graphicstandards - Valparaiso University

					VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY
The National Lutheran University

  Others teach skills,
 We do that and enable wisdom.

  Others offer knowledge,
 We do that and foster integrity.

  Others make people productive,
 We do that and connect faith to life.

Enrich your life and the lives of those around you.


   Communications,Graphics and
      Web Standards Guide
                             2007
       A Resource for University Spokespersons




                                                      Page 1
                                                                     INTRODUCTION



ABOUT THIS GUIDE
The Valparaiso University Communications Guide is a resource for those groups and
individuals who frequently serve as University ambassadors or spokespersons.


WHEN AND HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE
As academic institutions today face intense competition for attention and resources, it is
vital to position Valparaiso University in appropriate, meaningful, and memorable ways.
Our audiences need to be able to understand quickly and clearly who Valpo is and what
the University can offer them.

When marketing the University, members of the Valparaiso University community will
find this guide to be useful in a number of situations, including, but not limited to,
publications – print and electronic – letters, speeches, or even casual conversation.




                                                                               Page 2
                                                                                  CONTENTS

CONTENTS                                                                Page(s)
I. Valparaiso University at a Glance                                     4-8
           Institutional History                                        4
           Facts and Statistics                                         4-8

II.    Valparaiso University Strategic Plan                              9

III.   Positioning Valparaiso University                                10-12

IV.    Evidence of Excellence                                           13-19
           Academic Distinction and Excellence                         13
           Mentoring Faculty                                           14
           Student Life                                                15
           Character and Faith                                         15-16
           Location                                                    16
           Leadership                                                  17
           Broad Influence                                             18
           State-of-the-Art Facilities                                 18-19

V.     University Milestones                                            20-22

VI. Fun Facts and Traditions                                             23-24

VII. What’s New at Valpo in 2006-2007                                   25-28
           College of Arts & Sciences                                  25-26
           College of Business Administration                          26
           College of Engineering                                      26-27
           College of Nursing                                          27
           Graduate Division                                           28
           School of Law                                               28
           Service                                                     28

VIII. Compliance                                                         29

  IX. Graphic Standards                                                  30-45

 XI. Trademark Licensing Program                                         46-48

 XII. Web Standards                                                      49-54


XIII. Talking Points                                                    55-64
           Annual Profile                                              56-57
           Examples of Distinguished Valpo Alumni                      58-59
           Union                                                       60-61
           MSN/MBA                                                     62
           Tuition and Fees                                            63-64

XIV. Communications Resources                                           65-APPENDIX2
           Fact-Checking and Editing Guidelines                        65-69
           Publicity Audiences                                         70-71
           Media Relations – communicating with members of the press   72
           LRG Full-Color Graphic Representations                      APPENDIX1
           Vendor List                                                 APPENDIX2



                                                                                  Page 3
                                            VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY AT A GLANCE


HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY
Founded in 1859 by Methodists as Valparaiso Male and Female College, an
institution pioneering in coeducation, the school closed in 1871 because of the
Civil War. In 1873, Henry Baker Brown, an enterprising educator, reopened the
college as the Northern Indiana Normal School. By 1900, the fledgling institution
won recognition as an economical institution of higher learning that served
thousands of students who might not otherwise have been able to afford a quality
education. Following World War I, the University slipped into bankruptcy. In
1925, the Lutheran University Association purchased what is now Valparaiso
University and today, although remaining independent of ecclesiastical control,
the University maintains close ties with Lutheran church bodies.

For additional information, please review “Valparaiso in Brief” in the General
Catalog.

LUTHERAN HERITAGE
As an independent Lutheran university, Valparaiso University strives to embrace
the integration of religious faith and secular learning. Faithful to the vision and
tradition of the Lutheran Reformation, Valparaiso fosters an environment where
students and faculty can explore fundamental issues from all angles with
intellectual rigor, integrity, openness, and respect.

For additional information, please review “Valparaiso in Brief” in the General
Catalog.

FACTS AND STATISTICS
University Type:
          Co-ed
          Four-year
          Private
          Selective

Religious Affiliation:

          Independent Lutheran




                                                                        Page 4
                                          VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY AT A GLANCE


FACTS AND STATISTICS, continued
Undergraduate Academic Programs:
        Arts and Sciences
        Business Administration
        Engineering – Civil, Computer, Electrical, and Mechanical
        Nursing
        Christ College – The Honors College
        College of Adult Scholars – a program for non-traditional and part-time
         students

Graduate Programs:
      School of Law:
           Juris Doctor (includes eleven curricular concentration areas)
           International Master of Laws
           Dual Juris Doctor degrees:
               Master of Arts in Psychology
               Master of Arts in Liberal Studies
               Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
               Master of Business Administration
               Master of Science in International Commerce and Policy
               Master of Science in Sports Administration
      Graduate Division:
           Business Administration
               Master of Business Administration
               Master of Business Administration with Accounting
                 Specialization
               Master of Engineering Management
               Management Certificate
           Chinese Studies
               Master of Arts in Chinese Studies
           Education
               Master of Education: Initial Teaching Licensure Program –
                 Lutheran Education Alliance with Parochial Schools (LEAPs)
               Master of Education: Initial Teaching Licensure Program –
                 General Track
               Master of Education: Teaching and Learning Concentration
               Master of Education/Education Specialist in School
                 Psychology
               Non-degree Programs (Certification/Licensure, License
                 Renewal and/or Personal Enrichment, Adding a Content
                 Area to License, Licensure Programs in Special Education)
               Transition to Teaching Non-Degree Licensure Program
           International Studies
               Master of Science in International Commerce and Policy
                                                                     Page 5
                                           VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY AT A GLANCE


FACTS AND STATISTICS, continued
               Liberal Studies
                 Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (English, Ethics and Values,
                   Gerontology, History, Human Behavior and Society,
                   Theology, Theology and Ministry, Individualized)
               Nursing
                 Master of Science in Nursing (RN-MSN Option, Parish Nurse
                   Option, Advanced Nurse Education Option, Post-Master‟s
                   Family Nurse Practitioner)
                 Management Certificate for Nursing
               Psychology
                 Master of Arts in Community Counseling
                 Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
               Sports
                 Master of Science in Sports Administration

International Study:
        Thirteen semester or year-long programs on four continents,
         sponsored by VU or in conjunction with host institutions in the following
         nations:
            - Hangzhou, China
            - Anglia Polytechnic, England
            - Cambridge, England
            - Oak Hill Seminary, England
            - Paris, France
            - Cergy-Pontoise, France
            - Reutlingen, Germany
            - Tubingen, Germany
            - Athens, Greece
            - Hirikata, Japan
            - Puebla, Mexico
            - Windhoek, Namibia
            - Granada, Spain


Off-Campus Study:

        Chicago Urban Studies Semester
        Cooperative Education Programs (Colleges of Arts and Sciences,
         Business Administration, Engineering, and Nursing)
        Internships
        Service Learning
        The Lutheran College Washington Consortium (sponsored by the
         Luther Institute)
        Washington Semester Program (with American University)
        Semester on the United Nations (with Drew University)
                                                                      Page 6
                                           VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY AT A GLANCE


FACTS AND STATISTICS, continued
Community and Public Service:

        During the 2006-2007 academic year, 39 student organizations and
         athletic teams performed 54,064 hours of community service for a
         variety of programs and causes, mostly in Northwest Indiana.
        In addition to their service projects, Valparaiso student organizations
         raised $119,061 for philanthropic activities during the 2006-2007
         academic year.

Accreditations:
        The Higher Learning Commission: Member-North
         Central Association
        The American Chemical Society
        National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
        Indiana State Department of Education-Indiana Professional Standards
          Board
        National Association of Schools of Music
        The Council on Social Work Education
        AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools
         of Business
        The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
        State of Indiana Health Professions Bureau-Indiana State Board of
         Nursing
        Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
        The Association of American Law Schools
        The American Bar Association

National Programs Affiliated with VU
        See http://www.valpo.edu/about_valpo/national_organizations.php

National Rankings:

        Repeatedly ranked as a top regional university in the Midwest for quality
         by “U.S. News & World Report”
        Recognized as having “One of the Best Undergraduate Engineering
         Programs in the Nation” (Top 15% of masters level schools in 2007-
         2008) by “U.S. News & World Report”
        Nationally recognized Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business
         Administration, Engineering, Nursing, and Christ College – The
         Honors College
        Listed in Princeton Review‟s “The Best 361 Colleges”
        Listed in “Peterson’s Competitive Colleges”


                                                                       Page 7
                                           VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY AT A GLANCE


FACTS AND STATISTICS, continued
         Featured in John Templeton Foundation‟s “Guide to Colleges that
          Encourage Character Development”
         Barron‟s “Best Buys in College Education”
         Princeton Review‟s “Best 282 Business Schools”
         Featured in Kaplan‟s “369 Most Interesting Schools”

Location:

         Valparaiso, Indiana (population 31,000)
         County Seat – Porter County (population 152,500)

Nearby:

         Chicago – one hour
         Indianapolis – two and one-half hours
         Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore Park – 15 minutes
Campus Size:

         Over 300 acres with 60 academic and residential buildings

Athletics:

         NCAA Division I – nine teams for women, nine for men
         Teams compete as part of the NCAA Horizon League

              Women:
                        Basketball
                        Cross Country
                        Indoor Track
                        Outdoor Track and Field
                        Soccer
                        Softball
                        Swimming and Diving
                        Tennis
                        Volleyball
              Men:
                        Baseball
                        Basketball
                        Cross Country
                        Football
                        Indoor Track
                        Outdoor Track and Field
                        Soccer
                        Swimming and Diving
                        Tennis

                                                                      Page 8
                                                                       STRATEGIC PLAN

The Mission Statement and Strategic Plan of Valparaiso University reflect some of the
highest ideals, efforts, and aspirations of this institution. The University‟s mission, which
follows, is constantly pursued through six enduring commitments. The objectives of
each commitment reflect the specific achievements for which the University strives.
Together, the mission statement and commitments present a concise illustration of the
direction and aspirations of Valparaiso University.

VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT
Valparaiso University, a community of learning dedicated to excellence and grounded in
the Lutheran tradition of scholarship, freedom, and faith, prepares students to lead and
serve in both church and society.


ENDURING COMMITMENTS

1. FOSTER A DYNAMIC INTELLECTUAL ENVIRONMENT
   …marked by students engaged in learning both inside and outside the classroom, by
   faculty dedicated to excellence in teaching, mentoring, and professional
   achievement, and by a rich blend of rigorous undergraduate programs
   complemented by select graduate and non-traditional programs.

2. DELIVER A DISTINCTIVE EDUCATION
   …that integrates fields of study, connects theory to practice, combines liberal with
   professional education, and promotes interaction between campus life and
   classroom learning, in order to form men and women who will flourish in an
   increasingly diverse and interconnected world.
3. PROVIDE AN ENRICHING STUDENT EXPERIENCE
   …with programs and facilities that enhance students‟ capacity to lead socially,
   culturally, and physically satisfying lives, and that develops leaders, promotes
   service, and builds community.

4. MODEL THE BEST IN CHURCH-RELATED HIGHER EDUCATION
   …by continually discovering new ways to connect faith and reason in the lives of
   students, thereby enabling them to become ethical and responsible citizens, and by
   continuing to lead the national conversation about the vital importance of church-
   related higher education.

5. CONFIGURE CAMPUS SPACES THOUGHTFULLY AND AESTHETICALLY
   …so as to enhance learning, build community, and radiate hospitality.
6. INCREASE RESOURCES AND STRATEGIC INVESTMENTS
   …through increased operational revenue, maximized fundraising, and improved
   productivity through enhanced enrollments and higher net tuition, selective program
   expansions, rigorous program and service review, fundraising, endowment growth,
   and increased productivity.



                                                                                 Page 9
                                                      POSITIONING VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY

The overarching and support positionings presented herein are designed to differentiate
Valparaiso University from its competition and provide a foundation for internal and
external communications. Specifically, these communications should define the
institution as follows:

VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY POSITIONING
      Others teach skills,
      We do that and enable wisdom.

      Others offer knowledge,
      We do that and foster integrity.

      Others make people productive,
      We do that and connect faith to life.

Enrich your life and the lives of those around you.


SUPPORT POSITIONINGS
Complementing the overarching positioning are support positionings that further
underscore Valparaiso‟s strongest features and benefits:

Connecting Thought and Action, Theory and Practice
Valparaiso University combines the best aspects of both a traditional liberal arts
foundation and pre-professional preparation. Drawing on an array of programming
options that is unusual for a smaller university, all graduates receive a rigorous
grounding in the technical competencies of their chosen field, while also developing a
broader set of superior critical thinking and communications skills.

Students in pre-professional fields, as well as those in liberal arts majors, become
creative thinkers and problem solvers through exposure to the liberal arts. At the same
time, liberal arts majors, alongside students in more pre-professionally oriented majors,
participate in experiential learning opportunities that result in a distinct set of skills that
can be applied in their post-baccalaureate professional pursuits, regardless of their
aspirations.

Putting Faith at the Center of Learning
Anchored in the Lutheran heritage, which affirms the interaction of faith and learning,
Valparaiso University nourishes not only the intellectual but also the spiritual, emotional,
social, and physical dimensions of students‟ lives. Valparaiso University‟s enduring
commitment to values – faith, personal integrity, social responsibility, and respect for
human diversity – permeates each student‟s educational experience at the University.




                                                                                    Page 10
                                                    POSITIONING VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY


SUPPORT POSITIONINGS, continued
Emphasizing the concept of vocation, Valparaiso University prepares students to affirm
one of the fundamental tenets of Lutheranism: to connect their work and faith in the
service of God‟s world and its people. Beyond simply having a job or a career,
Valparaiso University graduates exhibit a dedication and passion to meet profound
human needs.

