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					Degree Description   SLO Type




Au.D.-Audiology                 1




Au.D.-Audiology                 1




Au.D.-Audiology                 1




Au.D.-Audiology                 1




Au.D.-Audiology                 1




Au.D.-Audiology                 1




Au.D.-Audiology                 1




Au.D.-Audiology                 1
Au.D.-Audiology   1




Au.D.-Audiology   2




Au.D.-Audiology   2




Au.D.-Audiology   2




Au.D.-Audiology   2
Au.D.-Audiology   2




Au.D.-Audiology   2




Au.D.-Audiology   2




Au.D.-Audiology   2




Au.D.-Audiology   2




Au.D.-Audiology   3
Au.D.-Audiology   3




Au.D.-Audiology   3




Au.D.-Audiology   3




Au.D.-Audiology   3




Au.D.-Audiology   3




Au.D.-Audiology   3




Au.D.-Audiology   3
Au.D.-Audiology                                 3




Au.D.-Audiology                                 3




Au.D.-Audiology                                 3




Au.D.-Audiology                                 3



B.S.I.S.E.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   1




D.P.M.-Plant Medicine                           1




D.P.M.-Plant Medicine                           2
D.P.M.-Plant Medicine                    3




Ed.D.-Curriculum and Instruction (CCD)   1




Ed.D.-Curriculum and Instruction (CCD)   2




Ed.D.-Curriculum and Instruction (CCD)   3




Ed.D.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   1
Ed.D.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   2




Ed.D.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   3




Ed.D.-Educational Leadership             1




Ed.D.-Educational Leadership             2




Ed.D.-Educational Leadership             3




Ed.D.-Educational Leadership             2




Ed.D.-Educational Leadership             3

Ed.D.-Educational Psychology             1

Ed.D.-Educational Psychology             2
Ed.D.-Educational Psychology            3




Ed.D.-Higher Education Administration   1
Ed.D.-Higher Education Administration   1
Ed.D.-Higher Education Administration   2




Ed.D.-Higher Education Administration   3
Ed.D.-Marriage and Family Counseling   1




Ed.D.-Marriage and Family Counseling   2
Ed.D.-Marriage and Family Counseling   3




Ed.D.-Mental Health Counseling         1
Ed.D.-Mental Health Counseling              2




Ed.D.-Mental Health Counseling              3




Ed.D.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   1
Ed.D.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   2




Ed.D.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   3




Ed.D.-School Counseling and Guidance        1




Ed.D.-School Counseling and Guidance        2




Ed.D.-School Counseling and Guidance        3
Ed.D.-School Psychology                  1




Ed.D.-School Psychology                  2



Ed.D.-School Psychology                  2




Ed.D.-School Psychology                  3




Ed.D.-Special Education                  1



Ed.D.-Special Education                  2




Ed.D.-Special Education                  3




Ed.S.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   1
Ed.S.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   2




Ed.S.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   3




Ed.S.-Educational Leadership             1




Ed.S.-Educational Leadership             2




Ed.S.-Educational Leadership             3




Ed.S.-Educational Leadership             2
Ed.S.-Educational Leadership            3

Ed.S.-Educational Psychology            1

Ed.S.-Educational Psychology            2

Ed.S.-Educational Psychology            3

Ed.S.-Foundations of Education          1

Ed.S.-Foundations of Education          2

Ed.S.-Foundations of Education          3
Ed.S.-Higher Education Administration   1
Ed.S.-Higher Education Administration   2
Ed.S.-Higher Education Administration   3




Ed.S.-Marriage and Family Counseling    1




Ed.S.-Marriage and Family Counseling    2
Ed.S.-Marriage and Family Counseling        3




Ed.S.-Mental Health Counseling              1




Ed.S.-Mental Health Counseling              2




Ed.S.-Mental Health Counseling              3
Ed.S.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   1
Ed.S.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   2
Ed.S.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   3
Ed.S.-School Counseling and Guidance   1




Ed.S.-School Counseling and Guidance   2




Ed.S.-School Counseling and Guidance   3




Ed.S.-School Psychology                1




Ed.S.-School Psychology                2
Ed.S.-School Psychology   3




Ed.S.-Special Education   1




Ed.S.-Special Education   1




Ed.S.-Special Education   2
Ed.S.-Special Education                         2




Ed.S.-Special Education                         3
Ed.S.-Student Personnel in Higher Education     1
Ed.S.-Student Personnel in Higher Education     2
Ed.S.-Student Personnel in Higher Education     3
Engr.-Aerospace Engineering                     1
Engr.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   1




Engr.-Chemical Engineering                      1




Engr.-Chemical Engineering                      1




Engr.-Chemical Engineering                      2




Engr.-Chemical Engineering                      1




Engr.-Chemical Engineering                      3

Engr.-Computer Engineering                      1
Engr.-Computer Engineering                  1



Engr.-Computer Engineering                  2



Engr.-Computer Engineering                  3
Engr.-Computer Engineering                  3
Engr.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   1
Engr.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   2
Engr.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   3




Engr.-Environmental Engineering Sciences    1




Engr.-Environmental Engineering Sciences    1

Engr.-Environmental Engineering Sciences    1



Engr.-Environmental Engineering Sciences    1



Engr.-Environmental Engineering Sciences    2




Engr.-Environmental Engineering Sciences    2




Engr.-Environmental Engineering Sciences    3

Engr.-Environmental Engineering Sciences    3

Engr.-Environmental Engineering Sciences    3
Engr.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   1
Engr.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   2
Engr.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   3
Engr.-Materials Science and Engineering    1
Engr.-Mechanical Engineering               1
Engr.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences         1




LL.M.Comp.Law-Comparative Law              1




LL.M.Comp.Law-Comparative Law              2
LL.M.Comp.Law-Comparative Law                3




LL.M.E.L.U.-Environmental and Land Use Law   1




LL.M.E.L.U.-Environmental and Land Use Law   2




LL.M.E.L.U.-Environmental and Land Use Law   3




LL.M.Int-International Taxation              1
LL.M.Int-International Taxation   2




LL.M.Int-International Taxation   3




LL.M.Tax.-Taxation                1




LL.M.Tax.-Taxation                2




LL.M.Tax.-Taxation                3




M.A.-Anthropology                 1
M.A.-Anthropology              3
M.A.-Anthropology              2
M.A.-Art                       1




M.A.-Art Education             1




M.A.-Art Education             1

M.A.-Art Education             2



M.A.-Art Education             3




M.A.-Art History               1




M.A.-Art History               1




M.A.-Art History               2




M.A.-Art History               3




M.A.-Business Administration   3
M.A.-Business Administration   1




M.A.-Business Administration   2




M.A.-Classical Studies         1




M.A.-Classical Studies         1




M.A.-Classical Studies         2




M.A.-Classical Studies         2




M.A.-Classical Studies         3




M.A.-Classical Studies         3
M.A.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   1




M.A.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   1




M.A.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   1




M.A.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   2




M.A.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   2




M.A.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   3




M.A.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   3




M.A.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   3
M.A.-Criminology, Law, and Society     1




M.A.-Criminology, Law, and Society     2




M.A.-Criminology, Law, and Society     2




M.A.-Criminology, Law, and Society     3




M.A.-Digital Arts and Sciences (DAR)   1




M.A.-Digital Arts and Sciences (DAR)   2




M.A.-Digital Arts and Sciences (DAR)   3
M.A.-Economics                        1




M.A.-Economics                        2




M.A.-Economics                        3




M.A.-English                          1




M.A.-English                          2




M.A.-English                          3

M.A.-English                          1




M.A.-French and Francophone Studies   1




M.A.-French and Francophone Studies   2
M.A.-French and Francophone Studies   2




M.A.-French and Francophone Studies   3




M.A.-Geography                        1




M.A.-Geography                        2




M.A.-Geography                        3




M.A.-German                           3




M.A.-German                           1




M.A.-German                           2
M.A.-German    2



M.A.-History   1




M.A.-History   3




M.A.-History   2
M.A.-International Business   1
M.A.-International Business   3
M.A.-International Business   3
M.A.-International Business   2
M.A.-International Business   2




M.A.-International Business   2




M.A.-Latin                    1




M.A.-Latin                    2
M.A.-Latin                    2




M.A.-Latin                    3




M.A.-Latin                    3




M.A.-Latin American Studies   1




M.A.-Latin American Studies   2




M.A.-Latin American Studies   2




M.A.-Latin American Studies   3
M.A.-Latin American Studies   3




M.A.-Linguistics              1




M.A.-Linguistics              2




M.A.-Linguistics              2




M.A.-Linguistics              3
M.A.-Mathematics              1
M.A.-Mathematics              2
M.A.-Mathematics              3




M.A.-Museology                1

M.A.-Museology                2




M.A.-Museology                3
M.A.-Philosophy   1




M.A.-Philosophy   2




M.A.-Philosophy   2
M.A.-Philosophy                                    3




M.A.-Political Science                             1




M.A.-Political Science                             2




M.A.-Political Science                             3




M.A.-Political Science - International Relations   1
M.A.-Political Science - International Relations   2




M.A.-Political Science - International Relations   3
M.A.-Psychology                                    1
M.A.-Psychology                                    1




M.A.-Religion                                      1




M.A.-Religion                                      1




M.A.-Religion                                      2



M.A.-Religion                                      3




M.A.-Sociology                                     1




M.A.-Sociology                                     1
M.A.-Sociology   1




M.A.-Sociology   2




M.A.-Sociology   2



M.A.-Sociology   3



M.A.-Sociology   3




M.A.-Sociology   3




M.A.-Sociology   3




M.A.-Spanish     1




M.A.-Spanish     2
M.A.-Spanish           3




M.A.-Women's Studies   1
M.A.-Women's Studies   2




M.A.-Women's Studies   3
M.A.E.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   1




M.A.E.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   2




M.A.E.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   3




M.A.E.-Early Childhood Education          1




M.A.E.-Early Childhood Education          2




M.A.E.-Early Childhood Education          3




M.A.E.-Early Childhood Education          3




M.A.E.-Educational Leadership             1
M.A.E.-Educational Leadership   2




M.A.E.-Educational Leadership   3




M.A.E.-Educational Leadership   3

M.A.E.-Educational Psychology   1

M.A.E.-Educational Psychology   2

M.A.E.-Educational Psychology   3




M.A.E.-Elementary Education     1




M.A.E.-Elementary Education     1




M.A.E.-Elementary Education     2




M.A.E.-Elementary Education     3
M.A.E.-English Education                1




M.A.E.-English Education                2




M.A.E.-English Education                3

M.A.E.-Foreign Language Education       1

M.A.E.-Foreign Language Education       2

M.A.E.-Foreign Language Education       3




M.A.E.-Marriage and Family Counseling   1




M.A.E.-Marriage and Family Counseling   2
M.A.E.-Marriage and Family Counseling   3




M.A.E.-Mathematics Education            1




M.A.E.-Mathematics Education            2




M.A.E.-Mathematics Education            3




M.A.E.-Mental Health Counseling         1




M.A.E.-Mental Health Counseling         2
M.A.E.-Mental Health Counseling              3




M.A.E.-Reading Education                     1




M.A.E.-Reading Education                     2




M.A.E.-Reading Education                     3



M.A.E.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   1




M.A.E.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   2



M.A.E.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   3




M.A.E.-School Counseling and Guidance        1
M.A.E.-School Counseling and Guidance   2




M.A.E.-School Counseling and Guidance   3



M.A.E.-School Psychology                1



M.A.E.-School Psychology                2




M.A.E.-School Psychology                3




M.A.E.-Science Education                1




M.A.E.-Science Education                2
M.A.E.-Science Education          3




M.A.E.-Social Studies Education   1




M.A.E.-Social Studies Education   2




M.A.E.-Social Studies Education   3




M.A.E.-Special Education          1
M.A.E.-Special Education                       2




M.A.E.-Special Education                       2




M.A.E.-Special Education                       3




M.A.E.-Student Personnel in Higher Education   3
M.A.E.-Student Personnel in Higher Education   1




M.A.E.-Student Personnel in Higher Education   2




M.A.M.C.-Mass Communication                    1




M.A.M.C.-Mass Communication                    1




M.A.M.C.-Mass Communication                    2




M.A.M.C.-Mass Communication                    2
M.A.M.C.-Mass Communication             3



M.A.T.-Anthropology                     1




M.A.T.-Anthropology                     2



M.A.T.-Anthropology                     3




M.A.T.-French and Francophone Studies   1




M.A.T.-French and Francophone Studies   2




M.A.T.-French and Francophone Studies   3
M.A.T.-Geography                        1
M.A.T.-Geography                        2
M.A.T.-Geography                        3
M.A.T.-Latin                    1




M.A.T.-Latin                    1




M.A.T.-Latin                    2



M.A.T.-Latin                    3
M.A.T.-Latin American Studies   1

M.A.T.-Mathematics              2

M.A.T.-Mathematics              3

M.A.T.-Mathematics              1
M.A.T.-Philosophy   1




M.A.T.-Philosophy   2




M.A.T.-Philosophy   2
M.A.T.-Philosophy                                    3

M.A.T.-Political Science - International Relations   1




M.A.T.-Spanish                                       1




M.A.T.-Spanish                                       2




M.A.T.-Spanish                                       3




M.A.U.R.P.-Urban and Regional Planning               1




M.A.U.R.P.-Urban and Regional Planning               2
M.A.U.R.P.-Urban and Regional Planning   3




M.AB.-Food and Resource Economics        1




M.AB.-Food and Resource Economics        2




M.AB.-Food and Resource Economics        3




M.Acc.-Accounting                        1
M.Acc.-Accounting   1




M.Acc.-Accounting   3
M.Acc.-Accounting   3




M.Acc.-Accounting   2




M.Acc.-Accounting   2
M.Acc.-Accounting    3




M.Adv.-Advertising   1




M.Adv.-Advertising   3
M.Adv.-Advertising     2




M.Arch.-Architecture   1
M.Arch.-Architecture   1
M.Arch.-Architecture   2




M.Arch.-Architecture   3
M.B.A.-Business Administration   1
M.B.A.-Business Administration   2
M.B.A.-Business Administration   3
M.B.A.-Business Administration   3
M.B.A.-Business Administration   3




M.B.C.-Building Construction     1




M.B.C.-Building Construction     2
M.B.C.-Building Construction                   3




M.E.-Aerospace Engineering                     1




M.E.-Aerospace Engineering                     2
M.E.-Aerospace Engineering                     3



M.E.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   1
M.E.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   2




M.E.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   3




M.E.-Biomedical Engineering                    1




M.E.-Biomedical Engineering                    1




M.E.-Biomedical Engineering                    2




M.E.-Biomedical Engineering                    2

M.E.-Biomedical Engineering                    3




M.E.-Biomedical Engineering                    3



M.E.-Chemical Engineering                      1



M.E.-Chemical Engineering                      1
M.E.-Chemical Engineering   1



M.E.-Chemical Engineering   2



M.E.-Chemical Engineering   3




M.E.-Civil Engineering      1
M.E.-Civil Engineering   2




M.E.-Civil Engineering   3
M.E.-Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering   1




M.E.-Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering   2




M.E.-Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering   3

M.E.-Computer Engineering                    1
M.E.-Computer Engineering                  1



M.E.-Computer Engineering                  2



M.E.-Computer Engineering                  3
M.E.-Computer Engineering                  3




M.E.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   1
M.E.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   2




M.E.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   2



M.E.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   3
M.E.-Environmental Engineering Sciences   1




M.E.-Environmental Engineering Sciences   2
M.E.-Environmental Engineering Sciences   3




M.E.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   1
M.E.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   2
M.E.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   3




M.E.-Materials Science and Engineering    1




M.E.-Materials Science and Engineering    1
M.E.-Materials Science and Engineering   2




M.E.-Materials Science and Engineering   3




M.E.-Materials Science and Engineering   3




M.E.-Mechanical Engineering              2
M.E.-Mechanical Engineering         1
M.E.-Mechanical Engineering         3




M.E.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   1




M.E.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   1




M.E.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   2
M.E.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences        3




M.E.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences        3




M.Ed.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   1
M.Ed.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   2




M.Ed.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   3




M.Ed.-Early Childhood Education          1
M.Ed.-Early Childhood Education   2




M.Ed.-Early Childhood Education   3




M.Ed.-Early Childhood Education   3




M.Ed.-Educational Leadership      1




M.Ed.-Educational Leadership      2
M.Ed.-Educational Leadership   3




M.Ed.-Educational Leadership   3

M.Ed.-Educational Psychology   1

M.Ed.-Educational Psychology   2

M.Ed.-Educational Psychology   3
M.Ed.-Elementary Education   1




M.Ed.-Elementary Education   1




M.Ed.-Elementary Education   2




M.Ed.-Elementary Education   3




M.Ed.-English Education      1
M.Ed.-English Education                2




M.Ed.-English Education                3




M.Ed.-Marriage and Family Counseling   1




M.Ed.-Marriage and Family Counseling   2




M.Ed.-Marriage and Family Counseling   3
M.Ed.-Mathematics Education      1




M.Ed.-Mathematics Education      2




M.Ed.-Mathematics Education      3




M.Ed.-Mental Health Counseling   3




M.Ed.-Mental Health Counseling   1
M.Ed.-Mental Health Counseling              2




M.Ed.-Reading Education                     1




M.Ed.-Reading Education                     2




M.Ed.-Reading Education                     3



M.Ed.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   1



M.Ed.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   2




M.Ed.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   3
M.Ed.-School Counseling and Guidance   1




M.Ed.-School Counseling and Guidance   2




M.Ed.-School Counseling and Guidance   3



M.Ed.-School Psychology                1



M.Ed.-School Psychology                2




M.Ed.-School Psychology                3
M.Ed.-Science Education          1




M.Ed.-Science Education          2




M.Ed.-Science Education          3




M.Ed.-Social Studies Education   1




M.Ed.-Social Studies Education   2




M.Ed.-Social Studies Education   3
M.Ed.-Special Education                       1




M.Ed.-Special Education                       2




M.Ed.-Special Education                       2




M.Ed.-Special Education                       3




M.Ed.-Student Personnel in Higher Education   1




M.Ed.-Student Personnel in Higher Education   2
M.Ed.-Student Personnel in Higher Education   3




M.F.A.-Art                                    1




M.F.A.-Art                                    2




M.F.A.-Art                                    3




M.F.A.-Creative Writing                       1



M.F.A.-Creative Writing                       2

M.F.A.-Creative Writing                       3




M.F.A.-Theatre                                1




M.F.A.-Theatre                                2
M.F.A.-Theatre                            3




M.F.A.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   1




M.F.A.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   1




M.F.A.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   3
M.F.A.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences      2




M.F.A.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences      2




M.F.A.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences      1




M.F.A.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences      2




M.F.A.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences      2




M.F.R.C.-Forest Resources and Conservation   1
M.F.R.C.-Forest Resources and Conservation        1




M.F.R.C.-Forest Resources and Conservation        2




M.F.R.C.-Forest Resources and Conservation        2



M.F.R.C.-Forest Resources and Conservation        3




M.F.R.C.-Forest Resources and Conservation        3



M.F.Y.C.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   1




M.F.Y.C.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   1




M.F.Y.C.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   1




M.F.Y.C.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   1
M.F.Y.C.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   2




M.F.Y.C.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   2




M.F.Y.C.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   2




M.F.Y.C.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   2



M.F.Y.C.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   3




M.F.Y.C.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   3

M.H.A.-Health Administration                      1




M.H.A.-Health Administration                      2

M.H.A.-Health Administration                      3
M.H.P.-Historic Preservation                     2



M.H.P.-Historic Preservation                     1



M.H.P.-Historic Preservation                     3




M.H.S.-Occupational Therapy                      1




M.H.S.-Occupational Therapy                      2




M.H.S.-Occupational Therapy                      3
M.H.S.-Rehabilitation Counseling                 1




