OHR News MAY 06

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OHR News MAY 06 Powered By Docstoc
					                      Breaking HR News from across Australia and the world

This edition:
       A NEW GENERATION GAP EMERGES AMONGST WOMEN
       WANTED: EXTRA HOURS
       SME’S TOLD TO GET THEIR ACT TOGETHER
       WORKFORCE RETENTION: A GROWING CONCERN
       GETTING WISE TO LIES
       MORE FEMALE MENTORS NEEDED
       DO YOU NEED A COACH?
       THE NEXT BIG THING IN ON-LINE RECRUITING
       VIRTUAL MENTORING
       WORKCHOICE SEMINARS ANNOUNCED
       CASUAL STAFF MAY END UP COSTING MORE
       NURSE DENIES CLAIMS SHE MISREPRESENTED QUALIFICATIONS
       GOVT STILL HAS A LONG WAY TO GO TO HELP WORKING MUMS: KELLY
       UNEMPLOYMENT RISES TO 5.1 PER CENT: ABS



A NEW GENERATION GAP: DIFFERENCES EMERGE AMONG WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE
Wall Street Journal (05/04/06) Jeff Zaslow

Some female bosses from earlier generations are discovering a definite generation gap with female Generation
Y workers. Such struggles can hurt mentoring and productivity. Some female executives are looking for ways to
discover their footing while overseeing women of various ages. For their part, numerous younger women think
that older female colleagues and bosses are not helpful or pertinent to them, a survey released last week by
employment-services company Randstad reports. Just 23 percent of women younger than age 34 stated that
older co-workers "energize me and bring new ideas to the table." This signifies the reality that numerous older
female managers are hesitant to be mentors, surmises Marymount Manhattan College gender-studies professor
Susan Shapiro Barash. In a study of 500 women done by Barash, 70 percent believed that male bosses treated
them better than did female bosses. Meanwhile, 65 percent of women older than age 50 acknowledged that they
would prefer to mentor women in their 20s than women in their late 30s and 40s, since a female baby boomer is
frequently uncomfortable assisting a women "who might get her job next," Barash notes.



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WANTED: EXTRA HOURS
HC MAGAZINE April 2006

The number of workers seeking to increase their hours in part-time employment positions has increased,
according to a recent annual report on underemployment showing that more than 60,000 part-time staff are
wanting to work more hours, but are unable to find the roles.


The study by ABS revealed that that of the 2.8 million part-time workers (less than 35 hours per week) in
Australia, 612,000 wanted more hours, with most of them (84% or 516,800) ready to start extra hours within four
weeks, and more than half wanting to work full-time.


A lack of vacancies in their industry was listed as the top reason that part-time workers couldn't increase their
workload, followed by unsuitable hours and lack of necessary skills or education.


Overall, the highest percentage of underemployed part-time workers were female (66% or 340,700) rather than
male (34% or 176,100), and were looking to add between 13.3 and 16.3 hours to their working hours
respectively.


SMES TOLD TO 'GET THEIR ACT TOGETHER'
HC MAGAZINE - April 2006

Small and medium enterprises need to smarten up their human resources strategies if they want to say in the
game warn a HR consulting firm.


According to TCBS Human Capital Solutions, SMEs are in danger of losing out in the war for talent because of
their lack of experience and insufficient time devoted to recruitment. They are also struggling to compete with the
big boys in terms of 'extras' such as unlimited access to gym facilities and corporate sporting competitions.


However Owen Salmon, director of TCBS Capital Solutions, said that this challenge can be overcome if SMEs
integrate recruitment into their business strategy, in the same way as they approach attracting and securing new
clients.


"A business plan must address how you will attract recruits, what your business has to offer them and the
timeframe, keeping in mind that it may take a while to find the right person for the job. Skills shortage means that
the days of expendable employees are well and truly over. You don't have skilled workers knocking down your
door, so a savvy, proactive business approach to attracting and retaining the right employee is needed," Salmon
said.




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Having the right people is critical for SMEs if they are to grow and remain competitive. "Plans for growth must be
long-term. Hiring a new employee tomorrow will not be an instant solution to workload issues. The recruitment
process must be well-thought out, ensuring that the right candidate is not only selected but also nurtured
throughout their employment."




