PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH 50th ANNIVERSARY

Document Sample
PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH 50th ANNIVERSARY Powered By Docstoc
					                             PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH 

                                      50th ANNIVERSARY 

                                        THE BEGINNING 

 

As the 1950’s drew to a close the United States was about to enter a new decade which would 
bring unforeseen changes to this country and its citizens.  The economic success of the post war 
era was fueling a growth of suburban communities, and Cleveland was no exception.  As people 
left the city to move to new suburban areas, they found the need to break the ties to their old 
communities and establish new ties.  Such was the case in the expanding communities in 
western Cuyahoga County.  By the summer of 1959, The Ohio Synod of the Lutheran Church of 
America began to take steps to meet the spiritual needs of our area.  Spearheaded by Rev. 
Richard Knudten, Mission Developer, Dr. Albert Buhl, Mission Superintendent, and aided by the 
congregation and staff of Bethany English Lutheran Church in Kamm’s Corner, an effort was 
started to gauge the interest in establishing a new LCA church in Westlake. 

 

Drawing on established Lutherans who had moved to the west suburbs, there appeared to be 
sufficient interest to proceed with the establishment of a new church.  The decision was made 
by the Synod to move forward.  The Mission Board purchased a house at 2260 Canterbury for 
use by the Mission Developer in the late summer of 1959. That house became the center for 
the effort to bring a new Lutheran Church to the west suburbs.  August, 1959 saw an initial 
meeting at the Mission Developer’s house to begin the process of moving beyond a synod 
based effort to one supported by the community.  Nearly 100 people attended this first 
meeting and 35 expressed an interest in becoming members in this new mission.  As this 
mission effort proceeded, the help of the members of Bethany Lutheran became an important 
factor in getting the new church established on solid ground.  Looking for a formal beginning in 
1960, it was decided to survey the Westlake community to see if additional potential members 
beyond this original 35 could be located.  Ten Boy Scouts from Bethany worked with Rev. 
Knudten to canvas door‐to‐door to inform the community of the new church and encourage 
those with an interest to join the new congregation.  The Bethany effort was supported by a 
number of the original 35 who also canvassed the area.   




                                                1 
 
                                                                                                
On September 13, 1959 Hilliard Elementary School provided the setting for the first service of 
what was to become Prince of Peace Lutheran Church.  With Rev. Knudten presiding, using an 
portable altar and lectern built by the Bethany Boy Scouts, and supported by the Bethany choir, 
149 people joined together to inaugurate a new congregation.   

 

October, 1959 saw great movement in the establishment of our new church.  In that month 
alone the church held its first Sunday School; started confirmation classes for both first and 
second year students; and formed Church Building, Christian Education, Evangelism, Finance, 
Stewardship, Worship and Music, and Social Concern committees.  Music was not forgotten 
either as a portable electric pump organ was purchased to support the newly organized senior 
and junior choirs.  The choir rehearsed in the homes of members that had access to a piano or 
organ. Perhaps the most important actions happened two weeks apart that month.  On 
October 11, 1959 the Congregation voted to put a name to this effort – Prince of Peace 
Evangelical Lutheran Church.  Just two weeks later on October 25, 70 adults signed the official 
Mission Charter. Included with the adult members signing the Charter were members of the 
first confirmation class.  Confirmation service was held prior to the signing to allow these new 
members the privilege of adding their names in a special box at the bottom of the Charter.  The 
holidays saw services on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Eve.  The seed was planted, but there 
were still hurdles to overcome. 

                                                 

                                                 


                                               2 
 
                                         OFFICIAL START 

 

March 13, 1960 marked the official “organization” of Prince of Peace.  Among the 210 
attendees were 98 Charter Members.  Presiding over 
the ceremony were Rev. Knudten, Pastor of Prince of 
Peace; Dr. Veler, Synod President; Dr. Buhl, Synod 
Director of Home Missions; and Dr. Trout, Pastor 
Emeritus of Bethany English Lutheran Church.  Prince 
of Peace was formally incorporated by the State of 
Ohio in April.  At this point the initial progress of 
forming our new congregation faced a major crisis.  
Pastor Knudten decided he did not wish to continue 
as pastor of the newly formed Prince of Peace.  
Coming at such a critical stage of our development, 
the resignation could have severely retarded or even 
ended the building of the new church.  However, the 
congregation did not falter, but moved forward.  In 
May the members identified and purchased a four 
acre site on Center Ridge Road to serve as the site for 
a permanent church building.  In support of the construction effort a Building Fund Drive was 
begun in June.  1960 saw the addition of a Board of Auxiliaries, Christian Concern, and 
Fellowship Committees to the church family.   While waiting for the new church to be built, the 
congregation utilized various sites.  The parsonage served various needs including meetings and 
even mid‐week Lenten services.  Additionally, sister churches throughout Westlake offered 
their facilities for some of our special services. 

It was not until February, 1961 that the position of resident 
Pastor was finally filled when the Rev. George H. Ulrich 
accepted the call to lead Prince of Peace.   Unfortunately 
Prince of Peace soon suffered another crisis in leadership 
when Pastor Ulrich resigned after just a year at the church.  
Luckily for the congregation, Dr. Trout, who had been so 
important in the effort to start our church, stepped in once 
again to keep Prince of Peace moving forward.  In March of 
1962 Dr. Trout agreed to serve as pastor until a permanent 
replacement could be found.                                               Dr Trout 

 


                                                 3 
 
                                   NEW LEADER, NEW HOME 

 

                                       As 1962 drew to a close and 1963 began, Prince of 
                                       Peace achieved important milestones. The Pulpit 
                                       Committee of Joe Dinkel, Dorothy Adams, Warren 
                                       Mallaby, and Christel Bey recommended a candidate for 
                                       senior pastor. In October, 1962 Rev. Eugene Loehrke 
                                       answered that call and arrived with his wife Carol and 
                                       three children, Tim, Christine, and Jeff.  Pastor Loehrke’s 
                                       arrival began what was to become an almost twenty 
                                       year period of service to the congregation.  Given the 
                                       fits and starts associated with the effort to fill the post 
                                       of pastor, Prince of Peace was certainly blessed when 
                                       Pastor Loehrke answered our call.  The coming of the 
new year saw the next critical milestone reached.  In January, 1963, the Board of American 
Missions granted Prince of Peace permission to award a contract and begin construction on the 
                                                         new church.  A ground‐breaking service 
                                                         was held on February 17, with 115 
                                                         people attending.  Actual construction 
                                                         of the facility was begun on May 1. The 
                                                         total cost of construction grew to 
                                                         $85,000 when initial work on the 
                                                         foundation uncovered quicksand.  1963 
                                                         drew to a close with the members of 
                                                         Prince of Peace Lutheran Church 
                                                         enjoying their first service in the new 
                                                         building on December 22, and their first 
                                                         Christmas Eve service just two days 
later. 