M.I.C.M.-International Construction Management   1




M.I.C.M.-International Construction Management   1
M.I.C.M.-International Construction Management   2




M.I.C.M.-International Construction Management   3




M.I.C.M.-International Construction Management   3



M.I.D.-Interior Design                           1



M.I.D.-Interior Design                           1




M.I.D.-Interior Design                           2




M.I.D.-Interior Design                           2




M.I.D.-Interior Design                           3




M.I.D.-Interior Design                           3
M.L.-Latin                      3




M.L.-Latin                      1




M.L.-Latin                      1




M.L.-Latin                      2




M.L.A.-Landscape Architecture   1




M.L.A.-Landscape Architecture   1
M.L.A.-Landscape Architecture   2




M.L.A.-Landscape Architecture   2




M.L.A.-Landscape Architecture   2
M.L.A.-Landscape Architecture   3




M.M.-Music                      1



M.M.-Music                      2



M.M.-Music                      3




M.M.-Music Education            1




M.M.-Music Education            1




M.M.-Music Education            2




M.M.-Music Education            3
M.O.T.-Occupational Therapy   1




M.O.T.-Occupational Therapy   1



M.O.T.-Occupational Therapy   2




M.O.T.-Occupational Therapy   2



M.O.T.-Occupational Therapy   3




M.O.T.-Occupational Therapy   3

M.P.H.-Public Health          1

M.P.H.-Public Health          1

M.P.H.-Public Health          1

M.P.H.-Public Health          1



M.P.H.-Public Health          2



M.P.H.-Public Health          2



M.P.H.-Public Health          2



M.P.H.-Public Health          2
M.P.H.-Public Health         2



M.P.H.-Public Health         2



M.P.H.-Public Health         2



M.P.H.-Public Health         2

M.P.H.-Public Health         3

M.P.H.-Public Health         3

M.P.H.-Public Health         3

M.P.H.-Public Health         3




M.S.-Aerospace Engineering   1
M.S.-Aerospace Engineering                     2
M.S.-Aerospace Engineering                     3



M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   1



M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   1



M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   1



M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   1




M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   2




M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   2




M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   3
M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering    3




M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering    3




M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering    3




M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering    3




M.S.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering    3




M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   1




M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   1




M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   1




M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   1
M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   2




M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   2




M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   2




M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   2



M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   2



M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   2



M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   3




M.S.-Agricultural Education and Communication   3
M.S.-Agronomy   1
M.S.-Agronomy   1




M.S.-Agronomy   1




M.S.-Agronomy   2
M.S.-Agronomy                                2




M.S.-Agronomy                                3



M.S.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   1



M.S.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   1



M.S.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   2



M.S.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   2



M.S.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   3
M.S.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   3




M.S.-Animal Sciences                         1




M.S.-Animal Sciences                         1




M.S.-Animal Sciences                         1




M.S.-Animal Sciences                         2
M.S.-Animal Sciences                      2




M.S.-Animal Sciences                      3




M.S.-Animal Sciences                      3



M.S.-Applied Physiology and Kinesiology   3




M.S.-Applied Physiology and Kinesiology   3



M.S.-Applied Physiology and Kinesiology   2



M.S.-Applied Physiology and Kinesiology   2




M.S.-Applied Physiology and Kinesiology   1




M.S.-Applied Physiology and Kinesiology   1



M.S.-Astronomy                            1
M.S.-Astronomy   2




M.S.-Astronomy   3




M.S.-Astronomy   3




M.S.-Astronomy   3




M.S.-Astronomy   3
M.S.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   1




M.S.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   1




M.S.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   2




M.S.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   2
M.S.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   3




M.S.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   3




M.S.-Biomedical Engineering               1




M.S.-Biomedical Engineering               1




M.S.-Biomedical Engineering               2




M.S.-Biomedical Engineering               2

M.S.-Biomedical Engineering               3




M.S.-Biomedical Engineering               3
M.S.-Biostatistics             1




M.S.-Biostatistics             2




M.S.-Biostatistics             3



M.S.-Botany                    1



M.S.-Botany                    1



M.S.-Botany                    2



M.S.-Botany                    2



M.S.-Botany                    3



M.S.-Botany                    3




M.S.-Business Administration   1
M.S.-Business Administration   2




M.S.-Business Administration   3




M.S.-Chemical Engineering      1




M.S.-Chemical Engineering      1




M.S.-Chemical Engineering      1




M.S.-Chemical Engineering      2




M.S.-Chemical Engineering      3




M.S.-Chemistry                 1




M.S.-Chemistry                 2
M.S.-Chemistry           3




M.S.-Civil Engineering   1
M.S.-Civil Engineering   2




M.S.-Civil Engineering   3
M.S.-Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering   1




M.S.-Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering   2




M.S.-Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering   3

M.S.-Computer and Information Sciences       1
M.S.-Computer and Information Sciences   1



M.S.-Computer and Information Sciences   2



M.S.-Computer and Information Sciences   3
M.S.-Computer and Information Sciences   3

M.S.-Computer Engineering                1



M.S.-Computer Engineering                1



M.S.-Computer Engineering                2



M.S.-Computer Engineering                3
M.S.-Computer Engineering                3




M.S.-Dental Sciences                     1




M.S.-Dental Sciences                     1



M.S.-Dental Sciences                     2
M.S.-Dental Sciences                   2




M.S.-Dental Sciences                   3




M.S.-Dental Sciences                   3

M.S.-Digital Arts and Sciences (DAS)   1



M.S.-Digital Arts and Sciences (DAS)   1



M.S.-Digital Arts and Sciences (DAS)   2



M.S.-Digital Arts and Sciences (DAS)   3
M.S.-Digital Arts and Sciences (DAS)   3
M.S.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   1




M.S.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   2
M.S.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   2



M.S.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   3




M.S.-Entomology and Nematology             1




M.S.-Entomology and Nematology             1




M.S.-Entomology and Nematology             1
M.S.-Entomology and Nematology   1



M.S.-Entomology and Nematology   1




M.S.-Entomology and Nematology   1




M.S.-Entomology and Nematology   2




M.S.-Entomology and Nematology   2




M.S.-Entomology and Nematology   2



M.S.-Entomology and Nematology   3
M.S.-Entomology and Nematology   3




M.S.-Entrepreneurship            1
M.S.-Entrepreneurship   2
M.S.-Entrepreneurship   2
M.S.-Entrepreneurship                     3




M.S.-Environmental Engineering Sciences   1
M.S.-Environmental Engineering Sciences   2




M.S.-Environmental Engineering Sciences   3




M.S.-Epidemiology                         1
M.S.-Epidemiology                           2




M.S.-Epidemiology                           3



M.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   1




M.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   1




M.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   1




M.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   1



M.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   2




M.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   2



M.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   2




M.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   2
M.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   3




M.S.-Family, Youth and Community Sciences   3




M.S.-Finance                                1
M.S.-Finance   2
M.S.-Finance   2
M.S.-Finance                          3




M.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   3
M.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   1




M.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   1




M.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   2




M.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   2




M.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   1
M.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   2




M.S.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   2




M.S.-Food and Resource Economics      1




M.S.-Food and Resource Economics      2
M.S.-Food and Resource Economics        3




M.S.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   1




M.S.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   1




M.S.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   2




M.S.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   2




M.S.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   2




M.S.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   2



M.S.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   3
M.S.-Food Science and Human Nutrition    3




M.S.-Food Science and Human Nutrition    3




M.S.-Forest Resources and Conservation   1




M.S.-Forest Resources and Conservation   1




M.S.-Forest Resources and Conservation   2




M.S.-Forest Resources and Conservation   2



M.S.-Forest Resources and Conservation   3




M.S.-Forest Resources and Conservation   3




M.S.-Geography                           1
M.S.-Geography   2




M.S.-Geography   3




M.S.-Geology     1




M.S.-Geology     1




M.S.-Geology     1




M.S.-Geology     2




M.S.-Geology     2
M.S.-Geology                         3




M.S.-Geology                         3

M.S.-Health Education and Behavior   1



M.S.-Health Education and Behavior   1

M.S.-Health Education and Behavior   2



M.S.-Health Education and Behavior   2

M.S.-Health Education and Behavior   3



M.S.-Health Education and Behavior   3




M.S.-Horticultural Science           1
M.S.-Horticultural Science   2




M.S.-Horticultural Science   3




M.S.-Horticultural Science   1




M.S.-Horticultural Science   1
M.S.-Horticultural Science                2




M.S.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   1
M.S.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   2
M.S.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   3
M.S.-Information Systems and Operations Management   1
M.S.-Information Systems and Operations Management   2
M.S.-Information Systems and Operations Management   2
M.S.-Information Systems and Operations Management   2
M.S.-Information Systems and Operations Management   3




M.S.-Interdisciplinary Ecology                       1
M.S.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   1




M.S.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   1




M.S.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   1




M.S.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   2
M.S.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   2




M.S.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   3




M.S.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   3
M.S.-Management   1
M.S.-Management   2
M.S.-Management                          3




M.S.-Materials Science and Engineering   1




M.S.-Materials Science and Engineering   1
M.S.-Materials Science and Engineering   3




M.S.-Materials Science and Engineering   3




M.S.-Materials Science and Engineering   2




M.S.-Mathematics                         3




M.S.-Mathematics                         2
M.S.-Mathematics              1




M.S.-Mechanical Engineering   1




M.S.-Mechanical Engineering   2
M.S.-Mechanical Engineering   3
M.S.-Medical Sciences   1




M.S.-Medical Sciences   1




M.S.-Medical Sciences   2




M.S.-Medical Sciences   2




M.S.-Medical Sciences   3
M.S.-Medical Sciences                3




M.S.-Microbiology and Cell Science   1




M.S.-Microbiology and Cell Science   1




M.S.-Microbiology and Cell Science   2




M.S.-Microbiology and Cell Science   3
M.S.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   1




M.S.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   1




M.S.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   2




M.S.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   3




M.S.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   3
M.S.-Physics                                1




M.S.-Physics                                2




M.S.-Physics                                3




M.S.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   1




M.S.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   1
M.S.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2




M.S.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2




M.S.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2




M.S.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2




M.S.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2




M.S.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2
M.S.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   3




M.S.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   3




M.S.-Plant Pathology                        1
M.S.-Plant Pathology   1




M.S.-Plant Pathology   2




M.S.-Plant Pathology   2
M.S.-Plant Pathology   2




M.S.-Plant Pathology   3




M.S.-Psychology        1




M.S.-Psychology        1




M.S.-Psychology        2
M.S.-Psychology   2




M.S.-Psychology   3




M.S.-Psychology   3




M.S.-Psychology   2




M.S.-Psychology   2
M.S.-Real Estate   3
M.S.-Real Estate   1
M.S.-Real Estate                      2



M.S.-Recreation, Parks, and Tourism   1



M.S.-Recreation, Parks, and Tourism   1

M.S.-Recreation, Parks, and Tourism   3

M.S.-Recreation, Parks, and Tourism   3



M.S.-Recreation, Parks, and Tourism   3

M.S.-Recreation, Parks, and Tourism   2

M.S.-Recreation, Parks, and Tourism   2
M.S.-Recreation, Parks, and Tourism   1



M.S.-Recreation, Parks, and Tourism   1

M.S.-Recreation, Parks, and Tourism   1




M.S.-Soil and Water Science           1




M.S.-Soil and Water Science           1




M.S.-Soil and Water Science           2
M.S.-Soil and Water Science   2




M.S.-Soil and Water Science   3




M.S.-Soil and Water Science   3
M.S.-Sport Management   1



M.S.-Sport Management   1



M.S.-Sport Management   1



M.S.-Sport Management   1



M.S.-Sport Management   1



M.S.-Sport Management   1

M.S.-Sport Management   1

M.S.-Sport Management   2

M.S.-Sport Management   2



M.S.-Sport Management   2

M.S.-Sport Management   2



M.S.-Sport Management   3



M.S.-Sport Management   3



M.S.-Sport Management   3
M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   1




M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2




M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2




M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2




M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2
M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2




M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2

M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   3




M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   3



M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   1




M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   1




M.S.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   3
M.S.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   1




M.S.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   1




M.S.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   2




M.S.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   2




M.S.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   2




M.S.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   3
M.S.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   3




M.S.-Zoology                             3




M.S.-Zoology                             3



M.S.-Zoology                             1




M.S.-Zoology                             2
M.S.A.S.-Architecture   1




M.S.A.S.-Architecture   2
M.S.A.S.-Architecture            3




M.S.B.C.-Building Construction   1




M.S.B.C.-Building Construction   1




M.S.B.C.-Building Construction   2




M.S.B.C.-Building Construction   3
M.S.Nsg.-Nursing                 1

M.S.Nsg.-Nursing                 2

M.S.Nsg.-Nursing                 3




M.S.P.-Pharmaceutical Sciences   3




M.S.P.-Pharmaceutical Sciences   1




M.S.P.-Pharmaceutical Sciences   1




M.S.P.-Pharmaceutical Sciences   1
M.S.P.-Pharmaceutical Sciences   2




M.S.P.-Pharmaceutical Sciences   2




M.S.Stat.-Statistics             1




M.S.Stat.-Statistics             2




M.S.Stat.-Statistics             3




M.S.T.-Astronomy                 1




M.S.T.-Astronomy                 2
M.S.T.-Astronomy   3



M.S.T.-Botany      1



M.S.T.-Botany      1



M.S.T.-Botany      2



M.S.T.-Botany      2



M.S.T.-Botany      3



M.S.T.-Botany      3




M.S.T.-Chemistry   1




M.S.T.-Chemistry   2




M.S.T.-Chemistry   3
M.S.T.-Geography   1




M.S.T.-Geography   2




M.S.T.-Geography   3




M.S.T.-Geology     1




M.S.T.-Geology     1




M.S.T.-Geology     2
M.S.T.-Geology       2




M.S.T.-Geology       3




M.S.T.-Geology       3
M.S.T.-Mathematics   3
M.S.T.-Mathematics   2
M.S.T.-Mathematics   1




M.S.T.-Physics       1




M.S.T.-Physics       2




M.S.T.-Physics       3
M.S.T.-Zoology       1




M.S.T.-Zoology       2




M.S.T.-Zoology       3




M.S.T.-Zoology       3




M.Stat.-Statistics   1




M.Stat.-Statistics   2
M.Stat.-Statistics                              3




Ph.D.-Aerospace Engineering                     1




Ph.D.-Aerospace Engineering                     2




Ph.D.-Aerospace Engineering                     3



Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   1



Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   1
Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   1




Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   1




Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   2




Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   2




Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   3




Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   3




Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   3




Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering   3
Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering    3




Ph.D.-Agricultural and Biological Engineering    3




Ph.D.-Agricultural Education and Communication   1




Ph.D.-Agricultural Education and Communication   1



Ph.D.-Agricultural Education and Communication   2



Ph.D.-Agricultural Education and Communication   2



Ph.D.-Agricultural Education and Communication   2




Ph.D.-Agricultural Education and Communication   3
Ph.D.-Agronomy   1
Ph.D.-Agronomy   1




Ph.D.-Agronomy   1




Ph.D.-Agronomy   2
Ph.D.-Agronomy                                2




Ph.D.-Agronomy                                3



Ph.D.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   1




Ph.D.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   1



Ph.D.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   2




Ph.D.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   2



Ph.D.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   3
Ph.D.-Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology   3




Ph.D.-Animal Sciences                         1




Ph.D.-Animal Sciences                         1




Ph.D.-Animal Sciences                         1




Ph.D.-Animal Sciences                         2




Ph.D.-Animal Sciences                         2




Ph.D.-Animal Sciences                         3
Ph.D.-Animal Sciences   3




Ph.D.-Anthropology      1




Ph.D.-Anthropology      3
Ph.D.-Anthropology      2




Ph.D.-Art History       1




Ph.D.-Art History       2




Ph.D.-Art History       3
Ph.D.-Astronomy   1




Ph.D.-Astronomy   1



Ph.D.-Astronomy   2



Ph.D.-Astronomy   2




Ph.D.-Astronomy   3




Ph.D.-Astronomy   3




Ph.D.-Astronomy   3
Ph.D.-Astronomy                            3




Ph.D.-Astronomy                            3

Ph.D.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   3

Ph.D.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   3

Ph.D.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   2

Ph.D.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   2

Ph.D.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   1

Ph.D.-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   1




Ph.D.-Biomedical Engineering               1




Ph.D.-Biomedical Engineering               1




Ph.D.-Biomedical Engineering               2




Ph.D.-Biomedical Engineering               2

Ph.D.-Biomedical Engineering               3
Ph.D.-Biomedical Engineering   3




Ph.D.-Biostatistics            1




Ph.D.-Biostatistics            2




Ph.D.-Biostatistics            3



Ph.D.-Botany                   1



Ph.D.-Botany                   1



Ph.D.-Botany                   2



Ph.D.-Botany                   2



Ph.D.-Botany                   3



Ph.D.-Botany                   3
Ph.D.-Business Administration   1
Ph.D.-Business Administration   2
Ph.D.-Business Administration   3



Ph.D.-Chemical Engineering      1



Ph.D.-Chemical Engineering      1



Ph.D.-Chemical Engineering      1



Ph.D.-Chemical Engineering      2




Ph.D.-Chemical Engineering      3
Ph.D.-Chemistry           2




Ph.D.-Chemistry           1




Ph.D.-Chemistry           3




Ph.D.-Civil Engineering   1




Ph.D.-Civil Engineering   2
Ph.D.-Civil Engineering   3




Ph.D.-Classical Studies   3




Ph.D.-Classical Studies   1



Ph.D.-Classical Studies   1




Ph.D.-Classical Studies   2




Ph.D.-Classical Studies   3



Ph.D.-Classical Studies   3



Ph.D.-Classical Studies   3

Ph.D.-Classical Studies   3
Ph.D.-Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering   1




Ph.D.-Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering   2




Ph.D.-Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering   3



Ph.D.-Communication Sciences and Disorders    1




Ph.D.-Communication Sciences and Disorders    1
Ph.D.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   1




Ph.D.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   2




Ph.D.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   2



Ph.D.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   3




Ph.D.-Communication Sciences and Disorders   3

Ph.D.-Computer Engineering                   1




Ph.D.-Computer Engineering                   1




Ph.D.-Computer Engineering                   2



Ph.D.-Computer Engineering                   3

Ph.D.-Computer Engineering                   3




Ph.D.-Counseling Psychology                  1




Ph.D.-Counseling Psychology                  1
Ph.D.-Criminology, Law, and Society   1
Ph.D.-Criminology, Law, and Society      3



Ph.D.-Criminology, Law, and Society      3




Ph.D.-Criminology, Law, and Society      2




Ph.D.-Criminology, Law, and Society      2




Ph.D.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)   1
Ph.D.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)               1




Ph.D.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)               2




Ph.D.-Curriculum and Instruction (ISC)               3




Ph.D.-Design, Construction, and Planning Doctorate   1




Ph.D.-Design, Construction, and Planning Doctorate   2




Ph.D.-Design, Construction, and Planning Doctorate   3
Ph.D.-Economics   1
Ph.D.-Economics   2
Ph.D.-Economics                3




Ph.D.-Educational Leadership   1




Ph.D.-Educational Leadership   2




Ph.D.-Educational Leadership   3
Ph.D.-Educational Leadership                3




Ph.D.-Educational Leadership                2

Ph.D.-Educational Psychology                1

Ph.D.-Educational Psychology                2

Ph.D.-Educational Psychology                3




Ph.D.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   1




Ph.D.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   1
Ph.D.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   2




Ph.D.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   2




Ph.D.-Electrical and Computer Engineering   3



Ph.D.-English                               3




Ph.D.-English                               1




Ph.D.-English                               2
Ph.D.-English                     2



Ph.D.-English                     1




Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   1




Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   1




Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   1




Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   1




Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   1




Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   2
Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   2




Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   2




Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   2




Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   2



Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   3




Ph.D.-Entomology and Nematology   3
Ph.D.-Environmental Engineering Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Environmental Engineering Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Environmental Engineering Sciences   3




