Docstoc

MUSIC DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK

Document Sample
MUSIC DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK Powered By Docstoc
					 Quincy
university
Music Program


  student handbook
Dear music students,
Welcome to Quincy University and the beginning of a new stage of your development as a musician.
Every successful musician must demonstrate strong technical ability, awareness of different styles and
how they are to be performed, knowledge of how music is put together, and the ability to create a sense
of ensemble. You already possess each of the skills to a certain degree. Over the course of the next
four years, you will develop these skills so that you can use them at the appropriate level in the career
which lies before you. The purpose of this handbook is to facilitate your learning and to give you an
overview of that process. Please remember that all of us on the music faculty are eager to help you
become the best musician you can be. This handbook, together with the guidance of your mentor and
advisor, will help keep you on track.

Three principal areas are covered in every music degree:
       Performance (private lessons and ensembles);
       How music is put together (music theory);
       How music has been created throughout time (music history).
Other areas pertinent to your specific degree enhance and augment these basic areas.
Course work taken in the music department will help you build on your knowledge of these areas, but
how far and how well you develop is up to you.

In order to help you keep track of your development, and to make sure you are at the appropriate stages
throughout, two specific times of evaluation have been established by the music faculty. At the end of
your sophomore year, you will complete qualifying exams which demonstrate your development to
that point. As you conclude your undergraduate studies, a comprehensive experience (typically a
recital and paper) will serve as the “crowning achievement” for your degree. These evaluations are
outlined in this handbook.
Welcome to QU! We look forward to that day when we will call you „colleague‟.

The QU Music Faculty

Mr. Bill Machold                                    Mr. Louis Margaglione
Marching Band Director, Percussion Instructor       Professor of Music, Woodwind Instructor

Mr. Jesse Mazzoccoli                                Mr. Steve Parke
Instructor of Guitar                                Jazz Artist-in-Residence &
                                                    Coordinator of Professional Multi-media

Mr. Allen Means                                     Mr. Mike Saul
Instructor of Choral Music                          Symphonic Band Director, Instructor of Horn

Mrs. Amy K. Stollberg                               Ms. Leonora Suppan-Gehrich
Instructor of Vocal Music                           Artist-in-Residence
Coordinator of Music Recruiting




1 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                           QUINCY UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT
Quincy University stands as a Catholic, independent, liberal arts institution of higher learning in the Franciscan
tradition. Inspired by the spirit of Francis and Clare of Assisi, we respect each person as a sister or brother with
dignity, value, and worth. We work for justice, peace, and the integrity of creation. We prepare men and
women for leadership and for the transformation of the world by educating them to seek knowledge that leads to
wisdom. We welcome and invite all to share our spirit and life.

                        DIVISION OF FINE ARTS AND COMMUNICATION
                                    MISSION STATEMENT
The faculty of the Division of Fine Arts and Communication set as their mission:
    To guide students in their discovery of the rich and diverse heritage of the fine arts and the liberal arts;
    To support students in their growth and development as creative individuals, team members, and
       contributors to the success of others;
    To provide students with expertise, assistance, resources, and models of integrity, intellectual acuity,
       critical and creative thinking, and lucid expression;
    To prepare them to have a positive impact through principled servant leadership in careers and in
       service to the larger community;
    To impart the values, skills, and traits of character essential to lifelong learning.

                              MUSIC PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT
The Quincy University Music Program rooted in the liberal arts tradition, is committed to the fullest
development of individuals, and dedicated to the preparation of aesthetically sensitive and committed creators
and perceivers of music.

                               MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAM GOALS
Upon completion of the Music Education program at Quincy University, students will be able to:
   1. clearly conduct an ensemble and evaluate and improve the performance.
   2. successfully analyze and describe a piece of music.
   3. correctly place music in appropriate time periods and perform/teach according to the style of that period.
   4. teach instrument and voice skills appropriate to grade level.
   5. design and implement curriculum and lesson plans appropriate to grade level.

                             MUSIC PERFORMANCE PROGRAM GOALS
Upon completion of the Arts degree in Music at Quincy University, students will be able to:
   1. demonstrate proper technique on his/her major instrument.
   2. demonstrate the ability to perform in front of others at a level that meets the university‟s standards.
   3. perform music accurately according to the style and period of the piece.
   4. evaluate their own performance.
   5. demonstrate the knowledge to teach their major instrument in a studio setting.

                              MUSIC PRODUCTION PROGRAM GOALS
Upon completion of the Music Production program at Quincy University, students will be able to:
   1. create, critique, and produce written materials for professional multi media.
   2. successfully analyze and describe a piece of music.
   3. experience a broad range of professional audio and video production techniques used in the music and
       entertainment industries.
   4. develop instrumental/vocal skills as applied through individual and ensemble performances.
   5. design and prepare a professional career portfolio.




                                            Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook -                 2
                       II. MUSIC FACULTY BIOGRAPHIES
Mr. Louis Margaglione, Professor of Music
Mr. Margaglione began teaching at Quincy University in 1965. His teaching duties have included
applied woodwinds (clarinet, flute, oboe, saxophone and bassoon), conductor of the symphonic band,
conducting and advanced conducting. He has also taught music theory, sight-singing/ear training,
woodwind methods, and has functioned as chairman of the Music Department and Music Coordinator
at Quincy University. Mr. Margaglione has appeared as clarinet soloist throughout Illinois, Missouri,
Iowa and New Jersey. He has been guest conductor with various high school bands and is an
adjudicator for solo, ensemble, band and orchestra competitions. He performed as solo clarinetist with
the Quincy Symphony for over 25 years. Mr. Margaglione received his B.S. in Music Education from
Ithaca College, Ithaca, N.Y. and his M.S. in Music Education at the University of Illinois and was solo
clarinetist with the University of Illinois Symphony Orchestra on their full semester tour of South and
Central America in 1964. He has studied clarinet with David Weber (N.Y.), Clarke Brodie (Chicago
Symphony), and Elsa Ludwig Vedehr. Students of Mr. Margaglione have gone on to graduate work at
Michigan State University, University of Illinois, Manhattan School of Music among others. His
students have gone on to perform with many Symphony Orchestras and military bands.

Mr. Allen Means, Instructor in Choral Music
Mr. Means teaches choir, voice, and low brass at Quincy University. He has a Master of Arts degree in
voice performance from Western Illinois University. He also has a Bachelor of Arts in trombone
performance from Quincy University and a Bachelor of Music with teacher certification from Liberty
University.

Allen has sung professionally with the Saint Martin Chamber Players in Peoria and the Muddy River
Opera in Quincy. He performed the role of “Antonio” in Mozart‟s Le Nozze di Figaro in the spring of
2005 with the Saint Martin Chamber Players. For the Muddy River Opera Company in 2006, he
performed the role of “Boatswain” in their January, production of Gilbert and Sullivan‟s H.M.S.
Pinafore, the role of “Mayor/Coyote/Ranchero” in the spring children‟s opera production of Enrique
Gonzales-Medina‟s How Nanita Learned to Make Flan, and the role of the “Tenor” in the September
2006 fundraiser production of Murder at the Opera. For MROC in 2007, Allen performed the role of
“Pish Tush” in the January production of Gilbert and Sullivan‟s The Mikado, and the role of
“Strongman/London Music Hall Artist” in the spring children‟s opera, Sid the Serpent Who Wanted to
Sing. In 2008, he performed the role of the “Baritone” in Alice in Operaland for MROC. Allen was the
“Wolf” for MROC‟s 2009 performance of Little Red Riding Hood, and the “Fox” in MROC‟s 2010
production of Chanticleer. In November of 2006, Allen sang the baritone solos from Faure‟s Requiem
with the Quincy Symphony Chorus and chamber orchestra, and has twice sung in Quincy‟s Sunday
Music Series.