Right-sized
Valparaiso University has the variety of programs and majors typical of a large
university. It offers the individual attention, sense of community, and opportunity to
belong that are normally found in a small college. Significant opportunities for
leadership, competitive participation in athletics, and meaningful participation in music,
arts, and other activities are more plentiful than at small colleges and more accessible
than at large state schools.

ADDITIONAL UNIVERSITY DESCRIPTORS
In addition to the overarching and support positionings described above, a number of
additional university descriptors are used in various university materials to further
convey the nature and character of Valparaiso University.

Branding Valparaiso University as a whole

             “In Thy Light We See Light”
              University Motto

             “Our Valpo….” Brand tagline used to communicate VU‟s values through
              Valpo people.

Sub-Brands

      College of Engineering – “Developing a Distinctive Engineer” &
       “Preparing our Engineers to Lead and Serve for Nearly 90 Years”

      College of Business Administration - “Values-Based Leadership” &
       “Forty Years of Preparing Ethical Leaders for the Business World”

      College of Nursing - “Preparing Leaders in Nursing” &
       “Preparing Leaders to Shape the Nursing Profession for More Than 35 Years”

      Christ College - “Honoring Intellect, Enlivening Faith, Engaging the World”




                                                                                Page 11
                                               POSITIONING VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY


ADDITIONAL UNIVERSITY DESCRIPTORS, continued
    School of Law - “Law as a Calling. Enduring Core Competencies. Exceptional
     Legal Research and Writing. Truly Personal Manner of Teaching and Learning.”

    Valparaiso University Athletics - “Valpo Crusaders: Champions in Competition,
     Classroom and Community”

    Lutheran community - “Grounded in Faith. Empowered to Learn. Inspired to
     Serve.”




                                                                         Page 12
                                                               EVIDENCE OF EXCELLENCE



ACADEMIC DISTINCTION AND EXCELLENCE
   Consistently ranked by “U.S. News & World Report” as one of the top universities in
    the Midwest for quality and value.
   Ranked as a leader among several educational publication reports:
        1. Peterson‟s “Competitive Colleges and Guide to Honors Colleges”
        2. Princeton Review‟s “Best 361 Colleges”
        3. Templeton Foundation‟s “Guide to Colleges that Encourage Character
            Development”
        4. Barron‟s “Best Buys in College Education”
        5. Princeton Review‟s “Best 282 Business Schools”
        6. Featured in Kaplan‟s “369 Most Interesting Schools”
   College of Engineering ranked by “U.S. News & World Report” 2006-2007 as one of
    the top 15 percent of U.S. institutions offering undergraduate degrees in
    engineering.
   College of Engineering‟s Hesse Learning Resource and Assessment Center
    provides one-on-one academic counseling and support for engineering students.
   Valpo‟s VisBox-X2 Scientific Visualization Laboratory in the College of Engineering
    is the only one of its kind among primarily undergraduate universities.
   College of Nursing‟s state-of-the-art Virtual Nursing Learning Center is one of the
    largest of its kind nationwide.
   College of Business Administration accredited by the AACSB International -The
    Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, one of approximately 25
    percent of private institutions in the U.S. to be distinguished as such.
   The Department of Geography and Meteorology is equipped with a 1,000 square
    foot Weather Center for hands-on weather forecasting and storm tracking, and also
    controls the University‟s very own Doppler Radar system, which was recently
    erected on campus.
   Freshman Core, a nationally recognized, interdisciplinary course, initiates first-year
    students into the Valparaiso academic community.
        1. Common first-year experience
        2. Writing-intensive program of study
        3. Collaborative inquiry focusing on segments of the human experience
   Three-year bachelor‟s degree programs in Nursing and the Arts.
   86 percent of first-year students return to Valpo.
   Greater than 85% of pre-medical students who apply to medical or dental school are
    admitted, usually within a year of graduation. For Christ College students, the
    percentage is 100.
   Christ College is one of the top honors colleges in the nation.
        1. Interdisciplinary focus
        2. Fellowship among students and faculty
        3. Discussion-based classes
        4. Emphasis on spiritual values
   College of Adult Scholars offers a selective program of study for part-time learners
    who are 24 years of age or older and who are either seeking a first degree or
    pursuing advanced training through a certificate of specialization.
   All professional graduate programs are accredited or seeking accreditation.
                                                                              Page 13
                                                                EVIDENCE OF EXCELLENCE


ACADEMIC DISTINCTION AND EXCELLENCE,
continued
   Retention rate for graduate programs is significantly higher than the average for
    similar kinds of institutions.
   The Bach Institute – preserving the legacy of the music and theological perspective
    of Johann Sebastian Bach for future generations.
   Chapters of academic honor societies for each college.
        1. Phi Beta Kappa – College of Arts & Sciences
        2. Beta Gamma Sigma – College of Business Administration
        3. Sigma Theta Tau – College of Nursing
        4. Tau Beta Pi – College of Engineering
   Integrated curriculum blends liberal arts and professional programs to a degree that
    is rare for institutions of VU‟s size.
        1. Interdisciplinary studies
        2. Multicultural, international focus
        3. Co-operative education program
   Student-initiated Honor System.
   Charter member of the Associated New American Colleges.
   One of only 15 schools chosen to participate in the prestigious James S. Kemper
    Foundation‟s internship program.

MENTORING FACULTY
   90 percent of Valpo full-time faculty has a Ph.D. or the highest degree in their field.
   13:1 student-faculty ratio; 12:1 student-faculty ratio at the graduate level.
   Small average class size of 22; classes are led by professors, not TAs.
   Host annual Celebration of Scholarship program, both graduate and undergraduate.
   Provide individual, caring attention.
   Offer academic and emotional support.
   Interact with students outside of class.
   Represent diverse talents and expertise.
   Enable critical thinking and model lifelong learning.
   Take an active interest and role in students‟ residential life and student
    organizations.
   Engage in service learning.
   Pursue scholarly work through research, publications, professional performances
    and other creative endeavors including music composition, photography, painting
    and drawing.




                                                                                Page 14
                                                               EVIDENCE OF EXCELLENCE


STUDENT LIFE
   80-100 student organizations and clubs available to students.
   About 50 percent of students participate in intramural activities.
   35 percent of Valpo students join one of nine national fraternities and 6 national
    sororities.
   About 50 percent of students participate in academic organizations.
   Abundant music-related activities and organizations for music majors and non-
    majors.
   NCAA Division I athletics – part of the Horizon League.
   Center for the Arts is the hub of musical life at Valpo. Performance opportunities
    include the Chamber Concert Band, Crusader Pep Band, Jazz Lab Band, Handbell
    Choir, Kantorei, Luce Band, Madrigal Dinners, Matins Choir, Musical Theatre
    Productions, Operas and Plays, Small-Group Musical Ensembles, Soul Purpose
    (touring liturgical drama troupe), Symphony Orchestra, University Community Band,
    University Singers, Valparaiso University Chorale, and the VU Gospel Choir.
   Brauer Museum of Art.
   Annual Jazz Fest celebration with participating schools from Northwest Indiana.
   Annual Law and Psychology Symposium and Lecture.
   $74 million Union project underway – scheduled for opening in the 2008-2009
    academic year.

CHARACTER AND FAITH
   Positions faith at the center of learning.
   75 percent of students participate in faith-related activities.
   Emphasis on “Service Learning” – one-third of Valpo students volunteered over
    48,000 hours for the 2006 academic year. Student organizations raised $107,502
    for philanthropic activities in the 2005-2006 academic year.
   LEAPs Program enables students to serve as apprentice teachers in under-
    resourced parochial schools in NW Indiana, Chicago, Cleveland, and Detroit.
   School of Law requires pro bono work.
   Valpo Law Clinic provides free legal services to disadvantaged members of the
    community; approximately 700 clients annually.
   Community Research and Service Center provides research and planning services
    for community organizations and local governments.
   Encourages open inquiry.
   Nourishes the “whole person” – spiritual, intellectual, emotional, social, and physical
    dimensions of students‟ lives.
   Affirms values – faith, personal integrity, social responsibility, and respect for human
    diversity.
   Home of the Lilly Fellows Program in the Humanities and the Arts, an initiative to
    strengthen the network of church-related colleges in the U.S. that provides
    fellowship opportunities and developmental support for young scholars in Christian
    communities of learning.
   Emphasizes the concept of vocation.
   Motivates and equips students for service to God and the human family.
                                                                                   Page 15
                                                             EVIDENCE OF EXCELLENCE


CHARACTER AND FAITH, continued
   Offers diverse worship opportunities.
   Fosters active campus ministry from the Valpo Chapel of the Resurrection, St.
    Teresa of Avila Catholic Student Center, Inter-varsity Christian Fellowship program,
    and Campus Crusade for Christ.
   Welcoming of all faiths.
   Every professional graduate program addresses issues of ethics.
   Home of the Project on Civic Reflection
   Home of Valparaiso Project on the Education and Formation of People in Faith
   Home of the Resurrection Labyrinth (Prayer Labyrinth) in Memory of Nicole Unrath


LOCATION
   A residential town of 31,000 people.
   County seat of Porter County, Indiana (population 152,500).
   Proximity to Chicago
        1. Diverse cultural resources
        2. Internship and employment opportunities
        3. Academic field trips
   Fifteen minutes south of the Indiana Dunes National Park on Lake Michigan.
   Two-and-one-half hours north of Indianapolis.
   Access to public transportation.
   Proactive campus safety: Valparaiso University Police Department, call boxes, and
    escort vans.
   Access to a plethora and range of practicum and internship training sites for both
    undergraduate and graduate programs.




                                                                              Page 16
                                                             EVIDENCE OF EXCELLENCE


LEADERSHIP
   Enhances Lutheran heritage.
        1. Public worship
        2. Residential ministries, including Institute of Liturgical Studies
        3. Visiting lecturers
        4. Theological conferences
        5. Institute on Law and Pastoral Ministry
        6. Symposium for Lutheran high school teachers of religion
   Enriches the cultural and spiritual life of Porter and Lake counties.
   Contributes to area economy.
   Promotes Associated New American Colleges model for higher education.
   Encourages public and community service.
        1. Indiana Campus Compact member (statewide volunteering network)
        2. Rebuilding Together sponsor
        3. Project Neighbors and Hilltop House support
        4. Active Habitat for Humanity chapter
        5. Engineers Without Borders Chapter; Kenya project
        6. Medical mission trip to Central America
   Guild – a unique community of Christian women committed to serving and promoting
    the success of Valpo for more than 75 years.
   Community Research and Service Center provides research, surveying, planning,
    and analysis services for community organizations and local governmental bodies.
   Chapel partners with the Community of the Cross of Nails and is the Center for
    Reconciliation; preserves historic religious sites nationwide.
   Partnership with social service and mental health organizations to provide training
    for graduate students in counseling and school psychology.




                                                                            Page 17
                                                                   EVIDENCE OF EXCELLENCE


BROAD INFLUENCE
   Respected by prestigious graduate schools, leading funding sources, and
    corporate recruiters.
   Garners high placement rates for graduates with top-notch companies, corporations,
    and graduate schools.*
       100% placement for College of Engineering
       100% placement for Nursing
       93% placement for Business Administration
       93% placement for Arts & Sciences
       94% placement for overall Undergraduate
       87.8% placement for School of Law nine months after graduation
       * Data reflects surveys submitted by graduates of Dec. ’05, May ’06, Aug ’06.
   Valpo annually provides the U.S. Air Force with more meteorology graduates than
    any other university nationwide.
   Supports a distinguished cadre of alumni in the arts, business, church, education,
    medicine, politics, social services, sciences, and sports. (Please see current list of
    examples in the Appendix.)
   Maintains global orientation.
       1. International Service, International Economics and Cultural Affairs,
           International Business major, Masters in International Commerce and Policy.
       2. 13 study-abroad programs coordinated in nine nations and on four
           continents; 15 percent of current students participate.
       3. Students from more than 40 countries
       4. Kade-Duesenberg German House and Cultural Center
       5. La maison francaise French House and Cultural Center
       6. Valpo International Engineering Program in German (Reutlingen)
       7. China Center
       8. Study-abroad requirement for International Business majors
       9. International internships
       10. Spring break research trips to China
       11. Musical group tours of Malta, China, Britain


STATE-OF-THE-ART FACILITIES
   Center for the Arts
        1. Brauer Museum of Art annually hosts world-renowned exhibits and displays
        2. Two theaters offer top-notch theatrical and musical settings
        3. Graphic arts computer facilities
        4. Advanced photography lab facilities and equipment
        5. The Bach Institute – preserving the legacy of the music and theological
       perspective of Johann Sebastian Bach for future generations.
   Department of Physics & Astronomy‟s Nuclear particle accelerator, subcritical
    nuclear reactor, lab stations with ultrasonic motion detectors, LED photogates, and
    thermocouples.
   Astronomical observatory with computer-controlled telescopic equipment
   Engineering‟s VisBox-X2 Scientific Visualization laboratory:
    enabling virtual reality learning
                                                                              Page 18
                                                      EVIDENCE OF EXCELLENCE


STATE-OF-THE-ART FACILITIES, continued
    Top-of-the-line robotics laboratory
    Radio and television production facilities; non-linear video editing
    Computer labs and campus workstations provide a student-to-computer ratio of
     6:1 (not including student-owned computers).
    Technology classrooms integrated with audio, visual, projection, computer, and
     Internet capabilities.
    Preservation of Guild and Memorial Halls; 50-year old, upper-class residence
     halls restored to architectural grandeur of the time of their construction.
    Continued integration of latest computer, networking, and learning equipment
     within the residential environment.
    Christopher Center for Library and Information Resources: automated storage
     and retrieval system among first five installed in the nation
    Virtual Nursing Learning Center: largest/most complete in the nation
    Kallay-Christopher Hall; studio devoted to weather forecasting with the only
     undergraduate meteorology program in the nation with Doppler
     radar system.
    Construction of new Union underway, with projected opening date of Fall 2008.




