data
  – information privacy
  – identity theft
  – secure e-commerce

• Emergency Communication

• Sensor Networks for
  Bio/Chemical Hazard
  Monitoring
  July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and   58
                           Economic Development
                   Telecom and Homeland Security
• Rutgers projects in communication security include:
  – tunable, programmable, adaptive filters for secure
    communication (Engineering School)
  – low bit-rate coding of speech signals for secure
    communications (CAIP) (with Sarnoff)
  – information privacy (DIMACS) (with HP Labs NJ,
    Telcordia, AT&T Labs, NEC Labs)
  – secure e-commerce (CS with Fogbreak Software)

• These projects are funded by NSF, DARPA, NJCST


   July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and   59
                            Economic Development
                   Telecom and Homeland Security
• Rutgers projects in emergency
  communication include:
   – infostations for rapid
     wireless communication for
     first responders (WINLAB)
     (with Mayflower Radio)
   – rapid networking at
     emergency locations
     (DIMACS with Telcordia)
   – rapid telecollaboration                       These projects are
     (CAIP)                                        funded by DARPA

   July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and              60
                            Economic Development
                 Telecom and Homeland Security
• Rutgers project in
  sensor networks with
  application to
  bio/chemical hazard
  monitoring:
   – WINLAB
   – partnered with
     Agere, Sarnoff,
     Semandex,
     Thomson, J&J,
     Lucent


 July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and   61
                          Economic Development
                  Telecom and Homeland Security
• Methods used in telecom are coming to be useful in
  homeland security research.
• Provides a great business opportunity for NJ’s telecom
  industry.
• Already, NJ telecom companies are subcontractors to
  Rutgers federal grants in this area.
• Examples are:
   – surveillance/detection methods
   – bioterrorism sensor location



  July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and   62
                           Economic Development
                    Telecom and Homeland Security
• Surveillance/detection:
   – Massive data set methods used in
     fraud detection, network intrusion
     detection, etc. are being used in
     bioterrorist attack detection,
     emerging disease identification.

       • DIMACS, $3M from NSF, ONR,
         Sloan Foundation, Burroughs
         Wellcome Fund
       • cooperating with AT&T, Lucent,
         Telcordia, Merck, state and local
         health departments, CDC                          anthrax

    July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and        63
                             Economic Development
                 Telecom and Homeland Security
• Surveillance/detection:
   – MDS methods also
     used in monitoring
     streams of text
     messages for “new
     events”
      • DIMACS, $1M from
        ICMIC (intelligence
        community)
      • cooperating with
        AT&T, Telcordia

 July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and   64
                          Economic Development
                Telecom and Homeland Security


• Bioterrorism
  sensor location



                 BASIS bioterroism
                 sensor system

July 11, 2003           Commission on Jobs Growth and   65
                           Economic Development
                   Telecom and Homeland Security
• Bioterrorism sensor location
  – Network design methods useful.
  – “Equipment placing” algorithms developed for
    broadband access at Telcordia are candidates for
    modification for sensor placement problems.
  – Algorithms developed at Telcordia for placing
    regenerating equipment in transparent optical
    networks are also relevant.
  – Work at DIMACS with partners from AT&T Labs,
    Telcordia, Industrial Engineering, Environmental and
    Occupational Health and Safety Institute (joint with
    UMDNJ), Statistics, CS, and RUTCOR
   July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and   66
                            Economic Development
                Telecom and Homeland Security


• Thus, homeland
  security research
  can put NJ telecom
  back to work.




July 11, 2003         Commission on Jobs Growth and   67
                         Economic Development

				
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