Allen has been an adjudicator for all-district auditions and solo and ensemble contest auditions in
Illinois. This will be his sixth year as the Quincy University choir director.

Mr. Steve Parke, Jazz Artist-in-Residence
His teaching responsibilities include courses in Applied Brass Instruments, Brass Methods, Business of
Music, Composition and MIDI, Orchestration, History of Jazz and Rock, First-Year Experience,
Principles of Audio Production, Electronic Technologies and Society, Understanding Media, Jazz
Improvisation and Jazz Ensemble while also serving as Advisor/Mentor to university students. In


3 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
addition, Parke has performed with many Quincy area music ensembles including the Quincy
Symphony Orchestra, Quincy Park Band, Quincy Brass Quintet and the Big River Swing Machine.

His professional experience includes performances and features with the Jim Widner Big Band, Buddy
DeFranco, Bobby Shew, Frank Mantooth, Steve Weist, Roger Enghram (lead trumpet player for Harry
Connick, Jr.), Bill Watrous, Clark Terry, Louis Bellson and many others. Among Parke‟s musical
compositions are Introduction, Melodie, Swing! performed in September 1994, by the Quincy
Symphony Orchestra, a jazz Big Band chart called Swing This! premiered by the Jim Widner Big Band
at the 1995 Missouri Music Educators Conference held at Osage Beach, MO, and another jazz chart
commissioned by the Hannibal High School, Hannibal, MO, entitled Dogs are from Mars, Cats are
from Venus, which was recorded on CD in the summer of 1996 and released for sale to the public.
Works composed in the summer of 1997 include Red Rose within a Blue Moon for piano performed in
recital by fellow faculty member Leonora Suppan-Gehrich in her recital at Concordia University and
Spiritus for brass quintet performed on tour by the music faculty of Western Illinois University.
Groovin' at O'Griff's was composed in 1999 for the Big River Swing Machine of Quincy.

Before accepting his employment at Quincy University, Parke traveled extensively throughout the
United States as a professional musician. Various performance situations include cruise ships off the
coast of Florida, the Variety Club Telethon broadcast live from Ames, Iowa, and nightclubs from coast
to coast including two years in Las Vegas, Nevada. In 1987, Parke decided to return to Indiana
University at Bloomington, Indiana, to finish a Master of Music Degree in performance with a minor
in Music Education. He accepted his current teaching position at Quincy University in 1989.

Leonora Suppan-Gehrich, Artist-in-Residence
Leonora received the Artist‟s Diploma from the Hochschule fuer Musik in Vienna and M.M. degree
and Performer‟s Certificate from Indiana University. Postgraduate studies were pursued at
conservatories of Venice and Warsaw, and at the University of Iowa. Before joining the faculty of
QU, Leonora taught at Western Illinois University, Culver-Stockton College, and MacMurray College.

She has performed concerts in many European countries (Austria, Germany, Poland, France, England,
Portugal, Holland) in Canada, Mexico, and Costa Rica. Her New York debut recital was in Carnegie
Recital Hall. Mrs. Gehrich also performed in Town Hall (with cellist Tsuyoshi Tsutsumi) and in Alice
Tully Hall at Lincoln Center (as a member of the Leopold Sipe Trio). She was first prize winner and
cash award winner in the International Recording Competition of the Piano Guild in 1982 and 1983.
In 1992, she was one of seventy pianists from the US and Europe to be invited at the International
Beethoven Festival at southern Illinois University. In 1987, Leonora Suppan-Gehrich received an
honorary doctorate from Quincy University and in 1988 she was the recipient of the Arts Award of the
city of Quincy. In addition to traditional concert repertoire, Leonora Suppan-Gehrich is performing
works of women composers at the 5th Interdisciplinary Conference of Women in San Jose, Costa Rica,
3rd and 4th Festival of Women Composers at Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Symposium of Black
Women composers at Hampton University; and Focus on African American Music at Dayton
University.

Amy K. Stollberg, Voice Professor/Music Coordinator
Born and raised in Palmyra, Missouri, Amy Stollberg received her Bachelor of Music degree from
Culver-Stockton College in Canton, Missouri in 1987. Mrs. Stollberg then went back to Palmyra and
taught both instrumental and vocal music for grades five through twelve for four years. At the same
time, she obtained a Master of Education Administration degree from Truman State University in

                                      Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook -      4
Kirksville, Missouri in 1992.

Amy has taught applied voice at Culver-Stockton College and presently teaches in her studio in
Quincy. She is the music director at Christ Lutheran Church.

Mrs. Stollberg has been a member of the Quincy Symphony Chorus and has served as soprano section
co-leader. She has sung as soloist with the Muddy River Opera Company and on the Sunday Music
Series. Mrs. Stollberg has been adjudicator for choral and vocal contests all over Western
Illinois. Amy served as the member organization representative to the executive committee of the
Quincy Society of Fine Arts while she was general manager of the Quincy Symphony Orchestra
Association. She has served as a board member at Blessed Sacrament School in Quincy. Amy and her
husband Jeff live in Quincy with their three daughters Ashley, Emily, and Erika.

Bill Machold, Marching Band Director, Instructor of Percussion
Bill Machold has earned a Bachelor of Music degree in Performance from SUNY Fredonia (Fredonia
NY) and a Master of Music degree in Performance from the University of Akron (Akron OH). He is
currently on the music faculties of Quincy University and Culver-Stockton College and has taught at
Western Illinois University.

Active as a clinician and performer, Bill has worked with and written music for many high school
bands in the Quincy region. He also maintains a large private teaching studio in Quincy. In recent
years he has been a judge at the Quincy High School Octoberfest marching band competition, The
Barry Apple Festival marching band competition, the Culver-Stockton Homecoming Parade marching
band competition, and the Clark County High School marching band competition, as well as various
IHSA and IGSMA solo and ensemble festivals.

Bill maintains an active performing schedule, including the Quincy Symphony Orchestra, Big River
Swing Machine, and Raised On Radio, and performs regularly on faculty recitals.

Michael Saul, Symphonic Band Director, Instructor of Horn
Michael Saul, a 35-year veteran music educator, holds the Bachelor and Masters Degrees in Music
Education and Performance from Illinois State University at Normal. He is currently the director of
middle school bands for the Hannibal Public Schools and serves the QU music department as director
of the Symphonic Band and instructor in applied horn. He has also served as an applied brass
instructor at Culver-Stockton College.

Mike is active as a performer with the Quincy Symphony and has also performed with the Knox-
Galesburg, Jacksonville, and Peoria Symphonies as well as a number of chamber ensembles and has
been featured as a soloist with the Quincy Chamber Orchestra and on a number of Sunday Music
Series recitals and serves as cantor for Temple B‟nai Shalom in Quincy. Mike is also active as an
adjudicator in Illinois and Missouri, having judged solo and ensemble and full band festivals as well as
numerous parades. His teachers have included: Dale Clevenger, Randall Faust, Roger Collins, and
Donald Hatch. In 1989, Mike was the winner of the Outstanding Soloist Award at the North American
Brass Band Championships and a 1994 recipient of a WGEM Golden Apple Award.




5 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                               III. GENERAL POLICIES
BUILDING HOURS:              Monday through Friday 8:00 am to 10:00 pm.
                             Saturday and Sunday 12:00 pm to 8:00 pm.

MUSIC OFFICE HOURS: The music office is located at NC A108. Office hours are posted each
semester.