                                                                          Page 19
                                                             UNIVERSITY MILESTONES

Valparaiso University is widely recognized as holding an enviably strong position among
its peer institutions. Propelling the University toward even greater distinction, VU has
recorded numerous benchmark achievements in the past 10 years.

MILESTONES OF THE PAST DECADE
   Creation of master of business administration, master of sports administration,
    master of international commerce and policy degrees, and computer engineering,
    biochemistry, actuarial science, youth, family and education ministries, creative
    writing, and professional writing majors and degrees.
   Lilly Fellows Program in Humanities and the Arts is established to promote national
    dialogue about issues facing church-related colleges and universities.

   The Brauer Museum of Art opens.
   Valpo Core is adopted as the collaborative, writing-based program of integrative
    study for first-year students.
   Valparaiso University receives praise and recognition from numerous accreditation
    bodies, including the designation as one of only a small number of undergraduate
    colleges to be recognized by the AASCB International–The Association to Advance
    Collegiate Schools of Business.
   Capital improvements to Valparaiso University‟s campus bring state-of-the-art
    technology and improved physical environments to Guild, Memorial, Brandt, and
    Wehrenberg halls; the Chapel of the Resurrection; the Valparaiso Union; Miller Hall;
    Dickmeyer Hall; the University Book Center, Meier, Urschel, Schnabel, and
    Gellersen.
   Valparaiso University‟s men‟s basketball team makes an appearance at the Sweet
    Sixteen of the NCAA tournament. VU‟s women‟s basketball team makes its first
    appearance in the NCAA, while women‟s volleyball, men‟s soccer, football, tennis,
    and other sports programs earn repeated conference championships and honors.
   COPC (Community Outreach Partnership Center) completes third construction
    project.

   Through a successful “Three Goals, One Promise” campaign and substantial
    increases in annual giving, the University‟s endowment jumps dramatically to more
    than $120 million with the support of alumni volunteers, the VUAA, and the Guild.
   Expansion of graduate and continuing education programs allows the creation of
    new interdisciplinary studies that integrate the liberal arts with the School of Law,
    creates opportunities for adult scholars, and allows the expansion of Valparaiso
    University‟s curriculum.




                                                                                 Page 20
                                                                  UNIVERSITY MILESTONES


MILESTONES OF THE PAST DECADE, continued
   Valparaiso is recognized as a national leader in the integration of liberal arts and
    professional studies and a charter member of the Associated American College
    Association, serving as a model of what future comprehensive universities should
    be.

   The College of Engineering establishes the Hesse Learning and Resource
    Assessment Center and the Valparaiso International Engineering Program in
    German (at Reutlingen)

   Hilltop House, the Involvement Center, and the Law Clinic are firmly established as
    partnerships between the University and community, models of service learning in
    higher education, and testaments to the distinctive Lutheran character of Valparaiso.

   The University receives a $15 million gift from Jay and Doris Christopher, VU‟s
    largest gift ever.

   In the spring of 2001, Valparaiso University welcomes the Ansel Adams photography
    exhibit, which draws more than 16,000 people from across the Midwest.

   Fellowship House is established.

   An Undergraduate Research fund for student use is established by the Guild.

   In 2003, the School of Law celebrates its 125th anniversary. Former President
    George P. Bush is the keynote speaker at a formal gala held at the Institute of
    Natural History in Chicago.

   The University completes construction of the $33 million Christopher Center for
    Library and Information Resources.

   Kallay-Christopher Hall is constructed, providing a state-of-the-art environment for
    the study of geography and meteorology; Doppler radar system installation begins.

   The China Center is established and a study-abroad program begins in Hangzhou,
    China.

   The Schweitzer Scholarship allows nursing and pre-medical students to spend
    springbreak providing hands-on medical service in Central America.




                                                                                Page 21
                                                                 UNIVERSITY MILESTONES


MILESTONES OF THE PAST DECADE, continued
   The Valparaiso Admission Network (VAN) is established to utilize alumni and friends
    of the University in the recruitment of students.

   A chapter of Engineers without Borders is formed; members travel to a Kenyan
    village to begin a multi-year irrigation project.

   The Bach Institute debuts in 2001 with a performance of St. Matthew Passion.

   The Kade-Duesenberg German House and Cultural Center opens and begins
    residential and other programming.

   The men‟s basketball team competes against Duke at Chicago‟s United Center in
    December 2004.

   Engineering students plan and execute re-location of the “student bridge,” bringing it
    back to campus; rededicated on campus in October 2005.

   The symphony orchestra travels to China for VU‟s first international musical tour.

   Home of the Resurrection Labyrinth (Prayer Labyrinth) installed in Memory of former
    student Nicole Unrath.

   The women‟s volleyball team is one of just 45 NCAA Division I programs to receive
    the American Volleyball Coaches Association Team Academic Award, the only Mid-
    Continent Conference school to qualify.

   For the second year, men‟s and women‟s soccer teams earn the NSCAA/Adidas
    Team Academic Award

   Basketball player Dan Oppland is named to the ESPN Academic All-American
    Team.

   Eleven students present their research projects at the National Conference on
    Undergraduate Research, the largest and most prestigious undergraduate research
    conference in the US.

   VU‟s historic Student Bridge is dedicated, following reconstruction on campus of the
    popular landmark by students in the Society of Civil Engineers.

   Groundbreaking is held for construction of $74 million Union project to be completed
    in 2008-2009.

   La Maison Francaise opens and begins French residential and cultural programming
    for students.


                                                                               Page 22
                                                       FUN FACTS AND TRADITIONS



FUN FACTS
 1. What Northwest Indiana school once was referred to by a New York newspaper
    as “the poor man‟s Harvard”? Valparaiso University

 2. What is the founding date of Valparaiso University? 1859

 3. Members of what religious denomination founded Valparaiso University?
    Methodist

 4. Valparaiso University‟s basketball team reached the Sweet Sixteen of the NCAA
    tournament in what year? 1998

 5. Valparaiso University students initiated, planned and constructed what campus
    building? Engineering – now called the Art-Psychology Building

 6. What U.S. presidential candidate was assassinated a month after speaking at
    Valparaiso University? Robert Kennedy

 7. With approval of a chapter at Valparaiso University, how many Indiana colleges
    now have chapter of Phi Beta Kappa? Seven

 8. Valparaiso University‟s football team once competed in what Florida bowl game
    on New Year‟s Day? Cigar Bowl in 1951

 9.   In the past 18 years, U.S. News &World Report magazine has ranked Valparaiso
      University in the top three for quality among master‟s level institutions how many
      times? 18




                                                                             Page 23
                                                            FUN FACTS AND TRADITIONS


TRADITIONS
Valparaiso Alma Mater*

Hail to the Brown and Gold!                   Hail to the Brown and Gold!
We pledge thee to uphold                      Thy sons and daughters hold
Wherever we may be                            In loving loyalty
Thy honored name.                             Thy colors dear;
Through years that come and go,               Colors whereby they show
To pay the debt we owe                        What others, too, should know:
We‟ll e‟er be true to you,                    That they belong to you,
Dear old Valpo.                               Dear old Valpo.
                                              (Tradition dictates singing of the third
Hail to the Brown and Gold!                   verse in less formal settings.)
Recall the days of old,
The happy days which we
Ne‟er shall forget.
As shadows longer grow
Brighter the flame shall glow,
The flame of love for you,
Dear old Valpo.


*Written in 1935 by President Oscar C. Kreinheder (to the tune of “How Can I Leave
Thee.”)



FIGHT SONG

Hail Crusaders! Who rise to glory,
Our challenge has been hurled.
Our team victorious, our colors glorious
Are known throughout the world.
Valparaiso, we‟re here to back you,
Our cheers like thunder roar
See our school, our team,
See our colors gleam,
As we fight for the Brown and Gold!




                                                                             Page 24
                                                             WHAT’S NEW AT VALPO


What’s New at Valpo?
College of Arts & Sciences

      Weather Center‟s Doppler radar system installed.

      A new Geoscience major is developed to equip students for careers in natural
       disaster preparation and other fields where an understanding of geography and
       meteorology are necessary.

      Student radio station WVUR 95.1 FM wins two awards in the national
       Communicator Award Audio Competition: The Crystal Award of Excellence for a
       station promotion and for a pre-produced football broadcast and an honorable
       mention for an edition of its weekly sports program “Crusader Week in Review.”
       The two awards were the third-most received by a college station.

      WVUR is named "Radio School of the Year" for excellence across its
       programming and wins several other awards from the Indiana Association of
       School Broadcasters, including Best News/Sports, Best Newscast, Best Radio
       Personality, Best Sports Play-by-Play, and Best In-Studio Sportscast.

      Valpo‟s student newspaper, The Torch, is named an All-American Newspaper by
       the Associated Collegiate press for its excellence during the 2005-2006
       academic year. The newspaper received praise by judges for both its news
       coverage and design, and won Marks of Distinction in four of five categories:
       coverage and content, art and graphics, layout and design, and leadership.

      An education student spends a semester student teaching at the Hong Kong
       International School, becoming the first Valpo student to student teach overseas.

      A German/Secondary Education student is selected for the prestigious four-week
       American Education Student Study in Germany program. A German and
       Geography major is one of 15 US juniors to win a fellowship to participate in the
       University of Pennsylvania‟s “Grad School Experience” seminar.

      English and Christ College alumnus Rene Steinke (VU ‟86) is a National Book
       Award finalist.

      Two sophomore Meteorology majors are among 100 national recipients of the
       Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship from the National Oceanic and
       Atmospheric Administration.

      The Community Research and Service Center completes studies on the need for
       housing assistance in Porter County and on gang dangers awareness. The
       results will assist the community in planning housing services and aid Valpo
       Police in making changes to their Gang Resistance Education and Training
       program.
                                                                             Page 25
                                                                WHAT’S NEW AT VALPO


What’s New at Valpo, continued
      Valpo joins the Pierce Cedar Creek Institute, a 661-acre biological field station
       with forest, wetlands, fields and lakes. The southwestern Michigan site will
       provide students with additional hands-on ecological research opportunities.

College of Business Administration
    Valerie Brown, A Valpo public relations and marketing student, is awarded with
      the Daniel J. Edelman/PRSSA Award for Outstanding Public Relations Student.
      In addition to receiving a $1,500 cash award, Brown received a three-moth paid
      internship at Edelman, an independent global public relations firm with
      headquarters in Chicago.

      VU‟s new student chapter of Delta Epsilon Chi, a student marketing organization,
       had a very successful first year. At the organization‟s regional competition, the
       team of Callie Spengler and Luis Sifuentes placed first in the International
       Marketing event and the team of Callie Spengler, Jana Larson, and Becky
       Christopher placed first in the Advertising event. This qualified both teams to
       compete at the national competition in Orlando, Florida where Spengler and
       Sifuentes placed in the top twelve. Additionally, Luis Sifuentes, president of VU's
       chapter, was appointed to the Delta Epsilon Chi 2007-2008 national officer team
       as Central Region Vice President.

      Matthew Cavin, junior International Business major, has been elected as
       President of the Student Senate at VU.

      The CBA created and offered a two-credit, college-level course on Success Skills
       to high school seniors in the Valparaiso community. MBA student Steve Olsen
       designed and taught the course as part of a SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise)
       project and an independent study in his graduate program.

      All CBA students are required to have an internship as part of their curriculum.
       Students have internships with many different organizations in the United States
       and abroad this summer including assignments with: U.S. Department of State in
       the Bureau of European & Eurasian Affairs at the American Embassy in London,
       NCAA Eligibility Center (Indianapolis), Houston Astros major league baseball
       team (Houston), International Speedway Corporation (Daytona), Banco
       Economico (Bolivia, South America), commodities trading with Robert M.
       Henner, Ltd (Chicago) and DT Trading, LLC (Chicago), and Beloit Snappers
       minor league baseball (Beloit, WI).

      Michael Rosenwinkel, who graduated in December 2005 with a BSBA in
       Accounting and Finance, was awarded an Excel Bronze Medal by the Illinois
       CPA Society for his outstanding performance on the Uniform CPA Examination.
       Michael is working for KPMG Peat Marwick in Chicago.




                                                                               Page 26
      Professor Sandra Strasser receives Instructional Innovation Award at the
       Decision Sciences Institute‟s annual meeting for her creation of a Business
       Statistics course that uses a wiki in place of a traditional textbook.

      Professor Ceyhun Ozgur has been elected as the president-elect of Midwest
       Decision Sciences Institute for 2007-08 and will serve as president from April
       2008 to April 2009.

      The College of Business enrolled a record Graduate class with approximately 85
       students in 2006 (10 enrolled in the new Masters of Engineering Management
       program).


College of Engineering
    The first Valparaiso International Engineering Program-Germany (VIEP) students
      enroll at Valpo‟s Reutlingen study center and participate in internships with area
      industries.

      U.S. News & World Report again ranks the College of Engineering in the top
       15% of engineering programs in the nation among schools where the highest
       degree awarded is the bachelors or masters.

      Valpo‟s two-year old Engineers Without Borders chapter hosts the national
       organization‟s annual conference, receives the organization‟s Educational
       Achievement Award and completes its three-year Kenya water system project.