Ph.D.-Epidemiology                         2
Ph.D.-Epidemiology   2




Ph.D.-Epidemiology   1




Ph.D.-Epidemiology   1




Ph.D.-Epidemiology   3




Ph.D.-Epidemiology   3
Ph.D.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   3




Ph.D.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   2
Ph.D.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences   2
Ph.D.-Food and Resource Economics   1




Ph.D.-Food and Resource Economics   2
Ph.D.-Food and Resource Economics        3




Ph.D.-Food and Resource Economics        3




Ph.D.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   1




Ph.D.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   1




Ph.D.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   2




Ph.D.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   2



Ph.D.-Food Science and Human Nutrition   3
Ph.D.-Food Science and Human Nutrition    3




Ph.D.-Food Science and Human Nutrition    3




Ph.D.-Food Science and Human Nutrition    2




Ph.D.-Food Science and Human Nutrition    2




Ph.D.-Food Science and Human Nutrition    2




Ph.D.-Forest Resources and Conservation   1




Ph.D.-Forest Resources and Conservation   1
Ph.D.-Forest Resources and Conservation   2




Ph.D.-Forest Resources and Conservation   2



Ph.D.-Forest Resources and Conservation   3




Ph.D.-Forest Resources and Conservation   3




Ph.D.-Genetics and Genomics               1
Ph.D.-Genetics and Genomics   2




Ph.D.-Genetics and Genomics   3




Ph.D.-Genetics and Genomics   1




Ph.D.-Genetics and Genomics   2




Ph.D.-Genetics and Genomics   3
Ph.D.-Geography   1




Ph.D.-Geography   2




Ph.D.-Geography   3




Ph.D.-Geology     1




Ph.D.-Geology     1




Ph.D.-Geology     1
Ph.D.-Geology   2




Ph.D.-Geology   2




Ph.D.-Geology   3




Ph.D.-Geology   3




Ph.D.-Geology   3




Ph.D.-German    1




Ph.D.-German    2
Ph.D.-German                         3




Ph.D.-Health and Human Performance   1




Ph.D.-Health and Human Performance   1



Ph.D.-Health and Human Performance   2



Ph.D.-Health and Human Performance   2




Ph.D.-Health and Human Performance   2



Ph.D.-Health and Human Performance   3




Ph.D.-Health Services Research       1



Ph.D.-Health Services Research       1




Ph.D.-Health Services Research       2
Ph.D.-Health Services Research          3




Ph.D.-Higher Education Administration   1
Ph.D.-Higher Education Administration   1
Ph.D.-Higher Education Administration   2
Ph.D.-Higher Education Administration   2
Ph.D.-Higher Education Administration   2




Ph.D.-Higher Education Administration   3
Ph.D.-History                 1




Ph.D.-History                 2




Ph.D.-History                 3




Ph.D.-History                 2




Ph.D.-Horticultural Science   1




Ph.D.-Horticultural Science   2
Ph.D.-Horticultural Science   3




Ph.D.-Horticultural Science   1




Ph.D.-Horticultural Science   1




Ph.D.-Horticultural Science   2
Ph.D.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   1
Ph.D.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   2
Ph.D.-Industrial and Systems Engineering   3




Ph.D.-Interdisciplinary Ecology            1




Ph.D.-Interdisciplinary Ecology            1
Ph.D.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   1




Ph.D.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   1




Ph.D.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   2




Ph.D.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   2
Ph.D.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   3




Ph.D.-Interdisciplinary Ecology   3




Ph.D.-Linguistics                 1




Ph.D.-Linguistics                 2



Ph.D.-Linguistics                 3
Ph.D.-Marriage and Family Counseling   1




Ph.D.-Marriage and Family Counseling   2
Ph.D.-Marriage and Family Counseling   3




Ph.D.-Mass Communication               1




Ph.D.-Mass Communication               1




Ph.D.-Mass Communication               2




Ph.D.-Mass Communication               2
Ph.D.-Mass Communication                  3




Ph.D.-Mass Communication                  3




Ph.D.-Materials Science and Engineering   1




Ph.D.-Materials Science and Engineering   1




Ph.D.-Materials Science and Engineering   2




Ph.D.-Materials Science and Engineering   3
Ph.D.-Materials Science and Engineering   3




Ph.D.-Mathematics                         1




Ph.D.-Mathematics                         2




Ph.D.-Mathematics                         3




Ph.D.-Mechanical Engineering              1
Ph.D.-Mechanical Engineering   2




Ph.D.-Mechanical Engineering   3




Ph.D.-Medical Sciences         1
Ph.D.-Medical Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Medical Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Medical Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Medical Sciences   3




Ph.D.-Medical Sciences   3
Ph.D.-Mental Health Counseling   1




Ph.D.-Mental Health Counseling   2
Ph.D.-Mental Health Counseling        3




Ph.D.-Microbiology and Cell Science   1




Ph.D.-Microbiology and Cell Science   1




Ph.D.-Microbiology and Cell Science   2
Ph.D.-Microbiology and Cell Science   2




Ph.D.-Microbiology and Cell Science   3




Ph.D.-Music                           1




Ph.D.-Music                           2




Ph.D.-Music                           3




Ph.D.-Music Education                 1
Ph.D.-Music Education                2




Ph.D.-Music Education                3




Ph.D.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   3
Ph.D.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   3




Ph.D.-Nuclear Engineering Sciences   3




Ph.D.-Nursing Sciences               1



Ph.D.-Nursing Sciences               2




Ph.D.-Nursing Sciences               3
Ph.D.-Nutritional Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Nutritional Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Nutritional Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Nutritional Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Nutritional Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Nutritional Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Nutritional Sciences   2



Ph.D.-Nutritional Sciences   3
Ph.D.-Nutritional Sciences      3




Ph.D.-Nutritional Sciences      3




Ph.D.-Pharmaceutical Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Pharmaceutical Sciences   1




Ph.D.-Pharmaceutical Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Pharmaceutical Sciences   3
Ph.D.-Philosophy   1




Ph.D.-Philosophy   2




Ph.D.-Philosophy   2
Ph.D.-Philosophy   3




Ph.D.-Philosophy   3




Ph.D.-Physics      1




Ph.D.-Physics      2
Ph.D.-Physics                                3




Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   1




Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   1




Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2




Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2
Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   3




Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   3




Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2




Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2
Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   1




Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   1




Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2




Ph.D.-Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology   2
Ph.D.-Plant Pathology   1




Ph.D.-Plant Pathology   1
Ph.D.-Plant Pathology   2




Ph.D.-Plant Pathology   2




Ph.D.-Plant Pathology   2
Ph.D.-Plant Pathology     3




Ph.D.-Political Science   1



Ph.D.-Political Science   2




Ph.D.-Political Science   3




Ph.D.-Psychology          1
Ph.D.-Psychology   1




Ph.D.-Psychology   2




Ph.D.-Psychology   2




Ph.D.-Psychology   2




Ph.D.-Psychology   2




Ph.D.-Psychology   2




Ph.D.-Psychology   2




Ph.D.-Psychology   3




Ph.D.-Psychology   3
Ph.D.-Psychology            3




Ph.D.-Psychology            3




Ph.D.-Public Health (PhD)   1




Ph.D.-Public Health (PhD)   1




Ph.D.-Public Health (PhD)   1




Ph.D.-Public Health (PhD)   1




Ph.D.-Public Health (PhD)   2




Ph.D.-Public Health (PhD)   3
Ph.D.-Public Health (PhD)      3




Ph.D.-Public Health (PhD)      3




Ph.D.-Rehabilitation Science   1




Ph.D.-Rehabilitation Science   1




Ph.D.-Rehabilitation Science   2



Ph.D.-Rehabilitation Science   2




Ph.D.-Rehabilitation Science   2




Ph.D.-Rehabilitation Science   3




Ph.D.-Rehabilitation Science   3
Ph.D.-Religion   1




Ph.D.-Religion   1




Ph.D.-Religion   1




Ph.D.-Religion   1




Ph.D.-Religion   2




Ph.D.-Religion   2




Ph.D.-Religion   2
Ph.D.-Religion                              3




Ph.D.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   1




Ph.D.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   2




Ph.D.-Research and Evaluation Methodology   3




Ph.D.-Romance Languages                     1
Ph.D.-Romance Languages                2




Ph.D.-Romance Languages                3




Ph.D.-School Counseling and Guidance   1




Ph.D.-School Counseling and Guidance   2
Ph.D.-School Counseling and Guidance   3




Ph.D.-School Psychology                1




Ph.D.-School Psychology                2



Ph.D.-School Psychology                2




Ph.D.-School Psychology                2




Ph.D.-School Psychology                3



Ph.D.-Sociology                        1



Ph.D.-Sociology                        1
Ph.D.-Sociology                1



Ph.D.-Sociology                2



Ph.D.-Sociology                2



Ph.D.-Sociology                3



Ph.D.-Sociology                3




Ph.D.-Sociology                3




Ph.D.-Sociology                3




Ph.D.-Soil and Water Science   1




Ph.D.-Soil and Water Science   2
Ph.D.-Soil and Water Science   3




Ph.D.-Special Education        1



Ph.D.-Special Education        2




Ph.D.-Special Education        3




Ph.D.-Statistics               1
Ph.D.-Statistics                    2




Ph.D.-Statistics                    3




Ph.D.-Statistics                    2




Ph.D.-Statistics                    2




Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   1
Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2




Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2



Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences   2
Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences         1

Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences         3




Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences         3




Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences         1




Ph.D.-Veterinary Medical Sciences         3




Ph.D.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   1
Ph.D.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   1




Ph.D.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   2




Ph.D.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   2




Ph.D.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   3
Ph.D.-Wildlife Ecology and Conservation   3




Ph.D.-Zoology                             1




Ph.D.-Zoology                             2




Ph.D.-Zoology                             2




Ph.D.-Zoology                             3
Student Learning Outcome                                               Degree Delivery Type

Graduates of this program will demonstrate an advanced understanding
of the acoustic, anatomical, psychological, developmental and social
aspects of normal and disordered hearing.                            Campus

Graduates of this program will demonstrate an advanced understanding
of the acoustic, anatomical, psychological, developmental and social
aspects of normal and disordered hearing.                            Campus

Graduates of this program will demonstrate an advanced understanding
of the acoustic, anatomical, psychological, developmental and social
aspects of normal and disordered hearing.                            Campus


Graduates of this program will demonstrate an advanced understanding
of the acoustic, anatomical, psychological, developmental and social
aspects of normal and disordered hearing.                            Distance


Graduates of this program will demonstrate an advanced understanding
of the acoustic, anatomical, psychological, developmental and social
aspects of normal and disordered hearing.                            Distance


Graduates of this program will demonstrate an advanced understanding
of the acoustic, anatomical, psychological, developmental and social
aspects of normal and disordered hearing.                            Distance




Graduates of this program will deomnstrate knowledge of the range of
appropriate management steps for persons with hearing and balance
disorders and the methods for determining the effectiveness of each.   Both




Graduates of this program will deomnstrate knowledge of the range of
appropriate management steps for persons with hearing and balance
disorders and the methods for determining the effectiveness of each.   Both
Graduates of this program will deomnstrate knowledge of the range of
appropriate management steps for persons with hearing and balance
disorders and the methods for determining the effectiveness of each.       Both


Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to obtain
accurate information about hearing and balance function, including via
case history interview, and through the appropriate selection and
completion of behavioral, electrophysiologic and psychosocial
assessments.                                                               Both


Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to obtain
accurate information about hearing and balance function, including via
case history interview, and through the appropriate selection and
completion of behavioral, electrophysiologic and psychosocial
assessments.                                                               Both


Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to obtain
accurate information about hearing and balance function, including via
case history interview, and through the appropriate selection and
completion of behavioral, electrophysiologic and psychosocial
assessments.                                                               Both




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to apply clinical
decision making and problem-solving skills in a clinical audiology context. Distance
Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to apply clinical
decision making and problem-solving skills in a clinical audiology context. Distance




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to apply clinical
decision making and problem-solving skills in a clinical audiology context. Distance




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to apply clinical
decision making and problem-solving skills in a clinical audiology context. Campus




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to apply clinical
decision making and problem-solving skills in a clinical audiology context. Campus




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to apply clinical
decision making and problem-solving skills in a clinical audiology context. Campus




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to critically
evaluate research relevant to audiologic practice.                         Both
Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to critically
evaluate research relevant to audiologic practice.                      Both




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to critically
evaluate research relevant to audiologic practice.                      Both




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to critically
evaluate research relevant to audiologic practice.                      Campus




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to critically
evaluate research relevant to audiologic practice.                      Campus




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to critically
evaluate research relevant to audiologic practice.                      Campus




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to communicate
critical clinically relevant information verbally or in writing.        Distance




Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to communicate
critical clinically relevant information verbally or in writing.        Distance
Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to communicate
critical clinically relevant information verbally or in writing.         Distance


Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to communicate
critical clinically relevant information verbally or in writing.         Campus


Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to communicate
critical clinically relevant information verbally or in writing.         Campus


Graduates of this program will demonstrate the ability to communicate
critical clinically relevant information verbally or in writing.         Campus
Program has no enrollment and is under review - both the UG and
graduate portions need to remain but the code listing the combined
degree needs to be studied                                               NULL




Students will master the subject matter and concepts related to the
prevention, diagnosis and management of plant health problems of all
types.                                                                   Campus




Students will integrate the subject matter and concepts learned during
their program of study to solve plant health problems.                   Campus
Students will exhibit professionalism in the practice of plant medicine by
maintaining client confidentiality, keeping up to date on plant health
management practices through continuing education and seeking the
assistance of their colleagues when necessary.                             Campus




The student will demonstrate conceptual and practical competence and
critical stances in theory, pedagogy, and research.                  Both




The student will present results of research about resolving context-
based problems of practice in written and oral format.                   Both




The student will disseminate and/or demonstrate professional
knowledge in formal and informal settings about best curricular and
pedagogical practices.                                                   Both




The student will demonstrate conceptual and practical competence and
critical stances in theory, pedagogy, and research.                  Both
The student will present results of research about resolving context-
based problems of practice in written and oral format.                     Both




The student will disseminate and/or demonstrate professional
knowledge in formal and informal settings about best curricular and
pedagogical practices.                                                     Both

Students will demonstrate advanced levels of knowledge of the core
curricular areas of educational leadership including: school finance and
law; human resources; technology; data-driven decision-making,
diversity; organizational theory, supervision and strategic planning.      Both




Demonstrates advanced levels of skill in the core areas of educational
leadership and dissertation research.                                      Both




Candidates will demonstrate ethical behavior, professional conduct and
communication.                                                         Both


Successful demonstration of competencies and skills of instructional
leadership, operational leadership, and school leadership by applying
knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students.              Both


Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who
have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by
understanding the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural
issues.                                                                  Both

Program termination form submitted for approval.                           Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                           Campus
Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus




To develop an understanding of: • the role of higher education is
society • the broad sector of higher education at a national, state,
regional, and institutional level • the institutional functioning of higher
education institutions including issues related to leadership and
governance, funding, the role of the government as well as issues
pertaining to students, faculty, and administrators • major global and
national trends affecting higher education                                  Campus
To acquire a working knowledge of: • the literature in the field of higher
education • qualitative and quantitative research methodologies
applied to the study of higher education                                   Campus
• To develop an ability to relate and apply major concepts and theories
in the literature to specific higher education issues, cases and settings •
To develop skills of analysis, synthesis, research, and communication
(verbal and written) concerning issues and topics related to higher
education • To write academically according to APA style and to other
audiences effectively • To develop problem solving skills • To develop
self-reflection skills related to how sociologically and culturally
constructed understandings may influence students’ viewpoints • To
display leadership skills, self-direction, independence, self-initiative and
creativity • To demonstrate professionalism, maturity, and
dependability • To demonstrate teamwork and interpersonal skills             Campus




• To display ethical behaviors according to professional standards
related to research and publishing and practice • To demonstrate
cultural sensitivity, awareness, and empathy • To abide to the
expectations and norms of the discipline and profession                   Campus
Common core curricular experiences and demonstrated knowledge in
each of the eight common core curricular areas are required of all
students in the program.                                               Campus




Professional practice, which includes practicum and internship, provides
for the application of theory and the development of counseling skills
under supervision. These experiences will provide opportunities for
students to counsel clients who represent the ethnic and demographic
diversity of their community.                                            Campus
1. PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION AND ETHICAL PRACTICE—studies that
provide an understanding of all of the following aspects of professional
functioning a. history and philosophy of the counseling profession; b.
professional roles, functions, and relationships with other human service
providers, including strategies for interagency/interorganization
collaboration and communications c. counselors’ roles and
responsibilities as members of an interdisciplinary emergency
management response team during a local, regional, or national crisis,
disaster or other trauma-causing event; d. self-care strategies
appropriate to the counselor role; e. counseling supervision models,
practices, and processes; f. professional organizations, including
membership benefits, activities, services to members, and current
issues; g. professional credentialing, including certification, licensure,
and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public
policy on these issues; h. the role and process of the professional
counselor advocating on behalf of the profession; i. advocacy
processes needed to address institutional and social barriers that
impede access, equity, and success for clients; and j. ethical standards
of professional organizations and credentialing bodies, and applications
of ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling             Campus




Common core curricular experiences and demonstrated knowledge in
each of the eight common core                                            Campus
Professional practice, which includes practicum and internship, provides
for the application of theory and the development of counseling skills
under supervision. These experiences will provide opportunities for
students to counsel clients who represent the ethnic and demographic
diversity of their community.                                              Campus
1. PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION AND ETHICAL PRACTICE—studies that
provide an understanding of all of the following aspects of professional
functioning a. history and philosophy of the counseling profession; b.
professional roles, functions, and relationships with other human service
providers, including strategies for interagency/interorganization
collaboration and communications c. counselors’ roles and
responsibilities as members of an interdisciplinary emergency
management response team during a local, regional, or national crisis,
disaster or other trauma-causing event; d. self-care strategies
appropriate to the counselor role; e. counseling supervision models,
practices, and processes; f. professional organizations, including
membership benefits, activities, services to members, and current
issues; g. professional credentialing, including certification, licensure,
and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public
policy on these issues; h. the role and process of the professional
counselor advocating on behalf of the profession; i. advocacy
processes needed to address institutional and social barriers that
impede access, equity, and success for clients; and j. ethical standards
of professional organizations and credentialing bodies, and applications
of ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling             Campus


Majors will achieve a thorough understanding of the concepts, methods
and issues in educational measurement and assessment, evaluation, and
research methodology.                                                 Campus
Majors will apply their understanding of the research process by
formulating hypotheses, planning and designing educational research
studies, planning and designing methodological research studies,
analyzing data, and reporting results.                                     Campus




Majors will participate in professional organizations, research
presentations, or scholarly publications.                                  Campus




Candidates demonstrate professional knowledge in each of the eight
common core curricular areas and at least one specialty area within the
counselor education context.                                            Campus




Candidates demonstrate proficiency in counselor education and
supervision skills by developing a personal philosophy of teaching and
learning; course design, delivery, and evaluation methods appropriate to
course objectives; and by assessing the needs of counselors in training
and developing techniques to help candidates develop into competent
counselors.                                                              Campus


Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in the field of
counselor education and supervision by engaging in: (a) professional
organizations, including membership benefits, activities, services to
members, and current issues; (b) professional credentialing, including
certification, licensure, and accreditation practices and standards, and
the effects of public policy on these issues; (c) ethical standards of
professional organizations and credentialing bodies, and applications of
ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling.               Campus
Candidates will demonstrate knowledge of core school psychology
content areas including: psychological foundations, assessment,
consultation, academic and behavioral interventions, counseling,
professional and ethical standards.                                       Campus




Candidates will demonstrate proficiency in using psychological
assessment results to design, implement, and evaluate an empirically
validated intervention.                                                   Campus

Candidates will demonstrate proficiency to present orally and in writing
the results and applications of their research and scholarship.          Campus