                                                      




                                                      


                                                4 
 
Following the formal dedication of the church building in March of 1964, Prince of Peace 
enjoyed a period of more routine matters.  Membership grew, services expanded, activities 
were planned, facilities improved, and the normal activities of a congregation were met.   

                                                             

                                                            STABILITY AND GROWTH 

                                                             

                                                            Even by late 1966 it was becoming 
                                                            apparent that Prince of Peace was 
                                                            outgrowing its existing facilities.  
                                                            Membership had grown by 40 
                                                            percent, and a second worship 
                                                            service had been added.  With an 
                                                            average attendance of 265 and a 
                                                            growing Church School enrollment, 
                                                            it was clear that the church would 
need to expand in the near future.  Sunday school was a special need.  At various times it was 
necessary to rent space from the Westlake Public School system and use the parsonage 
basement. A Planning Council was organized to develop plans for a new sanctuary.  An 
additional sign of Prince of Peace’s growth came in 1967, with the realization of financial self‐
sustainability.  The church was generating sufficient revenue to no longer need aid from the 
Board of American Missions.  Mr. Gilbert Jensen arrived to work with the congregation to raise 
funds as part of a “Debt Reduction Program” in support of the new building effort. 

1967 saw its share of improvements.  New signs, lighting and shrubbery were installed.  The 
Social Ministry reached out to the patients at the Cleveland Psychiatric Hospital.  A pictorial 
directory was distributed to the congregation in September.  Perhaps the highlight of the year 
was the installation of a new organ.  Purchased from the Saville Organ Corporation for $18,626 
it was the first installation by that corporation in the State of Ohio. 

It took almost three years from the awarding of a contract with the firm of Conrad and 
Fleischman to design a new sanctuary until ground was actually broken in October, 1971.  

During that time Prince of Peace continued to grow, reaching 300 members by its tenth 
anniversary.  Basketball and baseball teams were organized.  Confirmation and communion 
rites were modified reflecting changes adopted by the LCA.  More activities within the church, 
like Calling Couples and Kaffee Klatsches, were begun.  Two Women’s Circles were established 
and Luther League provided activities for middle and high school teens. Finally in March, 1973 
the new sanctuary was dedicated.  Completed at a cost of approximately $285,000, the 

                                                5 
 
dedication ceremony included Dr. John Rilling, president of the Ohio Synod, LCA; Dr. Richard 
Knudten; and Dr. J.H.L.Trout. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the 1970’s progressed, Prince of Peace enjoyed a period of growth and stability.  The period 
was marked by what only could be called normal activities.  New groups such as Prince of Peace 
Seniors, M & K (named for Martin and Katherine Luther) Bible study group, Prayer Chain, Secret 
Sister, Cottage Fellowship, Mothers Unite, and work morning for ladies were begun.  Outside 
activities included involvement in golf and bowling leagues and bridge groups.  Firsts included 
an annual church picnic, Thanksgiving dinner, high school boys as communion assistants, lay 
readers, and Sunday evening vespers.  The church staff offered assistance to the members with 
such presentations as Family Counseling Services and Parenting Skills Course.  New robes for 
the acolytes and communion assistances added to the Sunday morning service. As the decade 
ended members were introduced to the new green Lutheran Book of Worship.   

 

                                   TRANSITION IN LEADERSHIP 

 

1981 saw the end of one era for Prince of Peace and the beginning of another.  Pastor Loehrke 
tendered his resignation effective March 15, 1981 to answer a call to serve as pastor at Trinity 
Lutheran Church in Vermilion.  After over eighteen years as its spiritual leader, Prince of Peace 
bid a tearful farewell to the man who had been so instrumental in leading the church from its 
infancy at Hilliard Elementary to the vibrant congregation it had become.  With the aid of the 

                                                6 
 
                                            synod and especially Rev. John Clausen of All 
                                            Saints Lutheran in Olmsted Falls, Prince of Peace 
                                            continued its services until a new pastor was 
                                            found.   Rev. R. Landis Coffman began as new 
                                            pastor when he joined the church on January 11, 
                                            1982.  Following the pattern of most 
                                            congregations and the specific request of Pastor 
                                            Coffman, Prince of Peace decided to switch from 
                                            providing a parsonage to providing Pastor 
                                            Coffman with a living allowance.  The parsonage 
                                            was put up for sale, and Pastor Coffman moved 
                                            with his wife, Judy, and children Craig and 
Christina, into a home they purchased in Westlake.   

Building on the momentum established in the previous years, Prince of Peace continued to 
move forward.  New practices reflecting changes in the Lutheran Churches across the LCA were 
instituted.  Communion practices were changed when first communion was not part of 
Confirmation but offered to fifth and sixth graders following a short instructional period.  
Additionally, communion itself was offered every Sunday.  Staffing increased as two Parish 
Volunteer Coordinators, Parish Youth Coordinator, Retired Persons Activities Coordinator, 
Parish Fellowship Coordinator, and first service Choir Director were added.  Also in April, 1984, 
a search committee was formed to consider adding an associate pastor.  Continued 
improvements were made to the church.  New speakers were installed in the narthex and the 
nursery.  The Fellowship Hall was refurbished and additions and repairs made to the kitchen, 
sanctuary, storage shed, and foundation.  Finally in recognition of the growth of the 
congregation and hopes for continued growth in the future, the church purchased a five acre 
plot just west of the our existing facility in 1984 for $170,000. 