WORKFORCE RETENTION: A GROWING CONCERN

HR Magazine (04/06) Susan Meisinger,

Two prominent studies from late 2005 point to a potential trained workforce shortage in the United States as
baby boomers retire en masse and the economy continues to expand. In the "2005 U.S. Job Recovery and
Retention" survey by the Society for Human Resource Management and CareerJournal.com, 65 percent of HR
professionals reported being worried about the number of voluntary resignations since the beginning of the year.
Seventy-nine percent of employees indicated they were searching for a new job. The results were backed by
Internet-based job search company Monster's "Retention Strategies for 2006 and Beyond" study that found 70
percent of HR managers concerned about employee retention and 40 percent reporting a jump in worker
turnover during the 18 months before October 2005. Both studies advise companies to make employee retention
a key part of their strategies now. Steps to take include boosting wages and benefits, providing chances for
growth and development, promoting work-life balance, and improving communication with workers.


GETTING WISE TO LIES

Time (05/01/06) Vol. 167, P. 59; Cullen, Lisa Takeuchi

Resumes are chock full of half-truths, fibs, and down-right lies, and human resource personnel have to weed
through the sludge to find the gem candidates.


Recruiters are now asking job candidates to make sure their resumes are not padded with credits that are false
or degrees they are a few credits away from receiving. According to InfoLink Screening Services, 14 percent of
job applicants lie about their education on their resumes. These workers could be in trouble by their employers
later down the line if board members and other internal corporate investigators discover the misstatements. In
some cases, these misstatements can lead to termination or other consequences. As a result of the latest
regulations and renewed interest in integrity, many employers are conducting background checks to weed out
less than desirable job candidates.


Human resource experts note that most people lie on their resumes in the hope that it will make a favorable
impression on the hiring employer, but experts note that lying on resumes is more prevalent because statistically,
only 35 percent of employers verify information on those resumes. Researchers state that candidates lying on
resumes are likely to commit other wrongdoing in the workplace as well.



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                                                       4




MORE FEMALE MENTORS NEEDED

Human Resources Magazine (04/06) Vol. 51, P. 16

A recent survey conducted by Korn/Ferry International revealed that finding a mentor is difficult especially when
in search of a female mentor in the financial sector. Women tend to find the lack of role models in executive
offices disheartening, but some have found executive coaches able to help them enter corporate offices and
obtain desired promotions. Executive women in finance positions, however, could be headed for the top offices
as more and more CFOs are being hired as CEOs. Those women currently using executive coaches, according
to the survey, are looking forward to becoming mentors for other women in the financial sector. Experts note that
human resources departments can do a lot more to promote mentoring programs--formal and informal--within
the workplace as well.

DO YOU NEED A COACH?

Inc. Magazine (04/06) Wellner, Alison Stein

Business coaches are becoming an increasingly popular resource for entrepreneurs who can become
overwhelmed with the task of simultaneously running their business and looking for new and creative ways to
expand and improve it. However, sorting through all the options available for coaching can be a daunting task, as
coaches work in a variety of ways; some offer intense one-on-one personalized sessions, while others work in
large groups, and the business issues that coaches specialize in vary widely. In addition, coaches do not require
any particular credentials, which can make evaluating a potential coach's qualifications difficult. Still, many
business owners who work with coaches find the experience to be richly rewarding, such as clothing-shop owner
and designer Dava Muramatsu, who used a coach to help her step away from micromanaging small details of
her business in order to focus on more creative pursuits such as fashion shows and new lines of clothing and
jewelry. Home-services company CEO Dina Dwyer-Owens benefited from group coaching sessions that focused
on issues like time management and company expansion.




THE NEXT BIG THING IN ON-LINE RECRUITING

WALL STREET JOURNAL FEB 22 PETER WEDDLE


 Read the traditional media or even recruitment blogs these days, and you'd think that employers are desperate
for candidates. The commentary is all about search engines as the next big thing in online recruiting. Why are
they in the spotlight? Because apparently employers are facing a vast and growing shortage of applicants for
their openings, and only vertical search sites and search portals can redress the crisis. Employers are in a War
for Any Talent -- at least that's the hue and cry -- and they need the latest search technology to prevail.

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History, however, suggests a different view. It is true that the War for Talent was originally conceived as a
quantitative crisis, thanks to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' prediction that the U.S. would experience a
shortfall of 10 million workers by 2010. Those shortages would prevent some employers from executing critical
operations, and as a consequence, degrade their financial and market performance. To protect themselves,
therefore, employers began to compete much more aggressively for candidates. In classic economic terms, they
were battling to determine the haves and have-nots of human capital.