Candidates will demonstrate professional behaviors and attitudes
consistent with School Psychology professional standards and ethical
principals including: effective communication and interpersonal skills,
respect for diversity and individual differences, and responsive to
supervisory feedback.                                                     Campus

Candidates will demonstrate advanced levels of knowledge in the
following core areas: (a) trends and issues in Special Education and their
relationship to practice, policy, and research; (b) acquisition,
organization, and interpretation of information about research in Special
Education; c) identification of research questions and methodology
emanating from different knowledge paradigms; and, (d) critique of
Special Education research and practice from various knowledge
paradigms.                                                                 Campus
Candidates will attain the technical knowledge and skills to become
independent scholars capable of conducting research and evaluating
educational programs, products, and practices.                             Campus




Candidates will give a presentation to other professionals or submit a
paper for publication based on a research project.                        Campus




The student will demonstrate breadth of knowledge of content,
methods, and contexts of schooling and education.                         Both
The student will utilize expertise developed in an area of specialization
to pursue an original and significant inquiry or research question.         Both




The student will demonstrate an inquiry stance to improving teaching
and on-going professional learning that can be shared with other
professionals.                                                              Both

Candidates will demonstrate knowledge of the core curricular areas of
educational leadership including: school finance and law, human
resources, technology, data-driven decision-making, diversity,
organizational theory, supervision and strategic planning.                  Campus


Candidates will demonstrate advanced levels of skill in the core areas of
educational leadership.                                                   Campus




Candidates will demonstrate ethical behavior, professional conduct and
communication.                                                         Campus

Candidates will successfully demonstrate competencies and skills of
instructional leadership, operational leadership and school leadership by
applying knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students.    Campus
Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who
have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by
understanding the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural
issues.                                                                  Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus
Not actively admitting students.                                          Campus
Not actively admitting students.                                          Campus
Not actively admitting students.                                          Campus




Candidates demonstrate professional knowledge to address a wide
variety of issues in the context of relationships and families.           Campus




Candidates demonstrate proficiency in marriage and family counseling
skills by applying ethical and legal standards in marriage, couple, and
family counseling and demonstrating their ability to select models or
techniques appropriate to couples’ or families’ presenting problems.      Campus
Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in marriage and
family counseling by engaging in: (a) professional organizations,
including membership benefits, activities, services to members, and
current issues; (b) professional credentialing, including certification,
licensure, and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of
public policy on these issues; (c) ethical standards of professional
organizations and credentialing bodies, and applications of ethical and
legal considerations in professional counseling.                              Campus




Candidates will demonstrate the professional knowledge to address a
wide variety of circumstances within the clinical mental health
counseling context.                                                           Campus




Candidates demonstrate proficiency in counseling skills by applying
principles and practices of diagnosis, treatment, referral, and prevention
of mental and emotional disorders to initiate, maintain, and terminate
counseling. Candidates also apply multicultural competencies to clinical
mental health counseling involving case conceptualization, diagnosis,
treatment, referral, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders. Campus

Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in mental health
counseling by engaging in: (a) professional organizations, including
membership benefits, activities, services to members, and current
issues; (b) professional credentialing, including certification, licensure,
and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public
policy on these issues; (c) ethical standards of professional organizations
and credentialing bodies, and applications of ethical and legal
considerations in professional counseling.                                    Campus
Program termination form in process.                                          Campus
Program termination form in process.                                          Campus
Program termination form in process.                                          Campus
Candidates demonstrate professional knowledge to address a wide
variety of circumstances within the school counseling field.               Campus




Candidates demonstrate proficiency in school counseling skills by
demonstrating the ability to apply and adhere to ethical and legal
standards in school counseling and the ability to articulate, model, and
advocate for an appropriate school counselor identity and program.         Campus

Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in school counseling
by engaging in: (a) professional organizations, including membership
benefits, activities, services to members, and current issues; (b)
professional credentialing, including certification, licensure, and
accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public policy on
these issues; (c) ethical standards of professional organizations and
credentialing bodies, and applications of ethical and legal considerations
in professional counseling.                                                Campus




Candidates will demonstrate knowledge of core school psychology
content areas including: psychological foundations, assessment,
consultation, academic and behavioral interventions, counseling,
professional and ethical standards.                                        Campus




Candidates will demonstrate proficiency in using psychological
assessment results to design, implement, and evaluate an empirically
validated intervention.                                                    Campus
Candidates will demonstrate professional behaviors and attitudes
consistent with School Psychology professional standards and ethical
principals including: effective communication and interpersonal skills,
respect for diversity and individual differences, and responsive to
supervisory feedback.                                                        Campus




Program participants will demonstrate knowledge of effective academic
and behavioral interventions for students with disabilities and other
learning differences                                                  Both




Program participants will demonstrate knowledge of an area of study
within the field of special education (e.g. reading; transition; behavior)   Both




Program participants will use a variety of techniques/tools to determine
academic and behavioral needs of students with disabilities and other
learning differences.                                                    Both
Program participants will demonstrate ability to use professional
literature to discuss current issues in special education.              Both




Program participants will demonstrate leadership and professional
growth through involvement in collaborative (e.g. consultation;
coteaching), participatory (e.g. attending professional conferences),
and/or leadership activities (e.g. conducting school/district level
inservice, conference presentations, mentoring a new teacher).          Both
Program termination form in process.                                    Campus
Program termination form in process.                                    Campus
Program termination form in process.                                    Campus
Program under review for closure                                        NULL
Program under review for closure                                        NULL




Ability to identify a problem.                                          Campus




Ability to formulate a problem.                                         Campus


An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice at an advanced level.                Campus




Ability to solve engineering problems.                                  Campus




An ability to communicate effectively.                                  Campus
Ability to identify, formulate, and solve computer science and
engineering problems.                                                   Campus
Ability to critically read computer science and engineering literature.    Campus

Ability to use techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computer
science and engineering practice at an advanced level.                     Campus


Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.                  Campus
Ability to communicate effectively.                                        Campus
Degree will be canceled, N/A                                               Campus
Degree will be canceled, N/A                                               Campus
Degree will be canceled, N/A                                               Campus




Students demonstrate knowledge of the subject matter related to their
discipline.                                                                Campus




Students demonstrate knowledge of the subject matter related to their
discipline.                                                                Campus
Students demonstrate knowledge of the subject matter related to their
discipline.                                                                Distance

Students are able to articulate orally and/or in writing the results and
application of their results.                                              Distance

Students think critically about the emerging aspects of environmental
science and engineering.                                                   Campus


Students think critically about the emerging aspects of environmental
science and engineering.                                                   Distance


Students will exhibit professional conduct and ethics throughout their
program of study.                                                          Campus
Students will exhibit professional conduct and ethics throughout their
program of study.                                                          Distance
Students will exhibit professional conduct and ethics throughout their
program of study.                                                          Distance
Each student must develop significant expertise in a selected area of
applied research focus.                                                 Campus
Students should be proficient in independent applied research on
applications in operations research and industrial engineering.    Campus
Students should be prepared for a career in industry or a government
agency. Students should be able to provide contributions of value to
these professional organizations and should be well prepared for lifelong
service to the Industrial and Systems Engineering community.                Campus
no enrollment, under review for closure                                     NULL
Program under review for closure                                            NULL
Program under review for closure                                            NULL




Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the fundamental rules, policies and issues relevant to
U.S. law.                                                               Campus




Students will demonstrate the ability to conduct and apply legal research
and scholarship.                                                          Campus
Students will demonstrate awareness and comprehension of the ethical
rules and professional responsibilities applicable to U.S. lawyers.  Campus




Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the funamental rules, policies and issue relevant to
environmental and/or land use law.                                      Campus




Students will demonstrate the ability to conduct and apply
environmental and/or land use research and scholarship.                 Campus




Students will participate in the Environmental Capstone Colloquium, the
successful completion of which requires students to demonstrate
awareness and comprehension of the ethical rules and professional
responsibilities applicable to environmental and land use lawyers.      Campus




Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the fundamental rules, policies and issues relevant to
international taxation.                                                 Campus
Students will demonstrate the ability to conduct and apply international
tax research and scholarship.                                            Campus




Students will demonstrate awareness and comprehension of the ethical
rules and professional responsibilities applicable to international tax
lawyers.                                                                Campus




Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the fundamental rules, policies and issues relevant to
taxation.                                                               Campus




Students will demonstrate the ability to conduct and apply tax
scholarship.                                                           Campus




Students will demonstrate awareness and comprehension of the ethical
rules and professional responsibilities applicable to tax lawyers.   Campus




Demonstrate thorough understanding of the foundational concepts of
the discipline of Anthropology and its subfields.                      Campus
Demonstration of mastery of professional communication through the
preparation of a publication quality paper.                                  Campus
Complete coursework in research methods.                                     Campus
No enrollment, program is under reveiw for closure.                          NULL


Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject
matter relevant to the discipline, including art education theory and
practice and historical and contemporary trends in art education             Both


Demonstrate a thorough understanding of and comprehension of
traditional and current research methods in art education.                   Both

Demonstrate proficiency in the use of art tools and media.                   Both

Students will display conduct and communication appropriate for a
classroom art teacher.                                                       Both

Broaden the knowledge of historical and contemporary art and the
understanding of the theoretical, cultural and historical contexts of art
through researching, speaking, and writing on advanced levels.               Campus

Master processes of generating and solving problems in art history
writing; analyze, interpret and question traditional methodologies and of
art and art making on an advanced level.                                  Campus

Master advance knowledge, theories, and concepts about art history;
acquire the ability to develop a research topic in a specific field of art
history.                                                                     Campus

Master and understanding of what it means to be a professional art
historian; develop an advanced understanding of the demands and
expectations of the art history profession and art history field.            Campus

Graduate students are not directly admitted to this degree program.
Instead, this degree is available for faulty to confer on Ph.D. students
who 1) choose to not continue with their doctoral studies beyond the
qualifying exams, or 2) choose to not complete a dissertation. This
degree is conferred at a rate of one to two every five years.                Campus
Graduate students are not directly admitted to this degree program.
Instead, this degree is available for faulty to confer on Ph.D. students
who 1) choose to not continue with their doctoral studies beyond the
qualifying exams, or 2) choose to not complete a dissertation. This
degree is conferred at a rate of one to two every five years.              Campus

Graduate students are not directly admitted to this degree program.
Instead, this degree is available for faulty to confer on Ph.D. students
who 1) choose to not continue with their doctoral studies beyond the
qualifying exams, or 2) choose to not complete a dissertation. This
degree is conferred at a rate of one to two every five years.              Campus




Students will have an advanced proficiency in Greek.                       Campus




Students will have an advanced proficiency in Latin.                       Campus




Students will be able to construct an argument, evaluate evidence, and
justify conclusions.                                                       Campus




Students will be able to critique a scholarly argument and to present a
compelling alternative explanation or interpretation of the evidence.      Campus




Students will exhibit and maintain professional behavior and conduct as
teaching assistants in the department's undergraduate courses.          Campus




Students will present original scholarship to an outside audience.         Campus
Students will demonstrate knowledge of speech, language, hearing, and
swallowing processes, including their biological, neurological, acoustic,
psychological, developmental, linguistic, and cultural bases.             Campus

Students will demonstrate knowledge of the principles and methods of
prevention, assessment, and intervention for people with
communication and swallowing disorders, including consideration of
anatomical/physiological, psychological, developmental, social, linguistic
and cultural correlates of the disorders.                                  Campus

Students will demonstrate knowledge of the principles and methods of
prevention, assessment, and intervention for people with
communication and swallowing disorders, including consideration of
anatomical/physiological, psychological, developmental, social, linguistic
and cultural correlates of the disorders.                                  Campus


Students will demonstrate clinical skills needed to assess and diagnose
speech, language and swallowing disorders.                                Campus


Students will demonstrate clinical skills needed to provide efficacious
and appropriate intervention for individuals with speech, language, and
swallowing disorders.                                                     Campus


Students will demonstrate knowledge and performance of legal and
ethical behaviors in all interactions with clients/patients and their
families/caregivers, as well as with other professionals.                 Campus


Students will demonstrate knowledge and performance of legal and
ethical behaviors in all interactions with clients/patients and their
families/caregivers, as well as with other professionals.                 Campus

Students will demonstrate knowledge and performance of effective
communication, counseling, and collaboration with clients/patients and
relevant others, recognizing the needs, values, preferred mode of
communication, and cultural/linguistic background of the client/patient,
family, caregivers, and relevant others                                  Campus
(1) Demonstrate broad understanding and application of criminological
and law and society theories (2) Demonstrate broad understanding and
application of criminological and law and society research methods    Campus

(1) Demonstrate advanced competencies in conducting independent
empirical research with scientific integrity (2) Demonstrate advanced
competencies in applying substantive criminological and law and society
knowledge in critical thinking, analysis, and communication             Campus

(1) Demonstrate advanced competencies in conducting independent
empirical research with scientific integrity (2) Demonstrate advanced
competencies in applying substantive criminological and law and society
knowledge in critical thinking, analysis, and communication             Campus




(1) Demonstrate broad understanding and application of professional
ethics (2) Demonstrate broad understanding and application of the role
of the professional criminologist                                      Campus

1. Deepen and broaden knowledge of Digital Arts & Sciences (DAS) as
sociotechnical academic domain, and understand the transdisciplinary
foundations of DAS design, inquiry and expression. 2. Achieve a
professional level understanding of the principles involved in the
creation of interactive digital media artifacts.                       Campus

Demonstrate problem-solving and systems thinking skills necessary to
develop advanced media systems; Master collaboration skills necessary
for working in cross-functional design and development teams.         Campus
Mastery of the professional behaviors and disposition required in the
advanced Digital Arts and Sciences; Develop an understanding of the
demands of comportment requisite for an advanced DAS professional or
scholar.                                                              Campus
Graduate students are not directly admitted to this degree program.
Instead, this degree is available for faulty to confer on Ph.D. students
who 1) choose to not continue with their doctoral studies beyond the
qualifying exams, or 2) choose to not complete a dissertation. This
degree is conferred at a rate of one to two every five years.              Campus

Graduate students are not directly admitted to this degree program.
Instead, this degree is available for faulty to confer on Ph.D. students
who 1) choose to not continue with their doctoral studies beyond the
qualifying exams, or 2) choose to not complete a dissertation. This
degree is conferred at a rate of one to two every five years.              Campus

Graduate students are not directly admitted to this degree program.
Instead, this degree is available for faulty to confer on Ph.D. students
who 1) choose to not continue with their doctoral studies beyond the
qualifying exams, or 2) choose to not complete a dissertation. This
degree is conferred at a rate of one to two every five years.              Campus




Students have appropriate knowledge of their field.                        Campus




Students can teach an entry level college writing course                   Campus

Students are able to engage in professional activity at an MA level such
that their accomplishments will be competitive with their peers
continuing to PhD level work.                                              Campus
Students are able to formulate and complete a project that makes a
contribution to knowledge at the MA level.                                 Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of the core
areas of French and Francophone linguistic and/or literary studies for the
MA, as agreed upon by the faculty of the department.                       Campus

Literary/Cultural Studies: Demonstrate the ability to analyze and
interpret French and Francophone literary and cultural products, apply
results to broader context and engage in academic discourse via writing
and oral presentation.                                                  Campus
French and Francophone Linguistics: Demonstrate the ability to analyze
and interpret French and Francophone language and language-related
data, apply results to broader context and engage in academic discourse
via writing and oral presentation.                                      Campus




Display knowledge of ethical human data collection, professional
conduct and ethical academic writing skills (as established by Linguistic
Society of America Ethics Statement and/or Modern Language
Association).                                                                Campus




Students know the subject matter related to their discipline.                Campus




Student's think critically about the emerging science in their discipline.   Campus
Students will submit abstracts and give presentations/posters at
regional, state & national conferences. Students will exhibit
professional behavior and ethical practice during the conduct of their
research.                                                                    Campus




 Display knowledge of ethical human data collection, professional
conduct and ethical academic writing skills (as established by the
Modern Language Association).                                        Campus
Knowledge: SLO Stated in Measurable Terms: Demonstrate a thorough
understanding and comprehension of the core areas of German literary
and cultural studies for the MA as agreed upon by the faculty of the
department.                                                          Campus


Literary/Cultural Studies: Demonstrate the ability to analyze and
interpret German literary and cultural products, apply results to broader
context and engage in academic discourse via writing and oral
presentation                                                              Campus
Literary/Cultural Studies: Demonstrate the ability to analyze and
interpret German literary and cultural products, apply results to broader
context and engage in academic discourse via writing and oral
presentation.                                                             Campus

Students will demonstrate basic knowledge of major issues in the history
of the United States, Europe, Africa, or Latin America.                  Campus




Students will be prepared to pursue advanced graduate study and
research.                                                               Campus




Students are able to compile and analyze historical evidence.           Campus
Demonstrate ability to critically analyze and question knowledge claims
in a specialized industry, specifically to analyze the nature of competition
and macro-environmental changes, and the effect of these elements to
evaluate claims in a specialized industry.                                   Campus
Possess a global perspective on business, specifically to apply knowledge
of strategies used for the multinational corporation to analyze and make
recommendations for future growth and direction and apply cultural
awareness and intercultural skills to adapt, innovate, and solve problems
in unfamiliar environments.                                               Campus
Possess a global perspective on business, specifically to apply knowledge
of strategies used for the multinational corporation to analyze and make
recommendations for future growth and direction and apply cultural
awareness and intercultural skills to adapt, innovate, and solve problems
in unfamiliar environments.                                               Campus
Possess effective communication skills, specifically to write business
documents clearly, concisely, and analytically, speak in groups and in
public clearly, concisely, and analytically, with appropriate use of visual
aids, and demonstrate ability in languages other than English.                Campus
Possess effective communication skills, specifically to write business
documents clearly, concisely, and analytically, speak in groups and in
public clearly, concisely, and analytically, with appropriate use of visual
aids, and demonstrate ability in languages other than English.                Campus

Possess effective communication skills, specifically to write business
documents clearly, concisely, and analytically, speak in groups and in
public clearly, concisely, and analytically, with appropriate use of visual
aids, and demonstrate ability in languages other than English.                Campus




Student will have an advanced proficiency in Latin.                           Campus




Students will be able to construct an argument, evaluate evidence, and
justify conclusions.                                                          Campus
Students will be able to critique a scholarly argument and to present a
compelling alternative explanation or interpretation of the evidence.     Campus




Students will exhibit and maintain professional behavior and conduct as
teaching assistants in the department's undergraduate courses.          Campus




Students will present original scholarship to an outside audience.        Campus




Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the prevailing issues in and scholarly perspectives on
Latin American Studies.                                                   Campus




Students will develop and demonstrate the ability to critically analyze
and evaluate research data related to Latin American Studies.             Campus




Students must acquire and demonstrate the ability to communicate
effectively in written and oral presentations.                            Campus




Students will acquire and demonstrate the ability to behave
appropriately in a professional setting.                                  Campus
Students will acquire and demonstrate the ability to behave
appropriately in a professional setting.                                   Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of the core
areas of linguistic study, as agreed upon by the faculty of the
department.                                                        Campus


Demonstrate the ability to critically analyze and interpret language and
language-related data, apply results to broader context and engage in
academice discourse via writing and oral presentation.                     Campus

Demonstrate the ability to critically analyze and interpret language and
language-related data, apply results to broader context and engage in
academice discourse via writing and oral presentation.                     Campus

Display knowledge of ethical human data collection, professional
conduct and ethical academic writing skills (as established by the
Linguistic Society of America Ethics Statement)                            Campus
program under review for closure                                           Campus
program under review for closure                                           Campus
program under review for closure                                           Campus

1. Broad knowledge of the field of Museum Studies in the U.S. and
internationally. 2. Understanding of key disciplinary methods used in
Museum Studies to analyze important issues in the field. 3.
Understanding of current issues in Museum Studies. 4. Broad
knowledge of the work and responsibilities of museums and related
institutions. 5. Specific knowledge of a specialized area in museum work
through practical experience. 6. Critical analysis and writing skills to
analyze pertinent issues and write about them competently. 7.
Advanced research skills necessary to develop Museum Studies projects
or competently evaluate them.                                            Campus