As Prince of Peace approached its 25th Anniversary its members could look back with pride on 
their accomplishments.  From the original 70 charter members the congregation had, at the 
end of 1984, 914 baptized and 673 confirmed members.  Those 35 individuals who had 
expressed a desire to be part of a new Lutheran church back in 1959 had grown to a 
congregation that averaged 325 attendees each Sunday.  

                                                  

                                 START OF THE NEXT 25 YEARS 

                                                  

On March 10, 1985, the members of Prince of Peace Evangelical Lutheran Church gathered at 
Avon Oaks Country Club to celebrate their twenty‐five years of fellowship.  The Sunday brunch 

                                                7 
 
was enjoyed by all.  The effort to add an associate pastor reached a successful conclusion in 
April.  Cathleen Thompson accepted the call from Prince of Peace.  Mrs. Thompson, a registered 
nurse and mother of two sons, was formally ordained in May and joined the church on June 23, 
1985.  The addition of Pastor Thompson was certainly needed as attendance for the two 
services was averaging over 300.  Pastor Thompson found her first summer at Prince of Peace 
unusually busy when Pastor Coffman took a six week vacation in July and August to visit the 
Holy Land to pursue his interest in biblical archaeology.  The end of 1985 saw both an addition 
and an ending at Prince of Peace.  Our Christmas Eve celebration saw the addition of a 4:00PM 
family worship service to the existing 7:00PM and 10:30PM services.  The new service was 
designed to meet the needs of families, especially those with young children, to enjoy a 
Christmas Eve worship service while still meeting the requirements of family responsibilities.  
On a sadder note, the end of the year brought the retirement of Elaine Heeley as church 
organist.  Elaine had served as organist for 22 years. 

Financial issues confronted Prince of Peace in 1986.  On the positive side, the success of the 
“Land Fund Bond Drive” provided sufficient funds to pay off the mortgage on the five acres 
west of the church.  While our capital finances were on solid ground, problems with operating 
funding were growing.  In order to address the shortfall in revenue generation, church council 
decided to adjust spending and freeze a number of projects.  Efforts were discussed on how to 
increase revenue generation especially with regards to membership pledging. The council also 
decided to look into acquiring a computer. Recognizing the fact that many members were gone 
on weekends during the summer, the church decided to add a Wednesday night worship 
service for a three week trial period in June.  In July, the Synod requested that Pastor Thompson 
temporarily serve as Vice Pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church in Lakewood.  Finally in September, 
Prince of Peace joined the new Westlake Ministerial Association.  

In 1987, Pastor Coffman and Church Council asked the members of the congregation to take a 
deeper look at their spiritual life.  A “Year of Commitment” campaign was launched in support 
of the effort.  Following upon the success of the previous summer, Wednesday night worship 
services were again scheduled for the summer months.  In August, decisions were made to 
purchase a new organ and to revamp the entire Sunday School program.  In support of the 
“Year of Commitment” campaign, Pastor Coffman agreed to repeat the “Life with God” course 
he had taught his first year at Prince of Peace.  Also in October, the church received a report on 
a study done by a LCA Church Building consultant.  The study looked at trends and needs in the 
Westlake area as they related to the church’s facilities needs.  Noting the trend in the 
community toward young families with small children, the study stressed the need for a 
building that could accommodate child care and education.  On a practical note, the needs of 
the Sunday School resulted in a change in the length of the early service to insure that that 
service was over before Sunday School began.  Finally in November, it was decided to offer a 
coffee hour between the services.  As our membership grew and two worship services became 

                                                 8 
 
the norm, members found it more difficult to maintain ties with others in the congregation.   
The Cup n Conversation coffee hour was added in hope that members attending the early 
service would remain at the church and late service attendees would arrive a little early for the 
opportunity to enjoy a cup of coffee and renew old friendships.1988 was a new beginning for 
the majority of Lutherans across the United States, including the members of Prince of Peace.  
The Lutheran Church in America joined with the American Lutheran Church and other smaller 
Lutheran groups to become the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.  The ELCA became the 
largest Lutheran Church group in North America.  In recognition of our membership in the ELCA, 
Prince of Peace’s Council began work on rewriting our church constitution to conform to the 
ELCA Model Constitution.  While the proposed new constitution was finished by the end of the 
year, it was not submitted to the congregation until early in 1989.  The year saw much of the 
same routine as church activities continued.  The new computer was up and running in April, 
and a successful effort was launched beginning in April to establish a couple’s fellowship group 
for those in their 30’s and 40’s.  There were however, two major events in 1988.  The first was 
in the personnel area.   Pastor Thompson decided to answer the call from Hope Lutheran 
                                 Church in Cincinnati.  She left Prince of Peace in June.  Pastor 
                                 Thompson’s replacement was Pastor Patti Kaufman.  Pastor Patti 
                                 was installed in November.  The second major event was the 
                                 Stewardship Drive which was begun in October.  Leadership 
                                 within the church recognized the financial stress facing Prince of 
                                 Peace, and they decided to be proactive in addressing the 
                                 situation.  The idea was to reach out personally to each member 
                                 stressing the need for support for the church and its programs.  
                                 A series of Fireside Chats were scheduled for October and 
                                 November.  By the end of the effort over 95% of the members 
had been reached either in person or by phone. 

As the 1980’s drew to a close, Prince of Peace expanded its outreach programs.  In April, 1989 
members of the congregation met with Pastor Jamie Kaufman of Martin Luther and St. Paul 
Lutheran Church in Cleveland.  Pastor Jamie spoke of the various programs supported by Martin 
Luther/St. Paul and the challenges each one faced.   Prince of Peace moved forward in 
becoming a mission partner with Pastor Jamie’s church.  April also saw the visit of Rev. Adolf 
Hashikutuva of Namibia, South Africa.  Rev. Hashikutuva preached to the congregation as part 
of Evangelism Month.  Closer to home, the congregation began considering how best to work 
with Westlake Village, the senior living community being built right across Center Ridge Road.  
Perhaps the highlight of the outreach effort was the decision by Council in November to start 
the Stephen Ministry program in 1990.  1989 was not only about outreach.  Pastor Patti, in her 
role in support of Christian Education, spent part of her summer visiting each of the 45 youth 
involved in the confirmation program.  Finally, continuing the facilities expansion program, 


                                                 9 
 
Council hired Ellis‐Myers Architects in June to prepare initial drawings for both an expanded 
education wing and a new and larger sanctuary. 