BUILDING REGULATIONS: For many of us, North Campus is a second home. We must take good
care of it so that it may serve this purpose to the generations that will follow us. To that end, the
following regulations have been established:
     Keep the building clean. No food or drink is allowed in the rehearsal and practice rooms.
        Deposit trash in the wastebaskets provided.
     LOCKERS: Lockers are available on a first-come, first-served basis, through the coordinator.
        You must supply your own lock, and for your protection, lockers must be locked. Students
        should see Amy Stollberg to check out a locker. Quincy University and the Music Program are
        not responsible for any instruments left unlocked and unprotected.
     KEYS: Keys to rooms are not available to any student for any reason. Access to the
        percussion practice room or the recording studio is only available to authorized students by
        contacting Security at x5600.
     PRIVATE LESSONS: Due to insurance and liability issues, students are not permitted to teach
        private lessons in North Campus.

QU MUSIC LIBRARY: The QU Music Listening Library is located on the lower level of Brenner
Library. The library contains musical scores as well as a variety of multi-media materials.
This room is ordinarily locked, but students wishing to use the library may request entry from any
library staff member. Headphones, available in the music library, must be used with the audio-visual
equipment, and equipment should be turned off when not in use. Musical scores, records,
audiocassettes, videos, DVDs, filmstrips and slides may be checked out. However, CDs may not leave
the library. CDs must be used only in the listening room.




                                      Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook -       6
                                 MAJORS IN MUSIC
Quincy University offers the B.A. in Music, the B.S. in Music Education, and the B.A. in
Communications and Music Production. All contain either a vocal or instrumental concentration. For
more information regarding these degrees, see the current QU catalog. Specific degree checklists are
also available online at the QU website.

                                 MINORS IN MUSIC
Students must declare a minor in music by the end of the first semester of the junior year. Transfer
students who have taken music courses at another institution will be required to take a proficiency
exam to determine satisfactory completion of requirements. All students desiring a minor in music
must pass a satisfactory audition for the music faculty. The audition will consist of:
       1. Two prepared solos or etudes, each between one and two minutes long. One should
       demonstrate technical ability; the other should demonstrate lyrical or expressive ability.
       2. Three chromatically adjacent major scales (instrumentalists only).
       3. Sight reading.
       4. Basic theory exam.
       5. Basic aural skills exam.

The music minor consists of 18 credit hours plus ensemble participation for a total of 22 hours.
   1. Required foundation courses: MUS 113-114 Music Theory I and II; MUS 115-116 Aural
      Skills I and II; MUS 117 Music Appreciation; and two credit hours of Applied Music. Music
      minors must complete 3 semesters of concert attendance.

   2. Following completion of foundation courses, students must choose one of the following areas
      of concentration: Music Theory, Music History, Music Performance, or Music Education. A
      total of six credit hours in one of these areas will complete the minor. Suggested courses for
      each area:
      Music Theory:          MUS 213-214 Music Theory III and IV                6 hrs.
      Music History:         MUS 311-312 Music History I and II                 6 hrs.
      Music Performance: Applied music (usually one credit per semester;
                             students will perform in department convocations) 6 hrs
      Music Education:       MED 317 Elementary School Music                    2 hrs.
                             MED 341 Secondary School Music                     2 hrs.
                             MED 320 Percussion Methods                         1 hr.
                             MED 319 String Methods                             1 hr.
                             MED 321 Vocal Methods                              1 hr.
                             MED 412 Woodwind Methods                           2 hrs.
                             MED 413 Brass Methods                              2 hrs.


   3. Students are expected to perform in an ensemble for a minimum of four semesters. Students
      with an area of concentration in Music Performance must perform in one ensemble each
      semester for a total of eight semesters.
   4. Each student pursuing a Minor in Music must have an advisor from the Music faculty.



7 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                  IV. MUSIC GRANTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS

The music program offers four distinct scholarships as well as general music grants. All scholarships
and music grants are available to qualified incoming freshman and transfer students who audition
before the music faculty prior to their attendance at Quincy University. Current students may petition
the music faculty for music grants. Students can be awarded only one of the four scholarships each
year unless forfeited and awarded a different scholarship in its place.

CHORAL ENSEMBLE GRANTS: This grant is given to qualifying members of the choral
ensembles. It provides various amounts annually and is renewable for up to four years.

INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE GRANTS: This grant is given to qualifying members of the
instrumental ensembles. It provides various amounts annually and is renewable for up to four years.

THE HUGH SOEBBING SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship is given to an outstanding instrumental
music major from each entering class. The scholarship provides $6,500 each year and is renewable
for up to four years. The award is named in honor of the late Hugh Soebbing, an outstanding
percussionist and member of the QU faculty.

THE RUSS LAHL BASS SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship is given to a qualified string bass player
and entails obligations to perform with the Quincy Symphony Orchestra and the QU Jazz Ensemble.
These are Lahl Scholarship requirements that cannot be changed. The amount of the award is
dependent upon the annual value of the scholarship endowment; the award is renewable for up to four
years. The scholarship is named in honor of the late Russ Lahl, a talented musician who was proficient
on both the upright and electric bass.

LAVERN WAGNER JAZZ ENSEMBLE SCHOLARSHIP: This scholarship is given to an
outstanding jazz musician from each entering class. The scholarship provides $2,000 each year and is
renewable for up to four years. This scholarship is named in honor of Lavern Wagner, former member
of QU‟s music faculty.

Music Grants are available to music majors or non-majors and are renewable for a total of four years.
All music grants and scholarships require that you take applied lessons in your principal performance
area and participate in a corresponding ensemble as listed in your contract. Minimum GPAs are
required. Carefully read the contract so you understand your obligations to the program.

Contracts are issued annually and must be signed and returned by the stated deadline. Continuation of
a scholarship or music grant is not guaranteed. Each grant and scholarship recipient will be assessed
each semester at the discretion of faculty. Please see the evaluation form on page 10 of this handbook.
Any student found to be in violation of a contract provision will receive a letter of probation. A
student found to be in violation for a second semester will receive a letter of contract termination, and
the scholarship or grant will not be renewed.




                                       Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook -         8
                      SAMPLE MUSIC GRANT CONTRACT
                                                                                        March 30, 2011
*********
*********
*********

Dear *****:

On behalf of the music faculty at Quincy University, I am pleased to announce that you have been
awarded a music grant in the amount of $**** for 2011-2012. One-half of your grant will be applied
toward your account for the first semester, and the other half will be applied for the second semester
pending any applicable probationary status.

Your acceptance of this grant entails the following responsibilities for contributing to the success of
performing organizations at Quincy University:

       1. You are expected to participate in, and register for, all musical activities as listed in your
          contract. These may include: Chamber Choir, Concert Choir, Guitar Ensemble, Jazz Band,
          Marching Band, Pep Band, and/or Symphonic Band.
       2. You are expected to successfully complete the grant/scholarship assessment form twice
          each semester.
       3. You are expected to attain a B average in music courses each semester of enrollment.
       4. You are expected to take applied music lessons in your performing areas each semester.
       5. You are to keep confidential any information regarding music grants.
       6. You are expected to maintain a positive attitude as a representative of QU‟s music program.

Failure to fulfill any of these conditions may result in your being placed on probation for the grant. A
subsequent semester of failure to meet these requirements will result in revocation of the grant.

Since we would like for you to receive any other financial aid to which you are entitled, we encourage
you to apply for all other possible sources of aid. Completion of the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) is particularly important. If you do not already have a FAFSA form, please
contact the QU Financial Aid Office (217-228-5432, x 3750) immediately.

To indicate acceptance of this contract, please sign both copies of this two-page letter, keeping one for
your records and returning the other to my attention by *****. Please accept my congratulations to
you on your musical accomplishments. We look forward to your contributions to campus life as a
member of the QU music community!