First Hand experience in museum work                                       Campus

Master and understanding of what it means to be a professional in the
field of Museum Studies • use research libraries, their archives and their
contents efficiently • interact with the services, facilities and
technologies offered throughout the University as well as those provided
by the cooperating internship institutions and the resources in the
School of Art and Art History. • Attain skills needed for a specific
museum job (e.g. registration, development, education, curatorial, etc.) Campus
Substantial understanding of key aspects of ancient Greek philosophy,
the modern era (1600-1900), and core areas of contemporary
philosophy, focusing on the theory of knowledge and philosophy of
language.                                                               Campus




Expertise with contemporary formal logic, including first-order predicate
calculus and a substantial degree of meta-logical theory.                 Campus




Ability to read and comprehend contemporary philosophical work, to
present such work to others, to analyze and critically evaluate the
arguments therein, and to formulate one's own position clearly and
defend it in the context of philosophical discussion.                   Campus
 Ability to present philosophical material in a lucid and concise fashion to
audiences of varying backgrounds, to lead discussions of philosophical
material in a way that encourages clear and original thinking about the
issues, and to assess undergraduate work in philosophy classes, including
grading of written work for clarity of expression, comprehension of
material, and cogency of argument.                                           Campus




A thorough understanding and comprehension of research design, basic
statistical methods, and mastery in one field in political science.  Campus




Ability to conduct basic quantitative and/or qualitative research to
address research questions or applied analysis in at least one field in
political science.                                                        Campus




Attend professional conferences and workshops; attend department
orientation on professional development which covers academic
honesty, ethics, collegiality, and cultural sensitivity.                  Campus




Students will acquire a thorough understanding and comprehension of: -
International Relations theories -The historical evolution of the field
-The primary theoretical debates in the field -The seminal literature
associated with at least two of the following International Relations
subfields: International Political Economy, International Security,
American Foreign Policy, International Institutions    -Research Design
. -Statistical Methods for the Social Sciences                          Campus
Ability to design and conduct quantitative and/or qualitative research to
address theoretical and empirical questions in International Relations    Campus

Students will:    -attend professional conferences; -attend and present
research at professional attend department orientation on professional
development which covers academic honesty, ethics, collegiality, and
gender and cultural sensitivity                                         Campus
No MA program in this department                                        NULL
No MA program in this department                                        NULL




Students will become fully conversant with classical and contemporary
methods and theories in the study of religion.                               Campus




Students will develop a broad knowledge of the field of comparative
religion that prepares to pursue a doctoral degree in religion, as well as
any other field in the humanities and social sciences.                       Campus




Students will develop the ability to become effective educators in the
broad field of religion at community colleges, high schools, or other
equivalent educational institutions, including NGOs and non-profit
organizations.                                                               Campus

Students will demonstrate the ability to produce rigorous research and
scholarship that meet the professional standards of the field.               Campus


Demonstrate broad understanding and application of sociological
theories.                                                                    Campus


Demonstrate broad understanding and application of sociological
research methods.                                                            Campus
Demonstrate in-depth understanding and application of a specialty sub-
field in sociology.                                                    Campus


Demonstrate advanced competencies in conducting independent
empirical research with scientific integrity                               Campus


Demonstrate advanced competencies in applying substantive
sociological knowledge in critical thinking, analysis, and communication   Campus


Demonstrate broad understanding and application of professional ethics Campus



Demonstrate broad understanding and application of professional ethics Campus




Demonstrate broad understanding and application of professional ethics Campus



Demonstrate broad understanding and application of the role of the
professional sociologist                                                     Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of the core
areas of Hispanic linguistic and/or literary studies for the MA (with
optional secondary-foci in Luso-Brazilian studies), or of a specific area of
research within those fields for the Ph.D., as agreed upon by the faculty
of the department.                                                           Campus

Literary/Cultural Studies: Demonstrate the ability to analyze and
interpret Hispanic/Latino literary and cultural products (with optional
secondary foci in Luso-Brazilian studies), apply results to broader context
and engage in academic discourse via writing and oral presentation.
Hispanic Linguistics: Demonstrate the ability to analyze and interpret
Hispanic language and language-related data (with optional secondary
foci in Portuguese), apply results to broader context and engage in
academic discourse via writing and oral presentation.                       Campus
Display knowledge of ethical human data collection, professional
conduct and ethical academic writing skills (as established by Linguistic
Society of America Ethics Statement and/or Modern Language
Association).                                                               Campus




Students will demonstrate an in-depth interdisciplinary understanding of
gender in culture and society. Gender will be understood as historically
produced in relationship with other vectors of difference, including race,
sexuality, class, nationality, and so on. Students will demonstrate
knowledge of multi-cultural and transnational currents of feminist
thought. They will have breadth and also depth as they pursue theses
and projects to fulfill MA requirements.                                   Campus
Students will demonstrate critical thinking, research, and writing skills in
all of their courses and other graduate work; communication skills in
and out of the classroom as active participants in their own education;
and an ability to meet deadlines and fulfill on academic commitments. Campus




Students will demonstrate professional behavior, meeting expectations
in the academic community and beyond. They will fulfill work
obligations in a thoughtful and timely way, and display collegiality and
sensitivity to faculty and other students in the program. They will show
an ability to participate collaboratively and contribute to the life of the
CWSGR.                                                                      Campus
The student will demonstrate research-based knowledge of curriculum,
teaching, and learning.                                                    Campus


The student will apply knowledge to investigate a problem or question
related to curriculum, teaching, and learning.                             Campus


The student will present a written and an oral examination of a topic of
investigation within the field of study.                                   Campus




Demonstrates advanced levels of knowledge in the following core areas:
a) curriculum and instruction; b) child development and assessment; c)
family, diversity, and community relations; and, d) transition and public
policy.                                                                   Campus


Demonstrates advanced levels of skill in the following core areas: a)
curriculum and instruction; b) child development and assessment; c)
family, diversity, and community relations; and,d) transition and public
policy.                                                                    Campus




Displays ethical behavior, cultural sensitivity, and appropriate
professional conduct & communication                                       Campus




Displays ethical behavior, cultural sensitivity, and appropriate
professional conduct & communication                                       Campus


Candidates will demonstrate knowledge of core curricular areas of
educational leadership including school finance, law, human resources,
technology, data-driven decision-making, diversity, organizational
theory, supervision & strategic planning.                                  Campus
Candidates will successfully demonstrate competencies and skills of
instructional leadership, operational leadership and school leadership.   Campus




Students will demonstrate ethical behavior, professional conduct and
communication.                                                            Campus




Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who
have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by
understanding the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural
issues.                                                                  Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus


The student will demonstrate research-based knowledge of teaching and
learning in elementary education.                                     Campus


The student will critique teaching practices based on knowledge of the
developmental and socio-cultural context of the learner.                  Campus


The student will apply knowledge to investigate a problem or question
within the field of elementary education.                                 Campus


The student will present a written and oral presentation and defense of
a topic of investigation in elementary education.                         Campus
The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
English Education best practices of teaching and learning.                Campus




The student will apply knowledge to investigate a significant problem or
original question within the field of English Education.                 Campus




The student will complete a written thesis or project and an oral
presentation of a topic of investigation within English Education.        Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                          Campus




Candidates demonstrate professional knowledge to address a wide
variety of issues in the context of relationships and families.           Campus




Candidates demonstrate proficiency in marriage and family counseling
skills by applying ethical and legal standards in marriage, couple, and
family counseling and demonstrating their ability to select models or
techniques appropriate to couples’ or families’ presenting problems.      Campus
Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in marriage and
family counseling by engaging in: (a) professional organizations,
including membership benefits, activities, services to members, and
current issues; (b) professional credentialing, including certification,
licensure, and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of
public policy on these issues; (c) ethical standards of professional
organizations and credentialing bodies, and applications of ethical and
legal considerations in professional counseling.                           Campus




The student will demonstrate knowledge pertaining to current research
on teaching and learning of mathematics.                              Campus




The student will apply knowledge to investigate a significant problem or
original question within the field of study.                             Campus




The students will critically evaluate their own effectiveness to plan
future lessons and improve the teaching of all students over time.         Campus




Candidates will demonstrate the professional knowledge to address a
wide variety of circumstances within the clinical mental health
counseling context.                                                        Campus




Candidates demonstrate proficiency in counseling skills by applying
principles and practices of diagnosis, treatment, referral, and prevention
of mental and emotional disorders to initiate, maintain, and terminate
counseling. Candidates also apply multicultural competencies to clinical
mental health counseling involving case conceptualization, diagnosis,
treatment, referral, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders. Campus
Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in mental health
counseling by engaging in: (a) professional organizations, including
membership benefits, activities, services to members, and current
issues; (b) professional credentialing, including certification, licensure,
and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public
policy on these issues; (c) ethical standards of professional organizations
and credentialing bodies, and applications of ethical and legal
considerations in professional counseling.                                  Campus




The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
general and subject-specific best practices in Reading Education.         Campus




The student will apply knowledge to investigate a significant problem or
an original question within the field of Reading Education.              Campus


The student will complete a written thesis (or project) and an oral
presentation on a topic of investigation within the field of Reading
Education.                                                            Campus
Majors will achieve a thorough understanding of the concepts, methods
and issues in educational measurement and assessment, evaluation, and
research methodology.                                                 Campus
Majors will apply their understanding of the research process by
formulating hypotheses, planning and designing educational research
studies, planning and designing methodological research studies,
analyzing data, and reporting results.                                Campus

Majors will be able to effectively present concepts in research
methodology both orally and in writing.                                   Campus




Candidates demonstrate professional knowledge to address a wide
variety of circumstances within the school counseling field.              Campus
Candidates demonstrate proficiency in school counseling skills by
demonstrating the ability to apply and adhere to ethical and legal
standards in school counseling and the ability to articulate, model, and
advocate for an appropriate school counselor identity and program.         Campus

Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in school counseling
by engaging in: (a) professional organizations, including membership
benefits, activities, services to members, and current issues; (b)
professional credentialing, including certification, licensure, and
accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public policy on
these issues; (c) ethical standards of professional organizations and
credentialing bodies, and applications of ethical and legal considerations
in professional counseling.                                                Campus
Candidates will demonstrate knowledge of core school psychology
content areas including: assessment, consultation, intervention, and
professional and ethical standards                                         Campus
Candidates will demonstrate emerging skills in the design, data
collection/analysis, and writing process of a collaborative research
project.                                                                   Campus




Candidates will demonstrate effective collaborative skills when working
with faculty and more experienced scholars on a joint research project. Campus



The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
general and subject-area specific area best practices in teaching and
learning in Science Education.                                             Campus




The student will apply knowledge to investigate a significant problem or
original question within his/her specific field of Science Education.    Campus
The student will complete a written thesis or project and an oral
presentation of research that focuses on a significant problem or original
question in Science Education.                                             Campus


The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
both general and subject-specific best practices in social studies teaching
and learning.                                                               Campus




The student will apply knowledge to investigate a significant problem or
original question within the field of Social Studies Education.          Campus


The student will complete a written thesis or project and an oral
presentation on a topic of investigation within the field of Social Studies
Education.                                                                  Campus




Program participants will demonstrate knowledge of effective academic
and behavioral interventions for students with disabilities and other
learning differences.                                                 Distance
Program participants will use a variety of techniques/tools to determine
academic and behavioral needs of students with disabilities and other
learning differences.                                                    Distance




Program participants will use assessment data to design appropriate
academic and behavioral programs for students with disabilities and
other learning differences.                                             Distance




Program participants will use data to monitor progress and make
decisions regarding academic and behavioral programs and instruction
for students with disabilities and other learning differences.          Distance




2. To develop presentation skills to effectively communicate student
affairs related concepts and ideas                                      Campus
To develop an understanding of student affairs functioning which
includes, but is not limited to, issues related to leadership and
governance, technology, curriculum and co-curriculum partnerships, as
well as issues pertaining to students, faculty, and administrators    Campus




To develop the ability to critically evaluate the research found in student
affairs-related research articles, policy briefs, and position papers       Campus

Development of a thorough understanding of mass communication
theory and an expertise in research methods, aiding in a synthesized
perspective for evaluating and addressing current practitioner or
theoretical problems.                                                     Campus
Development of a thorough understanding of mass communication
theory and an expertise in research methods, aiding in a synthesized
perspective for evaluating and addressing current practitioner or
theoretical problems.                                                     Campus




Demonstrate a thorough understanding of communication subject
matter and issues through a synthesis of subjects, theories and
methodologies.                                                            Campus




Oral and written communication skills                                     Campus
Display of ethical behaviors, teamwork, cultural sensitivity/appreciation
for diverse viewpoints, and an understanding of professional standards
for effective and ethical decision making                                 Campus

Demonstrate thorough understanding of the foundational concepts of
the discipline of Anthropology and its subfields.                           Campus




Demonstrate skill in the application of Anthropological research
methods.                                                                    Campus

Demonstration of mastery of professional communication through the
preparation of a publication quality paper.                                 Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of the core
areas of French and Francophone linguistic and/or literary studies for the
MA, as agreed upon by the faculty of the department.                       Campus
Literary/Cultural Studies: Demonstrate the ability to analyze and
interpret French and Francophone literary and cultural products, apply
results to broader context and engage in academic discourse via writing
and oral presentation. French and Francophone Linguistics:
Demonstrate the ability to analyze and interpret French and
Francophone language and language-related data, apply results to
broader context and engage in academic discourse via writing and oral
presentation.                                                              Campus




Display knowledge of ethical human data collection, professional
conduct and ethical academic writing skills (as established by Linguistic
Society of America Ethics Statement and/or Modern Language
Association).                                                               Campus
we no longer offer this degree.                                             Campus
degree not offered.                                                         Campus
degree not offered.                                                         Campus
Students will have an advanced proficiency in Latin.                         Campus




Students will have a solid understanding of the history, culture, and
literature of ancient Rome.                                                  Campus




Students will be able to read critically ancient Latin literature and have
developed techniques for teaching Latin.                                     Campus


Students will present scholarly research to an outside audience.             Campus
Program has limited enrollment and is under review for closure               NULL
program under review. We have one that will be getting this in the
Summer                                                                       Campus
program under review. We have one that will be getting this in the
Summer                                                                       Campus
program under review. We have one that will be getting this in the
Summer                                                                       Campus
Substantial understanding of key aspects of ancient Greek philosophy,
the modern era (1600-1900), and core areas of contemporary
philosophy, focusing on the theory of knowledge and philosophy of
language.                                                               Campus




Expertise with contemporary formal logic, including first-order predicate
calculus and a substantial degree of meta-logical theory.                 Campus




Ability to read and comprehend contemporary philosophical work, to
present such work to others, to analyze and critically evaluate the
arguments therein, and to formulate one's own position clearly and
defend it in the context of philosophical discussion.                   Campus
Ability to present philosophical material in a lucid and concise fashion to
audiences of varying backgrounds, to lead discussions of philosophical
material in a way that encourages clear and original thinking about the
issues, and to assess undergraduate work in philosophy classes, including
grading of written work for clarity of expression, comprehension of
material, and cogency of argument.                                          Campus

program has limited enrollment and is under consideration for closure        NULL
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of the core
areas of Hispanic linguistic and/or literary studies for the MA (with
optional secondary-foci in Luso-Brazilian studies), or of a specific area of
research within those fields for the Ph.D., as agreed upon by the faculty
of the department.                                                           Campus
Demonstrate the ability to analyze and interpret Hispanic language and
language-related data, apply results to broader context of language
pedagogy; and engage in academic discourse via writing and oral
presentation.                                                                Campus




Display knowledge of ethical human data collection, professional
conduct and ethical academic writing skills (as established by Linguistic
Society of America Ethics Statement and/or Modern Language
Association).                                                               Campus




Students demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
subject matter relevant to the discipline.                         Campus


Students will demonstrate oral, written, and critical thinking skills
required of master’s students within their area of specialization.          Campus
Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct and communication.                                                Campus




Students will have a thorough understanding and comprehension of
economic, management, marketing, finance, quantitative analysis, and
policy principles as they apply to food and agribusiness firms.           Campus




Students will apply, analyze, and synthesize content knowledge to solve
management problems faced by food and agribusiness firms                Campus




Students will demonstrate teamwork, ethical, cultural sensitivity, and
professional communication skills                                         Campus




Students will conduct effective professional accounting and tax research,
specifically to interpret and apply statutory tax authority to unstructured
and complex transactions.                                                   Campus
Students will conduct effective professional accounting and tax research,
specifically to interpret and apply accounting standards governing
private and public sector financial reporting.                            Campus




Students will possess effective business communication skills, specifically
to write clearly, concisely, and persuasively.                              Campus
Students will possess effective business communication skills, specifically
to orally communicate clearly, concisely, and persuasively with the
appropriate use of supporting media.                                        Campus




Students will possess the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in
the accounting profession, specifically to demonstrate the ability to
reason and to solve complex accounting and business problems.             Campus

Students will possess the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in
the accounting profession, specifically to demonstrate the ability to
reason and to solve complex business problems.                            Campus
Students will recognize ethical questions encountered in the practice of
accounting and formulate solutions that consider all stakeholders,
specifically to recognize professional standards of conduct and recognize
legal, ethical, and social responsibilities.                              Campus




Development of a thorough understanding of advertising theory and an
expertise in research methods, aiding in a synthesized perspective for
evaluating and addressing current practitioner or theoretical problems. Campus

Display of ethical behaviors, teamwork, cultural sensitivity/appreciation
for diverse viewpoints, and an understanding of professional standards
for effective and ethical decision making                                 Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding of advertising and issues
through a synthesis of subjects, theories and methodologies. Oral and
written communication skills                                          Campus




Ability to use critical thinking and specialized knowledge of architectural
systems to identify clearly state, and convey problems and develop
design responses in an ethical and responsible manner.                      Campus
Ability to use critical thinking and specialized knowledge of architectural
systems to identify clearly state, and convey problems and develop
design responses in an ethical and responsible manner.                      Campus
Ability to individualize an area of focus, develop self-determination and
lead a project team, collaborate with other professionals for inclusive
and integrative proposals.                                                  Campus




Engage at leadership levels in advancing culture through the design of
buildings and cities.                                                       Campus
Demonstrate competency across business disciplines, specifically apply
the essential elements of core business principles to analyze and
evaluate problems and to construct and implement solutions in the
business environment.                                                    Both
Demonstrate critical thinking, specifically employ appropriate analytical
models and apply critical reasoning processes to evaluate evidence,
select among alternatives, and generate creative options in furtherance
of effective decision making.                                             Both
Demonstrate teamwork and leadership skills, specifically function in a
variety of work groups using appropriate leadership skills and styles and
collaborate with a variety of other people using elements of effective
team dynamics to effectively and appropriately structure team work.       Both
Possess effective communication skills, specifically write business
documents clearly, concisely, and analytically and speak in groups and in
public clearly, concisely, and analytically, with appropriate use of visual
aids.                                                                       Both
Possess effective communication skills, specifically write business
documents clearly, concisely, and analytically and speak in groups and in
public clearly, concisely, and analytically, with appropriate use of visual
aids.                                                                       Both




By a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject matter
relevant to the discipline.                                                Campus




By applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content knowledge to solve
problems by identifying component parts, relationships and ideas.          Campus
By displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork,
professional conduct and communication.                                    Campus