 

                             THE 1990’S: A DECADE OF CHALLENGES 

                                                  

The decade of the 1990’s began strongly for Prince of Peace.  In January the Land Fund was paid 
off.  This financial event prepared the way for the expansion efforts that were to occur this 
year.  Of greater significance was the formal beginning of the Stephen Ministry.  Also in January, 
Pastor Patti, Marge Holschuh, and Bob Larsen attended a two week Stephen Series Leadership 
Course in Orlando.  Upon their return to Westlake, the three began a training program for 
thirteen members to become Stephen Caregivers.  The thirteen received their commissions as 
Caregivers in June.  May saw the return of Rev. Hashikutuva from a now free and independent 
Namibia.  He spoke to the congregation about the needs of his country and its people.   In 
September, the council approved presenting building plans for both an expanded education 
wing and a new sanctuary to the congregation.  In support of the building expansion, Larry 
Wingard, from the national ELCA office, arrived to help develop fund raising plans for these 
capital projects.  The church’s traditional Thanksgiving Dinner celebration was expanded to 
include a special effort to promote fellowship and discuss the building plans.  After a careful 
review of all the issues surrounding the building plans, it was decided that Prince of Peace could 
not afford both the education and sanctuary plans.  It was the conclusion of the congregation 
that the current effort should focus solely on the expansion of the education facilities coupled 
with improvements to the parking lot. 

The plans for the education wing expansion moved forward on two fronts as Prince of Peace 
began 1991.  The actual plans for the building were developed and presented to the City of 
Westlake for approval.  On a parallel track the church instituted a fund raising effort to pay for 
the expansion.  The need for the expansion was very apparent as the number attending Sunday 
School grew to 250.   

 
Unfortunately, the plans for the new facility soon ran into problems.  The soil the wing was to 
be built on was unstable.  This condition caused numerous problems.  First, the soil conditions 
meant that any building would require pilings to be sunk.  Pilings had not been figured into the 
cost of construction.  With the added cost it became necessary to reconsider the size and scope 
of the project.  Additionally, as the project was changed new plans had to be prepared and 
presented to the city for approval.  Council struggled to decide how to change the plans to pay 
for the pilings and while remaining within budget.  Final plans were approved by the 
Congregation and submitted to Westlake late in the year. 

                                                10 
 
1991 saw an addition of 80 new members and the highest pledged amount in our history.  The 
Stephen Ministry saw 10 additional caregivers trained, and 16 members of Prince of Peace 
participated in the Habitat for Humanity program.  The church hired a full time sexton.  During 
the summer three Saturday night services were held in July and August.  The services were 
done on a trial basis to see how a casual Saturday evening service would be received.  Eric 
Kothari, a Harvard Divinity student, spent his summer with Prince of Peace as part of his 
required internship program.  Finally, the Mission and Ministry Committee began to consider 
on how best to utilize the opportunities presented by the expanded education wing. 

While 1991 had been a year of ups and downs with regards to the expansion, 1992 saw all that 
work come to fruition.  The City of Westlake approved the final modified plans for the building 
and parking lot in January.  The contract for construction was awarded to Fortney & Weygant of 
Lakewood.  The groundbreaking ceremony took place on May 24, with actual construction 
commencing on June 1.  Even with an unusually wet summer the building was completed and 
dedicated before the end of the year.  Funding costs were reduced as the result of a successful 
bond selling program which allowed Price of Peace to keep the amount of the mortgage at a 
lower than expected level.  

                                                                              

                                                                              The opening of the 
                                                                              new education wing 
                                                                              and the growing 
                                                                              number of the 
                                                                              members it served 
                                                                              was just one of the 
                                                                              positive happenings 
                                                                              for Prince of Peace in 
                                                                              1993.  Although the 
                                                                              final cost of the 
                                                                              expansion was higher 
than originally planned due to the cost of the pilings and some late additions, the actual dollar 
amount spent (approximately $885,000) was less than the final estimate.  Another addition to 
the facilities was the installation of the Luther’s Rose stain glass window in February.  The 
window, funded by a generous gift from Pastor Coffman, highlighted aspects of Luther’s life and 
theology.  Growth of the Sunday School attendees was matched by a growth of overall 
membership as that number grew to over 1000.  Working to maintain the church’s momentum, 
Council held a retreat in May to establish new directions and goals for the congregation.  They 
identified four areas for increased effort: Pro active Intentional Evangelism, Support Group, 
Variety in Worship, and Christian Education.  In support of this effort the Evangelism 


                                                 11 
 
Committee started a “Caring Evangelism” class taught by Pastor Coffman.  Finally, a sad note 
was received in June when the church was informed that the man who had been so 
instrumental in getting Prince of Peace to the strong position it currently enjoyed, Pastor 
Eugene Loerke, had died. 

                                                 

                                     PERSONNEL CHANGES 

                                                 

1994 began a three year period of significant personnel changes at Prince of Peace.  During 
1993 Pastor Patti had taken time to review the direction of her life.  By the spring of 1994, she 
concluded that her greatest satisfaction came from helping people one‐on‐one.  This insight led 
Pastor Patti to resign as associate pastor at Prince of Peace and look to acquire an advanced 
degree in counseling.  She tendered her resignation in April effective August 15.  Beyond 
creating a call committee to look for a replacement for Pastor Patti, Council decided to step 
back and review the direction Prince of Peace should be taking.  Council members along with 
committee chair persons and staff members held a one day retreat to discuss the needs of the 
church.  Additionally, Town Hall meeting were held to get feedback from the congregation.  Out 
of these efforts came new Vision and Mission Statements and a firm resolve that the new 
associate pastor needed to focus on the youth ministry.  While personnel issues dominated the 
year, there were other things happening at Prince of Peace.  To recall just two: a Singles Group 
was formed, and the church supported the Billy Graham Crusade including supplying seven 
members to work as counselors at the rally. 