Then, the economy that drove the War -- the late, unlamented dot-com bubble -- collapsed. Today, employers
aren't competing for candidates; they're overrun with them. In fact, some employers now complain about job
boards the way they used to complain about newspaper classified advertising. Post an opening online, and
they're likely to get hundreds, even thousands, of responses. E-mailboxes are stuffed to overflowing with
applicants; resume databases now hold more records than a person can effectively assess. If the War for Talent
is still a quantitative struggle, the conflict is over. We won.

That, of course, is wishful thinking. The War for Talent is every bit as real today as it was when it first erupted
almost a decade ago. It is now, however, a very different conflict. The War for Any Talent -- the quantitative
struggle for more candidates -- has been replaced by a War for the Best Talent, a qualitative contest for
extraordinary candidates. And extraordinary candidates are in very short supply. They involve two kinds of
workers:

   1. Those with critical skills, including workers in certain areas of information technology, certain fields of
      engineering, and in certain professions (e.g., technical sales), trades (e.g., machinists) and industries
      (e.g., health care);
   2. Those who are high performers, especially workers who fill critical positions that ensure effective and
      efficient organizational operations by virtue of their own performance and by their ability to raise the
      performance level of their co-workers.

These candidates are extraordinary because they are rare and they make a uniquely large contribution to their
employer.

And that's the problem with search engines and search portals. Their value proposition for candidates is simple:
We make it easy to find employers' job postings. Sure, that increases candidate flow -- assuming the search
engine site or portal is well known to workers, which is not always a safe assumption -- but that flow comes only
from those who are actively looking for a new job. To put it baldly, search engines and search portals attract and
support active job seekers. Now, there's nothing inherently wrong with making it easier for active job seekers to
connect with employers, but it is definitely not a strategy for sourcing extraordinary candidates.

Active job seekers have three defining characteristics:

   1. They are a small subset of the total work force. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, at any
      point in time, just 16% of all workers are actively looking for a job. In essence, search engines and search
      portals miss 84% of the work force.
   2. They encompass a proportionately smaller population of the best talent. Those with critical skills and
      those who are high performers are almost always employed and, as a consequence, seldom if ever look



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                                                         6
      for a job. Hence, search engines and search portals miss most of these passive job seekers. And passive
      job seekers are the best source of extraordinary candidates.
   3. They are, by definition, motivated searchers for employment. Active job seekers will take the initiative to
      visit employers' sites. While they may use a search engine or a search portal, they're just as likely to visit
      an employer's site on their own (especially if the employer is well branded).

All of which begs the question: What's the recruiting value of a search engine or search portal?

Certainly, they generate traffic. And, if you're selling cars or real estate, that's an advantage. Any person who
comes to a car dealer or real-estate company's site is a potential customer. They are, in the language of our
colleagues in sales, a "qualified prospect." That's not the case with recruitment. A qualified candidate is not
anyone who will do the work, but rather the one who will do the work best. Search technology can't capture those
prospects; only a special kind of web site can.

I call these special sites career community centers. Unlike search engines and search portals, they provide a
value proposition that appeals to people who aren't looking for a job as well as to those who are. In essence,
they have something for 100% of the work force. They provide job postings for the active job seeker and career-
advancement information, content and functionality for the passive person. Equally as important, they facilitate
personal development and support peer-to-peer interaction and collegiality, regardless of one's employment
situation.

Not all employment sites are career community centers. Many job boards have successfully been able to make
the switch. (And, certainly, search engines and portals could do so, as well.) They have transformed themselves
from simple listings of open positions to destinations that engage, educate, encourage, enlighten and entertain,
whether a person is actively looking for a job or not.

VIRTUAL MENTORING

HR Magazine (03/06) Donna Owens

Employees new to the workforce or just starting a more-advanced job can often benefit greatly from a
relationship with a more experienced mentor. However, in the past, these relationships were often forged
through chance meetings and other unreliable channels. Now, many companies are starting to formalize new
employees' search for an effective mentor through online matching services that get protégés in touch with
mentors who are best aligned with their students' skills and goals. The clearly delineated goals and desires of all
who use the service allow for more realistic expectations of the relationship and let participants choose a mentor
or protégé about whom they can be truly enthusiastic. Employees can search through lists of possible mentors in
their fields of expertise and send match requests, allowing the potential mentor to evaluate the employee to see
if the match will work. Because of the wide range of available mentors and the ease of online contact, an
effective mentor may be chosen who might otherwise be too distant to form a relationship. In addition to
company-exclusive online mentoring systems, many independent mentor-matching channels have been
developed, including several targeted to students wanting advice on their eventual career path.