Ability to identify, formulate and solve aerospace engineering problems Both




Ability to use applied mathematical techniques Ability to use modern
engineering tools for practice at an advance level                         Both
No outcome                                                                 Campus
by a thorough understanding and comprehension of mathematics,
science and engineering principles of the discipline of Agricultural and
Biological Engineering                                                     Campus
by applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content knowledge to solve
problems by identifying components or processes of agricultural and/or
biological systems to meet desired needs within realistic economic,
environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety,
manufacturability and sustainability constraints.                      Campus


by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                    Campus




an ability to develop a broad-based knowledge of Biomedical
Engineering problems                                                      Campus




an ability to critically read Biomedical Engineering literature           Campus




an ability to use apply fundamental engineering principles to identify,
analyze and solve biomedical engineering problems                         Campus




an ability to design and conduct scientific and engineering experiments,
and to analyze and interpret the resulting data                          Campus
an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility and the
impact of clinically significant engineering solutions                   Campus




an ability to communicate effectively and work collaboratively            Campus


Ability to Identify a problem.                                            Campus


Ability to formulate a problem.                                           Campus
Ability to solve engineering problems.                                   Campus

An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice at an advanced level.                 Campus


An ability to communicate effectively.                                   Campus




Students will demonstrate an ability to identify, formulate, and solve
engineering problems in the student’s program area. (Civil Engineering
Materials, Water Resources, Geotechnical Engineering, Construction,
Public Works, Structures, and Transportation).                           Both
Students will demonstrate an ability to use the techniques, skills, and
modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice at an
advanced level in the students program area (Civil Engineering Materials,
Water Resources, Geotechnical Engineering, Construction, Public Works,
Structures, and Transportation).                                          Both




Students will demonstrate an ability to communicate in a professional
manner within the student's graduate program area . (Civil Engineering
Materials, Water Resources, Geotechnical Engineering, Construction,
Public Works, Structures, and Transportation.)                           Both
Students will demonstrate an ability to critically read engineering
literature in Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering and an ability to
identify, formulate new solutions to engineering problems in Coastal and
Oceanographic Engineering.                                               Campus




Students will demonstrate an ability to use the techniques, skills, and
modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice at an
advanced level in Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering.                  Campus




Students will demonstrate an ability to communicate in a professional
manner within the student's graduate program area of Coastal and
Oceanographic Engineering.                                                Campus
Ability to identify, formulate, and solve computer science and
engineering problems.                                                     Both
Ability to critically read computer science and engineering literature.   Both

Ability to use techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computer
science and engineering practice at an advanced level.                    Both


Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.                 Both
Ability to communicate effectively.                                       Both




Ability to identify, formulate and solve electrical and computer
engineering problems                                                      Both
Ability to use applied mathematical techniques                          Both




Ability to use modern engineering tools for practice at an advanced level Both
The ECE department does not currently teach topics related to
professional behavior, so we are unable to evaluate this learning
outcome.                                                                  Campus
For M.E. with thesis--Knowledge an ability to identify, formulate, and
solve environmental problems using scientific and engineering methods
and tools                                                              Both




Skills o an ability to critically read and evaluate engineering or science
literature o an ability to use the techniques, methods, and appropriate
professional tools necessary for professional practice at an advanced
level o an ability to communicate effectively.                             Both
Professional Behavior: an understanding of professional and ethical
responsibility                                                          Both




Students must develop expertise in mathematical modeling and analysis
of business problems, customized development of solutions for these
problems, and the use of information technologies for solution delivery. Both
Students should be proficient in the core methodological and application
areas of operations research and industrial engineering.                 Both
Students should be able to effectively and professionally communicate
industrial engineering concepts and information in written and oral
form.                                                                   Both




An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.      Both




An ability to critically read engineering literature                    Both
An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice at an advanced level.                 Both




An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.             Both




An ability to communicate effectively.                                   Both




Ability to use applied mathematical techniques Ability to use modern
engineering tools for practice at an advance level                       Both
Ability to identify, formulate and solve mechanical engineering problems Both
No Outcome                                                               Campus




An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.       Both




An ability to critically read engineering literature                     Both




An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice at an advanced level.                 Both
An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.              Both




An ability to communicate effectively.                                    Both




The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
general and specific subject area best practices in teaching and learning. Both
The student will use knowledge of teaching and learning to organize
content for instruction, develop appropriate differentiated teaching
practices, and evaluate the impact of instruction on student learning.    Both




The student will collaborate with other professionals, reflect upon his or
her own practice, and demonstrate a sense of efficacy and ethical
practice.                                                                  Both


Candidates completing the M.Ed. as part of the Unified Early Childhood
Teacher Education Program will demonstrate understanding and
comprehension of early childhood concepts, principles, and teaching
theory.                                                                   Campus
Candidates will demonstrate effective planning and implementation of
classroom-based assessment and instruction.                              Campus




Displays ethical behavior and appropriate professional conduct &
communication                                                            Campus




Displays cultural sensitivity and teamwork                               Campus




Candidates will demonstrate knowledge of core curricular areas of
educational leadership including school finance, law, human resources,
technology, data-driven decision-making, diversity, organizational
theory, supervision & strategic planning.                                Campus




Candidates will successfully demonstrate competencies and skills of
instructional leadership, operational leadership and school leadership by
applying knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students.    Campus
Candidates will demonstrate ethical behavior, professional conduct and
communication.                                                         Campus




Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who
have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by
understanding the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural
issues.                                                                  Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                       Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                       Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                       Campus
The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
best practices of teaching and learning in elementary education.         Campus




The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
best practices of teaching and learning in elementary education.         Campus




The student will use knowledge of teaching and learning to organize
instruction, develop and apply appropriate inclusive teaching practices
for elementary education, evaluate the impact of instruction on student
learning, and create a positive learning environment.                   Campus




The student will collaborate with other professionals, reflect upon his or
her own practice, and demonstrate a sense of efficacy and ethical
practice.                                                                  Campus




The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
general and specific subject area best practices of teaching and learning. Campus
The student will use knowledge of teaching and learning to organize
content for instruction, develop and apply appropriate inclusive teaching
practices, evaluate the impact of instruction on student learning, and
create a positive learning environment.                                   Campus




The student will collaborate with other professionals, reflect upon his or
her own practice, and demonstrate a sense of efficacy and ethical
practice.                                                                  Campus




Candidates demonstrate professional knowledge to address a wide
variety of issues in the context of relationships and families.            Campus




Candidates demonstrate proficiency in marriage and family counseling
skills by applying ethical and legal standards in marriage, couple, and
family counseling and demonstrating their ability to select models or
techniques appropriate to couples’ or families’ presenting problems.       Campus

Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in marriage and
family counseling by engaging in: (a) professional organizations,
including membership benefits, activities, services to members, and
current issues; (b) professional credentialing, including certification,
licensure, and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of
public policy on these issues; (c) ethical standards of professional
organizations and credentialing bodies, and applications of ethical and
legal considerations in professional counseling.                           Campus
The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
best practices of teaching and learning mathematics.                      Campus




The student will create, select and implement: (1) specific learning goals,
(2) appropriate teaching methods and instructional materials, and (3)
evaluation strategies aligned with goals, using knowledge of subject
matter, learners and classroom management.                                  Campus




The student will collaborate with other professionals, such as peers and
mentor teachers, to reflect upon his or her mathematics teaching.
Students will communicate high expectations for all PK-12 students.      Campus

Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in mental health
counseling by engaging in: (a) professional organizations, including
membership benefits, activities, services to members, and current
issues; (b) professional credentialing, including certification, licensure,
and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public
policy on these issues; (c) ethical standards of professional organizations
and credentialing bodies, and applications of ethical and legal
considerations in professional counseling.                                  Campus




Candidates will demonstrate the professional knowledge to address a
wide variety of circumstances within the clinical mental health
counseling context.                                                       Campus
Candidates demonstrate proficiency in counseling skills by applying
principles and practices of diagnosis, treatment, referral, and prevention
of mental and emotional disorders to initiate, maintain, and terminate
counseling. Candidates also apply multicultural competencies to clinical
mental health counseling involving case conceptualization, diagnosis,
treatment, referral, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders. Campus




The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
best practices in Reading Education.                                     Campus




The student will use knowledge of teaching and learning to organize
instruction, develop and apply appropriate reading instructional
practices, and evaluate the impact of instruction on student learning.   Campus




The student will collaborate with other professionals, reflect upon his or
her own practice, and demonstrate a sense of efficacy and ethical
practice.                                                                  Campus
Majors will achieve a thorough understanding of the concepts, methods
and issues in educational measurement and assessment, evaluation, and
research methodology.                                                      Campus
Majors will apply their understanding of the research process by
formulating hypotheses, planning and designing educational research
studies, analyzing data, and reporting results.                            Campus


Majors will be able to effectively present concepts in research
methodology both orally and in writing                                   Campus
Candidates demonstrate professional knowledge to address a wide
variety of circumstances within the school counseling field.               Campus




Candidates demonstrate proficiency in school counseling skills by
demonstrating the ability to apply and adhere to ethical and legal
standards in school counseling and the ability to articulate, model, and
advocate for an appropriate school counselor identity and program.         Campus

Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in school counseling
by engaging in: (a) professional organizations, including membership
benefits, activities, services to members, and current issues; (b)
professional credentialing, including certification, licensure, and
accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public policy on
these issues; (c) ethical standards of professional organizations and
credentialing bodies, and applications of ethical and legal considerations
in professional counseling.                                                Campus
Candidates will demonstrate knowledge of core school psychology
content areas including: assessment, consultation, intervention, and
professional and ethical standards.                                        Campus
Candidates will demonstrate emerging skills in the design, data
collection/analysis, and writing process of a collaborative research
project.                                                                   Campus




Candidates will demonstrate effective collaborative skills when working
with faculty and more experienced scholars on a joint research project. Campus
The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
general and subject area-specific best practices in science teaching and
learning.                                                                  Campus




The student will apply knowledge of teaching and learning to organize
content for instruction, develop and implement appropriate inclusive
teaching practices, evaluate the impact of instruction on student
learning, and create a positive learning environment.                      Campus




The student will collaborate with other professionals, reflect upon his or
her own professional practice, and demonstrate a sense of efficacy and
ethical practice.                                                          Campus




The student will demonstrate mastery of research-based knowledge of
both general and subject-specific best practices in social studies teaching
and learning.                                                               Campus




The student will use knowledge of teaching and learning to organize
content for instruction, develop and apply appropriate inclusive teaching
practices, evaluate the impact of instruction on student learning, and
create a positive learning environment.                                   Campus




The student will collaborate with other professionals, reflect upon his or
her own practice, and demonstrate a sense of efficacy and ethical
practice.                                                                  Campus
Program participants will demonstrate knowledge of (a)research-based
teaching special education practices and their application in inclusive
general education classes and (b) special education law and required
practices for service delivery                                             Campus

Program participants will use knowledge of research-based teaching
practices in special education and student learning characteristics to
design, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of lessons and
instruction in inclusive general education classes and evaluate student
performance/learning.                                                      Campus




Program participants will design and maintain positive learning
environments.                                                              Campus




Program participants will demonstrate (a) reflective teaching practices,
(b)collaborative practice with other professionals and families of
students with disabilities, and (c)ethical professional practice.          Campus




To develop an understanding of student affairs functioning which
includes, but is not limited to, issues related to leadership and
governance, technology, curriculum and co-curriculum partnerships, as
well as issues pertaining to students, faculty, and administrators         Campus




To develop the ability to critically evaluate the research found in student
affairs-related research articles, policy briefs, and position papers       Campus
To develop presentation skills to effectively communicate student
affairs related concepts and ideas                                         Campus


Broaden knowledge of contemporary art and the theoretical, cultural
and historical contexts of art through writing, speaking, and art making
on advanced levels. Master processes of generating and solving
problems in art.                                                           Campus




Refine and expand the level of technical skill through disciplined work
habits as reflected in an articulated body of work.                        Campus


Develop an advanced understanding of professional practices in the
studio arts.                                                               Campus




Students have a knowledge of their craft.                                  Campus


Students are able to write professional quality work.                      Campus

Students will be able to successfully perform readings publicly.           Campus

Demonstrate or achieve a thorough understanding and comprehension
of subject matter relevant to the discipline. Demonstrate knowledge in
the field of history of theatre and criticism, general theatre design and
design within the student’s area of specialization.                       Campus


Depending of student's study emphasis, the student will either A.
Demonstrate proficiency in acting methods. Understand traditional and
innovative techniques appropriate to varying production formats; B.
Demonstrate proficiency in the use of design and production tools and
media.                                                                     Campus
Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct, and communication relevant to working in professional
theatre.                                                                   Campus




Students demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
the subject matter relevant to their discipline.                   Campus




Students demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
the subject matter relevant to their discipline.                   Campus




Students can effectively communicate and work in teams with peers,
interacting honestly, ethically, and with cultural sensitivity. Students will
be able to translate skills, knowledge, and motivation into observable
behaviors related to achieving success in specific situations.                Campus
Students will be able to effectively communicate in both written and oral
form.                                                                     Campus




Students will be able to effectively communicate in both written and oral
form.                                                                     Campus


Students will demonstrate their competence in their field of study by
applying the appropriate methodologies to the generation of new
knowledge or synthesis of existing knowledge.                           Campus




Students will develop an understanding of proper project design and
execution.                                                              Campus




Students develop critical thinking, including understanding and
evaluating spoken and written communications.                           Campus

Competency in major-specific and related subject matter areas relevant
to the individualized focus of the degree program, e.g. physiology,
genetics, ecology, economics, geomatics, management, environmental
education, silviculture, pathology, and policy.                        Campus
Competency in major-specific and related subject matter areas relevant
to the individualized focus of the degree program, e.g. physiology,
genetics, ecology, economics, geomatics, management, environmental
education, silviculture, pathology, and policy.                        Campus

Competence in critical evaluation of literature, analysis and synthesis of
information, understanding experimental and descriptive research
methodologies, and effectively communicating information and ideas
relevant to their specific program of study.                               Campus

Competence in critical evaluation of literature, analysis and synthesis of
information, understanding experimental and descriptive research
methodologies, and effectively communicating information and ideas
relevant to their specific program of study.                               Campus

Honest, ethical, and culturally sensitive behavior and practices in all
scholarly activities including teaching, research, and outreach.          Campus




Honest, ethical, and culturally sensitive behavior and practices in all
scholarly activities including teaching, research, and outreach.          Campus

Students will be able to use science-based research to analyze problems,
issues and needs affecting families, youth and communities.              Campus




Students will be able to use science-based research to analyze problems,
issues and needs affecting families, youth and communities.              Campus
Students will know how to plan and evaluate programs, provide
expertise for non-profit organizations, and develop science-based policy
recommendations to address the needs, problems and issues of
contemporary youth, families and communities.                            Campus

Students will know how to plan and evaluate programs, provide
expertise for non-profit organizations, and develop science-based policy
recommendations to address the needs, problems and issues of
contemporary youth, families and communities.                            Campus
Students will be able to analyze and assess the needs, issues and
problems of contemporary families, youth and communities.                 Campus




Students will be able to analyze and assess the needs, issues and
problems of contemporary families, youth and communities.                 Campus

Students will be able to develop plans and evaluations for programs,
programmatic tools and projects for public and non-profit organizations,
and recommendations for policy makers to address issues, needs and
problems of families, youth and communities.                             Campus




Students will be able to develop plans and evaluations for programs,
programmatic tools and projects for public and non-profit organizations,
and recommendations for policy makers to address issues, needs and
problems of families, youth and communities.                             Campus
Students will demonstrate ethical behavior, cultural sensitivity,
teamwork and effective communication to interact in professional
environments.                                                            Campus




Students will demonstrate ethical behavior, cultural sensitivity,
teamwork and effective communication to interact in professional
environments.                                                             Campus
Students will demonstrate in-depth knowledge of healthcare delivery,
organization, financing, and management.                                  Campus




Students will exhibit improved mastery of a set of 22 competencies in 4
domains (healthcare environment and community; healthcare
organizations and performance; business analysis and techniques;
leadership and professionalism) over the course of the Program.           Campus
Students will gain experience in healthcare management and develop
professional behavior skills in summer internship.                        Campus
Students will demonstrate the oral, written and critical thinking skills
required of specialists in the discipline of historic preservation.        Campus

Students must demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the discipline of
historic preservation.                                                     Campus

Students will demonstrate the oral and written professional skills
required of specialists in the discipline of historic preservation.      Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
advanced practice in occupational therapy in the focus areas of the
program: leadership and independent practice, assistive technology and
occupational performance, neuroscience of human occupation, trends
and issues in health care, evidence based practice, and professional
development                                                              Distance
Demonstrate problem solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing content knowledge and evidence in self-selected area of
practice specialty by designing, implementing, assessing, and reporting,
in writing and orally, an independent Professional Development Project
(capstone project)                                                       Both




Display sensitivity to diversity and diversity within cultural contexts    Distance
paperwork submitted for closure                                            NULL




By a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject matter
relevant to the discipline.                                                Campus




By a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject matter
relevant to the discipline.                                                Campus
By applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content knowledge to solve
problems by identifying component parts, relationships and ideas.        Campus




By displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork,
professional conduct and communication.                                  Campus




By displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork,
professional conduct and communication.                                  Campus

Ability to identify, formulate, test and analyze research questions in
interior design                                                          Campus

Ability to identify, formulate, test and analyze research questions in
interior design                                                          Campus




Demonstrate evidence of engaging in field experience                     Campus




Demonstrate evidence of engaging in field experience                     Campus


Students engaged in research involving human subjects will gain IRB
approval.                                                                Campus


Students engaged in research involving human subjects will gain IRB
approval.                                                                Campus
Students will present scholarly research to an outside audience.        Campus




Students will have an advanced proficiency in Latin.                    Campus




Students will have a solid understanding of the history, culture, and
literature of ancient Rome.                                             Campus




Students will be able to to read critically ancient Latin literature.   Campus




Demonstrate the understanding of research and theory as it relates to
the practice of landscape architecture.                                 Campus




Experience the breadth of the profession of Landscape Architecture
while exploring an individual specialization.                           Campus
Demonstrate core professional skills in landscape architecture.        Campus




Think creatively, analytically and logically, integrating research,
precedent, and theory into applications.                               Campus




Develop professional skills in the areas of visual, oral and written
communication.                                                         Campus
Display ethical behaviors and professional conduct.                      Campus


: Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject
matter and theory relevant to their disciplinary focus.             Campus


Students will demonstrate proficiency on an instrument or voice.         Campus

Students will demonstrate the ability to conduct themselves
appropriately in a professional performing situation.                    Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject
matter relevant to the discipline, including music education research,
practice, historical and contemporary trends in music education          Campus


Demonstrate a thorough understanding of and comprehension of
traditional and current research methods in music education.             Campus




Demonstrate proficiency in music education research and methods.           Campus
Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the application of research methods in Music
Education as applied to a specific research project and be able to present
research in a professional environment.                                    Campus
Demonstrate an understanding of the translation of research to clinical
practice, and be prepared to be an effective consumer of the latest
research and knowledge bases that support occupational therapy
practice and contribute to the growth and dissemination of research and
knowledge.                                                              Campus
Demonstrate an understanding of the translation of research to clinical
practice, and be prepared to be an effective consumer of the latest
research and knowledge bases that support occupational therapy
practice and contribute to the growth and dissemination of research and
knowledge.                                                              Campus

Achieve entry-level clinical competence as an occupational therapist
through a combination of academic and fieldwork education.                Campus

Be educated as a generalist with a broad exposure to the delivery
models and systems used in settings where occupational therapy is
currently practiced and where it is emerging as a service                 Campus

Demonstrate the professional behaviors expected of a health care
professional in general and at the standard expected by our profession.   Campus