Sincerely,


Dr. Barbara Schleppenbach,
Chair, Fine Arts and Communication




9 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                               Grant/Scholarship Assessment Form
Student name:                                          School Year:

Eighteen (18) or fewer points per evaluation will result in a continuation of the grant or scholarship. Nineteen (19) to 24
points will result in a letter of warning. Twenty five (25) or more points will result in immediate termination of the grant or
scholarship.
Evaluation 1 date:
1. Student is practicing on a regular basis.                                          1          2           3
2. Student attends and is punctual for each rehearsal/ lesson.                        1          2           3
3. Student shows professionalism and positive attitude in                             1          2           3
rehearsals and lessons.
4. Student shows preparation for rehearsals and lessons.                              1          2           3
5. Student shows improvement in quality of musicianship:
       tone quality                                                                   1          2           3
       intonation                                                                     1          2           3
       rhythm reading ability                                                         1          2           3
       sight reading ability                                                          1          2           3
       expressive qualities                                                           1          2           3
       ability to balance/ blend with an ensemble                                     1          2           3
       articulation/ diction                                                          1          2           3

Goals for the remainder of the semester:
1.

2.

3.

Student Signature:                                              Faculty Signature(s):

Evaluation 2 date:
1. Student is practicing on a regular basis.                                          1          2           3
2. Student attends and is punctual for each rehearsal/ lesson.                        1          2           3
3. Student shows professionalism and positive attitude in                             1          2           3
rehearsals and lessons.
4. Student shows preparation for rehearsals and lessons.                              1          2           3
5. Student shows improvement in quality of musicianship:
       tone quality                                                                   1          2           3
       intonation                                                                     1          2           3
       rhythm reading ability                                                         1          2           3
       sight reading ability                                                          1          2           3
       expressive qualities                                                           1          2           3
       ability to balance/ blend with an ensemble                                     1          2           3
       articulation/ diction                                                          1          2           3

Student Signature:                                              Faculty Signature(s):



                                                Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 10
                CRITERIA FOR MUSIC PROGRAM AWARDS
JOSEPH FISHER SCHOLARSHIP (based upon a letter dated May 1, 1967)
1. To be awarded to a student in the Music Program working for his/her degree in teaching.
2. The award may be applied as a portion of the tuition, music lessons or textbook cost. It must in any
case be utilized at Quincy University.
3. This award should be made upon the need and merit of the student, as determined by the music
faculty.

JUDITH A. WAND MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
1. The recipient must be a Music Education, Communication and Music Production, or Liberal Arts
Major in Music. First year students are not eligible for this award.
2. The recipient must possess an attitude toward the art of music, education, and fellow students and
teachers that represents the highest in artistic devotion and Christian example to the college
community.
3. The recipient must have at least a 2.8 cumulative average in the major field of study except in
unusual circumstances in which a student possesses exceptional practical talent.
4. The recipient must have participated in musical activities and ensembles at Quincy University.

JOSEPH FISHER PERFORMANCE AWARD (based on a statement of April 23, 1969)
The music faculty seek an expression of opinion from the music majors regarding the choice of a
recipient of the Joseph Fisher Award for outstanding performance for this academic year. The
requirements for the award are as follow:

1. The award is given for the best overall performance on the major instrument during both semesters
in one year.
2. First year students are not eligible for the award.

The Joseph Fisher and Judith Wand awards were established to honor outstanding QU music students
who died in their youth. Five students will be considered for the award based on a vote by secret ballot
to be conducted by the students themselves among the music majors of the present semester. The
music faculty will make the final choice of a recipient from this field of five nominees.

THE NAOMI WATTS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
The criteria and selection process are the same as those pertaining to the Judith Wand Scholarship.
This award is named in honor of the late Naomi Watts, a respected and beloved vocal music teacher,
and was established by a group of her former Quincy students.

THE BRADLEY M. SCHUTTLER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Established in 2005 in honor of Bradley (Brad) M. Schuttler, by family and friends, who was a Quincy
University student from 1984 through 1986. This award is given to a participant in the music program
chosen by the music faculty.




11 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                  V. STUDENT EVALUATION OF FACULTY
The goal of the music faculty is to prepare you to be the best musician that you can be. We all have
different backgrounds and life experiences that influence our teaching styles. You may prefer one
style over another, yet a classmate may prefer the opposite. However, we are not asking for your
preferences on the evaluations. We ask that you evaluate your applied instructor or ensemble
conductor through thoughtful consideration based on his/her interactions with you.

The university does not require evaluations from every instructor every semester. We ask that if you
have a concern or problem with a faculty member that you discuss that with him/her first. Do not wait
for an evaluation to vent your frustration, and do not go to another faculty member. Remember,
our desire is to see each of you succeed!

                             VI. CONCERT ATTENDANCE
This course entails attendance at required concerts to develop critical listening skills. It is important
that you, as a music major, understand the value of listening to a wide range of art music. You are
supporting the perpetuation of live music, encouraging your peers, gaining insight into improving your
performance, applying elements of music theory and history, and hopefully having an enjoyable
experience. Although you are required to pass this course five semesters, we strongly encourage you
to continue attending as many concerts as possible throughout the remaining college years and the rest
of your life.

ATTENDANCE: All music majors are required to attend all Convocations and the Music Faculty
Recital. In addition, all music majors are required to attend a total of five approved concerts. For
students enrolled in two performing ensembles, one written concert evaluation will serve as one
concert attendance. For students enrolled in three or more performing ensembles, two written concert
evaluations will serve as two concert attendances. Music Education majors are required to fulfill two
of the five required concerts by attending the following: 1) one high school music performance and (2)
one junior high school or middle school music performance. If you cannot attend a Convocation, you
must alert Mr. Parke prior to these concerts. Otherwise, you must attend two alternate concerts for
each required concert absence. PLAN AHEAD!

PROCEDURE: Choose approved concerts that are posted, and attend the concert in its entirety. Note
the rules of Concert Etiquette that follows. Submit the concert program, with your name on it, to the
faculty instructor at the end of each concert. If that faculty member is not present, you must submit the
program on the first school day immediately following the concert. Late programs will not be
accepted!

ADDITIONAL CONCERTS: The schedule of concerts will be periodically updated. Please pay
attention to the bulletin board. Concerts outside of the Quincy area may also qualify, but must be
approved before the concert takes place. Possibilities include, but are not limited to, St. Louis
Symphony, Chicago Symphony, other university concerts such as Millikin, WIU, etc. Complete
concert calendars for several out-of-town venues are available from the faculty.

GRADING: This course is Pass/Fail. If a student does not attend five concerts in addition to all
convocations, the student will fail the course.


                                       Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 12
               ELEVEN RULES OF CONCERT ETIQUETTE


   1. Refrain from talking. This is the first and greatest rule. It includes whispering
      to performers as well as to members of the audience.

   2. Refrain from unwrapping noisy candy wrappers during the performance.

   3. Turn off pagers, cell phones, and watch alarms.

   4. Do not put your feet on the chair in front of you.

   5. Do not wave to performers during the concert.

   6. Do not take flash photography.

   7. Please do not walk around with your video camera during the concert.

   8. Do not leave as soon as your (or your friend’s) portion of the concert is over.

   9. Applaud at appropriate times. Some music has several movements.
      Remember: It‟s not over until all of the movements have been performed.

   10. Do not leave the auditorium during the music. Wait for a break in the concert
       to visit the restroom unless you are ill or have a cough that will distract the other
       listeners.

   11. Go to the concert expecting the best.




13 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                                 VII. APPLIED LESSONS
Applied lessons are an integral component of the music major as they are designed to increase skill and
knowledge of the performance medium.

MATERIALS: Students are responsible for obtaining any music or method books deemed necessary
by the instructor. A metronome is strongly recommended, if not required by all faculty. Students may
be encouraged or required to buy other related items such as mutes, a tuner, mallets, etc. deemed
necessary by individual instructors.

ATTENDANCE: Students receive no fewer than twelve private lessons each semester. Attendance is
mandatory. Absences will be granted only if approved prior to the scheduled lesson time unless
serious illness, injury, or personal emergency preclude such notification.

INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES: All students are expected to spend time in private practice to
satisfactorily progress through assigned materials. A student enrolled in 1 credit hour of private
lessons is expected and required to practice a minimum of 5 hours a week (2 credit hours/10 hours a
week). Sign up sheets are posted outside all practice rooms for practice times. The faculty make note
of the sign up sheets, and can also hear practicing. Lessons are devoted to performance of assigned
materials and introduction of new material. Students are expected to bring their own music and
ancillary materials to every lesson.

PRACTICE FACILITIES: There are several practice rooms, many with pianos. As previously stated,
sign up sheets are posted outside each room. Please turn off electronic pianos and lights when
finished.

ASSESSMENT: Although lessons are inherently more subjective than most academic courses,
assessment of the applied lesson is possible and necessary. Students receive a grade for each lesson.
This grade is based on preparation of the assigned music, follow-through of key points discussed at
previous lessons, attitude, and improvement. A general description of expectations for each letter
grade is outlined below.

       A = Student takes initiative in lesson, is clearly, diligently practicing and completing
            assignments, eagerly progressing, exhibits strong desire to learn and improve.

       B = Evidence of regular practice, most assignments are completed, follow-through of key
            points not always present, moderately progressing, enthusiasm for learning not always
            present.

       C =    Evidence of sporadic practicing, assignments are generally not complete, progress is
              minimal, interest in growth and improvement lacking.

       D =    Evidence of little to no practicing, no progress in assignments, attends lessons
              in body only.

       F =    Student is not present and does not contact instructor.



                                       Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 14
In addition to the weekly lesson grade, students have a midterm and final performance evaluation.

The midterm evaluation is of your performance on Convocation, including the Student Self-
evaluation form. Students taking applied piano to complete piano proficiency as well as non-music
majors may be exempt from the midterm after consulting with the applied instructor. All music faculty
present for Convocation will complete an evaluation form, giving the student a letter grade based on
the elements outlined on the appropriate form. All letter grades are averaged together based on the
percentages listed below.

The final evaluation is of your performance at Juries, including the Student Self-evaluation form. All
students taking applied lessons are required to participate. Music faculty listening to juries complete
the evaluation form, giving the student a letter grade based on elements outlined on the appropriate
form. All letter grades are averaged together based on the percentages listed below.

                               Lessons           Seminar           Convocation       Jury
Music Major                    70%               Required          15%               15%
Music Minor                    80%               Required          10%               10%
Neither Major/Minor            90%               Optional          Optional 5%       10% (5%)


FURTHER EXPLANATION: Each student receives a grade (either letter or points) for each lesson.
Additionally, each lesson grade is based on preparation, which includes knowing the music well, and
focusing on key points discussed at previous lessons, attitude, and improvement.

                                Voice Lesson Requirements
1 Credit Hour
 - At least three pieces memorized (unless from oratorio).
 - 1st semester – At least one of the pieces should not be English.
 - After 1st semester – 1 English, 1 Latin or Italian, 1 German, French, or Spanish
      Exceptions to these rules are allowed but must be discussed between voice faculty first.

2 Credit Hours
 - At least four pieces memorized (unless from oratorio)
 - 1st semester – 2 English, 1 Latin or Italian, 1 German
 - After 1st semester – 1 English, 1 Latin or Italian, 1 German, 1 French
 - After 1st year, 1 aria each semester in any of the above languages
 - Other languages not listed above may be substituted for German or French, but not every semester.
      These requirements will be given and graded as assignments throughout the semester.




15 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                      FOUR YEAR APPLIED CURRICULUM
The following curriculum is a goal for all instrumental students taking applied lessons at Quincy
University. Individual instructors will have expectations unique to each instrument.

Year     Majors                          Minors                          Non- majors/ minors
at QU
First  All major scales and              Major scales up to 5bs and    Major scales up to 5bs and
       chromatic scale from              5#s and chromatic scale       5#s and chromatic scale. (not
       memory.                           from memory.                  from memory)
Second All Major scales, chromatic       All major scales and melodic  All major scales and melodic
       scale, and melodic minor          minor scales up to 5 bs and   minor scales up to 5 bs and
       scales from memory.               #s from memory.               #s.
                                                                       (not from memory)
Third    All Major scales, chromatic     All major and melodic minor All major and melodic minor
         scale, and melodic and          scales, natural minor scales  scales, harmonic minor
         natural minor from memory.      up to 5bs and #s from         scales up to 5bs and #s.
                                         memory.                       (not from memory)
Fourth   All Major scales, chromatic     All major, melodic minor,     All major, melodic minor,
         scale, and all forms of the     and natural minor scales, and and natural minor scales, and
         minor from memory.              harmonic minor up to 5 bs     harmonic minor up to 5 bs
                                         and #s from memory.           and #s. (not from memory)

                   VIII. ENSEMBLE ATTENDANCE POLICY
All ensembles at Quincy University have the same attendance policy. These ensembles include
Marching Band, Symphonic Band, Jazz Band, Chamber Choir, Concert Choir, Guitar Ensemble, and
the Hawk Pep Band. The attendance policy is as follows:

    Unexcused absence from a Rehearsal: drop of one letter grade per unexcused absence.
    Excused absence from a Rehearsal: Students are allowed six (6) excused absences for
     ensembles that meet three times per week, four (4) excused absences for ensembles that meet
     twice per week. Seven or more will result in a drop of one letter grade per absence.
    Unexcused absence from a Performance: automatic failure.
    Excused absence from a Performance: no change for the first. A second excused absence in
     one semester will result in an F for the course.
    Late by ten (10) or more minutes will count as an unexcused absence.
    Students who have attendance issues will be discussed during weekly faculty meetings.

An Excused absence is defined by notification to the ensemble director before the scheduled rehearsal.
Excused absences, or lateness, includes but is not limited to: illness, hospitalization, accidents, death
in the family, other emergencies, or waiver authorized by and in agreement with another member of
the QU faculty.




                                       Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 16
Absences will not be excused for, but are not limited to the following: homework, non-school related
concerts, sleep, advisor appointments, eating, parents called, doctors appointments, interviews, or other
reasons at the discretion of the ensemble director.
                             IX. MUSIC CONVOCATIONS
This is one of the many opportunities you have to gain experience as a performer. It is a chance to
perform for your peers and the general public. We are not intent on putting you through a difficult
experience; rather, we want you to have experience in front of an audience. Most of you are choosing
a career that will constantly be placing you in front of others, and we want you to be prepared. In
addition, it is an opportunity for you to receive some feedback from the music faculty as it is your
midterm applied lesson evaluation.

All music majors are required to perform on one convocation each semester with the exception of first-
semester freshmen. Non-majors may be required to perform on convocation. Students who perform a
junior or senior recital are exempt from convocation during that semester unless their applied teacher
requests that they perform.

A sign will be posted regarding convocation performances. At that time you will pick up a
Convocation Recital Form from the music office and complete the form with the assistance of your
applied instructor. Your applied instructor must sign the completed form before you return it to the
music office before the posted deadline. The music faculty determine the performance order for each
convocation. Students must attach five (5) copies of the performance piece to the Convocation
Recital Form.

At your convocation performance, all applied faculty that are present will complete Convocation
Evaluation Forms based on your performance medium. Our goal is to assist with your development as
a performer and musician! Music faculty listening to convocation complete the evaluation form,
including written comments, giving the student a letter grade based on elements outlined on the
appropriate form. Completed forms are given to your applied instructor to calculate your midterm
grade. Your applied instructor will give you copies of the evaluations and discuss them with you. It is
important that you keep these convocation evaluation forms as part of your portfolio.

After your convocation, you will listen to a recording of your performance with your applied teacher.
You and your teacher will fill out the Student Self-Assessment of Individual Performance as found on
page 20 of this handbook.

