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					Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning



                                   This We Believe




Ranked within the top 500 schools on Newsweek’s 2008 list of Top High Schools, Northridge
Academy High School has accomplished much in the five years since we first opened. At first
glance, it might appear that the school’s greatest strengths are based on physical attributes: its
small size, its relative newness, and its position on a university campus.

However, as this self-study will reflect, the strengths of our school come from much more than
physical factors. Creating a new school, grounding it with a clear belief system that supports the
growth and learning of all students, and supporting it with committed, creative partnerships with
California State University, Northridge, as well as with the surrounding community, is a
challenge that all stakeholders have embraced. We are using data and research to build our
teaching and learning environment to enable all of our students to achieve at high levels.

Our school motto reminds us daily of how we as teachers, counselors, administrators, school
support staff, students, parents, and partnership members want to impact those around us.
Our goal is this:

                                       “Inspire and Achieve.”




                                                          2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 2
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning



                                                      Table of Contents
Principal’s Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
WASC Timeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Chapter I – Student/Community Profile: Data and Findings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
           Our Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
           School Purpose and Expected School-wide Learning Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
           Demographics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
           Student Performance Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
           Results of Parent and Student Surveys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Chapter II – Student/Community Profile: Implications of Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Chapter III – Progress Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Chapter IV – Self-Study Findings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
           A: Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance, Leadership, Staff
                 and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
           B: Standards-Based Student Learning: Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
           C: Standards-Based Student Learning: Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
           D: Standards-Based Student Learning: Assessment and Accountability . . . . . . . . . . . 157
           E: School Culture and Support for Student Personal and Academic Growth . . . . . . . 175
Chapter V: Schoolwide Action Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
           Results of Student/Parent Surveys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
           Master Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
           School Accountability Report Card (SARC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
           CBEDS School Information Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
           Graduation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
           Other Pertinent Information
                      Bell Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
                      Campus Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
                      School Governance Committees 2008-2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239


                                                                                        2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 3
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                  NAHS Staff 2008-2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
                  NAHS Academies or Small Learning Communities
                             9th Grade Bridge Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
                             Arts, Media, and Communication Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
                             Careers in Education Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
                             Health and Human Development Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
       Budgetary Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
       Single Plan for Student Achievement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
       List of Standards-Based Local Board Adopted Textbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
       Bulletin 1600: Small Learning Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391
       NAHS-CSUN Shared Use Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398
       NAHS-UTLA Memorandum of Understanding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414
       Faculty, Administrators, and Counselors: List of Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417
       Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426




                                                                                  2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 4
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                               Northridge Academy High School
                              WASC Accreditation Self-Study Report
                                      Principal’s Message

It is with great pride that I welcome you to Northridge Academy High School, a school-
university collaboration focused on increasing urban student achievement. We are pleased to
present you with our WASC Accreditation Self-Study 2008-2009 Report: Focus on Learning.
Our report reflects a thorough analysis and investigation of our data, organization, curriculum,
instructional practices, assessments, and culture by all stakeholders of our Northridge Academy
learning community. This self-study process has provided us with the opportunity to look at
ourselves, and assess our strengths, successes, and challenges in terms of student achievement
through the eyes of our staff, students, parents, California State University, Northridge partners,
and community. Best of all, we present to you an action plan based on our findings to increase
the academic and personal achievement of all students.

Our 2008-2009 self-study process culminates the incredible five-year experience of opening a
new school. Many of our current stakeholders have been involved from the beginning in
building this school from the ground up, starting with an unused parcel of CSUN land and
becoming the first new LAUSD school to open in the San Fernando Valley in over thirty years.
From those early days in 2004, when we wore hard hats and steel-toed shoes while preparing our
classrooms which were still under construction, to the present, we have accepted the great
privilege and enormous responsibility of creating a school that will be recognized by all for the
outstanding achievement of our students. We are proud of the successes we can show from our
first five years. We have created a school culture of respect and responsibility that is second to
none. We have worked hard to sustain outstanding attendance and graduation rates. We have
created learning academies that engage and support our learners. And now, learning from what
we have seen through our self-study process, we are ready to focus on our future. We will
continue to build our practices that have been successful for the past five years. Further, based
on data analysis, we will develop additional ways to support all of our students. And we will
diligently monitor future successes and challenges through careful analysis of student
achievement and academic success.

I am exceedingly proud to be the principal of this unique community of learners. I hope that
during your visit, you will meet and interact with our wonderful students, collegial staff,
dedicated parents, and supportive CSUN partners. I trust that you will experience first-hand the
passion, caring, respect, dedication, and sense of community we all share. I believe that you will
see Puma Pride in action and see our school motto, Inspire and Achieve, personified in everyone
you meet.

Enjoy your visit,



Connie Semf
Northridge Academy High School Principal




                                                          2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 5
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




                               Northridge Academy High School
                              WASC Accreditation Self-Study Report
                                      Acknowledgments




                                    333 South Beaudry Avenue
                                     Los Angeles, CA 90017
                                        Ramon C. Cortinez
                                       General Superintendent
                                 Los Angeles Board of Education
                                 Marguerite Poindexter LaMotte
                                        Board District 1
                                     Monica Garcia, President
                                         Board District 2
                                          Tamar Galatzan
                                          Board District 3
                                          Marlene Canter
                                          Board District 4
                                        Yolie Flores Aguilar
                                          Board District 5
                                          Julie Korenstein
                                           Board District 6
                                       Dr. Richard Vladovic
                                          Board District 7

                                  LAUSD LOCAL DISTRICT 1

                                            Jean Brown
                                           Superintendent
                                           Larry Rubin
                                       Director, High Schools
                                           Henry Bessera
                                          Facilities Director




                                                                2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 6
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




                                  Acknowledgments (Continued)

                                    WASC Leadership Team
                                      Connie Semf, Principal
                              John Alexopoulos, Assistant Principal
                               Karen M. Matsui, Assistant Principal
                                 Bonnie Ericson, CSUN Liaison
                                    Ivan Cheng, CSUN Liaison
                                    Sharon Bernard, Counselor
                                   Francisca Ortega, Counselor
                               Michelle Katz, UTLA Chapter Chair
                                  Sandra DaLie, Literacy Coach
                         Jeanie Mortensen, 9th Grade Academy Facilitator
                              Patrick Haywood, Leadership Sponsor
                             Barbara Scott, Science Department Chair
                            Raquel Avila Baca, Family Center Director
                                  David Arias, Science Teacher
                                 Larry Atmore, English Teacher
                              Susan Eller, English Department Chair
                       Traci Weinper, Title I Coordinator/College Counselor
                       Small Learning Community/Academy Facilitators
                             Jeanie Mortensen, 9th Grade Bridge Academy
                       Lynne Culp, Arts, Media and Communication Academy
                            Michelle Katz, Careers in Education Academy
                     Caroline Mitchell, Health and Human Development Academy

                                    Department Chairpersons
                                   Francisco Ortega, Social Science
                                        Barbara Scott, Science
                                         Michelle Katz, Math
                                         Susan Eller, English
                                   Rich Gillett, Physical Education
                                  Linda Severino, Special Education
                                  Gladys Bonilla, Foreign Language
                               Rene Shufelt, Visual and Performing Arts
                                      Erin Thomas, Computers
                                    Marc McPhee, Library Media
                                        Beth Cantwell, Health

                                    District 1 WASC Consultant
                                       Barbara Garry, LAUSD

                                         WASC Coordinator
                                           Sandra DaLie




                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 7
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




                                  Acknowledgments (Continued)

                                    WASC Visiting Committee

                                              Chair
                                    Ronald A. Lipari, Principal
                                      Westlake High School
                                 100 North Lakeview Canyon Road
                                   Westlake Village, CA 91362

                                             Member
                              Mr. Chris C. Brown, Assistant Principal
                                   Ernest Righetti High School
                                        941 E. Foster Road
                                     Santa Maria, CA 93455

                                             Member
                                    Ms. Janice Cloward, Teacher
                                      Rubidoux High School
                                           4250 Opal St.
                                       Riverside, CA 92509

                                            Member
                              Dr. Valencia Jones, Assistant Principal
                                       Arroyo High School
                                    1881 West Base Line St.
                                   San Bernardino, CA 92411

                                            Member
                                    Mr. Michael Kelly, Principal
                                     San Dimas High School
                                        115 W. Allen Ave.
                                      San Dimas, CA 91773

                                             Member
                              Mr. Troy L. Mason, Assistant Principal
                                     Castle Park High School
                                       1395 Hilltop Drive
                                     Chula Vista CA 91911




                                                           2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 8
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




                                  Acknowledgments (Continued)

                     California State University, Northridge Facilitators
                   Bonnie Ericson, Chair, Department of Secondary Education
                       Ivan Cheng, Department of Secondary Education
                               Kenneth Sakatani, Art Department
                         Mary Jo Sariscsany, Kinesiology Department

                       CSUN-LAUSD Educational Advisory Committee

                                               Tana Ball
                                      District Director, District 3

                                           Tamar Galatzan
                                       Board Member, District 3

                                            Spero Bowman
                                       Associate Vice President
                                 Academic Resources and Planning
                                California State University, Northridge

                                           Robert Bucker
                         Dean of College of Arts, Media, and Communication
                               California State University, Northridge

                                           Bonnie Ericson
                              Department Chair of Secondary Education
                               California State University, Northridge

                                          Karen M. Matsui
                                         Assistant Principal
                                       Northridge Academy HS

                                            Larry Rubin
                                              District 1
                                   Director of Secondary Schools
                                 Los Angeles Unified School District

                                           Michael Spagna
                           Dean of Michael D. Eisner College of Education
                               California State University, Northridge

                                            Connie Semf
                                              Principal
                                       Northridge Academy HS

                                          Donna Smith
                      LAUSD Articulation Community Partnership Administrator



                                                               2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 9
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




                              NAHS Parent WASC Focus Group
                                 Amy Phillips, Friends of NAHS
                          Raquel Avila Baca, Family Center Coordinator
                                       Isabel Quintanilla
                                        Martha Campos
                                           Elsa Long
                                       Marina P. Maranan
                                        Kathleen Kelly
                                         Frank Freeman
                                        Carolyn Turman
                                          Vaneza Ruiz
                                           Jorge Ruiz
                                        Moises Vazquez

                              NAHS Support Staff Focus Group
                         Mireya Guzman, School Administrative Assistant
                                   Sal Rivera, Plant Manager
                              Christina Huihui, Cafeteria Manager
                                 Manny Sze, Financial Manager
                                   Holly Seery, School Nurse
                               Paula Hazard, School Psychologist
                                 Kevin Thomas, Safety Officer
                                  Ozzie Rivera, Campus Aide
                                          Claudia Paz
                                        Estella Luewang
                                          Lieu Nguyen
                                           Dung Dao
                                         Deborah Otzoy
                                        Maria Antekelian
                                         Hilda Rossell
                                        Sabina Rahman
                                         Shiree Chavez
                                         Charis Forney
                                         Latonya Walle
                                         Ana Martinez
                                       Rivera O. Oswaldo
                                         Daniel Epping
                                         Victor Cortez
                                         Celia Guzman
                                         Francisco Gil
                                          Aida Corona
                                          Patty Reese
                                          Aida Coran




                                                       2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 10
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




                                   Preface




                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 11
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                                            PREFACE
Since opening our doors to our students and community in 2004, we at Northridge
Academy High School have been passionate in our commitment to create a safe and
caring learning environment to support the achievement and success of every learner who
comes to us. Since our Initial WASC Visit in 2006, we have benefited from the insights
provided by our Visiting Committee and have found the Focus on Learning Self-Study
process extremely useful as we re-examine our purpose, align our goals, gauge our
progress, remedy critical needs, and chart our future.
The Northridge Academy High School Self-Study was conducted in accordance with the
guidelines provided by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, as required in
the Focus on Learning Joint WASC/CDE Process Guide, 2006 Edition. This process has
allowed us to talk with staff, parents, students, and community members, reflect on our
work, and examine where we have succeeded and where we have fallen short of our
expectations. The process has taught us new ways of looking at data and evidence and
using it more effectively to inform our operational, programming, instructional, and
curricular choices. It has motivated us to talk about issues impacting student
achievement that might otherwise go unexamined and undiscussed.
Since our 2006 Initial WASC Visit, we believe we have risen to the challenge of ongoing
improvement while being guided by the Expected Outcomes of the WASC Self-Study:

1. The involvement and collaboration of all staff and other shareholders to support
student achievement.

Because NAHS has always valued a safe and honest culture, all shareholders entered
freely into the conversations generated by our self-study process. Every member of our
staff serves on a Focus Group and understands their charge to communicate with their
Home Teams (Department and Academy). There is a deep level of understanding shared
by all, of the importance of WASC, as well as an earnest desire that the WASC self-study
process results in more than just a fact-filled binder, but in real change and growth.

Parents and students have responded with enthusiasm to the WASC process. Student
representatives on every Focus Group voluntarily stay after school to lend their voices to
self-study discussions. The leaders of both parent groups – The Family Center and
Friends of NAHS – feel a sense of shared ownership of the self-study process and
continuously reach out to our parent community to garner those voices and opinions.
The outcomes of the WASC self-study process have informed the work of all of our
leadership and governance groups, including School Site Council, the Professional
Development Committee, English Learner Advisory Council, Compensatory Education
Advisory Committee, School Leadership Council, Instructional Cabinet, and the CSUN-
NAHS Education Advisory Committee, as they oversee budgetary matters, professional
development, school calendar, and university partnerships.


                                                      2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 12
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


1. The clarification and measurement of what all students should know,
   understand, and be able to do through expected school-wide learning results and
   academic standards.

Our dedicated teaching staff has worked hard to provide a strong, standards-based
instructional program to our students, utilizing research-based teaching practices with
guidance provided by our district through resources like instructional guides, model
lessons, and periodic assessments.

Through the WASC self-study process, teachers are becoming clearer as they
communicate with their students about what they should know, understand, and be able
to do. The appearance of classrooms has been transformed with standards now being
prominently displayed, ELRS’s and Learning Conversation Principles represented by
bright posters, and samples of student work painting a picture of student success with
standards-based learning.

In 2006, the students who came to us as 10th graders in 2004 were now Seniors. As a
school, we adopted an expectation of a Senior Portfolio as a requirement to participate in
graduation ceremonies. A committee designed required portfolio elements that would
truly capture and reflect all aspects of a student’s educational experience at NAHS. But
through the WASC self-study process, and with special attention on our ESLR’s, the
focus of the portfolios has sharpened. In many ways, every Senior’s portfolio has
become a personalized version of the WASC self-study process wherein a student
graduating from NAHS must essentially ask him/herself, “How have I achieved while at
NAHS?” and “In what ways have I been able to achieve our ESLR’s at my highest
level?”

2. The gathering and analyzing of data about students and student achievement.

Since our Initial WASC Visitation, we have made concerted efforts to use data to inform
all of our school-wide practices. In departments, we routinely review assessment data
(e.g. periodic assessments) to examine the academic growth of our students. Categorical
funds and resources are allocated based on identified student needs and action plan
growth areas. Results from state assessments inform lesson design and planning.

Of benefit to us has been our participation in the Pearson Achievement Solutions
program since 2007. This is a professional development program in which teachers learn
to work collaboratively in identifying student needs and teaching objectives through the
examination of student work.

Another favorable outcome at our school in this area has been the emergence of a new
group of teacher leadership. The NAHS faculty has a significant number of relatively
new teachers, many of whom are currently involved in Master’s programs. Furthermore,


                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 13
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


some of our teachers come to the profession from previous careers in business and
technology. With their strong data backgrounds, these new teachers have come forth to
create presentations and activities to assist staff in understanding complex data and use
this knowledge to develop outcomes that can be measured and monitored on an ongoing
basis.

3. The assessment of the entire school program and its impact on student learning
   in relation to expected to school-wide learning results, academic standards, and
   WASC/CDE criteria.

An enormous amount of time and energy goes into running a school. Teachers,
counselors, administrators, and support staff work at maximum capacity throughout the
day to serve their students. It takes a concerted effort to step back from the day-to-day
demands of operating a school to take time to reflect and assess, to ask questions about
quality of learning and impact on student achievement. But when a school makes time
to have these valuable discussions, positive changes ensue.

At our school, many committees routinely meet to assess the entire school program from
various perspectives: operational, academic, student growth and development, etc.
Department meetings focus on the alignment between state, district, and classroom
expectations. Academic content standards are discussed within Academies in the
development of integrated curricular units.

The school has adopted several strategies and activities that support our students’ ability
to relate their learning to school-wide learning results. For example, “Exit tickets” help
students reflect at the end of an instructional period on how the day’s lesson or topic
supports our ESLR’s. Seniors include an ESLR reflective essay in their portfolios,
describing how they have achieved our expected results. Through these efforts, we have
incorporated the WASC process into our instructional program.

4. The alignment of a long-range action plan to the school’s areas of need; the
   development and implementation of an accountability system for monitoring the
   accomplishment of the plan.

The self-study process of our school-wide discussions and focus team meetings has
resulted in a clear picture of our areas of most critical need. We looked at our school
profile and achievement data from local, district, and state assessments to determine
benchmarks for student performance. We merged our action plan goals with our Single
Plan for Student Achievement to reflect the beliefs and expectations of the district,
school, academic departments, and Academies.




                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 14
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Our Action Plan will be used to monitor, evaluate, and sustain overall program
effectiveness. The Professional Development Committee will continue to support our
focus on increasing student achievement in areas identified through data analysis. The
administrative staff, Leadership Team, and school leadership councils will continually
monitor the progress of the action plan and oversee follow-up procedures.

We are excited that a clear action plan has emerged from our self-study. We feel that
there is genuine alignment between the plan and our greatest areas of need. We feel that
with this plan, we will be better able to serve all our students, especially those who have
been struggling the most, as we strive to increase achievement for all students who attend
Northridge Academy High School.




                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 15
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                              Northridge Academy High School
                            WASC Accreditation Self-Study Report
                           WASC Process Activities Timeline 2006-2009

           Date                                           Activity
April 20, 2006             WASC Accreditation Visiting Committee: Initial Visit

April 25, 2006             NAHS administrators discuss the findings and recommendations of the
                           Visiting Committee. A committee is appointed to address the need to create
                           ESLR’s for our 2008-2009 Self-Study report.

May, 2006                  ESLR committee members meet to share samples of ESLR’s from other
                           schools. They create our own preliminary list of seven ESLR’s. A meeting
                           is scheduled preceding Parent Night. Parents, students, and staff meet to
                           review the draft of ESLR’s. Two ESLR’s are eliminated.

                           ESLR’s are discussed at faculty meetings, parent meetings, and governance
                           meetings and approved by all.

September 19, 2006         Data-Driven Dialogue: Student Needs and Achievement Gaps

September 26, 2006         Data-Driven Dialogue: Academies

October 10, 2006           Data-Driven Dialogue: CST Data

October 17, 2006           Data-Driven Dialogue: Intervention

November 21, 2006          Data-Driven Dialogue: Student Portfolios

November 28, 2006          Data-Driven Dialogue: English Department “Fishbowl” Activity

December 12, 2006          Academy Development

January 16, 2007           Data-Driven Dialogue

February 6, 2008           CAHSEE Review

February 13, 2007          Portfolio Development

March 6, 2007              Building Resilience and Encouraging Academic Achievement

March 27, 2007             Small Learning Community Grant Proposal: Updates

April 10, 2007             CST Preparation by Department

April 17, 2007             Achievement Solutions: Introduction and Kick-off

May 8, 2007                Data-Driven Dialogue: Senior Fails

June 5, 2007               Academy Planning



                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 16
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning



September 11, 2007         CAHSEE Review; Master Schedule discussion

September 18, 2007         Data-Driven Dialogue: “What? So What? Now What?”

September 25, 2007         Data-Driven Dialogue: Academies

October 16, 2007           Data-Driven Dialogue: Content Areas

October 23, 2007           Academy priorities and benchmarks

November 13, 2007          Data-Driven Dialogue: Formal and informal data

December 11, 2007          Closing the Achievement Gap

January, 2008              Members of the WASC Leadership Team attend Day 1 of WASC
                           Accreditation training provided by WASC/CDE.

February 12, 2008          “Finding Your Voice”: Choosing a school-wide theme

February 20, 2008          The Professional Development Committee re-visits our initial school mission
                           and vision. A graphic is created to show the core values upheld by the school
                           and the connections we sustain with CSUN and community.

February 26, 2008          Department Meetings

March 4, 2008              Integration of instruction, standards, and assessments into Academies

March 25, 2008             Prioritizing student needs by content area

April 15, 2008             WASC overview

April 26-27, 2008          NAHS-CSUN “Planning for Success” Retreat

April 29, 2008             CST Preparation; Senior Portfolio Update

May 6, 2008                Members of the WASC Leadership team attend WASC Accreditation
                           training provided by WASC/CDE

May 13, 2008               Data-Driven Dialogue: Senior Fails; 9th grade Academy Selection packets

May 20-21, 2008            Because of state testing, students are on a minimum day schedule. Two-
                           meetings after dismissal are dedicated to WASC orientation and revisiting
                           the ESLR’s. A process is created wherein the ESLR’s are re-examined and
                           revised to be simpler and clearer in community-friendly language.

June 10, 2008              WASC Focus Groups and Expectations: An Overview




                                                             2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 17
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


June 13, 2008              Academy facilitators, administrators, and CSUN representatives meet with an
                           advertising consultant to discuss vision statements, mission statements, and
                           mottos. A survey is drafted and issued by e-mail to allow all stakeholders a
                           voice in identifying the unique attributes of the school. Our UTLA chapter
                           chair reminded people over the summer to complete the survey and was
                           responsible for collecting their responses.

August 20, 2008            Mission/Vision Statement Committee meets to finalize a mission statement.

September 2, 2008          WASC chair and assistant principal revisit documents from Initial Visit to
                           begin writing draft of Chapters 1-3.

September 4, 2008          WASC Executive Leadership Team (administrators and WASC Chair) meets
                           with WASC advisor provided by LAUSD Local District 1.

September 9, 2008          Faculty meeting focus is WASC. The staff receives a brief review of WASC
                           and the accreditation process. The new mission statement and motto is
                           introduced and accepted. Focus teams are announced. Sample graphic
                           organizer and protocol are introduced for discussing WASC criteria and
                           evidence.

September 10, 2008         Leadership team meets to discuss the role of the Focus Group leaders, other
                           group roles and responsibilities, the Self-Study report, the need to respect the
                           process.

September 16, 2008         Common Planning Tuesday. Faculty meets in Focus Groups to begin to
                           examine data and determine areas to explore in responding to Self-Study
                           criteria. Student leadership sponsors have recruited students to commit
                           themselves to Focus Groups. Students join their groups for the first time.

September 17, 2008         Members of the Leadership Team, including a parent representative, attend
                           Day 3 of WASC training provided by WASC/CDE.

September 18, 2008         Instructional Cabinet – consisting of Administrators, Department Chairs,
                           Academy Facilitators, UTLA Chapter Chair, and WASC chair – meets to
                           discuss school business and receive WASC updates.

September 23, 2008         Common Planning Tuesday. Staff and students meet in Focus Groups to
                           continue discussions of criteria and guide questions.

September 24, 2008         Leadership Team meets to discuss creation of academy logos and various
                           activities to support connections between standards-based instruction and our
                           ESLR’s.

September 25, 2008         An overview of WASC is presented to parents at the ELAC, SSC, and CEAC
                           school governance meeting. Surveys are distributed by Focus Team C on
                           Assessment and Accountability. Teachers are asked to jot notes on their own
September 30, 2008         methods and practices and be prepared to discuss them with their
                           departments on October 7.




                                                             2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 18
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


October 2, 2008            Back-to-School Night begins with a 20-minute parent meeting in the
                           Multipurpose Room to provide parents with an overview of WASC. An
                           informational flier is distributed which includes an invitation to parents to
                           participate in Focus Group discussions. Selected students circulate
                           throughout the campus during the evening to video and record parent
                           interviews about their children’s experiences at NAHS.

October 6, 2008            WASC Visiting Committee Chairperson visits the school to meet with school
                           administrators.

October 6-17, 2008         Parent Surveys distributed through Advisories, and responses collected.

October 7, 2008            Whole faculty meets to discuss Assessment and Accountability. There is a
                           teacher-led discussion about 2007-08 test data. Names are drawn for
                           voluntary Peer Readiness Walks. Faculty then breaks out into Home
                           Groups/Departments to review responses to A&A survey.

October 8, 2008            Leadership Team meets to discuss recent visit from WASC Visiting
                           Committee Chair and to plan further Focus and Home Group meetings.

October 8, 2008            Vision/Mission/Motto Committee (comprised of SLC lead teachers and
                           department chairs, a CSUN representative, and a NAHS administrator) meet
                           to re-visit existing vision statement. A neighborhood advertising consultant
                           volunteers to facilitate the meeting. A revised vision statement is created to
                           be shared with faculty, staff, parents, students, CSUN, and community.

October 9-28, 2008         Teachers participate in Peer Readiness Walks, Round 1.

October 14, 2008           Common Planning Tuesday. Staff and students meet in Focus Groups to
                           continue discussions of criteria and guide questions.
                           Instructional Cabinet agenda includes WASC updates.

October 21, 2008           Whole faculty meets to focus on Instruction. Focus Group B leaders
                           administer a staff survey on instructional practices. Faculty then breaks out
                           into Home Groups/Grade Level Advisories to review responses to Instruction
                           survey.

October 22, 2008           WASC Leadership Team meets to present updates of self-study reports.

October 27, 2008           Vision Statement voting process begins: staff, parents, community partners,
                           students

October 28, 2008           Common Planning Tuesday. Staff and students meet in Focus Groups to
                           continue discussions of criteria and guide questions.

November 4, 2008           Whole faculty meets to focus on Curriculum. Focus Group C leaders
                           administer a staff survey on Curriculum. Faculty then breaks out into Home
                           Groups/Departments to review responses to Curriculum survey.

November 17, 2008          Vision Statement roll-out activities begin,



                                                              2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 19
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Nov 17-Dec 12, 2008        Substitute coverage is provided to Focus Group leaders to enable them to
                           write Self-Study reports collaboratively.

November 18, 2008          Common Planning Tuesday. Staff and students meet in Focus Groups to
                           continue discussions of criteria and guide questions.

November 25, 2008          Common Planning Tuesday. Staff and students meet in Focus Groups to
                           continue discussions of criteria and guide questions.

November 26, 2008          WASC Leadership Team meets to discuss Action Plan.

December 2, 2008           Whole faculty meets to focus on School Culture. Focus Group E leaders
                           administer a staff survey on School Culture. Faculty then breaks out into
                           Home Groups/Academies to review responses to School Culture survey.

December 3, 2008           WASC Leadership Team meets to discuss Action Plan and Report Review
                           Process

December 8, 2008           Teachers’ rooms selected for “Extreme Makeover – Classroom Edition” are
                           announced on Puma News to heighten awareness of WASC preparation.

December 9, 2008           Common Planning Tuesday. Staff and students meet in Focus Groups to
                           continue discussions of criteria and guide questions.

December 10, 2008          WASC Leadership Team meets to review drafts of Self-Study report.

December 16, 2008          Whole faculty meets to focus on School Organization and Vision. Faculty
                           then breaks out into Home Groups/Grade Level Advisories to review
                           responses to Organization and Vision survey.

December 18, 2008          WASC Executive Leadership Team meets with District-provided WASC
                           advisor to review draft of Self-Study report.

Dec 22, 2008-Jan 8, 2009   Leadership Team reads 1st draft of Self-Study report to edit and revise.

January 13, 2009           Whole faculty meets for an update on the Self-Study report and a discussion
                           about next steps.

January 14, 2009           Leadership Team meets to discuss implementation of Action Plan steps.

January 15, 2009           Preliminary draft of WASC self-study report is posted on Google Groups and
                           faculty are advised to review the document and provide input.

January 20, 2009           Academies meet to discuss Action Plan implications for Academy
                           development.

January 27, 2009           PD focuses on how existing site technology can support Action Plan
                           implementation.

February 4, 2009           Classified office, custodial, and cafeteria staff meet for WASC orientation
                           and overview.


                                                             2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 20
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning



February 10, 2009          Parent Focus Group meets to review Self-Study report.

February 11, 2009          Parent WASC Information Night: Orientation and Overview

February 10, 2009          Grade level advisories meet to discuss Action Plan implications for Advisory
                           curriculum.

February 17, 2009          Data-Driven Dialogue: Departments meet to examine fall semester grades
                           and periodic assessment data.

February 24, 2009          Data-Driven Dialogue: Academies meet to examine fall semester grades and
                           periodic assessment data.

February 2009              WASC Accreditation Action Plans are reviewed by parents attending a
                           regularly scheduled meeting of English Language Advisory Committee. At
                           the ELAC and CEAC meetings, parents are given a copy of the Action Plan
                           and their input is solicited

March 3, 2009              WASC Steering Committee solicits input from faculty regarding progress
                           and pending revision of Single Plan for Student Achievement (SPSA).

March 10, 2009             Staff will engage in ongoing Advisory curriculum development informed by
                           Self-Study report.

March 17, 2009             Departments will engage in ongoing instructional program development
                           informed by the Self-Study report.

March 24, 2009             LAUSD District 1 WASC Committee conducts accreditation visit.

March 28, 2009             NAHS-CSUN One-Day Retreat (Academy and Vision Development)

March 31, 2009             Whole faculty reviews details of District 1 WASC visit

April 14, 2009             Departments meet to make final preparations for the WASC visit

April 19-22, 2009          NAHS WASC Accreditation Visit 2008-2009




                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 21
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




            Chapter I:
        Student/Community
             Profile –
         Data and Findings


                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 22
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                                 Northridge Academy High School
                           WASC Accreditation Self-Study 2008-2009
                    Chapter I: Student/Community Profile – Data and Findings

                                         INTRODUCTION

Northridge Academy High School was first envisioned in the late 1990’s by former Los Angeles
Unified School District Local District 1 Superintendent Debbie Leidner; LAUSD Board of
Education member Julie Korenstein; and former California State University, Northridge Provost
Louanne Kennedy. Their shared vision was to create a model of school-university collaboration
focused on increasing urban student achievement. A land swap agreement was approved by the
California Legislature, then Governor Gray Davis, and the LAUSD Board of Education, leading
to a Memorandum of Understanding between the district and university regarding facilities use
and decision-making by a six-person Educational Advisory Committee composed of
representatives from the high school, the district, and the university. In September 2004,
construction was completed for the first LAUSD high school in over thirty years to be built in
the San Fernando Valley. We opened our doors to our first students, 574 ninth and tenth graders
who, along with their parents and guardians, and the support of our community, helped us begin
to build our school, our vision, and our purpose. Since our opening in 2004, we have added two
additional grade levels to serve students in grades 9-12, with a current enrollment of 986.

                                     DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

OUR COMMUNITY

Northridge Academy High School, located in the San Fernando Valley, is an urban campus in
the city of Northridge. Because we were built to relieve overcrowding, our students live within
the attendance areas of three very large neighboring high schools: Monroe High School,
Cleveland High School, and Granada Hills Charter High School.




                                                       2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 23
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Consequently, although we are situated in Northridge, California in the center of a relatively
affluent community of homeowners, our attendance area is far-reaching and economically
diverse with students coming from Chatsworth, Granada Hills, Mission Hills, San Fernando,
Pacoima, Panorama City, Van Nuys, and Arleta. While the Northridge median income is
$48,855 and the median home value is $470,000, the other San Fernando Valley communities
that we serve, such as Pacoima, Mission Hills, and Arleta, have poverty rates well above the
regional average and median home values of $143,600.

Family and Community Trends
A unique aspect of our school is its location on a university campus situated in a safe, relatively
crime-free neighborhood which includes single-family homes and university student dorms and
apartments. A community-based police station is located only 1.4 miles away. In sharp contrast,
almost 80% of our students travel, mostly via the public bus system because we are not allotted
district school buses, through impoverished, gang-ridden areas both east and south of us to arrive
at our school.

Unique among the twelve high schools that make up LAUSD’s Local District 1, prospective
students apply to our school for the 9th grade, and admission is by lottery by District mandate.
No additional students are added in grades 10-12, with the exception of 3 district-placed students
to date. The parents who apply to our school consistently express their desire to find an
academically-enriching school where their children can be safe from the typical problems found
in many urban schools: bullying, gang-related encounters, violence, racism and harassment.
Therefore, through word-of-mouth, the response to our school’s annual lottery selection process
has been overwhelming, with more than double the applicants for available spots for 9th grade
enrollment each year. The parents and students in our community perceive our school’s
proximity to a university as providing a safe environment for learning with a culture of
opportunities for students from a wide range of backgrounds. This is particularly important to
our parents who, on average, graduated high school but did not go on to college and are hopeful
that their children will be the first generation to attain college degrees. Approximately 21% of
our parents who completed the parent education survey (68% of our parents) did not complete
high school.

Sixty percent of our students come from the Monroe HS residence area which encompasses a
large section of the East San Fernando Valley. The Monroe area has some of the highest crime
rates and lowest incomes in the Valley. As a result, we receive more than twice the number of
applicants as there are openings at our school each year for Monroe area students.

A large number of our applicants on our yearly waiting list for enrollment also come from the
families that reside in the Cleveland HS area, covering a section of the Valley to the southwest of
us. Though the Cleveland area has a lower crime rate than the Monroe area, it is very much a
working class community with lower median incomes than those of Northridge. We are allotted
20% of our 9th grade spots for Cleveland HS residents, yet we receive three times that number in
applications each year. Although we fill all spots for the allotted 20% for students from the
Granada Hills Charter High School area, the waiting list is negligible, in contrast to Cleveland
and Monroe High School area applicants, since Granada is a charter school in an affluent
neighborhood and perceived as a school of choice.


                                                         2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 24
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Although we are not part of LAUSD’s Magnet School Program which generally attracts parents
of identified gifted (GATE) and high-achieving students, we still draw a significant proportion of
already identified GATE students who make up 17.8% of our student population, and we
continue to identify more who qualify once they attend our school. In addition, parents of
diverse student subgroups are applying to our school with the hope that their children will have
access to a greater opportunity to excel. Families of traditionally underserved students,
especially of Hispanic and Filipino ethnicity, along with Asian families, are recruiting relatives
and friends to apply to our school, with a steady increase in our enrollment for Hispanic students,
from 54.4% in the 2006-07 school year to 63.39% this 2008-09 year. The predominant primary
home languages are English (90.9%) and Spanish (8.25%), with the remainder being Arabic,
Tagalog and “Other”.

In addition, applications for students with special needs have increased, and parents of students
with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) contact us regularly to schedule visits to our school.
They have heard from our current parents of special needs students that our school personalizes
instruction to meet the needs of students and provides a safe, welcoming environment for all
students, including those with a variety of disabilities. Our Collaborative Model for Special
Education also encourages our students with special needs to succeed in the general education
program. Therefore, students with special needs, who are included in the lottery process along
with all general education students, make up 14% of our student population.

State/Federal Program Mandates

Northridge Academy High School complies with and participates in all federal programs
mandated under the No Child Left Behind Act: Title I – Improving the Academic Achievement
of the Disadvantaged; Bilingual and Title III – Language Instruction for Limited English
Proficient and Immigrant Students; Title V – Promoting Informed Parental Choice and
Innovative Programs; Title VII – Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native Education; and
Title IX – Equal Opportunity in Education. As required by these mandated programs,
Northridge Academy’s governing and advisory boards are the School Site Council (SSC), the
Compensatory Education Advisory Council (CEAC), and the English Learner Advisory Council
(ELAC). State and local mandates include the Modified Consent Decree, the Williams
Settlement Implementation Agreement, and Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) mandates.

Modified Consent Decree (2003): Through this court-ordered mandate that originally came about
due to a lawsuit, Chanda Smith vs. LAUSD (1996), the District’s special education program
must comply with all applicable federal laws under the Individuals with Disabilities Education
Act (IDEA), with oversight from an independent monitor. There are 18 outcomes that schools,
local districts and the district as a whole must meet.

Williams Settlement Implementation Agreement (2004): This agreement addresses conditions at
schools regarding basic educational necessities, including instructional materials, school
facilities, and teacher training and credentialing. Districts must also have in place a uniform
complaint process to address the lack of these resources. Since it was implemented at our school
in 2004, we have been 100% Williams compliant.




                                                         2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 25
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


GATE Mandates: The LAUSD instructional programs for gifted and talented students are
supported by California State legislation (AB555, 1986) that provides for funding for GATE
students who demonstrate high performance or capacity for high performance far beyond
age/grade expectations. Because they are atypical learners, GATE students require differentiated
and specialized learning experiences beyond the regular curriculum. In addition, more recent
legislation (AB2313, Jan. 2001) requires that students from economically disadvantaged and
varying backgrounds be provided with full participation in these opportunities.

Parent/Community Organizations and Support and University Partnerships

A major contributing factor to the success of our school program is our partnership with
California State University, Northridge (CSUN).         Our three thematic Small Learning
Communities (SLCs), or Academies - Arts, Media & Communication (AMC); Careers in
Education (CE); and Health & Human Development (HHD) - are directly linked to three major
corresponding CSUN colleges. In addition, various CSUN departments interact with our
students on an ongoing basis through specific programs, supports, activities, and events. Some
of these programs include having CSUN professors and students come to our classrooms to
present lessons while others provide an opportunity for our students to visit CSUN classes, art
galleries, performances, and events.

All our students are given the privilege of library and lab access at CSUN’s Oviatt Library where
they can check out books and utilize the facilities for research and study. This privilege is
significant since other high schools are typically permitted to provide this opportunity only to
Advanced Placement students whereas all our students are given the same access as the
university students.

Northridge Academy HS is a clinical teaching site for CSUN and a key part of its Teachers for a
New Era (TNE) Initiative. As a partner school with an approved Shared Use Agreement with
CSUN, Northridge Academy High School is an effective partnership model being studied and
further developed as part of the TNE Initiative. Our ongoing collaborative activities, both
discipline- and academy-based, and our work with teacher preparation, CSUN student teachers,
and counseling/sociology interns are important aspects of that partnership.

Additionally, The Child and Family Guidance Center, located across the street, sends University
of Southern California (USC) interns to work with our students and also provides low or no cost
counseling for qualifying students who do not have insurance.

In order to expand the NAHS master schedule, provide additional opportunities to earn credits
and meet high school requirements, support our academies, and give our students the added
opportunities to complete A-G requirements and take college classes, Pierce College classes
have been available after school on our campus since September 2006. NAHS students in
grades 9-12, as well as community members, are eligible to enroll in these classes. Most classes
meet A-G college requirements, are UC/CSU transferable, and also meet high school graduation
requirements. In particular, Spanish 1-2 and American Sign Language 1-2 have been selected to
expand our foreign language offerings. NAHS does not have a credentialed Physics teacher, so a
Pierce College Physics course is offered along with a variety of electives, such as Business Law.


                                                        2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 26
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


One of our science teachers supports a beginning CSUN Engineering class that includes our
students by providing the labs and on-line instruction. A few of our students have been a part of
the CSUN Catalyst Program sponsored by a National Science Foundation Grant through the
Geology Department. Other possibilities for beginning CSUN courses are being currently
considered due to the success of these courses.

The major parent-based support organization for NAHS is Friends of NAHS, a non-profit
organization initiated and governed by an elected board made up of a group of committed NAHS
parents. When NAHS first opened, our parents and staff formed a Parent-Teacher-Student
Association (PTSA) governed by a local chapter of the California PTSA. However, after the
first two years, stakeholders came together to discuss the advantages and challenges of the PTSA
support process. A group of parents proposed the formation of a non-profit (501c3) community
organization that would take the primary role of fundraising to bring much-needed resources to
our school while the PTSA could continue to provide educational supports, such as parent
volunteers for our teachers and main office. Last year, after much discussion, our PTSA was
dissolved, and Friends of NAHS has stepped in as our primary parent organization.

This year we have hired a Family Center Director to develop a Family Center where parents and
families will gain consistent access to information and support needed to ensure student success.
The director’s role includes: (1) increasing outreach to our parents/guardians and the community;
(2) serving as liaison between home and school; and (3) providing information to parents to help
families in need to increase student achievement. Information and resources include community-
based and County referral sources that provide services for health, mental health, and basic needs
at low or no cost; school and community resource information; and workshops that address
adolescent development, navigating the school system, parenting skills, etc.

We have recently joined two local Chambers of Commerce, Woodland Hills-Tarzana and North
Valley Regional, that have begun to provide presenters for our Career Day as well as job
shadowing and internship opportunities to our students. In addition, the Director of Education
for the San Fernando Valley Economic Alliance Workforce Investments has linked with our
school to build partnerships with local businesses, government, and civic leaders in our
community, particularly in the fields of math, science, and technology.

WASC ACCREDITATION HISTORY FOR SCHOOL

Our Initial WASC visit took place in 2006, at which time NAHS was accredited for three years.
Chapter 3 of our Self-Study report details our responses to the recommendations made by the
visiting team. In preparation for our 2008-2009 WASC visit, we have honored the WASC
process by adhering to the Four “C’s”: Communication, Collaboration, Consensus, and
Commitment. The timeline of WASC activities, beginning on page 15, will show the time and
dedication we have invested in this process of self-study. It also illustrates how, following our
initial WASC visit in 2006, we immediately began to address our data more explicitly and
systematically to inform instructional and programming decisions. In anticipation of our first
full WASC self-study report and visit, we dedicated a great deal of time in 2008 and 2009 to
Focus Group and Home Group meetings in order to engage all stakeholders in the WASC self-
study process.


                                                         2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 27
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


SCHOOL PURPOSE AND EXPECTED SCHOOLWIDE LEARNING

Northridge Academy High School is committed to increasing the achievement of all students
through the ongoing process of examining data, refining our Expected School-wide Learning
Results (ESLR’s), revisiting our Action Plan regularly, and implementing new programs and
activities based on our data. Our purpose is reflected in our vision statement, made even more
relevant and authentic by our stakeholders through our mission statement and our ESLR’s.

Vision Statement
We envision a school where all students value learning and demonstrate integrity, an innovative
community recognized for its exceptional academic achievement.

Mission Statement
We are a small high school community in a unique partnership with California State University,
Northridge. Our mission is to inspire, support, and expect our students to achieve their fullest
potential as learners and productive citizens.

                                Expected Schoolwide Learning Results
             ESLR’s                                           ESLR DESCRIPTORS
     Who NAHS Students Are                                    What NAHS Students Do
Powerful Thinkers acquire                       Acquire high level content knowledge through critical
knowledge and use it to reason,                  reading and investigative activities.
question, make decisions, and solve             Select and utilize technology appropriately and creatively.
problems.                                       Apply new understandings to achieve deeper meaning.
                                                Build resiliency.
Life-Long Learners demonstrate                  Assess their own strengths and weaknesses and build on
self-motivation, resiliency, and                 them.
responsibility for their own                    Motivate and support their own learning.
education and growth.                           Access and build upon prior knowledge and experience.
                                                Show respect for diversity in a complex world.
Culturally Aware Individuals                    Uphold democratic values of freedom of expression,
show respect for diversity in all its            openness, equality, acceptance, cooperation and justice.
forms.                                          Demonstrate respect and compassion toward all
                                                 individuals
                                                Understand the power of language and its usages.
                                                Employ LCP’s* in daily practice.
Successful Communicators speak,                 Develop skills to speak, write, read, and listen effectively.
listen, write, and read purposefully            Analyze and evaluate information from a variety of
and insightfully.                                sources.
                                                Learn and apply academic and social skills.
Effective and Responsible Citizens              Develop and nurture lifelong compassion and
use what they learn to evaluate, take            understanding.
a stand, and take action to impact              Contribute productively to society through employment,
their own world and the global                   research, civic engagement, concern for community,
community in positive ways.                      issues, and service.

*Learning Conversation Principles. Adapted by Cherie’ Barker-Reid and Karen M. Matsui from the work of
        The Achievement Council, 2001 and 2002.


                                                               2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 28
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


STATUS OF SCHOOL

Based on SIS data from December 2008, 57.6% of our students qualify for the free and reduced
federal lunch program. We continue to qualify for school-wide Title I funding. As a new school
in 2004, we did not initially qualify for Title I funding, but in 2005 became eligible and now
continue as a school-wide Title I school.

Based on SIS data from December 2008, 62.9% of our students have a home language other than
English. Spanish is the home language for 53.2% of our students. Presently, 12% of our student
population is Limited English Speaking (LEP). All of these students are Preparing for
Redesignation (PRP). We do not have enough students to conduct an English Language
Development (ELD) Program.

In 2007-2008 our Academic Performance Index (API) score increased by 31 points, after
decreasing over the two previous years of 2005-2006 (692) and 2006-2007 (680). We met our
API criteria with a score of 711. Our participation rate has remained close to 100% since we
opened in 2004. The graduation rate for our first graduating class in 2007 was 97.7%.

In 2007-2008, we met 17 of the 18 Average Yearly Progress (AYP) criteria. We did not meet
the target in math for our English Learners and barely met our English Language Arts
proficiency for English Learners, qualifying under the “Safe Harbor” clause. For all previous
years we met all of our AYP criteria. Our math proficiency continues to be lower than our
English Language Arts (ELA) proficiency as the required percentage of students meeting
proficiency needed to meet AYP continues to increase. This year we are on the watch list for
Program Improvement. Schools that receive federal Title I funds that have not met state-defined
adequate yearly progress (AYP) in all criteria for two consecutive years must be identified as
needing school improvement before the beginning of the next school year.




                                                       2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 29
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


ENROLLMENT
A unique application process was developed and implemented to ensure equitable access to
Northridge Academy High School by students who live within the attendance areas of Monroe,
Cleveland, and Granada Hills Charter High Schools. Although the Monroe attendance area has
changed since 2004-2005 with the recent opening of two new Valley schools, we continue to use
the 2004-2005 boundaries which now include small portions of both Panorama and Arleta High
Schools. Applications to our school are submitted by March of each year, and a random drawing
process is used to select students once a year, with 60% coming from Monroe HS, and the
remaining 40% equally divided between Cleveland HS and Granada Hills Charter HS which also
includes a priority area. Since our school is not part of LAUSD’s Magnet Program, students are
not entitled to transportation and must live in specific attendance areas in the surrounding
neighborhoods. The only eligibility criterion we hold is residency in the attendance area of the
three major schools we support.

Another unique attribute of our school enrollment is the fact that we only admit incoming 9th
graders. No students in Grades 10 through 12 are allowed to transfer in. This policy enables us
to build and sustain a respectful and safe culture across our entire student population.

In 2004, we opened with an enrollment of 574 students, Grades 9 and 10 only. In September
2005, our second year began with approximately 800 students, consisting of new first-time 9th
graders and our continuing students moving into 10th and 11th grades. At full capacity in
September 2006, the school had 968 students, again only accepting new first-time 9th grade
students. Our enrollment stayed steady in the 2007-08 year with an enrollment of 969. In 2008,
our enrollment increased slightly to 986 students.

                                      Number of Students Enrolled

              1,000



                          969               968
               800


                                                            805
               600


                                                                               574
               400



               200



                 0
                        2007-08           2006-07         2005-06            2004-05




                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 30
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Grade Level
At present we are at our maximum enrollment capacity. Our Freshman class comprises 30% of
our student population, while our Senior class represents 18% of our students.
    Year                  9                  10                     11                            12                   Ungr. Sp Ed                     Total
   2007-08               323                 233                    235                           178                              0                   969
   2006-07               317                 321                    229                           101                              0                   968
   2005-06               338                 286                    157                            0                              24                   805
   2004-05               348                 212                     0                             0                              14                   574


Gender
Gender representation is fairly balanced school-wide. Females outnumber males in the 9th and
12th grades, but there are more males than females in the 10th and 11th grades.
                                       Female                                                                                 Male
                                                                    Total                                                                               Total        Total
 Year       9       10         11      12          Ungraded        Female                9            10      11              12        Ungraded         Male      Enrollment
 07-                                                                 484                                                                                 485
  08       168     106         106     104            0            (49.9%)              155        127        129             74           0           (50.1%)        969
 06-                                                                 458                                                                                 510
  07       139     144         125     50             0            (47.3%)              178        177        104             51           0           (52.7%)        968
 05-                                                                 392                                                                                 413
  06       166     148         72       0             6            (48.7%)              172        138        85              0           18           (51.3%)        805
 04-                                                                 280                                                                                 294
  05       179      96          0      0              5            (48.8%)              169        116         0              0            9           (51.2%)        574


Ethnicity
Our ethnic makeup has remained fairly consistent over four years. Two noticeable trends have
been the increase of our Hispanic/Latino population over four years and the decrease in our
White/Not Hispanic population over the same period of time.