Uphold the ethical standards, values, and attitudes of the occupational
therapy profession.                                                       Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of public
health                                                                    Both
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of public
health                                                                    Both
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of public
health                                                                    Both
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of public
health                                                                    Both
Demonstrate problem-solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing knowledge in public health by identifying component parts,
relationships, and ideas                                                  Both
Demonstrate problem-solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing knowledge in public health by identifying component parts,
relationships, and ideas                                                  Both
Demonstrate problem-solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing knowledge in public health by identifying component parts,
relationships, and ideas                                                  Both
Demonstrate problem-solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing knowledge in public health by identifying component parts,
relationships, and ideas                                                  Both
Demonstrate problem-solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing knowledge in public health by identifying component parts,
relationships, and ideas                                                  Both
Demonstrate problem-solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing knowledge in public health by identifying component parts,
relationships, and ideas                                                  Both
Demonstrate problem-solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing knowledge in public health by identifying component parts,
relationships, and ideas                                                  Both
Demonstrate problem-solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing knowledge in public health by identifying component parts,
relationships, and ideas                                                  Both
Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct, and appropriate communication                                    Both
Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct, and appropriate communication                                    Both
Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct, and appropriate communication                                    Both
Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct, and appropriate communication                                    Both




Ability to identify, formulate and solve aerospace engineering problems Both
Ability to use applied mathematical techniques Ability to use modern
engineering tools for practice at an advance level                         Both
No Outcome                                                                 Campus
by a thorough understanding and comprehension of mathematics,
science and engineering principles of the discipline of Agricultural and
Biological Engineering                                                     Campus
by a thorough understanding and comprehension of mathematics,
science and engineering principles of the discipline of Agricultural and
Biological Engineering                                                     Campus
by a thorough understanding and comprehension of mathematics,
science and engineering principles of the discipline of Agricultural and
Biological Engineering                                                     Campus
by a thorough understanding and comprehension of mathematics,
science and engineering principles of the discipline of Agricultural and
Biological Engineering                                                     Campus

by applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content knowledge to solve
problems by identifying components or processes of agricultural and/or
biological systems to meet desired needs within realistic economic,
environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety,
manufacturability and sustainability constraints.                      Campus

by applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content knowledge to solve
problems by identifying components or processes of agricultural and/or
biological systems to meet desired needs within realistic economic,
environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety,
manufacturability and sustainability constraints.                      Campus




by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                     Campus
by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                Campus




by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                Campus




by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                Campus


by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                Campus


by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                Campus

Competency in contemporary and foundational theory and research in
their selected specialization by a thorough understanding and
comprehension of subject matter relevant to the discipline.           Campus

Competency in contemporary and foundational theory and research in
their selected specialization by a thorough understanding and
comprehension of subject matter relevant to the discipline.           Distance


Application of evolving concepts and philosophies in their selected
specialization by applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content
knowledge to solve problems by identifying component parts,
relationships and ideas.                                              Campus

Application of evolving concepts and philosophies in their selected
specialization by applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content
knowledge to solve problems by identifying component parts,
relationships and ideas.                                              Distance
Effective use of instructional materials and methods with emphasis on
application of visual and nonvisual techniques.                         Campus




Effective use of instructional materials and methods with emphasis on
application of visual and nonvisual techniques.                         Distance




Application of Concepts and principles related to design, implementation
and evaluation of formal and non-formal education and/or training and
development programs.                                                    Campus

Application of Concepts and principles related to design, implementation
and evaluation of formal and non-formal education and/or training and
development programs.                                                    Distance

Application of principles, practices and strategies for conducting
behavioral research in agricultural and natural resource professions.   Campus

Application of principles, practices and strategies for conducting
behavioral research in agricultural and natural resource professions.   Distance

Outstanding professional character by displaying ethical behaviors,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional conduct and communication. Campus



Outstanding professional character by displaying ethical behaviors,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional conduct and communication. Distance
Acquire a core knowledge base in the plant sciences, with a deeper
knowledge in a chosen specialization (genetics/breeding,
physiology/biochemistry, ecology, management and nutrition).         Campus
Acquire the knowledge to design and execute an innovative research
plan and to analyze, synthesize and interpret research results using
appropriate experimental designs and statistical analyses.                 Campus


Acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to address and solve issues
related to crop production and resource management and to become
respected professionals and leaders in the discipline (in academia,
government, or the private sector).                                        Campus




Excellence in critical thinking, scientific writing, experimental techniques,
data collection, data analysis and synthesis.                                 Campus
Excellence in oral and written communication and interpersonal
relationships.                                                              Campus




Professional and ethical conduct will be evident in all scholarly activities.
Collegiality, cultural sensitivities, and ethical behaviors and practices will
be demonstrated in the conduct of all scholarly activities including
teaching, research, and outreach.                                              Campus

Thorough understanding of the principles of molecular and cellular
biology and their application to comparative biology.                       Campus

Thorough understanding of the principles of molecular and cellular
biology and their application to comparative biology.                       Campus

Ability to design, conduct and draw sound conclusions on scientific
experiments.                                                                Campus

Ability to design, conduct and draw sound conclusions on scientific
experiments.                                                                Campus

Interaction with peers and instructors with honesty, cultural sensitivity
and effective communication.                                                Campus
Interaction with peers and instructors with honesty, cultural sensitivity
and effective communication.                                                Campus




Thorough understanding of Animal Sciences.                                  Campus




Thorough understanding of Animal Sciences.                                  Campus




Ability to apply scientific methods to problems in animal sciences and
develop new solutions to such problems.                                     Campus




Competence in research methodologies for applying scientific methods
to solve problems and generate new knowledge.                               Campus
Competence in research methodologies for applying scientific methods
to solve problems and generate new knowledge.                             Campus




Display professional conduct including ethical behaviors, cultural
sensitivity, and ability to work well independently or in a team.         Campus




Professional communication.                                               Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in conducting themselves in a professional
manner.                                                                   Campus


Demonstrate proficiency in conducting themselves in a professional
manner.                                                                   Campus
Demonstrate proficiency in the discipline specific skills - exercise
physiology, biobehaviorial science, clinical exercise physiology, human
performance, athletic training                                            Campus
Demonstrate proficiency in the discipline specific skills - exercise
physiology, biobehaviorial science, clinical exercise physiology, human
performance, athletic training                                            Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject
matter relevant to the discipline – exercise physiology, biobehaviorial
science, clinical exercise physiology, human performance, athletic
training.                                                                 Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject
matter relevant to the discipline – exercise physiology, biobehaviorial
science, clinical exercise physiology, human performance, athletic
training.                                                                 Campus
Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the fundamental astrophysics covered by the core
curriculum.                                                               Campus
Masters students will develop and demonstrate the ability to conduct
supervised research in astrophysics.                                     Campus




Students will develop the ability to clearly communicate their research in
oral presentations in a style appropriate for conferences.                 Campus




Students will develop the ability to clearly communicate their research in
oral presentations in a style appropriate for conferences.                 Campus




Students will develop the ability to clearly communicate their research in
oral presentations in a style appropriate for conferences.                 Campus




Students will develop the ability to write articles at the level of a
conference proceeding based upon their research.                         Campus
Students will master core biochemistry knowledge in at least two of the
three areas including 1) Molecular Biology, 2) Metabolism, and 3)
Structural Biology/Physical Biochemistry.                               Campus




Students will master discipline-related knowledge required for
completion of their M.S. thesis research.                                   Campus




Students will master the ability to read, interpret, and critically evaluate
published literature in their fields.                                        Campus




Students will master the ability to follow experimental protocols
reported in the literature or established in their laboratories. Students
will gain proficiency in common techniques in their fields. Students will
master the ability to analyze the results of their experiments and to
report these results both orally and in written reports.                    Campus
Students will demonstrate professionalism in oral presentations required
for journal clubs and the final defense.                                 Campus




Students will demonstrate professional conduct in performing research
including following appropriate safety and regulatory rules, and
demonstrating ethical conduct in research.                                Campus




an ability to develop a broad-based knowledge of Biomedical
Engineering problems                                                      Campus




an ability to critically read Biomedical Engineering literature           Campus




an ability to use apply fundamental engineering principles to identify,
analyze and solve biomedical engineering problems                         Campus




an ability to design and conduct scientific and engineering experiments,
and to analyze and interpret the resulting data                          Campus
an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility and the
impact of clinically significant engineering solutions                   Campus




an ability to communicate effectively and work collaboratively            Campus
Demonstrate a solid underpinning of biostatistics concepts and methods,
which will enable students to collaborate effectively with researchers in
other disciplines.                                                        Campus




The ability to apply biostatistical concepts and methods in collaborative
work, to interpret results, and to communicate these results with
collaborators.                                                              Campus




Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct and communication.                                                  Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                            Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                            Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                            Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                            Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                            Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                            Campus

Graduate students are not directly admitted to this degree program.
Instead, this degree is available for faulty to confer on Ph.D. students
who 1) choose to not continue with their doctoral studies beyond the
qualifying exams, or 2) choose to not complete a dissertation. This
degree is conferred at a rate of one to two every five years.               Campus
Graduate students are not directly admitted to this degree program.
Instead, this degree is available for faulty to confer on Ph.D. students
who 1) choose to not continue with their doctoral studies beyond the
qualifying exams, or 2) choose to not complete a dissertation. This
degree is conferred at a rate of one to two every five years.              Campus

Graduate students are not directly admitted to this degree program.
Instead, this degree is available for faulty to confer on Ph.D. students
who 1) choose to not continue with their doctoral studies beyond the
qualifying exams, or 2) choose to not complete a dissertation. This
degree is conferred at a rate of one to two every five years.              Campus




Ability to identify a problem.                                             Campus




Ability to formulate a problem.                                            Campus




Ability to solve engineering problems.                                     Campus


An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice at an advanced level.                   Campus




An ability to communicate effectively.                                     Campus




Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the fundamental science of
the declared sub-discipline within chemistry (physical, biochemistry,
organic, inorganic and analytical chemistry).                              Campus




Demonstrate the ability to formulate new research ideas and carry them
out in the laboratory.                                                 Campus
Demonstrate ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork,
professional conduct and high level oral and written communication
skills.                                                                  Campus




Students will demonstrate an ability to identify, formulate, and solve
engineering problems in the student’s program area. (Civil Engineering
Materials, Water Resources, Geotechnical Engineering, Construction,
Public Works, Structures, and Transportation).                           Both
Students will demonstrate an ability to use the techniques, skills, and
modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice at an
advanced level in the students program area (Civil Engineering Materials,
Water Resources, Geotechnical Engineering, Construction, Public Works,
Structures, and Transportation).                                          Both




Students will demonstrate an ability to communicate in a professional
manner within the student's graduate program area . (Civil Engineering
Materials, Water Resources, Geotechnical Engineering, Construction,
Public Works, Structures, and Transportation.)                           Both
Students will demonstrate an ability to critically read engineering
literature in Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering and an ability to
identify, formulate new solutions to engineering problems in Coastal and
Oceanographic Engineering.                                               Campus




Students will demonstrate an ability to use the techniques, skills, and
modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice at an
advanced level in Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering.                  Campus




Students will demonstrate an ability to communicate in a professional
manner within the student's graduate program area of Coastal and
Oceanographic Engineering.                                                Campus
Ability to identify, formulate, and solve computer science and
engineering problems.                                                     Both
Ability to critically read computer science and engineering literature.   Both

Ability to use techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computer
science and engineering practice at an advanced level.                    Both


Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.                 Both
Ability to communicate effectively.                                       Both
Ability to identify, formulate, and solve computer science and
engineering problems.                                                     Both


Ability to critically read computer science and engineering literature.   Both

Ability to use techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computer
science and engineering practice at an advanced level.                    Both


Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.                 Both
Ability to communicate effectively.                                       Both




Demonstrate proficiency in their specialty.                               Campus




Demonstrate clinical excellence in their specialty.                       Campus


Clinically competent to evaluate, diagnose and treat patients.            Campus
Develop research skills and assess scientific conclusions.                Campus




Recognize standards for ethical behavior.                                 Campus




Engage in lifelong learning, with a commitment to teaching and service.   Campus
Ability to identify, formulate, and solve computer science and
engineering problems.                                                     Campus


Ability to critically read computer science and engineering literature.   Campus

Ability to use techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computer
science and engineering practice at an advanced level.                    Campus


Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.                 Campus
Ability to communicate effectively.                                       Campus
Ability to identify, formulate and solve electrical and computer
engineering problems                                               Both




Ability to use applied mathematical techniques                     Both
Ability to use modern engineering tools for practice at an advanced level Both
The ECE department does not currently teach topics related to
professional behavior, so we are unable to evaluate this learning
outcome.                                                                  Campus




Demonstrate knowledge of insects, other arthropods and/or nematodes,
including their relationship with the environment and humans.        Distance




Demonstrate knowledge of insects, other arthropods and/or nematodes,
including their relationship with the environment and humans.        Campus




Demonstrate knowledge of insects, other arthropods and/or nematodes,
including their relationship with the environment and humans.        Campus
Demonstrate an understanding of experimental design and execution.    Distance


Demonstrate an understanding of experimental design and execution.    Campus




Demonstrate an understanding of experimental design and execution.    Campus




Develop skills in communicating science orally and in written form    Campus




Develop skills in communicating science orally and in written form    Campus




Develop skills in communicating science orally and in written form    Distance

Interacting with professional peers with honesty, ethical behavior,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork and effective communication            Both
Interacting with professional peers with honesty, ethical behavior,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork and effective communication             Campus




Demonstrate competency in and across business disciplines, specifically
demonstrate knowledge and understanding of elements of economics,
finance, accounting, marketing, operations management, organizational
behavior, business law, information technology, business statistics, and
social responsibility.                                                   Campus
Apply appropriate problem solving and decision-making skills, specifically
demonstrate ability and capacity to critically evaluate and question the
feasibility of potential new venture opportunities.                        Campus
Think critically and analytically in formulating business solutions,
specifically demonstrate and apply knowledge and understanding of the
analysis and management of financial information in the valuation of
new venture opportunities.                                            Campus
Possess effective communication skills, specifically demonstrate ability
to write business documents clearly, concisely and analytically and
demonstrate ability to speak in groups and in public clearly, concisely,
and analytically, with appropriate use of visual aids.                     Campus




an ability to identify, formulate, and solve environmental problems using
scientific and engineering methods and tools                              Both
o an ability to critically read and evaluate engineering or science
literature o an ability to use the techniques, methods, and appropriate
professional tools necessary for professional practice at an advanced
level o an ability to communicate effectively.                          Both




o an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility          Both




Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
epidemiology                                                           Campus
Conduct a complete epidemiology research project                            Campus




Apply appropriate professional and ethical practices to the conduct of
research                                                                    Campus

Students will be able to use science-based research to analyze complex
social problems, issues and needs.                                          Campus


Students will be able to use science-based research to analyze complex
social problems, issues and needs.                                          Campus


Students will be able to apply social theory and research to the analysis
of policies and programs that affect families, youth and communities.       Campus


Students will be able to apply social theory and research to the analysis
of policies and programs that affect families, youth and communities.       Campus

Students will be able to analyze and assess the needs, issues and
problems of families, youth and communities.                                Campus




Students will be able to analyze and assess the needs, issues and
problems of families, youth and communities.                                Campus
Students will be able to develop, implement and analyze the impacts of
policies, programs, and organizations for families, youth and
communities.                                                                Campus




Students will be able to develop, implement and analyze the impacts of
policies, programs, and organizations for families, youth and
communities.                                                                Campus
Students will be able to demonstrate ethical behavior, cultural
sensitivity, teamwork and effective communication to interact in
professional environments.                                              Campus




Students will be able to demonstrate ethical behavior, cultural
sensitivity, teamwork and effective communication to interact in
professional environments.                                              Campus




Demonstrate technical competency in financial economics, specifically
demonstrate an understanding of valuation of financial claims.          Campus
Demonstrate ability to apply technical competency to solve finance
problems, specifically demonstrate an ability to synthesize financial and
economic data, apply the appropriate framework, and recommend a
financial strategy.                                                       Campus
Demonstrate ability to think critically about finance problems,
specifically demonstrate an ability to independently evaluate financial
strategies.                                                               Campus
Demonstrate effective communication skills, specifically demonstrate an
ability to write business documents and make clear, concise
presentations that are supported by convincing analysis.                Campus




Students can effectively communicate and work in teams with peers,
interacting honestly, ethically, and with cultural sensitivity. Students will
be able to translate skills, knowledge and motivation into observable
behaviors related to achieving success in a specific situations.              Campus
Students demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
the subject matter relevant to their discipline.                   Campus




Students demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
the subject matter relevant to their discipline.                   Campus




Students will be able to effectively communicate in both written and oral
form.                                                                     Campus




Students will be able to effectively communicate in both written and oral
form.                                                                     Campus




Students will demonstrate their competence in research by applying the
scientific method and the appropriate methodologies to the generation
of new knowledge.                                                      Campus
Students will develop an understanding of proper experimental design
and execution.                                                         Campus




Students develop critical thinking, including understanding and
evaluating spoken and written communications.                          Campus




Students will have a thorough understanding and comprehension of
economic, management, marketing, finance, quantitative analysis, and
policy principles as they apply to food and agribusiness firms.        Campus




Students will apply, analyze, and synthesize content knowledge to solve
management problems faced by food and agribusiness firms                Campus
Students will demonstrate teamwork, ethical, cultural sensitivity, and
professional communication skills.                                       Campus




Advanced comprehension and mastery of several components and
interactions of food and health.                                         Campus


Advanced comprehension and mastery of several components and
interactions of food and health.                                         Campus




Development of critical thinking skills.                                 Campus




Development of critical thinking skills.                                 Campus




Competency in research planning, methodologies and research
interpretation.                                                          Campus


Competency in research planning, methodologies and research
interpretation.                                                          Campus
Demonstration of ethical behavior in all areas of conduct; displaying
respect, fellowship, and cooperation among peers as well as among
faculty and staff.                                                       Campus
Demonstration of ethical behavior in all areas of conduct; displaying
respect, fellowship, and cooperation among peers as well as among
faculty and staff.                                                        Campus




Demonstration of ethical behavior in all areas of conduct; displaying
respect, fellowship, and cooperation among peers as well as among
faculty and staff.                                                        Campus

Competency in major-specific and related subject matter areas relevant
to the individualized focus of the degree program, e.g. physiology,
genetics, ecology, economics, geomatics, management, environmental
education, silviculture, pathology, and policy.                        Both

Competency in major-specific and related subject matter areas relevant
to the individualized focus of the degree program, e.g. physiology,
genetics, ecology, economics, geomatics, management, environmental
education, silviculture, pathology, and policy.                        Both

Competence in critical evaluation of literature, analysis and synthesis of
information, understanding experimental and descriptive research
methodologies, and effectively communicating information and ideas
relevant to their specific program of study.                               Both

Competence in critical evaluation of literature, analysis and synthesis of
information, understanding experimental and descriptive research
methodologies, and effectively communicating information and ideas
relevant to their specific program of study.                               Both

Honest, ethical, and culturally sensitive behavior and practices in all
scholarly activities including teaching, research, and outreach.          Both




Honest, ethical, and culturally sensitive behavior and practices in all
scholarly activities including teaching, research, and outreach.          Both




Students know the subject matter related to their discipline.             Campus
Students think critically about the emerging science in their discipline.   Campus




Students will exhibit professional behavior and ethical practice during
the conduct of their research.                                              Campus


Students are able to articulate orally and in writing the results and
applications of their research and scholarship. They should know the
basic concepts, theories, and observational findings related to Earth
materials and processes as they pertain to the student’s research
emphasis that forms the foundation of a graduate thesis document.           Campus

Students are able to articulate orally and in writing the results and
applications of their research and scholarship. They should know the
basic concepts, theories, and observational findings related to Earth
materials and processes as they pertain to the student’s research
emphasis that forms the foundation of a graduate thesis document.           Campus

Students are able to articulate orally and in writing the results and
applications of their research and scholarship. They should know the
basic concepts, theories, and observational findings related to Earth
materials and processes as they pertain to the student’s research
emphasis that forms the foundation of a graduate thesis document.           Campus




Demonstrate problem solving skills by: Analyzing data in the published
literature; Synthesizing analog and digital datasets to produce original
geologic maps and/or datasets; Applying the scientific method to
analysis of published and self-generated data                            Campus