      For the second consecutive year, a VU engineering student is named to USA
       Today‟s All-USA College Academic Team, which recognizes the nation‟s most
       outstanding students.




                                                                              Page 27
                                                               WHAT’S NEW AT VALPO


What’s New at Valpo, continued
      Senior Rachel Husfeld wins a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship
       of $40,500 annually for three years to pursue graduate studies.

      Valparaiso University‟s College of Engineering is the first in the nation to offer
       Dale Carnegie training as part of the freshman curriculum. This course provides
       education related to leadership, communication, presentations and public
       speaking – ensuring growth and skill development necessary to acquire top jobs
       following graduation.

      The GE 100 has been redesigned with a multi-disciplinary focus – introducing
       freshman to the many options offered to them in the field of Engineering.

      The College of Engineering partners with Caterpillar to host its first Engineering
       Career Awareness Day in September.

      Professor Jeffrey Will and student Mike Steffen work together to use virtual
       reality to control a farm vehicle located in Japan.

College of Nursing
    Three nursing alumni from three different states coincidently work together as
      hurricane relief workers in New Orleans.

      Twelve nursing students receive funding for Valpo‟s spring break medical
       missions trip to Central America.

      Associate Professor of Nursing Kristen Mauk, a leading national expert in
       gerontological nursing, publishes a textbook entitled “Gerontological Nursing:
       Competencies for Care.”

      Nursing graduates achieve a 100% job placement rate.

      LeBien Hall is equipped with wireless technology.

      Dean Janet Brown and Elise Alverson, Coordinator of the Family Nurse
       Practitioner Program, are selected as two of six nominees for Nursing
       Spectrum‟s Teaching Excellence Award. Valpo is the first program to have two
       finalists from the large number of nominations.




                                                                               Page 28
                                                               WHAT’S NEW AT VALPO


What’s New at Valpo, continued
Graduate Division
    An innovative Master of Arts in Chinese Studies program is launched, and the
     dual degree JD/MA Chinese Studies introduced in fall, 2007

      A new Masters of Engineering Management degree affords students with an
       undergraduate engineering degree from an ABET-accredited program the
       opportunity to prepare to be managers with just one additional year of study.

      A combined MSN/MBA program is approved.

      An MA program in English Studies & Communication, with the possibility of an
       embedded TESOL certificate, is launched with 10 new students enrolled. The
       program is designed for US and international students wanting to develop their
       skills with respect to the English language, American literature and cultural
       studies, and English communication skills.

Continuing Education

      A new bachelor‟s degree, the Bachelor of Liberal & Professional Studies, is
       approved. This program is intended for working, non-traditional age students who
       can benefit from a liberal arts education while developing specific skills that will
       serve them in their workplace or in exploring new career options. The program
       offers a flexible curriculum and delivery that is particularly friendly to this
       audience.

School of Law
   The School of Law opens the nation‟s first legal clinic dedicated to providing free
     legal assistance to athletes, coaches, and others involved in amateur sports.
     Prof. Straubel and 10 third-year law students represent Olympic and amateur
     athletes in six cases involving doping, eligibility, and immigration issues at Turin,
     Italy.

      A team of four students wins first place for its written argument in the East
       Regional Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition.

      Students take fourth place in the American Bar Association‟s Regional
       Negotiation Competition.

      Valpo is listed in Princeton Review‟s 2006 edition of “The Best 159 Law Schools.”




                                                                                Page 29
Service
    Fraternities and sororities perform nearly 30,000 hours of community service,
      raising more than $34,000 for charity.

      VU's Social Action Leadership Team (SALT) raises some $10,000 to build and
       supply a medical clinic in a poor Haitian village.

      Sponsored by the Chapel‟s Social Action Leadership Team (SALT), Pastor
       Cunningham leads a study trip to Nicaragua to focus on fair trade and Christian
       response to poverty.

      Student organizations increased their community service to 45,530 hours and
       donated more than $100,000 to various philanthropies.




                                                                             Page 30
                                                                               COMPLIANCE


COMPLIANCE STATEMENT
In order to be in compliance with IRS regulations regarding private universities,
Valparaiso University must include a statement of its racially nondiscriminatory policy
toward students in all of its brochures, catalogues, and other written communications
with the public dealing with student admissions, programs, and scholarships.

“Valparaiso University provides equality of opportunity to its applicants for admission,
enrolled students, graduates, and employees. The University does not discriminate with
respect to hiring, continuation of employment, promotion and tenure, other employment
practices, applications for admission, or career services and placement on the basis of
race, color, gender, age, disability, national origin or ancestry, sexual orientation, or (as
qualified herein) religions. An institution committed to its Lutheran tradition, the
University reserves the right to promote the teaching of the church and to exercise
preferences in admissions and employment-related practices in favor of Lutherans.”




                                                                                 Page 31
                                          VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY
The following University Trademarks and Symbols standards are to be used as a
guide for proper use of all Valparaiso University noncommercial brand identities
and logos and supercedes any previous standards.

A consistent image and identity reinforces and serves the goals, missions, and culture
of Valpo. The Valparaiso University Graphic Standards Guidelines outlines rules and
regulations for printed materials in order to preserve the integrity of Valparaiso‟s
identifiers and licensed properties and protect the University‟s image. Each time the
University logo or brand is being represented in print, Web or other media, the
highest standards mandated by the University should be met.

Included are University standards for using the seal, licensed marks, color variations,
and typography; specifications for college-specific letterhead, envelopes, mailing labels,
and business cards; and specifications for athletics stationery, envelopes, and business
cards.

If you have a need to modify or develop a logo beyond what is available to you in this
Standards Guide, or require information beyond that which is presented here, contact:

                                     Gail Kemper
                      Executive Assistant to the Vice President of
                       Admission, Financial Aid, and Marketing

                                  Valparaiso University
                                    Kretzmann Hall
                                   1700 Chapel Drive
                                  Valparaiso, IN 46383
                                Gail.Kemper@valpo.edu
                                 Phone: 219.464.6800
                                  Fax: 219.464.6898


Image files of logos are available upon written request at
www.valpo.edu/communications.




                                                                               Page 32
                                            VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY

Primary Marks




The Valparaiso Wordmark

The Valparaiso University wordmark has been developed as the primary institutional
identifier for Valparaiso University.

The wordmark consists of two primary elements – the seal combined with the
typography are optically centered to one another. The wordmark and its elements are
registered trademarks of Valparaiso University.

The Valparaiso University wordmark has been created in six different widths for
optimum legibility. They are ½ 1, 3, 4 ½, and 6. The seal created for use under ½
is significantly different from the other sizes. It has been drawn to remain legible when
used small. This wordmark should be used when the final size is 7/8 in width or
smaller.

The wordmark should not be used smaller than ½ in width under any circumstances. It
loses legibility when smaller than ½, reflecting poorly on the standards of the
University.

The typography in each version has been custom drawn and kerned for maximum
legibility and impact at each size. Choose the version of the logo closest to the final
reproduction size.




                                                                                Page 33
                                          VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY- continued




The Valparaiso University Seal

The Valparaiso University wordmark has been developed as the primary institutional
identifier for Valparaiso University, but the Valparaiso University seal may be used
alone in special circumstances.

Examples of this usage are as follows: on diplomas, invitations, or commencement
programs, in the design of pins, rings, or pendants, and on other formal articles where a
sense of ceremony is appropriate. The seal is a registered trademark of Valparaiso
University.




Typography

The Valparaiso University wordmark has been developed as the primary institutional
identifier for Valparaiso University, but the typographic element of the wordmark may be
used alone in special circumstances.

The typographic element of the Valparaiso University wordmark is based on the Adobe
Garamond font family. “Valparaiso University” and “Valparaiso Crusaders” are
registered trademarks of Valparaiso University.




                                                                              Page 34
                                          VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY- continued




Valpo-V Mark

The Valpo informal identifier has been developed as a secondary institutional identifier
for Valparaiso University. For many years “Valpo” has been the affectionate name given
to the institution by students, faculty, and the community.

Examples of usage are as follows: athletic uniforms, garments, print materials, and
venue displays such as scoreboards, etc. Also, print materials (including invitations,
announcements, newsletters, and advertising), banners, etc., promoting non-academic
events such as Homecoming, Parents Day, alumni reunions, and receptions.

The mark consists of two primary elements; the V with a double outline in the University
colors of gold and brown and the typography placed an optically centered across the V,
breaking the double outline. The mark should not be used smaller than 7/8 in width
under any circumstances. It loses legibility when used smaller than 7/8 in print
materials, reflecting poorly on the standards of the University.

The preferred color usage is Gold (Pantone 129C or Pantone 1210) and Brown
(Pantone 469). The Valpo-V is a registered trademark of Valparaiso University.




                                                                             Page 35
                                   VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued

Wordmarks




Arts Media and Our Valpo

The Valpo Arts Media wordmark is comprised of the Valparaiso University seal in
conjunction with the wordmark. Preferred placement of the Valparaiso University seal
with these wordmarks is shown, but can be altered. The seal must always be in close
proximity to the wordmark.

Our Valpo

The Valpo Arts Media wordmark was adopted for use in the promotion of Valparaiso
University arts media merchandise only. Again, preferred placement of the Valparaiso
University seal is shown.




                                                                            Page 36
                                      VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued

Athletic Marks




Crusader

The Valparaiso University Athletics mascot is the Crusader.

Examples of usage for the mascot are as follows: athletic uniforms, garments, print
materials, and venue displays such as scoreboards, etc. Also, print materials (including
invitations, announcements, newsletters, and advertising) and items promoting non-
academic events such as Homecoming, Parents Day, alumni reunions, and receptions.

The Valparaiso University Crusader serves as the athletic mascot. Variations of the
mascot by sport include baseball, basketball, football, soccer, swimming, diving, track
and field, and volleyball. The Crusader is a registered trademark of Valparaiso
University.




Valpo Spirit

The Valpo Spirit logo is a tertiary (and informal) institutional identifier for the promotion
of Valpo athletics and merchandise only.




                                                                                   Page 37
                                    VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS

GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued

Customization




Seal and Valpo mark

The Valparaiso University seal and the Valpo mark are customizable by academic
college, major, program, or administrative department.




Valpo Spirit

The Valpo Spirit logo is customizable for the promotion of all Valparaiso University
athletic sports and clubs and affiliated student and alumni groups (e.g., Crusader Club
Crusader Pep Band).




                                                                             Page 38
                                      VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS

GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued
Valparaiso University Official Colors

The Valparaiso University colors are gold and brown. Pantone 129 (gold) is to be used
on coated paper, Pantone 114 (gold) on uncoated paper and Pantone 8640 as a
metallic gold on ceremonial items such as diplomas, invitations and table accessories.
Pantone 469 (Brown) is the brown to be used on coated paper with Pantone 168
(brown) to be used on the uncoated paper.

The official color usage for the Valparaiso University wordmark utilizes gold for the seal
and brown for the typography. Other variations are listed below:
a.   Wordmark on gold, seal white, type brown
b.   Wordmark in white on gold
c.   Wordmark on brown, seal gold, type white
d.   Wordmark on brown, seal white, type gold
e.   Wordmark in black and white seal and black type
Letterhead
College Specific Letterhead: The wordmark is positioned 11p2 from the top trim and
2p from the left trim of the letterhead. It measures 7p2 across and prints in Gold and
Brown.

The college name is positioned 2p2 from the right edge of the wordmark and base
aligns with the wordmark. It is typeset in 12pt. Adobe Garamond Expert Semibold, flush
left, all caps, tracked to 70 and prints in Brown.

The college address, telephone, fax, and modem numbers are centered 27p4 below the
wordmark. They are typeset in 8pt. on 18pt. lead Adobe Garamond Expert Titling
Capitals, small caps, tracked to 5 and print in Brown.
Printing: Offset printing using the official colors specified in the color section of this
manual.
Paper: 24lb. bright white, wove finish with 25 percent cotton fiber, i.e., Strathmore
Writing.



#10 Envelope

The wordmark is positioned 2p from the left edge and 9p10 from the top edge of the
envelope. It measures 6p6 across and prints in Gold and Brown as shown.

The college name is positioned 2p from the right edge of the wordmark and 3p6 from
the top edge of the envelope. It is typeset in 11pt. Adobe Garamond Expert Semibold,
all caps, tracked to 65 and prints in Brown.

                                                                                   Page 39
                                     VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS

GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued
The address is positioned 2p from the right edge of the wordmark and 5p10 from the top
edge of the envelope. It is typeset in 8pt. Adobe Garamond Expert Titling Capitals,
small caps, tracked to 10 and prints in Brown.

Paper: Envelope and stationery to match.

Half-size Stationery & Envelopes

The stationery address is centered 11p6 beneath the wordmark. The envelope address
is flush left. Both typeset in 8pt. on 15pt. lead Adobe Garamond Semibold, small caps,
tracked to 10.

Paper: Inexpensive white offset, 70lb. text.

Mailing Label: The wordmark is positioned 2p from the left trim and 9p10 from the top
trim. It measures 6p6 across and prints in Gold and Brown.

The college name is positioned 2p from the right of the wordmark and 3p6 from the top
trim. It is typeset in 11pt. Adobe Garamond Expert Semibold, all caps, tracked to 65 and
prints in Brown.

The address is 5p10 from the top trim. It is typeset in 8pt Adobe Garamond Expert
Titling Capitals, small caps, tracked to 10 and prints in Brown.