                                                                                                                                   White
             American
                                             Pacific                                                       African-                  not
              Indian/
             Alaskan                         Islande            Filipin        Hispanic                    America                 Hispani           Multiple/No
 Year         Native           Asian             r                 o           / Latino                       n                       c               Response         Total
                   2             47             4                 74                 563                     63                         209               7             969
 07-08           0.2%           4.9%          0.4%               7.6%               58.1%                   6.5%                       21.6%            0.7%           100%
                   3             48             4                 79                 527                     73                         222              12
 06-07           0.3%           4.9%          0.4%               8.1%               54.4%                   7.5%                       22.9%            1.2%            968
                   2             40             3                 61                 434                     69                         196               0
 05-06           0.2%           4.7%          0.3%               7.1%                51%                    8.1%                        23%              0%             805
                   2             28             4                 47                 278                     54                         161               0
 04-05           0.3%           4.8%          0.6%               8.1%               48.4%                   9.4%                        28%              0%             574


                                                                         Enrollment by Ethnicity, 2007-08
                                                                          shown as Numbers of Students


                                                                                    7
                                                                                              2
                                                          63       209

                                                                              47                  4

                                                                               74                                  American Indian/ Alaskan Native
                                                                                                                   Asian
                                                                                                                   Pacific Islander

                                                          563                                                      Filipino
                                                                                                                   Hispanic/ Latino
                                                                                                                   African-American
                                                                                                                   White not Hispanic
                                                                                                                   Multiple/No Response




                                                                                                             2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 31
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Predominant Primary Languages Other Than English
Spanish is the predominant home language for 53.2% of our students. Tagalog is the second
most common language at 3.2%. Overall, 62.9% of our families do not have English as their
home language. 37.1% of our students come from English Only homes.

  *Home Language              English       Spanish         Filipino          Arabic       Armenian          Korean
    # Students                 362            520              31              11              7                7
   % of Students              37.1%          53.2%           3.2%             1.1%           .72%             .72%

Title I, Special Education, GATE, and Advanced Placement
Our Title I numbers have increased as we have become more sophisticated in our use of data and
in communicating with faculty, students, and parents. Our GATE and AP numbers have
increased in proportion to the increase in our overall student enrollment.

                       Year                Title I       Special Ed           GATE                AP
                    2007-08                 922             114                183                344
                    2006-07                 901             106                173                259
                    2005-06                 759             104                109                211
                    2004-05                 378              59                 83                **

Total Number of Students with IEP’s
Our Special Education population continues to grow each year as the number of students with
IEP’s in our application pool continues to increase. Parents appreciate the small setting and the
care and attention that students with disabilities receive at NAHS.

              Year              Total #      % Total              RSP            SDC              Other
                                            Enrollment
             2008-09             132          13.4%               98                 27             7
             2007-08             114          11.8%               81                 24             9
             2006-07             120          12.4%               86                 28             6


Ethnicity and Sex of Students in the Resource Specialist Program (RSP)
In the RSP Program there are significantly more males than females. Ethnically, over half of our
students are Hispanic and about one-third of our population is white. In the past 3-years the
Hispanic population has increased, while the White and Black populations have decreased.
  Year         A          AI              B            F         H              W         Male          Female
2008-09        1           1              9            3        51              33          61            37
              1%          1%            9.2%         3.1%      52%            33.7%       62.2%         37.8%
2007-08        2           1              10           3        36              30          50            31
             2.5%        1.2%           12.3%        3.7%     44.4%            37%        61.7%         38.3%
2006-07        2           1               7           2        41              33          54            32
             1.7%        .83%           5.8%         1.7%    34.2%            27.5%        45%          26.7%




                                                                       2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 32
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




Ethnicity and Sex of Students in Special Day Program (SDP)

In the SDP Program there are four times more males than females. Ethnically, the major
populations are Hispanic and White similar to our overall population. The Black population is
significantly larger than our overall school population.
   Year           A        AI       B          F       H         W         Male       Female
  2008-09         0         0       5          1       13        8           22         5
                 0%        0%     18.5%      3.7%    48.1%     29.6%       81.5%      18.5%
  2007-08         0         0       5          0       11        8           18         6
                 0%        0%     20.8%       0%     45.8%     33.3%        75%        25%
  2006-07         1         0       3          1       15        8           22         6
                3.6%       0%     10.7%      3.6%    53.6%     28.6%       78.6%      21.4%

Ethnicity and Sex of Students with IEP’s in Other Programs

Students in other programs include Speech and Language, Autism, Mental Retardation, and
sometimes Dual Enrollment from a Non-Public School. Overall, our population of students in
programs other than RSP or SDP is about 5% of the entire special education population. The
majority of students are Hispanic and White.
  Year            A        AI       B         F        H         W         Male      Female
 2008-09          1         0       0         0        4         2           3         4
                14.3%      0%      0%        0%      57.1%     28.6%       42.9%     57.1%
 2007-08          1         0       1         1        2         4           5         4
                11.1%      0%     11.1%     11.1%    22.2%     44.4%       55.6%     44.4%
 2006-07          0         0       1         0        0         5           1         1
                 0%        0%     16.7%      0%       0%       83.3%        50%       50%

Students Identified as Gifted 2004-2008

Since we opened in September 2004, our Gifted population has increased from 10.6% to 17.8 %.
We have had a different GATE Coordinator each year, making it more challenging to identify
new students and to build the capacity of our students and staff. Nevertheless, we remain
committed to providing opportunities for our students to achieve their highest potential.

                        2004-05       2005-06        2006-07           2007-08          2008-09
Number Gifted              61           104            162               172              174
% Gifted                 10.6%         12.9%          16.7%             17.8%            17.8%



GATE Students by Ethnicity 2004-2008
Fluctuations in percentages of GATE students by ethnicity generally reflect changes in our
overall student enrollment. For example, our Filipino student population has steadily risen over
the years, and our numbers of GATE students in this ethnic group have increased as well.
Though our African American student population has dropped, GATE numbers remain steady.
The percentage of GATE students in the White subgroup also reflect overall student enrollment.



                                                         2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 33
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Ethnicity        2004-05           2005-06                2006-7                 2007-08               2008-09
               #         %        #        %           #           %           #          %           #        %
Amer Ind        0                 0                    0                       0                      0
Asian           6        9.8      8        7.7         15         9.3          14         8          12        6.9
Black           5        8.2     11       10.6         14         8.6          12         7           14        8
Filipino        6        9.8      9        8.7         25        15.4         24         14          21        12
Hispanic       19       31.1     41       39.4         61        37.7          66        38          78        45
Pacific Is      0                 0                     1         .62           1        .58           0
White          25        41      35       33.7        46         28.4          55        32           49       28
Total          61                104                  162                     172                    174

Number of Students Enrolled in Advanced Placement (AP) Classes 2005-2008
All NAHS students are encouraged to take AP and Honors classes. With our commitment to
equity and access for all our students, the philosophy at NAHS is to be inclusive, not exclusive.
With only 9th and 10th grade students during our first year, we had yet to build our AP program.
During our second year, more teachers attended AP training, allowing us to offer nine AP
classes. Since then, all of our teachers have taken preparation courses and continue to become
more experienced and participate in ongoing professional development. We now offer fourteen
AP courses. Last year, we were able to send our AP World History teacher to Princeton, New
Jersey to score AP exams and gain expertise with the AP process. He was selected to serve as
our GATE coordinator this year.

 Department          Class Title        2005-6       #     2006-7       #         2007-8       #       2008-9         #
English         AP Eng Lang AB            2          35      2          39          2          46        2           39
                AP English Lit AB                            1          38          2          46        2           45
Math            AP Calculus AB            1           4      1          23          1          21        1           19
                AP Statistics AB                                                    1          17        1           27
Science         AP Biology AB             2          49        1        40          1          38        1           24
                AP Chemistry AB           1          22        1        16                               1           19
                AP Environ Sci AB                              1        26           2         63        1           42
Social Sci      AP World Hist AB          1          43        1        32           2         47        1           37
                AP US History AB          1          38        1        32           2         55        2           43
                AP Gov’t & Pol                                 1        22           1         14        1           40
World Lang      AP Spanish Lit                                 1        15                               1           10
                AP Spanish Lang           1           20                            1          15
Total                                     9          211      11        283         15         362       14      345


Number of Students by Ethnicity Enrolled in Advanced Placement (AP) Classes 2005-2008
AP class enrollment from the Hispanic and White subgroups align closely with overall student
enrollment, with a steady increase of Hispanic students enrolled in AP classes over the years
from 38.4% to 42.6%. Asian enrollment has also increased from 8% to 13%, while the African
American population has decreased from 11.8% to 4.6%. Further, because of an increase in our
Filipino population, there is an increase in AP enrollment by this subgroup. Though the decrease
in enrollment by our Black subgroup also represents trends in overall student enrollment, we
must still ensure that all students are receiving access and support.




                                                               2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 34
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                       05-06                   06-07                 07-08                   08-09
                 #             %          #            %       #             %         #             %
  Am In          0                        0                    0                       0
  Asian         17             8%         30           10.6    38            10.5     45              13
  Black          25            11.8       29           10.2    25             6.9      16             4.6
 Filipino        27            12.8       42           14.8                   18       48            13.9
 Hispanic        81            38.4      108           38.2    130           35.9     147            42.6
  Pac Isl         4             1.9        3            1.1     0                       0
  White         57              27       71            25.1    103           28.5     89             25.8
   Total        211                      283                   362                    345

Number of Students Enrolled in Honors Classes 2004-2008
Since our opening, “Honors” credit is earned through an Honors contract. Students are not
automatically assigned. Honors contracts are developed to extend the standards of each content
area, extend critical thinking skills, and increase writing. Honors English 10, an exception, is
offered both to support student preparation for AP English Language and allow for cross-
curricular connections with AP World History. Trigonometry/Math Analysis AB is offered
exclusively as an honors class. An area to be addressed in our Action Plan is consistency
regarding the “Honors” contract within and between departments.

                 Total         Year        AI          Asian   Black         Filip    Hisp           PI     White
  English 9       70            2004-5     0             5       4            25       28            6       2
                  70            2005-6     0             2       4            10       34            0       20
                  32            2006-7     0             1       1            6        13            0       11
                   7            2007-8     0             3       0            2        0             0       2
                  35            2008-9     0             1       2            5        19            0       8
English 10        43            2004-5     0             4       6            5        12            0       16
                  42            2005-6     0             3       4            3        14            2       16
                  45            2006-7     0             7       2            6        23            0       7
                  80            2007-8     0             4       7            12       37            0       20
                  75            2008-9     0             8       7            7        34            0       19
English 11        21            2005-6     0             1       5            4        9             0       2
                  42            2006-7     0             2       3            7        20            1       9
                  40            2007-8     0             2       1            8        18            0       11
                  16            2008-9     0             0       2            1        11            0       2
English 12                      2006-7
                                2007-8
                                2008-9
Geometry          40            2008-9     0             2      2             7        22            0       7
Algebra 2         11            2004-5     0             2      1             2        2             0       4
                  21            2005-6     0             2      4             3        2             0       10
                  27            2006-7     0             7      1             3        8             1       7
                  20            2007-8     0             2      1             8        2             0       7
                  10            2008-9     0             0      0             3        3             0       3
Trig/MA            7            2004-5     0             2      0             1        2             0       2
                  33            2005-6     0             3      3             7        12            0       8
                  61            2006-7     0             5      9             8        19            1       19
                  80            2007-8     0             10     10            13       29            1       17
                  67            2008-9     0             4      3             14       29            0       17
ICS               67            2004-5     0             6      7             6        23            2       23
                  86            2005-6     0             4      5             7        48            0       22
                   4            2006-7     0             0      0             0        4             0       0
                   0            2007-8     0             0      0             0        0             0       0
                  32            2008-9     0             2      1             5        17            0       7



                                                               2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 35
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Biology           22           2004-5       0              3         5              2           5              0       7
                  68           2005-6       0              7         4              8           30             1       18
                  65           2006-7       0              5         6              9           26             0       19
                  35           2007-8       0              3         0              4           17             1       10
                  130          2008-9       0              6         8              11          79             0       26
Chemistry         30           2005-6       0              0         5              6           14             0       5
                  16           2006-7       0              1         2              2           3              0       8
                  14           2007-8       0              2         2              0           3              0       7
                   0           2008-9       0              0         0              0           0              0       0
World Hist        59           2004-5       0              3         13             6           14             1       22
                  41           2005-6       0              4         3              4           20             0       10
                  53           2006-7       0              4         1              5           38             0       11
                  31           2007-8       0              1         2              2           21             0       5
                  47           2008-9       0              3         4              2           33             0       5
US History        20           2005-6       0              2         2              1           12             0       3
                  11           2006-7       0              1         2              1           4              0       3
                  34           2007-8       0              3         0              5           35             0       3
                  54           2008-9       1              3         5              8           26             0       11
US Gov’t           1           2006-7       0              0         0              0           1              0       0
                  42           2007-8       0              3         3              5           16             1       14
                               2008-9
Economics         22           2006-7       0              2          4             1           10             0       5
                  54           2007-8       0              7          4             7           16             1       19
                               2008-9



LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY
Our number of English Learners increased in 2008-2009. All of our English Learners are
Preparing for Redesignation (PRP) and are receiving Specially Designated Academic Instruction
in English (SDAIE). We do not offer an English Language Development Program (ELD). Our
Fluent-English Proficient student population has been increasing.         In 2007-2008 our
redesignation rate decreased. Students, in general, have met the CELDT and English grade
requirements, but are not proficient on the CST’s.

                                                               Fluent-English-Proficient
    Year          Enrollment            English Learners               Students            Students Redesignated FEP
  2008-09*          986                  118 (12%)                  Not Available                Not Available

  2007-08           969                   88 (9%)                  483 (49.8%)                  23 (21.5%)

  2006-07           968                 107 (11.1 %)              452 ( 46.7 %)                 35 ( 29.2 %)
  2005-06           805                 120 ( 14.9 %)             341 ( 42.4 %)                 12 ( 15.2 %)
  2004-05           574                 79 ( 13.8 %)              200 ( 34.8 %)                  0 ( 0.0%)




                                                                   2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 36
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


ATTENDANCE

Mobility Rate
The Mobility Rate shows the percentage of students who were counted as part of the school's or
District's enrollment on the October CBEDS data collection and who have been continuously
enrolled since that date. The numbers shown below reflect high levels of continuous enrollment
for both our school and the district.

                Year                         School                               District
            2007-08                            N/R                                  N/R
            2006-07                           100%                                 100%
            2005-06                           99%                                  100%
            2004-05                           100%                                 100%


Stability/Transiency Rate and Average Daily Rate of Attendance
The pattern of attendance rates, including stability and average rate of attendance, has steadily
risen over the past four years. This rise has been due to a combination of the implementation of
the new Integrated Student Information System, period by period attendance, and the focused
efforts of our office staff. Moreover, we have created a school tradition of honoring perfect
attendance.

                                                                               Average Daily Rate of
         Year               Stability Rate            Transiency Rate               Attendance
       2007-08                 92.89%                      8.26                       94.83%
       2006-07                 90.52%                    10.31%                       94.82%
       2005-06                 93.04%                     7.66%                       94.24%
       2004-05                 86.24%                    14.81%                       93.95%


SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION RATES AND CRIME STATISTICS

Truancy and Tardy Rates and Suspension and Expulsion Rates
Despite increases in overall student enrollment, our number of truancies and tardies has gone
down. In recent years, we have had the opportunity to add a new attendance tracking system to
monitor time of arrival of students and enable office staff to quickly process late students, inform
administration of habitually tardy students, and notify parents through timely letters. This
system, in conjunction with our Connect-Ed phone system, is now able to contact parents twice a
day in the event of an absence and as needed to address attendance and tardy issues. Our truancy
rate, as calculated by the CDE, has steadily decreased from 8.9% in 2004-05 to 2.06% in 2007-
08. This compares with the Los Angeles Unified School District rates which dropped from
8.89% to 6.71% and the State rate of 25.84%.




                                                             2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 37
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Our low suspension and expulsion rates reflect our commitment to keeping our students rather
than transferring misbehaving students to other schools. No opportunity transfers have been
issued by our school since we opened. Only one student has been expelled. Our suspension rate
increased from the 2005-06 year to the 2006-07 year because of the development of our school-
wide discipline plan and teachers’ heightened awareness. Further, the increase is also a
reflection of our increased enrollment. In the 2008-2009 school year, we have begun to
implement the LAUSD “Culture of Discipline” Student Expectations issued from the Office of
Student Health and Human Services which emphasizes preventative measures of intervention.

                                     School                                                        District
                                                  #           %                                                   #                %
  Year    # Suspensions   % Suspensions       Expulsions   Expulsions   # Suspensions   % Suspensions         Expulsions        Expulsions

 07-08         30              3%                 0          0.0%          51,712            8%                   72              0.1%

 06-07         63             6.5%                0          0.0%          60,962           8.4%                  512             0.1%

 05-06         89            11.1%                1          0.1%          72,868           9.8%                  500             0.1%

 04-05         77            13.4%                0          0.0%          79,690          10.5%                  674             0.1%


Suspensions and Reason for Suspensions
We work to inform and educate all incoming freshmen to bridge their transition into high school.
Our student-led Link Crew orientation program and our 9th grade parent orientations all address
the standards and expectations of our school. Still, most of our suspensions involve 9th graders,
with the most frequent cause of suspension being “willful defiance” and the second most
frequent being “physical confrontation or injury.” Overall, our suspension and expulsion rates
are lower than District averages.

 Event                                                                        2007-08    2006-07        2005-06         2004-05
 DAMAGED PROPERTY                                                                           1                 4            2
 DISRUPTION/WILLFUL DEFIANCE                                                    25         26             40               35
 DRUG PARAPHERNALIA                                                              1                                         2
 HAD CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE/INTOXICANT                                             7          2                 7            5
 HAD UNDER 1 OZ. MARIJUANA - 1ST OFFENSE                                         2          3                 3            5
 HARASSED/THREATENED/INTIMIDATED PUPIL                                           1          1                 1            2
 IMITATION FIREARM                                                               2
 KNIFE/EXPLOSIVE/DANGEROUS OBJECT                                                4          3                              2
 OBSCENITY/PROFANITY/VULGARITY                                                                                1
 RECEIVED STOLEN PROPERTY                                                                                                  1
 SERIOUS PHYSICAL INJURY/NON SELF-DEFENSE                                        1
 SEXUAL ASSAULT/BATTERY                                                                                       1
 SEXUAL HARRASSMENT                                                                         2                 1
 SOLD CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE                                                                  1
 STOLE/ATTEMPTED TO STEAL PROPERTY                                                                            1            5
 TERRORIST THREAT                                                                                                          1
 THREATENED/ATTEMPTED/CAUSED PHYSICAL INJURY                                     7         24             19               7


                                                                         2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 38
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


 TO PERSON

 TOBACCO                                                                            1                      4           1
 WILLFUL USE OF FORCE/VIOLENCE                                                     10                      8           10
 ALL SUSPENSION REASONS                                                            61       63            90           78

Crime Statistics
The primary cause of student disciplinary action has been for willful defiance, followed by
instances of student confrontation and physical conflict. These two reasons are followed by the
citation of students for possession and/or use of a controlled substance or alcohol. The
examination of this data, early on led to the implementation of our peer mediation program on
campus and the more recent purchase of a passive alcohol sensor.

 October 2005                                                                                       Truancy Rate
                  Number of students with an unexcused absence or tardy of more than 30
 CBEDS                                                                                               (Number of
                  minutes on 3 or more days (truants).
 Enrollment:                                                                                     Truants/Enrollment)

       968                                           33                                                3.41%
                                                                                          Number of         Number of
 Ed Codes         Ed Code Text
                                                                                          Expulsions       Suspensions
 48900(a)(1)       Related to physical injury to another person
 48900(a)(2)       Related to use of force or violence
 48900(b)          Related to firearms, knives, explosive devices, etc.
                   Related to possession or sale of controlled substances,
 48900(c)         alcohol, or intoxicants.
 48900(e)          Committed or attempted to commit robbery or extortion
                   Caused or attempted to cause damage to school property or
 48900(f)         private property
                   Stole or attempted to steal school property or private
 48900(g)         property
 48900(h)          Related to possession or use of tobacco products
                   Committed an obscene act or engaged in habitual profanity
  48900(i)        or vulgarity
  48900(j)         Related to possession or sale of drug paraphernalia
  48900(k)         Related to disruption of school activities or willfull defiance
  48900(m)         Possessed an imitation firearm
  48900(n)         Related to sexual assault
 48900.2           Related to sexual harassment
 48900.4           Related to harassment, threats, or intimidation
 48900.7           Related to terroristic threats

                                  Overall Total:                                                                 54
                              Violence/Drug Total:                                                               29
          Violence/Drug Rate (Violence/Drug Total / Enrollment):                                               3.00%
               Total of Persistently Dangerous Expulsions Only:
                   Number of Non-Student Firearm Incidents:
  Was school at risk of being designated"persistently dangerous" for 2003-04?                           No
  Was school at risk of being designated"persistently dangerous" for 2004-05?                           No
  Was school at risk of being designated"persistently dangerous" for 2005-06?                           No




                                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 39
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS

Free/Reduced Lunch Status
Students eligible for Free and Reduced Price Meals increased significantly last year because our
Title I Coordinator better understood the application process and encouraged more of our
students to apply. In addition, the District has updated the process to more effectively review the
applications. In December 2008, we again are at 57.6% qualifying for the Free/Reduced Lunch
Program. Our percentage has allowed us to qualify for school-wide Title I funds.


                  Year                        Free & Reduced Price Meals                  Unofficial Enrollment Used for Meals
              2008-2009                                  563 (57.6%)                                          977
                2007-08                                  547 (57.0%)                                          959
                2006-07                                  472 (49.6%)                                          951
                2005-06                                  459 (57.9%)                                          793
                2004-05                                  266 (50.0%)                                          532
*This "unofficial" enrollment count taken in October includes public and nonpublic school data.


Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) Status
Based on fall 2007 enrollment data, 10% of our students receive AFDC. The percentage of
students qualifying for AFDC has remained relatively constant for the past few years.

      Year                    2004-05                 2005-06                 2006-07                  2007-08             2008-09
      AFDC                   37 (6.2%)               70 (8.7%)              101 (10.4%)               99 (10.1%)           99 (10%)

Parent Education Level
Over the years, the percentage of parents with only a high school education has increased.
Perhaps this is evidence of a heightened awareness by parents who, though themselves have
lower education levels, desire to place their students in a school with close ties to CSUN. Of
adults over the age of 25 living in Northridge, 44% have college degrees. Our numbers are
reflective of the range of students who come from both Northridge and the less affluent areas of
Pacoima, Panorama City, and Arleta where the percentage of adults with college degrees is 9%.

                                                                                                                              Average
                                                                   Of Those with a Response:
                    Percentage                                                                                                 Parent
                      with a           Not a high          High school          Some              College       Graduate     Education
     Year           response*        school graduate        graduate           college            graduate       school       Level**
   2007-08             68%                 27%                 28%               17%               20%              8%         2.56
   2006-07             64%                 21%                 26%               19%               25%              9%         2.74
   2005-06             63%                 20%                 22%               23%               28%              7%         2.80
   2004-05             61%                 15%                 20%               24%               34%              8%         3.00
*This number is the percentage of student answer documents with stated parent education level information.
**The average of all responses where "1" represents "Not a high school graduate" and "5" represents "Graduate school."




                                                                                    2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 40
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


DESCRIPTION OF SAFETY CONDITIONS, CLEANLINESS, AND ADEQUACY OF
SCHOOL FACILITIES
Our school has an Integrated Safe School Plan in accordance with California Education Code
Section 32286(a). Our plan addresses violence prevention, emergency preparedness, traffic
safety, crisis intervention, and student wellness. We are also compliant with a variety of health
and safety requirements intended to ensure the health and safety of students and staff. Safety
personnel at our school include a school crisis team, a school safety officer, one campus aide, a
part-time nurse, and a part-time school psychologist. We have an Injury and Illness Prevention
Program (IIPP) that addresses workplace safety which we review and update regularly. Because
we are located on the CSUN campus, our emergency responses are coordinated by the LAUSD
School Police Department and the CSUN Police Department. Constructed in 2004, our campus
meets the requirements of handicapped access as required by the State of California.

The following table shows our scores from our 2007-08 Coordinated Safe and Healthy School
Plan Certification:

                                      Contents                                         Scores from Scorecards
Mandated Reporting/Notification                                                                 100%
Campus, Safety, Security, and Cleanliness; Traffic and Pedestrian Safety; and Crime              81%
Prevention
Violence Prevention and Intervention                                                             92%
School Discipline/Attendance                                                                     84%
                     Coordinated School Health
Nutrition Services Component                                                                     75%
Physical Education Component                                                                     80%
Health Education Component                                                                       79%
Health Services Component                                                                        75%
Counseling, Psychological, and Social Services Component                                         79%
Staff Wellness Component                                                                         55%
Parent/Community Involvement Component                                                           70%

STAFF

Number of Certificated/Classified, including number of qualified personnel for counseling
and other pupil support services and substitutes
Since the first two years of opening our school, our certificated and classified staff numbers have
finally stabilized at the current level. Moreover, we have added classified staff over the past two
years due to our increased need for special education assistants, a campus aide, an attendance
clerk, and additional custodial staff, along with an updated cafeteria requiring more staff.

                  Year                            Certificated                          Classified*
               2008-2009                              49                                    42
                2007-08                               49                                    40
                2006-07                               49                                    29
                2005-06                               40                                    20
                2004-05                               27                                    14
*Total numbers are full/part time combined.



                                                                   2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 41
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Classified Staff at NAHS in 2008-2009
Our classified staff has remained relatively constant. Some changes occurred as we increased
our student population from 2004-05 to 2006-2007. This semester our school cafeteria was
remodeled, and additional staff was hired to increase the number of students utilizing the
cafeteria and accommodate the slight increase in school staff. Our largest classified population
continues to be Special Education Assistants.

       Type of Classified Staff 2008-09                                         Number
Buildings and Grounds                                                             6.5
Cafeteria                                                                         10
Clerical                                                                           6
Security                                                                           2
Special Education Assistants                                                      12
Other (e.g., Family Center, campus aide                                            2

Percent of teachers who have met the Highly Qualified Teachers’ requirements of NCLB/
Number of National Board Certified Teachers
We have established protocols and practices that have allowed us to attract and hire quality
teachers. Our ranks of National Board Certified teachers continue to grow, with four teachers
currently in the process of applying for this recognition.

                                  # Of Teachers in           Highly Qualified                 National Board
            Year                   the Classroom                Teachers                     Certified Teachers
                                                                    40                                 5
        2008-2009                        42                      (95.2%)                           (11.9%)
                                         42                         40                                 4
        2007-2008                                                (95.2%)                            (9.5%)
                                                                    39                                 3
         2006-07                         43                      (90.7%)                           (6.98%)
                                                                    33                                 3
        2005-2006                        38                      (86.8%)                           (8.1%)
                                                                    19                                 3
        2004-2005                        24                      (79.2%)                          (12.5%)

NCLB Compliant Classes and Paraprofessionals
The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires all core academic teachers to be highly qualified.
Core academic subjects include classes in English, mathematics, social studies, and world
languages. The act mandates that these teachers hold a bachelor’s degree, have state certification,
and demonstrate subject matter competency in each core academic subject they teach. All NAHS
teachers are credentialed and only two need to secure CLAD certification.
     Year           NCLB Core Classes   NCLB Compliant    NCLB Percent          Para-                   %
                                           Classes       Compliant Classes   professionals       Para-professionals
                                                                                                    Compliant
  2008-2009               122                 117             95.9%               13                   N/A
  2007-2008               128                 128             100%                 9                   N/A
  2006-2007               134                 123             91.8%               14                   N/A
  2005-2006               112                  94             83.9%                8                   N/A
  2004-2005                73                  68             93.2%                7                   N/A




                                                                 2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 42
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Percent of teachers instructing outside credentialed areas
Our periods outside of subject area competence have often resulted from the offering of electives
to our students, e.g. a sports team, or an Academy-related elective. When our sports program
began in the 2006-2007 school year, we primarily used teachers as coaches. Recently, we have
utilized our PE teachers and a variety of “walk-on” coaches, reducing the number of
misassignments. The misassignment of teachers of English Learners is the result of the
California Education Code’s definition of an underprepared teacher as one who does not possess
a cross-cultural language acquisition development (CLAD) certificate, bilingual cross-cultural
language development (BCLAD) certificate, or their equivalents. Currently, NAHS has two
teachers who are considered underprepared, but only one is teaching EL students in sheltered
classes. Both teachers possess emergency CLAD credentials.

                                                              Periods of
                                Periods                   Misassignments of               Total Periods of
                        Teaching Outside Subject          Teachers of English                Teacher
          Year            Area of Competence                   Learners                   Misassignments
        2008-2009                   2                             5                               7
         2007-08                    2                             0                               2
         2006-07                    1                             11                             12
         2005-06                    6                             18                             24
        2004-2005                   0                             6                               6



Teachers with Credentials, University/District Interns, or Emergency Credentials
Presently, all of our teachers have credentials and are teaching in their credential content area.
When we opened in 2004, only half of our teachers were permanent. Since then, the majority of
our teachers have attained permanent status. Most of our teachers have remained, and we
continue to provide professional development to support quality teaching and learning.

 Year       Teachers     *Out of        University   Emergency   Permanent   Probationary    Probationary    Without
               In         Class-         Intern                                   1               2          CLAD
           Classroom      room
 2008-         42          7            0                0          38              0             4              2
  09                                  (0%)             (0%)      (90.5%)          (0%)         (9.5%)         (4.8%)
 2007-         42          7            0                0          27              5            10              2
  08                                  (0%)             (0%)      (64.3%)        (11.9%)       (23.8%)         (4.8%)
 2006-         43          6            3                0          24              8             8              4
  07                                  (7%)             (0%)      (55.8%)        (18.6%)       (18.6%)         (9.3%)
 2005-         38          5            2                0          18              9             9              5
  06                                 (5.3%)            (0%)      (47.4%)        (23.7%)       (23.7%)        (13.2%)
 2004-         24          4            0                1          12             10             1              5
  05                                  (0%)            (4.2%)      (50%)         (41.7%)        (4.2%)        (20.8%)
*Out of Classroom – Counselors & Administrators




                                                                  2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 43
  Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


  Number with advanced degrees/ Years of education within the district and total number of
  years in education
  Over 40% of our teachers have earned a master’s degree or higher. In addition, many of our
  teachers with B.A.’s are currently enrolled in master’s degree programs. Students regularly hear
  our teachers talk about their continuing education and the idea that learning is a life-long process.
                                                                                                                                           Avg.             Avg.
                             Master’s                        Bachelor’s                       Less than         Not           Total       Years of         Years in
Year       Doctorate           (+30)          Master’s          (+30)            Bachelor     Bachelor's     Responded        Staff       Service          District
2007-           1                11               8               17              12 (24.5
 08         (2.0 %)          (22.4 %)         (16.3 %)        (34.7 %)              %)         0 (0.0 %)      0 (0.0 %)        49              9              9
2006-           1                12               7               16              13 (26.5
 07         (2.0 %)          (24.5 %)         (14.3 %)        (32.7 %)              %)         0 (0.0 %)      0 (0.0 %)        49              9              9
2005-           1                 5            6 (15.0         15 (37.5           13 (32.5
 06         (2.5 %)          (12.5 %)            %)              %)                 %)         0 (0.0 %)      0 (0.0 %)        40           9.6              9.6
2004-                         4 (14.8          4 (14.8                            11 (40.7
 05        1 (3.7 %)            %)               %)              7 (25.9 %)         %)         0 (0.0 %)      0 (0.0 %)        27          11.3             11.3


  Specialized training/intern programs e.g., number in CLAD, BTSA or other teacher
  induction programs
  Being relatively new teachers, many of our faculty members have the CLAD certificate required
  to teach English Learners, having CLAD certification embedded in their credential programs or
  having attended workshops, classes, or taken tests to qualify for the CLAD certification. As a
  result, only two of our teachers still need the CLAD. In most cases, we have been able to
  provide BTSA support providers for our newer teachers. As our staff matures and completes the
  preliminary credential requirements, our staff will not require BTSA Support Providers. We
  have only hired three University Interns. Presently all of our teachers are credentialed.

                                                                                                                             University Intern Program
                  Year                                 Without CLAD                                 BTSA
                                                                                                                                           0
                 2008-09                                          2                                   4
                 2007-08                                          2                                   9                                    0

                 2006-07                                          4                                   10                                   3

                 2005-06                                          5                                   7                                    2

                2004-05                                 5                                    1                                    0
  *See #4 for numbers of teachers who are in intern programs. If teachers are in intern program or hold emergency credentials, they must enroll
  BTSA program.


  Gender
  We are cognizant of the fact that our staff is predominantly female. We make every effort to
  interview as many qualified male candidates as possible and have steadily increased the number
  of male certificated and classified personnel since first opening our school. We have seen an
  increase in the number of male student teachers who have been selected to student teach at our
  school and hope to provide more gender balance in the coming years.

                                              Certificated                                                      Classified
        Year           Female           Male         No Response              Total          Female            Male           No Response          Total
    2007-08             34               15                  0                 49             24                16                    0              40
    2006-07             33               16                  0                 49             21                 8                    0              29
    2005-06             28               12                  0                 40             13                 7                    0              20
    2004-05             18               8                   1                 27              8                 6                    0              14




                                                                                                   2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 44
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Ethnicity
Great attention is given to hiring staff members of diverse ethnic backgrounds. Because of this,
students respond positively to the variety of adult role models on our campus who mirror the
ethnic diversity of our student population.

                                                                Certificated Staff
                 American                                                                      African
              Indian/Alaskan                         Pacific                     Hispanic/    American/     White not      Multiple/No
   Year           Native            Asian           Islander       Filipino       Latino       Black        Hispanic        Response     Total
                                                                       2             12            6           25
 2007-08         0 (0.0%)          4 (8.2%)         0 (0.0%)       (4.1%)        (24.5%)      (12.2%)       (51.0%)         0 (0.0%)         49
                                                                       0             13            4           27
 2006-07         0 (0.0%)         5 (10.2%)         0 (0.0%)       (0.0%)        (26.5%)       (8.2%)       (55.1%)         0 (0.0%)         49
                                                                       0              9            3           24
 2005-06         0 (0.0%)         4 (10.0%)         0 (0.0%)       (0.0%)        (22.5%)       (7.5%)       (60.0%)         0 (0.0%)         40
                                                                       0              2            3           19
 2004-05         0 (0.0%)         3 (11.1%)         0 (0.0%)       (0.0%)         (7.4%)      (11.1%)       (70.4%)         0 (0.0%)         27



                                                                 Classified Staff *
                        American                                                                 African
                     Indian/Alaskan                   Pacific                     Hispanic/     American/      White not       Multiple/No
      Year               Native             Asian    Islander      Filipino        Latino        Black         Hispanic         Response          Total
   2007-08                  0                 8          0            0              20             5              7                0              40
   2006-07                  0                 6          0            0              16             2              5                0              29
   2005-06                  0                 4          0            0              11             1              4                0              20
   2004-05                  0                 0          0            0              11             2              1                0              14
*Total numbers are full/part time combined.


Attendance Rates of Teachers
The absence rate of our dedicated teachers is below District allowances and averages. The higher
rate in 2004-2005 was due to a teacher being on a workmen’s comp leave for an extended time.
In January 2009 the LAUSD Report Card was issued. Per our most recent District report card,
the faculty and staff attendance rate was 92% for the 2007-2008 year.

                                                                     Certificated              Classified
                                         2005-06                          7.0                      6.5
                                         2004-05                          17.1                     8.1




                                                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 45
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


CONTENT OF STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND NUMBERS PARTICIPATING
Staff development at Northridge Academy High School is a combination of District-initiated,
school-initiated, and teacher-initiated topics. All credentialed staff members are required to
attend professional development. The District mandates 14 professional development days on
Tuesdays for 90 minutes each. In 2008-2009, for the first time, NAHS applied and was
approved for a waiver to combine the total time from the 14 mandated District professional
development days and a portion of the District provided 10 minimum days to provide 30
professional development Tuesdays for 60 minutes each. Utilizing our time effectively, it was
hoped that we would more consistently be able to improve our academic achievement by
meeting more frequently by whole staff, by department, by academy, by advisory, and by grade
level. NAHS has a Professional Development Committee comprised of an administrator,
Academy Facilitators, Literacy Coach, WASC Focus Group Leaders, UTLA Chapter Chair or
representative, Advisory Facilitator, Counselor, and other interested staff. The Committee
makes recommendations to the School Leadership Council (SLC), who approves all professional
development. Other professional development opportunities have included Pearson’s Learning
Team Achievement Solutions, Advanced Placement conferences, College-Going College Culture
trainings, etc. Many of our faculty meetings have included both operational/UTLA and
professional development topics. Due to union action in 2007-08 and 2008-09, many of our
faculty and other after-school unpaid meetings were cancelled.

Professional Development 2006-07
           Date                                             Topics
September 12, 2006        Faculty Meeting – Technology, Williams Decree, Stull Evaluations,
                          Sp. Ed., Discipline Plan, STAR Reports, Advisory Portfolios
September 19, 2006        Data discussion: Utilizing data to address student needs and
                          achievement gaps, break out groups by Academy Teams
September 26, 2006        Data discussion: – By academies and cored teams discuss how we
                          will utilize this data to continue to address student needs and
                          achievement gaps, Examine the at-risk” lists and compare with the
                          STAR data.
October 10, 2006          Faculty Meeting – Data discussion: Review CST data by department
                          using observations to discuss some key skills that your students, in
                          general, are missing and/or struggled with last year, Discuss
                          departmental practices that need to be developed, strengthened, or
                          even changed to ensure All students are successful.
October 17, 2006          Data and intervention discussion: Review test data and plan
                          intervention
October 24, 2006          Department Meetings – Action plan based on data discussion
November 14, 2006         Student-led conferencing for Parent Conference Night, Continue on
                          systemic, instructional strategies that positively impact student
                          achievement, Next steps
November 21, 2006         Faculty Meeting – Review of Data, Student Portfolios
November 28, 2006         Utilizing the data inquiry process – English Language Arts Data
                          “Fishbowl” discussion, What can we do as departments and
                          academies to facilitate, support, and enhance learning higher-level
                          skills on a consistent, systematic basis?


                                                      2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 46
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


December 5, 2006               Faculty Meeting – Academy Design Teams
December 12, 2006              Share best practices: seniors successes and next steps, Discuss how
                               to effectively integrate Academy themes into Advisory, teaching and
                               learning in core academic and elective. How will we utilize and
                               integrate effectively input from our CSUN colleagues.
January 16, 2007               Faculty Meeting
February 6, 2007               Faculty Meeting – Lesson Study, AP Audit, Mentoring, Portfolios,
                               Advisories, CAHSEE Exam/Prep, Anti-Bullying, and Anti-
                               Harassment, and Senior Awards
February 13, 2007              Portfolios – Reflection, ESLR’s/LCP’s, Clear Expectations,
                               Academic Rigor, Accountable talk. What skills need to be
                               mastered?
February 27, 2007              Advisory Presentation, Grade-level specific discussions, Who are
                               the seniors (Class of 2007) in your classes – teacher responsibilities/
                               student responsibilities, Reflections on Portfolio on the Wall and its
                               alignment with curriculum/academies
March 6, 2007                  Personalizing what we do to build resiliency and encourage
                               academic achievement
March 27, 2007                 Small Learning Community Grant Proposal –successes, needs,
                               planning for next year.
April 10, 2007                 CST Preparation by Departments – Core Content and Others
April 17, 2007                 Faculty Meeting – Career Day, CST’s, AP Audits, Achievement
                               Solutions, Senior Fails
April 24, 2007                 By Department chart key concepts, skill sets, projects, and topics
                               that are used for each content area, Review Portfolio on the Wall
                               (POW) and ESLR’s, Identify and points of alignment with
                               interdisciplinary possibilities.
May 8, 2007                    Faculty Meeting – CST’s, Attendance, Senior Fails/U’s
June 5, 2007                   Framing the Work for Next Year: Read and discuss – “Teaching as
                               Jazz”, Academy planning
June 12, 2007                  Faculty Meeting – Closing procedures and graduation




                                                          2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 47
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Professional Development 2007-08
            Date                                                       Topics
September 4, 2007                  Faculty Meeting –School operations and procedures for 2007-08
September 11, 2007                 Faculty Meeting – Attendance Issues, Student Orientation Meetings,
                                   Advisory, Achievement Solutions, CAHSEE Review Classes, Master
                                   Calendar
September 18, 2007                 Data discussion by department: “What?”, “So What?’, “Now what?” for
                                   AYP data, CST results by school-wide and classroom
September 25, 2007                 Academy reflection and discussion: data review and planning, Looking at
                                   ineligibility lists and determining supports needed
October 16, 2007                   Data discussion: Identifying “teaching and learning” student outcomes
                                   based on data for each content area
October 23, 2007                   NAHS Vision for Academies: Academy Team discussions on student-
                                   based academy needs (Advisory student survey comments), priorities, and
                                   evidence/benchmarks
November 13, 2007                  Data discussion: Use of formal and informal data to address expect student
                                   outcomes, Data needed for addressing EL student needs
November 20, 2007                  Faculty Meeting
November 27, 2007                  Career Pathways linkage to Academy work of students
December 4, 2007                   Faculty Meeting
December 11, 2007                  “Closing the Achievement Gap: Culturally Relevant and Responsive
                                   Teaching”: Overview, 5 tenets, action plan, sample data for EL students,
                                   discussion by department, “How do we integrate concepts of culturally
                                   relevant and responsive teaching into our learning community efforts?”
February 12, 2008                  “Finding your Voice” as our school-wide theme and connections with
                                   CSUN
February 26, 2008                  Meetings by Department
March 4, 2008                      Integration of instruction/standards/assessments with Academy work
March 25, 2008                     Student academic outcomes based on priority student needs (by content
                                   area), Plan strategies to prepare students for CST’s
April 3, 2008                      Voluntary Informational Meeting: Review and update of Academies/Small
                                   Learning Communities (SLC) initiative
April 8, 2008                      “Finding Your Voice”: Big idea and thematic curriculum development
April 15, 2008                     Faculty Meeting: NAHS/CSUN Retreat, CST preparation, WASC
                                   overview, Attendance
April 22, 2008                     Meetings by department to review periodic assessments and student work
April 26-27, 2008                  NAHS / CSUN “Planning for Success” Retreat
April 29, 2008                     Faculty Meeting: CST preparation, Senior portfolio update
May 13,2008                        Faculty Meeting: 18-week senior fails, CST’s, WASC, 9th grade Academy
                                   packets
June 3, 2008                       ESLR connections to Academies and retreat work, Academy planning
                                   proposals/next steps
June 10, 2008                      WASC focus groups and expectations
Note: Faculty Meetings, as well as other unpaid meetings there were not for governance such as School Site Council
and School Leadership Council, were cancelled due to Teacher Union action as of January 15, 2008.




                                                                  2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 48
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Professional Development 2008-09
            Date                                         Topics
September 9, 2008         WASC Overview/Mission & Motto Discussion
                          Faculty Meeting: Focus Groups and Academies
September 16, 2008        WASC Focus Groups
September 23, 2008        WASC Focus Groups
October 7, 2008           WASC Focus Groups
                          Faculty Meeting: Departments and Curriculum Focus Group
October 14, 2008          WASC Focus Groups
October 21, 2008          WASC Focus Groups
                          Faculty Meeting: Academies and Instruction Focus Group
October 28, 2008          WASC Focus Groups
November 4, 2008          WASC Focus Groups
                          Faculty Meeting: Grade Level Groups and Assessment and
                                            Accountability Focus Group
November 18, 2008         WASC Focus Groups
                          Period by Period Faculty: Special Education – IEP’s,
                          Accommodations, Special Ed Assistants, etc.
December 2, 2008          WASC Focus Groups
December 9, 2008          WASC Focus Groups
December 16, 2008         WASC Focus Groups
January 13, 2009          The WASC Action Plan – by Department
January 20, 2009          The WASC Action Plan – by Academy
January 27, 2009          The WASC Action Plan – Intervention – Entire Staff
February 10, 2009         Grade Level Advisories – Advisory Curriculum
February 17, 2009         Departments – Department Planning
February 24, 2009         Academies – Academy Planning
March 3, 2009             Preparing for the WASC Visit – Entire Faculty
March 10, 2009            Grade Level Advisories – Preparing for WASC and Advisory
                          Curriculum
March 17, 2009            Departments – Department Matters and Preparing for WASC
March 24, 2009            Academies – Academy Matters and Preparing for WASC
March 28, 2009            NAHS-CSUN “Partners for Achievement” Planning Workshop
March 31, 2009            Renewing the Common Planning Time Schedule for 2009-2010 and
                          WASC Reminders
April 14, 2009            Departments – Preparing for the WASC Visit
April 21, 2009            WASC Visit with Focus Groups
April 28, 2009            Reflections on the WASC Process – Entire Faculty
May 5, 2009               Departments – Department Matters
May 12, 2009              CST’s and Academies – Academy Matters
May 26, 2009              Grade Level Advisories – Advisory Curriculum
June 2, 2009              2008-2009 School Year in Review – Entire Faculty
Note: Faculty Meetings, as well as other unpaid meetings there were not for governance such as School Site Council
and School Leadership Council, were cancelled due to Teacher Union action as of November 4, 2008. Only Period
by Period Faculty Meetings are allowed.




                                                                  2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 49
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


STUDENT PARTICIPATION IN CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES AND EXTRA
ACTIVITIES
Since we opened in 2004, students have continued to initiate clubs by finding a sponsor and at
least twenty other students showing an interest. As a result, we have a rich variety of clubs and
activities that support student interests. We also have clubs that support our academies, grade
level classes, and sports teams. In addition to our Leadership class, we have student leaders who
meet regularly as Link Crew and Peer Mediators (HEART). Peer counselors are also trained to
work with our students. Most clubs meet during lunch on a regular basis, while Leadership
meets during “0” period. Link Crew often meets before school or during Advisory, and HEART
meets a few times a month during a period for follow-up training.

          CLUB/ACTIVITY NAME                     SPONSOR(S)           ROOM        DAY         # OF
                                                                                            STUDENTS
Academic Decathlon                            Ms. Gordon               217       Per. 6         15
Arts, Media & Communication (AMC) Academy     Ms. Culp                 221        Th           10+
Club
Anime Commission                              Mr. Speer                421      T/W/Th           20
Asian Club                                    Ms. Williams             321        Fri            15
Baseball Club                                 Mr. Gillett              209       Wed             16
Black Student Union (BSU)                     Ms. Shufelt              313        Fri            18
California Scholarship Federation (CSF)       Ms. Gordon /             217        Th             25
                                              Dr. Scott
Careers in Education (CE) Academy Club        Ms. Helfing              226       Mon             10
Cheerleading                                  Ms. Nuguid              Fitness   Varied           20
                                                                      Center    M/W/Th
Class of 2009                                 Ms. Rodriguez / Ms.      218       Wed            10+
                                              Figueroa
Class of 2010                                 Dr. Scott / Mr. Arias    420        Wed            28
Class of 2011                                 Ms. Shufelt              313        Wed            20
Class of 2012                                 Ms. Burk /               229        Wed            12
                                              Mr. Gross
College Peer Counselors                       Ms. Weinper              138       Per 1-6         12
Creative Artists, Animators, and Designers    Ms. Shufelt              313        Mon            9
(CAD)
Dance Club                                    Ms. Cantwell             425         Th
Drama Club                                    Ms. Eller /              309        Tues           30
                                              Ms. Gordon
Environmental Awareness Club                  Dr. Scott                420        Tues           12
Game Club                                     Ms. Burkhart             318         Fri            5
Gay Straight Alliance (GSA) Club              Ms. Mortensen            322         Fri           12
Halo Halo Club                                Ms. Nuguid /             319         Fri           50
                                              Ms. Knell
Health & Human Development (HHD) Academy      Ms. Mitchell             227        Mon            20
Club
Human Efforts Aimed at Relating Together      Ms. Ortega /            Varied      Tues           26
(HEART)                                       Ms. Nuguid                         Per 1-6
Hiking Club                                   Ms. Galvez               423        Wed            10
Improv Club                                   Mr. Wegner               216        Wed            13
Journalism                                    Ms. Culp                 221        Per 5           6
Leadership                                    Mr. Haywood              427        Daily          43
Link Crew                                     Ms. Ortega /            Varied      Per 0          65
                                              Ms. Nuguid                          Adv



                                                              2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 50
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


MADDEN Club                                    Mr. Thomas                 215           Tues        31
Mathletes Club                                 Ms. Burkhart               318           Mon          5
Mr. Gross’ Lunch Club                          Mr. Gross                  219           M-F          8
Muslim Student Association                     Ms. Nelson                 223           Mon         15
Paw Print Club                                 Ms. Culp                   221            Th         36
Peer Counselors                                Counselors                 CO           Per 1-6       7
Robotics Club                                  Dr. Scott                  420            Fri        10
Running Club                                   Ms. Burk                   229           Tues        38
Sabor Latino Club                              Ms. Rodriguez /            218           Tues        12
                                               Ms. Figueroa
Soccer Club                                    Ms. Simmers                225 /         Wed         30
                                                                          Gym
Students Run for LA (SRLA) Club                Ms. Knell                   319          Mon        25+
Teen Nutrition Team (TNT) Club                 Ms. Burk                    225           Fri       15+
Telecommunications (Puma News)                 Mr. Thomas                  215          Per 5       33
Video Game Mania Club                          Mr. Atmore                  327           Fri        18
Xample Christian Club                          Mr. Atmore                  327          Wed         12
Yearbook                                       Ms. Culp                    221          Per 5       29

Athletic Teams and Participation
When we opened in September 2004, we did not have a gym, and therefore, were unable to
support Athletic Teams in our first year. Initially, we were told that our athletic teams could
utilize the CSUN campus, but in October 2005, we were informed that we could only use the
CSUN campus for PE classes, not athletics. Initially our teams were coached by school staff, but
presently, most of our coaches are walk-on coaches which results in most of our teams practicing
after school.