Attendance at your convocation performance is mandatory. Absences may be granted only if approved
prior to the performance unless serious illness, injury, or personal emergency preclude such
notification.




17 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                           CONVOCATION RECITAL FORM
Information about works to be performed on convocation recitals must be submitted to the secretary of
the Division of Fine Arts and Communication at least five days before the performance. A notice will
be posted to indicate the exact date of the performance and form deadlines. All performers must
attach five (5) copies of the piece. Vocalists must attach English translations of any lyrics to be
sung in other languages.

Please complete this form carefully, checking for correct spelling of all titles and the names of
composers. Translation must be correct and idiomatic.

Each performer will be allotted no more than 10 minutes.

Date of performance:____________________________ Duration of work:_______________ minutes

Title of work (and opus number):________________________________________________________

Numbers of movements, tempo markings, and/or titles (if applicable):__________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

If the selection is taken from a larger work – e.g., opera, oratorio, suite – list the title of

the larger work:______________________________________________________________________

Composer: _________________________________________________________________________
             First name              middle name                   last name

Performer: _________________________________________________________________________
              (Please list your formal given name as it should appear in the program.)

Performing medium: _________________________________________________________________
                    (instrument or vocal range)

Accompanist: _______________________________________________________________________
(Please list the formal given name of the accompanist as it should appear in the program.)

Accompanying instrument: ____________________________________________________________


                                                ______________________________________________
                                                Signature of instructor




                                          Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 18
                                    CONVOCATION EVALUATION
   Student ____________________________________________                   Semester/year__________________

   I.        Superior Preparation: No notable performance problems. Very high musicianship level.
   II.       Excellent Preparation: Few notable performance problems. High musicianship level.
   III.      Average Preparation: Several notable performance problems. Average musicianship level.
   IV.       Below Average Preparation: Many notable performance problems. Low musicianship level.
   V.        Weak Preparation: Numerous notable performance problems. Very low musicianship level.

                            Score                                    Comments
                                                   You must provide a comment for any score of 1 or 5.
Tone Quality

Intonation

Diction/ Articulation

Breathing/ air support

Tempo

Rhythm

Note Accuracy

Memorization (Vocal)

Phrasing/ Style

Technique

Dynamics

Stage Presence

Rudiments/Technique
(percussion)
Pedaling (piano)

Other Comments


   Total Points: _______________ divided by # of categories ______________ = ________________

Grading Scale                       A               B                  C                   D               F
                                 1.0-1.4         1.5-1.9            2.0-2.4             2.5-2.9          3.0 +
   Adjudicator Signature:

   19 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                 Student Self-Assessment of Individual Performance (Optional)
   This form may be completed by the student after listening to the performance CD following each
                      convocation or jury and turned in to the applied teacher.

Student Name _____________________________________________ Semester/Year _____________




                                              Superior



                                                         Average



                                                                      Average
                                                          Above




                                                                                              Weak
                                                                                  Fair
        Planning Stage Assessment:              1             2         3          4           5
I met with my applied teacher early in the
semester to choose appropriate literature.
I scheduled and confirmed rehearsals and
performance date with an accompanist
and my applied teacher.
I filled out all the necessary paperwork
by the due date.
I practiced the performance piece(s)
consistently throughout the semester.
I met regularly with my applied teacher
to work on the piece(s).
Senior Recital Only: I arranged for a
pre-performance of the recital with
appropriate faculty.
         Performance Assessment                 1             2         3          4           5
Tone Quality
Intonation
Diction/ Articulation
Breathing/ air support
Tempo
Rhythm
Note Accuracy
Memorization
Phrasing/ Style
Technique
Dynamics
Stage Presence
Ensemble


                                       Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 20
                      X. APPLIED MUSIC EXAMINATIONS
                                           (Music Juries)

Applied music examinations, commonly known as music juries, are a final exam to assess the progress
of each student taking private lessons. This is one of the many ways that you are evaluated in
performance areas. It is also an opportunity for other faculty members to hear your progress, and a
chance for you to gain experience as a performer. Although we attempt to make your jury as
comfortable as possible, it is generally more difficult to perform your best when you are being
evaluated. Be assured that we want you to succeed!

Juries are typically held during final exam week. Several music faculty members and possibly an
outside professional musician evaluate juries. Instrumental juries do not require an accompanist.
Vocal and piano juries are usually performed in a recital format, similar to Convocation.

For instrumental juries, sign-up sheets are posted in the main hall a week prior to juries. Sign up for a
six-minute time slot for each credit hour of lessons. Generally, a music major will have a twelve-
minute jury, and a non-major will have a six-minute jury.

When you come to your jury you will need to bring a completed Applied Music Examination form.
Instrumental students will need three (3) copies of your prepared piece(s). These forms are available
in the music office during the last few weeks of the semester. It is important that you are very specific
and thorough when completing the form. Make a copy for your music portfolio since the original will
be placed in the music office file.

At your jury performance, all evaluators will complete Evaluation Forms based on your performance
medium. Music faculty listening to your jury complete the evaluation form, including written
comments, then give you a letter grade based on elements outlined on the appropriate form.
Completed forms are given to your applied instructor to calculate your final exam grade. Your applied
instructor will show you the evaluations and discuss them with you.

Attendance at juries is mandatory. Absences may be granted only if approved prior to the performance
unless serious illness, injury, or personal emergency preclude such notification. Absence from jury
will result in an incomplete for the semester. The jury must be made up the following semester.




21 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
Applied Music: Repertoire Record for Juried Performance
Bring three copies of your prepared piece(s) with this form.

Name: __________________________________________ Semester/Year: _____________________

Instrument or Vocal range: __________________________ Course # MUA _____________________

Please circle as appropriate: 1 credit hour           2 credit hours

                              Music major             Music minor         Non-major/minor

(Place an asterisk (*) before a selection to be performed on the jury.)

List prepared scales:
Major: ___________________________________ Minor: ___________________________________

Technical studies:




Pieces completed this semester. (List title and composer, indicate memorized pieces):




Pieces begun this semester and still in progress:




Ensembles in which you currently participate:




                                        Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 22
                                            JURY EVALUATION
  Student _____________________________________                    Semester/year________________
  I.       Superior Preparation: No notable performance problems. Very high musicianship level.
  II.      Excellent Preparation: Few notable performance problems. High musicianship level.
  III.     Average Preparation: Several notable performance problems. Average musicianship level.
  IV.      Below Average Preparation: Many notable performance problems. Low musicianship level.
  V.       Weak Preparation: Numerous notable performance problems. Very low musicianship level.

  Scales: _________, ________, ________ Score:                         Comments:
                                Score                                     Comments
                                                       You must provide a comment for any score of 1 or 5.
Tone Quality

Intonation

Diction/ Articulation

Breathing/ air support

Tempo

Rhythm

Note Accuracy

Memorization (Vocal)

Phrasing/ Style

Technique

Dynamics

Stage Presence

Rudiments/ Technique
(percussion)
Pedaling (piano)

Other Comments


  Total Points: ____________ divided by # of categories ___________ = _____________
  Grading Scale            A            B              C             D          F
                        1.0-1.4      1.5-1.9        2.0-2.4       2.5-2.9     3.0 +

  Adjudicator Signature:

  23 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                                  XI. QUALIFYING EXAMS
Qualifying exams are major benchmarks of your progress as a music major. The purpose or goal of
this process is to integrate all of the skills and knowledge that you receive in the music department
while at QU to make you into a well-rounded, fully informed, conceptually-thinking musician,
performer and/or teacher. Qualifying exams are normally administered before your junior year. You
are required to retake elements of the exam that you do not pass, and must pass 8/9 components to
qualify.