Paper: Crack and peel label. Bright white wove to match the stationery.
University Business Card
The business cards are designed on the same grid as follows:
The wordmark is positioned 1p from the left trim and 10p6 from the top rim. It measures
6p8 across and prints in Gold and Brown.
The individual name and title are positioned to the right of the wordmark and 5p from
the top trim. They are typeset in 9pt Adobe Garamond Bold, flush left, small caps,
tracked to 5, and 8pt. on 10pt. lead Adobe Garamond Semibold Italic, upper and lower
case. Both print in Brown.
The college name is positioned 2p from the top trim. It is typeset in 8pt. on 10pt. lead
Adobe Garamond Titling Capitals, small caps, tracked to 5 and prints in Brown.
The last line of the text containing address and phone information aligns baseline to
baseline with the wordmark. That information is typeset in 8pt. on 10pt. Adobe
Garamond Titling Capitals, flush left, small caps, tracked to 5 and prints in Brown.
Paper: Bright white wove finish 80lb. cover to match the letterhead.



                                                                                Page 40
                                           VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued
Athletic Specific Letterhead
The informal mark is positioned 11p2 from the top trim and 2p from the left trim of the
letterhead. It measures 7p2 across and prints in Gold and Brown.
The sport name is positioned 2p4 from the right edge of the informal mark and base
aligns with the informal mark. It is typeset in 12pt. Adobe Garamond Expert Semibold,
flush left, all caps, tracked to 70 and prints in Brown.
The coach‟s name is centered 24p4 below the informal mark. It is typeset in 9pt. on
10pt. lead Adobe Garamond Expert Titling Capitals, small caps, tracked to 10 and prints
in Brown.
The department name is centered 28p below the informal mark. It is typeset in 10pt. on
18pt. lead Adobe Garamond Expert Semibold, all caps, tracked to 50 and prints in
Brown.
The address, telephone, fax, and modem numbers print in Brown. They are typeset in
8pt. on 18pt. lead Adobe Garamond Expert Titling Capitals, centered, small caps,
tracked to 5.

Paper: 24lb. bright white, wove finish with 25 percent cotton fiber, i.e., Strathmore
Writing

Athletic Business Card

The informal mark is positioned 1p6 from the left trim and 9p6 from the top trim. It
measures 5p8 across and prints in Gold and Brown.

The sport name is positioned 1p10 from the right edge of the informal mark and 2p from
the top trim. It is typeset in 8pt. on 10pt. lead Adobe Garamond Titling Capitals, flush
left, small caps, tracked to 5 and prints in Brown.

The individual name and title are positioned 1p10 from the right edge of the informal
mark and 4p2 from the top trim. They are typeset in 9pt. Adobe Garamond Bold, flush
left, small caps, tracked to 5, and 8pt. on 10pt. lead Adobe Garamond Semibold Italic,
upper and lower case. Both print in Brown.

The address, phone, and e-mail information are positioned 1p10 from the right edge of
the informal mark and 6p4 from the top trim. They are typeset in 8pt. on 10pt. lead
Adobe Garamond Titling Capitals, flush left, small caps, tracked to 5 and print in Brown.

Paper: Bright white wove finish 80lb. cover to match the letterhead.




                                                                                Page 41
                                         VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued
School of Law Graphic and Wordmark Standards

Preface: This is intended as a supplement to the Valparaiso University Graphics
Standards Guidelines. The primary application of these standards is to the design and
production of any School of Law logo apparel and products (stationery and business
card standards are found in the university Guidelines). Secondarily, these standards
also state the appropriate manner in which the Valparaiso University School of Law may
be identified and referenced.

   1. Generally, only images and wordmarks contained in the Valparaiso University
      Graphic Guide to Logo Usage Manual are acceptable. These images and
      wordmarks may be made school of law specific by including “School of Law”
      below the image/logo/seal in acceptable font and format (see, e.g., the two-color
      “Valpo-V” design for alumni relations in the Usage Manual).

   2. The official, name, identity, wordmark is “Valparaiso University School of Law.”
      Other acceptable word marks/identity references include:
         a. Valpo Law
         b. Valpo School of Law
         c. VU School of Law

   3. A non-exclusive list of unacceptable graphics and wordmarks:
         a. VUSL
         b. any use of the words Law School (e.g., Valparaiso Law School, VU Law
            School) as our official identity.
         c. any reference that omits a designation for university (e.g., Valparaiso
            School of Law)
         d. use of a generic scales of justice as a School of Law logo.
         e. any other unofficial mark, generic mark, or abridgement of approved
            marks.

   4. For specific law school design approvals and questions, contact Curt Cichowski,
      Associate Dean, School of Law, Wesemann Hall, 219-465-7841.




                                                                             Page 42
                                         VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued
College of Engineering Graphic & Trademark Standards

Preface: This is intended as a supplement to the Valparaiso University Graphics
Standards Guidelines. The primary application of these standards is to the design and
production of any College of Engineering logo apparel and products (stationery and
business card standards are found under the standard university guidelines).
Secondarily, these standards also state the appropriate manner in which the Valparaiso
University College of Engineering may be identified and referenced.

    1. Generally, only images and trademarks contained in the Valparaiso University
       Trademarks and Symbols Graphics Standards Manual are acceptable. These
       images and word marks may be made College of Engineering specific by
       including “College of Engineering” below the image/logo/seal in acceptable font
       and format.

    2. The official name and identity is “Valparaiso University College of Engineering.”

    3. A non-exclusive list of unacceptable graphics and word marks:
         a. VUCoE
         b. Any reference that omits a designation for university (e.g., Valparaiso
            College of Engineering).
         c. Any other unofficial mark, generic mark, or abridgement of approved
            marks.

    4. For specific College of Engineering design approvals and questions, contact
       Dean Kraig Olejniczak at 219-464-5085 or Vice President of Marketing,
       Katharine Wehling, at Katharine.Wehling@valpo.edu

    5. For requests to use University trademarks, please reference this link:
       www.valpo.edu/communications.




                                                                                Page 43
                                         VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued
College of Business Administration Graphic & Trademark Standards

Preface: This is intended as a supplement to the Valparaiso University Graphics
Standards Guidelines. The primary application of these standards is to the design and
production of any College of Business Administration logo apparel and products
(stationery and business card standards are found under the standard university
guidelines). Secondarily, these standards also state the appropriate manner in which
the College of Business Administration may be identified and referenced.

    1. Generally, only images and trademarks contained in the Valparaiso University
       Trademarks and Symbols Graphics Standards Manual are acceptable. These
       images and word marks may be made College of Business Administration
       specific by including “College of Business Administration” below the
       image/logo/seal in acceptable font and format.

    2. The official name and identity is “Valparaiso University College of Business
       Administration.”

    3. A non-exclusive list of unacceptable graphics and word marks:
                a. VUCoB
                b. Any reference that omits a designation for university (e.g.,
                    Valparaiso College of Business).
                c. Any other unofficial mark, generic mark, or abridgement of
                    approved marks.

   4. For specific College of Business Administration design approvals and questions,
   contact Dean Tom Boyt at 219-464-5040 or Vice President of Marketing, Katharine
   Wehling, at Katharine.Wehling@valpo.edu

   5. For requests to use University trademarks, please reference this link:
      www.valpo.edu/communications.




                                                                               Page 44
                                         VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued
College of Nursing Graphic & Trademark Standards

Preface: This is intended as a supplement to the Valparaiso University Graphics
Standards Guidelines. The primary application of these standards is to the design and
production of any College of Nursing logo apparel and products (stationery and
business card standards are found under the standard university guidelines).
Secondarily, these standards also state the appropriate manner in which the College of
Nursing may be identified and referenced.

   1. Generally, only images and trademarks contained in the Valparaiso University
      Trademarks and Symbols Graphics Standards Manual are acceptable. These
      images and word marks may be made College of Nursing specific by including
      “College of Nursing” below the image/logo/seal in acceptable font and format.

   2. The official name and identity is “Valparaiso University College of Nursing.”

   3. A non-exclusive list of unacceptable graphics and word marks:
         a. VUCON
         b. Any reference that omits a designation for university (e.g., Valparaiso
      College of Nursing)
         c. Any other unofficial mark, generic mark, or abridgement of approved
      marks.

   4. For specific College of Nursing design approvals and questions, contact Dean
      Janet Brown at 219-464-5289 or Vice President of Marketing, Katharine Wehling,
      at Katharine.Wehling@valpo.edu

   5. For requests to use University trademarks, please reference this link:
      www.valpo.edu/communications.




                                                                               Page 45
                                         VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued
College of Arts & Sciences Graphic & Trademark Standards

Preface: This is intended as a supplement to the Valparaiso University Graphics
Standards Guidelines. The primary application of these standards is to the design and
production of any College of Arts & Sciences logo apparel and products (stationery and
business card standards are found under the standard university guidelines).
Secondarily, these standards also state the appropriate manner in which the College of
Arts & Sciences may be identified and referenced.

       1. Generally, only images and trademarks contained in the Valparaiso
          University Trademarks and Symbols Graphics Standards Manual are
          acceptable. These images and word marks may be made College of Arts &
          Sciences specific by including “College of Arts & Sciences” below the
          image/log/seal in acceptable font and format.

       2. The official name and identity is “Valparaiso University College of Arts &
          Sciences.”

       3. A non-exclusive list of unacceptable graphics and word marks:
             a. VUCoAS
             b. Any reference that omits a designation for university (e.g., Valparaiso
             College of Arts & Sciences).
             c. Any other unofficial mark, generic mark, or abridgement of approved
              marks.

       4. For College of Arts & Sciences design approvals and questions, contact
          Dean Jon Kilpinen at 219-4645314 or Vice President of Marketing, Katharine
          Wehling, at Katharine.Wehling@valpo.edu.

       5. For requests to use University trademarks, please reference this link:
          www.valpo.edu/communications.




                                                                              Page 46
                                         VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


GRAPHIC IDENTITY – continued
Christ College Graphic & Trademark Standards

Preface: This is intended as a supplement to the Valparaiso University Graphics
Standards Guidelines. The primary application of these standards is to the design and
production of any Christ College logo apparel and products (stationery and business
card standards are found under the standard university guidelines). Secondarily, these
standards also state the appropriate manner in which Christ College may be identified
and referenced.

      1. Generally, only images and trademarks contained in the Valparaiso University
         Trademarks and Symbols Graphics Standards Manual are acceptable. These
         images and word marks may be made Christ College specific by including
         “Christ College” below the image/logo/seal in acceptable font and format.

      2. The official name and identity is “Christ College – The Honors College.”

      3. A non-exclusive list of unacceptable graphics and word marks:
             a. VUCC
             b. Any reference that omits a designation for university (e.g., Valparaiso
                Christ College).
             c. Any other unofficial mark, generic mark, or abridgement of approved
                marks.

      4. For specific Christ College design approvals and questions, contact Dean
         Margaret Franson or Vice President of Marketing, Katharine Wehling, at
         Katharine.Wehling@valpo.edu

      5. For requests to use University trademarks, please reference this link:
         www.valpo.edu/communications.




                                                                             Page 47
                                       VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY GRAPHIC STANDARDS


TRADEMARK LICENSING PROGRAM
The Valparaiso University licensing program is managed by Licensing Resource Group,
Inc, (LRG). The agency assists with protection and promotion of the University‟s name,
logos, and wordmarks.

Any manufacturer interested in using our marks and logos must receive permission from
the University through a formal licensing agreement and is subject to applicable
royalties at the current rate of 7.5 percent. Any person, organization, or corporation
manufacturing a product or providing a service mark bearing or containing any of the
marks of the University must, prior to use of such marks, enter into a licensing
agreement with the University.

Licensed vendors are required to submit product samples and artwork to the University
for approval. This ensures that the product is of good quality and that the artwork is
done in a manner that reflects positively on the University.

University purchases for items that are not for resale are exempt from royalties.
However, it is still very important that purchases go through licensed vendors. They
have received authorization to use our marks and logos and carry product liability
insurance coverage.

Licensing Revenues
   Licensed manufacturers pay the University royalties on all products sold. Revenues
   collected on licensed merchandise support the University‟s scholarship program.

   Licensing Program Coordinator
    Managing the University‟s trademarks and the licensing program is Katharine
    Wehling, Vice President, Kretzmann Hall, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN,
    46383; Phone: 219.464.6800; Fax: 219.464.6898; email:
    katharine.wehling@valpo.edu.

   Valparaiso University Book Center
    The Valparaiso University Book Center is managed by Folletts, 1109 Union Street,
    Valparaiso, IN, 46383; Phone: 219.464.5421; Fax: 219.464.5439; email:
    valpo@bkstr.com.

   Valparaiso University Registered Trademarks
    - “Valparaiso University”
    - “Valparaiso Crusaders”
    - University Seal
    - Crusader Mascot
    - Valpo-V Logo




                                                                             Page 48
                             LICENSING PROGRAM APPROVAL FORM
                             Museum Store, Brauer Museum of Art
                                  Valparaiso University Guild


Although officially exempt from the royalty fee charged to commercial ventures, the Museum Store
at the Brauer Museum of Art and the Valparaiso University Guild must have commercial projects
and artwork approved by Valparaiso University.

The request to use the names, marks, logos, images and/or symbols of Valparaiso University in any
commercial venture should be completed prior to project initiation and sent to the University
Licensing Office, Katharine E. Wehling, Vice President, Kretzmann Hall, Valparaiso University,
Valparaiso, Indiana, 219.464.5011, FAX 219.464.6989.