During the 2008-2009 year, we have, or will have, the following sports teams: Boy’s:
Frosh/Soph Basketball, JV/Varsity Basketball, JV/Varsity Soccer, JV/Varsity Volleyball,
JV/Varsity Baseball, Varsity Cross Country, and Varsity Golf, and Girl’s: JV/Varsity Basketball,
JV/Varsity Soccer, JV/Varsity Volleyball, JV/Varsity Softball, Varsity Cross Country, and
Varsity Golf. Practices that take place within our gym are usually scheduled at 3:30-5:30 p.m.
and 5:30-7:30 p.m. The remaining teams have to find transportation to a local park or other
school site to conduct practices since our campus does not have the necessary athletic facilities.

Athletic Teams and Participation 2005-2009
      Year                        # of Teams                                      Participation
                       Male         Female       Total            Male               Female        Total
    2005-2006           9              8          17              154                  116         270
    2006-2007           7              7          14               78                  78          156
    2007-2008           9              5          14              123                  76          199




                                                                 2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 51
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Athletic City and League Championships 2006-2008
              Year                       League Championships                City Championships
              2006                 Boys Basketball                    Girls Cross Country
                                   Girls Cross Country
                                   Girls Volleyball
              2007                 Boys Basketball                    Girls Cross Country
                                   Girls Cross Country                Boys Volleyball
                                   Girls Volleyball
              2008                 Boys Soccer                        Boys Cross Country
                                   Girls Soccer                       Girls Cross Country
                                   Boys Volleyball                    Boys Volleyball
                                   Girls Volleyball

Athletic Teams and Participation 2007-08
   Male Sports Teams          # Participating          Female Sports Teams           # Participating
     FALL SPORTS                                           FALL SPORTS
Frosh Basketball                     9               Varsity Cross Country                  17
Soph Basketball                     11               Varsity Volleyball                     8
Varsity Cross Country               17


  WINTER SPORTS                                         WINTER SPORTS
Varsity Basketball                  10               JV Basketball                          13
Varsity Soccer                      28               Varsity Soccer                         18


   SPRING SPORTS                                         SPRING SPORTS
Varsity Baseball                    17               Varsity Softball                       20
Varsity Golf                        3
JV Volleyball                       8
Varsity Volleyball                  20




                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 52
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


DISTRICT POLICIES/SCHOOL FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Expenditures Per Pupil
Per pupil expenditure is determined by the Average Daily Attendance (ADA) as calculated by
the State. Based on the most current data available in 2006-2007, the District allocated $6,912
per pupil at Northridge Academy High School.

                                         Expenditures per Pupil


                 Total                     Restricted Source                   Unrestricted Source
               **$6,912                         $2,218                               $4,694
                *$7,553                         $2,745                               $4,808
         * Fiscal Year 2005-06
        ** Fiscal Year 2006-2007


Funding Sources
Northridge Academy High School’s facilities, employees, programs, and services are funded by
several sources: general funds, categorical funds, and a grant. Currently, CSUN has provided
one period of Math taught by a CSUN Education Professor through a CSUN grant. This year,
for the first time, we received a $10,000 School Beautification Grant in order to provide
resources for murals on our outside walls.

SOURCE OF FUNDING 2008-2009                                        GENERAL (G) /               AMOUNT
                                                                   CATEGORICAL
                                                                   (C)/ GRANT (G)
AB825 10th Grade Counseling                                               C                          $5,004
Bilingual (Title III = $1,320)                                            C                         $41,945
CAHSEE Intensive Instruction (11th-12th Grade)                            C                        $13,500
Closing the Achievement Gap                                               G                         $12,808
Discretionary Resources                                                   C                          $5,610
Donations                                                                 G                          $3,426
Extended Learning Program - ELP (10th Grade CAHSEE Review)                G                          $3,979
Gifted Program                                                            C                          $6,244
Instructional Materials Account (IMA)                                     G                        $28,888
Microsoft Settlement Funds                                                G                      $21,790.60
Modified Consent Decree (Special Ed)                                      C                         $10,988
PHBAO (Predominantly Hispanic/Black/Asian/Other) Class Size               C                       $298,440
Reductions
Physical Education Grant                                                   G                           $3,884
School and Library Improvement (SLIP) Block Grant                          C                          $18,499
School Determined Needs – General Program                                  G                          $19,993
Special Day Class IMA                                                      C                             $850
Title I                                                                    C                         $172,579
Visual/Performing Arts Grant                                               G                           $6,384
TOTAL                                                                                                $653,021




                                                               2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 53
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                                STUDENT PERFORMANCE DATA

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE INDEX

Past API Performance
During the first two years, we were in transition in terms of student growth and population.
Because of our high student participation rate in all formal assessments used to calculate API and
in our extremely low dropout rate, we were forewarned that we would see a “J-curve” with
scores dropping for a couple of years, and then, hopefully climbing again as we made
adjustments to our curriculum and instruction to address the retention of at-risk students who
typically drop out in the 10th and 11th grades at other urban high schools. The increase in our
2007-08 numbers indicates our success in reaching greater stability resulting in increased student
achievement.

 2004-05
                                        API                           Met 2004-05 Growth API Target
                                          2004-05                               Comparable         Both
     Number of        2005       2004     Growth     2004-05    Met Growth     Improvement      Schoolwide
      Students       Growth      Base      Target    Growth       Target           (CI)           and CI
        511            742        B*          B*       B*
  "B"means the school did not have a valid 2004 API Base and will not have any Growth or target information.


    2005-06
                                        API                           Met 2005-06 Growth API Target
                                          2005-06                               Comparable         Both
     Number of        2006       2005     Growth     2005-06    Met Growth     Improvement      Schoolwide
      Students       Growth      Base      Target    Growth       Target           (CI)           and CI
        761            705        742         3        -37           No             No              No

    2006-07
                                        API                           Met 2006-07 Growth API Target
                                          2006-07                               Comparable         Both
     Number of        2007       2006     Growth     2006-07                   Improvement      Schoolwide
      Students       Growth      Base      Target    Growth     Schoolwide         (CI)           and CI
        767            680        692         5        -12           No             No              No

Current API Growth Report 2007-08

                                        API                           Met 2006-07 Growth API Target
                                          2007-08                               Comparable         Both
     Number of        2008       2007     Growth     2007-08                   Improvement      Schoolwide
      Students       Growth      Base      Target    Growth     Schoolwide         (CI)           and CI
        700            711        680         6         31          Yes             Yes             Yes




                                                                 2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 54
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Comparisons with District and State
Though our API dropped from 2006 to 2007, we more than doubled the State in our 2007-2008
gains and outperformed LAUSD (see “LEA” bars, or “Local Educational Agency”) as well
during this same time period.




Current API Growth Report, Subgroups 2007-08:
In 2007-2008, we have exceeded growth targets in the three subgroups of Hispanic or Latino,
White (not of Hispanic origin), and Socioeconomically Disadvantaged. Other subgroups such
as African American, Asian, English Learners, and Students with Disabilities are too small to be
numerically significant for API. We failed to reach growth targets with three of these subgroups
during the preceding year: 2006-2007.
                                   Numerically                Subgroup API                     Met
                        Number     Significant                       2007-08                 Subgroup
                           of        in Both      2008      2007      Growth      2006-07     Growth
 Subgroups              Students      Years      Growth     Base      Target      Growth      Target
 African American          45          No
 American Indian or
 Alaska Native             1           No
 Asian                     37          No
 Filipino                  52          No
 Hispanic or Latino       425         Yes            688    647          8          41         Yes
  Pacific Islander         2           No
  White (not of
 Hispanic origin)         136         Yes            746    719          5          27         Yes
 Socioeconomically
 Disadvantaged            456         Yes            690    658          7          32         Yes
  English Learners
 (includes RFEP’s)        273          No
  Students with
 Disabilities              98          No                   520




                                                           2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 55
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


API Growth Report, Subgroups 2006-07
                                     Numerically                  Subgroup API                     Met
                          Number     Significant                         2006-07                 Subgroup
                             of        in Both        2007      2006      Growth      2006-07     Growth
 Subgroups                Students      Years        Growth     Base      Target      Growth      Target
 African American           50           No
 American Indian or
 Alaska Native               3           No
 Asian                      40           No
 Filipino                   64           No
 Hispanic or Latino         433         Yes           647       652          7           -5         No
 Pacific Islander            3           No
 White (not of Hispanic
 origin)                    173         Yes           719       718          5           1          No
 Socioeconomically
 Disadvantaged              424         Yes           658       653          7           5          No
 English Learners           297          No                     605
 Students with
 Disabilities               114         Yes           518       499          15          19         Yes



API SCORES AND GROWTH AT NAHS 2005/2006
The following six tables graphically demonstrate our growth process as a school. We had a
significant drop in API scores from 2005-2006. Possible factors contributing to this drop might
include staffing changes, demographic changes, and the rigors of opening a new school within a
large school district. It is possible that a “J-curve” growth pattern exists for new schools as
stakeholders encounter frustrations and unexpected challenges but learn from them and show
subsequent gains. Our 2006-2007 scores show how we had begun to close the gap between our
scores and those of both the District and the State. The 2007-2008 scores show that we had a 31-
point gain in our API scores, meeting all subgroup growth targets and significantly exceeding
our API growth target of 6 points.




                                                              2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 56
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


API SCORES AND GROWTH AT NAHS 2006/2007




API SCORES AND GROWTH NAHS 2007/2008




School Ranking
The statewide school ranking compares our school to similar schools in the entire state. The
ranking is determined by ten categories called deciles. Schools can receive a ranking of 1-10, a
“10” indicating that a school’s API fell within the top 10% of all schools in the state. Since
2004-05, our ranking has dropped by four deciles. In addition to statewide ranks, schools are
ranked compared to 100 other schools with similar demographic characteristics. Based on our
2007-2008 API, our current similar schools ranking is a 4.

                                                     Statewide         Similar
                                   Year                Rank         Schools Rank
                                 2007-08                4                  4
                                 2006-07                5                  7
                                 2005-06                8                  9
                                 2004-05                *                  *
                 *No Data Available.




                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 57
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


CALIFORNIA STANDARDS TESTS
The percentage of NAHS students who are not meeting standards is significant. Except in
English 11 and Chemistry, the percentage of students meeting standards in 2007-2008 increased
compared to 2006-2007. In English, our percentages of students meeting standards in the 9th and
11th grades are slightly better than State averages, but our numbers fall behind the State in the
10th grade. We lag behind the State in all math subjects with the exception of Algebra 2. In
World History and US History, the percentages of students who are not proficient exceed the
State. While more of our students demonstrate proficiency in Life Science, Biology, and Earth
Science, we fall behind the State in Chemistry and Integrated Science 1.

CST 2007-08, Northridge Academy SH
                               # Students                                  % Below     % Far       % Not Meeting
Exam                             Tested         % Adv    % Pro   % Basic    Basic    Below Basic     Standards
ELA (GR 9)                          252         19%      33%      35%        11%        2%             48%
ELA (GR 10)                         221         15%      23%      41%        14%        7%             62%
ELA (GR 11)                         232         12%      27%      32%        20%        9%             61%
GEN. MATH                           36          0%       3%       22%        67%        8%             97%
ALGEBRA 1                           228         1%       9%       29%        45%        16%            90%
GEOMETRY                            246         2%       7%       23%        46%        22%            91%
ALGEBRA 2                           122         1%       21%      27%        28%        23%            78%
HS MATH                             51          4%       27%      35%        31%        2%             68%
WORLD HISTORY                       225         4%       22%      34%        17%        23%            74%
US HISTORY                          229         5%       22%      36%        19%        17%            72%
LIFE SCIENCE                        220         22%      22%      37%        13%        5%             55%
BIOLOGY                             295         17%      28%      38%        10%        7%             55%
CHEMISTRY                           139         2%       7%       46%        24%        20%            90%
EARTH SCIENCE                       51          14%      29%      39%        10%        8%             57%
INT. SCIENCE 1                      181         0%       8%       51%        27%        14%            92%

CST 2007-08, State of California
                                   # Students                     %        % Below     % Far       % Not Meeting
Exam                                 Tested      % Adv   % Pro   Basic      Basic    Below Basic     Standards
ELA (GR 9)                         506,746       23%      26%    27%        17%          8%            52%
ELA (GR 10)                        478,575       19%      22%    28%        18%         13%            59%
ELA (GR 11)                        446,153       16%      21%    26%        19%         18%            63%
GEN. MATH                          78,158        2%       16%    27%        34%         21%            82%
ALGEBRA 1                          474,083       1%       12%    26%        41%         19%            86%
GEOMETRY                           365,924       1%       10%    24%        43%         21%            88%
ALGEBRA 2                          238,843       1%        7%    23%        46%         23%            92%
HS MATH                            116,040       16%      31%    27%        21%          5%            53%
INT MATH 1                          8814         1%        8%    23%        45%         23%            91%
INT MATH 2                          4,231        1%        8%    23%        45%         23%            91%
WORLD HISTORY                      496,099       13%      20%    26%        15%         26%            67%
US HISTORY                         434,460       16%      22%    26%        17%         19%            62%
LIFE SCIENCE                       465,406       18%      22%    27%        17%         16%            60%
BIOLOGY                            525,053       16%      26%    33%        13%         13%            59%
CHEMISTRY                          232,439       12%      20%    38%        13%         17%            68%
EARTH SCIENCE                      224,532       8%       21%    37%        16%         18%            71%
INT. SCIENCE 1                     75,998        2%        9%    37%        22%         30%            89%


                                                                  2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 58
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




CST 2006-07, Northridge Academy SH
                          # Students    %                      % Below    % Far Below    % Not Meeting
Exam                        Tested     Adv   % Pro   % Basic    Basic        Basic         Standards
ELA (GR 9)                  250        16%   29%      32%        19%          4%             55%
ELA (GR 10)                 291        10%   24%      35%        20%         11%             66%
ELA (GR 11)                 226        16%   24%      33%        19%          8%             60%
GEN. MATH                   46          0%    0%      43%        46%         11%            100%
ALGEBRA I                   273         0%    8%      27%        49%         15%             91%
GEOMETRY                    241         1%    8%      21%        43%         27%             91%
ALGEBRA II                  143         3%    8%      30%        38%         20%             88%
HS MATH                     40          3%   18%      33%        43%          5%             81%
WORLD HISTORY               297         3%   12%      36%        22%         27%             85%
US HISTORY                  222         5%   22%      32%        26%         16%             74%
LIFE SCIENCE                290         9%   24%      32%        19%         16%             67%
BIOLOGY                     300        10%   23%      42%        18%          7%             67%
CHEMISTRY                   184         0%   12%      49%        21%         18%             88%
EARTH SCIENCE               40         10%   15%      50%        18%          8%             76%

 CST 2006-07, State
                                                                                            % Not
                          # Students    %                      % Below     % Far Below      Meeting
 Exam                      Counted     Adv   % Pro   % Basic    Basic         Basic        Standards
 ELA (GR 9)               506,050      22%   25%      26%        17%          9%             52%
 ELA (GR 10)              479,826      16%   21%      29%        20%          14%            63%
 ELA (GR 11)              438,530      17%   20%      24%        18%          21%            63%
 GEN. MATH                87,160        1%   12%      32%        33%          22%            86%
 ALGEBRA I                481,556       1%   12%      26%        40%          21%            87%
 GEOMETRY                 370,307       7%   17%      25%        35%          15%            89%
 ALGEBRA II               230,965       7%   20%      28%        28%          18%            73%
 HS MATH                  108,808      17%   30%      24%        23%          6%             53%
 INT MATH II               7,023        1%    8%      21%        41%          29%            91%
 INT MATH II               3,632        5%   16%      29%        35%          15%            79%
 WORLD HISTORY            503,928      11%   18%      29%        19%          24%            72%
 US HISTORY               429,174      13%   22%      28%        21%          16%            65%
 LIFE SCIENCE             466,335      13%   22%      28%        19%          18%            65%
 BIOLOGY                  506,771      13%   24%      35%        16%          12%            63%
 CHEMISTRY                227,746      10%   21%      41%        14%          14%            69%
 EARTH SCIENCE            206,996       6%   20%      38%        19%          17%            74%




                                                               2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 59
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


California Standards Test: English Language Arts

Our proficiency results on the CST require that data be examined from two distinct perspectives:
1. Examining the progress of single groups of students – e.g. 2004/2005 9th grade through to 12th
grade in 2007/2008.
 9th grade 2004/05>11th grade 2006/07 increase in number meeting proficiency of 2%
 9th grade 2005/06>11th grade 2007/08 increase in number meeting proficiency of 1%
 9th grade 2006/07>10th grade 2007/08 increase in number meeting proficiency of 7%

2. Examining the progress of the school in meeting proficiency as defined by the state over the
time period from 2004/2005 -2008/2009.
 9th grade decrease in number meeting proficiency of 10% over 4 years.
 10th grade decrease in number meeting proficiency of 10% over 4 years.
 11th grade decrease in number meeting proficiency of 15% over 3 years.

In comparing both examinations, it appears that although the ability of our students to meet
proficiency standards increases as they progress from grade to grade, their ability to demonstrate
proficiency is steadily decreasing as state benchmarks are raised.

        CST 2003-08, ELA, Northridge Academy SH
                                # Students    %                        % Below      % Far      % Not Mtg
      EXAM             YR        Counted     Adv     % Pro   % Basic    Basic    Below Basic   Standards

                     2004-05       342       17%     24%      33%       19%          6%          58%

                     2005-06       357       13%     28%      32%       17%         10%          59%
    ELA (GR 9)
                     2006-07       250       16%     29%      32%       19%          4%          55%

                     2007-08       252       19%     33%      35%       11%          2%          48%

                     2004-05       170       11%     38%      37%       10%          5%          52%

                     2005-06       271       13%     23%      34%       15%         16%          64%
    ELA (GR 10)
                     2006-07       290       10%     24%      35%       20%         11%          66%

                     2007-08       221       15%     23%      41%       15%          7%          62%

                     2004-05

                     2005-06       135       19%     34%      27%       15%          4%          47%
    ELA (GR 11)
                     2006-07       226       16%     24%      33%       19%          8%          60%

                     2007-08       231       12%     27%      33%       20%          9%          62%




                                                                2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 60
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


The bar graphs below will show that while significant numbers of students fall below proficiency
levels, many of those students are achieving at “Basic” levels and can reach proficiency with
appropriate support and intervention
                     100%
                                                                      17%                13%             16%              19%

                         80%
                                                                                         28%
                                                                      24%                                29%
                                                                                                                          33%
                         60%


                                                                      33%                32%
                         40%                                                                             32%
                                                                                                                          35%

                         20%                                                             17%
                                                                      19%                                19%
                                                                                         10%                              11%
                                                                      6%                                 4%               2%
                          0%
                                 2002-03          2003-04            2004-05        2005-06            2006-07           2007-08

                                                                            ELA (GR 9)

                                              % Far Below Basic       % Below Basic        % Basic     % Pro     % Adv




                         100%
                                                                      11%                13%            10%               15%

                         80%                                                                            24%
                                                                                      23%                                 23%
                                                                      38%

                         60%

                                                                                      34%               35%

                         40%                                                                                              41%
                                                                      37%

                                                                                      15%               20%
                         20%
                                                                                                                          15%
                                                                      10%
                                                                                      16%               11%
                                                                      5%                                                  7%
                          0%
                                  2002-03         2003-04            2004-05        2005-06            2006-07           2007-08

                                                                           ELA (GR 10)

                                              % Far Below Basic       % Below Basic        % Basic     % Pro     % Adv




                  100%
                                                                                                                 12%
                                                            19%                     16%


                  80%
                                                                                                                 27%
                                                                                     24%

                                                            34%
                  60%



                                                                                     33%                         33%
                  40%
                                                            27%


                  20%                                                                                            20%
                                                                                     19%
                                                            15%
                                                                                      8%                         9%
                                                            4%
                   0%
                                2004-05                2005-06                     2006-07                     2007-08

                                                                     ELA (GR 11)

                                          %Far Below Basic        %Below Basic     %Basic       %Pro     %Adv


                                                                                               2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 61
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


California Standards Test: Mathematics
Meeting Algebra I standards continues to be a dilemma facing schools nationwide. Our scores,
although low, are slightly higher than surrounding high schools with similar demographics. We
believe the scores are higher due to the use of College Preparatory Math (CPM), a conceptual,
problem-solving curriculum, which was found by the US Department of Education to be an
exemplary curriculum. Though we still fall behind state-wide and district-wide test results in
Algebra 1, we have observed gains in Algebra 2 among students who have successfully
completed the CPM curriculum. Because of this trend, we are implementing the same
curriculum for Trigonometry and Math Analysis for 2008-09.

 CST 2003-08, Math, Northridge Academy SH
                                  # Students                               % Below   % Far Below   % Not Meeting
       EXAM              YR        Counted     % Adv   % Pro     % Basic    Basic       Basic        Standards

                       2004-05       10         0%      0%         0%       40%         60%            100%

                       2005-06       119        0%     13%        25%       45%         17%              87%
     GEN MATH
                       2006-07       46         0%      0%        44%       46%         11%            100%

                       2007-08       36         0%      3%        22%       67%          8%              97%

                       2004-05       338        0%     11%        34%       42%         12%              89%

                       2005-06       271        0%      9%        32%       44%         15%              90%
     ALGEBRA I
                       2006-07       273        0%      8%        27%       50%         15%              92%

                       2007-08       228        1%      9%        29%       45%         16%              90%

                       2004-05       110        1%     11%        35%       44%         10%              88%

                       2005-06       245        1%     10%        27%       42%         20%              89%
     GEOMETRY
                       2006-07       240        1%      8%        21%       43%         27%              91%

                       2007-08       246        2%      7%        23%       46%         22%              91%

                       2004-05       39         3%     21%        33%       28%         15%              77%

                       2005-06       84         1%     11%        36%       32%         20%              88%
     ALGEBRA II
                       2006-07       143        4%      8%        30%       38%         20%              88%

                       2007-08       122        1%     21%        27%       28%         23%              78%

                       2004-05        7         0%     29%        57%       14%          0%              71%

                       2005-06       37         5%     24%        30%       41%          0%              70%
      HS MATH
                       2006-07       40         3%     18%        33%       43%          5%              80%

                       2007-08       51         4%     28%        35%       31%          2%              69%




                                                               2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 62
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


The bar graphs below might suggest a “learning curve” across three years of math instruction at
NAHS. As we address the state-wide challenge of increasing proficiency levels in Algebra and
Geometry classes, we are seeing increased proficiency – along with increased enrollment
numbers – in third and fourth year math classes.

                                                          0%               0%            0%               0%
                  100%                                    0%                             0%               3%
                                                                           13%
                                                                                                          22%
                   80%                                    40%                           44%
                                                                          25%

                   60%


                   40%                                                    45%                             67%
                                                          60%                           46%

                   20%

                                                                          17%            11%              8%
                    0%
                          2002-03       2003-04          2004-05       2005-06         2006-07           2007-08

                                                                GEN MATH
                                     % Far Below Basic    % Below Basic     % Basic    % Pro     % Adv




                                                          0%                0%           0%                 1%
                 100%
                                                          11%               9%            8%                9%

                 80%                                                                     27%
                                                                           32%                             29%
                                                          34%
                 60%


                 40%                                                                     50%               45%
                                                                           44%
                                                          42%

                 20%

                                                                           15%            15%              16%
                                                          12%
                  0%
                         2002-03        2003-04          2004-05       2005-06          2006-07           2007-08

                                                                ALGEBRA I
                                    % Far Below Basic     % Below Basic      % Basic   % Pro      % Adv




                                                          1%                1%            1%                2%
                100%
                                                          11%              10%            8%                7%

                 80%                                                                     21%               23%
                                                                           27%
                                                          35%
                 60%
                                                                                         43%
                                                                                                           46%
                 40%                                                       42%
                                                          44%
                 20%
                                                                                          27%              22%
                                                                           20%
                                                          10%
                  0%
                         2002-03        2003-04          2004-05       2005-06          2006-07           2007-08

                                                                GEOMETRY
                                    % Far Below Basic     % Below Basic      % Basic   % Pro      % Adv




                                                                                2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 63
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                                                    3%              1%              4%               1%
            100%
                                                                    11%             8%
                                                    21%                                              21%
             80%
                                                                                    30%
                                                                    36%
                                                                                                     27%
             60%                                    33%


             40%                                                                    38%
                                                                    32%                              28%
                                                    28%
             20%
                                                                                                     23%
                                                    15%             20%             20%
              0%
                     2002-03      2003-04          2004-05        2005-06         2006-07           2007-08

                                                          ALGEBRA II
                               % Far Below Basic    % Below Basic       % Basic   % Pro     % Adv




                                                    0%                 5%           3%               4%
            100%

                                                    29%                             18%
             80%                                                    24%                              28%


                                                                                    33%
             60%
                                                                    30%
                                                                                                     35%
             40%                                    57%

                                                                                    43%
             20%                                                    41%                              31%
                                                    14%
              0%                                     0%             0%              5%               2%
                     2002-03      2003-04          2004-05        2005-06         2006-07           2007-08

                                                          HS MATH
                               % Far Below Basic    % Below Basic       % Basic   % Pro     % Adv




                                                                       2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 64
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


California Standards Test: Science
Our Integrated Coordinated Science 1 (ICS) scores are at or above district averages even though
this year our overall percentage of students not meeting standards increased. Earth Science
scores are also at or above District averages due to an innovative curriculum and an active
partnership with the CSUN Geology Department. There have been several staffing changes in
the Chemistry classes, and we are implementing ten district approved labs beginning this year,
using a new adopted textbook, and aligning curriculum to standards more consistently. Life
Science scores have improved over the years and are above State and District averages. Our
Biology scores are above State and District averages. New standards-based curriculum from
UCLA, State and district adopted textbooks, a lesson study approach to planning, and targeted
intervention has resulted in increased scores. Scores have steadily improved, with more students
moving from “Far Below Basic” and “Below Basic” to “Basic” as they approach proficiency.
Because of staffing and credentialing circumstances, Physics is not offered at NAHS during the
school day but is available to our students through a Pierce Community College class that is
offered at no cost to our students on our campus after school.

 CST 2003-08, Science, Northridge Academy SH

                                                                                                 % Not
                                   # Students    %                      % Below   % Far Below    Meeting
       EXAM               YR        Counted     Adv   % Pro   % Basic    Basic       Basic      Standards

                        2005-06       272       10%   25%      32%       22%         11%          65%
    LIFE SCIENCE        2006-07       290       9%    24%      32%       19%         16%          67%

                        2007-08       220       22%   22%      37%       13%          5%          56%

                        2004-05       168       4%    20%      45%       26%          5%          76%

                        2005-06       344       7%    29%      38%       19%          7%          64%
      BIOLOGY
                        2006-07       300       10%   23%      42%       18%          7%          67%

                        2007-08       295       17%   28%      38%       10%          7%          55%

                        2004-05

                        2005-06       120       3%    20%      49%       18%         10%          78%
     CHEMISTRY
                        2006-07       184       0%    12%      50%       21%         18%          88%

                        2007-08       139       2%     7%      46%       25%         20%          91%

                        2004-05

                        2005-06        4        0%     0%       0%       50%         50%         100%
     EARTH SCI
                        2006-07       40        10%   15%      50%       18%          8%          75%

                        2007-08       51        14%   29%      39%       10%          8%          57%
      PHYSICS
                                                         Not Offered

                        2004-05       325       0%    15%      54%       22%          9%          85%

                        2005-06       277       0%     5%      49%       30%         16%          95%
      INT SCI 1
                        2006-07       216       1%    13%      40%       27%         20%          87%

                        2007-08       181       0%     8%      51%       27%         14%          92%




                                                              2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 65
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


The bar graphs below illustrate the progress we are making in improving proficiency rates in our
science classes. For example, proficiency in Life Science increased by 11% in one year. In
Biology, we increased by 12%. We continue to struggle in Chemistry and ICS with staff
turnovers and a changing curriculum.

                100%
                                   10%                             9%
                                                                                                  22%
                 80%               25%                             24%

                                                                                                  22%
                 60%
                                   32%                             32%
                 40%
                                                                                                  37%

                                   22%                             19%
                 20%
                                                                                                  13%
                                  11%                              16%
                  0%                                                                              5%
                                  2005-06                        2006-07                        2007-08

                                                               LIFE SCIENCE
                                     % Far Below Basic    % Below Basic       % Basic   % Pro     % Adv




               100%                                       4%
                                                                             7%           10%
                                                                                                           17%
                                                          20%
                80%                                                         29%           23%
                                                                                                           28%
                60%
                                                          45%
                                                                            38%           42%
                40%
                                                                                                           38%

                20%                                       26%               19%           18%
                                                                                                           10%
                                                                            7%            7%               7%
                 0%                                       5%
                        2002-03          2003-04         2004-05           2005-06      2006-07           2007-08

                                                                BIOLOGY
                                    % Far Below Basic     % Below Basic       % Basic   % Pro     % Adv




                                                                            3%            0%               2%
                100%
                                                                                          12%              7%
                                                                            20%
                80%
                                                                                                           46%
                                                                                          50%
                60%
                                                                            49%

                40%
                                                                                                           25%
                                                                                          21%
                20%                                                         18%
                                                                                         18%               20%
                                                                            10%
                 0%
                        2002-03          2003-04         2004-05           2005-06      2006-07           2007-08

                                                                CHEMISTRY
                                    % Far Below Basic     % Below Basic       % Basic   % Pro     % Adv




                                                                              2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 66
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


California Standards Test: History

The Social Studies department continues to focus on achieving greater results on standardized
tests. Our scores remain below the state average. Our implementation of standards-based
instruction and backwards planning, we hope, will continue to help us fulfill state-wide and
district-wide expectations. State and district data indicates that the instructional support programs
we are using are not sufficient to support the learning needs of our students. The need for a more
consistent CST-based curriculum is especially true for our EL students taking United States and
World History classes. The 10th Grade World History Model Lesson Plans put forth by LAUSD
this year, have now been implemented. With the added use of the 10th grade (and next year's
11th grade) Periodic Assessments, teacher's ability to gauge student success on formative
assessments will improve. Furthermore, through our collaboration with the English department
and as students begin to draw thematic connections between content areas, we expect our scores
will make marked improvements in preparation for the CST examinations in May.

 CST 2003-08, Social Science, Northridge Academy SH
                                     #                                %        % Far      % Not
                                  Students    %       %      %       Below     Below      Meeting
       EXAM              YR       Counted    Adv      Pro   Basic    Basic     Basic     Standards
                       2002-03
                       2003-04
                       2004-05      170       5%      28%   44%       14%        8%         66%
 WORLD HISTORY
                       2005-06      271       6%      18%   27%       22%       27%         76%
                       2006-07      294       3%      12%   36%       22%       27%         85%
                       2007-08      219       4%      22%   34%       17%       23%         74%
                       2002-03
                       2003-04
                       2004-05
    US HISTORY
                       2005-06      135      13%      38%   30%       11%        9%         50%
                       2006-07      222       5%      22%   32%       26%       16%         73%
                       2007-08      229       5%      22%   36%       19%       18%         73%




                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 67
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


The following bar graphs illustrate fluctuation that our Social Studies department has
experienced since 2004. Factors affecting the department include: Complete re-staffing within
our first two years. The 2007-08 numbers, represent the established baseline from which the
department must build the capacity to support the ability of our students to demonstrate
proficiency on standards based assessments.
                   100%                                                                     3%
                                                            5%                6%                              4%
                                                                                            12%
                                                                            18%                              22%
                    80%                                     28%


                                                                                            36%
                                                                            27%
                    60%
                                                                                                             34%


                                                            44%
                    40%                                                                     22%
                                                                            22%
                                                                                                             17%

                    20%
                                                            14%             27%             27%
                                                                                                             23%

                                                            8%
                    0%
                           2002-03       2003-04           2004-05       2005-06          2006-07           2007-08

                                                             WORLD HISTORY

                                      % Far Below Basic     % Below Basic      % Basic    % Pro     % Adv




                    100%
                                                                                           5%               5%
                                                                            13%

                                                                                          22%               22%
                     80%


                                                                            38%

                     60%
                                                                                          32%
                                                                                                            36%


                     40%
                                                                            30%
                                                                                          26%
                                                                                                            19%
                     20%
                                                                            11%
                                                                                          16%               18%
                                                                            9%
                      0%
                            2002-03       2003-04          2004-05       2005-06         2006-07           2007-08

                                                                 US HISTORY

                                       % Far Below Basic    % Below Basic     % Basic    % Pro     % Adv




                                                                                   2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 68
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


CST Results by Subgroup

CST from 2002-03 to 2007-08, Subgroup: Hispanic
The students in our Hispanic/Latino subgroup are consistently demonstrating approximately 30%
proficiency in English across three years. Science proficiency has increased due to intentional
use of scaffolding and other SDAIE methods. History fluctuated between 20% and 30%,
remaining consistent over the last two years. Proficiency rates in math remain consistent and
are recognized as an area of growth.

                                                                   %        % Far       % Not
                            # Students    %              %       Below      Below       Meeting
   EXAM            Yr        Counted     Adv    % Pro   Basic    Basic      Basic      Standards
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       248       9%      21%    41%       20%        10%         70%
     ELA
                 2005-06       414       10%     23%    36%       18%        13%         68%
                 2006-07       433       9%      22%    34%       25%        10%         68%
                2007-08        428       11%     24%    42%       18%        6%          65%
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       246       0%      6%     30%       50%        15%         94%
   MATH
                 2005-06       413       1%      9%     27%       45%        19%         90%
                 2006-07       419       0%      6%     25%       48%        22%         94%
                2007-08        411       1%      9%     26%       46%        19%         91%
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       243       1%      7%     51%       31%        11%         92%
  SCIENCE
                 2005-06       544       3%      14%    40%       29%        14%         83%
                 2006-07       590       3%      15%    40%       25%        17%         82%
                2007-08        527       7%      18%    45%       19%        12%         76%
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       73        3%      18%    51%       19%        10%         80%
  HISTORY
                 2005-06       199       7%      20%    26%       22%        26%         73%
                 2006-07       290       3%      14%    31%       26%        27%         84%
                2007-08        255       3%      19%    35%       20%        23%         78%




                                                           2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 69
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


CST from 2002-03 to 2007-08, Subgroup: White
The CST results of this subgroup, though slightly higher, parallel other subgroups. For example,
Math continues to show learners’ challenges. Science shows steady gains here too, proficiency
levels increasing by 7% over two years. It appears that in subjects dependent upon language
skills, there is greater success.

                                                                  %         % Far        % Not
                           # Students    %       %     %        Below       Below        Meeting
   EXAM            Yr       Counted     Adv     Pro   Basic     Basic       Basic       Standards
                2002-03
                2003-04
                2004-05       142       19%    34%    32%        13%          2%          47%
    ELA
                2005-06       185       20%    30%    25%        15%         10%          50%
                2006-07       172       20%    29%    30%        13%          8%          51%
                2007-08       136       24%    32%    26%        13%          5%          43%
                2002-03
                2003-04
                2004-05       140       0%     16%    38%        35%         11%          84%
   MATH
                2005-06       181       0%     13%    32%        39%         17%          87%
                2006-07       167       2%     10%    28%        41%         19%          89%
                2007-08       134       1%     15%    29%        42%         13%          84%
                2002-03
                2003-04
                2004-05       136       1%     26%    53%        18%          2%          74%
  SCIENCE
                2005-06       254       8%     25%    40%        15%         11%          67%
                2006-07       224       10%    24%    45%        11%         10%          67%
                2007-08       177       23%    23%    34%        14%          7%          54%
                2002-03
                2003-04
                2004-05        51       8%     35%    39%        14%          4%          57%
  HISTORY
                2005-06       113       9%     29%    27%        16%         20%          62%
                2006-07       116       6%     19%    39%        19%         17%          75%
                2007-08        95       5%     30%    32%        15%         19%          65%




                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 70
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


CST from 2002-03 to 2007-08, Subgroup: Socio-economically Disadvantaged
There is a significant overlap between the students represented in this subgroup and those in the
Hispanic/Latino subgroup. Therefore, the achievement numbers are strikingly similar.

                                                                      %        % Far       % Not
                             # Students    %          %     %       Below      Below       Meeting
    EXAM           Yr         Counted     Adv        Pro   Basic    Basic      Basic      Standards
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05        263       10%        24%   38%       19%        9%          66%
     ELA
                 2005-06        452       10%        21%   36%       19%        13%         68%
                 2006-07        423       10%        24%   33%       23%        10%         66%
                 2007-08        459       12%        26%   39%       17%        7%          63%
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05        259        0%        8%    32%       46%        14%         92%
    MATH
                 2005-06        450        1%        8%    26%       47%        18%         91%
                 2006-07        415        1%        8%    24%       47%        21%         92%
                 2007-08        442        1%        9%    26%       44%        20%         90%
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05        255        1%        10%   49%       31%        9%          89%
  SCIENCE
                 2005-06        589        3%        15%   42%       27%        13%         82%
                 2006-07        579        4%        16%   40%       24%        16%         80%
                 2007-08        574        8%        18%   44%       18%        12%         74%
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05        83         2%        22%   43%       19%        13%         76%
  HISTORY
                 2005-06        214        6%        21%   27%       23%        24%         74%
                 2006-07        277        4%        12%   30%       26%        28%         83%
                 2007-08        279        3%        20%   33%       20%        24%         77%




                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 71
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


CST from 2002-03 to 2007-08, Subgroup: Special Education
Though their proficiency levels are lower than the other subgroups, students in the Special
Education subgroup show modest gains across the years as well. Students scoring at the “Far
Below Basic” range has dramatically decreased in two years from 39% to 19% . For 2007-2008
the percentage of Special Education students demonstrating proficiency in content areas are low:
ELA 8%, MATH 5%, Science 3%, and History 12%. These numbers indicate that our current
instructional practice is not adequately meeting the needs of this subgroup.

                                                                %          % Far        % Not
                            # Students    %             %      Below       Below        Meeting
   EXAM            Yr        Counted     Adv   % Pro   Basic   Basic       Basic       Standards
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       59        3%      5%    31%      32%         29%           92%
     ELA
                 2005-06       106       3%     11%    23%      25%         39%           86%
                 2006-07       113       2%     12%    20%      39%         27%           86%
                2007-08        100       4%     11%    28%      38%         19%           85%
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       56        0%      5%    13%      46%         36%           95%
   MATH
                 2005-06       102       1%      4%    18%      43%         34%           95%
                 2006-07       105       1%      2%    12%      49%         36%           97%
                2007-08        91        2%      6%    14%      50%         29%           92%
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       57        0%      4%    35%      32%         30%           97%
  SCIENCE
                 2005-06       136       2%     12%    29%      36%         21%           87%
                 2006-07       147       4%      7%    29%      33%         27%           89%
                2007-08        110       6%     12%    44%      25%         15%           83%
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       17        6%      6%    41%      18%         29%           88%
  HISTORY
                 2005-06       51        0%     16%    18%      20%         47%           84%
                 2006-07       70        1%      6%    24%      34%         34%           93%
                2007-08        72        3%      8%    29%      19%         40%           89%




                                                          2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 72
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


CST from 2002-03 to 2007-08, Subgroup: EL Students
With proficiency levels lower than other subgroups, EL students’ ability to demonstrate
proficiency on CST’s is our greatest need group, in all content areas. For 2007-2008 the
percentages of EL students demonstrating proficiency in content areas are extremely low: ELA
3%, MATH 1%, Science 5%, History 3%. These numbers indicate that our current instructional
practice is not adequately meeting the needs of this subgroup.


                                                                      %        % Far       % Not
                            # Students    %               %         Below      Below       Meeting
   EXAM            Yr        Counted     Adv    % Pro    Basic      Basic      Basic      Standards
                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       71         1          1    31          35         31          97%
     ELA
                 2005-06       103        0          4    26          39         31          96%

                 2006-07       85         0          0    20          52         28         100%

                 2007-08       71         0          3    41          39         17          97%

                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       70         0          1    20          51         27          99%
   MATH
                 2005-06       102        0          2    19          47         32          98%

                 2006-07       83         0          0    6           60         34         100%

                 2007-08       67         0          2    15          45         39          99%

                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       66         0          2    32          46         21          99%
  SCIENCE
                 2005-06       128        0          2    32          37         30          98%

                 2006-07       113        0          4    21          36         38          96%

                 2007-08       91         0          6    36          33         25          95%

                 2002-03
                 2003-04
                 2004-05       18         6          6    28          28         33          89%
  HISTORY
                 2005-06       42         0          5    14          29         52          95%

                 2006-07       54         0          0    19          28         54         100%

                 2007-08       35         0          3    20          31         46          97%




                                                              2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 73
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL EXIT EXAM
In 2007-2008 our overall percentage of students passing the California High School Exit Exam
(CAHSEE) in Math increased by 4% and in English increased by 7%. Significant increases in
the passing rate were in Special Education (Math–15% and ELA-23%), English Learners (Math-
4% and ELA-14%), and Socio-Economically Disadvantaged (Math-6% and ELA-10%) students.
We continue to provide CAHSEE review though our Saturday classes, CAHSEE Boot Camp,
Special Education Learning Centers, Advisory, and in English and Math classes.

                                                                        Redesignated
                                                            English     Fluent-English
                                              Special       Learner       Proficient         Socio-           Not socio-
                                  All        Education        (EL)         (RFEP)        economically       economically
 Year           Subject        Students       Students      Students       Students      Disadvantaged      Disadvantaged

                 # Tested        212            28            25             80              137                 46
         Math                    163
 2007-           Passing        (77%)        11 (39%)       7 (28%)       68 (85%)        101 (74%)           40 (87%)
  08
                 # Tested        209            28            24             79              135                 46
         ELA                     183
                 Passing        (88%)        18 (64%)       12 (50%)      73 (92%)        116 (86%)           41 (89%)

                 # Tested        292            45            41             108             209                 60
         Math                    214
 2006-           Passing        (73%)        11 (24%)       10 (24%)      95 (88%)        142 (68%)           51 (85%)
  07
                 # Tested        293            46            42             109             209                 60
         ELA                     237
                 Passing        (81%)        19 (41%)       15 (36%)      99 (91%)        159 (76%)           57 (95%)

                 # Tested        272            35            33             87              148                 75
         Math                    211
 2005-           Passing        (78%)        14 (40%)       14 (42%)      72 (83%)        106 (72%)           64 (85%)
  06
                 # Tested        261            29            27             86              137                 76
         ELA                     227
                 Passing        (87%)        14 (48%)       16 (59%)      77 (90%)        116 (85%)           69 (91%)




Sub-test Scores for 10th, 11th, and 12th, 2007-08
Our CAHSEE sub-test scores for all grade levels indicate that our strongest area in English is in
Word Analysis, while or greatest area of need is in Writing Applications and Writing Strategies.
In math sub-scores our strongest area is in Probability & Statistics, but our greatest area of need
continues to be in Algebra 1. These sub-test scores verify the need for our continued efforts to
provide interventions for students in Algebra 1 and to increase writing in all classes.


            Grades 10- 12 CAHSEE Subscores                                     Grades 10 CAHSEE Subscores

                                                Average %                                                         Average %
 Exam                            # Tested        Correct       Exam                                # Tested        Correct

 ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS             302               70.1      ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS                  214             76.2

   WORD ANALYSIS                   302               78.9          WORD ANALYSIS                      214             86.4

   READING COMPREHENSION           302               70.5          READING COMPREHENSION              214             76

   LIT RESPONSE & ANALYSIS         302               72.9          LIT RESPONSE & ANALYSIS            214             79.4

   WRITING STRATEGIES              302               61.6          WRITING STRATEGIES                 214             68.8




                                                                          2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 74
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning



  WRITING CONVENTIONS               302          72.2         WRITING CONVENTIONS              214            78.3

  WRITING APPLICATIONS              302          56.1         WRITING APPLICATIONS             214            58.8

 MATHEMATICS                        345          60.7        MATHEMATICS                       215            68.1

  PROB & STATS                      345          66.1         PROB & STATS                     215             73

  NUMBER SENSE                      345          63.7         NUMBER SENSE                     215            71.6

  ALGEBRA & FUNCTIONS               345          63.2         ALGEBRA & FUNCTIONS              215            70.5

  MEASUREMT & GEOMETRY              345          59.8         MEASUREMT & GEOMETRY             215            67.3

  ALGEBRA I                         345          47.4         ALGEBRA I                        215             55




               Grades 11 CAHSEE Subscores                                  Grades 12 CAHSEE Subscores

                                               Average %                                                    Average %
 Exam                             # Tested      Correct      Exam                             # Tested       Correct
 ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS              54           58.5        ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS              34            49.6
  WORD ANALYSIS                     54            64          WORD ANALYSIS                     34            55.9
  READING COMPREHENSION             54            62          READING COMPREHENSION             34            49.8
  LIT RESPONSE & ANALYSIS           54           59.6         LIT RESPONSE & ANALYSIS           34            52.9
  WRITING STRATEGIES                54           47.8         WRITING STRATEGIES                34            38.5
  WRITING CONVENTIONS               54           60.5         WRITING CONVENTIONS               34            52.2
  WRITING APPLICATIONS              54           52.5         WRITING APPLICATIONS              34            44.9
 MATHEMATICS                        74           49.1        MATHEMATICS                        56            47.4
  PROBABILITY & STATISTICS          74           55.7         PROBABILITY & STATISTICS          56            53.4
  NUMBER SENSE                      74           51.2         NUMBER SENSE                      56             50
  ALGEBRA & FUNCTIONS               74           52.6         ALGEBRA & FUNCTIONS               56            49.3
  MEASUREMT & GEOMETRY              74           47.3         MEASUREMT & GEOMETRY              56            47.7
  ALGEBRA I                         74           35.9         ALGEBRA I                         56            33.3


Sub-test Scores for 10th, 11th, and 12th, 2006-07

              Grades 10- 12 CAHSEE Subscores                                  Grades 10 CAHSEE Subscores

                                                 Average %                                                      Average %
 Exam                              # Tested       Correct     Exam                               # Tested        Correct

 ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS                340         70.8%       ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS                  292            73.3%

  WORD ANALYSIS                       340         80.2%         WORD ANALYSIS                        292            82.2%

  READING COMPREHENSION               340         71.2%         READING COMPREHENSION                292            74.0%

  LIT RESPONSE & ANALYSIS             340         74.9%         LIT RESPONSE & ANALYSIS              292            77.3%

  WRITING STRATEGIES                  340         64.6%         WRITING STRATEGIES                   292            67.2%

  WRITING CONVENTIONS                 340         67.7%         WRITING CONVENTIONS                  292            70.1%

  WRITING APPLICATIONS                340         62.1%         WRITING APPLICATIONS                 292            64.0%

 MATHEMATICS                          391         62.4%       MATHEMATICS                            293            66.2%

  PROBABILITY & STATISTICS            391         70.1%         PROBABILITY & STATISTICS             293            73.2%




                                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 75
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning



  NUMBER SENSE                       391       63.2%        NUMBER SENSE                          293      66.5%

  ALGEBRA & FUNCTIONS               391        64.4%        ALGEBRA & FUNCTIONS                   293      69.2%

  MEASUREMT & GEOMETRY              391        59.4%        MEASUREMT & GEOMETRY                  293      63.0%

  ALGEBRA I                          391       54.3%        ALGEBRA I                             293      58.2%




               Grades 11 CAHSEE Subscores                                    Grades 12 CAHSEE Subscores

                                             Average %                                                    Average %
Exam                              # Tested    Correct      Exam                                # Tested    Correct

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS              43         56.7%        ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS                 5        47.2%

 WORD ANALYSIS                     43         69.1%          WORD ANALYSIS                       5        57.1%

 READING COMPREHENSION             43         54.9%          READING COMP                        5        45.6%

 LIT RESPONSE & ANALYSIS           43         61.3%          LIT RESPONSE & AN                   5        50.0%

 WRITING STRATEGIES                43         50.2%          WRITING STRATEGIES                  5        38.3%

 WRITING CONVENTIONS               43         53.8%          WRITING CONVENTIONS                 5        48.0%

 WRITING APPLICATIONS              43         51.5%          WRITING APPLICATIONS                5        47.5%

MATHEMATICS                        71         50.5%        MATHEMATICS                          27        52.7%

 PROBABILITY & STATISTICS          71         60.2%          PROBABILITY & STATs                27        62.4%

 NUMBER SENSE                      71         51.4%          NUMBER SENSE                       27        58.0%

 ALGEBRA & FUNCTIONS               71         49.6%          ALGEBRA & FUNCTIONS                27        51.3%

 MEASUREMT & GEOMETRY              71         47.5%          MEASUREMT & GEOM                   27        51.9%

 ALGEBRA I                         71         44.4%          ALGEBRA I                          27        38.3%




ADEQUATE YEARLY PROGRESS (AYP)
We have met all of our AYP criteria every year with the exception of 2007-2008, where we met
17 out of 18 criteria. In 2007-2008 we met our school-wide criteria and all sub-groups except for
our English Learners. Each year we have met our API criteria.

