Docstoc

TUTORIAL TUTORIAL ESSAY WRITING – INTRODUCTION Sources www

Document Sample
TUTORIAL TUTORIAL ESSAY WRITING – INTRODUCTION Sources www Powered By Docstoc
					        TUTORIAL
   ESSAY WRITING – INTRODUCTION
Sources: www.yorku.ca/rkenedy/critical_skills/student/
      www.jcu.edu.au/studying/services/studyskills/essay
           http://www.bookrags.com/articles/4.html
                   www.images.google.com
       IMPORTANT POINTS
Before you write, consider your reader:

• will influence your choice of vocabulary,
  sentence structure, and even the kind of
  evidence you use to support your essay
• writing a paper for a university
  assignment requires a greater level of
  style using academic conventions
  (rules) than writing a personal letter
• there are many variations so consider the
  preferences of the instructor, as well as
  the requirements of the essay.
• the tone of your essay depends in part by
  your topic and the kind of essay you are
  writing e.g. descriptive, narrative,
  persuasive, argumentative
• another consideration is the attitude you
  communicate as you express yourself.
  Be careful of being either too timid or too
  aggressive
• do not fill your essays with superlatives
  and jargons in an effort to sound as if you
  can write extremely well
• your writing should be objective and
  dispassionate (i.e. avoid the use of
  emotional language) although on some
  occasions, where appropriate, you may be
  critical or adversarial
WRITING INTRODUCTIONS




  Source: http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/acadwrite/intro.html
  WRITING THE INTRODUCTION
An introduction is the first paragraph (or
 paragraphs) of any written work.

PURPOSE
• is to prepare the reader for the body of
  writing that comes after it
• Introduces and gives a background on
  your topic
• develops interest in your topic.
WRITING AN INTRODUCTION
• after you had written the body of your essay.
• before you write the body of your essay.
• an outline first and then focus and revise it once you
  have written your essay.

Many people write a draft and from that find out what their
  purpose really is and what they really believe. Then they
  revise the focus, language, or order of their introduction.
  This sequence -- of drafting an introduction and then
  revising and refining it once the body of the paper is
  sketched out -- is very common.
 WRITING THE INTRODUCTION
           (cont’d)
GOOD INTRODUCTION
• indicates the topic that the essay is about
• describes how the body of the essay is
  organised
• explains the point of writing the essay
LENGTH OF AN INTRODUCTION
• can have a few to many sentences, or even be
  more than one paragraph in length, depending
  on the length of your essay
• the actual number of sentences in an
  introduction is not important
• what is important is that this section of your
  essay can capture your reader’s attention
  enough to want to read the entire essay
             EXAMPLE
Essay question: Should body-checking
 of athletes be banned in Olympic ice-
 hockey?
Here is how someone new to academic essays
 may write the introduction (the topic-sentence is
 in red, essay structure in blue, thesis in green):

       This essay is about the issue of body-checking
  athletes competing in the Olympics ice-hockey.
  First, arguments for a ban on body-checking are
  examined. Second, arguments against a ban are
  discussed. It is shown that pro-ban arguments are
  stronger than anti-ban arguments. Therefore, the thesis
  of this essay is that body-checking of athletes
  competing in the Olympics ice-hockey games should be
  banned.
        DISCUSSION OF THE EXAMPLE

The introduction is fine as it is better to have an
  introduction that includes the three important
  elements (topic, structure, thesis) than to have
  one that does not.
Many people start out by writing essays with
  introductions like this one. It does have the virtue
  of being clear, and clarity is essential. The
  structure-sentences are fine.
Notice that words such as first and second are
  useful in helping to describe how the body of an
  essay is organised.
However, if you can convey the structure of your
  essay without using too many organisational
  words, that is even better.
           HOW TO IMPROVE
• The topic-sentence could be improved:
   – Rather than writing: “This essay is about…” it would
     be better to write a few topic-sentences that convey
     the current state of the topic.
   – This not only tells the reader what the topic is but it
     also gives the impression that you are knowledgeable
     about the topic and in command of your research
     material.

• The thesis-sentences could be better:
   – Instead of writing: “Therefore, the thesis of this essay
     is…” simply give a bold, factual sentence that
     expresses your position on the issue. This conveys
     an air of confidence, unlike the phrase “…the thesis of
     this essay…” which is timid and non-committal.
    GOOD EXAMPLE

Body-checking has always been a controversial issue.
However, the recent decision of the Olympic Ice-Hockey
Committee to allow body-checking among players as has
caused anger amongst the ice hockey community in
recent months. Perspectives fall into three main categories:
viewpoints of fans, the official standpoint of the Olympic
Ice-Hockey Committee, and positions held by the medical
community. Evaluation of the main arguments shows quite
clearly that the decision to allow body-checking of some
athletes, is a serious mistake.
              EXPLANATION
• In this second introduction, the topic-sentences give an
  impression of the current state of the topic (and, so,
  convey the topic of the essay to the reader) without
  using the words essay or topic.
• The structure-sentences inform the reader of the main
  parts of the body of the essay and their order of
  discussion (views of fans, the Olympic Ice-Hockey
  Committee, and the medical community) without using
  many organisational words.
• The thesis-sentences tell the reader where you stand on
  the issue and how you arrived at your position (through
  evaluation of the main arguments for and against a ban),
  without including words such as essay or thesis.
          IN-CLASS EXERCISE
• Write the introduction for this question:

     “ To what extent are computers essential
     in modern society?”




 Source: Duigu, G. (1996). Essay writing for English tests – How to pass
 the essay question in IELTS, TOEFL: TWE CULT. New South Wales:
 Academic English Press
                           Sample
It is amazing to realise that computers have only
been in common use for the last 10 years or so. The
invention of personal computers has had such a
major effect on modern society that it is almost
impossible to imagine life without them. Business,
education and entertainment have all been
significantly affected. It is clear now that both
business and education would be unable to function
effectively without them, but there are many people
who would argue that their role in entertainment is
not so beneficial.

RED – Topic sentence   BLUE – Essay structure   GREEN - thesis statement

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:1/25/2012
language:English
pages:21