   Description of merchandise to be produced __________________________________

   Name, logo, image requested for use on merchandise __________________________

Artwork has been/will be submitted to Valparaiso University for approval by ________
                                                                                  (Date)

       __________________________________________                   __________________
        Signature of Museum Store/Guild Representative               Date



The above project has been approved and is exempt from the royalty charge:


       __________________________________________      __________________
        Katharine E. Wehling                      Date
        Vice President
        Licensing Coordinator




                                                                                      Page 49
                                VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY
                             LICENSING PROGRAM WAIVER FOR
Student Organizations

Officially recognized student organizations using any name, mark, logo, seal and/or symbol
identifying Valparaiso University, whether fund-raising or promotional, are required to seek
prior approval from the VU Licensing Coordinator, Katharine E. Wehling, Vice President of
Marketing, (219) 464-6800. Products sold or given away bearing such marks of the University
for the sole benefit of the student organization are exempt from the royalty fee charged
commercial vendors.

The Follett Higher Education Group, which operates the VU Book Center, has the exclusive right
of sale of University merchandise on-campus. Student organizations producing products for
commercial distribution on-campus must use the Book Center as their wholesaler/vendor. Products
produced for promotional and other non-commercial purposes must use a licensed vendor. The list
of VU licensees is available from Vice President Wehling. All artwork must be approved by the VU
Licensing Coordinator prior to production. Please reference www.valpo.edu/communications for
guidelines regarding artwork design.

The following waiver must be completed prior to production of any materials.

Name of Student Organization: _______________________________________________

Name of Student Managing this Project: ________________________________________

Academic Year: ___________________________________________________________

Description of Project:   _____________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

Length of Project: _________________________________________________________

Artwork has been/will be submitted to Valparaiso University for approval by ________ (Date)

I verify that the fund-raising/promotional project described above is only for the purpose of
generating revenue for or promoting the organization, not for the profit of an individual or business:

                ________________________________________                      ___________
                Signature of Student Organization Representative              Date

The above project has been approved and is exempt from the royalty charge:

                ________________________________________                      ___________
                Signature of Licensing Coordinator                            Date

Licwaiv.doc 1 Mar 2007


                                                                                         Page 50
                                                                             WEB STANDARDS


WEB STANDARDS
The Valparaiso University Office of Web Services created this guide with contributions
from the Web Standards Group of Valparaiso University‟s Public and Corporate
Communications Committee. The Office of Web Services provides standards and
technical assistance to help the Valparaiso University community develop Web pages
that are designed for optimum usability and accessibility. Creating a consistent Web
presence at Valparaiso University is one of the group‟s primary goals.


Writing for the Web

Users want to find what they are looking for as quickly and easily as possible. Web-
oriented writing and editing are essential for optimal content delivery. Key concepts of
web writing include:

     1. Omit non essential words. Users don‟t read – they scan.
     2. Use “inverted pyramid” writing style: start with the point, then support it, using
        links for more in-depth details.
     3. One idea per paragraph.
     4. Keep the most important elements “above the fold,” that is, visible upon initial
        page view without scrolling.
     5. Categorize according to users‟ needs, not by departmental organization or
        hierarchy.
     6. When creating a link, highlight only the one-to-three most important words, NOT
        “click here.”

Dos and Don’ts of Web Writing

Do

     1.   Facilitate scanning with subheads, bullet points, lists, and captions.
     2.   Provide links to related and additional detail.
     3.   Use an active voice.
     4.   Use lists or tables when possible.

Don’t

     1.   Expect your visitors to read everything.
     2.   Put everything on one page.
     3.   Use a passive voice.
     4.   List items in a paragraph to save room.




                                                                                   Page 51
                                                                            WEB STANDARDS


WEB STANDARDS, continued
Use of the Valparaiso University name

The consistent use of the Valparaiso University name plays a critical part in the
university‟s identity system. By using the official name of the university, we build
greater recognition worldwide.

The recommended designations for the university are:

First Reference – Valparaiso University (preferred)

Second Reference – Valpo

Third Reference – the university

When used in copy, the complete name “Valparaiso University”, should be used upon
first mention. Thereafter, “Valpo” or “the university” may be employed to reference the
university.

Our identity hinges on the words “Valparaiso University.” Do not use the acronym “VU”
when communicating to mixed or outside audiences. Beyond our community of
“insiders,” this acronym is not well or universally recognized and may be confused with
other institutions. When writing for internal audiences familiar with the university, it is
acceptable to refer to the university as VU.

The formal name of the university must be on all legal documents as well as university
publications.

When employed in a graphic context, the wordmark for the university should be used.

Copyright Issues

Copyright protects expression – your expression and that of others. All original
expression is eligible for copyright protection as soon as it is fixed in a tangible form.

Items NOT eligible for copyright protection include:

   1.   Ideas
   2.   Facts
   3.   Titles
   4.   Names
   5.   Short Phrases
   6.   Blank Forms




                                                                                  Page 52
                                                                         WEB STANDARDS


WEB STANDARDS, continued
While it‟s easy to download and copy files (text, photographs, graphics, sound, movies,
etc.) from the web, you must have permission from the copyright holder to use them no
your own web pages (or anywhere else). Under the terms of the Digital Millennium
Copyright Act, the University is obligated to take appropriate action if it receives a
complaint that copyrighted material is being published over our network without
permission from the copyright holder.

Visual Identity

Required Elements
It is important for university sites to contain specific elements of similarity in order to
present a unified look and feel to the University‟s web presence. The elements below
are required on all official Valparaiso University websites. These elements in some way
will be built into all university approved web templates. Please contact the Director of
Web Services if you have questions about any of the following elements.

      On the site‟s homepage, the gold header, including the brown university seal
       followed by the brown Valparaiso University wordmark, must be present.
      On the site‟s subpages, the gold header including the brown wordmark, must be
       presenet. Below the gold header bar, must be a brown bar containing white
       breadcrumbs and a search box and button.
      On all subpages, one of the three approved logos (listed below) must be present
       on the left hand side of the page. This logo can be used as a design element.
      On all pages, the index link and content link must be present.
      On all pages, the footer must contain the
        University seal
        Name Valparaiso University
        City, State and Zip Code address
        Location corner information (homepage only)
        Phone number of the department
        Hours of operation (Monday--Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm CT)
        Copyright link (which will contain copyright information, EEO statement and
           privacy policy)
        Date and time of last update (updated by CMS)
        Link to a contact form, instead of the e-mail of a site administrator.

      On all pages, the navigation should be placed on the left hand side of the page.
       There must be a separate presentation for category and audience links.
      On your sites home page, there must be a clearly-labeled link to the Valpo
       homepage page.
      On all pages of your site, there must be a link to your site‟s home page (designed
       or labeled so it is distinguishable from the front-page link to the Valpo home
       page).




                                                                               Page 53
                                                                            WEB STANDARDS


WEB STANDARDS, continued
Logo Use

Valparaiso University Seal
The official Valparaiso University seal is the primary (and formal) institutional identifier.
The seal can be used in conjunction with the wordmark or as a stand-alone mark and is
required in the header of all homepages as well as in the footer on all pages. The seal,
except when used as a design element, should always be in high color contrast with the
background.




The Valpo V mark
The Valpo V mark is a secondary (and informal) institutional identifier for the university.
This mark is recommended for use on web subpages that are non-academic, except for
the School of Law.




The Spirit Logo
The Valpo Spirit logo is a tertiary (and informal) institutional identifier for the promotion
of Valpo athletics and may only be used on athletic web subpages.




                                                                            WEB STANDARDS
                                                                                   Page 54
WEB STANDARDS, continued
Official Valpo websites may not use logos/wordmarks, or variations of logo/wordmarks,
that are not explicitly approved and provided by the University Marketing department for
current, public use. Logos developed for internal, departmental, or limited use – even if
they have been officially approved – are NOT permitted on web sites, as the web is a
public forum.

If you have any questions regarding the use of any Valpo logos or wordmark, or if you
need an electronic version of a Valpo logo for your website, please place this request
online at www.valpo.edu/communications.


Elements Not to Include

There are certain elements that detract from the user experience, and from the
professionalism of your site‟s presentation. Please do not include the following on your
web site:

      Individual dates or other specifically time-sensitive information on web pages,
       unless you are thoroughly prepared to remove as soon as possible after a date
       has passed, or unless you have an automated method for daily updates. It is
       important to maintain completely updated information.
      Distracting design elements, such as flashing .gifs, blinking text, background
       images, super-saturated (very bright) colors, looped sound files, etc.
      Any advertising, promotions or commercial activity, unless approved. These
       activities are prohibited in the Valpo domain, because it is an .edu domain.
      Frames, Flash-only navigation, etc.

Colors

Official brown and gold is required on the Valparaiso University web pages in the logo
as well as the title bar.

Official gold: C=0, M=16, Y=77, K=0

Official brown: C=0, M=52, Y=100, K=62

Web-safe colors are not required.


Graphics and Photography

It is recommended that each top-level and first level page have at a minimum, either
one large or two medium-sized photographs. GIF and JPEG are the most common
formats for web graphics. As a general rule of thumb, their size should be small enough
to load quickly (~25k). Total page load should be taken into account, however.


                                                                              Page 55
                                                                            WEB STANDARDS


WEB STANDARDS, continued
GIF
   1.   Better for solid colors
   2.   Render with a transparent background to avoid dithering
   3.   Smaller file size
   4.   Smaller color palette

JPEG
  1. Better for images with subtle variations of color (photographs, for example)
  2. Higher compression tends to degrade quality; adjust compressions to avoid large
     file size and bad image quality.

Text Treatment

       For text, use dark colors on a light background for maximum contrast and
        readability. Black text is recommended for greatest readability. Always use
        black text (hex color #000000) for any text longer than a couple of lines.
       If you are using color in text for emphasis, provide an additional means of
        emphasis as well, for those who are colorblind. Any colors you use should also
        be clear, contrasting, and readable.
       If you wish to use color in text, stick to the web color palette (256 colors) and use
        colors that will work within the Valpo color palette. Avoid using multiple text
        colors. Text colors should be used sparingly for selective highlights, not as a
        way to add decoration or color to a page.
       Do not underline text for emphasis; use bold (<strong>) or italic (<em>) text
        instead. For web users, underlined text, and particularly colored underlined text,
        signifies a link.
       When using bold or italic for emphasis, do not overemphasize. As the saying
        goes, “all bold is no bold.” And, since italicized text is harder to read than regular
        text, use italics sparingly, and for no more than a few lines of text at a time.
       Text size should be within a readable range. No font size should be smaller than
        10 pt. for body copy and 11 pt. for header copy.
       The specific font that should be used in body copy is Arial Helvetica.
       For links in text, use the browser default colors OR an intuitive color structure.
        For example, unvisited links should be darker in color than visited links. Make
        sure text links are underlined so the user knows they are links. For graphic links,
        construct the navigation so links are obvious. Be consistent with text throughout
        your site.
       Be aware that Valpo uses AP style for editorial content.




                                                                                  Page 56
                                              TALKING POINTS


TALKING POINTS

    Annual Profile

    Examples of Distinguished Valpo Alumni

    Union

    MSN/MBA

    Tuition and Fees




                                                     Page 57
                                                               ANNUAL PROFILE 2005-2006


ANNUAL PROFILE 2006-2007

   Enrollment:                  3,866 students from most states and over 40 countries
                                538 of these students are enrolled in the School of Law

   2006-2007 Student Profile:   -52 percent female; 48 percent male
                                -39.7 percent Lutheran; 21.3 percent Catholic
                                -66 percent of students from outside Indiana
                                -ACT mid 50% range: 22-28
                                -SAT mid 50% range: 1020-1260
                                -More than 150 undergraduate and law student organizations

   Faculty:                     340 faculty – More than 232 full time, 108 part time;
                                almost 90 percent of whom hold Ph.D. or highest degree
                                awarded in field

   Student to Faculty Ratio:    13:1

   Average Class Size:          22

   Alumni:                      45,000+ (including undergraduate, graduate, and School of
                                Law)

   Endowment:                   $143,095,735

   Technology Resources:         5-to-1 student-computer ratio (not including
                                    student-owned computers)
                                -90 percent of residential students have their own
                                computers

   Library Volumes:              1,362,598

   Retention Rate:              - 85 percent for freshman to sophomore year students
                                - 90 percent for School of Law students

   Graduation Rate:             - 72.1 percent for Undergraduate (within five years)
                                - 85 percent for School of Law
   Placement Rates:
                                - 100 percent placement for Engineering
                                - 100 percent placement for Nursing
                                - 93 percent placement for Business Administration
                                  93 percent placement for Arts and Sciences
                                  94.3 percent overall Undergraduate placement
                                  99 percent for School of Law




                                                                                Page 58
                                                     ANNUAL PROFILE 2005-2006


ANNUAL PROFILE 2006-2007, continued

   Financial Aid             -Approximately 92 percent of all students receive financial
                             aid; more than $53 million awarded annually, total
                             including graduate and law school, $50.6 million.
                             - $17,000 annual average aid award (includes grants,
                                 scholarships, loans) for new undergraduate students in
                                 fall of 2004.

   2007-2008 Direct and
   Estimated Expenses*:
                             Tuition                                       $24,360
                             General Fee                                    $ 840
                             On-Campus Room and Board                       $ 7150
                             Total Direct Costs                             $32,350

                             Books and supplies                            $ 2500
                             Estimated Total Expense                       $34,850

                             *Costs indicated are for students enrolling as first-year
                             students.