AYP, 2005-08
                                                                                   2005-
                                                         2007-08     2006-07        06
 Made AYP                                                  No          Yes          Yes
                                                                                   18 of
 Met AYP Criteria                                        17 of 18    18 of 18       18
 ELA Participation Rate                                    Yes         Yes          Yes
 Math Participation Rate                                   Yes         Yes          Yes
 ELA Percent Proficient                                    Yes         Yes          Yes
 Math Percent Proficient                                   No          Yes          Yes
 Academic Performance Index (API)                          Yes         Yes          Yes
 Graduation Rate                                           Yes         Yes          Yes




                                                                    2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 76
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Participation Rate
We continue to exceed the target participation rate each year. All students, parents, teachers, and
staff are aware of the importance of taking the CST’s. Make-up testing for absentees is an
important part of the process to maintain and increase the participation rate.

                                         English-Language Arts : Target 95%                               Mathematics: Target 95%

                                        Met All Participation Rate Criteria? Yes                   Met All Participation Rate Criteria? Yes
                                                                                                                               Met
                               Enrollment       No. of            Met 2007                Enrollment       No. of              2007
                               First Day of    Students            AYP          Alt.      First Day of    Students             AYP        Alt.
 Groups                          Testing        Tested    Rate    Criteria     Method       Testing        Tested     Rate    Criteria   Method
 Schoolwide
                                  210           209       100        Yes                     213            212       100       Yes
  African American or Black
 (not of Hispanic origin)          13            13       100        --                       13             13       100        --
  American Indian or Alaska
 Native                             0             0        --        --                        0             0         --       --

  Asian                            11            11       100        --                       11             11       100        --

  Filipino                         22            21        96        --                       22             21        96       --

  Hispanic or Latino              118            118      100       Yes                      121            121       100      Yes

  Pacific Islander                  0             0        --        --                        0             0         --       --
  White (not of Hispanic
 origin)                           46            46       100        --                       46             46       100       --
  Socioeconomically
 Disadvantaged                    135            135      100       Yes                      137            137       100      Yes

  English Learners                 83            83       100       Yes            ER         85             85       100      Yes            ER

  Students with Disabilities       28            28       100        --                       28             28       100        -




                                                                                   2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 77
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Annual Measurable Objectives (AMO’s) 2008 – Percent Proficient
The AMO’s are the prime indicator of a school’s status relative to inclusion as a Program
Improvement School. In 2006/2007 NAHS students failed to meet Percent Proficient Criteria for
EL students at the Mathematics target of 32.2%. EL students were marked as meeting
proficiency in ELA under “safe harbor”. More importantly, with the projected increase in
proficiency targets for all subgroups for next year it is critical that we closely examine all groups
scoring at or below a +10% level. These target groups are highlighted as indicate areas of critical
need for the next school year.

                                               English-Language Arts : Target 33.4%                      Mathematics: Target 32.2%
                                                                                                    Met All Percent Proficient Rate Criteria?
                                            Met All Percent Proficient Rate Criteria? Yes                             No
                                                                           Met
                                                No. at or     % at or      2007                               No. at or     % at or     Met 2007
                                   Valid         Above        Above        AYP       Alternative   Valid       Above        Above        AYP
 Groups                            Scores       Proficient   Proficient   Criteria    Method       Scores     Proficient   Proficient   Criteria
 Schoolwide                          207          113          54.6         Yes                     210          99          47.1         Yes
  African American or Black
 (not of Hispanic origin)            13             8          61.5          --                     13            6          46.2          --
  American Indian or Alaska
 Native                              0              --           --          --                      0            --           --          --
  Asian                              11             8          72.7          --                     11            9          81.8          --
  Filipino                           21            13          61.9         --                      21           15          71.4          --
  Hispanic or Latino                 116           55          47.4        Yes                      119          50           42          Yes
  Pacific Islander                   0              --           --         --                       0            --           --          --
  White (not of Hispanic origin)     46            29           63           --                     46           19          41.3          --
  Socioeconomically
 Disadvantaged                       133           66          49.6        Yes                      135          57          42.2         Yes
  English Learners                   81            27          33.3        Yes          SH          83           23          27.7         No
  Students with Disabilities         27             4          14.8         --                      27            2           7.4          --


Academic Performance Index (API) – Additional Indicator for AYP


                                                             2008 Growth             2007-08                Met 2007 API            Alternative
                     2007 Base API                               API                 Growth                   Criteria               Method
                     680                          711            31                 Yes
2007 API Criteria for meeting federal AYP: A minimum "2007 Growth API" score of 590 OR "2006-07 Growth" of
at least one point.




CALIFORNIA ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT TEST (CELDT)
Approximately 35-38% of the students in the past 2 years have tested Advanced or Early
Advanced on the CELDT. Over 60% of our students tested at the Intermediate level. Limited
English Proficient (LEP) students have been clustered in core content subjects. All of our
students are Preparing for Redesignation (PRP). Presently, all but two of our teachers are CLAD
certified. These 2 teachers have obtained emergency CLAD’s.




                                                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 78
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


CELDT 2007-08
        Grades                9      10              11     12           Total Tested
                              0         0            2       0                2
       Advanced
                          0%         0%              7%     0%               2%
                             11         8            8       5                32
    Early Advanced
                         33%         31%         29%       45%               33%
                             16      16              18      2                52
      Intermediate
                         48%         62%         64%       18%               53%
                              5         2            0       3                10
   Early Intermediate
                         15%         8%              0%    27%               10%
                              1         0            0       1                2
       Beginning
                          3%         0%              0%     9%               2%
                             33      26              28     11                98
    Number Tested
                         100%       100%         100%      100%             100%

CELDT 2006-07
       Grades            9          10               11      12          Total Tested
                         0           1               2          1              4
     Advanced
                         0%         2%           11%        10%               4%
                         7          17               6          5             35
   Early Advanced
                        23%         40%          32%        50%              34%
                         22         19               7          2             50
    Intermediate
                        71%         44%          37%        20%              49%
                         2           5               4          2             13
  Early Intermediate
                         6%         12%          21%        20%              13%
                         0           1               0          0              1
      Beginning
                         0%         2%           0%         0%                1%
                         31         43               19      10              103
   Number Tested
                        100%       100%          100%      100%             100%

CELDT 2005-06
       Grades            9          10           11         12           Total Tested
                         14         13           7          0                34
      Advanced
                        21%        29%          44%        0%               26%
                         36         21           7          0                64
   Early Advanced
                        53%        47%          44%        0%               50%
                         15         9            1          0                25
    Intermediate
                        22%        20%           6%        0%               19%
                         3          2            1          0                 6
  Early Intermediate
                        4%          4%           6%        0%                5%
                         0          0            0          0                 0
     Beginning
                        0%          0%           0%        0%                0%
                         68         45           16         0                129
   Number Tested
                        100%       100%         100%       0%               100%




                                                          2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 79
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


SAT
The percentage of students taking the SAT has decreased, but the verbal, math and writing
average scores have increased. We have a new College Counselor and we assume that our
participation rate will increase. We did not have seniors in 2004-05 or 2005-06.

                      Grade
                        12     Number      Percent     Verbal      Math      Writing    VMW>=1,500      VMW>=1,500
      Year             Enr.    Tested      Tested      Average    Average    Average      Number          Rate
    2007-08*          178        105       59.0%         458        447        475
    2006-07           101           74     73.27%        435        444        442           19             18.8%
    2005-06*
    2004-05*



Advanced Placement Tests
Every year we have increased the number of students taking AP exams. Our number of exams
with 3, 4 and 5 has increased. Our teachers continue to attend Advanced Placement Conferences
in order to improve their teaching skills.

                             Grade        # of
              Grade 12      11 + 12       Test       # of AP      Exams     Exams      Exams      Exams     Exams
   Year       Enrolled      Enrolled     Takers      Exams       Score 1    Score 2    Score 3    Score 4   Score 5

                                                                   167         78         50        19        13
 2007-08        178           413          *          327        (51.1%)    (23.9%)    (15.3%)    (5.8%)    (4.0%)
                                                                   157         60         35        12         5
 2006-07        101           330         156         269        (58.4%)    (22.3%)    (13.0%)    (4.5%)    (1.9%)
                                                                    99         57         28        12         9
 2005-06         0            157         121         205        (59.0%)    (27.8%)    (13.7%)    (5.9%)    (4.4%)
 2004-05*
*No Data Available – No Exams Given Due to the School Opening



CSU Early Assessment Program (EAP)
Passage of the added CSU Early Assessment items on the English and mathematics portions of
the CST demonstrates college readiness and waives the CSU required entrance tests, English
Placement Test (EPT) and Entry-Level Mathematics Exam (ELM). Participation at NAHS has
been strong over the past three years. The percentage of our students ready for college in
English is about four times that of the students ready for college in mathematics. Similar patterns
of lower mathematics scores than English Language Arts scores are seen in the CST and
CAHSEE results. While the percentages of students who are not demonstrating college
readiness are high, it is worth noting that all juniors at NAHS complete the EAP sections of the
CSTS, rather than just selected students or students in selected classes. This school policy of
mandatory participation in the EAP is in alignment with our commitment to provide equity and
access to college preparation opportunities to all students.




                                                                       2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 80
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                                                                                                                                              % of Did
                                                                                                                            # of Did Not         Not
                                                                                                                            Demonstrate      Demonstrate
                                                                                                                              College          College
                        EAP            CST                             Ready                    Ready for                    Readiness        Readiness
                      Students       Students         % of EAP           for       % of         College -      % of            on This         on This
 Year    Subject       Tested         Tested         Participation     College   Readiness     Conditional   Conditional    Assessment       Assessment
         English        229                232             99%           26        11%                                           201            88%
         Algebra
 2007-   II             75                 80              94%           0         0%              11           15%              64             85%
 2008    HS
         Math           41                 45              91%           3         7%              32           78%              6              15%
         Math
         Total          116                125             93%           3         3%              43           37%              70             60%
         English        218                226             96%           30        14%                                           188            86%
         Algebra
 2006-   II             85                 89              96%           2         2%              11           13%              72             85%
 2007    HS
         Math           37                 38              97%           3         8%              29           78%              5              14%
         Math
         Total          122                127             96%           5         4%              40           33%              77             63%
         English        135                135             100%          26        19%                                           109            81%
         Algebra
 2005-   II             42                 44              95%           0         0%              7            17%              35             83%
 2006    HS
         Math           32                 33              97%           3         9%              23           72%              6              19%
         Math
         Total          74                 77              96%           3         4%              30           41%              41             55%



A-G Requirements
The highest percentage of students enrolled in A-G classes receiving a C or better is in Art,
Music, and Theater Arts. The lowest percentage of students enrolled in A-G classes receiving a
C or better is in Math and Science. Overall there are more students with a C or better in the
upper grades. We continue to utilize our Academy and Advisory teachers, along with our
Counselors to meet with students and their parents in order to increase student achievement.

2007-08
                                 BILing-          COMP                   ENV/AGR     FOREIGN                                       SOCIAL      THEATER
 Grade   Enrollment   ART         ESL            SCIENCE     ENGLISH       IED        LANG         MATH      MUSIC    SCIENCE     SCIENCE        ARTS
         A-G
         Enroll        38                                        502                    17         465        241          500         98        24
  9
         % Pass C     73.7
         & Above       %                                      64.9%                  52.9%        65.6%      95.4%     59.2%         53.1%      79.2%
         A-G
         Enroll        65                                        467                  274          451        52           456         479       16
  10
         % Pass C     75.4
         & Above       %                                      66.4%                  76.6%        53.2%      94.2%     58.8%         74.9%      81.3%
         A-G
         Enroll       118                                        491                  348          438        27           402         578       11
  11
         % Pass C     86.4
         & Above       %                                      76.0%                  84.8%        53.4%      92.6%     59.7%         82.2%      90.9%
         A-G
         Enroll       149                                        450                    86         210        24           143         534       17
  12
         % Pass C     92.6
         & Above       %                                      80.0%                  91.9%        66.2%      87.5%     72.7%         83.5%      94.1%




                                                                                         2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 81
       Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


       2006-07
                                                      BILIN      COMP           ENV/AG     FOREIGN                                           SOCIAL       THEATER
             Grade      Enrollment          ART       /ESL        SCI    ENG      ED         LAN        MATH          MUSIC     SCIENCE     SCIENCE         ARTS
                        A-G
                        Enroll               5                           516                 12          466           250        513             75
            GRADE
                        % Pass
              9
                        C&
                        Above          20.0%                            56.2%              66.7%        63.1%         96.4%      54.4%       56.0%
                        A-G
                        Enroll              43                           632                342          601            31        596            636
            GRADE
                        % Pass
              10
                        C&
                        Above          67.4%                            70.4%              67.0%        55.4%         93.5%      50.7%       65.3%
                        A-G
                        Enroll              99                           483                301          417            26        428            511
            GRADE
                        % Pass
              11
                        C&
                        Above          80.8%                            89.4%              88.4%        53.0%         92.3%      52.1%       80.8%
                        A-G
                        Enroll              133                          283                 87          152            22        124            336
            GRADE
                        % Pass
              12
                        C&
                        Above          90.2%                            90.1%              92.0%        69.1%         100.0%     72.6%       89.6%


       % of Ds and Fs
       In general, the percentage of students earning Ds and Fs is highest in math and science, with over
       40% of our students earning a D or F grade. In English, in fall and spring 2007-2008, about 28%
       of students earned a D or F. We are aware of the challenge of these subject areas for our students
       and continue to seek ways to increase their success with this difficult subject matter.

                                                  BILING-      COMP             ENV/AGRI    FOREIGN                                                     SOCIAL   THEATER
 Semester      Enrollment            ART            ESL       SCIENCE   ENG        ED        LANG              MATH            MUSIC     SCIENCE       SCIENCE     ARTS
               A-G
               Enrollment             110                                790                   319              745             185        781           451
   FALL
SEMESTER
               % of D                11.8%                              7.5%                  6.9%             24.7%           3.2%       22.7%         18.6%
 2005-2006
               % of F                4.5%                               18.4%                 10.3%            16.2%           1.1%       24.1%         18.8%
               A-G
               Enrollment             157                                767                   305              618             171        744           436
  SPRING
SEMESTER
               % of D                10.8%                              8.4%                  10.8%            20.3%           1.8%       17.9%         11.9%
 2005-2006
               % of F                3.8%                               15.9%                 15.1%            22.4%           2.9%       22.8%         11.0%
               A-G
               Enrollment             150                                967                   377              868             167        845           782
   FALL
SEMESTER
               % of D                12.0%                              8.7%                  2.7%             20.8%           3.6%       22.5%         18.2%
 2006-2007
               % of F                4.0%                               17.3%                 23.3%            19.3%           0.0%       26.5%         11.4%
               A-G
               Enrollment             130                                947                   365              768             162        816           776
  SPRING
SEMESTER
               % of D                16.9%                              7.9%                  1.1%             20.5%           1.9%       20.5%         11.0%
 2006-2007
               % of F                3.1%                               16.0%                 15.6%            21.4%           1.2%       22.7%         9.0%
               A-G
               Enrollment             191                                952                   373              819             176        765           857         36
   FALL
SEMESTER
               % of D                14.1%                              12.3%                 3.5%             17.9%           1.7%       19.6%         14.5%       11.1%
 2007-2008
               % of F                4.7%                               16.1%                 19.6%            20.9%           2.3%       16.9%         5.7%        16.7%
               A-G
               Enrollment             179                                958                   352              745             168        736           832         32
  SPRING
SEMESTER
               % of D                5.0%                               13.0%                 1.1%             20.0%           2.4%       21.5%         14.9%       0.0%
 2007-2008
               % of F                4.5%                               15.2%                 11.9%            24.0%           4.8%       21.2%         7.2%        0.0%




                                                                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 82
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Graduation Rates: 2006-2007
The method of calculating our Graduation Rate is not clear. Our first graduation class was the
Class of 2007, indicated on the chart below as 97.7%. Our rate is the direct result of our
emphasis on the value of graduating from high school. Faculty and staff work hard with students
and their families to achieve this exceptional graduation rate.


                                                       Rate for                                  Met 2007
                                                        2008,                        Average     Graduation
                                                       Class of                      2-Year         Rate        Alternative
          Rate for 2007, Class of 2005-06              2006-07          Change       Change       Criteria       Method
                      99.8%                             97.7%           -2.10%         N/A          Yes

Algebra I and II
In Algebra 1 the number of 9th grade students enrolled has decreased, due to more students
having completed Algebra 1 in middle school. The second semester has fewer students due to 9th
graders, who failed Algebra 1A, being enrolled in Algebra 1A2 for the second semester. The
students will earn credit and then re-enroll in Algebra 1 in the Fall. Our numbers of enrollment
continue to vary as our class size varies each year. Students who do not pass Algebra 2A are
frequently enrolled as a tutor in an Algebra 1B class and expected to not only review Algebra 1,
but do the homework and take the tests in preparation for the repeat of Algebra 2 the following
year. We continue to develop interventions that will support our at-risk students in math.

                      ALL GRADE
                        LEVELS             GR 9                 GR 10             GR 11                 GR 12
                            % Pass            % Pass                                   % Pass               % Pass
                      A-G    C&        A-G      C&      A-G       % Pass C    A-G       C&          A-G      C&
 Course     Year     Enroll Above     Enroll  Above    Enroll     & Above    Enroll    Above       Enroll   Above
           2004-05    366     52.7%   281     57.3%     85          37.6%
ALGEBRA    2005-06    361     49.9%   283     53.0%     67          37.3%        11      45.5%
   1A
           2006-07    339     53.1%   210     55.2%     118         48.3%        8       50.0%       3        100.0%
           2007-08    263     57.4%   197     62.4%     53          41.5%        13      46.2%
           2004-05    344     53.2%   281     54.1%     63          49.2%
ALGEBRA    2005-06    252     50.0%   169     59.8%     68          27.9%        15      40.0%
   1B
           2006-07    281     51.2%   157     58.0%     111         40.5%        11      54.5%       2        100.0%
           2007-08    234     50.4%   161     58.4%     51          27.5%        18       50%        4        25.0%
           2004-05    44      70.5%     7     100%      37          64.9%
ALGEBRA    2005-06    98      63.3%     4     100%      39          79.5%        55      49.1%
   2A
           2006-07    197     67.0%     7     100%      51          90.2%        106     58.5%       33       51.5%
           2007-08    175     61.1%     5      80%      37          91.9%        94      57.4%       39       38.5%
           2004-05    39      69.2%     7     57.1%     32          71.9%
ALGEBRA    2005-06    83      66.3%     4     75.0%     36          83.3%        43      51.2%
   2B
           2006-07    160     70.0%     7     100%      47          87.2%        88      58.0%       18       72.2%
           2007-08    140     60.7%     4     100%      38          84.2%        79      51.9%       19       42.1%




                                                                    2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 83
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


12th Grade Enrollment and 12th Grade Graduates

                                                   Grade 12 Enrollment Graduates
                                Northridge Academy                 101      126
                                District Total                  32830     28545
                                County Total                   107759     87119
                                State Total                   443,121 356,641

12th Grade Graduates Completing all Courses Required for U.C. and/or C.S.U. Entrance
We look forward to having additional information so that we can see if the results from 2006-
2007 demonstrate a pattern. All students from Asian backgrounds completed UC/CSU required
courses, while 75% of Filipino students and 71% of White students did so. Hispanic/Latino and
African American students completed UC/CSU entrance courses at lower and similar rates of
48% and 47% respectively. The number of graduates increased due to the seniors without 170
credits in the Fall semester being listed as 11th grade and the students with at least 170 credits by
the Spring semester and a plan of courses, being changed to 12th grade status.


                         American
                         Indian or                                                         White      Multiple
                          Alaska              Pacific              Hispanic     African     (not       or No
   Year      Graduates    Native     Asian   Islander   Filipino   or Latino   American   Hispanic)   Response   Total
             # of
             Grads          0         5         1         12          59         17          31          1       126
             # Grads
             with
             UC/CSU
             Required
  2006-07
             Courses        0         5         0          9          28          8          22          1        73
             % Grads
             with
             UC/CSU
             Required
             Courses       0%        100%      0%        75%         48%         47%        71%        100%      58%
             # of
             Grads
             # Grads
             with
             UC/CSU
             Required
 2005-06*
             Courses
             % Grads
             with
             UC/CSU
             Required
             Courses
*No Data Available


Enrollment and Dropout Rates, 2006-07
Relative to other comparable LAUSD high schools, the dropout rate at NAHS is low, with fewer
than 1% dropping out in a given year. Only one student left NAHS in 2005-2006 (the school’s
second year, with students in Grades 9-11 only), and a total of 9 students dropped out in 2006-
2007 (the school’s third year, and the first time students in grades 9-12 were present). The
strong enrollment/low dropout rate at NAHS is an accomplishment of which we are very proud.


                                                                      2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 84
        Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning



        2006-07
                                                                                                                                                                            4 Yr
                                                                                                                                                     Total                 Derived       1 Year
                                                    Gr.      Gr.                 Gr.      Gr.                 Gr.      Gr.                 Other     Drops      Total      Dropout       Dropout
                     Gr. 9     Gr. 9                10       10                  11       11                  12       12                 Secndy      (9-      Enroll      Rate (9-      Rate (9-
    Ethnic Group     Drop      Enroll        %     Drop     Enroll        %     Drop     Enroll        %     Drop     Enroll        %      Enrl       12)      (9-12)        12)           12)
    Amer
    Indian or
    Alaska
    Native              0          2     0.0%         0         0      0.0%        0         1     0.0%         0         0     0.0%          0         0          3         **          0.0%

    Asian               0          12    0.0%         2         17    11.8%        0         12    0.0%         0         6     0.0%          1         2          47     10.5%          4.2%
    Pacific
    Islander            0          1     0.0%         0         0      0.0%        0         2     0.0%         0         1     0.0%          0         0          4         **          0.0%

    Filipino            0          23    0.0%         0         24     0.0%        0         19    0.0%         0         12    0.0%          0         0          78      4.5%          1.3%

    Hispanic
    or Latino           1       151      0.7%         0      186       0.0%        1      113      0.9%         0         59    0.0%          0         2       509        4.9%          1.3%

    African
    American            0          14    0.0%         0         23     0.0%        0         17    0.0%         1         17    5.9%          0         1          71     13.9%          2.7%

    White (not
    Hisp)               0          58    0.0%         0         62     0.0%        1         62    1.6%         2         35    5.7%          0         3       217        8.5%          1.4%

    No Resp             0          0     0.0%         1         0      0.0%        0         0     0.0%         0         0     0.0%          0         1          0       0.0%          0.0%

    Total               1       261      0.4%         3      312       1.0%        2      226      0.9%         3      130      2.3%          0         9       929        7.2%          1.5%


        2005-06
                                                                                                                                                                         4 Yr
                                                                                                                                                   Total                Derived       1 Year
                                                  Gr.      Gr.                 Gr.      Gr.                 Gr.      Gr.                 Other     Drops      Total     Dropout       Dropout
                   Gr. 9     Gr. 9                10       10                  11       11                  12       12                 Secndy      (9-      Enroll     Rate (9-      Rate (9-
Ethnic Group       Drop      Enroll      %       Drop     Enroll      %       Drop     Enroll      %       Drop     Enroll      %        Enrl       12)      (9-12)       12)           12)
American
Indian or
Alaska
Native              0          0        0.0%      0         2        0.0%      0         0        0.0%      0         0        0.0%       0         0          2          **          0.0%

Asian               0         18        0.0%      0        13        0.0%      0         8        0.0%      0         0        0.0%       1         0         40          **          0.0%
Pacific
Islander            0          0        0.0%      0         2        0.0%      0         1        0.0%      0         0        0.0%       0         0          3          **          0.0%

Filipino            0         24        0.0%      0        23        0.0%      0        13        0.0%      0         0        0.0%       1         0         61          **          0.0%

Hispanic or
Latino              0        203        0.0%      1       151        70.0%     0        68        0.0%      0         0        0.0%      12         1        434          **          20.0%

African
American            0         26        0.0%      0        20        0.0%      0        20        0.0%      0         0        0.0%       3         0         69          **          0.0%

White (not
Hispanic)           0         67        0.0%      0        75        0.0%      0        47        0.0%      0         0        0.0%       7         0        196          **          0.0%
Multiple or
No
Response            0          0        0.0%      0         0        0.0%      0         0        0.0%      0         0        0.0%       0         0          0          **          0.0%

Total               0        338        0.0%      1       286        30.0%     0       157        0.0%      0         0        0.0%      24         1        805          **          10.0%

        Dropout Formulae:
        ♦1 Year Rate Formula: (Gr. 9-12 Dropouts/Gr. 9-12 Enrollment)*100
        ♦4 Year Derived Rate Formula: (1-((1-(drop gr 9/enroll gr 9))*(1-(drop gr 10/enroll gr 10))*(1-(drop gr 11/enroll gr 11))*(1-(drop gr 12/enroll gr
        12))))*100
        ♦** Asterisks in the 4 year derived rate column indicate that one or more grade levels have zero enrollment. If a grade level has zero enrollment,
        the formula can not be calculated.




                                                                                                            2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 85
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Results of Parent Survey
We received responses from just 390 parents representing approximately 40% of our parents. Their
responses show an overall high level of support from, and awareness by, our parents. Noteworthy is the
fact that 90% of our parents see that we hold high expectations of our students (Question 2). Further,
93% of our parents know that they are invited to participate in school activities (Question 18). From
these survey results, we have been able to identify areas in need of improved communication. For
example, our parents need more information about the types of job shadowing and internship
opportunities that their children have access to.
                         Question                            Strongly   Agree    Disagree     Strongly          Don’t
                                                              Agree                           Disagree          Know
VISION/ LEADERSHIP
1.  Diversity of all types is honored and supported by         160       183        1            1               30
    students, teachers, and staff.                            (42%)     (48%)                                   (7%)
2.  My child’s teachers have high expectations.                154       189        7            3               25
                                                              (40%)     (50%)                                  (6.5%)
3. Overall, my child is treated with respect by teachers,      181       167         8           3               16
   administrators, security, other staff, and other           (48%)     (43%)     (2.1%)                       (4.2%)
   students.
4. I am aware of the decisions made by the school staff        145       188        12           7               21
   that support my student’s learning.                        (38%)     (49%)     (3.1%)                       (5.5%)
CURRICULUM
5. My child plans to go to college or technical school         296       67%        4            1                  6
   after he/she graduates.                                   (77.8%)    (17%)
6. My child has been involved in choosing courses to           183       147        20                           25
   achieve his/her future goals.                              (48%)     (39%)     (5.2%)                       (6.5%)
7. I am aware that my child has the opportunity to take        237       121         5           3               13
   Honors or Advanced Placement (AP) courses.                 (62%)     (32%)     (1.3%)                       (3.4%)
8.   I am aware that my child can belong to different          181       147        15            6              27
     small learning communities or academies (9th, AMC,       (48%)     (39%)     (3.9%)       (1.6%)          (7.1%)
     HHD, CE).
9.   My child has the opportunity to participate in            143       162        15            8              40
     community services, job shadowing, and real world        (38%)     (43%)     (3.9%)       (2.1%)          (11%)
     experiences through classes, clubs and organizations.
INSTRUCTION
10. My child’s teachers use a variety of strategies and        151       178        10           1               37
    resources to teach, including technology.                 (40%)     (47%)     (2.6%)                       (9.7%)
11. My child’s teachers understand the subject they            146       184         7           2               36
    teach, and use the California State Standards to guide    (38%)     (48%)     (1.8%)                       (9.4%)
    them what to teach.
ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY
12. I know what is expected of my child in each of             185       173         8           1                9
    his/her classes in terms of classroom and school-wide     (49%)     (45%)     (2.1%)                       (2.3%)
    rules.
13. My child’s teachers use a variety of techniques to         149       167        15           2               41
    evaluate student learning.                                (39%)     (44%)     (3.9%)                       (11%)
14. My child is aware of what he/she is expected to learn      217       151         2                            6
    to pass his/her class.                                    (57%)     (40%)                                  (1.5%)
STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES
15. My child has the opportunity to participate in school      209       147         8                           13
    leadership, clubs, and after school activities.           (55%)     (39%)     (2.1%)                       (3.4%)
16. My child has the opportunity to receive tutoring in        210       152        2                            15
    math, English, science, and CAHSEE preparation.           (55%)     (40%)                                  (3.9%)

17. If my child has a problem or questions about the           167       167        11           5               27
    future, he/she feels there are adults at the school       (44%)     (44%)     (2.9%)                       (7.1%)
    he/she can go to.
18. I am invited to participate in school activities.          151       201        13            4              21
                                                              (40%)     (53%)     (3.4%)       (1.0%)          (5.5%)
19. My child has the opportunity to learn life skills in       161       170         6            7              31
    programs such as field trips and guest speakers.          (42%)     (45%)                                  (8.1%)

20. Northridge Academy High School is a safe, secure,          237       138        1                             4
    and clean environment.                                    (62%)     (36%)                                   (1%)




                                                                          2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 86
     Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


     Results of Student Survey
     We received responses from over 740 students, just over 75% of our student population. We see that a
     majority of our students perceive themselves to be informed about their school and satisfied with most of
     their experiences. Over 90% of our students know of classroom and schoolwide expectations. Over 85%
     feel that they are treated with respect. Areas of concern emerge as 25% of our student either don’t know
     about AP and Honors course or don’t believe they have access to them. Approximately 20% of our
     students need more information about internships, job shadowing and other real world experiences.
                                                          Strongly   Agree        Disagree     Strongly     Don’t       #
                                                           Agree                               Disagree     Know        Of
                                                                                                                       Resp.
VISION/ LEADERSHIP

1.     Diversity is celebrated and supported by            189        390           30            6          63        678
       students, teachers, and staff.                     27.8%      57.5%          4.4                     9.2%
2.     My teachers have high expectations.                 241        374           29            7          37        688
                                                           35%       54.3%         5.6%                     5.3%
3.  Overall, I am treated with respect by teachers,        236        360           65           12          23        696
    administrators, security, other staff, and other      33.9%      51.7%         9.3%
    students.
4.  I am aware that the school makes decisions to          216        358           42           13          58        687
    support my learning.                                  31.4%      52.1%         6.1%                     8.4%
CURRICULUM
5.  I plan to go to college or technical school after I    468        167           12            6          49        702
    graduate.                                             66.6%      23.7%                                  6.9%
6.  I have been involved in choosing courses to            377        237           34           12          39        699
    achieve my future plans.                              53.9%      33.9%
7.  I am aware that I have opportunity to take             266        268            95          20          57        706
    Honors or Advanced Placement (AP) courses.            37.6%      37.9%         13.4%        2.8%        8.0%
8.  I am aware that all students belong to a small         365        234            28           3          55        685
    learning community (SLC) or Academy (9th,             53.2%      34.1%
    AMC, HHD, CE).
9.  I have the opportunity to participate in               266        297           45           12          64        684
    community services, job shadowing, and real           38.8%      43.4%                                  9.3%
    world experiences through classes, clubs and
    organizations.
INSTRUCTION
10. My teachers use a variety of strategies and            214        401           45           14          36        702
    resources to teach, including technology.             30.1%      56.4%
11. My teachers understand the subject they teach,         233        380           44            8          58        701
    and use the California state standards to guide       32.2%      52.5%         6.2%                     8.2%
    what to teach.
ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY
12. I know what is expected of me in each of my            315        334           24            6          27        706
    classes in terms of classroom and school-wide         44.6%      47.3%
    rules.
13. My teachers use a variety of techniques to             191        366           60           11          65        693
    evaluate my learning.                                 27.5%      52.8%         8.6%                     9.3%
14. I am aware of what I am expected to know for           208        398           50           10          33        699
    specific tests.                                       29.7%      56.9%         7.1%                     4.7%
STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES
15. I have the opportunity to participate in school        331        300           24            8          33        696
    leadership, clubs, and after school activities.       47.5%      43.1%
16. I have the opportunity to receive tutoring in          325        324           19            5          26        699
    math, English, science, and CAHSEE                    46.4%      46.2%
    preparation.
17. If I have a problem or questions about the             244        321           19            5          26        699
    future, I feel there are adults at the school I can   35.1%      46.2%
    go to.
18. My parents or guardians are invited to                 229        346           44           18           86       703
    participate in school activities.                     31.6%      49.2%         6.2%                     12.3%
19. I have the opportunity to learn life skills in         208        330           48           20           80       686
    programs such as internships, field trips, and        30.3%      48.1%         9.5%         2.9%        11.6%
    guest speakers.
20. Northridge Academy High School is a safe,              299        313           22           12          45        691
    secure, and clean environment.                        43.2 %     45.2%




                                                                             2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 87
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


The following lists represent selected comments from parents, guardians, and students.

Positive Comments from Our Parents/Guardians:
    It is such a good feeling for a parent that his child's school recognizes her ability and treat
       her cultivates her to be a leader, not a follower, and most of all to encourage her to
       achieve her academic goals. It is very fulfilling as a parent.
    Todo lo que se pueda hacer bien para beneficio de todos los estudiantes. (B)
    I couldn't be more impressed with the staff and school environment my son has the
       opportunity to learn from/in. Open House was a wonderful experience.
    Northridge Academy High School is a great learning environment for my child and I'm
       also sure for the rest of the student body.
    NAHS gives beyond my expectation for my child's education and preparing her for a UC
       or state school. Thank you.
    Overall I am very impressed with the leadership, curriculum, and instruction at NAHS.
    This is a model school. Other administrators should come to this school to observe a
       positive learning environment.

Concerns Expressed by Our Parents/Guardians:
   As a parent, I would like more information on the real world experiences through the
      classes, clubs, and organizations.
   At the Open House, I signed up for a conference and not even one teacher called me to
      schedule an appointment. I also e-mailed those teachers and never replied back.
   Some teachers show favoritism and do not grade all their classes fairly. Tutoring is not
      sufficient, i.e., students to student.

Positive Comments from Our Students
    I really enjoy coming to school here. I look forward to my future here at NAHS, and
       although there might be a few flaws, it is overall the best school I’ve attended.
    This school is a very good school and I love it.
    This school is a very nice environment to be in. I feel I’m getting a very good education.
    My teachers always mention standards, and the school is cleaner than anywhere I’ve
       been.
    NAHS is a really supportive school. People actually care. Very safe.
    This is the most welcoming school I’ve ever been to. I’m glad I got the opportunity to go
       here.
    This school is very safe. Teachers try to help us as much as possible. . . I with there was
       a tennis team here though.

Concerns Expressed by Our Students:
   There are no field trips. I have almost never been on one. (11th grade student)
   School is too small and needs [its] own soccer field. (10th grade student)
   More field trips. (9th grade student)
   I don’t like California state standards! (9th grade students)



                                                          2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 88
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




        Chapter II:
    Student/Community
         Profile –
Overall Summary Analysis of
         Profile Data


                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 89
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                      WASC Accreditation Self-Study 2008-2009
  Chapter II: Student/Community Profile – Overall Summary Analysis of Profile Data

        IMPLICATIONS OF THE DATA WITH RESPECT TO STUDENT
                          PERFORMANCE

ENROLLMENT
Northridge Academy HS has reached its maximum enrollment capacity at this time with
986 students. All of our classrooms are in full use without teachers having to travel,
except for our Advisory period where we have had to double up teachers and classes in
the library media center and one classroom. Two resource specialist teachers also share a
room to conduct their learning centers. Because of the smallness of our campus and the
lack of large spaces, we have difficulty holding events where all students can attend at the
same time, i.e., assemblies, school-wide presentations, etc.

Implications: Our staff has learned to adapt to the smallness of our school and to be
flexible and creative in our use of space. At the beginning of our second and third years
after opening, our students felt overcrowded as we added grade levels. However, because
we have invested in building a positive school culture, our students have adjusted to the
comparatively large numbers of new ninth graders coming in each year. All stakeholders
continue to work consciously on ways to make the ninth graders feel welcome while
maintaining a feeling of school pride and ownership among the continuing students.

With a smaller enrollment size in comparison to the 3500-4000 student enrollments at our
neighboring high schools, we have also had to creatively problem-solve ways to build a
viable master schedule so that all our students are not only able to take the necessary high
school graduation and A-G courses while being cored in English and Social Science
classes for Academy purposes, but also, have access to a variety of Advanced Placement
courses as well as electives that address their career pathway interests. Within our small
faculty of 49 teachers, a few have agreed to take on auxiliary periods to add needed
courses to our master while all of our faculty understand that year by year the courses
each teacher teaches may fluctuate based on students’ needs and changing district
guidelines regarding students-to-teacher ratios. We have also added Adult School and
Pierce College courses to our after school program to accommodate the needs of our
students, whether to make up failed courses or to enrich their program with electives.

 In addition, our staff members willingly wear multiple hats since we need the same level
of participation in governance groups, on committees, and for various initiatives as in
larger high schools. We also have no deans, and the only out-of-classroom positions are
those of the 3 administrators, 3 counselors, and one college counselor who also serves as
our bilingual coordinator and Title I coordinator. We have been fortunate this year to
have our Local District 1 literacy coach housed on our campus since she has willingly
organized her time to provide much-needed coordination, involvement, and support in
our WASC process. As a small school, despite the unpredictability of the district’s
norming guidelines and funding from year to year, all our stakeholders have made a
strong commitment to adjust and compensate to meet the needs of our students.



                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 90
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


PRIMARY LANGUAGES
Our data indicates that, after English, Spanish is the predominant primary home language
of our students. Because of this, all important written and verbal communication, such as
informative letters sent home and messages through our Connect-Ed phone system, must
be translated into Spanish.

 *Home Language       English      Spanish      Filipino          Arabic         Armenian         Korean
   # Students          362           520           31              11                7               7
  % of Students       37.1%         53.2%        3.2%             1.1%             .72%            .72%

Implications: Since we have only six office staff members, we rely heavily on the three
who are bilingual in English and Spanish for translation of written communications to
parents, as well as to serve as interpreters when we hold individual conferences with
Spanish-only parents and group meetings to disseminate important information. We are
fortunate that two of our three counselors are also bilingual, although this means they are
sometimes overwhelmed with assisting our round table conferences, SST meetings, IEP
meetings, parent phone calls, meetings with individual teachers with at-risk students and
their parents, and parent assemblies. Pre-scheduling everything well in advance,
therefore, becomes crucial for addressing everyone’s translation needs.

SPECIAL EDUCATION
Because of our Collaborative Model for Special Education, whereby almost all students
with IEPs are integrated into the general education program, our teachers have had to
adjust to meet the needs of the comparatively large number of students with special
needs. Over the past 4-1/2 years, the parents of special needs students who live in our
catchment area have applied in large numbers to our lottery process, leading to an
average enrollment each year of 14-15% of students with IEPs. We have stabilized in the
number of students who require Special Day Program (SDP) self-contained classes.
However, the SDP-eligible students with the most intensive academic needs also increase
our class sizes, since within our Collaborative Model, they attend the general education
social science, science and elective classes.

                    Year              Title I        Special Ed        GATE                 AP
                  2007-08              922              114                183              344
                  2006-07              901              106                173              259
                  2005-06              759              104                109              211
                  2004-05              378              59                 83               **

Implications: Our general education and special education teachers understand they
need to work together to ensure our special needs students are able to access and succeed
in general education classes through our Collaborative Model. As we monitor the results
of our implementation of this model, we are becoming more and more aware of the need
to explicitly provide professional development that develops all teachers’ skills in
effective differentiation of instruction, strategies for accommodating special needs
students, and best practices for co-teaching as well as for utilizing special education
assistants effectively.


                                                         2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 91
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATION (GATE)
Our GATE enrollment has continued to increase each year from 10.6% in the 2004-05
school year to 17.8 % of our student population this year. Our current GATE coordinator
has also been conducting a thorough search for additional students who matriculated from
middle school but had not yet been identified, and he will be adding more students to
these numbers as he completes the documentation process. One challenge we have had is
in retaining the same coordinator from year to year since this is a position taken on by a
full-time teacher as an additional assignment, and we had had to replace our original
experienced coordinator when he moved to another district. This is our third GATE
coordinator, a relatively new teacher, and he has had to quickly learn how to maximize
his new role to address the ongoing and growing needs of our GATE students.

                    2004-05         2005-06          2006-07         2007-08         2008-09
 Number Gifted         61             104              162             172             174
 % Gifted            10.6%           12.9%            16.7%           17.8%           17.8%

Implications: In examining the data regarding our GATE students, as well as listening to
the voices of our students, we realize we are still struggling to institute a consistent
process for addressing the diverse needs of our GATE students. Within each classroom,
the effective implementation of differentiated instruction varies, and teachers express
concern that, while working toward meeting the needs of heterogeneous groups of all our
students, they sometimes do not adequately address the varying needs of our gifted
students to the extent necessary. We have clustered GATE students in core content
courses and the vast majority of these students regularly enroll in AP courses. We have
developed an Honors Challenge contract whereby any student, including GATE students,
are encouraged to engage in honors level work and receive honors credit in our core
content classes. We continue to need to develop consistency in this process since we see
that some of our GATE students tend to underachieve as well as not choose to engage in
the Honors Challenge Program. In addition, our faculty needs to continue working on
improving consistency of Honors Challenge assignments within each department, as well
as across all departments, in order to ensure that the honors level work is characterized by
quality rather than quantity, incorporating research-based curricula, strategies, and tasks.




                                                       2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 92
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


ENGLISH LEARNERS
Our EL population has also increased this year to 12% from the 9% of last year. Our
Fluent English Proficient (FEP) population continues to increase each year. However,
our redesignation rate decreased last year, from the previous year, primarily due to
students not meeting proficiency on the CST’s. We also have been examining our
“D/Fail” lists and are seeing an increasing number of our EL students not passing, or
barely passing, their core content courses.

                                                     Fluent-English-Proficient
    Year       Enrollment      English Learners              Students            Students Redesignated FEP
 2008-09*        986            118 (12%)               Not Yet Available             Not Yet Available

  2007-08        969             88 (9%)                 483 (49.8%)                   23 (21.5%)

  2006-07        968           107 ( 11.1 %)            452 ( 46.7 %)                  35 ( 29.2 %)
  2005-06        805           120 ( 14.9 %)            341 ( 42.4 %)                  12 ( 15.2 %)
  2004-05        574           79 ( 13.8 %)             200 ( 34.8 %)                    0 ( 0.0%)

Implications: This is an area that our faculty has identified as high priority. In
examining our CST results, we see that our EL students are challenged in all content
areas, especially in English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics. Our teachers
observe our English Learners demonstrate difficulty reading and comprehending our
increasingly more comprehensive core content textbooks as well as difficulty with
writing tasks. Two ELA Learning Teams are currently in the midst of utilizing the
Pearson Achievement Solutions process to examine data, identify student needs, and
develop and implement targeted lessons. Results of this process indicate that many of
our 9th and 10th graders still are not proficient in understanding sentence structure and
parts of speech while our 11th and 12th graders require more scaffolding in effectively
utilizing evidence, rather than their own opinions, to respond to higher-level writing
prompts in more sophisticated, coherent formats. Our faculty, therefore, are focused on
utilizing research-based classroom strategies as well as implementing interventions to
help our EL students, as well as our FEP students, access the high school curriculum
more effectively.




                                                        2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 93
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




STABILITY RATE
The stability rate measures the percentage of students who enroll in the first month of
school and remain for the duration of the year. Our stability rate has increased by 6.65%
over the past 4 years to the present rate of 92.89%.

                                                                        Average Daily Rate of
       Year             Stability Rate         Transiency Rate               Attendance
      2007-08              92.89%                     8.26                     94.83%
      2006-07              90.52%                    10.31%                    94.82%
      2005-06              93.04%                    7.66%                     94.24%
      2004-05              86.24%                    14.81%                    93.95%

Implications: An increasing number of our students are remaining for the entire school
year, and in fact, are also remaining until their graduation. This positive trend continues
to motivate our staff to conscientiously facilitate the academic and personal development
of each student as students move from each grade level to the next. We also realize the
need to become better at explicitly planning and documenting how we do this as a school,
as grade levels, and as academies so that we are able to sustain our high stability rate and
all stakeholders are knowledgeable regarding shared expectations and desired outcomes.


TRANSIENCY RATE
The transiency rate measures the percentage of students leaving during the school year,
including students who move out of the area or transition to other communities and
schools. Our transiency rate has dropped over the past 4 years to a current rate of 8.26%,
indicating improvement. (See chart above.)

Implications: Over the past four years, less students have moved to access other school
options. We need to continue monitoring reasons for movement and document
successful strategies so that they become institutionalized and our success rate continues.


AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF ATTENDANCE
Our Average Daily Rate of Attendance has increased by 0.88% over the past 4 years to
the current rate of 94.83 %. Currently, our attendance rate is the highest among all high
schoosl in our Local District. (See chart above.)

Implications: We are doing a better job of getting students to be in school on a daily
basis. As with transiency and stability, we need to continue documenting and monitoring
how we attained successful results so that we institutionalize successful strategies.




                                                       2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 94
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE INDEX (API)
For 2007-08, our API score rose 31 points from the previous year, and we exceeded our
growth target with an API of 711. We had become increasingly concerned about the drop
in our API over the last couple of years since we had started strong in our first year of
opening the school with an API of 742. However, we also had been forewarned that this
drop was likely to happen so we concentrated on developing focused interventions and
possible preventions. One component, whereby we have been successful in linking what
we learned from our data to successful implementation of interventions, has been in
supporting students to successfully pass the CAHSEE.

                                     API                                      Met 2006-07 Growth API Target

                                           2007-08                                     Comparable          Both
    Number of        2008                  Growth    2007-08                          Improvement       Schoolwide
     Students       Growth   2007 Base      Target   Growth          Schoolwide           (CI)            and CI

       700           711       680           6         31               Yes                Yes                Yes


Implications: A key focus area for all stakeholders needs to be in the examination of
data and utilizing what we learn to continue best practices while also bringing together a
comprehensive, coordinated system of interventions to address gaps in our students’
achievement. We learned from the success of doing this for raising our CAHSEE pass
rate last year. Our next steps will, therefore, need to focus on the other factors that affect
both our API and AYP, in particular, performance on the CST’s by each subgroup.

ADEQUATE YEARLY PROGRESS (AYP)
In 2007-08, for the first time since opening our school, we did not make AYP due to
meeting only 17 of the 18 AYP criteria. Our EL students did not meet proficiency in
Mathematics. In addition, they met ELA percentage proficiency in 2007-08 through the
safe harbor provision, which means, we moved enough students from Far Below Basic
(FBB) to Basic (B) but, without the safe harbor margin, we would not have been able to
meet our expected outcome for EL students. We recognize we must continue to examine
our subgroup data since, each year as the criterion levels rise, we will need to ensure that
we are not only moving our EL students forward but that we are also moving all other
subgroups forward, in particular our Hispanic/Latino subgroup in Mathematics.

                                                            2007-08      2006-07       2005-06
 Made AYP                                                      No             Yes         Yes
 Met AYP Criteria                                           17 of 18     18 of 18      18 of 18
 ELA Participation Rate                                        Yes            Yes         Yes
 Math Participation Rate                                       Yes            Yes         Yes
 ELA Percent Proficient                                        Yes            Yes         Yes
 Math Percent Proficient                                       No             Yes         Yes
 Academic Performance Index (API)                              Yes            Yes         Yes
 Graduation Rate                                               Yes            Yes         Yes




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Implications: If we do not meet the percent proficient criteria for EL students in
Mathematics this year, we will become a Program Improvement school in the following
year. In addition, we will not be meeting outcomes specified in our District
Superintendent’s Action Plan. Our staff has committed to making this a priority area for
our school’s action plan, and we have been researching innovative ways to address these
outcome gaps for our EL students. Again, a coordinated system of interventions is
needed since we recognize that we need to maximize the limited funding, resources, and
staffing of our small school to address identified gaps in the most powerful way to make
the most impact on our students’ achievement.
.
ANNUAL MEASURABLE OBJECTIVES (AMOs)
In examining the performances of our subgroups, our top critical need is in supporting the
progress of EL students in both ELA and Math while our next areas of need are for White
students in Math, Hispanic/Latino students in ELA, and Socio-economically
Disadvantaged students in Math. In addition, although not numerically significant due to
student numbers below 100, our Students with Disabilities also continue to require
targeted learning supports. Based on a separate report of the Modified Consent Decree
criteria, our Students with Disabilities subgroup met the outcome for ELA but not for
Mathematics.