The rapid change in the pastoral ranks accelerated in 1995.  In February, Church Council 
extended a call to Pastor Bret Rizzo to replace Pastor Patti Kaufman.  Pastor Bret accepted the 
                               call and began his ministry at Prince of Peace in March.  The 
                               arrival of the new associate pastor seemed to herald a return to 
                               more normal times.  The church purchased a fifteen person van 
                               and began steps to improve the “barn” to store the new vehicle.  
                               The success of the previous Saturday evening programs led to the 
                               decision to begin a new summer Saturday 5:30 worship service.  
                               The 1995 summer service featured the Victory Feast liturgy and 
                               contemporary music, a change from previous programs.  The 
                               personnel stability did not last long.  In August, Senior Pastor 
                               Coffman resigned from Prince of Peace to answer a call from a 
church in Reynoldsburg, Ohio.  Pastor Coffman left in September.  After meeting with Bishop 
Miller, head of the ELCA Northeast Ohio Synod, the church decided to move forward in 
replacing Pastor Coffman with a two pronged approach.  In the immediate term, it was decided 

                                               12 
 
to look for an interim pastor to serve at Prince of Peace until a full time senior pastor could be 
hired.  In support of the search for the full time pastor, a call committee was formed.  Closely 
following the advice given by Bishop Miller, this committee was tasked with clearly delineating 
what Prince of Peace felt were necessary attributes to be a successful senior pastor at the 
church.  Once the committee had clearly stated what the church was looking for in terms of the 
skill set needed, those attributes would be forwarded to the Synod Office.  The synod would 
then prepare a list of potential candidates to be sent for review.  In October, Rev. Carole Mohr 
accepted the call to become interim pastor. 

While the search for a new senior pastor was not the only matter that concerned the church in 
1996, it was certainly dominate.  Pastor Mohr agreed to extend her position as interim pastor 
for six more months after Rev. David Hinkleman changed his mind about accepting Prince of 
Peace’s call to become senior pastor.  Unfortunately for Prince of Peace, Pastor Mohr had to 
shorten her commitment to the church when she accepted the call for a full time position in 
June.  Pastor William Moser was hired to replace Pastor Mohr as interim pastor.  Finally in 
December, the search for a senior pastor was successfully concluded when Rev. Sherman 
Bishop accepted the call to fill the position.  Pastor 
Bishop joined the church after serving as an interim 
pastor in Warren, Ohio.  Before that he had been at 
the Synod office where he had served as an assistant 
to the Bishop. 

Other activities were part of Prince of Peace’s year.  A 
new catechism program entitled “Promise Seekers” 
was begun.  The “With One Voice” hymnal was added 
as a supplement to the Lutheran Book of Worship.  To 
most of the congregation it began known as the blue 
book.  Consideration was begun on whether to 
remodel the church office, the senior pastor office, 
and add a new work room.  Throughout 1996, the 
congregation had to deal with issues surrounding running the church’s office.  The phone 
system needed to be upgraded, security issues considered, support staff duties redefined and 
expanded, and structural problems addressed.  Finally in November, Barbara Pilkey resigned as 
church organist. 

                                WORSHIP SERVICE CONTROVERSY 

1997 began on a high note as Prince of Peace installed Sherman Bishop as its new senior pastor 
in January.  Pastor Bishop decided to hold a series of “cottage meetings” with members of the 
congregation.  The meetings began in February with the purpose of allowing the Pastor and the 
members the opportunity to get to know each other.  The intimate small group setting allowed 

                                                13 
 
for more open discussions about the feelings of the members and their individual hopes for the 
future of Prince of Peace.  Mundane matters like the decision to review the church’s phone and 
computer systems and the purchase of a new John Deere riding mower occupied the everyday 
matters during the early part of the year.  On the personnel side, a Parish Nurse Support Team, 
advised by Dr. Steve ReMine, was formed in February.  One of the outcomes of this team was 
the hiring of Rosemary Miles as Parish Nurse in April.  Also in 1997, Marianne Powrie offered 
her services as a volunteer lay minister.   Marianne was contemplating attending seminary to 
become a minister, and she felt volunteering as a lay minister would help decide what direction 
she should follow.   

The success of the Saturday night contemporary service led to the decision to introduce a 
contemporary worship service on Sunday morning.  This decision led to a series of 
controversies concerning liturgies and Sunday School.  At the heart of the controversy was the 
problem of trying to balance individual preferences for one of the three available musical 
settings and the ability to attend Sunday School.  If the preferred musical setting was only 
offered at the same time as Sunday School the parishioner was faced with a difficult choice.  
Council offered various alternatives, but unfortunately the issue could not be satisfactorily 
resolved for a small segment of the congregation. 

Beginning in 1998, a second Sunday School was added to address the needs of a growing 
population of those seeking to be part of the education process and the three worship service 
issue.  Marianne Powerie became the Director of Caring Ministry.  Brent Bauknecht, as part of 
the requirements to achieve Eagle Scout status, led the project to construct the Chapel in the 
Woods.  Pastor Bret and Elaine Messersmith created the Acolyte Corps.  An effort was begun to 
raise funds to install a full service elevator in the church.  The effort to train lay persons to 
distribute communion to shut‐ins was realized.  Perhaps the highlight of the year was the trip 
the choir under the direction of Dorothy Kriechbaum made to Heidelseim, Germany. 

 

                                    MISSION DEVELOPMENT  

Much of 1999 was spent in the effort to provide mission development in Avon and North 
Ridgeville.  The effort was marked by fits and starts as 
communications between ELCA headquarters in Chicago and the 
churches asked to support the effort ran into difficulties.  Once 
those issues were resolved the churches led by Prince of Peace 
began looking for a Mission Developer.  Jerry Karp was named 
Developer in the Spring.  On the music front, Prince of Peace 
hosted the India Children’s Choir in July, and David Bird joined the 
staff as Director of Contemporary Music.  Marianne Powerie 

                                               14 
 
reached the decision that she wanted to become a minister in the Lutheran Church and began 
seminary training.  The full service elevator was finally installed in November.  The bank 
mortgage was retired, and competing in its first Synod Bible Bowl the youth of Prince of Peace 
won.  