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WORKCHOICE SEMINARS ANNOUNCED

Office of Employment Advocate 3 April 2006

The Department of Employment and Workplace Relations and the Office of the Employment Advocate have
begun a national seminar series to provide employees and employers with an overview of WorkChoices.

Information includes the advantages and opportunities WorkChoices provides together with an understanding of
the practicalities of agreement making.

Topics to be covered in the seminars include:

       a national workplace relations system;
       the Australian Fair Pay and Conditions Standard;
       role of the Australian Fair Pay Commission;
       award protection;
       agreement making;
       changes to the unfair dismissal laws;
       transitional arrangements;
       the legislation in Victoria; and
       compliance.

Over 350 seminars will be held in metropolitan and regional locations throughout Australia. To register for the
seminars visit the Events section of this site.

Attendees will receive information kits containing WorkChoices fact sheets and other resources for the
workplace. Further information on the reforms is available by calling the WorkChoices Infoline on 1300 363 264.


CASUAL STAFF MAY END UP COSTING MORE
Tuesday, 16 May, 2006 AAP Samantha Baden, Industrial Reporter


Bosses who hire casual workers to save money and gain flexibility could end up shelling out more in the
long run because of the hidden health and safety costs of temporary staff, new research shows. A study by
University of NSW (UNSW) PhD student Maria McNamara has found that casual workers are at a greater
risk of being injured compared to permanent employees, creating significant costs for companies.

Lower motivation and productivity also impose a further hidden cost on employers of casual workers, the
research says. Casual workers are often considered a cheaper alternative to permanent staff because they are
not entitled to either paid holiday leave or sick pay.

"(But) there is a growing body of international research linking casual employment with an increased risk of
occupational injury and illness as well as other adverse outcomes," Ms McNamara says. "These adverse
outcomes include increased staff turnover, lower motivation and job satisfaction, lower productivity and higher
costs to companies." With 2.3 million casual workers in Australia, more than one in four Australian workers are
casual workers, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

While it is too early to tell what effect the federal government's Work Choices legislation will have on the
prevalence of casual labour, Ms McNamara says it could encourage even more companies to employ casuals.


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"In making it generally easier for employers to restructure work arrangements, Work Choices may encourage the
use of more temporary workers," the report says. "On the other hand, the reduced access to unfair dismissal
protection may make some employers less reluctant to take on permanent workers." Whatever the effect, Ms
McNamara says companies need to focus on ensuring temporary workers are properly trained.

"Companies that want to lessen the risks associated with a temporary workforce should pay attention to ensuring
that all casual employees get appropriate levels of induction training and on-the-job supervision," Ms McNamara
says. "There have been many recent court cases where inadequate supervision of casual workers has been
cited as contributing to increased accidents and injuries."

NURSE DENIES CLAIMS SHE MISREPRESENTED QUALIFICATIONS
Wednesday, 17 May, 2006 AAP


The nurse at the centre of the latest Queensland health scandal has denied claims she misrepresented her
qualifications to land a senior job at the Prince Charles Hospital, and is threatening legal action. State parliament
last week heard allegations that Virginia Hancl used a bogus masters degree and listed her boyfriend as a
referee to land the role of Prince Charles Hospital's nursing manager.

In a statement today, Ms Hancl's lawyers said the allegations that she used false credentials were untrue and
she would begin defamation action against some media outlets. She also said allegations that she was removed
from clinical duties in her previous job over concerns about her nursing skills were "completely unfounded".

Queensland Nurses Union leader Gaye Hawksworth told ABC TV that Ms Hancl did not mislead Prince Charles
hospital into believing she had a masters degree. She also denied that Ms Hancl listed her boyfriend as a
referee.

She said he was one of four referees listed and became Ms Hancl's boyfriend afterwards. "She believes some of
the media reportings have been defamatory to her," the Queensland Nurses Union leader said.

The Crime and Misconduct Commission (CMC) is investigating the matter as well as the treatment of a doctor
who was disciplined for raising concerns about Ms Hancl's appointment. Health Minister Stephen Robertson was
forced to apologise to a doctor who sent an email to two senior health bureaucrats in April last year questioning
her performance.

The doctor, the hospital's head of rehabilitation and aged care, Chris Davis, was ignored and subsequently
disciplined by Queensland Health. He has since been awarded whistleblower status over the incident, his
disciplinary record cleaned and his legal costs covered by the government. The government last Friday stood
down three senior health bureaucrats pending the outcome of the investigation.