   2007-2008 School of Law
   Expenses:
                             Tuition and General Fee                       $31,210




                                                                              Page 59
                                                       DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI


EXAMPLES OF DISTINGUISHED VALPO ALUMNI
 1. Marjorie Albohm, class of 1972 –Executive Director of Research and Business
     Development, OrthoIndy and the Indiana Orthopaedic Hospital; the first woman certified
     as an athletic trainer in Indiana (Indianapolis)
 2. G. Allen Andreas, Jr., class of 1965 and Law 1968 – Retired Chairman and Chief
     Executive Officer of Archer-Daniels-Midland
 3. Kathryn Baerwald, class of 1972 – Senior Associate Counsel, Georgetown University
 4. Jacqueline Baker, class of 1984 – Registered nurse and founder of health clinic in
     Vancouver, WA, which treats individuals unable to afford medical care
 5. Richard Bimler, class of 1963 – Former Director, Wheat Ridge Ministries; Valparaiso
     University Ambassador
 6. Stephen Buyer, Law 1984 – U.S. Congressman (Indiana’s 4th Congressional District)
 7. JoBe Cerny, class of 1970 – Actor, producer, and author - Voice of Pillsbury DoughBoy
     and silent actor in Cheers detergent commercials; appeared in My Best Friend’s Wedding
     (1997) and Road to Perdition (2002)
 8. Jay Christopher, class of 1967 – Chairman of the Thatcher Technology Group, a
     software developer in Addison, IL; co-founder of The Pampered Chef
 9. Bryce Drew, class of 1998 – Former NBA player (Houston Rockets, Chicago Bulls, New
     Orleans Hornets); Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach, Valparaiso University
 10. Richard Duesenberg, class of 1951 – Retired General Counsel, Monsanto Co.
 11. Robert Duesenberg, class of 1951- Retired Senior Vice President, General Dynamics.
 12. Arthur Fabsits, class of 1962 – Consultant, Hansen Information Technology
 13. Carolyn Femovich, class of 1971 – Executive Director of the Division I Patriot League
 14. Donald Fites, class of 1956 – Former Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive
     Officer, Caterpillar, Inc.
 15. Richard Gozon, class of 1960 – Retired Executive Vice President and CEO,
     Weyerhaueser Co.
 16. Lowell P. Hager, class of 1947 – Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois; National
     Academy of Sciences inductee
 17. Catherine Jenny, class of 1957 – Retired Director, Addiction Recovery Programs at N
     Street Village, Washington, D.C.
 18. Heather (Mitchell) Johnson, class of 1974 – Obstetrician and gynecologist, Reiter Hill
     & Johnson, LLP, Washington, D.C.
 19. Mary Junck, class of 1969 – Chairman, President & CEO, Lee Enterprises, Inc.
 20. Richard Kauzlarich, class of 1966 – Former U.S. Ambassador to Bosnia and
     Herzegovina; National Intelligence Office for Europe
 21. Paul Landahl, class of 1961 – Bishop of the Metropolitan Chicago Synod of the ELCA
 22. Jacki Lyden, class of 1975 – Host and senior correspondent, National Public Radio;
     author of The Queen of Sheba (1997)
 23. Paul Manske, class of 1960 – Chief of Orthopedic Surgery at Washington University
     School of Medicine
 24. Lloyd McClendon, class of 1981 – Nearly 20 years in Major League Baseball; Hitting
     Coach for Detroit Tigers
 25. Robert Moellering Jr., class of 1958, 1974 LL.D. – Chair, Department of Medicine,
     Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital
 26. Julie Meyer, class of 1988 – Founder and CEO of Ariadne Capital Ltd., United Kingdom


                                                                               Page 60
27. Deborah Neymark, class of 1979 – Vice President of Regulator Affairs, Vascular
    Solutions
28. Carole Nuechterlein, class of 1983 – Chief Corporate Counsel, Sangstatt Medical
    Corporation in Switzerland
29. Rebecca Pallmeyer, class of 1976 – Judge, U.S. District Court
30. Robert Palumbo, class of 1980 – Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Valparaiso
    University; research scientist at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland
31. Eugene Parker, Law 1982 – Attorney and Sports Agent; clients include Deion Sanders,
    Aeneas Williams, Ray Lewis, Derrick Brooks, Emmitt Smith
32. T. Marshall Rousseau, class of 1955 – Retired Executive Director of the Salvador Dali
    Museum, Sarasota, Florida
33. Robert Rucker, Law 1976 - Justice, Indiana Supreme Court
34. Ben Schnakenberg, class of 2000 – Vice President, LaSalle Bank Corporation
35. Paul Schrage, class of 1957 – Retired Senior Executive Vice President and Chief
    Marketing Officer at McDonald’s Corporation
36. Al Seib, class of 1978 – Pulitzer-winning photojournalist, Los Angeles Times
37. Kathi P. Seifert, class of 1971 - Retired Executive Vice President, Kimberly-Clark
    Foundation; Fortune magazine's 50 Most Powerful Women in Business in 2002 and
    Forbes.com's annual America's Top Businesswomen
38. Paul Sieving, class of 1970 - Director of the National Eye Institute
39. Rene Steinke, class of 1986 – Author of The Fires (1999); Holy Skirts (2005) was one of
    five finalists for the National Book Award (fiction category).
40. Jill Long Thompson, class of 1974 – Former Undersecretary, U.S. Department of
    Agriculture; former member of U.S. Congress; CEO/Sr. Fellow for National Center for
    Food & Agriculture
41. Charles R. Vaughan, Law 1957 – Attorney, defended Ryan White, AIDS victim
42. Marc Voth, class of 1965 – Nuclear Reactor Inspector for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
    Commission
43. Richard Wamhoff, class of 1967 – Retired Vice-President, Asia/Pacific & Global
    Manufacturing / Supply Chain, H.J. Heinz Company
44. Julie Winkler, class of 1996 – Vice President-Business Development, Chicago Board of
    Trade
45. Ron Zech, class of 1965 – Retired Chairman and CEO, GATX Corporation




                                                                               Page 61
UNION TALKING POINTS
OVERVIEW

     205,000 square feet in size – two stories. Current union is 44,369 sq. ft.
     Will serve as third anchor in a vibrant campus triad, which also includes the
      Chapel of the Resurrection and the Christopher Center for Library and
      Information Resources.
     Construction began in early November 2006
     Anticipated opening projected for 2008-2009 academic year
     Total cost is $74 million
     Being funded by private gifts

SIZE AND LOCATION

     Largest room will seat nearly 1,000 people or 500 banquet tables, compared with
      the current union‟s 350 person capacity, or 260 tables.
     Resides across the street from the Chapel of the Resurrection and the
      Christopher Center for Library and Information Resources.

KEY BUILDING FEATURES

     Large central dining hall with a “marketplace” selection of a variety of food
      stations
     Café for breakfast (coffee, pastries, etc.), lunch and late night snacking (pizza,
      soft drinks, etc.)
     Convenience store, eliminating the need to leave campus for various sundries
      and basic needs.
     Post office and mailboxes for each resident student.
     Bookstore which carries books and Valpo merchandise for students, alumni,
      visitors and local community.
     Spacious conference areas for student organizations to meet, plan, and carry out
      their missions.
     Comfortable lounges for students to relax, study, visit with friends and faculty, or
      watch sporting events.
     Recreation area with billiards, ping pong, outdoor recreation equipment, etc.

DEFINING QUALITIES – Students, Faculty, Staff & Community

     Encourages student/faculty conversation and collaboration, where information
      relayed in the classroom becomes assimilated through open discussion in an
      informal setting.
     Provides room for symposia and other events for 1,000 people.
     Doubles the number of dining, meeting and social accommodations.
     Provides a location for leadership training/developing for members of Valpo‟s
      more than 100 student organizations.
     Fosters community spirit – where student groups congregate, from Student
      Senate to Habitat for Humanity to Latinos in Valparaiso for Excellence.


                                                                              Page 62
UNION TALKING POINTS, continued

     Hosts groups within the local community and Northwest Indiana, including Meals
      on Wheels, the Red Cross, Council on State Government, and Rotary Club.
     A place for developing friendships, whether watching a sporting event, playing
      billiards,
      or gathering in the café to discuss the day‟s events.
     Underscores the faith-based, residential education that distinguishes Valparaiso
      University.




                                                                           Page 63
COMBINED MSN/MBA JOINT DEGREE TALKING POINTS
September 2006

Valparaiso University‟s Graduate Studies Division, the College of Business
Administration, and the College of Nursing have partnered to blend two top-notch
programs into one, thus creating the MSN/MBA degree option. Adoption of this joint
degree program enables Valparaiso University‟s College of Nursing to remain
competitive in the marketplace and elevates the Valparaiso University brand among a
regional audience.

Why should a student pursue the MSN/MBA degree at Valparaiso University?

   1. Nurse administrators will not have to choose between a graduate degree in nursing or
      one in business. They can have both.
   2. A focus on both nursing and business at the graduate level is essential for nurse
      administrators to apply theory and research to practice. Graduate education in these
      fields can enhance a career trajectory, providing extensive managerial opportunities.
   3. The curriculum prepares nurse leaders with a unique blend of nursing, administration,
      and leadership skills essential for careers in health care administration.
   4. Completion of the MSN/MBA will greatly enhance professional growth and earnings
      opportunities.
   5. Both Valparaiso University‟s College of Business Administration and College of Nursing
      are fully accredited.
   6. The 65 credits can be completed in approximately two years of full-time study.
   7. The values-based leadership approach of the MBA program and the reputation of the
      College of Nursing‟s graduate programs are attractive to students because they can trust
      that they will receive a quality education and be even more marketable as professional
      managers.

   MSN/MBA Program Facts

      1. The MSN/MBA joint degree program prepares students to:

                Assume mid-level executive positions in health care delivery systems;
                Apply research findings to health care systems;
                Apply state-of-the-art business practices to the administration and
                 management of health care organizations.

      2. Admission to the program is selective. Applicants must meet the admission criteria
         of the Colleges of Nursing and Business Administration and of the Graduate Division,
         and must take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT).
      3. Students desiring certification in a clinical specialty area will add 12 credits of nursing
         course work.
      4. Neither degree is awarded until all MSN and MBA requirements are fulfilled.
      5. If a student elects not to continue in the joint degree program, yet desires to
         complete either the MSN or the MBA, all requirements for the individual degree will
         need to be completed.
      6. The approximate cost of completion of this 65-credit (21 MSN, 44 MBA) joint degree
         will be $33,500.




                                                                                       Page 64
TALKING POINTS ABOUT 2007-2008 UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEE INCREASES

                   {Audiences: Prospective and Current Students, Parents, Alumni, Media}

                                    Undergraduate Tuition ….....          $24,360
                                    General Fee ……….……..…                 $840*
                                    Freshman Board ……….…..                $2,720
                                    Room …………….….…….                      $4,430
                                    TOTAL …………….…….. $32,350

                 Freshman - Senior COE students are charged an additional $700 engineering fee

   Valparaiso University’s modest tuition increase of 5 percent remains consistent over the past decade, illustrating
    the University’s commitment to holding increases to the lowest possible level without compromising the quality
    of the educational programs.

   The tuition increase is the third lowest in the past 13 years and less than one-quarter of a percent from being the
    lowest increase in that time span.

   Room rates will continue to vary by residential unit

            Compass Pointe apartments and air-conditioned units will cost more.

            Compass Pointe apartments will continue to be staffed and recognized as if they are          on-campus
             living units.

   Board rates are changing to reflect higher costs of operation, but for returning students, the increase is very
    little. In fact, there is no significant change in meal plan expenses for current students. Seniors will continue to
    have the option of establishing the level of meal plan they wish to purchase.

   We're forced to raise tuition each year because our costs of operation increase annually.

            The University obtains its operating revenue primarily from three sources: gifts and grants, endowment
             (investment) earnings, and tuition.

            While our alumni and other donors have been generous in their growing support of the University, the
             majority of these funds are restricted by the donors to be used for specific purposes such as
             construction of the new Union, and for creating endowment funds to support specific programs such as
             student financial aid or scholarly activity by the faculty. Although unrestricted gifts that directly
             support the operating budget have increased steadily, it’s never been at the rate needed to offset the
             increasing cost of goods and services required.

            Grants from the federal and state government to provide aid to worthy students have been decreasing
             or staying flat forcing the University to absorb some of these operational costs.




                                                                                                         Page 65
            More than half of our budget is personnel costs (faculty, staff, physical plant, housekeeping, etc.) so
             even a modest increase in salaries becomes a significant budget increase. Benefit costs also increase
             annually, fueled by a double-digit increase in cost of health care benefits.

            It's important that we remain competitive with salaries so we can continue to provide excellent
             classroom teachers. We have a reputation for a high quality academic program and we want to
             continue to build on that reputation.

            To maintain high quality, we must invest in "high cost" areas such as laboratories, teaching aids and
             technology.

            We want to maintain small class sizes and keep courses available when students need them so they can
             graduate on schedule. That may require additional faculty members in select areas.

   Even students who receive no scholarships or grants pay only about two-thirds of the cost of a Valpo education.
    Students receiving financial assistance pay even less. The other third comes from gifts, special grants and
    earnings from our investments. We're constantly working to increase revenue from these sources so we can
    keep tuition increases as small as possible.

   We're very conscious of cutting costs where we can, making investments to reduce expenditures for utilities and
    reviewing health care alternatives, for example, but we must do so with great care so that we do not diminish
    the quality of education we provide. Some of the additional costs incurred in recent years have been to meet
    student expectations -- increased counseling services, improved security, greater access to computers, etc.

   Students and their families also need to be aware that tuition money is not spent on new buildings.

   Valpo’s comprehensive cost of tuition, room and board for 2006-2007 is less than the national average for four-
    year, private institutions ($29,840 vs. $30,367) and could be described as being mid-range for schools of its
    quality. This comparative position is not expected to change.

