Modular Home Installation Safety Training - Residential Fall Safe

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Modular Home Installation Safety Training - Residential Fall Safe Powered By Docstoc
					Modular Home Installation
    Safety Training
       Developed by West Virginia University Safety &
                    Health Extension

            130 Tower Lane, Morgantown, WV 26506
                        1-800-626-4748
              Training Material Available online at
               http://www.residentialfallsafe.org


     This material was produced under grant (46C4-HT11) from the
   Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of
   Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or the policies of the
    U.S. Department of Labor, nor does the mention of trade names,
    commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the
                           U.S. Government.
Modular Home Installation Safety
          Training
 Introduction to Modular Homes
• Modular Homes are not new. Factory built
  houses have been produced for over a
  century.
• Modular is one of several types of
  industrialized houses. The others are:
  – Panelized
  – Production Builder
  – HUD Code
 Introduction to Modular Homes
• Of the industrialized housing market,
  modular homes is the smallest segment
• Still, modular homes have seen the
  greatest growth, averaging 12% per year
  in the number of homes.
  Modular Home Technology
• With this growth the modular home
  designs have become more varied.
• Modular's are no longer just low slop ranch
  homes.
• The use of tilt up roofs is a key technology
  that has made architectural flexibility
  possible.
• The tilt up roof also creates many hazards
  to the installers.
      Modular Home Injuries and
            Fatalities
• in 2000, modular and mobile home
  manufacturing industries experienced 13
  fatalities
• This number is falsely low due to the difficulty in
  tracking injures and fatalities in this industry.
   – Many modular installers are categorized in different
     industrial classifications such as residential
     construction or manufactured housing retail sales.
• A recent report named the Modular and Mobile
  Home Installation and Manufacturing among the
  top 10 high –risk industries
 Modular Home Installation Safety
    Training Background
• Beginning in 2001, West Virginia
  University Safety & Health Extension
  conducted research attempting to begin to
  identify safety hazards specifically
  associated with installing a modular home.
• This training pulls from that study to inform
  the industry on what the high risk hazards
  are and how to avoid them.
             Major Job Tasks
The study identified the following major job tasks
   in installing a modular home:
• Flagging traffic while positioning the home
   for hoisting
• Hoisting of modules
• Work under and around heavy loads being
   hoisted
• Aligning the house to the foundation
• Accessing the foundation walls with a ladder
               Major Job Tasks
•   Setting, placing and aligning the module on
    the foundation
•   Accessing the roof with an extension ladder
•   Securing the tilt-up roof into place from the
    attic, the roof top or from the other half of the
    home.
•   Completing the roofing material and ridge
    vent installation.
     Typical Residential Construction
            Hazards Identified
•Using a chain saw
•Setting and climbing an extension ladder
•Hammering
•Using an air nailer
•Using a circular saw
•Setting and using a step ladder
•Overhead hazards
•Misuse of tools
•Walking and working at heights above 6 feet
•Safe access to roof
•Carrying bundles of shingles
•Using a cordless drill.

Click the highlighted text to see examples of the hazards identified. Once on the photo slide click the
photo to come back to this slide
 Hazards Specific to Modular Home
           Installation
•Flagging traffic while positioning the home for hoisting (struck by)
•Hoisting of large, heavy modules, or "boxes," on uneven terrain and
other less-than-desirable conditions. (struck by, caught between)
•Working under a heavy load that is being hoisted into place (struck by,
caught between), which happens less often in other residential work
•Aligning the house to the foundation (caught between)
•Accessing the foundation wall with a ladder that does not exceed the
top edge of the wall, as required by OSHA, to allow clearance for the
house to set (fall)
•Accessing the roof with an extension ladder (fall)(also a problem in
traditional residential construction)
•Riding the tilt-up roof into place/riding the load (fall)
•Accessing the attic area from the roof top (fall)
•Working under the roof while it is suspended by the crane (caught
between, crushed by, fall).

Click the highlighted text to see examples of the hazards identified. Once on the photo slide click the photo to come
back to this slide
Employee Hazards During Modular
   Home Installations (Video)
• This short video demonstrates many of the
  hazards that are specific to installing a modular
  home.
Employee Hazards During Modular
   Home Installations (Video)
• The following training modules will
  address the major safety hazards
  identified within each of the major tasks
  that are involved in installing a modular
  home
• The training will then provide the
  information needed to perform these tasks
  more safely.
Chain Saw
Accessing Tilt Up Roof Prior To Lift
Using a Circular Saw
Step Ladder
Misuse of Tools
Placing Module on Foundation
Accessing Tilt Up Roof
Accessing Home Site
Removing Material from Underside
          of Module
Riding Tilt Up Roof
Accessing Attic Area
Working Under Tilt-Up Roof

				
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