                                               English-Language Arts : Target 33.4%                      Mathematics: Target 32.2%
                                                                                                    Met All Percent Proficient Rate Criteria?
                                            Met All Percent Proficient Rate Criteria? Yes                             No
                                                                           Met
                                                No. at or     % at or      2007                             No. at or     % at or     Met 2007
                                   Valid         Above        Above        AYP       Alternative   Valid     Above        Above        AYP
 Groups                            Scores       Proficient   Proficient   Criteria    Method       Scores   Proficient   Proficient   Criteria
  School-wide                       207           113          54.6         Yes                     210        99          47.1          Yes
  African American or Black
  (not of Hispanic origin)          13              8          61.5          --                     13          6          46.2          --
  American Indian or Alaska
  Native                             0              --           --          --                      0          --           --          --
  Asian                             11              8          72.7          --                     11          9          81.8          --
  Filipino                          21             13          61.9         --                      21         15          71.4          --
  Hispanic or Latino                116            55          47.4        Yes                      119        50           42          Yes
  Pacific Islander                   0              --           --         --                       0          --           --          --
  White (not of Hispanic origin)    46             29           63           --                     46         19          41.3          --
  Socio-economically
  Disadvantaged                     133            66          49.6        Yes                      135        57          42.2         Yes
  English Learners                  81             27          33.3        Yes          SH          83         23          27.7          No
  Students with Disabilities        27              4          14.8         --                      27          2           7.4          --


Implications: As with API and AYP results, our stakeholders will need to examine
research-based strategies for raising the performance levels of our identified subgroups
while also supporting the continued growth of all subgroups. We have made a good start
with CAHSEE interventions and facilitation of successful high school graduation for all
our students. Our outcomes for meeting and exceeding AYP and AMO outcomes for our
EL students is a priority that will be addressed in our WASC Action Plan.




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                   Chapter III:
                 Progress Report



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                               WASC Self-Study Report 2008-2009
                        Chapter III: Progress Report: Our Responses to the
                          Initial WASC Visit Recommendations of 2006

The Initial WASC Visit in 2006 helped NAHS stakeholders identify and address six critical areas
in which to grow. We brought together two small, but key groups – the Professional
Development Committee and the Academy Facilitators Team – to integrate them into one
Leadership Team that now discusses and facilitates the implementation of school-wide
outcomes-based efforts, including the Initial WASC recommendations. The following is an
explanation of how we have addressed these recommendations since the 2006 visit.

RECOMMENDATION 1: The need to shift from an adult-centered
perspective to a focus on student learning.

How We Have Responded:
   Our focus during our early years was on creating structures, systems, and policies.
   We’ve made concerted efforts to involve students in leadership and governance meetings.
   We’ve added additional student support personnel.
   Our small learning communities are growing to support student involvement and
     achievement.
   Our advisory program is growing to support student achievement.
   Our CSUN connections are growing to support student achievement.

Representative Accomplishments:
    By engaging students in leadership and governance meetings, we are supporting their
      development as Powerful Thinkers.
    The development of small learning communities and our advisory program is aligned to
      our Single Plan for Student Achievement.
    The development of a comprehensive student activities and athletics program has
      provided more opportunities for student participation, involvement, and achievement.

Student academic and personal success is at the heart of all we do at Northridge Academy High
School. Because of this passion and commitment, much attention in our early years was placed
on the development of the roles and responsibilities of the adult stakeholders of our community.
Even before our school opened in September 2004, the adult stakeholders understood the
necessity of setting a foundational context based on clearly defined shared core values of all our
stakeholders.

Initially, much of our outwardly visible efforts did go toward the structures, systems, and
policies needed to allow the school to function safely and effectively. We needed attendance
policies, a school-wide discipline policy, and equity and access protocols. It was no surprise that
the Initial Visiting Team would see much of our time and attention dedicated to these critical
matters. However, underlying all of these “operational” policies and protocols, there have
always been our shared core values linked to actions and systems based on the focused work of
all our stakeholders, including both NAHS and CSUN faculty and staff, NAHS students, and
their parents. Because of this explicit work, we were able to develop a true “pulse” for our


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school culture. Based upon the recommendation of the Initial WASC Visiting Team, we
expanded the active involvement of our students in leadership and governance where, with staff
and parents, students play a key role in shaping school policies and defining resource allocation.

By 2007, just two years after opening, our enrollment numbers had stabilized and the
parent/student choice to come to NAHS was being based on the growing respect our community
held for our school. Less faculty meeting time needed to be given to the establishment of
common policies and procedures, allowing us to delve deeper into the question of how we would
ensure that all students achieved our school-wide expected learning results. We finally were able
to hire a College Counselor/Title I Coordinator who, from a central location, now provides
students greater access to supports and resources leading to a “college-going culture”. With new
State funding allocations, we added a third counselor that year, significantly reducing the
student-counselor ratio, allowing students more individualized academic counseling.

Perhaps the most salient evidence of our increased focus on student learning is the current,
ongoing development of our small learning communities (SLCs), or academies. Research has
shown us that smaller learning communities are essential to a student’s success by creating a
safe, personalized learning environment in which each student feels recognized and supported.
We also know that interdisciplinary instruction deepens student learning by enabling students to
see big pictures connected to their lives and their community. So, we dedicate ourselves to
providing our students with a quality, creative, engaging education within each of our academies,
based on student interests and needs.

The development of our advisory curriculum is yet another manifestation of our dedicated focus
on student learning. Grade-level curricula have been created to develop students’ awareness and
understanding of graduation and college admission requirements as well as career pathways.
Our 9th Grade Bridge Academy advisory curriculum is exemplary. Even before the school year
starts, through our student-led Link Crew orientation, incoming freshmen are welcomed and
given the chance to build friendships that create an academic and personal safety net for them
when the school year starts. The 9th grade advisory curriculum addresses very practical skills
and strategies for academic success in high school: time management, accessing information on
the Internet, basic computer skills (e.g. Word documents, PowerPoint presentations), and more.

Over time, we have also built a true high school culture of student leadership, clubs, activities,
sports, and traditions. In almost all cases, students have been the initiators of these, garnering
sponsorship from staff members and participation from enough students with similar interests to
sustain over 25 different clubs and a strong, active Student Body Leadership program.

The NAHS-CSUN partnership has been an effective motivational tool for our students. By
attending selected CSUN events, observing CSUN classes, and touring the CSUN campus, our
students get a clearer picture of their future and choices after graduation. Various groups of
CSUN students often participate in NAHS activities and serve as role models for our high school
students. Several of our former graduates, who are now attending CSUN, return to our campus
on a regular basis to mentor and tutor our students because they feel this is filling a huge need in
our community, that of developing a college-going legacy among students who will be the first
in their families to attend college.



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RECOMMENDATION 2: The development of a school-wide emphasis on
student academic achievement to include: Collaborative identification of
Expected School-wide Learning Results to be submitted by June 30, 2006.

How We Have Responded:
   We opened our school with a clear vision and expectations that all students will succeed.
   Our ESLR’s were drafted by a committee of teachers, administrators, parents, students,
     and CSUN partners.
   Our ESLR’s were updated and revised by the faculty and students in May 2007.

Representative Accomplishments:
    Having clearly stated ESLR’s as well as ESLR rubrics and activities (see Appendix) has
      provided stakeholders with evidence of our students’ gains in our expected school-wide
      learning results.

Staff prioritized this recommendation as the first to work on. Shortly after the Initial Visit, we
began the process of creating clearly defined and measurable ESLR’s. A committee of teachers,
administrators, students, and parents began to review ESLR’s of neighboring schools as well as
examples of ESLR’s on the Internet, seeking to find guidance to form our own statements that
aligned with our school’s vision, mission, and guiding principles, as well as our Learning
Conversation Principles and our day-to-day practices. Through much discussion, we identified
our five ESLR’s. That first set of ESLR’s was introduced to staff at a faculty meeting in April
2006 and to our parents at a meeting preceding our spring semester Parent Night in May 2006.

In the following year (2007-08), the ESLR’s were incorporated further into our school culture by
their inclusion in the student agenda planner books and supported through planned Advisory
ESLR activities to ensure that every NAHS student knows and understands our ESLR’s.
Further, the Senior Portfolio, a NAHS requirement for participation in graduation ceremonies,
was updated to include a student-generated ESLR essay in which our students reflect on how
their four years at NAHS has supported their growth in each of the five ESLR’s.

In May 2008, Professional Development activities were created to allow the entire staff and our
CSUN partners to re-examine each ESLR more closely, to envision what student success in each
ESLR would look like, and suggest revisions to our ESLR’s, resulting in clearer, community-
friendly language. Revised ESLR’s were shared with the wider community, including parents,
students, and other CSUN faculty, and the revision was adopted for the 2008-09 school year.
The current agenda planner includes the revised ESLR’s, and Advisory activities continue to
support students’ awareness and ownership of these student outcomes.

Our ESLR’s have been foundational in supporting the academic and personal development of
our students, even after they graduate. Many of our graduates regularly return to “give back” to
our school by serving as mentors and tutors to our at-risk students, giving presentations about
school success and college preparation, sharing expertise with our Leadership program and
clubs, assisting with major school events, serving as assistant coaches for our athletic teams,
assisting office staff with critical tasks, and much more.



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RECOMMENDATION 3: More effective use of data to drive instruction.

How We Have Responded:
   The data we are now generating allows us to gain better insights.
   More faculty and department time is being allotted to data analysis.

Representative Accomplishments:
    Data analysis (e.g., CST scores, periodic assessments, CAHSEE results) has been
      discussed by whole faculty, departments, and Academies.
    We have processes in place to analyze data to inform all budget decisions, professional
      development, and instructional priorities.

After opening our doors to 9th and 10th grade students in September 2004, we added a new
freshman class each of the following two years until we reached near maximum enrollment in
September 2007. Therefore, it has taken a few years to gather comparison data that we are now
able to examine more thoroughly to inform instruction and monitor our progress.

We now are receiving test scores and other data that had not existed previously, data that allows
us to see bigger pictures of who our students are and how well they are learning from our
teaching. Complete data now allows us to see patterns, find anomalies, and draw conclusions.
Whole faculty, as well as department and academy time, has subsequently been dedicated to the
analysis of our data, with guide questions provided to structure teachers’ conversations around
using data to inform instruction. Further, we have developed better articulated processes to use
data to inform professional development and budget decisions.

RECOMMENDATION 4: Professional development focused on identified
student needs.

How We Have Responded:
   Participation in the Pearson Achievement Solutions program has helped us focus on
     identified student needs.
   Small Learning Community implementation and development relies on student voice and
     articulated needs
   CSUN, NAHS, community representatives, and parent representatives met for a two-day
     retreat to plan integrated curricular units based on student needs.
   Distributive leadership allows entire staff to share areas of expertise to better serve all
     students.

Representative Accomplishments:
    We are focusing our attention on targeted groups of students who did not meet the AYP.
    We are utilizing District-provided resources (e.g., Pearson Achievement Solutions) to use
      evidence of student achievement more effectively in planning instruction.
    We continue to develop our skills to use data to effectively inform instruction.




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When NAHS opened, the faculty and staff adopted this unofficial motto: “Every student who
walks through these gates is ours.” That simple belief has manifested itself in a school that gives
up on no child, transfers no child on the basis of disciplinary concerns, and strives to provide
individualized support in whatever way a student might need in order to become successful.

In August, 2007, the NAHS faculty began its participation in the research-based Pearson
Achievement Solutions program, a professional development program based on the concepts that
“schools must be places of learning for both students and teachers” (Pearson Learning Teams
Manual, 2008) and that “you haven’t taught until they have learned” (John Wooden, 2005).
Teachers learn, using a Seven-Step Protocol, how to purposefully identify and address common
student needs.

Throughout the 2007-08 school year, core content teachers in Math, Science, English, and Social
Studies, along with Special Education teachers who selected a core content area to join, met
regularly in Learning Teams to thoughtfully construct standards-based lessons based on a student
need identified and clearly defined through data analysis. Instructional choices for the lesson
were collaboratively developed, keeping in mind the ultimate task of examining student work in
an intensive, hands-on way. When the Learning Team analyzed the student work, the questions
asked were: “Did the instruction meet the students’ needs?” and “What can we do better to even
more effectively meet these needs?”

The Pearson cycle of planning has been a positive influence on departmental level planning,
teaching us how to use student work and evidence of student success to inform curriculum
development and instructional planning. This year, we are continuing the Achievement
Solutions professional development program with Learning Teams for Math, English and Social
Studies. Our data inquiry has also informed us of the need to focus a significant amount of our
district-provided professional development time on school-wide strategies that will permeate all
classrooms, including SDAIE and literacy strategies.

During the past year, and continuing into this year, a second major focus for our professional
development has evolved around the development of our Academies, or Small Learning
Communities, based on student voice. Students have clearly stated that they learn best when they
can make connections among content areas and can link their learning to real life. Therefore, a
significant portion of our District-allocated professional development time for 2007-08 was
dedicated to re-visiting the vision, mission and goals of our Academies and developing action
plans that align with each of our four Academies’ goals.

In April 2008, NAHS and CSUN faculty participated in an intensive weekend retreat, funded by
CSUN, to develop the details of the Academy action plans and to define how our NAHS/CSUN
partnership would effectively support our Academies. Our newly-hired Family Center Director,
a parent of one of our students who has been developing a more effective parent network, served
as a key participant by providing the much-needed parent voice. This year, we will continue to
set aside professional development time to analyze the impact of this Academy work on student
achievement and to learn and implement research-based strategies that will increase the
effectiveness of our Academies.




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Finally, distributive leadership amongst staff is structured and developed through our
professional development. Since the beginning, staff has been encouraged to share best practices
and expertise and regularly serve as facilitators and presenters in workshops designed to address
achievement gaps and identified student needs.

RECOMMENDATION 5: Development of more focused student
interventions.

How We Have Responded:
   Based on data analysis, we have created intervention programs which address specific
     needs and/or student populations.
   We are using CST data to identify student needs and allocating Title I resources to
     provide support and intervention.

Representative Accomplishments:
    CAHSEE Preparation and Intervention
    CST Preparation and Intervention
    At-Risk Students Intervention
    English Language Learners Intervention
    Special Education Students Intervention

As recommended by the Initial WASC Visit, we examined our data over the last two years.
Specific needs emerged, and we developed the following interventions as an integral part of our
school program while monitoring effectiveness each year to determine continued need:

    CAHSEE Preparation and Intervention: A 30-hour Saturday course for increasing the
     pass rate of 10th graders taking the exam for the first time, as well as 11th and 12th graders
     who have not yet passed. An online tutorial program adopted by LAUSD last year is
     addressing the needs of our 11th and 12th graders who traditionally have struggled with
     previous test preparation using “book work”. We have also instituted a CAHSEE Boot
     Camp that involves intensive CAHSEE preparation for five half-days just prior to the
     CAHSEE make-up administration for 12th graders who have not passed. Since data has
     shown us that most of these students have IEPs, we have selected Special Education
     teachers who also are trained in the CAHSEE Prep programs to implement the Boot
     Camp. In particular, they are able to teach our students with special needs how to utilize
     testing accommodations to their advantage.

       Our Math and English teachers have developed an “exchange program” with our 10th
       grade Advisory teachers whereby, three weeks before the March CAHSEE examination,
       sample CAHSEE Math and English questions, as well as terminology and testing
       strategies, are reviewed with all 10th graders during Advisory each morning.

    CST Preparation and Intervention: Our teachers and students are eager to raise individual
     as well as school-wide CST scores. We determined, through research of effective
     schools, that an important aspect of helping students perform better on tests was to teach
     students to understand their own data. Last year, our testing coordinator coordinated a


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       process through our advisories in which students recorded their previous year’s CST
       scores on a form, discussed what their scores meant and what they needed to do to raise
       their scores, and then, developed and committed to an improved outcome. A celebration
       was planned for the fall semester for students who met or exceeded their CST goals.

    At-Risk Students Intervention: We have been looking carefully at data regarding retained
     students in each grade level who are in danger of not graduating with their class due to
     course fails and lack of credits. Based on this data, our counseling staff has developed a
     comprehensive guidance program that includes conferencing with these students and their
     parents, providing focused guidance in special small group assemblies at the very
     beginning of each year, reviewing Individualized Graduation Plans (IGPs) with all
     students and more intensively with our at-risk students, and guiding students to enroll in
     after school and Saturday classes to make up failed classes and earn missed credits. In
     addition, all students are encouraged to participate in our tutoring program, take
     community college classes held on our campus, or on college campuses, and access
     occupational program courses, for academic enrichment and/or development of additional
     skills related to the student’s career pathway. We have also instituted and expanded an
     LAUSD Adult School program on our campus to increase accessibility to course
     offerings since transportation is an issue for many of our students.

    English Learners Intervention: Our data continues to reveal a significant achievement
     gap for our EL students in English Language Arts and Mathematics, as well as a need to
     help our Limited English Proficient (LEP) students to move to Redesignated Fluent
     English Proficient (RFEP) status. Therefore, we are taking focused action, including the
     following steps:
         1. EL workshop: Presentation and Question-and-Answer session with all LEP
            students to discuss how redesignation works and what part the student can play to
            move toward successful RFEP status.
         2. Individualized conferencing with student, parent and counselor with a focus on
            success in all courses, especially English and math, and in participation in
            CAHSEE Saturday Intervention classes
         3. Plan for professional development focused on research-based SDAIE strategies
         4. Round table discussions and Student Success Team meetings where the student
            and parent meet with his/her teachers and counselor to discuss strengths and
            challenges and plan a course of action with appropriate supports.
         5. Recently, we began one period of a learning support elective in which we have
            enrolled EL students who have experienced a history of low marks in core content
            courses and below basic score on the CST’s.
         6. Bilingual Family Center Director focus on parent outreach and education on how
            to navigate the high school process

    Special Education Students Intervention: Our Modified Consent Decree team reviews
     data regularly to monitor the progress of our students with special needs. Data analysis
     indicates that our Special Education students have met growth targets in English
     Language Arts but not in Mathematics. We developed a co-teaching model within a
     general education Advanced Applied Math class where a general education math teacher



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       and a special education teacher work together to help all students to enhance their math
       skills to perform at higher levels on the CAHSEE. This year, a special math elective,
       taught by a Special Education Teacher, is in place to address 11th and 12th grade special
       needs students with significant gaps in math skills.

RECOMMENDATION 6: Effective allocation of all resources based upon
identified student needs.

How We Have Responded:
   We created a proposal process for requesting the use of Title I funds based on supporting
     and increasing student achievement.
   Allocation of other funds is now based on identification of student needs.

Representative Accomplishments:
    Data analysis has enabled us to assess the equitable and effective use of Title I funds
    Programs and activities supported by Title I funds help students meet expected school-
      wide learning results.
    Our School-wide Single Plan is based on data analysis to determine priorities.

This recommendation of the WASC Initial Visiting Team helped administration and the
leadership teams on our campus think about ways to make the connection between resource
allocation and student need more explicit to all staff and school governance groups. In
particular, the School Site Council (SSC), composed of elected staff, parents and students, has
been taking a closer look at how funds and resources are allocated to address identified student
needs, especially in addressing the school’s School-wide Single Action Plan. A proposal process
is now in place whereby staff may request specific amounts from Title I funds but must provide a
written description of how these funds will specifically be used to support and increase student
achievement. In this way, all staff members have gained understanding that data analysis of
student needs is central to the allocation of funds and resources.

Other resources, such as funds for registration at outside conferences, monies to set up an
intervention program, or use of school equipment, are also based on identified student needs.
Each funding stream requires a clearly-defined budget, based on identified student needs and
allocated to maximize effectiveness. The ultimate questions of the administrators and all
leadership teams on our campus, including the School Leadership Team (SLC), Instructional
Cabinet (IC), and Professional Development/Academy Facilitators Team, are: “How will you
use the funds and/or resources – including allocation of time - to raise student achievement?
What will you do to maximize the impact on achievement? How will you measure this impact?”

These questions apply, even to the funding that is provided to us through a non-profit parent
group, Friends of NAHS, which specifically raises funds to provide monies and resources to our
school. The Friends of NAHS Board Members require information that informs them how the
funds will be spent to address student needs before any monies will be released.

We are confident that the processes and procedures we have institutionalized to use data to
identify resource allocation priorities have set a precedent that will serve us well in the future.


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               Chapter 4:
          Self-Study Findings



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               Chapter 4:
          Self-Study Findings
                Organization:
       Vision and Purpose, Governance,
      Leadership and Staff, and Resources



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Focus Team A: Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance,
           Leadership and Staff, and Resources
                                          Team Leaders




                   Pat Haywood, Social Studies, Health and Human Development Academy
                         Jeanie Mortensen, Mathematics, 9th Grade Bridge Academy

                                        Team Members




                      Holly Brown, Student; Arts, Media, and Communication Academy
                     Trevor Caskey, Student; Arts, Media, and Communication Academy
                      Sue Gordon, English; Arts, Media, and Communication Academy
        Karen M. Matsui, Assistant Principal; Careers in Education Academy/9th Grade Bridge Academy
                                      Marc McPhee, Teacher-Librarian
                   Joanna Nuguid, Counselor; Arts, Media, and Communication Academy
              Mary Jo Sariscsany, CSUN Kinesiology; Health and Human Development Academy
               Linda Severino, Special Education; Arts, Media, and Communication Academy
                  Donna Smith, LAUSD Articulation Community Partnership Administrator
                      David Speer, Science; Health and Human Development Academy
                      Chris Wegner, English; Arts Media and Communication Academy
                            Tracy Weinper, Title I Coordinator/College Counselor
                        Elizabeth Zambrano, Student; Careers in Education Academy



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                                Northridge Academy High School
                               WASC Self-Study Report 2008-2009
                                       Focus on Learning

                           CHAPTER IV: SELF-STUDY FINDINGS

     CATEGORY A. ORGANIZATION: VISION AND PURPOSE, GOVERNANCE,
               LEADERSHIP AND STAFF, AND RESOURCES


A1: To what extent does the school have a clearly stated vision or purpose
based on its student needs, current educational research and the belief that
all students can achieve high levels?

To what extent is the school’s purpose supported by the governing board and
the central administration and further defined by expected school-wide
learning results and the academic standards?

                                      Findings                                         Data/Evidence

Northridge Academy High School has a clearly stated vision and mission which
                                                                                         Mission and
reflect our commitment to the success of all students. We are dedicated to                    Vision
providing a standards-based curricular program that will enable our students to           Statements
achieve our expected school-wide learning results and meet or exceed high
academic standards.

Vision and Mission
The development of the current vision and mission statements for Northridge
Academy High School has been a collaborative and evolving process. Before the
school opened in the fall of 2004, the administration, staff, and CSUN partners
spent significant time discussing and defining the elements of a vision and core
values that would serve as the foundation for our new school. Once we had
                                                                                        Meeting notes
enrolled our very first student body, we invited all students and their parents to
join in the development of this vision and our guiding principles. Through our
newly-established Advisory program, each and every student contributed to our
school-wide definition of “what makes an ideal school?” through a reflective
activity. All parents were invited to a series of meetings where they too were
asked the same question. As a result, we were able to identify common core
values and norms, across all stakeholder groups, which would become the
precursors of our current vision and mission for the school.

Over the next several years, these guiding principles have been refined to state
more clearly the importance of academic success, personal integrity, instructional            ESLR’s
innovation, and a culture of community. In 2006, as a result of the initial WASC
visit recommendations, Expected School-wide Learning Results (ESLR’s) were
identified and adopted. The details of this process are provided in Chapter 3.

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During the 2007-08 school year, we determined that there was a need to re-visit
the school’s vision, core values and ESLR’s, particularly within our Academy
structure. In April 2008, CSUN sponsored a weekend retreat for faculty,
administration, and CSUN partners, as well as representatives from our parents,
local district, and community. Significant time was spent reviewing what aspects
of our academy structure have been working well and what improvements were                Notes/Charts
                                                                                          from Retreat
needed. Goals for the upcoming school year were set. An important outcome of
this retreat was the opportunity to solidify the vision and core values of the school
and use them not only for evaluation of existing programs, but also for planning
of new initiatives. In addition, the Big Idea of “Finding Your Voice” was
adopted for the 2008-09 school year. This big idea has become a theme for many
interdisciplinary lessons, academy projects, service learning projects, and student
leadership and club activities.

During the summer of 2008, with the results of the retreat still fresh in our minds,
a committee of faculty and administration met with a facilitator to synthesize a
formal vision statement and mission statement based on a compilation of the               Meeting notes
original vision and core values, the ESLR’s, and the results of discussions at
professional development meetings and the retreat. A proposed mission
statement was developed and then presented to the faculty and administration.
After discussion, the statement was resoundingly approved.

Although there was significant support and appreciation for our original school
motto, “The Choice is Learning”, we decided to develop a new school motto that
reflected the newly adopted school mission statement. “Inspire and Achieve” was           School motto
approved by all stakeholders as a memorable summarization of our mission
statement since it explicitly embodied our collective beliefs and expectations.

The formal vision statement was also developed and adopted in 2008 after a
series of committee meetings, faculty/staff feedback, and voting by faculty, staff,
parents, and students. It reflects the culmination of years of reflection,                     Meeting
                                                                                           notes/voting
discussion, and refinement. From the initial discussions of the administration and              ballots
faculty that opened the campus, the vision of Northridge Academy High School
has been to ensure the academic success of all students who enroll here and to
effectively meet their needs.

Our school purpose is established in our ESLR’s and our Single Plan for Student
Achievement. The Single Plan is developed with input from all stakeholders,
data-driven, standards-driven, and approved by the LAUSD Central and Local
District governing offices. The academic focus is on students scoring proficient or      Single Plan for
above on the California Standards Tests (CST’s), passing the California High                    Student
                                                                                           Achievement
School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), and completing LAUSD graduation and UC/CSU
A-G requirements. In addition, the plan focuses on the school climate ensuring
that all students experience a safe and supportive learning environment as
measured by student, parent, and staff surveys.

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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Student Needs
Our students are very diverse. Each has unique needs that must be addressed in
order to achieve at high levels. Some of our students are identified as
academically or artistically gifted. Some have significant athletic abilities. Some
have physical, emotional, or behavioral disabilities that make learning a
challenge.     Some are learning English.         Some have an abundance of
developmental assets that provide support for learning and personal growth.
                                                                                               School
Others have significantly fewer of these assets and require more support outside          observations
themselves to develop a stronger base of personal assets. Our vision and mission
statements specifically address both the universal and diverse needs of our
students. They reflect the universal hope of academic achievement and personal
integrity for all our students. They also recognize the diversity of our student
body. We are committed to using innovation and our creativity to help diverse
learners attain academic success. The importance that inspiration and support
play in creating a highly-effective learning environment is understood, stated, and
enacted throughout the high school community.

The implementation of the vision and mission statements and the ESLR’s is
visible throughout Northridge Academy High School. It can be seen in the small                 School
learning communities, collaborative model for special education, interdisciplinary        observations
lessons, advisory, service learning, inquiry-based instruction, heterogeneous
groupings, the 9th Grade Bridge Academy, and the many other educational
innovations and models actively in motion to meet the universal and individual
needs of the students at Northridge Academy.

Our parents express strong support for the vision and mission of this school.
Through a recent survey we learned that 90% of our parents either agree or              Parent survey,
                                                                                            Self study
strongly agree that NAHS teachers hold high expectations of our students.                 report, Ch 1
Moreover, 94% of our parents know what is expected of their children in each of
their classes, and 97% state that their children know what they are expected to
learn to succeed in their classes.

District and CSUN Connections
All of our efforts are supported by school administration, the Shared Use
Agreement with CSUN, the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between our                     Shared Use
school and United Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA), and the various councils                  Agreement
and governance groups at our school, such as SLC, SSC, CEAC and ELAC. In
                                                                                          UTLA/NAHS
addition to their representation on these committees, parents provide support                  MOU
through Friends of NAHS, our booster organization, and the coordination of the
Family Center. In the past, our guiding norms and values permeated and became            Meeting sign-
the foundation for the discussions in these groups. Now that the mission and                 in sheets
vision statements are formalized, they will be even more effectively used in
decision-making.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


The MOU between NAHS and UTLA was developed by our NAHS
administrators, district representatives from the Office of Staff Relations, and
union representatives and approved by our then LAUSD Superintendent prior to
the hiring of our staff. This MOU, unique to LAUSD and UTLA, defines special
attributes of our school and the enrollment process of our students, as well as
specific expectations for faculty who are hired to work at NAHS, including
agreement to: work in a highly collaborative manner with their NAHS colleagues
                                                                                               MOU
and CSUN partners; continually learn and utilize skills regarding new
technologies and our interactive video-technology for supporting classroom
instruction; participate in our small learning community structure of 3 thematic
academies (AMC, HHD, and CE); support the inclusion model for our special
education program; and support and participate in our partnership with CSUN
which includes a teacher training component funded by two grants awarded to
CSUN. In addition, teachers understand that every classroom has interactive
cameras, controlled by the teacher, to be used for educational interaction between
NAHS and CSUN, but not for evaluation of teachers.

Current Educational Research
Even before we opened, we have maintained the practice of grounding our
decision-making and practice in current research. Educational literature that has
greatly influenced our thinking include: Ten Steps to a Learning Organization
(Kline and Saunders, 1996); Setting Our Sights: Measuring Equity in School
Change (Johnson, 1996); From Gatekeeper to Advocate (Hart, 1992); What’s
Worth Fighting For In Your School (Fullan and Hargreaves, 1996); The
Productive High School: Creating Personalized Academic Communities
(Murphy, et al, 2001); Results Now: How We Can Achieve Unprecedented
Improvements in Teaching and Learning (Schmoker, 2006); On Common
Ground: The Power of Professional Learning Communities (DuFour, et al, 2005);
Classroom Instruction that Works (Marzano, et al, 2001); and Data-Driven
Dialogue: A Facilitator’s Guide to Collaborative Inquiry (Wellman and Lipton,
2007).




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                                        VISION STATEMENT
        We envision a school recognized for its innovation and exceptional academic achievement
                       where all students value learning and demonstrate integrity.

                                        MISSION STATEMENT
    We are a small high school community in a unique partnership with California State University,
  Northridge. Our mission is to inspire, support, and expect our students to achieve their fullest potential
                                    as learners and productive citizens.

                                                   MOTTO
                                             Inspire and Achieve.

                                             BIG IDEA 2008-2009
                                              Finding Your Voice

                        EXPECTED STUDENT LEARNING RESULTS (ESLR’s)
             ESLR’s                                             ESLR DESCRIPTORS
       Who NAHS Students Are                                    What NAHS Students Do

                                                 acquire high level content knowledge by critical reading and
Powerful Thinkers acquire knowledge               investigative activities.
and use it to reason, question, make             select and utilize technology appropriately and creatively.
decisions, and solve problems.                   apply new understandings to achieve deeper meaning.


                                                 build resiliency.
Life-Long Learners demonstrate self-             assess their own strengths and weaknesses and build on them.
motivation, resiliency, and responsibility       motivate and support their own learning.
for their own education and growth.              access and build upon prior knowledge and experience.


                                                 show respect for diversity in a complex world.
                                                 uphold democratic values of freedom of expression, openness,
Culturally Aware Individuals show                 equality, acceptance, cooperation and justice.
respect of diversity in all its forms.           demonstrate respect and compassion toward all individuals
                                                 understand the power of language and its usages.


                                                 employ LCP’s in daily practice.
Successful Communicators speak,                  develop skills to speak, write, read, and listen effectively.
listen, write, and read purposefully and         analyze and evaluate information from a variety of sources.
insightfully.

                                                 learn and apply academic and social skills
Effective and Responsible Citizens use           develop and nurture lifelong compassion and understanding.
what they learn to evaluate, take a stand,       contribute productively to society through employment,
and take action to impact their own               research, civic engagement, concern for community, issues, and
world and the global community in                 service.
positive ways.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


A2: To what extent does the governing board have policies and bylaws that are
aligned with the school’s purpose and support the achievement of the expected
school-wide learning results and academic standards based on data-driven
instructional decisions for the school?
To what extent does the governing board delegate implementation of these
policies to the professional staff?
To what extent does the governing board regularly monitor results and
approve the single school-wide actions plan and its relationship to the Local
Educational Association/Local Educational Agency (LEA) plan?

                                       Findings
                                                                                          Data/Evidence
Northridge Academy High School (NAHS) is part of Local District 1, one of eight
local districts within the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). The
Central District is governed by the seven elected members of the Board of
Education. The Board is responsible for establishing and administrating LAUSD
policies. The Superintendent of Schools is responsible for developing procedures to
implement Board policies. The eight Local District superintendents report directly               LAUSD
                                                                                                 website
to the Superintendent of Schools. Local Districts have high school directors who
serve as liaisons to high school principals to ensure that Local District plans are
consistent with Central District policies and are implemented at school sites.
NAHS staff, students, and parents work collaboratively to develop school site policy
and make decisions based on District directives. The School Site Council (SSC)
meets monthly to provide students and staff with support and resources to improve
                                                                                                 Meeting
student achievement. The SSC is responsible for the budgets of categorical                       minutes
programs including Title I, Gifted, Special Education, and School Library
Improvement. Our coordination with the Local District is facilitated by the LAUSD
Local District 1 compliance coordinator.
The School Leadership Council (SLC) is our governing body that has purview over
staff development programs, student discipline guidelines, bell schedules, and the
                                                                                                 Meeting
allocation of minimum days. SLC also determines guidelines for school equipment                  minutes
use and coordinates some budgetary matters including instructional materials
(Account 4170) and school-determined needs (Account 3986) based on data
analysis.
SLC has charged the Professional Development Committee – a group consisting of
Academy facilitators, counselors, department chairs, administrators, CSUN liaisons,
and our literacy coach – with the creation of a professional development plan. SLC         Meeting notes
uses its final authority to approve the plan or suggest critical topics, such as the
alternating use of Common Planning Time for both Department and Academy
meeting time. Furthermore, Departments, along with math and literacy coaches,
make additional instructional decisions. Academy teachers also participate in the
collaborative process of making curricular and instructional decisions based on their
analysis of data and assessment results.

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The School Site Council, School Leadership Council, English Learner Advisory
Committee (ELAC), and Compensatory Education Advisory Committee (CEAC) all                     SLC, SSC,
                                                                                               CEAC and
meet monthly to support the achievement of academic standards and expected                  ELAC minutes
school-wide learning results by allocating funds to academic programs in response
to the needs of Departments and Academies. Funding requests must show evidence
of having a direct impact on improving students' academic success.

Other governance committees that contribute to the development of policies,
programs, and activities that support student achievement include the CSUN-NAHS             Meeting notes
Educational Advisory Committee, Instructional Cabinet, Technology Committee,
Library Leadership Team, Discipline Committee, Academy Facilitators Team,
Modified Consent Decree Compliance Team, and the Advisory Committee.

Some of the policies developed by these groups include district initiatives, discipline
policy, dress code, attendance policy, Title IX, and club policies. Faculty and staff            Training
are kept informed of the policies, and implementation is delegated through                         session
professional development, distribution of bulletins and e-mail communication,                  attendance
                                                                                                      logs
including the use of Google-Groups. For many of the policies, formal training
sessions are held in order to ensure understanding and compliance of all
stakeholders.

Parents are informed of the policies through Parent Night meetings during the
                                                                                           Parent/Student
school year, distribution of the LAUSD Parent/Student Handbook, fliers and letters             Handbook
sent home with students, and SLC, SSC, ELAC, and CEAC minutes distributed by
e-mail. Parents can also find many of the district and school policies listed in their             School
student’s agenda planners. Current information is visibly posted on our Main Office           observations
bulletin board, and key forms and information sheets are placed in accessible
holders, also in the Main Office. Information can also be effectively distributed to
parents via the phone through the use of the “Connect-ED” system which provides
the capability to contact parents with a pre-recorded message, as well as through our
school website.

 Still, the results of the recent parent survey indicate that communication with our            Self-study
parents is an area of growth. While 87% state that they are aware of decisions made           report, Ch 5
by the school staff that support student learning, this percentage indicates to us that
a significant number of our parents are still not accessing all the information they
need to know. Improving communication, increased outreach to parents, and
authentic engagement of parents in our academic programs are areas of growth that
are represented in our Self-Study report and Action Plan.
In addition to the information in the agenda planners that we provide to every
student each year, students review school and district policies in their Advisory
classes and are reminded of the policies by the use of posted bulletins, posters,             Teacher
school-wide video and audio broadcasts, and student assemblies. In addition, it is            evidence
                                                                                             notebooks
the implicit practice of all staff on our campus to regularly talk to students about
these policies, individually as well as in groups, within the context of each day as
opportunities arise.

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At NAHS, we cultivate and sustain a culture of respect and responsibility among all
stakeholders, which has proven to be an asset in the implementation of various
policies. Faculty members are supported by administration in the implementation                  Self-study
and enforcement of discipline and dress policy through the referral procedure.                 report, Ch 1
Faculty and administration work cooperatively in enforcing attendance and tardy
policies. For example, when faculty and administration discussed how to address
the large number of tardies at the beginning of the school day, tardy sweeps were
started which rely on both the administration’s and staff’s consistent effort for             ISIS/SIS data
effective implementation. As a result of this effective collaboration, we have seen a
remarkable decrease in tardies, with numbers being reduced from an average of
50-80 per day in 2007 to 10-20 per day currently.

As Northridge Academy enters its fifth year, the various councils and committees
are maturing.      As each group becomes more familiar with its role and
responsibilities, participation is growing, particularly among parents, and members           Meeting sign-
are becoming more diverse. For many of the parents, this is their first time serving              in sheets
in a leadership function at their child’s school. This year, the diversity of the parent
members of the SSC is much more in line with the diversity of our student body.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement is formally reviewed by the School Site             Single Plan for
Council each year. CST scores are also reviewed by the Council. With the creation                  Student
of our school-wide Action Plan during the WASC Accreditation Self-Study process,              Achievement
we made a commitment in our Action Plan to vigilantly monitor the alignment of                   Self-study
our WASC Action Plan to our Single Plan for Student Achievement and ensure that                report, Ch 5
all decisions on budget priorities are made after close analysis of achievement data.




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A3: To what extent based on student achievement data, does the school
leadership and staff make decisions and initiate activities that focus on all
students achieving the expected school-wide learning results and academic
standards?

To what extent does the school leadership and staff annually monitor and
refine the single school-wide action plan based on analysis of data to ensure
alignment with student needs?


                                      Findings                                            Data/Evidence


Northridge Academy High School is committed to using achievement data
analysis as a basis for decisions and to initiate activities that focus on all students
achieving expected school-wide learning results and academic standards. Many                     Meeting
systems and school-wide practices have been created to support this commitment.                  minutes
Moreover, NAHS has a number of governance groups, councils, and leadership
committees which collectively function as the leadership of our school.

CST, CAHSEE, and Periodic Assessment data are some of the major sources of
data by which we monitor student achievement. Additional data sources that give
us insight to our student achievement include the California English Language                    Meeting
Development Test (CELDT); triennial IEP results; FitnessGram data; student                       agendas
attendance, graduation, and dropout rates; academic grades; credits earned; and
Advanced Placement enrollment and success rates. This data is reviewed in
departments, during professional development meetings, at leadership committee                 Self-study
                                                                                             report, Ch 1
meetings, and by administration on a regular basis. Other groups that use this data
are Associated Student Body (ASB) Leadership, Advisory Committee, Discipline
Committee, Technology Committee, Library Leadership Team, NAHS – CSUN
Educational Advisory Committee, Modified Consent Decree Compliance                          Meeting notes
Committee, Administrative Leadership Committee, and the Achievement
Solutions Leadership Committee. We use data analysis results to inform
instructional practices, create a master schedule that meets the needs of all
students, support curricular choices, and contribute to the development of our
Academies.

A significant school-wide change that resulted from our examination of student                 Self-study
achievement data is the implementation of our Common Planning Time schedule.                 report, Ch 1
With a District waiver, we are now able to provide regular, almost weekly,
planning time for curriculum and instruction development by Departments,                    Bell schedule
Academies, and interdisciplinary teams within Academies, with a special
emphasis on the WASC self-study process during the 2008-09 year.




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Close analysis of our CAHSEE data over the past three years has resulted in the
creation of several intervention programs. They include:
                                                                                       Session sign-in
     CAHSEE Boot Camp                                                                          sheets
     CAHSEE Math and English Advisory activities facilitated by Math and
        English teachers through a teacher “exchange” system
     Saturday CAHSEE Intervention classes
As a result of intensive intervention, we have seen significant improvement in our
CAHSEE passing rates in recent years.

Our Advisory program provides us with another avenue through which we can
create and implement programs and activities in response to our examination of
student achievement data. Academy-specific activities allow students to make
connections between academic curriculums and career interests. Advisory-                    Advisory
specific activities, such as the True Colors Personality Test and the                     curriculum
Developmental Assets program, allow students to understand themselves and                 documents
their personal communication and learning styles better. Student-led Link Crew
activities in Freshman Advisories provide 9th grade students with much-needed
support to achieve expected school-wide learning results.

School-wide efforts created as a result of student achievement data analysis also
include an after-school tutoring program three days a week; development of our
on-site Adult School and Pierce College programs; the distribution of agenda            Meeting notes
planners to students every year; more focus by Academies on improving
academic achievement; additional career exploration activities, e.g., the annual
Career Fair; and additional college exploration activities, e.g., college
representative presentations.

The School Site Council is responsible for annually reviewing the Single Plan for
Student Achievement. This process is reflected in the minutes for the council          Single Plan for
meeting. It is a growth opportunity for NAHS to review the plan each year for                 Student
the purpose of refining it to better meet student needs. With the development of         Achievement
our 2008-09 WASC Self-Study report and the resultant Action Plan, it becomes               Self-study
the responsibility of the WASC Executive Leadership Team to ensure that both             report, Ch 5
the WASC Action Plan and the Single Plan for Student Achievement are
examined regularly and concurrently and that these two plans are closely aligned.




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A4: To what extent does a qualified staff facilitate achievement of the
academic standards and the expected school-wide learning results through a
system of preparation, induction, and on-going professional development?


                                      Findings                                        Data/Evidence


The teachers at Northridge Academy High school are dedicated to their
profession and are all considered “highly qualified” as required by the No Child
Left Behind legislation. Every effort is made to ensure that faculty are teaching
in their credentialed content areas. Chapter 1 data shows that five teachers are           Self-study
                                                                                         report, Ch 1
National Board Certified, with five more teachers currently working toward that
distinction, and nineteen teachers hold master’s degrees, with five more currently
enrolled in master’s programs. One teacher has a doctorate. Four teachers and
one counselor are instructors or adjunct professors at local colleges and
universities.

Our Professional Development committee consists of Academy facilitators,                Meeting notes
counselors, department chairs, administrators, CSUN liaisons, and our literacy
coach. This committee meets bi-monthly to develop and implement a                          Self-study
comprehensive school-wide professional development program. All decisions                report, Ch 1
that the committee makes are consistent with District policies and are grounded in
student achievement data. A complete overview of our professional development
topics is available in Chapter 1 of our self-study report.

Our professional development plan is a collaborative effort involving
                                                                                               School
administration, faculty, and staff. When district budget has allowed, buy-back               calendar
days before the beginning of the school-year have provided opportunities for
valuable in-service training, school policy discussions, and close analysis of
achievement data. This school year, a modified schedule, which allows common
planning time almost every Tuesday afternoon, has provided consistent time for
planning and professional development.

Our unique relationship with CSUN also has provided us with additional
resources to inform our professional development plan and increase student
achievement. Four members of the CSUN faculty are allotted two units of their
                                                                                        Sign-in sheets
total teaching schedule to serve as liaisons between the University and NAHS.
Each person is assigned to one of our Academies to assist the respective
Academy facilitator in the development of Academy activities. CSUN facilitators
participate in Professional Development Committee meetings, present at
Professional Development meetings, and participate in Academy activities. For
two years, generous funding from CSUN through the Teachers for a New Era
(TNE) grant has enabled NAHS and its CSUN partners to have extended planning
time together through a spring retreat.



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Departments and academies meet at lunch, after school, during Tuesday
afternoons, and during the summer to discuss student needs and to plan activities
                                                                                               Meeting
and curriculum to meet these needs. The administration, classified leadership,                 agendas
and counseling staff hold regularly-scheduled calendar meetings once a week to
discuss and update the master calendar, review student and staff needs, and plan
for the upcoming week, or weeks.
New teachers at NAHS benefit from a special half-day New Teacher Training
that NAHS administrators and volunteer teachers provide before the school year
starts to familiarize them with the school, its policies and procedures. Monthly
meetings are held throughout the school year to address concerns and specific                    Master
procedures, such as entering grades into the marks reporting system. These new                 calendar
teachers participate in the district BTSA induction program and are assigned
support providers to help them plan and implement standards-based lessons. New
teachers also attend local district training in their specific content area.
Our core content teachers are currently utilizing the Pearson Achievement
Solutions Learning Teams program which supports lesson design and
development based on teachers' examination of student achievement as evidenced
by student work to identify learning objectives and appropriate curriculum.
Currently, teams in Math, Social Studies, and English meet bi-monthly using the Learning Team
                                                                                    notebooks
Pearson Seven-Step protocols and processes.
Teachers of Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) students participate in
training to better service this student population through differentiation. Those
who teach Advanced Placement classes have participated in an AP Audit of their
courses and most have also attended the AP by the Sea conferences.            Our
teachers also regularly attend subject-specific professional development provided
                                                                                               Meeting
by the local district to develop additional and more effective ways to support                 agendas
student achievement. As new information, such as in brain-based research,
comes forth, our teachers are motivated to attend workshops and conferences to
learn strategies and methods that hone and strengthen their ability to better
facilitate student learning.
Because the use of technology to promote more effective teaching and learning is
an intrinsic part of our vision for becoming a school recognized for its innovation,
the NAHS staff receives ongoing technical training provided by our Technology
Committee with the support of our Teacher-Librarian. Previous training has                 Technology
addressed such topics as, using websites such as yourhomework.com and                       Committee
MyRoad.com; using EasyGradePro and ISIS, two electronic grade book                        meeting notes
programs; and operating the audio-visual equipment in their classrooms. The               Survey results
California Technology Assistance Program Technology Assessment Profile
(CTAP2) survey and an in-house technical survey inform us of the technical
training needs of our faculty and staff. After initial technical delays, we are now
making great strides in activating the Video-on-Demand capabilities we have
                                                                                            Shared Use
through the cameras that are installed in almost all instructional rooms, with cable         Agreement
connections to CSUN creating the possibility of allowing students and instructors
to view and study classroom practices and experiences from both institutions.

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A5: To what extent are leadership and staff involved in on-going research or
data-based correlated professional development that focuses on identified
student learning needs?


                                      Findings                                         Data/Evidence

The NAHS leadership and staff are involved in ongoing research and data-driven
professional development that focuses on identified student learning needs.

The NAHS administrators attend monthly professional development meetings
related to District instructional initiatives. Following the "trainer of trainers"            Meeting
model, they then disseminate information to our leadership committees and                     agendas
councils. The District initiatives are all research-based and have been selected on
the basis of data analysis - e.g., the adoption of the Directed Reading and Writing
programs.

The NAHS Professional Development Committee consists of administrators,
Academy facilitators, counselors, CSUN liaisons, department chairs, and our               SLC minutes
literacy coach. Our United Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA) chapter chair also
participates on this committee. The committee integrates review of current                PD Meeting
research with data analysis to ensure our students are achieving academic success.             notes
In accordance with LAUSD procedures and the UTLA contract, this committee
must present their plans for approval to the School-Site Leadership Council,
which has purview over professional development. The resulting plan is sent to
the Local District for approval.

In addition to the NAHS Professional Development plans, individual teachers
access professional development in a variety of ways. We conduct monthly new
teacher meetings every year to support those new to our school, and possibly new
to the profession, by providing them with instructional strategies and classroom            BTSA logs
management policies based on what we have come to know about our students
through data analysis. New teachers are also supported through the California
Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment (BTSA) program. Many of our
veteran teachers and National Board Certified teachers serve as BTSA support
providers for our first- and second-year teachers.

Both the Central District and Local District 1 provides ongoing professional
development to support student achievement and triennial trainings for teacher                Meeting
new to the English Language Arts Instructional Guides. Workshops are offered                  agendas
to support teachers in working effectively with identified subgroups of students,
e.g., Gifted and English Learners, and in areas such as the use of technology to
support effective teaching and learning.