Students MUST pass each section with 80% or will no longer be considered a music major. If students
make between 75% and 79% on three sections or less, he or she will be allowed to return to school
early the following fall to make up the grade for those sections. If a student fails more than three
sections, he or she will no longer be considered a music major and will be encouraged to retake classes
in the areas of weakness. If one element is below 75%, the student will no longer be considered a
music major until additional classes are taken in the area of weakness.

Element                           Assessment Type                    Grade
Piano Proficiency *               rubric                             Average of 2.0 or lower
Sight Singing exam *              rubric                             80% or better
Performance exam                  Jury/Convocation rubric            Average of 2.0 or lower
Portfolio (Music Education)       Portfolio checklist. See page 27. 19 or more checked elements
Theory and ear training exam *    Written test                       80% or better
History written exam              Written test                       80% or better
History listening exam *          Written test                       80% or better
Grade of B or better in                                              pass/ fail
applied lessons *
Grade of C or better in                                              pass/ fail
Theory IV

We want you to be well-prepared and fully qualified to hold a degree in music, and we want you to be
aware of your standing, before you spend all of your time (and parent‟s money) in a career field that
may not be the best choice for you. Although this may sound foreboding and intimidating, we are also
maintaining a standard of excellence in the music program at QU. Whether you continue with
graduate school or join the workforce, your music degree at QU makes you equally qualified with
students from any other university.

The qualifying process is actually easier than it sounds. All of the components are directly related to
courses that you take as a freshman and sophomore. Keep this information available, periodically
review the Check List, and you are well on your way! (A detailed description of each of the
components can be found in Explanation of Requirements.)

Papers and other assignments related to each specific major will be assigned in applied lessons by the
instructor throughout the student‟s Junior and Senior years. These assignments combine all aspects of
music (theory, history, performance), and ultimately guide the student in the Senior Paper.

                                       Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 24
                               QUALIFYING EXAMS
                          EXPLANATION OF REQUIREMENTS

Elements to be graded by entire music faculty:
   1. Piano Proficiency
   2. Sight Singing exam
   3. Performance exam
          a. Prepared Piece of one week
          b. Sight Reading
          c. Other as determined by lesson instructor
   4. Portfolio

Elements to be graded by individual instructors:
   1. Comprehensive theory and ear training exam
          a. Four part harmonization of hymn or folksong
          b. Analysis of a piece
          c. Dictation exam
                  i. Rhythm
                 ii. Melody
                iii. Harmony
   2. Comprehensive History exam
   3. Listening exam

Other Elements:
   1. Grade of C or better in applied lessons
   2. Grade of C or better in Theory IV

Piano Proficiency exam
Students have to enroll in piano (class or private instruction) every semester until they pass the Piano
Proficiency Exam.

Students with background in piano can audition and take the exam at the end of their first semester at
QU.

For students with no background, the requirements are:

       Freshman Year:
             1. All major scales, two octaves up and down, with a logical fingering.
             2. One solo piece of at least 24 measures in length.
             3. Chord progression I-IV-I-V-I in 12 keys.
             4. Simple harmonization using block chords.
             5. Easy sight reading.

       Sophomore Year:
            1. All harmonic minor scales, two octaves up and down, with a logical fingering.
            2. One solo piece of at least 32 measures in length.
            3. Chord progression in various keys.

25 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
              4. Transposition.
              5. The Star-Spangled Banner.
              6. Sight reading.
              7. Accompany a singer or instrumentalist (easy).


Sight Singing Exam
Students will be asked to sing on sight two simple examples, one in Major and one in Minor. Students
will be given similar samples to practice at least two weeks before the exam.

Performance exam on applied instrument
This exam includes sight-reading, the preparation of a piece with one week lead time, and additional
elements determined by the applied teacher. Instead of a standard jury, students completing their
sophomore year will perform the exam during the last week of classes for the entire music faculty.

Portfolio
The portfolio should be designed to represent your time at Quincy University to a potential employer.
See page 27 for a detailed list of what should be included in the portfolio.

Theory and Aural Skills exam
This exam covers ear training (dictation), and theory. It is a culmination of four semesters of music
theory and is scheduled during the final exam week.

History and Listening exams
These exams cover the principal terms, styles, genres, periods, and composers of music history. These
exams will be offered during finals week. The list of required works to be covered on the listening
exam is located on p. 28. You may check out recordings from your instructor; however, they may not
leave the building!




                                      Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 26
                                  PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS
The portfolio process is a requirement intended to represent your accomplishments at Quincy
University to a potential employer or other official. The portfolio ** should highlight your
achievements in your area of specialization. Your portfolio and this checklist should be kept in your
advisor‟s office. Present your portfolio at your sophomore proficiency.

Freshman Year
_______ Convocation Programs                     _____ Fall (optional)        _____ Spring
_______ Convocation Evaluation forms             _____ Fall (optional)        _____ Spring
_______ Convocation Self-evaluation forms        _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Programs from all concerts
_______ Repertoire sheets                        _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Jury evaluation forms                    _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Jury Self-evaluation forms               _____ Fall                   _____ Spring

Sophomore Year
_______ Convocation Programs                     _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Convocation Evaluation forms             _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Convocation Self-evaluation forms        _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Programs from all concerts
_______ Repertoire sheets                        _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Jury evaluation forms                    _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Jury Self-evaluation forms               _____ Fall                   _____ Spring

Junior Year
_______ Convocation Programs                     _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Convocation Evaluation forms             _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Convocation Self-evaluation forms        _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Programs from all concerts
_______ Repertoire sheets                        _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Jury evaluation forms                    _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Jury Self-evaluation forms               _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Program for Junior Recital (B.A. only)

Senior Year
_______ Convocation Programs                     _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Convocation Evaluation forms             _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Convocation Self-evaluation forms        _____ Fall                   _____ Spring
_______ Programs from all concerts
_______ Repertoire sheets                        _____ Fall                    _____ Spring
_______ Jury evaluation forms                    _____ Fall                    _____ Spring
_______ Jury Self-evaluation forms               _____ Fall                    _____ Spring
_______ Program for Senior Recital                      _______ Senior Recital Paper

Music Education Majors may also include:
_______ Secondary instrument performance evaluations
       _____ Brass _____ Woodwinds _____ Percussion             _____ Strings
_______ Philosophy of Education/ Music Education
_______ Various papers/ assignments from music education courses
       *such as: sample music budget, advocacy statements, sample drill, etc
_______ Clinical Evaluations
** See Mr. Parke for Music Production Major Portfolio
27 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
Music History Listening Proficiency List
Most of these listening excerpts will be on your Music History compact discs (2010 edition)