2000 saw the beginning of a new millennium, and the actual start of the mission development 
effort in Avon and North Ridgeville.  Jerry Karp and Pastor Bishop traveled to Portland, Oregon, 
to attend a mission development seminar.  Jerry was soon hard at work making cold calls 
throughout the development area to look for potential new members.  It was soon apparent 
that Jerry faced a daunting task. He had to overcome the challenge of identifying potential new 
members with little or no specific information, following up on those who expressed interest, 
gauging which methods were working with almost no feedback, educating members of the 
congregation on what was happening and how to help, and doing all this with the uncertain 
question of whether the effort was to increase the membership at Prince of Peace or create a 
new ELCA church for Avon/North Ridgeville.  In the end, Jerry decided he was not the individual 
to successfully manage this effort.  He resigned in October.   

 Mission development was not the only concern of 2000.  Our Youth Bible Bowl team was once 
again the Synod winner.  The seminar, “Happily Married For a Lifetime” was presented in 
March.  The summer was a very busy time.  The choir from Heidelseim, Germany, visited Prince 
of Peace.  Our choir had visited the Heidelseim church in 1998.  The Prince of Peace high school 
youth traveled to St. Louis to take part in the Lutheran Youth Gathering.  A trial Tuesday 
evening service was added to met the worship needs of members’ busy summer schedules.  In 
June, the congregation gathered to celebrate its Fortieth Anniversary.  Perhaps the musical 
highlight of the year was the presentation of the musical “What Does It Mean”.  Members of 
the congregation offered their musical and acting talents to give the audience an insightful, if 
somewhat light hearted, lesson on the meaning of Luther’s small catechism. 

2001 opened with the church facing the serious question of how to proceed with the mission 
development effort following Jerry Karp’s resignation.  The questions surrounding the direction 
of the effort continued.  While the ELCA central office continued to express support for the 
effort, it was not clear to Prince of Peace what our role should be. Basically, the church saw 
itself faced with three alternatives.  It could continue the effort with the purpose of adding new 
members to Prince of Peace.  It could continue the effort with the expectation of building a new 
church in the area, or it could discontinue the effort. The issue of the times and musical content 
of the worship services arose once again.  The concerns of LBW vs. WOV, Sunday School 
conflicts, length of service, start times, fellowship between members who attended different 
services, and use of different settings continued to arise.  Karen ReMine missionary work in 
Russia and South Korea led to the start of Orphans Medical Network International (OMNI).  
Prince of Peace supported her medical missionary trip to Zambia with the donation of medical 


                                                15 
 
supplies.  Finally, in support of our outreach ministry, Prince of Peace began a pilot program 
called Church Coach developed by the Joy Leadership Center. 

Personnel changes continued into 2001.  Pastor Bret Rizzo tendered his resignation as associate 
pastor in March.  He left to become associate pastor of Bethel Lutheran Church in 
Boardman/Youngstown.  Pastor Bret’s departure forced the membership to consider how best 
to meet the staffing requirements of the church.  After consideration it was agreed to continue 
with the associate pastor position, but to only move forward on a one year basis.  After some 
fits and starts, the position of associate pastor was offered to 
Rev. Rod Funk.  Pastor Funk accepted and joined Prince of 
Peace in October.  After 28 years, Dorothy Kriechbaum retired 
as Director of the Senior Choir.  David Bird agreed to step in as 
interim Director.  In June, Holly Wenz and Gerry Wilhelm 
began as joint Christian Education Directors. 

2002 was a quiet year at Prince of Peace.  In May the 
congregation celebrated with Marianne Powrie her 
graduation from Trinity Seminary, her ordination, and her call 
to Salem Lutheran Church in Wooster.  Karen ReMine 
returned to Zambia as part of the OMNI Mission with the 
continued support of the church.  The ALPHA class was begun 
in October.  Finally, a second band was formed for the contemporary service music. 

The early years of the new millennium saw a continuation of many of the same issues that 
Prince of Peace had faced at the end of the last century.  Personnel matters continued to 
challenge the church in 2003.  A new organist came on board when Suk Kejeung Choi was hired.  
Pastor Funk’s duties were the subject of much discussion throughout the year.  Council 
frequently was called upon to try and balance the needs of the congregation which were 
traditionally filled by the associate pastor against budget concerns and Pastor Funk’s 
responsibilities as interim pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in the early months of the year 
and later in the same role at The Church of the Good Shepherd.  Additionally, the progressive 
decline in average attendance with the resulting loss of funding led Council to recognize the 
need to focus on how best to reverse the tide.  On a more positive note, the Prince of Peace 
Bible Bowl team continued to dominate the local competition.  The workshop, “More Fun, 
More Faith, More Family Moments” was hosted at the church in February.  Finally, after a 
careful review by Pastors Bishop and Funk, it was decided to commit Prince of Peace to begin 
the Crossways bible study program.  Training for the instructors began in June with an 
introduction date in the fall.  It was anticipated that the rollout of the entire course would take 
about two years. 



                                                16 
 
2004 was a busy year for Prince of Peace.  On the personnel side, Pastor Funk began the 
transition to full retirement planned for 2005.  His status was changed from interim associate 
pastor to contract employee.  This change was done to facilitate a number of financial concerns 
of both the Pastor and the church.  Finally, by setting a firm retirement date for Pastor Funk, 
the church was motivated to more fully address the best approach to meeting the staffing 
needs of the congregation.  Deb Winar was named Youth Ministry Coordinator in January.  The 
last personnel addition of the year was the hiring of Don Jackson as organist in August.  In 
February, Council undertook a review of the church’s Social Ministry opportunities.  The 
outcome of this review was an affirmation that Prince of Peace would continue to focus on four 
ministries: Habitat for Humanity, Project Renewed Hope, Interfaith Coalition for the Homeless, 
and the Westhaven Youth Shelter.  On a similar note the church’s effort in support of Karen 
ReMine and OMNI continued to grow.  The congregation decided to not only support the effort 
with its traditional gifts of supplies but also to undertake a major fundraising campaign to send 
members to Zambia in 2005.  In conjunction with the OMNI support program, Memory, a boy 
from Zambia, and Pastor Andrew visited Prince of Peace from Zambia.  Both were present 
during the Rally Day program with Pastor Andrew delivering the sermon.  Memory was in the 
United States to have surgery on his foot.  A second fundraising campaign was begun to finance 
various renovation project.  The campaign was highlighted by a pledge by a member of the 
congregation to match all donations up to $40,000. On a lighter but no less important side, the 
Quilting Group finished its 1,000 quilt for cancer patients and the church opened its first web 
site 