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NAHS teachers, administrators, counselors, and other staff are active participants
in their professional organizations and attend local, state, and national
conferences, both as conference attendees and as presenters in content areas such
as, math, science, English, technology, library media, and foreign languages, as            Approved
well as in research-based initiatives and programs, such as small-learning             travel requests
communities, advisory programs, Collaborative Model for Special Education, etc.
All Advanced Placement teachers have successfully undergone the College Board
Audit process and attended Advanced Placement training conferences. We take
pride in the fact that our staff is committed to staying informed of current
educational research and proven best practices as well as serving as role models
and mentors to other educators.

The NAHS Math and English Departments receive the help and guidance of a
math coach and a literacy coach. All District 1 coaches meet monthly to review
District and school site data; discuss current research on effective instruction;
identify areas of student need based on assessment data analysis; and develop             Coach logs
strategies for improving student achievement. NAHS coaches do not limit their
school-site interactions exclusively to the Math and English departments but also
work across the disciplines in their efforts to increase academic success.
Periodic assessment data for Math, English, Science, and Social Studies often
inform department meetings both with and without the involvement of the
coaches.




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A6: To what extent are the human, material, physical, and financial
resources sufficient and utilized effectively and appropriately in accordance
with the legal intent of the program(s) to support students in accomplishing
the academic standards and the expected school-wide learning results?


                                       Findings                                          Data/Evidence


Northridge Academy High School’s vision of achieving exceptional academic
excellence through innovation drives the allocation of our human, material,
physical, and financial resources. We ensure stakeholder participation in the
decision-making process by involving staff, students, and parents in all of our
school site governance committees and councils.

Assessment of data from a variety of sources drives the allocation of resources.
Several programs including Special Education, Gifted and Talented Education                   Self-study
(GATE), and Title I must meet State and Federal eligibility requirements to                 report, Ch 1
receive funding. AYP and API benchmarks must be met annually. Therefore, all
decisions affecting the use of human, material, and financial resources must be
based on analysis of student achievement at our school.

The Effective and Appropriate Use of Human Resources
All of our students receive the support of a highly-qualified staff, a dedicated
community of life-long learners who support student achievement through
department and Academy curriculum and promote the achievement of academic
standards and the fulfillment of our expected school-wide learning results.

Our students are also supported academically, socially, and emotionally by a
variety of other support staff members, including, but not limited to:
     A Title I coordinator who ensures that academic programs receive
        sufficient funding while meeting District, State, and Federal guidelines.
        Our Title I coordinator also serves as our Bilingual coordinator and our          Staff directory
        College Counselor.
     A part-time nurse who monitors the physical well-being of our students.
     A full-time Teacher-Librarian supports teachers and students.
     A full-time campus officer who ensures the safety of our campus. He also
        volunteers his time to meet with and mentor a small group of at-risk
        students.
     A part-time school psychologist who provides counseling and assessment
        services for not only our students with special needs, but also, our at-risk
        general education students. She is also a member of our SST and School
        Crisis Team as well as available as a support to our staff..
     A Family Center Director who coordinates outreach activities in an effort
        to increase parent involvement in their children's academic progress. She
        works closely with our faculty, administrators, and staff, reviews data and

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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


       provides input at various leadership and governance meetings, and mentors
       parents as well as students.
      Certificated staff to offer CAHSEE and CST intervention.
      A full-time literacy coach and a part-time math coach to support the                List of Faculty
       instructional practices of the entire faculty.                                     Responsibilities
      A GATE coordinator, who is also our Social Studies teacher, who oversees
       GATE monies and ensures the appropriate allocation of those resources.
      Walk-on coaches for our athletic teams
      Additional District itinerant personnel, e.g. an audiometrist, a speech
       therapist, an Special Education occupational guidance counselor, etc.
Due to the small staff size at our school, which must still fulfill all the
                                                                                          Single Plan for
responsibilities of a full-fledged comprehensive high school, all staff members                  Student
willingly serve multiple roles to ensure our students are engaged in a high-quality         Achievement
educational experience, even before and after school and during nutrition and
lunch. Most teachers volunteer as club sponsors and work in ways to promote                Meeting notes
school spirit and inspire academic excellence. All staff members participate on the
various committees and councils that guide our school.
In addition, we are very proud and appreciative of our classified staff members
who also take on numerous roles to ensure our school runs smoothly. Our clerical
staff, led by our School Administrative Assistant (SAA), is small but consistently
provides high quality service to our students, parents, community members, and
staff. They too review data and are very knowledgeable about our students and                     School
                                                                                             observations
their needs. Our SAA ensures that administrators and staff receive up-to-date
information regarding district policies, meetings, and ongoing information in a
timely manner. The SAA, along with the Plant Manager, meet with administration
on a weekly basis to discuss updates and issues that affect our school.
Our cafeteria manager and her staff work diligently to provide nutritious meals to
our students and staff in a courteous and efficient manner while also maintaining
                                                                                                  School
excellent records of cafeteria data and keeping up with current district policies and        observations
federal lunch program mandates.
Our custodial staff, under the management of our plant manager, works diligently
to complete daily tasks as well as meet the moment-to-moment needs of our staff
and students. Our plant manager communicates regularly with local and central
district Maintenance and Operations and Facilities staff, as well as other related
                                                                                                  School
offices, in order to stay current on incoming district, state, and federal mandates          observations
regarding our facilities, including campus health and safety issues. Our campus
aide works hand-in-hand with our school safety officer and the plant manager to
ensure the safety of our students and staff.
In addition, all of our classified staff have taken on a mentoring role to all our
students. Many of our students confide in our classified staff members and view                   School
                                                                                             observations
them as their advocates and role models who also teach them to grow and develop
in unique and positive ways.


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The Effective and Appropriate Use of Financial Resources
Our Single Plan for Student Achievement informs all major decisions for allocating
resources to provide standards-based instruction to all students. The School              Single Plan for
Leadership Council (SLC) meets monthly to endorse all procurement activity with                  Student
final approval being made by the SSC (School Site Council). All stakeholders are            Achievement
included in these transparent processes. The Professional Development Committee
meets bi-monthly to plan and determine the focus and agenda for the new year
based on student outcomes revealed in the data.

The Effective Use of Material and Physical Resources
To ensure that students receive appropriate materials, resources and experiences to
meet the academic standards and the expected school-wide learning results, we
provide them with the following:

      General school supplies
      State-adopted and District-approved textbooks
      Supplemental resources such as novels, reference books, and consumable              Inventory lists
       workbooks
      Academy-related curricular trips
      Classrooms equipped with computers, video cameras, LCD projectors, and
       DVD/CD players
      Three computer labs and three laptop carts
      Science laboratory materials and equipment
      Physical education equipment and facilities
      Academic intervention program materials
      Counseling and mental health services

Our District assists in maintaining and upgrading site facilities in order to provide
a safe and clean environment. Our dedicated custodial crew works in shifts from 6              Self-study
a.m. to 11 p.m. to maintain our campus and ensure that it is able to support our             report, Ch 1
instructional needs. More information about the safety conditions of our school is
available in Chapter 1 of our self-study report.




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Areas of Strength:

    Committed staff members are willing to take on multiple roles and responsibilities in
     order to ensure a high-quality education for all our students..

    The active participation of our CSUN partners provides us with valuable research-based
     input and guidance in the development of our professional development planning.

    The building of our vision statement, mission statement, and expected school-wide
     learning results was a true collaboration among NAHS staff, students, parents,
     community, and CSUN.

    Our entire staff has shown both willingness and ability to examine data to establish and
     implement instructional goals.


Areas of Growth:

    We must be more intentional in reviewing our Single Plan for Student Achievement by
     ensuring that all stakeholders have the skills and abilities to review and discuss the
     contents of this document effectively.

    We must ensure that the current level of engagement and partnership we experience with
     CSUN is sustained over time and made systemic as part of the long-term organizational
     structure of our school.

    We must identify more effective ways of engaging our parents and community in
     understanding our achievement data results and in actively participating in our decision-
     making and initiating of activities that focus on students achieving our school-wide
     learning results and academic standards.




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              Chapter IV:
          Self-Study Findings
              Curriculum


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                             Focus Team B: Curriculum
                                        Team Leaders




                     Barbara Scott, Science; Health and Human Development Academy
                 Maureen Burkhart, Mathematics; Arts, Media, and Communication Academy


                                       Team Members




                    Ana Aguilar, Student; Careers in Education Academy
                            John Alexopoulos, Assistant Principal
                Tara Burk, English; Health and Human Development Academy
                Erika Figueroa, Social Studies; Careers in Education Academy
              Bree Johnson, Student; Health and Human Development Academy
            Cletus Mbata, Mathematics; Health and Human Development Academy
      Galene Martinez, Visual/Performing Arts; Arts, Media, and Communication Academy
       Caroline Mitchell, Special Education; Health and Human Development Academy
             Ken Sakatani, CSUN Art; Arts, Media, and Communication Academy
               Rene Shufelt, Visual/Performing Arts; 9th Grade Bridge Academy
                     Erin Thomas, Computers; 9th Grade Bridge Academy


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                     CHAPTER IV: SELF-STUDY FINDINGS
              CATEGORY D: STANDARDS-BASED STUDENT LEARNING:
                               CURRICULUM


B1: To what extent do all students participate in a rigorous, relevant,
and coherent standards-based curriculum that supports the
achievement of the academic standards and the expected school-wide
learning results? [Through standards-based learning (i.e., what is
taught and how it is taught), the expected school-wide learning results
are accomplished.]

                                    Findings                                           Data/Evidence

A Rigorous, Relevant, and Coherent Standards-Based Curriculum
Northridge Academy High School maintains and fosters a learning
community in which all students have the opportunity to participate in             Mission and Vision
rigorous, relevant, and coherent standards-based curricula. It is our                      statements
expectation that students will demonstrate achievement of academic
                                                                                    State Content Area
standards through a wide variety of assessments and demonstrate expected              Frameworks and
school-wide learning results daily. Our curricula are aligned to the California             Standards
State Frameworks and Standards, and incorporate research-based
instructional strategies aimed at meeting the needs of all students.

To support student learning, we have created three small learning
communities, or Academies, in which students receive a comprehensive,
standards-based curriculum and the additional support of cross-curricular Academy brochures
and real-life connections, activities, and assignments that reflect the focus of
a specific Academy. Our four Academies are: 9th Grade Bridge Academy;
Arts, Media and Communication (AMC) Academy; Health and Human
Development (HHD) Academy; and Careers in Education (CE) Academy.

In order to ensure that we provide our students with a research-based,
professionally acceptable curriculum, we adhere to State and District                   LAUSD CREE
                                                                                            Bulletin
mandates to provide a Culturally Relevant and Responsive Education
(CREE). Our expected school-wide learning results are developed to support                  Life Skills
students as they “participate in the curriculum” so as to promote high student               syllabus
engagement and higher student achievement. For example, our Life Skills
curriculum incorporates a CSUN anti-prejudice/anti-bullying awareness
program called STOP (Students Take Out Prejudice) in which CSUN student
mentors offer presentations and conduct activities designed to heighten our
students’ awareness of diversity issues.

We also adhere to district mandates regarding professional development and
closing the achievement gap. To maximize the effectiveness of these                     Bell Schedule
mandates, we have adopted a Common Planning Schedule allowing us                      Master Schedule
weekly time to meet as Departments and Academies. We have also worked
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together to create a master schedule, informed by data analysis and
instructional needs, which provides all students with access to courses that
meet A-G requirements as well as Honors and AP classes.
                                                                                            Periodic
Further, academic instruction is aligned with district, state, and national         assessment, EAP,
standards assessments. Data from district, state, and national assessments         CST, and CAHSEE
drive instruction and help teachers formulate and plan lessons that will help                   data
students access the curriculum.

To ensure that curriculum development is informed by evidence from
student work, core content area teachers meet regularly as Pearson                    Learning Team
Achievement Solutions (PAS) Learning Teams. PAS learning protocols are                    workbooks
used to design lessons based on specific student needs as evidenced from our
analysis of data, including student work.

Our administration provides Department and Academy teachers with
extensive data regarding overall student mastery of standards as reflected in        Sample periodic
                                                                                         assessment
CST, CAHSEE, and periodic assessment scores, along with grades. Teachers
are working to develop shared rubrics and, in some cases, departmental
assessments, to assist in developing consistent expectations and standards for
all students within each content area as well as school-wide..

EL students’ progress in their transition from English Language                       Master Plan for
Development (ELD) to fluency in English is monitored by the use of the                          ELA
California English Language Development Test (CELDT), California
Standards Tests (CST’s), grades, and portfolios. Administration provides                CELDT data
teachers with print-outs to identify EL students in core classes who would
benefit from additional support in accessing rigorous curriculum.

At NAHS, we recognize the critical need to develop the academic literacy
skills of all our students to allow them to succeed with challenging
curriculum. In grades 9-10, English classes use District instructional guides
                                                                                        Instructional
as resources for assisting students with mastery of the academic standards, as                Guides
well as Design Lessons to serve as models for instructional strategies and
sequencing. These provide teachers with a curriculum that aligns
instructional standards to district and state assessments. Our literacy coach
provides teachers with support in the implementation of District curriculum.

Struggling 9th and 10th graders have been identified on the basis of grades,
test scores at Below and Far Below Basic, and teacher feedback for
placement in a directed reading and writing program. The Read 180 course                Class rosters
primarily uses a series of teacher-guided small group instruction, one-on-one
learning, and computer-aided technology activities. These strategies provide
students with a comprehensive literacy curriculum that supports their
advancement from current lowered performance to grade level proficiency.



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In Foreign Language, our school size limits our language offerings to
Spanish. Nevertheless, we are able to provide differentiated learning              Spanish Evidence
                                                                                         Notebooks
opportunities by offering both Spanish and Spanish for Spanish Speakers
classes. Further, advanced students take AP Spanish Language and AP                  Pierce College
Spanish Literature. Our teachers have developed departmental final exams            course offerings
and projects which support expected student learning results. To provide
students access to additional language classes, we offer a Pierce College
class in American Sign Language on our campus after school, a course
which fulfills the foreign language graduation and a-g requirement. In
addition, we encourage students to enroll in other foreign language course at
community colleges and other accredited schools.

Teachers of Visual and Performing Arts (VAPA) meet both as members of a
department and in our academies to support the engagement of students in             VAPA Evidence
core content and interdisciplinary curriculum. Our Performing Arts offerings            Notebooks
include Instrumental Music, Dance, and Drama while Visual Arts include
painting, filmmaking, and cartoon/animation. Each VAPA course engages
students in a standards-based curriculum, supported by authentic
demonstration and performance opportunities. VAPA teachers ensure that
students make explicit connections between coursework and expected
school-wide student outcomes.

The Science Department meets regularly and implements common lessons
and lab investigations, utilizing a semester pacing plan that follows the      Science testing
district course instructional guides and state science curriculum frameworks      spreadsheet
to ensure standards are taught. Periodic assessments provide feedback on
student mastery of standards. The department also develops individualized Science pacing plan
remediation assignments and projects for students to help them strengthen
skills in areas of the course standards where they show weaknesses. A
District Science Specialist provides our teachers with support in the
implementation of standards-based curriculum.

In Algebra 1AB, Algebra 2AB, and Pre-Calculus, the math department has
implemented the College Preparatory Math (CPM) Program which has been
found by the U.S. Department of Education to be an exemplary curriculum.
Students develop critical thinking skills and make connections between
California State grade-level standards and relevant, applicable problems             Math Evidence
                                                                                        Notebooks
which stress multiple representations. Math Department members also
collaborate to create rubric-based projects which enhance student learning in
Algebra 1 and 2, Geometry, Pre-Calculus and AP Calculus. During spring
2007, a CSUN Math Education professor taught a course in Algebra
Readiness for ninth grade students who failed Algebra 1. This year, he is           Master schedule
teaching a math elective class for struggling freshmen, taken concurrently
with Algebra 1 to help bolster algebra and basic math skills and concepts.
Our district-assigned math coach provides teachers with support in
delivering a standards-based curriculum.

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Social studies teachers also meet regularly to discuss best practices. This
year, the department is utilizing Pearson Achievement Solutions to
                                                                                       History
orchestrate recursive conversations and examine student work. The teachers instructional guides
follow a District pacing plan and utilize district-provided instructional     and pacing plans
guides. They are analyzing periodic assessment results and CST data to
drive instructional practices. A District Social Studies Advisor supports our
teachers in the implementation of the instructional guide curriculum.
Physical Education teachers meet as both department and academy members
and are enrolled in district-provided workshops to align state standards with
course curriculum.       The department works in partnership with the
Kinesiology Department at California State University, Northridge using a                PE Evidence
combination of on-campus and CSUN facilities to provide a whole health                     Notebook
and fitness curriculum to students. A grant from “Sound Body, Sound Mind”
allowed for the purchase of equipment for our fitness center which is used in     Sound Body, Sound
conjunction with gymnasium and field facilities. The curriculum of the                   Mind grant
Physical Education department includes fitness, personal health, team
development, and individual accomplishment. Co-teaching of special units
is conducted by students enrolled in the CSUN Secondary Teacher Program,
under the guidance of a CSUN faculty member and NAHS P.E. teachers.
A vital component of our PE curriculum is established through the program,
"Pursuing Victory with Honor". This program incorporates the Character
Counts® Six Pillars of Character: trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, “Pursuing Victory
caring, fairness, and citizenship. These tenets are incorporated into daily      with Honor”
activities. Teachers also encourage student ownership of their health and
                                                                            Character Counts
fitness through the Live Strong program. This program utilizes a web-based
program where students record all food intake and exercise and develop a Live Strong website
personalized fitness regimen. Students participate in team sports, which
allow them to collaborate and assume responsibilities for group outcomes.
Special Education and General Education teachers meet regularly to discuss
student achievement of Individualized Education Plans (IEP) goals and to
review strategies to help special needs students meet academic standards,
individual student goals, and ESLR’s. Students are provided additional
assistance in core content classes through adult assistants in classes as well Master schedule
as in a learning center setting. NAHS has adopted a collaborative model for
teaching Resource Specialist Program (RSP) students. RSP teachers co-plan IEP goals
and co-teach with general education teachers to ensure that RSP students
receive a rigorous standards-aligned curriculum in general education classes
while also ensuring the support structures necessary for success.
Special Education teachers meet as both Department and Academy
members. IEP’s are developed and implemented to provide accommodations
and modifications to assist in curriculum delivery that meets each student’s        Special Ed syllabi
individual needs. Learning Centers are staffed by Special Education
Teachers to provide additional support to Special Education students to
access core content curriculum.

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Additional Curriculum
Academies
In addition to the standards-based subject matter curricula taught, every
NAHS Academy has developed Academy-specific electives and career-
related curriculum as well. For example, AMC offers Animation and Web
Design electives and curricular units on banned books and issues of                  Master schedule
censorship. HHD offers Environmental Science and units of study on teen
nutrition, wellness, and AIDS. CE offers Careers with Children and
Psychology electives as well as instructional units on learning modalities and
multiple intelligences.
Advisories
The advisory curriculum model was developed by a team of teachers,
counselors, administrators, and faculty from California State University,
Northridge. The presence of the advisory period emphasizes our belief that
                                                                                  Advisory notebooks
the effectiveness of the curriculum is dependent upon the establishment of a
learning culture that supports diverse learning modalities. The advisory
curriculum covers grade level-specific concepts and skills for a wide range
of topics, including: school culture, developmental assets, study skills, time
management, interest inventories, career exploration, and Academy-based
activities.
Senior Internships
In 2008, we began a concerted effort to establish internships for eligible
Seniors in each Academy to extend our students’ learning and Academy
experiences into the real world. We have become members of two local
Chambers of Commerce to utilize networking opportunities to create                     Student Intern
                                                                                           portfolios
internships and job shadowing opportunities for our students. Our
beginnings are humble, with students placed at only two locations this year
(a printing company and a local elementary school), but the student results
have been outstanding and encourage us to expand these types of offerings.
On-Site Community College Classes and Adult School Classes
To supplement course offerings during the school day, concurrent
enrollment community college classes are offered on our site after school.
Through the community college classes, students have access to a wide
range of subjects, including, psychology, child development, and physics.            Course offerings
Through adult school classes, students have access to additional
opportunities to take and pass courses needed for graduation. We are
currently developing a pilot on-line class in Algebra readiness, and we hope
to utilize advances in technology to bring other courses to our students.

ROC and ROP Classes
NAHS students have access to Regional Occupational course and programs
                                                                                      ROC and ROP
through two local Regional Occupational Centers. These courses allow                 Course offerings
students to pursue career-related interests and, in some cases, earn needed
credits toward graduation.

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Textbooks
In all core content areas, including English, math, science, and social
science, students are provided district-approved, standards-aligned
textbooks. Other departments align their textbooks with district standards.             Textbook lists
From 2004 to 2008, textbooks in Foreign Language, Health, Social Studies,
Science, English, and Math were aligned to State Standards. Currently, we
are 100% “Williams compliant,” having issued quality, current, district-
approved textbooks in all core content courses to all students.

Curriculum Support Services and Parental Participation

Providing oversight for our academic programs, our Instructional Cabinet,
                                                                                       Instructional
consisting of department chairs, academy facilitators, and administrators,           Cabinet minutes
meets regularly to discuss and examine curricular issues and student
progress towards achievement of standards school-wide.

Local District level support is provided through literacy and math coaches as
well as through training designed and delivered by District specialists in           LAUSD Website
Math, English, Social Studies, Science, and English Language Development.

From the start, CSUN faculty members have worked closely with our staff in
developing Academy curricula that can be readily supported by CSUN staff
and other resources. We are fortunate that CSUN funds a representative
from each of the three colleges that align with our Academies to serve as            Meeting minutes
University facilitators – counterparts and colleagues to our NAHS Academy
facilitators. Our CSUN partnership opportunities have included annual                       Academy
visits to the CSUN Castaic Lake Satellite Campus for our HHD Academy                       Facilitator
                                                                                           notebooks
students to explore careers in leisure studies; ongoing visits by our AMC
Academy to the CSUN Gallery to view installations and meet artists; and CE
Academy’s observations at the CSUN Family Center and Preschool.

All Advanced Placement Science students participate in the UCLA AP
Readiness program which provides bus transportation from NAHS to UCLA                    AP Teacher
for one Saturday each month. Students attend supplementary classes in their       Evidence Notebook
subject area to prepare them for the AP exams and experience UCLA as a
“college student”.

Our 2008-2009 parent survey and focus groups indicate that our parents have
a high level of awareness of the course offerings and curricular opportunities
available to their children here at NAHS. For example, 94% of the parents              Parent Survey
who responded to our survey indicated they were aware of Honors and AP
courses available to their children. Approximately 87% either agreed or
strongly agreed with the statement that their children were involved in the
process of selecting their own classes.




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B2: To what extent do all students have access to the school’s entire
program and assistance with a personal learning plan to prepare them
for the pursuit of their academic, personal, and school-to-career goals?


                                    Findings                                        Data/Evidence


Program Access
All students at Northridge Academy High School have a personal learning
plan, also referred to as an “Individualized Graduation Plan (IGP).” This                Sample IGP’s
document is developed in collaboration with student, parent, counselor, and
advisory teacher and reviewed at least twice a year for four years.

To ensure an awareness of graduation requirements from the very beginning
of high school, incoming freshmen are invited to attend our August
orientation where they have an opportunity to meet with student Link Crew
                                                                                      Link Crew roster
members, 9th grade advisory teachers, counselors, and academy facilitators.        Summer Orientation
During this time, information about various curricular and co-curricular                       agenda
programs is disseminated. Community-building activities are conducted by
the Link Crew members.

Additionally, when their first semester begins, freshmen are exposed to the
school’s academies and curricular paths. All students must take a semester-
long Life Skills course. One of the primary goals of this class is to introduce
students to career and educational opportunities beyond high school and to            Life Skills syllabi
assist students in developing decision-making, time management, and study
skills necessary to succeed in high school and pursue their post-secondary
plans.

Academy and Advisory curricula are designed to promote focused
conversation and students’ self-awareness and development of academic,
                                                                                   Academy notebooks
personal, and school-to-career goals. Each Academy continues to develop
and promote grade-level appropriate activities and discussion topics to help
students continually monitor their own learning plans.

9th Grade Bridge Academy
NAHS provides a 9th Grade Bridge Academy program where freshmen
explore each of our three Academies prior to making an Academy selection
for grades 10-12. Every ninth-grader receives assistance in developing an
IGP from the ninth grade counselor and his/her advisory teacher. This plan         Academy facilitator
is reviewed at least twice a year and modified as the student progresses                          logs
towards his/her academic, career and personal goals. Much attention is
given to monitoring students’ report card grades. Students with D’s and F’s
are required to develop and implement action steps to raise their grades.



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Arts, Media & Communication (AMC) Academy
The AMC Academy embraces the disciplines of Media Studies, Music, and
Theatre Studies. AMC highly values practical work of students in television,
radio, multi-media, photography, musical composition and musical and
theatrical performance. We recognize that practical work needs a sound                   Bulletin 1600
critical and theoretical underpinning, and each course is designed to provide
this. AMC seeks to develop a range of key transferable skills, skills to help
students to be highly successful in gaining employment not only as
performers, teachers, media practitioners and journalists but also in the
rapidly developing cultural industries. The motivation created by these
highly engaging and relevant disciplines supports our students’ success in
their overall Individualized Graduation Plans (IGP’s).

Health and Human Development (HHD) Academy
The HHD Academy seeks to develop a range of key transferable skills to
help students to be highly successful in gaining employment, not only as                 Bulletin 1600
researchers, teachers, social workers and health care professionals, but also
in protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human
services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves:

Students gain valuable experience through community service and internship
programs. All programs emphasize improvement of the quality of life for
individuals and families and the managing of services that promote health
and well-being and educate the whole person - psychologically, emotionally,
socially, and intellectually. The relevant and “real life” significance that
Academy-based learning provides students with additional motivation to
succeed in the completion of their IGP’s.

Careers in Education (CE) Academy
The CE Academy is aligned to the departments of Deaf Studies, Educational
Leadership and Policy Studies, Educational Psychology and Counseling,
Elementary Education, Secondary Education, and Special Education, all
                                                                                         Bulletin 1600
within the CSUN College of Education. This Academy provides students
with the opportunity to explore a wide range of career opportunities in the
field of education. Students learn about opportunities as teachers, day care
workers, counselors, school psychologists, administrators, and more.
Through guest speakers, tutoring at elementary schools, and internships at
neighborhood schools and family centers, students are motivated to
successfully complete their IGP’s.

Advisory
All students are enrolled in an advisory class. Once students reach 10th grade,
the students remain with their advisory for the rest of their high school
experience. The primary purpose of advisory is to provide each student a              Master Schedule
personal connection to an adult mentor on our campus. After the ninth grade,
students are programmed into advisory classes by academy interest and grade

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level. Advisors have time to meet with advisees regarding academic, social
and personal needs. Academy curriculum emphasizes student choice and
reflection regarding progress towards successful completion of graduation
requirements.
Special Education
Following a Collaborative Model, our special education teachers, including
Resource Specialists, work in partnership with parents, general education
teachers, adult assistants, counselors, and our administrator in charge of         Special Ed teacher
                                                                                        logs and case
special education to develop Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s) and to                    records
provide the least restrictive environment to students in need of additional
academic and post-secondary support. IEP’s are further augmented by
Individualized Transition Plans (ITP’s) and Student Support Team meetings
as needed.
Counselors
Each student is assigned by Academy to an academic counselor trained to
help him or her with designing individualized learning plans and choosing
post-secondary options. Counselors review student data, including grades,
cumulative records, assessment results, and courses taken. They then                   Counselor logs
interview students to assess the students’ interests and goals. Working with
counselors, advisory teachers, and parents, students develop four-year
personal learning plans that allow them to explore educational and career
opportunities while simultaneously fulfilling graduation requirements. To
ensure that parents are aware of their children’s goals, they are asked to
review and sign the learning plans.

Besides providing individual counseling sessions that focus on specific
student needs, counselors hold formal group sessions with their counselees
each semester in their advisories to re-evaluate goals and modify their plans          Life After High
as necessary. At this time, students reflect on their progress by reviewing            School booklet
grades in courses taken and analyzing test results. Students are guided in
developing, updating, or modifying their individualized programs. The
LAUSD publication Life After High School is used as an annual review tool
with students to monitor progress towards graduation.

Our counseling staff also conducts parent meetings each year to go over
graduation expectations with underclassmen. Individualized Graduation
Plans (IGP’s) are completed and then updated each semester. In the 9th and
10th grades, counselors discuss the a-g requirements, CAHSEE and other
state and national assessments, and the available support services at the            Meeting agendas
school, such as tutoring, intervention, HEART peer mediation, and peer
counseling programs. At college nights held for juniors and sophomores, as
well as other informational nights for seniors, counselors go over graduation
requirements, college preparation, and testing information. At the meetings
for juniors and sophomores, the counseling staff also reviews the PSAT
results with students and parents.

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College Counselor
Through the College/Career Center (CCC), students are able to access
resources and materials to support selection of an appropriate post-secondary
choice. The CCC is staffed by our College Counselor who trains College
Peer Counselors to assist students as they access the resources of the CCC.        College Counselor
Through the College/Career Center, students have access to resources and                        logs
materials that aid in their selection of post-secondary educational choices:
catalogs, CDs, brochures, applications, forms, and Internet access to college
and career websites and other links. Students are invited and encouraged to
attend college fairs hosted at the local community college and speak to
college and university representatives who are regularly scheduled to visit
our school.

Throughout the year our College Counselor hosts 12th grade parent nights to
present information on post-secondary options, including college selection
and financial aid. Our College Counselor organizes and schedules visits
from both public and private colleges and universities during the                    Meeting agendas
instructional day to provide students with the opportunity to make
appropriate career and educational choices. Outreach representatives from
Pierce College and CSUN visit every two weeks to speak with students
personally.

Our College Counselor organizes and facilitates administration of the
Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) on site at our campus for all                PSAT results
10th and 11th grade students. All 10th and 11th graders enrolled at NAHS took
the PSAT in 2007 and 2008.

Due to our relatively small student enrollment, the district does not provide
funding for our school to have a Career Counseling position, even part-time.         Master Schedule
Therefore, one of our academic counselors serves as a career counseling and
work experience point person, among her multiple roles.

Support Services and Parental Participation
NAHS offers free after school tutoring and study sessions in our library. A
math teacher is always present to assist students with conceptual
understanding, and student experts in Science, English and Social Studies are           Tutoring logs
present to assist students as well. California Scholarship Federation
members fulfill community service hours by assisting with tutoring. Our
future plans include recruiting CSUN students in need of service learning
hours to support our tutoring program.

A key to supporting students’ and parents’ access to curricular paths and
postsecondary opportunities is communication. Northridge Academy High
maintains a website with an event calendar which provides a weekly bulletin            NAHS Website
of scheduled events and informs parents through our NTI Connect-Ed
telephone system. Parent and student attendance at school events, including

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Back-to-School Night, Parent Student Conferences, Open House, 12th Grade
Parent and Academy Awards nights which recognize exemplary student
achievements, are encouraged throughout the year.

Our Family Center Director is instrumental in communicating with parents           Family Center
and guardians and providing them with information that will help them to            Director log
support the achievement of their children’s academic and personal goals.




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B3: To what extent are students able to meet all the requirements of
graduation upon completion of the high school program?


                                  Findings                                             Data/Evidence
Northridge Academy High School maintains a learning community whose
function is to provide all students with the support necessary to be
academically successful. Our entire learning community is committed to             District Graduation
supporting all students in meeting all the requirements of graduation,                    requirements
increasing graduation rates, increasing California High School Exit Exam
(CAHSEE) passage rates, and reducing dropout statistics.

Opening in 2006 with a student population of only 9th and 10th graders, we
graduated our first class of Seniors in 2007. Chapter 1 of our Self-study
                                                                                      Self-study report,
report (p.83) shows that the graduation rate of our Seniors was 97.7%. We                     Chapter 1
attribute this outstanding graduation rate to the culture of resiliency we have
established at our school and to the dedication and commitment of all
stakeholders to support the learning of every NAHS student.

Further, our data chapter will show that only one child dropped out of NAHS
in the 2005-06 year, and nine dropped out in the 2006-07 year, a drop-out            Planning meeting
rate of less than 1%, a rate far lower than our District averages. We attribute                 notes
this exemplary achievement to the fact that, from the day we opened, we
made a commitment that every child who enrolls at our school belongs here;
and he/she is our responsibility for all four years.

Where we have been less successful is in our percentages of students who
complete a-g requirements with C’s or better. Our 2007-08 data will show
that our highest percentages are in Foreign Language and Performing Arts              Self-study report,
                                                                                              Chapter 1
(over 90%). Our lowest percentage is in Math (66%). Further, 80% of our
students are meeting a-g English requirements, and 72.7% are meeting
Science requirements. We have identified this as an area of growth for the
coming years.

We make concerted efforts to support our students in the successful passage
of the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE). CAHSEE preparation
classes are available on Saturdays over a period of six weeks, each semester.
Students review key concepts and skills necessary for success.. Our testing           Self-study report,
coordinator designs Advisory lessons which Advisory teachers use during                       Chapter 1
specifically scheduled weeks prior to the March exam to provide students
with additional support. In 2007-08, the overall percentage of students
passing the CAHSEE increased 4% in Math to 77% and 7% in English to
88%. The subgroups who struggle the most are our Special Education
students and our English Learners. One of our identified areas of growth
includes the need to provide these groups with effective targeted instruction.

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Ongoing Support
Throughout all four years, NAHS students receive multiple sources of
support and intervention toward the successful completion of graduation
requirements:

    Advisors and counselors monitor at-risk students and recommend
     other services and supports.
    Mathematics teachers provide initial and ongoing assessments to
     ensure academic progress and provide support and intervention when
     needed.
    Students are placed in appropriate classes.
    In the Special Education program, students are assigned to a case                     Counselor logs
     carrier who monitors academic and personal needs.
    Student Success Teams discuss referrals, develop proactive
     interventions and placements for at-risk students, and make
     recommendations to test students for learning disabilities or to
     provide 504 accommodations, when necessary.
    Interventions may include enrollment in literacy electives, tutoring,
     learning center, or counseling.

Additional support is provided for all NAHS Seniors. Our 12th grade students
are required to complete a senior contract which outlines the responsibilities            Senior contract
and privileges of their senior year. Included in this are required support
hearings before a panel of staff members if attendance or academic                          Sample senior
requirements are not met. Because of the NAHS graduation requirement of a                       portfolio
completed Senior Portfolio, 12th grade students receive highly-structured
guidance and assistance from their Advisory teachers in the completion of
this particular requirement.

Throughout high school, counselors, advisors, and Academy facilitators
regularly meet to examine student data: grades, test results, and courses
taken. After every progress reporting period, counselors, advisors and
facilitators review student grades and counsel those who are not succeeding.
Families and teachers are come together to discuss issues impacting student
performance. Staff members suggest interventions such as weekly progress
and attendance reports, after school tutoring, or referrals to district or outside          Meeting notes
school resources and community agencies, when appropriate. Students work
with advisors, counselors and parents to review personal learning plans to
investigate educational and career opportunities while meeting graduation
and college entrance requirements. Through these concerted, multi-faceted
efforts, we strive to help every student at NAHS succeed in attaining their
personal and academic goals.




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    CATEGORY B: STANDARDS-BASED STUDENT LEARNING: CURRICULUM

Areas of Strength:

    Three Academies aligned to CSUN Colleges allow staff to personalize instruction and
     students to experience a rigorous and relevant curriculum.

    By providing a variety of support programs, services, and interventions, we have
     achieved high percentages of students who graduate successfully and in a timely manner.

    Our students receive support in accessing rigorous curriculum from a wide range of
     people and resources.

Areas of Growth:

    We must continue to utilize data analysis to evaluate effectiveness of programs and
     interventions designed to support student learning.

    We must continue to explore – with CSUN and other partners – student choice regarding
     a wide range of electives.

    We must be more systematic in providing students with support in the completion of a-g
     requirements with grades of “C” or better.




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              Chapter IV:
          Self-Study Findings
               Instruction


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                              Focus Team C: Instruction

                                        Team Leaders




                           David Arias, Science; Careers in Education Academy
                            Larry Atmore, English; 9th Grade Bridge Academy


                                       Team Members




                 Ivan Cheng, CSUN Secondary Education Math; 9th Grade Bridge Academy
                      Lynne Culp, English; Arts Media and Communication Academy
                    Natasha Galvez, Science; Health and Human Development Academy
                     Luis Garibay, Student; Health and Human Development Academy
                 Rich Gillett, Physical Education; Arts Media and Communication Academy
                David Lubnow, Special Education; Health and Human Development Academy
                     Hunter March, Student; Arts Media and Communication Academy
                 Francisco Ortega, Social Studies; Arts Media and Communication Academy
                                     Rene Rances, District 1 Math Coach
                                           Connie Semf, Principal
                       Rebeca Solano, Foreign Language; 9th Grade Bridge Academy
                         Wendi Williams, Mathematics; 9th Grade Bridge Academy




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                  CHAPTER IV: SELF-STUDY FINDINGS
    CATEGORY C: STANDARDS-BASED STUDENT LEARNING: INSTRUCTION


C1: To what extent are all students involved in challenging learning
experiences to achieve the academic standards and the expected school-wide
learning results?

                                      Findings                                          Data/Evidence

All students at NAHS experience – on a daily basis – a rigorous instructional
program aligned to State standards and delivered using research-based strategies
and practices. Students not only learn the rigorous state content standards but also
begin to explore and comprehend the expected school-wide learning results.

Before opening in 2006, we researched many aspects of an effective school
program. In particular, much attention focused on the type of bell schedule to
adopt. Based on our research, we adopted a block schedule, allowing for 110-
minute class periods twice a week, and one day of 42-minute classes with early           Bell schedule
dismissal for common planning time. The block schedule has compelled teachers
to evaluate their instructional practices, and develop new ones, to maximize the
learning experience of our students. Within a typical 110-minute period, one is
likely to observe a thoughtful balance of a variety of instructional strategies,
including direct teacher instruction, whole- and small-group discussion, guided
practice, individual work, and reflective learning. Over the years, we have
witnessed much growth by individual teachers, as well as entire departments and
Academies, in developing ways to engage our learners in mastery of state
standards and our expected school-wide learning results.

Rigorous Teaching and Learning in the Content Areas

Mathematics
The NAHS Math department has identified and implemented many effective
instructional strategies. Examples of the ways they engage our learners include,
bur are not limited to, these practices:

 Math teachers use the Pearson Achievement Solutions Learning Teams                         Learning
  program to meet regularly to examine student work to determine how to use                     Team
  small group learning more effectively in students’ mastery of mathematics.                 Notebook

 Each of the various math disciplines incorporates literature into the
  curriculum, and the math department collaborates with the English department
  for strategies, such as, Socratic seminars, blogs, and reciprocal teaching. For       Course syllabi
  example, students in Algebra 2 read the book, Zero: The Biography of a
  Dangerous Idea. Students in Pre-Calculus read Fermat’s Enigma: The Epic



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   Quest to Solve the World’s Greatest Mathematical Problem.

 In Algebra 1AB, Algebra 2AB, and Pre-Calculus, the math department has
  implemented the College Preparatory Math (CPM) Program in which students                 Textbooks
  develop critical thinking skills and make connections between California State
  grade-level standards and relevant, applicable problems which stress multiple
  representations.

 Many math classrooms utilize seating configurations that promote cooperative
  learning. Students must help each other in completing assignments, which in          Seating charts
  turn, helps all learn the content better. The Algebra 1 classes and calculus
  classes are activity-based to help students better learn the concepts.

 Manipulatives, such as, tile patterns are used in Algebra 1 to assist students in        Classroom
  solving equations and progressively obtain a wider range of strategies for             observations
  representing data in various ways. Eventually, students demonstrate mastery
  in representing data graphically, verbally, algebraically, and pictorially.

Science
The Science department employs the inquiry method of learning by promoting
experiential, hands-on learning. Students are allowed to explore a topic through
experimentation before the technical information is dispensed. This gives the
                                                                                           Classroom
students “buy-in” as new information is supported by their experiences.                  observations
Metacognition is promoted throughout the science curriculum by having students
reflect on the effectiveness of completed projects, asking such questions as, “what
could we have done differently”. Students then provide feedback through surveys.

Here are some representative examples of the kinds of classroom activities that
our science teachers use to promote academic success in their classrooms.

 Integrated Coordinated Science (ICS) students learn how to solve word
  problems and use dimensional analysis in many of their lab activities. ICS
                                                                                             Science
  students create review booklets for each topic and learn study skills that help           evidence
  them as they progress in all their high school science classes. Ninth grade              notebooks
  students learn the process of lab write-ups and a higher level of learning
  through the use of composition books. This process continues each year and
  more complex activities are scaffolded.

 All science teachers use the District periodic assessment data to inform
  instructional choices. Based on their assessment results, students are assigned           Periodic
  specific standards to re-learn. Students create trading cards, similar to               assessment
  baseball cards, which paraphrase and illustrate the State Content standards that
  students need help with.

 Ours science teachers make explicit efforts to support the learning of our
  English Language Learners. As an example, in biology classes, the “Dinner



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   with Darwin” project requires students to write a transcript that records a
   conversation at home during a holiday dinner in which they describe a debate                Teacher
                                                                                              evidence
   between themselves and the historical figures that contributed to the theory of           notebooks
   evolution by natural selection. Through this activity, students are able to
   honor their own cultural experiences and engage in a culturally responsive and
   relevant activity.

English
The English department utilizes a variety of strategies to allow students to tap into
their specific learning modalities. Teachers use graphic organizers and audio                  Teacher
recordings to assist students in comprehending difficult texts or concepts. Writing           evidence
as a meaning-making tool is another shared strategy used across the department.              notebooks
Quick writes, for example, help students access their prior knowledge and help
teachers identify targeted areas of instruction.

Embedded in the District-issued instructional guides for all levels are recursive
habits of thinking and learning. By standardizing these research-based best
practices across four years, students are able to develop and effectively use
specific skills throughout high school. Here are some of the learning strategies
students use regularly in their English classes:
     Re-reading for different purposes
     Annotating the text
                                                                                           Instructional
     Interactive writing and reading                                                            guides
     Reflection
     Scaffolded writing activities
     Inquiry-based discussions
     Collaborative reading and writing tasks
     Culminating writing tasks

As an example, every instructional guide unit of instruction has a culminating
writing task. The 10th grade exposition unit involves reading several
autobiographical excerpts of noted authors discussing their own journey to                 Instructional
                                                                                                 guides
literacy. As a culminating activity, students interview people who have been
influential in the development of the student’s own reading habits and preferences
and then write an expository narrative of their own growth as readers.

Foreign Language
Our Spanish teachers use a wide range of strategies and provide an abundance of
learning opportunities for our students. Some of their instructional practices
include:
      Etymological word analysis                                                        Course syllabi
      An historical approach to understanding language
      Cultural studies and research
      Multi-media presentations (both teacher- and student-generated)
      Literature study (e.g., Bless Me Ultima)
      Creative writing (e.g., poems, fables, and skits)



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For example, to recognize a Latino cultural holiday, Dia de los Muertos (Day of
                                                                                               Teacher
the Dead), our Spanish teachers utilize guest speakers who discuss the                        evidence
significance of altars and symbols. They provide students with real life                      notebook
experiences through a field trip to a local Dia de los Muertos ceremony at the
Hollywood Cemetery.
Social Studies
Our Social Studies department is comprised of very new but extremely dedicated
                                                                                              Learning
teachers. They meet regularly to review pacing plans and develop their practice                  Team
together. The Social Studies department also utilizes the Pearson Achievement                 notebook
Solutions Learning Teams construct to set learning objectives, review student
work, and plan instruction.
Their instructional strategies include:
     Socratic seminars
     PowerPoints and instructional videos
     Trivia and review games                                                             Daily agenda
     Trade magazines (e.g., Invention)
     Essential Questions
     Debates
     Writing assessments at the end of every unit
Student-created projects include:                                                         Student work
     Creating a MySpace page for a historical figure
     Debates
     Oral reports
Moving toward a more integrated, interdisciplinary curriculum, the Social Studies
teachers have incorporated literature study into their curriculum and use Literature     Course syllabi
Circles to engage their learners. This type of “outside-the-box” thinking is part of
the uniqueness of our school. These are some of the novels our history teachers
use:
      Farewell to Manzanar
      The Jungle
      Black Dogs
      The Things They Carried

Visual and Performing Arts (VAPA)
As active contributors to the development of all four NAHS Academies, VAPA
teachers incorporate multi-disciplinary strategies into their arts-based instruction.
Literature, history, and math skills are all reinforced in our art and music classes.        Classroom
For example, the music instructor frequently provides the historical and cultural          observations
context of a selection that students are learning. By doing so, she is also
promoting our expected school-wide learning result to become culturally aware
individuals. Peer tutoring in the visual and performing arts encourages students
achieving at higher levels to assist lower achieving students, giving both learners
an opportunity to gain a better understanding of the material.


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Health/Life Skills
Our Health teacher provides her students with opportunities to work with case
studies and engage in simulations as doctors who diagnose and treat patients                Classroom
based on the evidence provided by the case study. In her classes, one is likely to         observation
observe lively and relevant class discussion, PowerPoint presentations,
instructional videos, and collaborative learning.

Life Skills teachers work closely with university student facilitators from
California State University’s STOP program to bring awareness to and hopefully              Classroom
eradicate bias, prejudice, racism, and discrimination. Teachers and facilitators           observation
utilizing video clips, skits, and real-life scenarios to teach the various concepts.
Also, Life Skills teachers utilize several helpful websites that engage students and
personalize instruction.

Academy-Based Instruction
The Academy construct of our school provides teachers with additional
opportunities to enhance instruction. By making cross-curricular connections, or
by utilizing CSUN facilities and resources, we are able to give students the
opportunity to extend their thinking and learning.

An example of an interdisciplinary, Academy-based project is the 10th grade
“United Nations Peace Conference” project. Students in their English class read
about genocides throughout history and conduct a research project on Darfur.            Course syllabi
Meanwhile, in their World History class, students learn about the United Nations
and create a Model U.N. in the NAHS multi-purpose room. On the day of the
Peace Conference, students make speeches, show student-made videos and
PowerPoint presentations, and discuss key issues in Socratic Seminar discussions.

Our Spanish teachers are committed to making interdisciplinary connections
within their Academies to support student learning. For example, in Spanish 1,
students use math skills to conduct surveys, graph data, and generate reports in
Spanish. They then analyze the graphs and organize the information into                 Course syllabi
PowerPoint presentations that they share with the class. Another activity includes
students learning about diverse cultures by converting Fahrenheit temperatures for
various Latin American countries to Celsius metric measurements using a math
formula given to them in their math classes. In addition, they reinforce their
geography skills by drawing and finding these cities on the Latin American map.

Special Education Students
For Special Education students, teachers utilize graphic organizers, one-pager
assignments, short quizzes, and learning assistance. Students with Individualized            Evidence
                                                                                            notebooks
Education Plans (IEP’s) are, in most part, taught in the general education
environment with a Collaborative Model in which the Special Education teacher
and general education teacher co-plan, and in many cases, also co-teach.
Accommodations and/or modifications are discussed and implemented. For                   IEP Progress
                                                                                              Reports


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example, teachers help students compare components that make a strong essay
versus a weak essay. They also provide rubrics, have students write a rough draft Classroom and
                                                                                       Learning
for each writing assignment to be reviewed with the teacher, and have them use            Center
content vocabulary in writing. Additional support is provided through Learning      observations
Centers which Special Education students either take as an elective class or use on
a drop-in basis to complete work, receive academic assistance, reinforce needed
skills, or extend time while taking a test.

English Language Students
Identified English Language students are clustered in core content classes that are         Classroom
taught by qualified, CLAD credentialed teachers. These teachers make conscious            observations
efforts to utilize SDAIE techniques to support student learning. Nevertheless, our
data indicates that we must do much more to move these students to greater levels
of proficiency. We have recognized this as an area of growth for our school.




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C2: To what extent do all teachers use a variety of strategies and resources,
including technology and experiences beyond the textbook and the
classroom, that actively engage students, emphasize higher order thinking
skills, and help them succeed at high levels?

                                      Findings                                        Data/Evidence

Classroom Technology
We at NAHS are fortunate to have access to an abundance of technology to enrich
the learning process and to expose students to the technological world they will
experience when they leave our school. Each classroom is equipped with an LCD
projector. Every teacher is provided with a laptop for school/home use. The
campus is completely wired for high-speed Internet access, and wireless access is
also available. In all but a few rooms on campus, there is a ceiling-mounted LCD
projector connected to a VCR/DVD system, room sound system which includes
an amplifier, and ceiling mounted speakers. Computer connections at the teachers’
desks enable the projection of both video and computer signals through the LCD            Classroom
projector. In all but a few rooms on campus, there is a ceiling mounted video           observations
camera and omni-directional microphone. Teachers are able to control the camera
to record classroom lessons in order to improve and share best practices. The
cameras are also used for instruction, for example, zooming in on and projecting
student work or taping student presentations. A school-wide video network
system, also viewed through the ceiling mounted projectors, allows for school-
wide video broadcasts. Our cable-TV feed comes from CSUN, which also allows
us to utilize the CSUN Video Library which contains over 8000 titles.