Ms Hancl is on unpaid leave but continues to work at the Logan Nursing Home south of Brisbane where she is
Director of Nursing




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GOVT STILL HAS A LONG WAY TO GO TO HELP WORKING MUMS: KELLY
Monday, 15 May, 2006 AAP

This year's budget is all about tax cuts and offers little spending on working mothers, a federal Liberal
backbencher says. Western Sydney MP Jackie Kelly already has criticised the childcare measures
announced in the budget last week, describing them as inadequate.

This morning, she backed away from comments attributed to her that the Labor Party was taking the issue more
seriously. But now, she has taken a swipe at the budget more generally. "It's a very big budget, I'm not criticising
the budget," she told ABC radio. "But it is not a big-spending budget. Besides ... medical research and roads,
there isn't much spending. It is all about tax cuts," she said. The government still had a long way to go to help
working mothers, she said.

"It is a good budget, but it's only a step. We still have a long way to go. We really do need to keep moving and
take every opportunity to make the burden on working mums thinner." Last Tuesday's budget promises $37
billion in tax cuts, delivering between $10 and $40 a week to low and middle income earners.

The government also announced it would scrap the funding cap on out-of-school-hours and family day care
places. Labor says the plan is meaningless because there are already nearly 100,000 such places being
unused. And Ms Kelly yesterday appeared to endorse Labor's childcare initiatives over her own party's. Today,
she defended the government's childcare record, but said it fell short of what was needed. "I think our
government's got a great record on childcare and I think that the lifting of the cap on family day care is another
step in the right direction - it's an installment, if you like.”But my point is that we still have a lot more installments
to be made to accommodate the 21st century working mum."

She disagreed with the opposition that a shortage of long day care places was an issue, but indicated some
support for its plan to set up centres in schools to avoid the "double drop-off" for working mothers. "There's
probably a shortage for long day care places in the inner-city of Sydney and Melbourne, but right across
Australia there's a lot of long day care."

Ms Kelly said Labor could go further and pledge more support for preschools and workplace-based centres. "We
have to look at preschools - a lot of parents prefer preschools options, but get no federal funding for that," she
said. "A lot of women prefer workplace-based childcare. Labor does have something in terms of schools-based
childcare, but some of their policies pose a definite threat to existing viable businesses." Schools-based care
should be provided by the private sector, not the government, she said.

"If you fix up childcare at schools, you've also got to fix up childcare in the workplace and I think if you get those
two right, you're a long way to fixing that double drop-off, addressing that national guilt about leaving their kids
for eight hours a day and, in some cases, ten hours a day."




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UNEMPLOYMENT RISES TO 5.1 PER CENT: ABS
Thursday, 11 May, 2006 AAP


Australia's unemployment rate rose 0.1 percentage points to 5.1 per cent in April, new figures show. The
Australian Bureau of Statistics said total employment fell 3,200, to 10.08 million people. Full time
employment rose 22,700 to 7.2 million, while part time jobs dropped 25,900 to 2.9 million. Total
unemployment rose 10,000 to 542,100.

The number of people looking for full-time work fell 10,100 to 366,200, while the number looking for part-time
work rose 20,000 to 175,900. The participation rate fell slightly to 64.3 per cent.

The increase in the overall unemployment rate was due to NSW where the jobless rate rose to 5.6 per cent from
5.1 per cent. Unemployment was down to 4.6 per cent in Queensland (from five per cent), to 5.4 per cent in
South Australia (from 5.5 per cent), to 3.9 per cent in Western Australia (from 4.1 per cent), to 6.3 per cent in
Tasmania (from 6.4 per cent) It stayed steady in Victoria at 5.3 per cent, at 6.6 per cent in the Northern Territory
and at 3.2 per cent in the ACT.




                                          THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

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                                                          IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER

   No person should rely on the contents of this publication without first obtaining advice from a qualified professional person. This
   publication is provided on the terms and understanding that (1) the editor & publisher are not responsible for the results of any actions
   taken on the basis of information in this publication, nor for any error in or omission from this publication; and (2) the editor and
   publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting, professional or other advice or services. The publisher and editor, expressly
   disclaim all and any liability and responsibility to any person, in respect of anything, and of the consequences of anything, done or
   omitted to be done by any such person in reliance, whether wholly or partially, upon the whole or any part of the contents of this
   publication.




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