Effective Strategies for Gaining Entry Building Relationships with Latino

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					Effective Strategies for Gaining Entry and
Building Relationships with Latino
Communities
            Doris Cancel-Tirado
            Oregon State University
            Sara Curiel
            Rural Development Initiatives, Inc.
            Dr. Daniel López-Cevallos
            Western Oregon University
                                                  1
Hispanic Population in the United
States: 1970 to 2050         102.6
Population in millions                                                                   87.6
                                                                              73.0
                                                                  59.7
                                                       47.8
                                           35.3
                                22.4
                    14.6
          9.6


         1970 1980 1990 2000 2010* 2020* 2030* 2040* 2050*



                       Census                                           Projections
                                                                *Projected Population as of July 1                        2
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000 Decennial Censuses; Population Projections, July 1, 2010 to July 1, 2050
3
Hispanic population in Oregon
Percent of Increase,                           Hispanic Population
                           County
     1990-2000                                    (current in 2000)

       245%              Washington                  49,735
       170%              Multnomah                   49,607
       167%                Marion                    48,714
       135%              Clackamas                   16,744
       117%                 Lane                     14,874
       104%               Jackson                    12,126
       114%               Umatilla                   11,366
       118%                Yamhill                    9,017
       57%                Malheur                     8,099
       96%                  Polk                      5,480
       86%               Hood River                   5,107
                                                                          4
                       Source: http://www.oregonhispanic.org/facts.html
Oregon

 Latinos: 377,477 (10%)
 MSFW: 174,484 (5%)




 Larson A (2002). Oregon MSFW Enumeration Profile Study.   5
      Educational Attainment by Sex: 2006
           (Population 25 years and older)

                83.5                84.6


                                                                                61.7
                                                          58.7
Percent




                       27.9                26.2   24.5                   23.3
                                                                 11.5                  13.1
          6.7                 6.3


           Total: Male        Total: Female       Hispanic: Male        Hispanic: Female

          Less than 9th grade       High school or more     Bachelor's degree or more


                                                                                              6
                  Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 American Community Survey
Case study: Purple River Community
(hypothetical)
  Increasing Latino population. Organizations are
  trying to better serve them.
  The Family Center translated a parenting
  curriculum in Spanish and offered parenting
  class.
  Parents enroll in the program but drop out soon.
  School District tried to engage parents in school
  activities but participation has been inconsistent.
  Most of the programs have been offered during
  the school time.
                                                        7
Case study: Purple River Community
(hypothetical)
  Mental Health Center tried to recruit
  bilingual bicultural counselors with little
  success.
   They recently hired a bilingual counselor,
  who just moved from California.
  Families have not been using this service.
  Long-term Latino leaders involvement
  with these organizations has decreased.
  Some members of the community have
  resented these efforts.                       8
Questions for discussion:

   What are some of the issues regarding
   Latino outreach in this community?
   How can we engage Latino parents in
   community programs?
   In which ways can community agencies
   coordinate efforts?
   How can we keep long-term Latino
   residents engaged in community
   activities?                             9
Case Study # 1

 Benton County Promotores Program
   BCHC is FQHC since 2004
   HIV Integration Project 2004-2007
     To increase the awareness of HIV prevention
     among the Hispanic population in Benton County.
     Using Promotores
     Popular Education approaches for education
     session.



                                                   10
Benton County Promotores Program

Lessons Learned
 Active outreach (building social networks)
    Cultural brokers.
  Community events
  Funding.
  Management.
    Social/cultural understanding
  Community-based?
                                              11
Case Study # 2
Dorado County Mental Health Services
  The Problem: Latino families are currently under using
  health care and mental health services provided by public
  and non-for-profit agencies.
  Strategy: Comprehensive Needs Assessment
     Bilingual/bicultural qualified professional
     4 focus group were conducted with parents (2),
     community leaders, and management level personnel.
     Questions:

       – What barriers exist for Latino families to seek or receive
         mental health services and, most importantly, how might
         these barriers be addressed?

       – How do Latino families seek and receive health information,
         and what makes an information source trustworthy?

                                                                      12
Case Study # 2
Lessons learned
  Barriers to access services
     Limited number of bilingual/bicultural professionals
     Inadequacy of interpreters
     Ineligibility for services
     Medical Mistrust and Perceived Discrimination
     Lack of Information/Misinformation
  Dissemination of Information
     Trusted sources of information: School, WIC/Welfare
     Office, Churches, Spanish Radio Stations, Well-known
     community leaders
     Community events or forums rather than written
     material
                                                        13
Case Study # 3

 Edith-Kerry Neighborhood. Walla Walla,
 WA.
 History
 Programs
 Leadership Development Training




                                          14
Case #3

Lessons Learned
 Commitment and Persistence
 Trust
 Visioning
 Community-based participatory approach
 Active engagement with community efforts


                                        15
Conclusions: Best Practices
 Building Trust- takes time!
 Readiness
 Be flexible
 Latino Professionals
 Use culturally appropriate curriculum
 Recruitment and Retention
   Church (Hispanic ministry), schools, radio,
   newspaper, etc.
   Food and Childcare
   Avoid Community Exhaustion: Join efforts
   with other organizations.
                                                 16
Conclusions
Strengthening Latino Programs
  Pay attention to macro/micro organizational
  issues
  Work from an asset-based approach
  Make a commitment to the community as a
  whole and the Latino community.
  Follow-up after the program or intervention is
  concluded.
  Maintain contact with key leaders.
  Be cautious! What you do today matters
  tomorrow
  Inter-agency collaboration: Save time,
  resources and public attention.
                                               17
Resources
 Sousa et al (2007). Recommendations for Working in
 Partnership with Latino Communities: A Guide for
 Public Agencies and Other Social Service Practitioners.
 Davis, CA: University of California Division of
 Agriculture and Natural Resources. ~ Includes a Self-
 Assessment Guide of Organization Readiness.
 RIPPLE
    www.rdiinc.org




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Contact Information

 Doris Cancel-Tirado
 canceltd@onid.orst.edu; 541-737-8623.
 Sara Curiel
 scuriel@rdiinc.org; 503-545-2918.
 Dr. Daniel López-Cevallos
 lopezced@wou.edu; 503-838-8021.


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Questions?




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