Computer Access
NAHS students and staff have easy access to computers. Each classroom has two
or more desktop computers. In addition, we have one cart of 20 iMacs in the Art
department, two carts containing 32 ThinkPads in the Math department, one cart
containing 20 ThinkPads in the Library Media Center, and one cart containing 20          School map
ThinkPads in the Science department. We also have three open computer labs for
whole-class use – one on every floor – and one computer lab used by our
Computer teacher. The computer lab in the Library Media Center is open before
and after school, and during nutrition and lunch on a rotating basis, giving
students access to complete class assignments and conduct research.

Web-based Services
The school subscribes to the video-streaming service called United Streaming,                Vendor
providing teachers access to hundreds of quality, District-approved instructional           contract
videos.

As a LAUSD school, our students and staff are provided with free email and
access to the LAUSD Digital Library both on- and off-campus. The LAUSD                      LAUSD
Digital Library contains dozens of academic databases for all content areas.                website




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The majority of our teachers use the service YourHomework.com, facilitating
school/family communication. With this service, teachers are able to post
homework and handouts on line, and students can access this information from            Roster of site
any computer with Internet. This service is especially useful because of our block              users
schedule and classes that meet generally every other day. An absent student can
access homework assignments from home to keep up with required work.

Additional Classroom Technologies
 In the Math department, students use graphing calculators and Calculator
  Based Rangers (CBR). Students use the Calculator Based Ranger to gather
  real data and analyze it. The CBR represents the data graphically, and students
  then represent it algebraically.
 In the English department, students are encouraged to use Google Docs to
  write and peer-review each others’ essays. Students also create blogs to use as
  electronic portfolios.
 In the Science department, students in biology classes use spreadsheets to
  graph and analyze data about variations in characteristics when learning about
  natural selection.
 In biology classes, students create a podcast that reviews a specific content
  standard that they have been assigned. Students can then use the podcast to
  review material throughout the year or prior to the CST.
 Special Education uses on-line Databases (such as Career Cruiser) to help                Classroom
                                                                                         observations
  develop the Individualized Transition Plan portion of the IEP. The student is
  able to find careers that are related to their surveyed interest and research the    Course syllabi
  career and educational pathway for those particular careers.
 Teachers have access to, and some use, the ICLICKER. This allows teachers
  to instantly take a class survey or do instantaneous assessments of a concept
  by having the students individually input data remotely.
 In Spanish for Spanish Speakers classes, students use group co-teaching and
  multi- technology research and analysis to create a TV newscast presentation
  modeling one of the current Spanish TV Stations. Students use movie-making
  cameras, design, write and perform interviews.
 For English Learners in the Developmental Readers and Writers (DRW) class,
  the teacher uses the Read 180 program to increase the reading levels of low-
  performing students (lexile reading levels). There are four elements to the
  program, with its centerpiece being the computer-based software instruction.
 In Science classes, students create illustrated glossaries within their
  composition book, or science notebooks, after an activity. Students define a
  concept or term in their own words and draw pictorial representations which
  support students who struggle with the vocabulary taught in science.
 The Physical Education department utilizes a website where students enter
  their entire day’s food intake to assess whether or not they are meeting the
  predetermined caloric allotment. In conjunction with the daily food intake
  assignment, students practice calculating their body mass index (bmi), heart
  rate, and exertion levels.




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NAHS and CSUN Library Services
At Northridge Academy High School, the full time Teacher-Librarian oversees
the three computer labs and the library facilities. In addition, the Shared-Use
Agreement between LAUSD and CSUN provides for student access to the CSUN                  Shared-Use
Oviatt library whenever it is open. To develop and maintain this partnership, our          Agreement
Teacher-Librarian works with the Outreach Librarian at CSUN, whose duties
include working with our school.

Through a school-wide research curriculum, we ensure all students are taught
information literacy skills throughout Grades 9-11, with development of a Grade
12 curriculum in progress. In providing a uniform curriculum that is planned and
evaluated collaboratively between our grade-level English teachers, our Teacher-
                                                                                        Meeting notes
Librarian, and the CSUN Outreach Librarian, we ensure that all of our students
receive the same quality instruction. This allows us to build upon these research
skills as students advance to the next grade level, helping us to graduate students
who are better prepared for the types of research they will be asked to conduct at
the college level and in future careers.

Students may use the Oviatt Library whenever it is open, per the CSUN/LAUSD               Shared-Use
Shared-Use Agreement. All students also have book check-out privileges and                 Agreement
may borrow up to three books at a time. All that is required is a NAHS student
identification card.

The NAHS library maintains a book/student ratio of roughly 14 books per student.
It hosts a website that provides a central source for informing students and staff
about the library and linking them to the myriad of resources the library offers.
Many of our reference books are available as e-books. On campus, students
                                                                                        NAHS library
access these books through the website. Off campus, the e-books are password                website
protected, but students can get the password from the library. The library has
books on CD available for check-out to students and staff. Among others, Special
Education and EL students use the Books on CD as a support tool. The library
has DVDs and videos available for student and staff checkout.

Library-Provided Instructional Services
   Teacher training in the use of technology and software programs
   Collaboration with teachers to design instructional activities using print
     and/or non-print library and Internet resources
   Maintenance of computer resources school-wide                                       Meeting notes
   Library orientations
   Creation of assignment-specific webliographies or bibliographies
   Book talks to classes
   Instruction in research skills; Internet searching and website evaluation;
     utilizing the on-line public access catalog (OPAC); MLA format for
     academic research




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CSUN Campus Resources
The CSUN Outreach Office supports our entire 9th Grade Bridge Academy by
providing us with campus tours. Seeing a university campus motivates our                   Academy
students to pass their classes, choose an Academy for Grades 10-12, and set                Notebook
academic goals that include high school graduation and going on to college.
University campus tours enrich our overall instructional program immensely.

Both the CE Academy and the HHD Academy have taken advantage of the
invitation of several CSUN faculty members to allow our students to observe one
of their class sessions. Students from both Academies have attended sessions of a       Lesson plans
CSUN Child and Adolescent course. NAHS teachers were able to plan follow-up
instruction based on the students’ experiences and observations while attending
the CSUN class.

Geology students enjoy field trips to the California State University, Northridge
campus for programs in Astronomy and Geology. Guest speakers are scheduled
throughout the year for enrichment and career guidance. NAHS students are also
invited to take university classes at CSUN through the Catalyst program where         Course syllabi
they work hand-in-hand with university undergraduate and graduate students and
professors on research projects, allowing them to earn college credits and a
generous stipend. Finally, the geology students are taken out of the classroom
where they learn about geologic processes through observations and experiences.
Field trips are a vital part of learning Earth processes, and the students are
motivated to learn because of these opportunities.

The AMC Academy hosts Banned Books Week every fall semester to discuss
issues of censorship and freedom of speech. CSUN English faculty provides
                                                                                           Academy
support in co-creating activities involving students from both campuses in debate          notebook
and discussion. The CSUN book store brings copies of banned books to our
campus for students to purchase for themselves during a Banned Books assembly.

The Oviatt Library provides NAHS students with the following services:
     Research assistance through the reference desk
     CSUN Email Reference service and LiveChat 24/7
     Virtual Reference for assistance in finding specific facts and information
     Assistance in developing appropriate search strategies                           Meeting notes
     Assistance in selecting, locating, and using materials to complete
       assignments
     Whole-class instruction as part of our developing school-wide research
       curriculum
     Access to specialized collections




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Academy-Based Activities, Field Trips, and Internships
NAHS teachers work hard to create opportunities for student learning that go
“above and beyond” the textbook and the classroom. Here are some examples of
the kinds of Academy-based activities and experiences that are available to NAHS
students:
For Dia de los Muertos in October, a guest speaker comes to our Spanish
classrooms to discuss altars that are made for Dia de Los Muertos. The guest
speaker discusses the symbolism, the elements of an altar and its connection to
history. Students learn of the origin of the celebration and how it has influenced        Lesson plans
other religions. Students then go to the Hollywood Cemetery to participate in Dia
de Los Muertos. Students also make an altar inside the classroom that uses the
elements and symbolism that the guest speaker described. Through these
extended learning opportunities, students’ understanding of cultural, historical,
and geographic issues is stretched on a much deeper and experiential level.
AMC students take an annual trip to the Getty Art Museum in Los Angeles and/or               Academy
the Huntington Museum in Pasadena as an extension of an interdisciplinary                    notebook
curricular unit designed by AMC English and History teachers.
HHD 10th grade students take an annual trip to the CSUN Aquatic Center at                    Academy
Castaic Lake, California, where they explore careers in Leisure Studies and                  notebook
Recreation and Tourism Management.
In AP Environmental Science, students go to Balboa Lake Park, clean up the
                                                                                          Lesson plans
wash, and take soil and water samples which they bring back to the class and
analyze to learn about the effects of pollution on the environment.

AP US History students write children’s books which they then go and read to
students at a nearby elementary school, Andasol Elementary. Students also create          Lesson plans
a postage stamp for a historical figure and write a justification for why the person
should have a stamp.

CE Seniors have the opportunity to apply for an internship experience at a local
elementary school. Interns are trained by the elementary school literacy coach in
the implementation of a standards-based writing intervention program. Struggling
fourth graders are identified and assigned to this after school writing intervention         Academy
program called the “Northridge Academy Writing Club” taught by our Senior                    notebook
Interns. Currently, similar internship experiences are being developed in the
AMC and HHD Academies.

Student Survey Feedback
In a recent student survey, over 86% of NAHS students either “agree” or                 Student survey
“strongly agree” that their teachers use a variety of strategies and resources to         results, Ch 1
teach effectively. Close to 85% believe that their teachers use State Standards to
drive instruction.




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Areas of Strength:

    NAHS teachers utilize a wide variety of research-based instructional strategies to deliver
     a rigorous, standards-based instructional program.

    A wide variety of technology is integrated into our daily instructional practices.

    Our CSUN and community partnerships provide diverse “beyond the classroom” learning
     experiences which allow our students to extend and deepen their thinking.

    Teachers and staff routinely use data to inform instructional decision-making.


Areas of Growth:

    We need to be more systematic and strategic in the use of SDAIE and other research-
     based instructional strategies to support the learning of our Special Education and EL
     students.

    We must use professional development time to develop more interdisciplinary
     instructional strategies and activities that allow students to apply the same skill sets
     across different courses (e.g., math with science and English with social studies).

    We need to ensure that we have the ongoing human and financial resources to
     continuously maintain, update, and sustain our school-wide technology.

    We must continue to expand student opportunities for internships, mentorships, and job
     shadowing.




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               Chapter 4:
          Self-Study Findings
              Assessment
                  and
            Accountability
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             Focus Team D: Assessment and Accountability
                                        Team Leaders




                        Michelle Katz, Mathematics; Careers in Education Academy
                       Susie Eller, English; Health and Human Development Academy


                                       Team Members




                     Dan Bramlage, Student; Arts Media, and Communication Academy
                     Dante Carrillos, Student; Health and Human Development Academy
                 Bonnie Ericson, CSUN Secondary Education; Careers in Education Academy
                            Julie Anna Glynn, English; 9th Grade Bridge Academy
                     Michael Gross, English; Arts Media, and Communication Academy
                        Karen Mullin, Special Education; 9th Grade Bridge Academy
                  Laurie Nelson, Social Studies; Health and Human Development Academy
                      Niru Parmar, English; Health and Human Development Academy
                      Christa Simmers, Physical Education; 9th Grade Bridge Academy
                            Fred Von Dohlen, Science; 9th Grade Bridge Academy




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                     CHAPTER IV: SELF-STUDY FINDINGS
              CATEGORY D: STANDARDS-BASED STUDENT LEARNING:
                     ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY

D1: To what extent does the school use a professionally acceptable
assessment process to collect, disaggregate, analyze, and report student
performance data to the parents and other shareholders of the community?

                                      Findings
Data Collection                                                                     Data/Evidence
Northridge Academy HS uses a variety of professionally acceptable assessment
processes to collect, disaggregate, analyze, and report student performance data to
our parents and other shareholders of the community. Our National, State, and
District assessment instruments include the California Standards Tests (CST's),
the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), the California English School calendar
                                                                                    District testing
Language Development Test (CELDT), District Periodic Assessments, Advanced                calendar
Placement (AP) Exams, the Presidential Fitness Test, the California State
University Early Assessment Program (EAP) for English and Math, the
Scholastic Aptitude Tests (SAT), the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Tests
(PSAT), and the American College Testing (ACT) Program.

National assessment results such as the AP exams, SAT, PSAT, and ACT are sent
to the principal and students by their respective agencies, e.g., The College Board
and The ACT. State and District assessment results are available on the
California Department of Education website and the district’s Decision Support              Assessment
                                                                                                  data
System (DSS) and are also published in the School Accountability Report Card
(SARC) which provides an overview of the school, including data on student
achievement and demographics. Periodic Assessment results are available to
teachers on the Princeton Review website and can be disaggregated in multiple
ways (i.e., by class, individual student, standard, etc.).

Administration regularly collects data on student academic grades, attendance,
and discipline records through the use of the Student Information System (SIS)                 SIS/ISIS
and Integrated Student Information System (ISIS). We also use less formal
parent, staff, and student surveys as assessment and accountability instruments.
Data analysis determines all instructional priorities such as budget allocation and
our professional development program.

Communicating with Staff
Each year, as we begin to receive school performance data in August, our
administrators and program coordinators (e.g., Honors/Gifted Coordinator, Title I
                                                                                               Meeting
Coordinator) begin the review process. Our assessment data is made available to                agendas
the faculty at the start of the school year during allotted professional development
time. We examine growth and challenges by comparing new data with the
previous year’s data. We compare test scores, both overall and disaggregated
data, to District and State averages as another indicator of our progress.



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Recently, we have recognized the need to incorporate a yearly re-examination of
our Single Plan for Student Achievement (SPSA) in light of each year’s
performance indicators. We have identified this as an area of growth.

Although the CST’s assess only the core content areas of English, Math, Science
and Social Studies, the entire NAHS staff receives CST data at the beginning of
the school year so that everyone can examine this data together and provide
                                                                                         Meeting notes
collaborative input. Departments review individual data, as well as disaggregated
data by subgroup, for their students and compare changes in scores from the
previous year. Then, departments meet to strategize appropriate measures to
improve academic achievement throughout the year. Departments design lessons
and activities that target those skills where students lack proficiency.
Departments of non-core content areas and Academies discuss ways to support
students in the core content courses. Additionally, data analysis determines our
intervention program priorities.

Communicating with Parents
In order to properly communicate with parents and the community, NAHS
disseminates information in numerous ways.         Individual student reports for
national assessments and the CST’s are sent home by the testing agencies. At
NAHS, we communicate with our parents through parent information nights,                  Letters/fliers
parent conferences, and various printed forms of notification, giving special
attention to communicating closely with parents of at-risk students and students
with IEP’s. Since Spanish is the second predominant language in our students’
homes, we consciously provide translated versions of all printed material as well
as Spanish translation at individual and group meetings with parents.

Our Family Center Director attends our staff meetings and professional
development sessions and has taken a special interest in learning how to analyze
data alongside our faculty in order to assist parents in understanding student data
and its implications for their children’s academic success. Through consistent           Family Center
outreach, she has begun to regularly meet with parents to explain test data and           Director logs
report card grades. During the fall semester this year, she worked closely with
English and math teachers to plan and implement evening meetings with parents
and at-risk students to help parents understand the impact of these types of data.

Recently, in addition to the SARC report available on-line, our LAUSD
Superintendent has begun to publish a LAUSD Report Card for every school
which is issued to every parent/guardian in English and in Spanish. This report         LAUSD Report
imparts information about a child’s school, including graduation rates, college                Card
readiness rates, an overview of the school’s CST results, and percentages of
students who are on track for college and careers.

At NAHS, we have Student Success Teams and Round Table conferences which
include the student, parent, counselor/administrator, and teacher who work
together to address the special needs of students who are struggling in their



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classes. The main focus of these endeavors is to examine data and make plans            Meeting sign-in
and identify learning supports to help individual students. Teachers also have                   sheets
individual conferences with parents and students and use other forms of
communication such as email, telephone calls, and letters home.

Parents/guardians are kept up-to-date on student grades by report cards
distributed every five weeks, and two PHBAO parent conference evenings per
year. In addition, at-risk students receive weekly or bi-weekly grades with an
attached assignment summary chart. Parents of special education students are
provided an “IEP Report of Progress and Achievement from Current IEP” in                      IEP logs
conjunction with the 10-week and 20-week report cards for each semester.
Additionally, parents are provided with information in regard to incremental
progress towards meeting goals as per identified methods in the student’s IEP.
IEP meetings are held at least once annually, and every third year, a
comprehensive re-evaluation may be determined as necessary to continue to meet
service eligibility requirements.

In preparing for an annual or triennial IEP review, as well as for initial IEP’s,
Special Education teachers, which include both Special Day Program (SDP) and
Resource Specialist teachers (RSTs), collect data from a variety of sources which
may include: standardized-referenced assessments, performance-based
assessments, curriculum-based assessments, report cards, class tests, anecdotal
records, behavioral reports, checklists and other teacher evaluations, reports from
providers of transitional services, performance on State and District assessments,
observations from parents, and comments from the student. These teachers also
give various checklists and teacher evaluations to a student’s general education         Meeting notes
teachers who provide details of a student’s progress in specific courses. When all
necessary data is collected and drafted into a “present level of performance”, the
IEP meetings are scheduled, involving: the student, at least one parent/guardian,
the special education teacher, an administrator, at least one general education
teacher, and in some specific types of IEP meetings, the school nurse, the school
psychologist, itinerant service providers, advocates for the family, and other
participants whose expertise may be sought by the district or the parent to develop
the most appropriate and least restrictive environment for the student to gain
access to a grade level or modified curriculum.

We make every effort to ensure a successful graduation rate. Our current
graduation rate of 97.7% reflects this commitment. We attribute our high                     Self-study
graduation rate to our conscientious monitoring of student achievement data and            report, Ch 1
our proactive interventions for struggling students. Counselors visit Advisory
classes beginning in 9th grade to explain the Individual Graduation Plan (IGP) to
the students. These IGP’s are taken home for review and signature by the                Meeting sign-in
                                                                                                 sheets
parent/guardian. Counselors also regularly send home letters informing parents
and students of the graduation requirements that they have met and still need to
meet. A senior appeals process, through scheduled Senior Support meetings, has
been established to review student records and aid struggling seniors in



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graduating successfully. Important communications about progress toward
graduation, in both English and Spanish, are mailed home via certified mail.

Communicating with Students
One of our primary modes of communicating assessment information and results
to students is through our Advisory classes. Our 9th grade “specialists” who teach
our freshman advisory classes work hard to raise student awareness of the                     Teacher
                                                                                             evidence
importance of earning passing marks, accumulating high school credits, and                  notebooks
scoring well on state assessments. Grades 9 through 12 advisory teachers create a
safe environment in which students can be thoughtful and purposeful in
examining their own data and using it to plan their high school years carefully.

Students who do not pass the CAHSEE in the 10th grade will have multiple                Sign-in sheets
subsequent opportunities to re-take the exam to pass. To support them, we offer
several preparation programs, including CASHEE Saturday workshops and
CAHSEE Boot Camp during the weeks prior to the CAHSEE administration.

In the spring semester, the CSU system offers the Early Assessment Program
(EAP) which allows 11th grade students to demonstrate the level of English and
Math proficiencies needed to be college-ready upon entering a CSU. If students            EAP results
receive an acceptable score on these EAP elements, contained in the English and             print-out
Math CST’s as well as a separate English writing assessment, they will be exempt
from taking the CSU entrance exams for English and Math. Both our students
and our school receive results from these additional assessments. These results
are useful to students and teachers alike in identifying areas of growth and need
for additional instruction.

Periodic Assessments are mandated by the District and given throughout the year
in English 9 and 10, Algebra 1, Geometry, Integrated Coordinated Science,
Biology, Chemistry, and World History. These assessments measure the
students’ level of proficiency toward meeting content standards. When the               Meeting notes
teachers receive their students’ scores, the students review and reflect on their
achievements as well as on their need for improvement. Teachers meet in
departments, review the assessment data, and modify their curriculum and
instruction accordingly.      Some teachers require students to share their
performance data with their parents, and parents are asked to respond to their
child’s data. Student-led conferences are sometimes utilized for this data
discussion. Parent and student responses further inform department and whole
faculty discussions on instruction and curriculum.

Department meetings and faculty professional development meetings regarding
the Periodic Assessment data are sometimes facilitated by our literacy and math
coaches who present and model strategies that help staff interpret data more
effectively and address deficiencies identified in data analysis.




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Our Special Education teachers require copies of all Periodic Assessments be
included in developing and determining goals and objectives for the student’s
next IEP, as well as to assess whether or not the student is achieving expected
goal levels. As part of the IEP process, Special Education teachers include results            Special
of Periodic Assessments as a part of the data that addresses the student’s present      Education logs
level of performance, including the student’s strengths, areas of need, the impact          and IEP’s
of the student’s disability on accessing grade level standards, and the need for
specialized support, or accommodations and/or modifications to the student’s
instruction and curriculum. The Periodic Assessment can be used as one of
several instruments in developing current goals and objectives for students with
special needs, as well as for determining appropriate accommodations for
assessments, such as the Periodic Assessment and CST’s.

Communicating with Other Stakeholders
At NAHS, we have monthly meetings of our Educational Advisory Board,                     Meeting notes
consisting of NAHS administrators and representatives from both CSUN and
LAUSD Central and Local Districts. These meetings are useful in keeping all
stakeholders, including our university partners, well-informed of our assessment
data and implications for school and program improvements.




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D2: To what extent do teachers employ a variety of assessment strategies to
evaluate student learning? To what extent do students and teachers use
these findings to modify the teaching/learning process for the enhancement
of the educational progress of every student?


                                     Findings                                            Data/Evidence
Teachers at NAHS recognize the absolute necessity of using a variety of
assessment strategies -- both formative and summative -- to evaluate student
learning. They use strategies with purpose and intentionality to address content
standards in all disciplines through multiple modalities. School-wide strategies
include traditional exams, quizzes and essays, portfolios, skill-based projects, the            Teacher
                                                                                               evidence
use of technology, writing prompts and assignments, journaling and quick-writes,              notebooks
Socratic seminars and literature circles, informal assessments, warm-ups, oral
discussions and debates, diagnostic tests, inquiry-based labs, project-based
learning, blogs, and illustrated vocabulary assignments. The data from these
various assessments are used by teachers to modify their instructional practice
and prioritize content and curriculum. Additionally, data from assessments has
been used to prioritize professional development plans.         The following are
representative examples of the variety of assessments used by NAHS teachers.
English
The English Department uses formal and informal assessments to evaluate
student mastery of academic content standards. In particular, writing of all types
is used to allow students to demonstrate their thinking and learning. Informal
writing assessments can be as simple as reading logs and Quick Writes at the
beginning of a class period to ascertain students’ prior knowledge and possible                 Rubrics
misconceptions. Formal, extended writing allows students to carefully organize
and articulate their new understandings. Often, a check of grammar, spelling, and
other language conventions are incorporated into the assessment of these
extended writing assignments.
English teachers use a wide variety of oral activities as assessment tools. Student
participation in Socratic seminars, literature circles, and class discussions provide
teachers with informal information on their progress. More formal oral
assessment strategies include debates, group projects, and oral reports. Peer
review, often with rubrics, is used as a valuable assessment and feedback tool.
The analysis of multiple assessment results is critical in identifying 9th and 10th             Teacher
grade students for placement in the Developing Readers and Writers Course                      evidence
(DRWC) which is designed for struggling readers. In 9th grade, this is a one-year             notebooks
course for students who qualify as needing this extra support. We extend it to
10th grade students who have advanced, but still require additional help to be
successful in all courses, based on evidence garnered from data analysis.
Students gain valuable insight to their own academic progress through the
feedback they receive – from both teacher and peers – based on assessment
analysis. This feedback allows them to develop their writing and speaking skills



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in order to be as clear, specific, cogent, and credible as possible in their
communication. They are taught to view literature as an ongoing discourse, a
                                                                                            Class data
conversation which welcomes their refined voice. They develop that voice
through construction and analysis of narrative, expository, persuasive and
descriptive texts, class discussions, and multi-media presentations. They are
taught to develop an awareness of the subtleties and nuances embedded in
communication, from body language to diction to syntax to rhetorical strategies.
Mathematics
The Math department reviews incoming 9th grade students’ state test scores and
identifies which students have far below basic skills prior to entering our school.             Master
They are placed in an additional math class which supports them in their Algebra              schedule
1 classes. In this class, they are taught support skills and concepts which align
with the Algebra curriculum so as to increase chances of success in Algebra 1.

The Math Department has developed skill quizzes which assess basic content
standards for Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Pre-Calculus. They use teacher-designed
unit tests as well as common course final exams. Non-traditional assessments
include projects, such as “Barbie Bungee”, Geometry Tessellations, Calculus
Volume projects, Graphing Calculator, and CBR (Calculator Based Ranger)                  Math evidence
                                                                                            notebooks
activities to model real world data. Students in Geometry also use Geometry
Sketch Pad (computer software program) to help demonstrate their understanding
of concepts. There is a school-wide annual “Pi-Day” (March 14) where students
participate in geometry-based problems designed by teachers and students.

In Math, students share ideas, investigate and explore open-ended situations that
incorporate mathematical functions and then reflect upon and summarize their
learning. They hypothesize, test theories and make inductive judgments based on
observations. They use technology appropriately and investigate patterns and
data. Students read, interpret and engage in discourse around books related to the
content and mathematical discoveries of their course. NAHS math students must
demonstrate their ability to use strategies for problem solving. Students learn           Student work
how to ask good questions, the key to life-long learning. They analyze test results
and develop skills for assessing their own strengths and weaknesses and how to
build on them. In Math classes, students work with groups and partners to
explain procedures. They present their findings, using the language of
mathematicians. In AP Statistics, they engage in projects, surveys, and written
reports for which they collect, analyze and interpret their data. Effective
observations and review of a variety of student work has become a daily teacher
practice to assess and monitor student progress in our math classes.

Science
Science teachers use a wide array of assessment tools and strategies to monitor
student progress and achievement of academic standards and expected school-                    Science
wide learning results. Science classes use performance tests and lab practicums               evidence
                                                                                             notebooks
to allow students to demonstrate their acquired proficiencies.



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Written tests and quizzes on specific assignments provide teachers with additional
assessment information while on-line quizzes give immediate feedback to the
students. Writing as a meaning-making tool is valued by Science teachers who
use quick-writes, persuasive writing, and letter writing as assessment tools.

Standards-based trading cards, scientific reports, analysis of data or activity plays
(e.g., “Dinner with Darwin”), children’s story books, posters integrating various                 Teacher
                                                                                                 evidence
systems/cycles, comic books, pod casts, and PowerPoint reports all demonstrate                  notebooks
how creative the Science department is in providing students with multiple and
varied opportunities to demonstrate their academic understandings.

Social Studies
Social Studies teachers use warm-ups as an informal assessment, using trivia
games, current events, essential questions, and reading and response questions.
11th graders write reflections, short essays and formal essays. Allowing students              Classroom
to use communication and social skills developed in other classes, Social Studies            observations
teachers also use Socratic seminars for controversial topics. Social Studies
courses usually require one major project per grading period.

Social Studies teachers also require their students to demonstrate their abilities to
evaluate historical and contemporary events for impact on their lives. Students                   Teacher
are asked to compare and contrast different political and economic systems. They                 evidence
                                                                                                notebooks
write and present specific information about various historical, political and
economic topics via PowerPoint presentations and essays. They read aloud and
respond to oral information.

Social Studies teachers meet regularly to discuss student progress and review
                                                                                           Learning Team
data. They utilize the Pearson Achievement Solutions Learning Teams protocol                    notebook
to assess student outcomes, set department objectives, and plan and implement
instruction.

Visual and Performing Arts (VAPA)
Visual and Performing Arts (music, drama, and art) teachers use a variety of
assessment tools, including written analysis, warm-ups, analysis, performance
tests and quizzes, visual literacy, on-site activities at the CSUN Art Gallery, and
student-led conferences. VAPA students are required to develop portfolios that
reflect the successful communication of the visual arts standards. They are
                                                                                               Classroom
expected to speak rationally and intelligently about the arts and write effectively          observations
with high levels of success. Students evaluate and analyze music on a regular
basis and are able to discuss what they are learning. They can play or listen to
music and then verbalize what they have heard or performed. By monitoring
what their students are learning in this hands-on, experiential way, VAPA
teachers are able to instill in their students the desire and ability to appreciate and
serve as patrons of the arts as well as to develop a strong sense of responsibility to
support and sustain creativity in their communities.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


By being exposed to art and music of many different varieties, genres, and
cultures, students gain a better understanding of cultures and lifestyles besides
their own. VAPA students develop the academic knowledge to place art and                         Teacher
music in historical and cultural context as well as to discern the dynamic impact               evidence
of the numerous contributions of world cultures to the arts. Through their                     notebooks
experiences and discussions, VAPA students gain appreciation for the history
behind the music or art that they hear and view. They also learn technical art
skills that allow them to creatively express their ideas in both two- and three-
dimensional media. In addition, they develop problem-solving skills that teach
them to appreciate, create, and support the arts.

Special Education
Special Education teachers utilize skill quizzes to assess the student’s grasp of
academic material and adapt lessons to address areas of challenge. They use
special writing assignments to help identify grammar and structural fluency.                     Teacher
Based on a student’s individual needs as evidenced in these assessments, targeted               evidence
support is provided for developing independent skills in the acquisition of                    notebooks
knowledge and in the use of strategies that promote the ability to reason, question,
make decisions, and solve problems.

Data analysis also helps our Special Education department determine what
appropriate supports their students need for the development of self-motivation,
resilience, and independence in life-long learning and achievement of personal
short- and long-term goals throughout their lives. Special efforts are made to
provide students with assistance in developing effective communication skills,                   Teacher
especially in expressive and receptive language. As a result of the heightened                  evidence
awareness of our NAHS teachers, both special education and general education,                  notebooks
regarding the individual needs of each student, students with a wide range of
special needs are encouraged to actively participate in opportunities that deepen
their understanding of global issues and community involvement. The success of
our special needs students meeting a-g requirements and graduating with a high
school diploma is a result of the collaborative use of data among our staff.

Physical Education
Physical Education assessments vary greatly, depending on the activities on a
given day. P.E. teachers most often use performance-based assessments,
allowing students to demonstrate their understanding of a kinetic movement or
the impact of a cardio exercise. Written activities are a required element of the
dailyplate.com program where students assess their daily nutritional intake with
the amount of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Teachers also require a fitness              Data results
portfolio, where students evaluate a “client” by creating a pamphlet that includes
the client’s health history, along with a proposed nutrition and workout plan.
Students run the mile, climb stairs, use fitness stations, and participate in aquatics
and visual assessments. They are assessed on eight components: team, individual
sports, gymnastics, aquatics, fitness, dance, and body composition.




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A goal of the P.E. department is to help students discover what they enjoy. By
doing so, students will be more prone to utilizing outside resources, such as a
                                                                                                 Teacher
YMCA, community center, or gym, to help themselves continue with their fitness                  evidence
and health for their entire lives. Therefore, students and teachers alike often                notebooks
engage in analysis of test results to see where strengths and interests lie.

By comparing our students’ fitness results with national statistics from the Center
for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), students are also able to compare their
fitness levels, and those of others living in their community, to a national level.
The President’s Fitness Test is a series of six tests (aerobic capacity, body                Student data
composition, abdominal strength, trunk extensor strength, upper body strength,
and flexibility). There is a pre-test in September and a final test in April. All 10th
grade students must pass or continue physical education until they pass the final
test. This assessment instrument provides us with additional valuable information

Health/Life Skills
Health class uses project-based instruction with quizzes and tests from the newly
designated standards-based curriculum.         Our Health teacher frequently               Course syllabi
communicates with Advisory teachers and other content area teachers to monitor
students’ progress and provide individualized support for her students in all areas.

Life Skills teachers are cognizant of the need to use assessment tools which allow
visual, verbal, and kinesthetic learners to communicate their learning effectively.              Teacher
Students learn to use data from these tools to develop increased self-awareness                 evidence
regarding aptitudes, interests, attitudes, and developmental skills necessary for               notebook
effectively planning and implementing goals and strategies that help them to
succeed in school, in the community, and toward post-secondary outcomes.

Foreign Language
At the beginning of the school year, Foreign Language teachers provide
diagnostic tests to determine appropriate class placements. Throughout the                   Student data
school years at NAHS, students demonstrate proficiency levels through the use of
oral and written assessments that include warm-ups, quizzes, tests, presentations,
and projects.

In NAHS Spanish classes, students have to think through the conventions and
new rules of their new language to properly communicate. Learning a new
language, such as Spanish, is a challenge that our students take as part of their
graduation requirements and preparation for college. They must carefully apply
new information to their everyday lives (at home, school, after school activities,          Student work
shopping, traveling, etc). Analysis of a variety of assessment data is essential to              samples
effective teaching and learning of a language. Classes are scaffolded in a way
that encourages students to use their base knowledge and experiment in the
community in new ways of applying information they already know. The
primary goal of our Spanish teachers is to bring all students to a proficient level
where they can listen, speak, read and write in Spanish. Depending on their skill



                                                                2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 168
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


levels, students are required to produce written and oral activities for a variety of
themes and encouraged to express their ideas and opinions as they would in their
native language. Our two teachers in the Spanish Department meet regularly to
review student work, discuss data findings, and plan curriculum together.

Computers/Technology
In Computer/Technology classes, learning is “hands on”, with activities that can
be utilized across the disciplines and in real life: for example, PowerPoint, My
Cost Excel Spread Sheet and Macromedia Fireworks. Therefore, teacher                         Classroom
discussions of student assessment results often exceed mere assessment of content          observations
mastery; they also involve the development of the overall school success of
enrolled students. Technology teachers often use peer assessments and peer
evaluation to provide students with additional insight into their own learning.

Senior Portfolios
Currently, one of our most informative school-wide assessment tools is the Senior
Portfolio. At the beginning of their Senior year, all NAHS students sign a Senior
                                                                                          Portfolio table
Code of Conduct Contract. This contract stipulates that a non-negotiable                     of contents
requirement for participating in graduation ceremonies is the completion of a
Senior Portfolio.

The Senior Portfolio is a compilation of evidence of the academic and personal
growth that our students have experienced over their four years with us.
Artifacts include samples of their best academic work across the years; letters of
recommendation; college applications; and reflective pieces on the NAHS                   Sample Senior
Learning Conversation Principles and our Expected School-wide Learning                        Portfolio
Results. Through portfolio presentations in May, we have gained great insight
into how well we, as a learning community, are meeting the needs of our students.
In addition, exemplary portfolio presentations are shared by our seniors with
Grades 9-10 Advisories so that our freshmen and sophomores can learn and
develop high expectations for their own portfolios as they work on them starting
in the ninth grade.

Parent and Student Feedback
Results from recent parent and student surveys are positive. Over 92% of NAHS
students either “agree” or “strongly agree” that they know what is expected of
them both in their classes and by the school at large. Over 94% of our parents                Self-study
                                                                                            report, Ch 1
agree as well. Close to 80% of our students’ teachers use a wide variety of
strategies to assess what students know and have learned. A resounding 97% of
our parents agree that their children know clearly what is expected of them to
pass their classes, and 87% of our students agree with this statement as well.




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D3: To what extent does the school with the support of the district and
community have an assessment and monitoring system to determine student
progress toward achievement of the academic standards and the expected
school-wide learning results?


                                      Findings                                          Data/Evidence

The Los Angeles Unified School District provides administrators and
coordinators with accountability reports on student achievement and outcomes.
The State provides the School Accountability Report Card (SARC) that gives an
                                                                                        Single Plan for
overview of the school, including data on student achievement, demographics,                   Student
and staff information. At NAHS, School Site Council (SSC) is our governing                Achievement
board which consists of administrators, teachers, staff, students, parents, and
community members. The SSC uses our Single Plan for Student Achievement to
monitor student progress toward the successful achievement of the academic
content standards and our school-wide learning results. It is this document that
monitors the allocation of school resources to support the academic achievement
of all our students. At NAHS, all instructional decisions are data-driven.

School Site Assessment Monitoring System
Administrators work with department chairs, program coordinators, counselors,
and Academy facilitators to review assessments and make instructional program
decisions. Professional development time is allocated to Departments and
Academies to consider the instructional and programmatic implications of our
assessment data. Processes have been established requiring all funding requests
                                                                                      Meeting agendas
to be submitted with a rationale based on how the funding of a stated request will
improve student achievement. Administrators work with department chairs and
Academy facilitators to modify the master schedule each year, and sometimes,
each semester, based on assessment data analysis. Core academic classes,
electives, intervention courses, and enrichment opportunities are built into the
master schedule to help students succeed. Additionally, budgetary priorities are
directly related to instructional priorities identified through data analysis.

Department and Academy Assessment Monitoring System
Departments regularly re-assess pacing plans or curricular maps through the lens
of our most current assessment results. Recently, we voted to adopt a Common
Planning Time schedule which allows us to meet for one hour weekly, either by
Academies, Departments, or grade levels, to analyze data and build our                   Meeting notes
instructional programs. Math, Science, English, and Social Studies meet three
times per year to discuss data generated by our District Periodic Assessments.
Moreover, most core content teachers meet regularly as part of the Pearson
Achievement Solutions Learning Teams to look at student data and samples of
student work in order to establish goals and create instructional units.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


We have been fortunate to have received funding provided by CSUN for the past
two years to conduct an annual planning retreat. During these events, CSUN
partners join us as we examine and analyze our evidence of student learning,             Retreat agendas
discuss implications, and create plans for building our Academies. The
participation of CSUN facilitators and other staff allows us to identify innovative
ways in which the university can support our students’ academic achievement.

Individual Teacher Assessment Monitoring System
Classroom teachers use formal and informal daily assessments to monitor
student achievement of academic standards and expected school-wide learning
results. Though curriculum is largely dictated by District Instructional Guides             Lesson plans
and pacing plans, it is still essential that teachers closely monitor the progress of
their students and adapt lessons, differentiate instruction, and modify pacing
plans as needed by their students.




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D4: To what extent does the assessment of student achievement in relation
to the academic standards and the expected school-wide learning results
drive the school's program, its regular evaluation and improvement, and
usage of resources?


                                      Findings                                        Data/Evidence

The Development of School Programs
Analysis of assessment and data results, in conjunction with student and parent
surveys, has been useful in the identification and development of programs and
electives.

Assessment data analysis has been especially instrumental in the development of
our Academy structure. Research has shown that providing learners with
interdisciplinary connections is a highly effective way to support academic                Academy
                                                                                          organizers
success. Therefore, Academy teachers are strongly encouraged to look for cross-
curricular connections and to plan instructional units and activities across the
content areas.

Our student data surveys have shown us that our students need to see
connections between their academic endeavors and the real world. This
compelling insight has resulted in the creation of electives such as the Careers
with Children class and the development of job-shadowing opportunities and
internships in our community. This year, we are modeling an intervention class       Master schedule
for our English Learners after the Learning Center model used by our Special
Education department. Our after school math tutoring program is yet another
example of programs we created in response to our data analysis. We are
hopeful that these direct responses to our data analysis will result in improved
student achievement of academic standards and our expected school-wide
learning results.

The creation of our CAHSEE intervention programs – in Advisory, during
school, and on Saturdays – is a direct response to our close examination of our        CAHSEE prep
students’ needs as evidenced in their CAHSEE results over recent years. For                      bell
example, for three weeks each spring, 10th grade Advisory teachers become math         schedule/room
                                                                                         assignments
and English Language Arts “specialists” and rotate among classes, providing
additional CAHSEE preparation.

Assessment data analysis also informs professional development and the
identification of key conferences, trainings, and in-services for teachers to         Sample request
                                                                                               forms
attend. Title I funds have been used to allow teachers to attend AP training,
regional and State math and English conferences and District-provided training,
and national conferences for Science and English educators.




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Our Single Plan for Student Achievement ensures that our budget is intrinsically        Single Plan for
tied to our school programs as well as our professional development that are                   Student
                                                                                          Achievement
based on results of our data analysis.

Ongoing Evaluation
Departments and Academies are also a part of the school-wide monitoring
system to help students meet academic standards and achieve our expected                   Coach logs
                                                                                         meeting notes
school-wide learning results. In English and Math, district-provided coaches
support teachers, departments, and academies in the use of assessment data
analysis.

The Instructional Cabinet consists of administrators, coaches, the union chapter
                                                                                      Meeting agendas
chair, department chairs, and Academy facilitators. This group of instructional
leaders provides additional perspectives and insights that are useful in the
ongoing evaluation of our school programs, policies, and procedures.

Parents and students also lend their voices to the ongoing process of assessment
data analysis and program evaluation by participating on governance committees           Meeting notes
and conducting parent advisory and parent association meetings. Student
representatives in our Associated Student Body (ASB) leadership program
provide great wisdom and insight to creating and sustaining an effective school.

The Usage of Resources
School Site Council (SSC) routinely reviews assessment data, and school
programs and services are modified or developed, based on data analysis results.
The SSC allocates categorical monies to support student achievement by funding
after school ,tutoring and other intervention programs. Instructional materials
and equipment purchased with Title I funds include books, reference materials,
guest speakers, technology, and media equipment, and even support personnel.               SSC minutes
These resources enable teachers to better assist students to achieve academic
standards and expected school-wide learning results. Since our first year,
processes have been developed and refined to ensure that all funding requests
identify a targeted group of students (e.g., EL, Honors/Gifted, Special Education,
at-risk, etc.) who will benefit from a requested expenditure and require the
person or group making the request to provide an explanation as to how the
expenditure relates to our school goal of improving student achievement.

WASC
This 2008-09 WASC Self-Study report represents our first complete WASC
report beyond our Initial WASC reports. The development of our WASC Action
Plan (Chapter 5) will heretofore provide our stakeholders with a powerful                  Action Plan
evaluation process and instrument that will facilitate our commitment and ability
to continue to monitor our progress toward increasing student achievement for
all students.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Areas of Strength:

    Teachers, both as content area teachers and as Academy members, utilize a wide range of
     assessments to allow students to demonstrate their academic growth and to help guide
     instruction and curriculum.

    Teachers, both in departments, Academies, and grade-level groupings, routinely examine
     data and modify instructional delivery accordingly.

    The District provides support through assessments and resource personnel (e.g., coaches
     and specialists), which allows us to more effectively address the needs made evident by
     data analysis.

    Our community of stakeholders -- teachers, counselors, administrators, support staff,
     students, and parents -- collaborates regularly to determine common areas of concern for
     our students’ growth and success.


Areas of Growth:

    We must continue to develop our abilities to effectively and systemically understand and
     analyze data to inform instruction.

    We must provide guidance and assistance to all stakeholders, including parents, in
     understanding data and using data analysis to identify and address student needs.

    We must regularly re-visit the Single Plan for Student Achievement to ensure alignment
     with the assessment data findings and identified needs.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




               Chapter 4:
          Self-Study Findings
               School Culture
     and Support for Student Personal and
             Academic Growth




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning



    Focus Team E: School Culture and Support for Student
              Personal and Academic Growth
                                         Team Leaders




                    Sharon Bernard, Counselor; Health and Human Development Academy
            Francisca Ortega, Counselor; 9th Grade Bridge Academy/Careers in Education Academy




                                        Team Members




                                  Raquel Avila Baca; Family Center Director
               Gladys Bonilla, Foreign Language; Arts, Media, and Communication Academy
                     Kevin Cabrera, Student; Health and Human Development Academy
                              Beth Cantwell, Health; 9th Grade Bridge Academy
             Michelle Hernandez, Physical Education; Health and Human Development Academy
                                Jessica Estrada, NAHS graduate/CSUN student
                       Brenda Helfing, Social Studies; Careers in Education Academy
                  Meredith Knell, Mathematics; Health and Human Development Academy
                          Emilie Kaplan, Student; Careers in Education Academy
                Jackie Latter, Special Education; Arts, Media, and Communication Academy
                        Kellie Randa, Special Education; 9th Grade Bridge Academy
                         Laura Rodriguez, English; Careers in Education Academy



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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                 CHAPTER IV: SELF-STUDY FINDINGS
  CATEGORY E: SCHOOL CULTURE AND SUPPORT FOR STUDENT PERSONAL
                     AND ACADEMIC GROWTH


E1: To what extent does the school leadership employ a wide range of
strategies to encourage parental and community involvement, especially with
the teaching/learning process?

                                      Findings                                         Data/Evidence

NAHS utilizes a comprehensive approach to communicating with the parents and
community, promoting involvement as active partners in education for our
students’ success. We are fortunate to have the support and involvement of very
dedicated parents, staff, and community partners.

Our school website offers to the NAHS community an overview of our school, its
programs, our focus on expected school-wide learning results, school policies and          lausd.net/
SLC descriptions. Our on-line school calendar of events enables parents and              northridge_
community members to actively participate in the NAHS learning community.                academy_hs
Through the site, one also has access to many resource databases. There are also
links to teacher websites and blogs.

Parents participate actively in the following governance groups: School Site
Council (SSC), Compensatory Education Advisory Committee (CEAC), English
Learners Advisory Council (ELAC), and School Leadership Council (SLC).
                                                                                             Meeting
Friends of NAHS, our parent booster club, raises funds, gives input on policies,             agendas
sponsors an after school “snack shack”, and holds fundraisers, providing funds for
supplies, support programs in the classrooms, field trips, student leadership
activities, and more. Parents are also involved in several clubs and sport teams on
campus, as well as our Leadership-sponsored events.

NAHS Family Center, under the guidance of a Family Center Director, is
beginning to expand our resource base of parent volunteers, speakers for Career
Day and classroom presentations, and workshops for parents. Most importantly
she serves as a point person to improve the two-way communication between
                                                                                       Family Center
home and school. Our director is fully bilingual in Spanish and English and has         sign-in sheets
assisted both counselors and teachers in reaching out to the families of at-risk
students. She facilitates parent/teacher conferences, assisting the parent if
translation and/or advocacy are needed. Furthermore, the director organizes
orientations for parents and students and transportation to adult school sites when
the student needs to acquire outside credits. She has also been instrumental in
increasing the membership of our school councils and the booster club and in
establishing a rapport with local businesses to support on-campus activities.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Another way we build two-way communication and support learning at home is
through the use of the “yourhomework.com” website. The majority of NAHS
                                                                                         www.yourhom
teachers post homework assignments on this valuable website that can be readily            ework.com
accessed by parents as well as students. Access to the e-mail addresses of all
teachers is also available on our website, and six teachers maintain their own
websites as a student resource and to aid in communication with the parents.
NAHS utilizes the LAUSD’s ConnectEd phone message delivery service to
instantly inform parents and guardians about upcoming events, such as parent
informational meetings, college nights, awards ceremonies, conferencing nights,             ConnectED
and other school events. Messages are also sent regarding attendance issues,                    Phone
emergency information, and teacher messages to entire classes or individual                   Message
students. All school correspondence, both written and oral, is communicated in                Delivery
both English and Spanish. Recently, teachers were given access and training in                 System
using ConnectEd to communicate with their students’ parents/guardians regarding
the academic and behavioral expectations they maintain for their students.
Following the ASCA standards for developing a comprehensive counseling
program, our counseling team, consisting of three counselors and a designated
Assistant Principal, has created a series of interventions for at-risk students. They
make concerted efforts to communicate effectively with parents and students to
                                                                                             Counseling
achieve the academic standards and our expected school-wide learning results.               Department
Communication is routinely conducted in the appropriate home languages. Phone               logs and SB
calls, letters sent by certified mail, individual conferences, Round Table                    1802 data
conferences, Student Success Team meetings, and IEP meetings are among the
many ways our counselors engage our parents in supporting the academic
achievement of our students. Translation is provided, as needed, at all meetings.
We also invite parents to regularly scheduled evening informational meetings.
These meetings are usually held by grade level and address graduation status,
graduation requirements, credit recovery options, and student support services                 Meeting
available on and off campus for students and families. Our college counselor                   agendas
conducts parent informational meetings and workshops which focus on college
admission requirements, financial aid, grade-level preparation and readiness,
college application workshops, and Senior Awards Night.
The NAHS clerical staff provides parents with information regarding support
programs for students. They are well-informed about the various programs and
available resources on our campus and provide parents with accurate and helpful          Staff directory
information. They are often our parents’ most direct link to our school, and we
take great pride in how they serve and support our entire learning community.
According to the results of surveys conducted this year, parents feel highly
welcomed at NAHS and aware of opportunities to be involved members of our
                                                                                         Parent survey,
learning community. The survey reveals that 93% of our parents either agree or               Self-study
strongly agree that they are invited to participate in school activities. Further,         report, Ch 1
95% of our parents indicate an awareness of the kinds of academic support
services we offer to their children.


