Docstoc

Patient Satisfaction Patient Satisfaction Patient

Document Sample
Patient Satisfaction Patient Satisfaction Patient Powered By Docstoc
					Patient Satisfaction
         Patient Perception

    Presented By
    Diane Angelico, RN
    Asst Director Information Services
    Health Care Services Division
Satisfaction Survey Basics

   HCSD Surveys are distributed at each facility
    by employees in a face to face encounter
    during a visit… Clinic, ER, ASU or Blood
    Draw. 19 questions
   Some facilities are surveying patients in
    Radiology and other areas.
   Surveys are returned in a postage paid
    envelope to HCSD for review and tabulating.
   Results are reported approx 8 weeks after
    the end of the quarter
        Minimum Sample Size 2002

   Confidence Interval @ 99% Confidence
    Level
   Inpatient 60
   Clinic    67
   ER       136

   The minimal standards listed above hold true
    regardless of the facility.
   New calculations coming soon
       OVERALL SATISFACTION
         Quarters 1 -3 FY 08-09
                    Overall Satisfaction Q 1/2/3

            98
            96
            94
Quarter 1   92
            90
Quarter 2
            88
Quarter 3   86
            84
            82
            80
                      1        2      3        4         5      6      7
                                           Hosptials

     1- MCLNO    2- EKL   3- LJC   4-UMC    5-LAK      6-BMC   7-WOM
              HCAHPS SURVEYS

   CMS mandated survey of med/surg inpatients via
    phone call a few weeks after discharge.
   HCSD provides data to contractor (Myers Group)
    who will attempt 5 calls to patient at different times
    of day, different days of week.
   Reports generated and provided approx 8 weeks
    after end of quarter for each facility and system.
   Results reported on Hospital Compare and will be
    tied into Medicare reimbursement in future.
NO ONE CAN SAY WE MAKE THIS
STUFF UP !!!
   Hospital Compare
   www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov

   Specific United States hospitals are compared with
    national averages in their treatment of the three
    medical conditions of heart attack, heart failure, and
    pneumonia.
   CAHPS Hospital Results are also available
   Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare
    Provider Systems
WHAT OUR PATIENTS TELL US

   Everyone was so friendly and compassionate
   I will recommend this hospital always
   How can the staff at the desk order things on the
    internet when I am sitting here waiting?
   I am grateful for the time the doctor spent with me
   Best care ever – better than Terrebonne Gen.
   The nurses were very uncaring and did not take the
    time to listen to me.
   So glad to have this hospital to go to for care
   Thanks to the employees who were so nice to me
More comments from surveys
   The employees seem inattentive and cold
   The Security Guard was too busy on his cell phone to answer my
    questions.
   The staff was having a pizza party in the ER while I sat outside in
    terrible pain. Lost my paperwork.
   Wonderful medical care- not so good attitudes
   Thank God for this hospital and the staff that care for patients
    each and every day
   These doctors saved my life
   Just because I am poor does not mean I am stupid
   Very caring and compassionate staff
   Once you get past registration everything is okay
Keeping Patients informed boosts
satisfaction with ER
   The Times-Picayune | 06.22.08
   The Washington Post

   The first step to helping emergency room patients feel better could be…no, not treating
    them or helping them control their pain, but telling them how long they’ll have to wait.
    That’s the finding of a recent national survey of more than 1.5 million patients in over 1,600
    ER’s.

   The survey, conducted by health-care consulting firm Press Ganey, found that although
    satisfaction decreased the longer a patient waited, consistent communication with ER staff
    helped people feel comfortable and cared for.

   In 2007, the average ER visit lasted four hours and five minutes - five minutes longer than
    in the previous year. Patients ranked “how well they were informed about delays” as their
    top priority, followed by pain control, how much the nurses cared about them as a person,
    how well they were informed of treatment, and the overall wait time.

   People who waited more than three hours to see a doctor but remained well-informed of
    delays scored more than twice as high on overall satisfaction (96.6 points on a 100-point
    scale) as those who waited just one hour and considered their updating “very poor” (42.7).
WHAT ELSE CAN WE DO ?

   Thank patients for keeping their appointments either
    verbally when they check in or with signage in the
    clinic waiting areas.
   Mental image of “Mama”
   Reward excellent behavior and good manners
   Share results of surveys and comments with hands
    on staff
   Compassion
   Attention
   Responsiveness
   Empathy

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:11
posted:1/31/2012
language:English
pages:12