                                                 NEW DIRECTION – STRATEGIC PLAN 

                                    Following a number of years of declining attendance, 
                                    staffing issues, controversies in music and worship services, 
                                    and the right direction for the church, Prince of Peace 
                                    entered 2005 faced with a significant challenge – how 
                                    should the church proceed?  After careful discussions 
                                    Council agreed to undertake the challenge of preparing a 
                                    comprehensive strategic plan for the church.  The effort 
                                    began early in the year and extended into 2006.  On the 
                                    personnel front, it was decided to replace Pastor Funk with 
                                     Deaconess Jeanette Rebeck.  Deaconess Jeanette accepted 
                                     Prince of Peace’s offer to become Director of Discipleship 
Ministries and began on July 1.  The music ministry again was faced with the loss of leaders 
when both the head of the Contemporary music program and the Chancel Choir resigned.  
David Bird’s departure prodded Council to take a hard look at the respective roles of the two 
contemporary bands at the church.  The music leadership voids were temporarily filled when 
Jim Myers was hired on an interim basis in June.  Mr. Myers was hired to head the 

                                               17 
 
contemporary band, the Chancel Choir and the Children’s Choir for a six month period.  The 
OMNI mission grew in importance at Prince of Peace.  Two mission teams traveled to Zambia 
from the church in 2005.  One unexpected event arose from our support of OMNI.  Pat Van De 
Motter had been active in supporting the goals of OMNI.  His involvement in a trip to Zambia 
gave him the conviction to pursue a calling as a minister in the Lutheran Church.  In 2005, he 
formally began that process   Other important events included the music fundraiser entitled 
“An Evening with Bach” which was held at the church in April.  Additionally, the “Three T’s”, an 
effort to attract more people in their teens, twenties, and thirties (hence the name) to the 
church, was begun. The renovations began the previous year were completed. Finally, the 
North Ridgeville mission development effort became official when the ELCA placed a mission 
developer in the area.  Prince of Peace continued to be conflicted by the issue as the church 
struggled with reconciling its missionary work in North Ridgeville with The Synod and ELCA 
central office efforts.  The mission question of how to proceed in North Ridgeville took an 
unexpected twist when the ELCA Mission Developer for the North Ridgeville mission resigned in 
the fall.   

2006 saw the fruits of the efforts began the previous year.  After a slow but steady decline in 
average worship service attendance over the previous years, 2006 saw an increase.  While 
small, the increase was welcome news.  It appeared that our efforts at attracting new members 
were beginning to reap benefits.  On the music front Fran Wilhelm agreed to lead the Chancel 
Choir, and David Bird returned as Director of Contemporary Music.   After a number of different 
iterations of worship service times and music components, Council settled on a 9:00 
contemporary and 11:00 traditional service schedule.  The OMNI benefit concert, “Bluz Over 
Africa”, was a rousing success.  The concert at the Westlake High School Performing Arts Center 
(PAC) raised over $8,000.  Youth programs included a trip to San Antonio for the ELCA Youth 
Gathering and a joint confirmation class with All Saints, Olmsted Falls, Our Savior, Rocky River, 
and Redeemer Lutheran, Elyria.  In June, 2006 the positions of Christian Education Directors 
were eliminated.  Holly Wenz and Gerry Wilhelm had jointed served in as directors for five 
years.  Their inspired leadership in guiding Prince of Peace’s Christian education programs 
would be both greatly appreciated and sorely missed. 

 More new additions to Prince of Peace’s staff highlighted 2007.  June Zweidinger joined Fran 
Wilhelm as co‐director of the Chancel Choir.  Mike Cramer joined the staff as head of the 
mission effort to young adults.  Mike’s hiring was a continuation of the effort that had begun 
earlier to reach out to young adults as the most promising area for new members.  Mike came 
to Prince of Peace with an extensive background in mission work with young adults.  Rosemary 
Miles was recognized for her ten years as parish nurse with Prince of Peace.  OMNI continued 
to grow in importance for our congregation.  A second benefit concert was held and another 
team was sent to Zambia.  The Zambia trip was different this year because Ron and Mary Sue 
Claus decided to extend their stay in the country to three months.  Recognizing the financial 

                                               18 
 
burden the extended stay would cause Ron and Mary Sue, members of the congregation raised 
nearly $8,000 to cover many of their expenses.  Other events of the year included repaving the 
parking lot and purchasing new hymnals.  Much of the cost of the hymnals was covered by 
members of the congregation who purchased individual hymnals many of which contained 
personal dedications.   Recognizing the importance of our history, the church decided to have 
the original Charter of Prince of Peace, which had begun to deteriorate, restored and undergo 
treatment to preserve it.  Throughout 2007, Prince of Peace along with other Lutheran 
Churches on the west side had been in discussions with St. Andrew Lutheran Church in North 
Olmsted.  St. Andrew was having difficulties remaining as a viable congregation and was looking 
for options.  Late in 2007, the members of St. Andrew decided to join with Prince of Peace.  
Initial discussions were begun on the transition which was to take place in 2008.  The issue of 
the mission development effort in North Ridgeville was restarted when the Northeast Ohio 
Synod and the ELCA central office appointed a new mission developer.  Committed to the 
establishment of a new church in North Ridgeville, the developer and his family were relocated 
to the area.  In support of the effort Prince of Peace committed itself to the establishment of 
the new church. 