   We will continue to work to ensure that Valpo is a good "value." That is, to see that students receive good
    value for their investment. We're pleased when publications such as U.S. News & World Report, Barron's and
    others recognize us as a "good value" or "best buy" as well as for the quality of our academic programs.

   A good education is, after all, an investment. It is not a perishable commodity that is gone or worn out after a
    few years.

            Studies continue to show that lifetime earnings of a college graduate exceed those of a high school
             graduate by 80 percent. (Up from 45 percent in 1980.) (Based on notes distributed in 2002 by the
             Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges)

            And, the economic factors don't address the fact that college graduates enjoy a higher quality of life,
             are better prepared to adjust to changes in their careers, etc.

            A more educated citizenry means decreased demands on public budgets and increased participation in
             civic activities.




                               Law Tuition ………….…… $30,510
                                     Law Fee ………….…… $698
            The law school tuition increase (8%) is less than one percent higher than the increase a year
             ago.

            It is anticipated that tuition and fees for the law school will remain in the mid-range among schools
             with strong academic programs.

                                                                                                        Page 66
                                                 COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES



FACT-CHECKING AND EDITING
The goal of fact-checking is to make certain that text content is correct and
cannot cause a lawsuit or harm somebody personally or physically. A fact-
checker should come to a piece of writing with a legal eye. In order to do this,
time should be taken to secure the validity, authenticity, and legitimacy of
content. Fact-checking contains two major elements:

      Check and collect approval on quotes, dates, names, job titles, agencies,
       statistics, citations, and other represented facts.
      Work with all parties involved to secure information through sources
       deemed worthy for validation and finalization.


PROCESS
      Print out the content to be fact-checked. Read it line by line and make a
       note or mark beside every fact that needs to be checked.
      A fact-checking and editing trick is to start at the end of the document with
       a ruler. Put the ruler underneath the last line. Gradually push it upwards
       through the document, as you read the text right from left, watching out
       only for facts that need checking.
      Be skeptical and investigative. Don‟t accept anything just because it
       comes from a “reputable” source.
      Never rely on a single source. Always try to find at least two or three
       sources to confirm a particular fact. If a source you come across conflicts,
       then spread your net wider.
      If an organization is being named, go to its Web site, and/or find official
       documentation that will confirm the correct spelling of the organization‟s
       name.
      If the document contains Web site links, copy and paste them into a
       browser and test them out so as to ensure that each link is correct.
      If the document contains a phone number, call it and verify that it is
       correct.
      Be extra careful with dates and numbers. Watch out for zeros and
       commas in numbers. Also, check whether it says “millions,” when in fact it
       should say “billions.” Always do the math, adding or subtracting dollar
       figures, percentages, etc.




                                                                         Page 67
                                                     COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES


DOCUMENTATION

Stories should be submitted with documentation
When the final version of a written piece is submitted, it should include all
documentation used to write the body of work. Your documentation should include
the following:

       Primary Sources: a list of contacts with phone numbers
        Provide a list of names, numbers and e-mail addresses to the fact-checker
        so that he/she can verify information. You may indicate those persons you
        would prefer not be contacted, but an alternative should then be provided.

       Secondary Sources: articles in newspapers, magazines, and books
        Submit any articles or photocopies of articles that you used to write your
        stories, including printouts of articles accessed online. These should
        include the name of the publication, author, and date. If you used a book,
        photocopies should include the title, author, and page number. If you
        submit the whole book, indicate page numbers. If you used information
        from the Web, include print outs of Web pages, including URLs.


HEADLINES

   1.   The headline should tell the story.

   2.   The headline should come from the key facts.

   3.   The headline, in most cases, will come from the first couple of
        paragraphs, but don‟t steal the punch – and don‟t simply repeat the lead.

   4.   Use specifics, details.

   5.   Proof the spelling of headlines, as these words are often overlooked.

   6.   Use dynamic verbs in the present tense. Strong verbs - not adjectives -
        give headlines color.

   7.   If you get stuck, start over. Headlines can be polished, just like good
        stories.




                                                                          Page 68
                                                   COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES


STYLE CONSIDERATIONS

Accurate grammar, spelling, and punctuation are required in academic writing. If
you experience difficulty in these areas, consult an authoritative dictionary and/or
style manual or contact Valparaiso University‟s Writing Center in the Christopher
center for Library and Information resources, 464-5216.

As problems in grammar, spelling, and punctuation contribute to poor
representation of the college, program, and/or University image, pay particular
attention to the following areas in the final editing phase:

      Accurate spelling is essential. If there is more than one way of spelling a
       word, there should be consistency throughout the document (e.g., s or z).
       APA (2001, p. 89)i recommends that if the dictionary gives a choice, the first
       spelling listed should be used. Computer spell checkers save time and
       promote accuracy, but are not a substitute for careful editing.

      Every word that you use should mean exactly what you intend it to mean.
       APA (2001, p. 36) states that direct, declarative sentences with simple,
       common words are usually best. It is important to keep a dictionary and
       thesaurus at hand to both vary vocabulary and to increase word
       knowledge. A thesaurus may also be available in your word processing
       program. Terminology should be clearly defined early in the paper, and
       use of the defined terms should remain consistent throughout. Avoid the
       use of slang, colloquialisms, clichés, euphemisms, and overused words.
       APA (2001, p. 61) states that devices such as clichés, heavy alliteration,
       rhyming, and poetic expression attract attention to words, sounds, or other
       embellishments rather than to ideas.

      Attention to the tense of the verb is important, as is consistency of tense
       throughout a document. The past tense is generally used in academic
       writing to express an action or condition that occurred at a specific time in
       the past (e.g., the person complained of pain). The present perfect
       tense is used to express an action beginning in the past and continuing to
       the present (e.g., patients require analgesia when ... ), or that did not
       occur at a specific, definite time (APA, 2001, p. 43).

      Use of the active voice rather than the passive voice is desirable (e.g., the
       person sat on the chair rather than the person was sitting on the chair),
       because it is generally more emphatic and direct. However, the passive
       voice is acceptable when the focus is on the object or recipient of the action
       rather than the actor (e.g., the person was sitting on the old rocker
       recliner).

      Headings, sub-headings, dates, signatures or units of measurement should
       not finish with a period.



                                                                          Page 69
                                               COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES



STYLE CONSIDERATIONS, continued
   Use of capital letters for titles (e.g., of books and articles) varies in the text
    of your document and reference list, but italics are used in both. In titles
    within the text of your paper, and headings and subheadings, capitalize the
    first letter; and the first letter of all words, except articles (e.g., an), short
    prepositions (e.g., in), and conjunctions (e.g., but). All words of four letters
    or more are capitalized, and all verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs and
    pronouns are capitalized.

    In reference lists, capitalization of titles of books and journal articles is
    minimal, but the name of the journal is capitalized. The names of university
    departments/schools require maximal capitalization if they refer to a specific
    department/school within a specific university, as do complete names of
    academic courses if they refer to a specific course.

   When using a singular noun, (e.g., student), the personal pronoun (i.e.,
    her/his) referring to its antecedent (i.e., student) must also be singular, (e.g.,
    when a student loses a library book, he/she [not they] is required to ...).

   To identify placement of an apostrophe, ask “To whom [or what] does X
    belong?” If the answer ends in s, add an apostrophe (e.g., James’ book). If
    the answer does not end in s, add an apostrophe followed by an s (e.g.,
    Sally’s book). However, if X belongs to more than one person or thing, the
    apostrophe comes after the s (e.g., students’ books for more than one
    student, but student’s books when the books belong to only one student).
    A word like children is already plural and hence becomes children’s books
    - with the apostrophe

   Note that it’s is a contraction, and always means it is. A common error in
    written work is the use of it’s to denote possession (its means 'belonging to
    it'). An apostrophe is always required in contractions such as can‟t, don‟t or
    won‟t (or it‟s); but not all contractions have an apostrophe (e.g., Govt., Qld).
    Contractions such as can‟t, don‟t, it‟s, and won‟t are not normally used in
    academic writing unless they occur in a direct quotation.

   Paragraphs should be characterized by unity, cohesiveness and continuity.
    Bate and Sharpe (1996) recommend that most paragraphs should be about
    100 words in length, but may vary between 50 and 250 words. Paragraphs
    are units of writing that assist in structuring an essay and guide the reader
    from one main idea to the next. A topic sentence can establish a
    paragraph‟s focus by expressing its main idea. This should then be
    supported or developed by the other sentences in the paragraph, and linked
    to the next paragraph.




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                                                               COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES

STYLE CONSIDERATIONS, continued
             Paragraphs that follow one another should relate to each other and to the
             subject under discussion. Connections of meaning between sentences or
             paragraphs are made by a set of words or phrases known as „connectives‟
             (e.g., furthermore, on the other hand, to sum up). These can be used to
             add an idea to make comparisons or contrasts, to illustrate or support, to
             summarize, or to express a result or relationship, including one paragraph‟s
             relationship to the following paragraph. Paragraph length will vary,
             depending on the required amount of development or support of the
             paragraph‟s main idea, expressed in the topic sentence. Uniformity in length
             can be monotonous and may appear to be over-controlled; although very
             long paragraphs can be difficult to follow and can give the impression of
             rambling. Very short paragraphs can also be irritating, and can give the
             impression of the topic being undeveloped.

            Parentheses ( ) are used to set off structurally independent examples,
             abbreviation introductions, and to reference citations in text. Examples are
             used throughout this Style Guide. Brackets [ ] are used to enclose
             parenthetical material within parentheses, and to enclose material inserted
             in a quotation (see APA, 2001, pp. 84-87; and examples throughout this
             Style Guide).

            A colon (:) is used between a grammatically complete introductory clause,
             and a final clause that illustrates, extends or amplifies this. APA (2001)
             proposes that in text, if a “clause following the colon is a complete sentence,
             it begins with a capital letter” (p. 80). The semi-colon is used to separate
             elements in a series (or sentence) that already contain commas, and to
             separate two independent clauses that are not joined by a conjunction (e.g.,
             and, but, yet) in a sentence.




O‟Brien, K. (2002). Fact Checking. Retrieved January 13, 2003 from
 http://www.together.net/~ktob/pages/fact_checking.htm.
Victoria University. (2002). Faculty of Human Development Handbook 2002. Melbourne: Author.
American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication Manual of the American Psychological
               th
Association (5 ed.). Washington, DC: Author.




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                                                        COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES


PUBLICITY AUDIENCES
The following are suggested audiences for your consideration when sending out any
form of Valparaiso University publicity. Consider carefully the groups that would benefit
most from the information you are providing. Not all groups should always be included,
but it may be more beneficial to err on the side of inclusion rather than exclusion.

Alumni                                            Employees
 By Major                                         Hourly
 By Geography                                     Salaried
                                                   Administrators‟ Forum
Board of Directors
Campus Visitors                                   Employers
 Tour Groups                                      Of alumni

 Conference Groups                                Of students

 Camp Groups                                      Prospective (Career Center)

 Lutheran Basketball Tourney participants
 Liturgical Institute participants
 History Symposium participants

Churches
 Lutheran – Evangelical Lutheran Church of America
  (ELCA)
 Lutheran – The Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod (LCMS)
 Lutheran – All Other
 Catholic
 Protestant                                 Foundations/Corporations
 All other                                   Lilly
                                              Wheat Ridge
Church Leaders
 Local                                      University Guild
 State
                                             Higher Education Professional
 National
                                             Associations
Colleges/Universities                                Accrediting Associations
 Schools in our Carnegie Classification             Lutheran Educational Conference of
 Indiana Schools                                     North America (LECNA)
 Law Schools                                        National Association for College
 Peer Schools                                        Admission Counseling (NACAC)
 Aspirational Schools                               Indiana Association for College
 Mid-Continent Conference Schools                    Admission Counseling (IACAC)
 Luther Institutes
                                                  High Schools
Donors                                             Lutheran

 Alumni donors                                    Parochial

 Non-alumni donors                                Feeder
                                                   Indiana
                                                   Private




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                                       COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES


PUBLICITY AUDIENCES, continued
High Schools Educators               Professional
 By discipline                      Associations/Groups
                                      National Council for
Legislators                             Accreditation at Teacher
 Local                                 Education (NCATE)
 State                               American Association of
 National                              Colleges of Nursing (AACN)
                                      National Association of
Media                                   Independent Colleges and
 General news
                                        Universitites (NAICU)
 Sports
                                      American Bar Association (ABA)
 Church
                                      Crusader Club
 The Arts
                                      Porter County Lawyers
                                      Northwest Indiana Nurses
Northwest Indiana business leaders
 Chamber of Commerce                Students
                                      Current
Parents
                                      Prospective
 Current
                                      Undergraduate
 Former
                                      Law
                                      Graduate
Internship/Co-op Sponsors
                                     VAN (Valpo Admission Network)




                                                           Page 73
                                                        COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES

Members of the Valparaiso community should be aware of University communication
protocol as outlined below:

                           MEDIA RELATIONS
    All requests from the media should be cleared by the Office of University Relations:

                                   Reggie Syrcle
                                 Executive Director
                                 University Relations

                                Valparaiso University
                                 1700 Chapel Drive
                                Valparaiso, IN 46383
                              Reggie.Syrcle@valpo.edu
                                   219.464.5114

         In the Athletics Department, all media queries should be directed to:

                                  Ryan Wronkowicz
                  Assistant Director of Athletics for Media Relations
                             Athletics Recreation Center
                                Valparaiso University
                                  1009 Union Street
                                Valparaiso, IN 46383
                            Ryan.Wronkowicz@valpo.edu
                                  219.464.5232




                                                                             Page 74

				
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