CD Number     Title                                               Composer
1             Ave virgo virginum                                  Late 12th/Early 13th Century
2             Factum est salutare                                 from Magnus liber organi
2             Sumer is icumen in                                  Anonymous
2             In arboris                                          Philippe de Vitry
2             Rose, liz, printemps, verdure                       Guillaume de Machaut
2             Quam pulchra es                                     John Dunstable
2             Innsbruck ich muss dich lassen                      Henricus Isaac
3             Mille Regretz                                       Josquin des Prez
3             Ein feste burg                                      Martin Luther
3             O Magnum Mysterium                                  Tomas Luis Victoria
3             Oy Comamos y Bebamos                                Luiz de Narvaez
3             My Bonnie Lass She Smileth                          Thomas Morley
3             As Vesta Was                                        Thomas Weelkes
3             Il bianco e dolce cigno                             Jacques Arcadelt
4             Canzon septimi toni a 8                             Giovanni Gabrielli
4             Per quell vago boschetto from “l‟Euridice”          Jacopo Peri
4             Ahi, caso acerbo from “L‟Orfeo”                     Claudio Monteverdi
4             The Coronation of Poppea                            Claudio Monteverdi
4             e che si fa? from “Orontea”                         Antonio Cesti
4             Lagrime mie                                         Barbara Strozzi
5             With Drooping Wings from “Dido and Aeneas”          Henry Purcell
6             Trio Sonata Op. 3 No. 2                             Arcangelo Corelli
6             Violin Concerto in A minor                          Antonio Vivaldi
6             Prelude and Fugue in A minor                        Johann Sebastian Bach
6             O Fatal Consequence of Rage from “Saul”             George Frederic Handel
7             My Heart was so Free from The Beggar’s Opera        John Gay
7             Creation from The Continental Harmony               William Billings
7             Sonata in D Minor                                   Domenico Scarlatti
7             Symphony No. 92 (Oxford) Adagio Cantabile           Franz Joseph Haydn
7             The Creation: In the Beginning                      Franz Joseph Haydn
8             Piano Concerto in A Major                           Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
8             Symphony No. 3 (Eroica) Allegro con brio            Ludwig van Beethoven
8             Gretchen am Spinnrade                               Franz Schubert
9             Nocturne in D flat Major                            Fryderyk Chopin
9             Symphonie Fantastique                               Hector Berlioz
9             Elijah: And then Shall Your Light Break Forth       Felix Mendelssohn
10            Tristan und Isolde: Prelude and Conclusion Act I    Richard Wagner
11            Carmen: Act I Seguidilla and Duet                   Georges Bizet
11            Slavonic Dances                                     Antonin Dvorak
11            The Pirates of Penzance: When the Foreman …         Gilbert and Sullivan
12            Stars and Stripes Forever                           John Philip Sousa
12            Nuages from Nocturnes                               Claude Debussy
12            Piano Suite                                         Arnold Schoenberg
12            Maple Leaf Rag                                      Scott Joplin
13            Appalachian Spring                                  Aaron Copland
                                      Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 28
                          XII. COMPREHENSIVE EXPERIENCE
                                 STUDENT RECITALS

Special Recital

In consultation with the applied instructor, students may perform a special recital. Typically, a special
recital is for music education majors who desire to perform a junior year recital. In rare circumstances
a sophomore may be approved to perform a special recital. All procedures for junior recitals apply.


Junior Recital

B. A. students are required to perform a junior recital. The student must determine an acceptable date
with the applied instructor and accompanist at least one semester prior to the desired performance date.
Once the date is approved and on the music program calendar, the student‟s primary responsibility is to
practice, practice, practice!

When scheduling recital dates, it is important to note the following. Recitals are not permitted less
than three weeks before the end of the semester. No recitals will be scheduled during the summer.
Recitals will not be given during a semester when the student is doing student teaching. You should
also take into account vacation periods and holidays. North Campus might not be available for
practice or rehearsal for recitals given immediately after a vacation period.

Three or more weeks before the scheduled recital date the student must complete a Student Recital
Scheduling Form, gaining approval from all faculty to proceed with the performance. Should a faculty
member require a pre-performance jury, this is done no later than two weeks prior to the scheduled
recital performance.

Failure to present the Student Recital Scheduling Form, make the necessary arrangements for a
requested pre-performance jury or meet the approval of all faculty in the pre-performance jury results
in cancellation or postponement of the recital.

As soon as the recital is approved in full, the student is responsible for submitting a draft of the recital
program to the applied faculty member for proofreading and approval. The student is then responsible
for printing their program and providing ten additional copies to the music program for archiving.
Students are also responsible for their own publicity.




29 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                              SENIOR RECITAL AND PAPER
The senior recital and paper are the culmination of four years of work toward understanding all aspects
of music. To achieve truly comprehensive performances, the performer needs to draw from every facet
of the composer and his work. With this in mind, the paper considers the following elements in the
works performed in the senior recital.

I. Introduction – State the objectives of the paper. What pieces will be discussed?

II. Musicology/History
     What is the background of each composer (personal life, within the period)? How is this work
       representative of the composer‟s output? How is it representative of the period? Are there
       aspects that make it particularly typical/atypical?
     Choose a single composer to discuss at length. Answer the above questions, and include a
       more thorough biographical section.

III. Theory/Analysis (Both analyses may be on the same piece)
      Do a structural/formal analysis of one piece. How is this representative of the form? How does
        it depart from it?
      Do a harmonic/chordal analysis of one piece. Are there any unusual elements?

IV. Performance Practice
     Present a detailed approach to one work from the point of view of the performer. What is
       difficult? How do you cope with it? Are there exercises which can help a performer deal with
       these difficulties? This is primarily a technical element of the paper. For a Baroque piece,
       write ornamentations, cadenzas, etc. Reference to recordings may be helpful for this section.

V. Text and Music
    For one work (or several by a single composer), explore the relationship between music and
       text. How do they fit together? Where was the composer less successful? Who is the poet?
       Give some background on him/her and the poetry itself in its historical/stylistic context.
    If there is a programmatic work in instrumental programs, discuss the programmatic elements,
       including discussion of the non-musical source.

VI. Conclusions – Restate the main ideas of the paper. Summarize the pieces.



The paper must be reviewed and approved by all members of the music faculty.




                                       Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 30
SENIOR RECITAL AND PAPER CHECKLIST
   I.      Initial Planning Stages (more than one full semester before the recital – 15 weeks)
           A. Choose recital repertoire
               At least 45 minutes of music
               Chosen in conjunction with applied teacher
               Submit list of repertoire to your applied teacher.
           B. Decide on paper content
               Confer with the applied teacher.
               Cover the required 3 or 4 areas
               Submit decision on composers and paper elements to your applied teacher.
           C. Decide recital date (No later than two weeks prior to last class)
               Confirm availability of accompanist, applied teacher and venue
               Petition Division Chair for inclusion on music faculty agenda
               Receive faculty approval
               Reserve date with music secretary
               Finalize confirmation of date with ALL parties

   II.     Bibliography Listing (10 weeks before recital date)
           Include inter-library loans, recordings, journal articles, special purchases, etc.
           Submit thorough and accurate citations to your applied teacher.

   III.    Outline of paper (8 weeks before recital date)
           Include updated bibliography (if changes), completed introduction
           Submit to your applied teacher.

   IV.     Rough Draft (6 weeks before recital date)
           This is for initial consideration and may require thorough reworking.
           Submit to your applied teacher and schedule meeting for discussion within a week.
           The recital may be postponed at this point.

   V.      Final Draft (3 weeks before recital date)
           Submit to your applied teacher, minor re-writes may be necessary.
           If re-writes are extensive, the recital may be postponed.

   VI.     Complete all necessary paperwork (3 weeks before recital date)
           Submit form giving faculty authorization of recital to your applied teacher
           Submit recital publicity form to publicity office.

   VII.    Give a pre-performance of the recital (2 weeks before recital date)

   VIII.   RECITAL PERFORMANCE – Have Fun!! Faculty will use the Convocation Evaluation
           Form to assess the performance. A passing grade is 2.0 or better.




31 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook
                                 Recital Preparation Form

                                     Recital Set-Up Request
Requests must be submitted to the program secretary at least two weeks prior to the performance.

Today‟s date _____________ Circle one: Junior Recital       Senior Recital   Other: _______________

Name of performer/Ensemble: _________________________________________________________

Performance information: _____________________________________________________________
                             (date)            (time)            (place)
Music stands/stage prop needs:_________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

Other:


Instructor‟s signature: ________________________________________________________________
(required)

                                  Student Recital Scheduling
The recital by ___________________________________scheduled for ______________ should be
played for members of the faculty no later than two weeks prior to the scheduled performance. The
date of the pre-performance is ___________________________________________.

This form must be presented to each faculty member for his or her signature at least three weeks before
the scheduled recital date.

                                    Signatures of faculty members


_________________________________________________


_________________________________________________


_________________________________________________


_________________________________________________


_________________________________________________


                                       Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook - 32
                            This page was intentionally left blank.




33 – Quincy University Music Department – Student Handbook

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:27
posted:1/31/2012
language:English
pages:34