                                                   

                                    WELCOME SAINT ANDREW 

                                                                               Prince of Peace 
                                                                               formally welcomed 
                                                                               Saint Andrew to be 
                                                                               part of our joint 
                                                                               congregation in 
                                                                               January, 2008.  
                                                                               While those 
                                                                               members coming 
                                                                               from St. Andrew 
                                                                               felt the loss of their 
church, the fellowship felt by all brought a realization that the joint congregation promised a 
special future.  It was this question of our future that caused Council to look once again at our 
strategic plan.  The previous years had been challenging.  While the decline in average 
attendance had been reversed there were still grave concerns about whether the increase 
could be sustained.  Financial issues still plagued the congregation.  The music programs 
remained unsettled as questions of leadership and direction seemed to arise on a regular basis.  
The Young Adult Outreach program was moving forward as Mike Cramer initiated a number of 
efforts to reach the target population.  At its annual March retreat, Council committed to 
create a new strategic plan for Prince of Peace that concentrated on the challenge of attracting 


                                                 19 
 
new and maintaining existing members.   On the music front David Bird resigned, Cindy Streiter 
agreed to serve as director of the contemporary band, and the church undertook a fundraising 
campaign to raise $25,000 to purchase a grand piano to replace the church’s upright piano.  
Mike Cramer started the Convergence Café concept in February.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Convergence was designed to present an informal atmosphere that would attract a young adult 
audience to a church setting.  Along with the success of Convergence Café, Mike Cramer 
directed other programs to attract young adults.  One of his most successful ideas was a block 
party for his neighborhood.  OMNI was another success story for Prince of Peace.  The annual 
“Bluz Over Africa” benefit concert was moved to the Irish Heritage Club in Avon Lake.  The 
October event raised over $11,000.  Two OMNI missions were staffed by Prince of Peace 
members with the Clauses extending their visit to oversee construction projects.  The joining of 
Prince of Peace and St. Andrew left the congregation with two buildings.  Much of 2008 was 
spent discussing how to best utilize the Clague Road facility.  Finally, Prince of Peace was again 
faced with how best to deal with the mission development program in North Ridgeville.  Spirit 
of Joy was facing difficulty attracting enough potential members to sustain a congregation and 
was looking to other west side Lutheran churches for help.  Prince of Peace offered to ask its 
members to visit Spirit of Joy to talk with potential new members and to give the appearance of 
more individuals at the Sunday worship service. 

The year 2009 saw a number of positive efforts on Prince of Peace’s missionary work.  OMNI 
was especially successful.  The fourth benefit concert raised over $15,500.  The church recruited 
St. Peter Episcopal in Lakewood and Westshore Unitarian Universalist in Rocky River to join 
Prince of Peace in support of OMNI.  Matt Bishop, in conjunction with Young Adults in Global 
Mission, left for Hungary to teach English to the Roma. Matt began his one year mission in 
August.  The church joined LOVE, Inc., an area wide referral agency set up to work with persons 
in need to find other agencies that can provide assistance.  A Coins for the Kingdom jar was 
placed in the narthex to collect monies to support the synod wide mission development effort.  
In an attempt to reach out to the surrounding community and to provide our members with an 

                                                20 
 
opportunity to enjoy fine music on a pleasant summer’s evening the church offered three free 
Concerts on the Lawn.  While free, each concert did ask for a freewill donation in support of 
specifically recognized community needs.  On a personal note, Pat Van De Motter became the 
third member of Prince of Peace to be ordained into the Lutheran Church. 

The question on how best to utilize the St. Andrew facility seemed to be resolved when the 
Lutheran Home leased the facility for its Hospice of the Good Shepherd. Unfortunately, the 
hospice was never able to attract enough patients to justify its continued existence.  In June, 
the Lutheran Home asked to be released from the lease. With the departure of the hospice, 
Convergence Café began to utilize the space for its Sunday meetings.  Convergence had earlier 
concluded that its mission could be better served if it met off campus.  The meeting of the two 
needs seemed to offer a solution to the utilization of St. Andrew, even if only temporarily.  The 
continued growth of the contemporary worship service raised a concern about overcrowding.  
A number of suggestions were offered, but no immediate solution was apparent.  Two 
problems arose during the year.  The first was a fire in the Fellowship Hall on Easter Sunday.  
The fire did minor damage and did not disrupt either Late Worship Service.  (The fire began 
between worship services).  However, the subsequent inspection by the Westlake Fire 
Department uncovered a number of fire code violations.  The fire damage and code violations 
were repaired with insurance funds, church funds and the hard work of member volunteers.  
The second problem was a church wide issue.  As had many churches, the ELCA had struggled 
with the issues surrounding human sexuality, alternate sexual orientation, and the role of those 
with such orientations within the church.  The final stance taken by the ELCA to allow these 
individuals to be ordained ministers and deacons/deaconesses troubled many in the ELCA.  
Prince of Peace and its members were no different.  While the loss of members was small at 
Prince of Peace, it did bring home once again the issue of how best to create an open 
atmosphere at our church.  

Our fiftieth year began with a renewed effort to build upon the strengths of the church to 
secure another fifty years.  Recognizing the need to retain current members and reach out to 
the community to attract new members, Prince of Peace undertook a number of new 
programs.  The “Just Walk Across the Room” program was started in February.  The effort 
encouraged members to reach out to people on a one on one basis and make Prince of Peace a 
welcoming house of worship.  While not as successful as hoped, JWATR did raise sensitivities to 
the importance of human contact in making our church a place that individuals would want to 
make their spiritual homes.  On another level, the entire thrust of our youth and young adult 
ministry was subjected to major review.  Beginning with the “Three T” emphasis and the hiring 
of Mike Cramer, Prince of Peace had concentrated much effort in attracting and maintaining 
individuals in the teens to thirties group.  The lack of success, Mike Cramer’s health and funding 
issues led to this review.  Late in the year Mike Cramer left to take a position in Illinois.  The 
support Prince of Peace gave to OMNI continued to be a bright spot.  Ben Blakeslee undertook 

                                                21 
 
a medical mission to Zambia, and the fifth annual “Bluz Over Africa” benefit concert raised 
around $20,000.  Mary Humer was added to the secretarial staff.  A new Employee Handbook 
was written.  An Easter Vigil was added to the Holy Week experience.  The dilemma 
surrounding the use of the Clague Road Property looked to be resolved.  Calvary Community 
Church submitted an offer to lease the facility with the expectation that it would purchase the 
church upon approval of Council.  November saw the Fiftieth Anniversary celebration held at 
the Holiday Inn in Westlake. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                              Compiled by Les Larson, 2010‐2011 


                                               22 
 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:8
posted:1/30/2012
language:English
pages:22
jianghongl jianghongl http://
About