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E2: To what extent is the school a safe, clean, and orderly place that
nurtures learning?
To what extent is the culture of the school characterized by trust,
professionalism, high expectations for all students, and a focus on continuous
school improvement?

                                      Findings                                          Data/Evidence

The data represented in Chapter 1 of our Self-Study report is evidence of the
extremely clean, safe, and orderly school we maintain. Beyond the high quality of            Self-study
                                                                                           report, Ch 1
the physical plant, great attention has been given to establishing and maintaining a
school culture that promotes professionalism, high expectations for students and
staff alike, and a focus on continuous personal and school improvement.
Our campus has only one point of entry after students arrive on campus in the
morning. Perimeter gates and doors are always locked during the school day,
leaving the Main Office as the only way to come onto or leave campus on foot.
Our underground parking structure is monitored by camera surveillance and is             Staff directory
secured after 8:00 a.m. Visitors must check in with the Main Office for passage
onto campus. We have a full-time school safety officer on campus who not only
responds promptly to any emergencies, but also builds rapport with our students.
Our full-time campus security aide assists with the traffic flow in the mornings
and performs routine sweeps of the campus all day long. Administration and
security conduct periodic security searches for weapons, narcotics, alcohol, and
other contraband.
Vigilance and supervision of our hallways during passing periods by our teachers
who welcome students at the door into their classrooms is expected and
                                                                                               School
demonstrated. This school-wide practice establishes our expectations for how              observations
students behave in the hallways and other school areas. As a result, incidents of
bullying are greatly reduced because the culture does not support such behavior.
A significant contributing factor to our safe campus is our H.E.A.R.T program, a
peer mediation program, in which student mediators have been trained to resolve
conflicts that arise between students, or groups of students, before situations            H.E.A.R.T.
                                                                                        mediation logs
escalate into violence. Supported by the positive culture that we have created at
NAHS, it is evident that our program is working as indicated by the decreasing
number of mediations required from year to year. As our students acknowledge,
"It is better to resolve things through peer mediation than end up being in serious
trouble with the administration!"
At NAHS we place great emphasis on sustaining a supportive and nurturing                       ESLR’s
culture through staff development and planning. We continually monitor how we                Character
create a caring environment, forming connections between staff, students and                   Counts
parents. Our expected school-wide learning results and the Character Counts™
attributes contribute significantly to defining our school culture.


                                                              2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 179
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


A seminal influence on our school culture comes from the work The Achievement
Council and one of our assistant principals who previously worked with this
former nationally-recognized organization that was instrumental in promoting and
facilitating the concept and processes for developing a college-going culture in
LAUSD's K-12 schools and in other districts throughout California and in other
states.    The "Learning Conversation Principles"®, or LCP's®, guide all
interactions that take place among our stakeholders. These are our LCP's:
   1.   Listen with the intent to understand, rather than to respond.
                                                                                             LCP’s
   2.   Open your mind to new learning and practice.
   3.   Invite differences and move away from “either/or”. Embrace “and”.
   4.   Wonder in front of each other.
   5.   Assume and exhibit good will.

Our freshmen learn the LCP's as a part of the 9th Grade Bridge Academy
curriculum. Grades 10-12 advisories reinforce the necessity of adhering to these           Academy
guiding principles in all discussions and conversations. Teachers make every               notebook
effort to model these principles in their daily practice. The LCP's are also a
foundational part of all school staff and parent leadership meetings.
With our small school size and our Academy structure, very few students remain              School
"invisible" or unrecognized. We are afforded the opportunity to know our               observations
students on a level that larger schools cannot achieve.
NAHS’ Advisory Program is designed to create an emotionally and socially safe
place where students can find the support of a caring adult - the Advisor - who
serves as a mentor, a role model and an advocate. Guidance and support are                  Advisory
                                                                                        lesson plans
provided for students to develop academic and personal-social skills in a
developmentally appropriate manner. Advisory is a venue for developing school
culture and identity while providing students with personalized advisement.
Our conduct management plan, Puma PRIDE (Positively Reinforced Individual
Discipline Expectations) describes expected behaviors for appropriate conduct of
our students and staff. It is aligned with LAUSD's discipline policy that embeds            LAUSD
                                                                                      Student Code
school-wide Positive Behavior Support. Each month, a student is recognized as,           of Conduct
"Inspirational Student of the Month". In addition, positive acknowledgement for
excellent attendance, conduct, and/or grades is given to students through awards
and certificates at awards ceremonies, both school-wide and academy-based;
recognition of whole advisories; announcements over our PA system and in our
Puma News broadcasts; our "Senior Stars" recognition sponsored by our parent
booster club; etc.
We have attendance and tardy monitoring systems in place that reduce the
interruptions to the instructional program and maintain an orderly learning            Absence and
environment by ensuring that students are in class, on time. Our absence and          tardy policies
tardy policies are aligned with District policies.




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Our Safe School Plan is developed collaboratively and revised annually. It                 Safe School
addresses violence prevention, emergency preparedness, traffic safety, crisis                     Plan
intervention, and student wellness. Our plan is compliant with a variety of State                 IIPP
and District health and safety requirements to ensure the well-being of students
and staff. We also have an Injury and Illness Prevention Program addressing
workplace safety which we review and update regularly
Our dedicated custodial staff works hard to ensure that our campus is clean and
attractive. Respect for our campus is inculcated in our students from their
                                                                                               School
freshman year and reinforced throughout their four years at NAHS. As a result,            observations
almost all of our students place their refuse in trash receptacles and bus their own
lunch tables. Our custodial staff models respectful behavior to our students, and
in turn, our students show respect to them by helping to keep our campus clean.
Collegiality is observable among all staff members. We always strive to improve
                                                                                               School
communication and support with all members of our learning community.                     observations
Genuine regard for all members is modeled by all staff and recognized by
students. One manifestation of this collegiality is our school-wide recognition of
an “Inspirational Educator of the Month”. Past recipients of this recognition
include classroom teachers, administrators, our plant manager, and our cafeteria          Inspirational
                                                                                              Educator
staff. These student-selected recipients reflect how every adult member of our                  plaque
learning community is recognized for making a contribution to our students’
education.

We received positive feedback from our recent parent and student surveys
                                                                                        Survey results,
involving the safety and cleanliness of our school. Over 88% of our students and            Self-Study
a resounding 98% of our parents perceive NAHS to be a safe, secure, and clean             report, Ch 1
school. One parent commented, “I couldn’t be more impressed with the staff and
school environment my son has the opportunity to learn from/in. . .” A student
wrote, “This school is very safe [and] the teachers try to help us as much as
possible.”




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




E3: To what extent do all students receive appropriate support along with an
individualized learning plan to help ensure academic success?

                                      Findings                                         Data/Evidence

Administrators, counselors, advisors, and teachers regularly review student data
from CST scores, grades from progress reports, CAHSEE pass/fail rates, behavior
referrals, periodic assessments, attendance information, and other graduation          Sample student
requirement and A-G requirement data to determine any interventions needed.              data reports
This information is disseminated to teachers, advisors, parents, and students to
create a support network in which all stakeholders are aware of the issues at hand
and take responsibility for doing their part to support our students.

At NAHS, the approach to guidance and counseling focuses on students’ personal,
career, and academic interests and goals. Following the ASCA—American
School Counseling Association’s national standards for school counseling, our
counselors have created a comprehensive guidance and counseling program that
covers the academic, personal-social, and career awareness needs of our students.
To deliver on this promise, we have developed an Advisory program that meets
the developmental needs of each student based on grade level and personal
interests. Students enter the 9th Grade Bridge Academy upon arrival at NAHS,             Class rosters
where they participate in personality and career interest inventories, engage in
curricular activities connected with personal and academic growth, and chart a
course for the next four years. Toward the end of 9th grade, freshmen select their
preferred academy, based on data they have gathered about themselves, including
their career interests. Once NAHS students are housed in Academy-based
Advisory classes, grade-level specific benchmarks are met in Advisories toward
meeting Academy expectations, developing appropriate academic skills, and
producing their Senior Portfolio. Students stay in these Academy-based
Advisories with the same Advisor for grades 10-12.

Our school’s agenda planner is issued to every NAHS student at the beginning of
every school year. This valuable organizational tool becomes an intrinsic part of
our Advisory curriculum as Advisors use it to teach students about time
management and setting goals. Critical information in the agenda planner includes             Agenda
expected school-wide learning results, a four-year college planning timeline, the             planner
A-G requirements for graduation and college entrance, and deadlines for signing
up for SAT and ACT exams. The agenda planner also serves as the key
communication piece between home and school.

Grade-level meetings for at-risk students are held periodically throughout the year
                                                                                       At-risk student
at certain reporting periods and the beginning of each semester. Students are                meetings
counseled in small and large group settings on their own graduation status and
options and resources for getting back on track with grades and credits.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Counseling interns from California State University, Northridge, as well as Cal              Counseling
Lutheran University, provide our students with additional adult support in                   Intern logs
reviewing A-G and graduation requirements regularly and providing individual
student counseling for academic success on a weekly basis.

The partnership between CSUN and NAHS provides another level of support and
motivation for students to pursue their individualized learning plans to attain
                                                                                                Academy
academic success. With the valuable input we receive from our CSUN liaisons as                 notebooks
we develop our Academy curriculums, and with the experiential opportunities our
students are able to have when visiting the CSUN campus, our students gain
enthusiasm and focus in pursuing their learning goals.

Some of the appropriate services and support that our counseling staff provides
for our students include, but are not limited to, the following:

AB1802 Conferences—Counselors assertively pursue opportunities to meet with
parents and students to conduct AB1802 Conferences. By December, all students
who are lacking credits for their expected grade level are contacted personally by
the student’s counselor, and face-to-face conferences are arranged to devise a plan             AB1802
for the student to recover lost credits and if possible, graduate on time with his/her      meeting logs
classmates. These meeting also serve the purpose of charting the student’s career
pathway, choosing classes that will lead students down their chosen path, and
informing the parents and family of additional resources they should access in
preparing for post-secondary schooling and training options.
IGP—Individual Graduation Plan. Each year, every student is required to fill
out a copy of their Individual Graduation Plan (IGP) during Advisory and secure a            Sample IGP
parent signature as acknowledgement of the student’s present level of progress.
The IGP is subsequently reviewed by the counselor and then filed in the student’s
cumulative record.
Round-Table Conferences. These conferences are arranged by counselors to
address academic difficulties experienced by individual students. Parents,                      Meeting
student, counselor, and teachers are in attendance. The student’s strengths are                 records
first addressed, concerns are raised, and interventions and strategies are shared to
help the student experience academic success and socio-emotional growth.
Student Success Team Meetings. The purpose of the Student Success Team is to
further explore reasons why students are not achieving academic success after
interventions have been tried but have not been unsuccessful. Parents, the student,             Meeting
counselor, and teachers, as well as any support staff, such as the school nurse or              records
psychologist interested in the case, attend. Accommodations made to assist the
student in his/her classes are reviewed, and recommendations are made for further
interventions, including possible assessment to determine if a learning disability
or other health impairment may be inhibiting the student’s progress.




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IEP Meetings. These meetings ensure that the parents/guardians, teachers,
administrators, the school psychologist, and appropriate service providers, with
the student, form a team that supports the student’s academic and personal                      Meeting
success. With the input of all participants, the IEP documents important data and a             records
targeted plan, with goals and objectives, to help the student successfully complete
graduation requirements as well as transition to life after graduation. The IEP
provides a written plan for all interested parties to support the student toward
meeting his/her learning goals.

The following are some examples of additional support services provided to
NAHS students:

Link Crew. We take great pride in to be affiliated with the Link Crew program, a
high school transition program that increases freshman success. Members of the
junior and senior class are trained to be Link Leaders who act as positive role
models, motivators, mentors, and teachers who guide the freshmen to discover                  Link Crew
what it takes to be successful during the transition to high school. As freshmen                 rosters
success increases, the benefits to our school culture and climate become apparent.
Our freshmen demonstrate a greater connection to our school, increased
extracurricular participation, fewer discipline issues, and greater pride and spirit.

Small Learning Communities (SLC’s). Research has shown that students are
                                                                                               Academy
more successful when housed in smaller learning communities within a larger                 mission and
educational institution. Our Academies provide that safe place in which students                  vision
are recognized, known as the individuals that they are and can become, and                   statements
supported throughout their high school years.

Senior Support Team Meetings. These meetings provide guidance and support
to senior students who are at-risk for losing their opportunity to participate in         Meeting notes
senior activities and the graduation ceremony due to poor attendance, behavior
problems, or academic difficulties. Students, parents, senior sponsors, advisors,
counselors, and administrators are in attendance at these meetings.

The Senior Contract. This document defines stipulations and requirements that
members of the senior class must meet in terms of academic performance,                          Sample
attendance, and behavior throughout the school year in order to earn their high                 contract
school diploma and participate in graduation and other senior activities. The
contract is signed by students and parents.

The College/Career Center. This resource is open and accessible to students on
a daily basis. A wide variety of resources and information regarding colleges is                School
available. In addition, trained Peer College Counselors are available to help              observations
students research colleges and careers and to complete college applications.
District Office of Transition Services (DOTS) counselor. The DOTS counselor               Staff directory
coordinates the planning and delivery of transition services for all students with
disabilities to prepare them for transition from school to adult living.


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E4: To what extent do all students have access to a system of personal
support services, activities, and opportunities at the school and within the
community?

                                           Findings                                       Data/Evidence

The personal nature of the support we provide for our students, made possible by
our relative small size and the dedication of our entire staff, is one of our greatest
strengths. By the hard work of so many adults at our school, we are able to offer
an abundance of activities and opportunities through which we can engage and
inspire our students, both at school and within the community.

Glancing at the list of faculty responsibilities provided in our self-study report,
one can see how many hats the members of our learning community wear. We do
so out of necessity since we are a small school that requires us all to assume                 Self-study
numerous responsibilities. But we do so out of passion as well. We are                            report,
passionate about seeing our students succeed.         Beyond the list of faculty               Appendix
responsibilities outside our classrooms, our support staff also supports our
students in ways often surprising to those who view us from the outside. For
example:

 Our school safety officer meets weekly with a group of at-risk African
  American and Hispanic male students, to mentor them, to change negative
  attitudes toward authority, and to encourage them in their school endeavors.

 Our financial manager also served as our girls’ basketball coach until we                      School
  could officially hire a walk-on coach. Even with the hiring of a new coach,               observations
  our financial manager continues to work out with our boys’ and girls’ teams to
  show his support and instill pride in extracurricular participation.

 Our cafeteria manager has volunteered her time for selected students in our
  Health and Human Development Academy to shadow her and observe first-
  hand a variety of aspects of the food preparation industry.

Support Services, Activities, and Opportunities at NAHS

Clubs and Organizations. We provide a wide range of clubs and organizations
that allow our students to explore the diversity of the surrounding neighborhood
as well as honor their own cultural and ethnic backgrounds. These clubs provide
an avenue for students with different, or similar, backgrounds or interests to come         Club rosters
together in a safe environment to celebrate and invite differences. One of our
clubs, the Halo Halo Club has forged a relationship with the CSUN Filipino
American Student Association (FASA) in joint ventures on the CSUN campus.
Complete lists of clubs, organizations, and athletic teams are included in Chapter
1 of our Self-Study Report.



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9th Grade Orientation- 9th grade orientation is a fun way to ease incoming 9th
graders into the new high school life. Link Crew’s goal is to make freshmen feel
like they belong. By making a “link” to others at our school (upperclassmen and               Academy
other new students), they are less likely to drop out. Link Crew takes                        Notebook
responsibility for making sure the new freshmen have full knowledge of the rules
and also have tips, straight from the minds of upperclassmen, to help make their
days go a little more smoothly. The day-time Freshmen Orientation is followed
by an evening 9th Grade Parent Orientation.
Link 2-4. This is a follow-up program for Freshmen Student Support throughout
the first semester of high school. The student Link Crew Leaders visit the 9th                  Advisory
Grade Advisories once a week to facilitate lessons on a wide variety of subjects,           lesson plans
including time management and organizational skills, study strategies, goal
setting, conflict resolution, and diversity awareness exercises.
Math Night. The Math Department hosts an annual Math Night in the fall
semester. All parents of Algebra 1 students are especially encouraged to attend.
During this evening, Math teachers speak to parents on the following topics: intro             Meeting
to learning strands; an overview of learning goals; parent questioning techniques;             agenda
yourhomework.com; and how to support and encourage their child. As a result of
this event, parents have a better, more personal relationship with their student’s
teachers and a better understanding of what their student will be learning
throughout the year and how to support this learning.
Math Tutoring Lab. This is an elective for new 9th grade students based on 8th
grade standardized test scores and academic grades. This class is given                  Student sign-in
concurrently with Algebra 1A/B as an added support for these students struggling                  sheets
in math. Taught by a CSUN professor and two credential program candidates,
this class provides additional support to students in achieving academic success.
After School Tutoring. Tutoring is offered in all subjects, three days a week,
supervised by one of our teachers and staffed by student tutors from CSUN as
well as NAHS. Supplemental tutoring is offered by individual teachers often              Student sign-in
during nutrition and lunch, and sometimes, after school. Several teachers, of their               sheets
own initiative, offer nutrition, lunch, and after-school study hall. The Math
department is in the process of re-vamping their tutoring services so that it is more
targeted. In addition, a Homework Club, supervised by teachers, is planned.
Real-World Connections. Provides opportunities within the “real world” of
work for students. Through project-based learning, innovative curricula, and the                Teacher
use of technology in the classroom, students gain valuable skills used in real-life            evidence
situations. Additionally, experts from various career fields and industries are               notebooks
brought into the classroom to share their experiences in the world of work.

Student-Led Leadership Conference. Last year, in what we hope will become a
NAHS tradition, our Associated Student Body Leadership students hosted student                 Meeting
leadership representatives from several near-by District high schools to share                 agenda
experiences as student leaders and develop new leadership skills as well.


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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


Support Services, Activities, and Opportunities in the Community
Connections with Local Businesses and Organizations. Great efforts are being
made to place students in businesses, agencies and community organizations
where they can experience the connections between school and work firsthand                 Counselor
through job-shadowing and internship opportunities. In an effort to network and              notebook
build relationships and alliances with the community, NAHS is an active member
of the North Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce, the Tarzana-Woodland
Hills Chamber of Commerce and the Economic Alliance.
Kennedy/San Fernando Adult School. This local adult school offers lab classes
after school three days a week on our campus to aid students in remediation of            Class rosters
core classes and to offer opportunities to earn credits. Our two adult school lab
teachers keep counselors apprised of attendance, behavior, and progress in the lab
so that follow-up can be made with the students and their parents.
Health Fair. Doctors, health care professionals, the CSUN Health & Human
Development Department, and healthcare institutions such as Kaiser Permanente                 Academy
                                                                                              notebook
and the Northridge Hospital, have collaborated with us in an all-day health fair.
Northridge Hospital has opened its doors to our 9th Grade Bridge Academy and
other groups of NAHS students as an opportunity for students to fulfill service
learning graduation requirements.
Career Day. The purpose of Career Day is to bring the community and NAHS
students together in order to show our students real-world career opportunities.            Counselor
                                                                                              records
Community representatives give presentations on a variety of careers to expand
and inspire our students’ vision of themselves as productive members of society.

Ready, Set, Gold. We are fortunate to have been chosen to participate in this
program sponsored by the United States Olympic Committee. The Committee has                    Athletic
                                                                                               director
appointed a former Olympics medalist who currently visits our P.E. classes to                  records
motivate and mentor our students and assist with our athletic programs.
Community Resources. We refer our students and their families to a number of
community organizations for support services. County organizations, district
offices, and local agencies that provide resources to our students include: District
1 Resource Coordinating Council, Our House Grief Support Group, Child and
Family Guidance Center, Mitchell Family Counseling Clinic, CalFAM, Because I
Love You Program, Youth Advocacy Program (YAP), El Proyecto del Barrio, and             Counselor logs
the Family Stress Center,, LAUSD School Mental Health. We have a formal
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with The Child and Family Guidance
Center, a non-profit mental health agency across the street from our school,
whereby counseling and social work interns from USC are assigned to work with
our at-risk students in academic support groups held on campus under the
Counseling Office supervision.         In addition, the agency provides crisis
intervention, ongoing individual and family counseling for those students who
qualify, and consultation services to our administrative and counseling staff, as
part of this MOU.


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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




Academy-Based Senior Internships. Recently, we have begun to establish
internship experiences for students who have distinguished themselves in their              Internship
Academies. For example, currently four students from the Careers in Education               Portfolios
Academy receive regular mentorship from professors in the CSUN Elementary
Education Department and implement their newly acquired knowledge and skills
by running a writing intervention program at a neighboring elementary school.




Areas of Strength:

    We have a dedicated staff and extended learning community which is passionately
     dedicated to the academic success of all students.

    Our counseling staff offers a wide range of support services to assist students in fulfilling
     their individualized learning plans to achieve success.

    Our relatively small size, our enrollment policy of only admitting students as freshmen,
     and our organizational structure of small learning communities allow us to cultivate a
     culture of respect and caring and reinforce our cultural expectations across four years.



Areas of Growth:

      While much of our attention for our first five years as a school has been on building a
       culture of respect and caring, we must now use this strong cultural foundation to
       promote and reinforce our high expectations for academic rigor and success.

      We must create additional ways for our parents and community to be involved in our
       teaching and learning processes by coordinating existing efforts and creating new ones.

      In order to better serve our students, we must continue to cultivate and build our
        partnerships both with CSUN and with community businesses, agencies, and
        organizations to provide more mentorships, job-shadowing experiences, and internships.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




                         Chapter V:
                        School-wide
                        Action Plan


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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                                Northridge Academy High School
                               WASC Self-Study Report 2008-2009
                                       Focus on Learning

                      CHAPTER V: OUR SCHOOL-WIDE ACTION PLAN

The Northridge Academy High School School-wide Action Plan was developed in accordance
with the WASC Focus on Learning guidelines. Our action steps emerged from school-wide
discussions and focus group and home group meetings that occurred consistently throughout the
course of the self-study process. Our approach was collaborative, with all stakeholders having a
voice in the process. The WASC Leadership Team met to compile, organize, and formulate
action steps that reflect our critical areas of growth. Our plan will guide our planning and growth
for the next six years.

The NAHS Action Plan contains three major goals: focus on student achievement in all academic
content areas; focus on student outcomes for English Learners; and focus on student achievement
through improved student support and intervention. Our school vision and the expected school-
wide learning results provide the foundation for our action plan.

To monitor the progress of the action plan, we will conduct an annual evaluation at the beginning
of every school year for the next six years. Furthermore, the NAHS administration, in
conjunction with the School Site Council, School Leadership Council, and the Professional
Development/Academy Facilitator Committee, will oversee follow-up procedures and actions
with WASC review as a permanent item on meeting agendas. The process will ensure and
facilitate the ongoing implementation of our school-wide action plan.

We appreciate how the WASC self-study process has provided us with a systematic and
comprehensive way to examine and assess our growth as a community of learners. In this, our
fifth year as a school, we know that we are deeply committed to student success and passionate
about building and sustaining a school that supports all students to achieve at the highest levels.
Our self-study, and especially our school-wide action plan, has provided us with a concrete and
focused way to continue to move forward for the next six years.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                                        Northridge Academy High School
                                       WASC Self-Study Report 2008-2009
                           CHAPTER V: OUR SCHOOLWIDE ACTION PLAN FOR 2009-2015

Goal 1:                Improve student achievement in all academic content areas.

Critical Need:         Increase CST scores for all students in all academic content areas.
                               Utilize data to inform instructional and curricular choices.
                               Raise Algebra 1 scores.
                               Increase student participation in higher level math and science courses.
                               Improve student grades in A-G courses.
                               Increase student participation in Honors coursework.

Rationale:             Current data indicates that many NAHS students are not meeting proficiency levels in core academic areas.
                       Other data suggests the need to increase the numbers of students passing A-G courses with acceptable grades.
                       Our self-study reveals that while efforts are being made to address this critical area of growth, we need to take
                       action to increase student outcomes for students who are performing at the far below basic, below basic, and
                       basic performance bands on state tests. We must also promote and support student enrollment in upper level
                       math and science classes.

Growth Target:         These are our growth target goals:
                               All subgroups will meet annual state-determined API growth targets for six years
                               All subgroups will meet annual state-determined AYP growth targets for six years
                               Increase percentage of students achieving proficiency in Algebra I by 5% annually for six years
                               Increase percentage of students enrolled in upper level A-G math and science classes by 5%
                                  annually for six years.
                               Increase numbers of students achieving C’s or better in core content areas by 5% annually for six
                                  years.

ESLRS Addressed:        Powerful Thinkers, Successful Communicators, Life-Long Learners

CSUN Partnership Connections:          Academy-based activities and collaborations, discipline-based activities and opportunities,
                                       student teacher/master teacher activities


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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning




                  Action Steps                           Timeline              Personnel              Resources            Means to Assess        Means to Monitor
                                                                              Responsible                                    Progress               and Report
                                                                                                                                                     Progress
              Initial Planning and                    Initial Planning:    Academy                CSUN facilities and    Academy Activity       Connect-Ed
                     Phase I                            Spring 2009         Facilitators            faculty                 Logs                   CSUN Ed Advisory
                                                                           Administrators         Educational            CAHSEE data             Committee
1. Establish a coordinated system to identify
                                                                           CSUN facilitators       research               CST data               Department finals
and assist students who are underachieving in             Phase I          Instructional          IMA funds              Grades analysis        E-mail
core content areas.                                   Implementation:       Cabinet                Local district         Master schedule        Faculty meetings
 Develop a schoolwide system to identify and           August 2009-
  monitor student achievement in a timely                                  Literacy Coach          funds/personnel        Meeting notes          Instructional
                                                         June 2010         Math Coach             Pierce and SMC
  manner.                                                                                                                  Periodic assessment     Cabinet
 Research in-house intervention programs and                              SLC                     College classes         data                   NAHS website
  strategies.                                                              SSC                    Professional           SIS/ISIS               Newsletters
 Observe schools currently employing effective                            SST                     Development and        Student survey         Parent meetings
  intervention programs.                                                   Teacher-Librarian       Common Planning        Tutoring logs          School report card
                                                                           Teachers                Time                                           SLC
2. Incorporate into schoolwide professional                                Technology             Regional                                       SSC/Single Plan
development plan additional strategies to raise                             Committee               Occupation Center                              WASC Action Plan
student outcomes in all content areas.                                     Title I Coordinator    Title I funds
 Provide staff with support in the analysis and
    use of data to inform instruction.
 Involve in-house expertise by incorporating
    more teacher-led workshops on differentiated
    instruction, integrating technology, and
    SDAIE techniques.
 Develop a comprehensive plan for the
    systematic integration of technology into the
    curriculum.
 Elicit assistance from district and CSUN on
    how to interpret assessment results and
    identify and address key findings.
 Further train staff to understand the Single Plan
    for Student Achievement and how it is
    monitored.
 Provide staff with time and resources to
    develop Honors contracts and curricula.
 Examine ways that student teachers and
    counseling interns can better support student
    academic achievement.




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Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


3. Establish a coordinated system to identify
and assist potential students for upper level
math and science classes.
 Utilize counseling staff and advisory teachers
  to identify and recruit students.
 Pursue funding sources to for tutoring and
  mentoring programs.
4. Create additional support systems to bridge
Algebra 1 curriculum to CST’s.
 Create test preparation activities that closely
   simulate CST questions.
 Implement CST preparation activities in
   Advisory classrooms.
 Use video broadcasts to raise student awareness
   of CST significance.
                       Phase II                          Phase II:       Academy                CSUN facilities and    Academy Activity       Connect-Ed
1. Assess effectiveness of existing programs          Implementation:     Facilitators            faculty                 Logs                   CSUN Ed Advisory
   that identify and assist students who are          September 2010-    Administrators         Educational            CAHSEE data             Committee
   underachieving in core content areas.                 June 2012       CSUN facilitators       research               CST data               Department finals
 Use professional development time and                                  Instructional          IMA funds              Grades analysis        E-mail
   resources to examine data over past two years                          Cabinet                Local district         Master schedule        Faculty meetings
   to identify areas of improvement                                      Literacy Coach          funds/personnel        Meeting notes          Instructional
 Use parent and student surveys to assess                               Math Coach             Pierce and SMC         Periodic assessment     Cabinet
   stakeholder perception of program                                     SLC                     College classes         data                   NAHS website
   effectiveness.                                                        SSC                    Professional           SIS/ISIS               Newsletters
                                                                         SST                     Development and        Student survey         Parent meetings
2.      Continue to provide a professional
                                                                         Teachers                Common Planning        Tutoring logs          School report card
     development plan which includes additional                                                   Time
                                                                         Technology                                                             SLC
     strategies to raise student outcomes in all                                                 Regional
     academic content areas.
                                                                          Committee                                                              SSC/Single Plan
                                                                         Title I Coordinator     Occupation Center                              WASC Action Plan
    Design rigorous, engaging Academy-based                                                     Title I funds
     integrated units of instruction.
    Access CSUN partnership resources to develop
     effective instructional practices.
    Utilize expertise of the Teacher-Librarian in
     integrating technology into the curriculum and
     coordinating development of a research
     curriculum with CSUN library faculty.
    Provide students with information about
     Honors Challenge Contract opportunities.
    Provide ongoing training in the use of
     technology available on site and at CSUN.




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3.   Assess effectiveness of systems used to
  identify and assist potential students for
  Algebra 1 and upper level A-G courses in
  math and science.
 Monitor student achievement at and across
  grade levels
 Allocate resources for the effective operation of
  after school or weekend academic support
  sessions.
 The Visual and Performing Arts Department
  will utilize new media and print media to
  communicate information to all stakeholders.
                    Phase III                            Phase III        Academy                CSUN facilities and    Academy Activity       Connect-Ed
1. Re-visit support programs that identify and        Implementation       Facilitators            faculty                 Logs                   CSUN Ed Advisory
assist students who are underachieving in core         and Review:        Administrators         Educational            CAHSEE data             Committee
content areas to determine effectiveness and          September 2012-     CSUN facilitators       research               CST data               Department finals
means of required ongoing support.                       June 2015        Instructional          IMA funds              Grades analysis        E-mail
 Incorporate effective programs into 2015                                 Cabinet                Local district         Master schedule        Faculty meetings
  WASC Action Plan and the Single Plan for            Annual Review:      Literacy Coach          funds/personnel        Meeting notes          Instructional
  Student Achievement                                 August 2010-2015    Math Coach             Pierce and SMC         Periodic assessment     Cabinet
 Determine need to continue and/or supplement                            SLC                     College classes         data                   NAHS website
  existing efforts.                                                       SSC                    Professional           SIS/ISIS               Newsletters
                                                                          SST                     Development and        Student survey         Parent meetings
2. Continue to support schoolwide professional
                                                                          Teacher-Librarian       Common Planning        Tutoring logs          School report card
    development plan with additional strategies                                                    Time
                                                                          Teachers                                                               SLC
    to raise student outcomes in all content                                                      Regional
    areas.                                                                Technology                                                             SSC/Single Plan
                                                                           Committee               Occupation Center                              WASC Action Plan
 Incorporate effective programs into 2015                                                        Title I funds
   WASC Action Plan and the Single Plan for                               Title I Coordinator
   Student Achievement
 Ensure that WASC Leadership team continues
   to meet regularly to ensure the quality of a
   comprehensive professional development plan.

3. Assess effectiveness of systems used to
support students in upper level courses in
math and science.
 Incorporate effective programs into 2015
  WASC Action Plan and the Single Plan for
  Student Achievement.
 Review and refine academic and extra-
  curricular media as communication tools that
  increase student achievement.




                                                                                                                          2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 194
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                                                 Northridge Academy High School
                                                WASC Self-Study Report 2008-2009

Goal 2:                Improve student outcomes for English Learners

Critical Need:         Develop a comprehensive academic literacy support system that has structures in place to help
                       all students, especially English Learners, to read and write at or above grade level standards.
                          Analyze data.
                          Address needs of all subgroups.
                          Provide differentiated instruction and appropriate support.

Rationale: Current data indicates that EL students are struggling to meet proficiency levels in all academic areas.
           Our self-study reveals that while efforts are being made to address this critical area of growth, we
           need to take action to increase student outcomes for EL Learners who are performing at the far below
           basic, below basic, and basic levels of proficiency on the CST’s.

Growth Target:         These are our growth target goals:
                      English Learners subgroup will meet annual state-determined API growth target for six years.
                      English Learners subgroup will meet annual state-determined AYP growth target for six years.
                      The numbers of English Learners earning C’s or better in core academic classes will increase by
                       5% annually for six years.

ESLRS Addressed:               Powerful Thinkers, Life-Long Learners, Successful Communicators

CSUN Partnership Connections:                  Student tutors/mentors, credential candidates completing literacy field
                                               assignments, literacy support, grant writing support




                                                                                          2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 195
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


              Action Steps                        Timeline              Personnel                 Resources            Means to Assess        Means to Monitor
                                                                       Responsible                                       Progress               and Report
                                                                                                                                                 Progress
           Initial Planning and                Initial Planning:    Academy                  Adult school            Academy Activity       Connect-Ed
                  Phase I                         Spring 2009        Facilitators             CSUN facilities and      Logs                   CSUN Ed Advisory
                                                                    Administrators            faculty                 CAHSEE data             Committee
1. Establish a coordinated system to               Phase I          Counseling Staff         Educational research    CELDT test results     Department finals
identify and assist EL students who are        Implementation:      CSUN facilitators        IMA funds               Counselor logs         E-mail
underachieving academically.                     August 2009-       EL Coordinator           Local district          CST data               Faculty meetings
 Develop a schoolwide system to identify         June 2010         Instructional Cabinet     funds/personnel         Grades analysis        Instructional Cabinet
  and monitor student achievement in a                              Literacy Coach           Parent associations     Master schedule        NAHS website
  timely manner.                                                                              Pierce and SMC
                                                                    Math Coach                                        Meeting notes          Newsletters
 Provide information to teachers in a
                                                                    SLC                       College classes         Periodic assessment    Parent meetings
  timely manner.                                                                              Professional
                                                                    SSC                                                data                   School report card
 Research or create in-house intervention
                                                                    SST                       Development and         SIS/ISIS               SLC
  programs and strategies for all
                                                                    Teacher-Librarian         Common Planning         Tutoring logs          SSC/Single Plan
  Academies.                                                                                   Time
 Observe schools currently employing                               Teachers                                                                  WASC Action Plan
                                                                    Title I Coordinator      Regional
  effective intervention programs                                                              Occupation Center
 The Visual and Performing Arts                                                              School support
  Department will utilize new media and                                                        personnel
  print media to communicate information                                                      Title I funds
  to all stakeholders.

2. Incorporate into schoolwide
professional development plan
additional strategies to raise EL student
outcomes in all academic content areas.
 Provide staff with ongoing support in the
    analysis and use of data to inform
    instruction.
 Involve in-house expertise by
    incorporating more teacher-led
    workshops on differentiated instruction,
    integrating technology, scaffolded
    instruction and other SDAIE
    techniques.
 Identify human and material resources
    available in both the NAHS and CSUN
    libraries that can support the
    development of academic skills for our
    EL students.




                                                                                                                        2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 196
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


 Elicit assistance from district and CSUN
   on how to interpret assessment results
   and identify key findings.
 Further train staff to understand the
   Single Plan for Student Achievement
   and how it is monitored.

3. Review master schedule to ensure that
    the needs of EL’s are addressed.
 Program EL’s into appropriate classes
 Support EL participation in Academy
   activities
 Explore possible academic electives to
   provide EL’s with additional support.

                 Phase II                         Phase II:       Academy                  Adult school            Academy Activity       Connect-Ed
                                               Implementation:     Facilitators             CSUN facilities and      Logs                   CSUN Ed Advisory
1. Assess effectiveness of existing            September 2010-    Administrators            faculty                 CAHSEE data             Committee
support programs that identify and                June 2012       Counseling Staff         Educational research    CELDT test results     Department finals
assist EL students who are                                        CSUN facilitators        IMA funds               Counselor logs         E-mail
underachieving in core content areas.                             EL Coordinator           Local district          CST data               Faculty meetings
 Use professional development time and                           Instructional Cabinet     funds/personnel         Grades analysis        Instructional Cabinet
  resources to examine data over past two                         Literacy Coach           Parent associations     Master schedule        NAHS website
  years to identify areas of improvement                                                    Pierce and SMC
                                                                  Math Coach                                        Meeting notes          Newsletters
 Use parent and student surveys to assess                        SLC                       College classes         Periodic assessment    Parent meetings
  stakeholder perception of program                                                         Professional
                                                                  SSC                                                data                   School report card
  effectiveness.
                                                                  SST                       Development and         SIS/ISIS               SLC
                                                                  Teachers                  Common Planning         Tutoring logs          SSC/Single Plan
2. Continue to provide a professional                                                        Time
development plan which includes                                   Title I Coordinator                                                       WASC Action Plan
                                                                                            Regional
additional strategies to raise student                                                       Occupation Center
outcomes in all academic content areas
                                                                                            School support
with special attention given to use of
                                                                                             personnel
technology.
                                                                                            Title I funds
 Design rigorous, standards-based,
  Academy-based integrated units of
  instruction.
 Access CSUN partnership resources to
  develop effective instructional practices.
 Utilize Teacher-Librarian to provide
  professional development to staff in
  effective use of library resources both at
  NAHS and CSUN.




                                                                                                                      2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 197
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


3. Monitor EL student grades in core
academic content. Provide intervention
for students with multiple “D’s” and
“F’s”.
                Phase III                        Phase III         Academy                  Adult school            Academy Activity       Connect-Ed
                                             Implementation and     Facilitators             CSUN facilities and      Logs                   CSUN Ed Advisory
1. Re-visit support programs that                 Review:          Administrators            faculty                 CAHSEE data             Committee
identify and assist EL students who are       September 2012-      Counseling Staff         Educational research    CELDT test results     Department finals
underachieving in core content areas to          June 2015         CSUN facilitators        IMA funds               Counselor logs         E-mail
determine effectiveness and means of                               EL Coordinator           Local district          CST data               Faculty meetings
required ongoing support.                                          Instructional Cabinet     funds/personnel         Grades analysis        Instructional Cabinet
 Incorporate effective programs into 2015   Annual Review:        Literacy Coach           Parent associations     Master schedule        NAHS website
  WASC Action Plan and the Single Plan       August 2010-2015
                                                                   Math Coach               Pierce and SMC          Meeting notes          Newsletters
  for Student Achievement
                                                                   SLC                       College classes         Periodic assessment    Parent meetings
 Determine need to continue and/or                                                          Professional
                                                                   SSC                                                data                   School report card
  supplement existing efforts.
                                                                   SST                       Development and         SIS/ISIS               SLC
 Review and refine academic and extra-
                                                                   Teachers                  Common Planning         Tutoring logs          SSC/Single Plan
  curricular media as communication tools                                                     Time
  that increase student achievement.                               Title I Coordinator                                                       WASC Action Plan
                                                                                             Regional
                                                                                              Occupation Center
2. Continue to support schoolwide                                                            School support
professional development plan with                                                            personnel
additional strategies to raise EL student
                                                                                             Title I funds
outcomes in all academic content areas.
 Incorporate effective programs into 2015
  WASC Action Plan and the Single Plan
  for Student Achievement

3. Ensure that WASC Leadership team
continues to meet regularly to ensure
the quality of a comprehensive
professional development plan.




                                                                                                                       2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 198
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


                                                      Northridge Academy High School
                                                     WASC Self-Study Report 2008-2009

Goal 3:                Improve student achievement through coordinated student supports and interventions

Critical Need:         Develop a comprehensive student support system that has structures in place to help all students
                       achieve personal and academic success by providing academic intervention and parental involvement.
                          Improve existing student support systems.
                          Create authentic opportunities for parental involvement.
                          Provide interventions through homework help, counseling and guidance program, Family Center
                             workshops, and our Advisory program.

Rationale: Current data and survey results indicate that NAHS students would benefit from more academic support and
parental involvement. Our self-study reveals that while efforts are being made to address this critical area of growth, we
need to take action to increase intervention opportunities for students who are performing at the far below basic, below
basic, and basic levels of proficiency on the CST’s.

Growth Target:         These are our growth target goals:
                           Increase percentages of students completing UC/CSU requirements, with C’s or better, upon
                             graduation by 5% annually for six years.
                           Increase percentage of students participating in Honors-level and AP coursework by 5%
                             annually for six years.
                           Increase percentage of students enrolled in internships and career exploration electives by 5%
                             annually for six years.

ESLRS Addressed:               Powerful Thinkers, Life-Long Learners, Successful Communicators

CSUN Partnership Connections:                  Parent outreach tours, Educational Opportunity Program support,
                                               course/internship opportunities




                                                                                           2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 199
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


              Action Steps                       Timeline              Personnel               Resources            Means to Assess        Means to Monitor
                                                                      Responsible                                     Progress               and Report
                                                                                                                                              Progress
           Initial Planning and               Initial Planning:    Academy                Adult school            Academy Activity       Connect-Ed
                  Phase I                       Spring 2009         Facilitators           CSUN facilities and      Logs                   CSUN Ed Advisory
                                                                   Administrators          faculty                 CAHSEE data             Committee
1. Provide parental support for                   Phase I          Counseling Staff       Educational research    Counselor logs         Department finals
understanding and interpreting                Implementation:      CSUN facilitators      IMA funds               CST data               E-mail
assessment results.                             August 2009-       EL Coordinator         Local district          Grades analysis        Faculty meetings
 Communicate results of district and state      June 2010         Family Center           funds/personnel         Master schedule        Instructional
  assessments in a timely manner.                                   Coordinator            Parent associations     Meeting notes           Cabinet
 Conduct parent in-services on                                    Instructional          Professional            Periodic assessment    NAHS website
  interpreting assessment results.                                  Cabinet                 Development and          data                   Newsletters
 Develop parent workshops during and                              SLC                     Common Planning         Senior Portfolios      Parent meetings
  after school on how to support student                           SSC                     Time                    SIS/ISIS               School report card
  achievement.                                                                             Regional
                                                                   SST                                             Student survey         SLC
 Create a parental support program to                             Teachers                Occupation Center       Tutoring logs          SSC/Single Plan
  assist in identifying and minimizing                                                     School support
                                                                   Technology                                                              U.S. Certified Mail
  barriers to student achievement.                                                          personnel
                                                                    Committee                                                               Video broadcasts
 Further train parents to understand the                                                  Title I funds
                                                                   Title I Coordinator                                                     WASC Action Plan
  Single Plan for Student Achievement and                                                  Local chambers of
  how it is monitored.                                                                      commerce
                                                                                           feeder elementary
2. Effectively communicate available                                                        and middle schools
school and community resources to all
stakeholders.
 Investigate and observe successful
  extended learning opportunities,
  including tutoring and remediation
  electives, during and after school.
 Increase parent awareness of graduation
  requirements, A-G requirements,
  financial aid, etc.
 Collaborate with CSUN personnel in
  creating parent outreach opportunities.
 Provide Family Center with print and
  human resources to support parent
  awareness.
 Ensure that information is accessible to
  most language groups.
 The Visual and Performing Arts
  Department will utilize new media and
  print media to communicate information
  to all stakeholders.



                                                                                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 200
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


3. Continue to establish relationships
with community partners to create
internships and job shadowing
experiences for students both during
and after the school day.
 Pursue additional funding sources to
  support off-site learning experiences.
 Identify community and district
  resources to support the development of
  additional career connections.
                  Phase II                        Phase II:       Academy                Adult school            Academy Activity       Connect-Ed
                                               Implementation:     Facilitators           CSUN facilities and      Logs                   CSUN Ed Advisory
1. Provide ongoing parental support            September 2010-    Administrators          faculty                 CAHSEE data             Committee
with understanding and interpreting               June 2012       Counseling Staff       Educational research    Counselor logs         Department finals
assessment results.                                               CSUN facilitators      IMA funds               CST data               E-mail
 Continue to communicate results of                              EL Coordinator         Local district          Grades analysis        Faculty meetings
  district and state assessments in a timely                      Family Center           funds/personnel         Master schedule        Instructional
  manner.                                                          Coordinator            Parent associations     Meeting notes           Cabinet
 Conduct parent in-services on                                   Instructional          Professional            Periodic assessment    NAHS website
  interpreting assessment results.                                 Cabinet                 Development and          data                   Newsletters
 Develop additional parent workshops                             SLC                     Common Planning         Senior Portfolios      Parent meetings
  during and after school on how to                               SSC                     Time                    SIS/ISIS               School report card
  support student achievement.                                                            Regional
                                                                  SST                                             Student survey         SLC
 Implement a parental support program
                                                                  Teachers                Occupation Center       Tutoring logs          SSC/Single Plan
  using community resources to assist in                                                  School support
                                                                  Technology                                                              U.S. Certified Mail
  identifying and minimizing barriers to                                                   personnel
  student achievement.
                                                                   Committee                                                               Video broadcasts
                                                                  Title I Coordinator    Title I funds                                   WASC Action Plan
 Further train parents to understand the                                                 Local chambers of
  Single Plan for Student Achievement and                                                  commerce
  how it is monitored.
                                                                                          feeder elementary
                                                                                           and middle schools
2. Increase communication to all
stakeholders regarding available school
and community resources.
 Provide additional extended learning
  opportunities, including tutoring and
  remediation electives, during and after
  school.
 Continue to inform parents of graduation
  requirements, A-G requirements,
  financial aid, etc.
 Collaborate with CSUN personnel in
  creating parent outreach opportunities
  (e.g. campus tours, class observations).



                                                                                                                    2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 201
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


 Provide Family Center with print and
  human resources to support parent
  awareness.

3. Continue to establish relationships
with community partners to create
internships and job shadowing
experiences for students both during
and after the school day.
 Identify qualified staff to supervise and
  oversee off-site learning experiences.
 Continue to access community and
  district resources to support the
  development of additional career
  connections.
                  Phase III                        Phase III        Academy                Adult school            Academy Activity       Connect-Ed
                                              Implementation and     Facilitators           CSUN facilities and      Logs                   CSUN Ed Advisory
1. Provide parental support with                    Review:         Administrators          faculty                 CAHSEE data             Committee
understanding and interpreting                  September 2012-     Counseling Staff       Educational research    Counselor logs         Department finals
assessment results.                                June 2015        CSUN facilitators      IMA funds               CST data               E-mail
 Communicate results of district and state                         EL Coordinator         Local district          Grades analysis        Faculty meetings
  assessments in a timely manner.              Annual Review:       Family Center           funds/personnel         Master schedule        Instructional
 Conduct parent in-services on                August 2010-2015      Coordinator            Parent associations     Meeting notes           Cabinet
  interpreting assessment results.                                  Instructional          Professional            Periodic assessment    NAHS website
 Develop parent workshops during and                                Cabinet                 Development and          data                   Newsletters
  after school on how to support student                            SLC                     Common Planning         Senior Portfolios      Parent meetings
  achievement.                                                      SSC                                                                     School report card
                                                                                             Time                    SIS/ISIS
 Create a parental support program to                              SST                    Regional                Student survey         SLC
  assist in identifying and minimizing
                                                                    Teachers                Occupation Center       Tutoring logs          SSC/Single Plan
  barriers to student achievement.                                                          School support
                                                                    Technology                                                              U.S. Certified Mail
 Further train parents to understand the                                                    personnel
                                                                     Committee                                                               Video broadcasts
  Single Plan for Student Achievement and                                                   Title I funds
                                                                    Title I Coordinator                                                     WASC Action Plan
  how it is monitored.                                                                      Local chambers of
                                                                                             commerce
2. Communicate available school and                                                         feeder elementary
community resources to all stakeholders.                                                     and middle schools
 Provide additional extended learning
  opportunities, including tutoring and
  intervention electives, during and after
  school.
 Increase parent awareness of graduation
  requirements, A-G requirements,
  financial aid, etc.




                                                                                                                      2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 202
Northridge Academy High School  Focus on Learning


 Collaborate with CSUN personnel in
  creating parent outreach opportunities.
 Provide Family Center with print and
  human resources to support parent
  awareness.
 Review and refine academic and extra-
  curricular media as communication tools
  that increase student achievement.

3. Continue to establish relationships
with community partners to create
internships and job shadowing
experiences for students both during
and after the school day.
 Pursue additional funding sources to
  support off-site learning experiences.
 Identify community and district
  resources to support the development of
  additional career connections.




                                                     2008 Accreditation Self Study  Page 203

				
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