Demonstrate problem solving skills by: Analyzing data in the published
literature; Synthesizing analog and digital datasets to produce original
geologic maps and/or datasets; Applying the scientific method to
analysis of published and self-generated data                            Campus
Students will demonstrate professional attributes such as: attending
local, regional or national conferences and skills such as
writing/preparing professional communications; conducting research in
an ethical and responsible manner                                          Campus
Students will demonstrate professional attributes such as: attending
local, regional or national conferences and skills such as
writing/preparing professional communications; conducting research in
an ethical and responsible manner                                          Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of health
education and behavior.                                                    Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of health
education and behavior.                                                    Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in health education and behavior skills.           Campus


Demonstrate proficiency in health education and behavior skills.           Campus
Demonstrate proficiency in conducting themselves in a professional
manner.                                                                    Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in conducting themselves in a professional
manner.                                                                    Campus




Students will obtain contemporary and relevant knowledge in the
various disciplines of Horticultural Sciences including understand plant
physiology and plant genetics as related to horticultural plant growth
and development, and the integration of structure and function of the
whole plant.                                                               Campus
Students will be able to demonstrate problem-solving skills through
experimental design and data analysis required for successful production
of fruits, vegetables and ornamental crops.                              Campus




Professional Behavior: Understand and display ethical behaviors, cultural
sensitivity, teamwork and professional conduct.                           Campus




Students will become knowledgeable of new techniques and
technologies from associated disciplines.                                 Campus




Students will understand how to evaluate horticultural systems,
components and/or processes to meet industry and societal needs
within realistic economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health
and safety, manufacturability and sustainability constraints.                Campus
Students will develop effective communication skills when
communicating technical data and design information to other students,
scientists, and the public.                                            Campus




Students must develop expertise in mathematical modeling and analysis
of business problems, customized development of solutions for these
problems, and the use of information technologies for solution delivery. Both
Students should be proficient in the core methodological and application
areas of operations research and industrial engineering.                 Both
Students should be able to effectively and professionally communicate
industrial engineering concepts and information in written and oral
form.                                                                   Both
Demonstrate competency in and across business disciplines, specifically
demonstrate knowledge and understanding of elements of economics,
finance, accounting, marketing, operations management, organizational
behavior, business law, information technology, business statistics, and
social responsibility.                                                   Campus
Apply appropriate problem solving and decision-making skills, specifically
specify and implement a framework for identifying a business problem
and develop alternative solutions and a set of evaluation criteria and
assess the outcomes of a course of action and make appropriate
adjustments.                                                               Campus
Possess effective communication skills, specifically to write business
documents clearly, concisely, and analytically and speak in groups and in
public clearly, concisely, and analytically, with appropriate use of visual
aids.                                                                       Campus
Possess effective communication skills, specifically to write business
documents clearly, concisely, and analytically and speak in groups and in
public clearly, concisely, and analytically, with appropriate use of visual
aids.                                                                       Campus
Think critically and analytically in formulating business solutions,
specifically to solve intricate problems by applying expanded knowledge
of ever evolving technologies, processes, and technical skills and
critically evaluate the impact of business decisions on stakeholders.   Campus




Thorough understanding of the components, processes, and interactions
of the social-ecological system.                                      Campus
Thorough understanding of the components, processes, and interactions
of the social-ecological system.                                      Campus




Thorough understanding of the components, processes, and interactions
of the social-ecological system.                                      Campus




Thorough understanding of the components, processes, and interactions
of the social-ecological system.                                      Campus




Competence in research methodologies for applying the scientific
method to the generation of new knowledge.                          Campus
Competence in research methodologies for applying the scientific
method to the generation of new knowledge.                            Campus




Interacting with professional peers with honesty, ethical behavior,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, and effective communication.          Campus




Interacting with professional peers with honesty, ethical behavior,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, and effective communication.          Campus
Demonstrate competency across business disciplines, specifically
demonstrate significant business knowledge gain compared to
knowledge at program entry and apply the essential elements of core
business principles to analyze and evaluate problems and to construct
and implement solutions in the business environment.                    Campus
Demonstrate critical thinking, specifically employ appropriate analytical
models and apply critical reasoning processes to evaluate evidence,
select among alternatives, and generate creative options to advance
effective decision making.                                                Campus
Possess effective communication skills, specifically write business
documents clearly, concisely, and analytically and speak in groups and in
public clearly, concisely, and analytically, with appropriate use of visual
aids.                                                                       Campus




An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.        Both




An ability to critically read engineering literature                      Both
An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.             Both




An ability to communicate effectively.                                   Both




An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice at an advanced level.                 Both

(1) Develop proficiency in the teaching of undergraduate mathematics at
various levels; initially in cooperation with coordinators, progressively
independent.                                                              Campus




 (1) Demonstrate ability to formulate and solve 'real-world' problems.
(2) Develop ability to communicate mathematics effectively, in teaching. Campus
 (1) Acquire understanding of mathematics in a range of areas
Measured by whom: Course instructors.     (2) Achieve a firmer grasp of
two core areas, chosen from algebra/analysis/applied. How measured:
Two comprehensive written examinations. Desired level: 100% pass
both examinations. Measured by whom: Examination committees.            Campus




Ability to identify, formulate and solve mechanical engineering problems Campus




Ability to use applied mathematical techniques Ability to use modern
engineering tools for practice at an advance level                     Both
No Outcome                                                             Campus
Students will master core knowledge (genetics, cell biology,
biochemistry/molecular biology) along with concentration-specific core
knowledge (genetics, molecular cell biology, immunology/microbiology,
physiology/pharmacology, biochemistry/molecular biology, or
neuroscience).                                                         Campus




Students will master the discipline and research project-related
knowledge to complete their Masters thesis research.                          Campus

Students will master the ability to read, interpret, and critically analyze
the published literature of their field. They will master the skill in
presenting analysis of the literature in a formal, structured class-like
setting.                                                                      Campus




Students will master the skill of the scientific method: formulating
hypotheses based on their ability to use the literature, their own
experimental observations, and those of others; designing a technically
sound and up-to-date experimental plan with appropriate controls;
executing the experimental plan in a technically proficient manner;
interpreting the data; and then reformulating hypotheses.                     Campus




Students will demonstrate professionalism in their conduct of research,
specifically knowledge of and adherence to ethical conduct in research
and adherence to appropriate safety, administrative, and regulatory
rules.                                                                        Campus
Students will demonstrate professionalism in their presentation of their
own research results in oral and written formats.                        Campus




Thorough understanding of the molecular genetic, biochemical and
cellular basis of life.                                                Campus




Thorough understanding of the molecular genetic, biochemical and
cellular basis of life.                                                Campus




Competence in research methodologies for applying the scientific
method to the generation of new knowledge (M.S. Thesis) or
preparation of a technical report or project (Non-thesis M.S.).        Campus




Interacting with professional peers with honesty, ethical behavior,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, and effective communication.           Campus
An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.       Both




An ability to critically read engineering literature                     Both




An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice at an advanced level.                 Both




An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.             Both




An ability to communicate effectively.                                   Both
Students demonstrate overall knowledge of the field of physics          Campus




Students are required to show that they can synthesize their knowledge
of physics and apply it to new areas of physics and/or demonstrate
mastery of physics at a high level.                                    Campus




Students will demonstrate ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity and
professional conduct and be able to communicate their work orally as
well as in writing.                                                     Campus

Students demonstrate fundamental knowledge in plant biochemistry,
cell and developmental biology, genetics and genomics, molecular
biology and general plant biology, and develop critical thinking to
evaluate research and design experiments.                               Campus

Students demonstrate fundamental knowledge in plant biochemistry,
cell and developmental biology, genetics and genomics, molecular
biology and general plant biology, and develop critical thinking to
evaluate research and design experiments.                               Campus
Students can critically evaluate the primary scientific literature.   Campus




Students can critically evaluate the primary scientific literature.   Campus




Students develop practical knowledge of experimental research.        Campus




Students develop practical knowledge of experimental research.        Campus




Students develop scientific writing and oral presentation skills.     Campus




Students develop scientific writing and oral presentation skills.     Campus
Students can effectively communicate and work in teams with peers
interacting honestly, ethically, and with cultural sensitivity.        Campus




Students can effectively communicate and work in teams with peers
interacting honestly, ethically, and with cultural sensitivity.        Campus




Acquire knowledge and critical understanding of the science of Plant
Pathology, its literature, theories, and ideas.                        Campus
Acquire knowledge and critical understanding of the science of Plant
Pathology, its literature, theories, and ideas.                        Campus




Develop cognitive analytical and decision making skills necessary to
utilize the scientific method to conduct experimental research.        Campus




Develop effective skills in oral and written communication             Campus
Develop teaching skills for course development, organization and
delivery                                                              Campus




Students will develop and exhibit professional behavior and ethical
practices in the conduct of their research and scholarship.           Campus




Students will achieve a broad and general comprehension of the science
of psychology and of the specialty area of clinical psychology.        Campus




Students will achieve a broad and general comprehension of the science
of psychology and of the specialty area of clinical psychology.        Campus




Students will develop broad competencies in psychological asssessment,
intervention, and treatment                                            Campus
Students will develop broad competencies in psychological asssessment,
intervention, and treatment                                            Campus

Student will deliver professional services to patients and conduct
research in a manner that shows dedication to applicable ethical,
professional practice, and legal standards                            Campus

Student will deliver professional services to patients and conduct
research in a manner that shows dedication to applicable ethical,
professional practice, and legal standards                            Campus




Students will develop competencies in design, conduct, and reporting of
scientific psychological research                                       Campus




Students will develop competencies in design, conduct, and reporting of
scientific psychological research                                       Campus
Possess effective communication skills, specifically write business
documents clearly, concisely, and analytically and speak in groups and in
public clearly, concisely, and analytically, with appropriate use of visual
aids.                                                                       Campus
Demonstrate competency in and across real estate disciplines,
speficically demonstrate knowledge and understanding of elements of
construction methods and materials, market analysis, real estate finance
and investment, real estate law, real estate appraisal, business statistics,
and ethical and social responsibility.                                       Campus
Apply appropriate problem solving and decision-making skills, specifically
specify and implement a framework for identifying a real estate
problem/decision, apply appropriate decision making tools, techniques,
and evaluation criteria to the problem/decision, and develop alternative
solutions and predict the outcomes of a decision or course of action and
make appropriate adjustments to changing conditions and information. Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
recreation, parks and tourism.                                           Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
recreation, parks and tourism.                                           Campus
Demonstrate proficiency in conducting themselves in a professional
manner.                                                                  Campus
Demonstrate proficiency in conducting themselves in a professional
manner.                                                                  Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in conducting themselves in a professional
manner.                                                                  Campus
Students will demonstrate proficiency in recreation, parks and tourism
skills.                                                                  Campus
Students will demonstrate proficiency in recreation, parks and tourism
skills.                                                                  Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of research
methods within recreation, parks and tourism.                      Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of research
methods within recreation, parks and tourism.                      Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of research
methods within recreation, parks and tourism.                      Campus




Demonstrate comprehensive understanding in soil and water sciences.   Both




Demonstrate comprehensive understanding in soil and water sciences.   Both




Demonstrate problem solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing content knowledge by identifying component parts,
relationships and ideas.                                              Both
Demonstrate problem solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing content knowledge by identifying component parts,
relationships and ideas.                                                  Both




Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct and communication.                                                Both




Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct and communication.                                                Both
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of sport
management.                                                          Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of sport
management.                                                          Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of sport
management.                                                          Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of research
methods within sport management.                                   Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of research
methods within sport management.                                   Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of research
methods within sport management.                                   Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of research
methods within sport management.                                   Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in sport management skills.                  Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in sport management skills.                  Campus


Demonstrate proficiency in sport management skills.                  Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in sport management skills.                  Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in conducting themselves in a professional
manner.                                                              Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in conducting themselves in a professional
manner.                                                              Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in conducting themselves in a professional
manner.                                                              Campus
Students will attain the necessary technical skills, knowledge and
attitudes to obtain suitable employment or pursue advanced education. Campus




Students will learn to think critically when evaluating new information
and ideas contained in books and journal articles as well as information
and ideas presented at scientific meetings, seminars, or informal
discussions with other scientists.                                         Campus




Students will learn to think critically when evaluating new information
and ideas contained in books and journal articles as well as information
and ideas presented at scientific meetings, seminars, or informal
discussions with other scientists.                                         Campus




Students will learn to think critically when evaluating new information
and ideas contained in books and journal articles as well as information
and ideas presented at scientific meetings, seminars, or informal
discussions with other scientists.                                         Campus


Students will learn speaking skills needed to communicate orally in
formal or informal settings.                                               Campus
Students will learn speaking skills needed to communicate orally in
formal or informal settings.                                              Campus




Students will learn scientific writing skills.                            Campus
Students will exhibit ethical and professional behavior during their
studies and research.                                                     Campus


Students will exhibit ethical and professional behavior during their
studies and research.                                                     Campus
Students will learn an appropriate body of knowledge in their area of
specialization within broader areas of animal health, animal biology, and
biomedical science.                                                       Campus




Students will “learn how to learn” independently of any formal courses
to prepare them to learn independently for the rest of their lives.       Campus




Students will learn the etiquette of constructive criticism, including both
how to provide appropriate constructive criticism in a professional
manner, and likewise, how to respond to constructive criticism in a
professional manner. The latter case will include responses accepting
and revising manuscripts in accordance to constructive criticism as well
as disagreeing with such criticism in a professional manner                 Campus
Students will achieve a thorough understanding and comprehension of
wildlife ecology and conservation science, and demonstrate mastery of
methods and techniques in a specialization.                                Campus




Students will demonstrate ability to plan, conduct and analyze a research
problem (MS-Thesis) or present a technical report or project (MS-Non-
Thesis) in the field of wildlife ecology and conservation.                Campus




Students will demonstrate problem–solving skills by application and
analysis using quantitative, spatial or qualitative research approaches for
addressing wildlife ecology and conservation problems.                      Campus




Students will demonstrate proficiency and productivity in oral and
written communication.                                                     Campus




Students will demonstrate proficiency and productivity in oral and
written communication.                                                     Campus

Students will display ethical behaviors and professional conduct to
contribute as responsible professionals in the field of wildlife ecology
and conservation.                                                          Campus
Students will display ethical behaviors and professional conduct to
contribute as responsible professionals in the field of wildlife ecology
and conservation.                                                          Campus




Students will demonstrate ethical behaviors and professional conduct;
they will be able to interact and communicate with professionals at
scientific conferences.                                                    Campus

Students will demonstrate ethical behaviors and professional conduct;
they will be able to interact and communicate with professionals at
scientific conferences.                                                    Campus

Students will demonstrate knowledge of the basic fundamentals of
biology and zoology.                                                       Campus




Students will demonstrate the ability to design a research project, collect
data, analyze and interpret the results. Be able to present this in written
and oral form.                                                              Campus
Ability to apply critical thinking, specialized knowledge and research
protocols to study problems and develop research based design
strategies that support architectural design.                            Campus




Ability to individualize an area of focus, develop self-determination and
support a project team, collaborate with other professionals for inclusive
and integrative proposals. Develop a personal teaching pedagogy as
related to a research expertise.                                           Campus
Engage at leadership levels in advancing culture through the design of
buildings and cities.                                                    Campus




By a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject matter
relevant to the discipline.                                              Campus




By a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject matter
relevant to the discipline.                                              Campus




By applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content knowledge to solve
problems by identifying component parts, relationships and ideas.        Campus




By displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork,
professional conduct and communication.                                  Campus
An MSN graduate will demonstrate a comprehensive, in-depth
knowledge base for life-long learning and professional development as
evidenced by annual pass rates on the national certification exams
>80%.                                                                     Campus
An MSN graduate who is clinical competent to assume an advanced
practice nursing position.                                                Campus
An MSN graduate who is clinically competent to assume an advanced
practice nursing position.                                                Campus




Demonstrate the ability to effectively convey information when talking
about a topic that is related to a discipline within the pharmaceutical
sciences.                                                                 Campus




Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge related to a specific discipline
within the pharmaceutical sciences.                                       Campus




Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge related to a specific discipline
within the pharmaceutical sciences.                                       Campus




Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge related to a specific discipline
within the pharmaceutical sciences.                                       Distance
Demonstrate the ability to evaluate a research problem that is related to
a discipline within the pharmaceutical sciences.                          Campus




Demonstrate the ability to evaluate a research problem that is related to
a discipline within the pharmaceutical sciences.                          Distance




Acquire core knowledge in statistical methods and applications.          Campus




Identify appropriate methods, conduct appropriate analyses on data,
and successfully collaborate with scientists in other disciplines.       Campus




Clearly and effectively present ideas in speech and writing concerning
statistical issues and analysis of data.                                 Campus




Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the fundamental astrophysics.                           Campus




Students will demonstrate the ability to effectively teach astronomy.    Campus
Students will demonstrate the ability to effective communicate with
their peers in a professional environment.                                Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus




Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the fundamental science of
chemistry and an ability to communicate it to students through
pedagogy and education                                                    Campus


Demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate the principles of
chemistry by training in an educational setting.                          Campus




Demonstrate ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork,
professional conduct and good oral and written communication skills.      Campus
Students know the subject matter related to their discipline.               Campus




Students think critically about the emerging science in their discipline.   Campus




Students will conduct their research with professionalism taught by their
supervisory committee.                                                    Campus




Students are able to articulate orally and in writing the results and
applications of their scholarship, demonstrating a proficiency in
geosciences content. They should know the basic concepts, theories, and
observational findings related to Earth materials and processes.        Campus




Students are able to demonstrate knowledge of the geosciences content
standards established at the state or national level and be able to relate
developmentally appropriate concepts, theories, and observational
findings related to Earth materials and processes to those content
standards.                                                                 Campus




Demonstrate problem solving skills by: Applying the scientific method
to analysis of published and/or self-generated data.                        Campus
Students will create, select and implement: (1) specific learning goals, (2)
appropriate teaching methods and instructional materials and (3)
evaluation strategies aligned with goals, using knowledge of subject
matter, learners and classroom management.                                   Campus

Students will demonstrate professional attributes such as: conducting
research in an ethical and responsible manner ; productive classroom
management; the ability to effectively communicate with students; the
ability to provide constructive assessment and feedback of student work Campus

Students will demonstrate professional attributes such as: conducting
research in an ethical and responsible manner ; productive classroom
management; the ability to effectively communicate with students; the
ability to provide constructive assessment and feedback of student work   Campus
program under review for closure                                          Campus
program under review for closure                                          Campus
program under review for closure                                          Campus




Students demonstrate overall knowledge of the field of physics.           Campus




Students are required to demonstrate the capability to communicate
successfully in both a classroom and a teaching lab environment.          Campus




The student will display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity and
professional conduct and be able to communicate their work orally as
well as in writing.                                                       Campus
Students will demonstrate knowledge of the basic fundamentals of
zoology and pedagogy.                                                   Campus




Students will demonstrate the ability to teach zoology and biology.     Campus


Students will demonstrate ethical behaviors and professional conduct;
they will be able to interact and with professionals at conferences.    Campus




Students will demonstrate ethical behaviors and professional conduct;
they will be able to interact and with professionals at conferences.    Campus




Acquire core knowledge in statistical methods and applications.         Campus




Identify appropriate methods, conduct appropriate analyses on data,
and successfully collaborate with scientists in other disciplines.      Campus
Clearly and effectively present ideas in speech and writing concerning
statistical issues and analysis of data.                                   Campus




Ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems Ability to
critically read and integrate engineering research literature              Campus




Ability to use applied mathematical and/or modern experimental
techniques Ability to use modern engineering tools for practice at an
advance level                                                              Campus




Ability to communicate effectively                                         Campus
by a thorough understanding and comprehension of mathematics,
science and engineering principles of the discipline of Agricultural and
Biological Engineering                                                     Campus
by a thorough understanding and comprehension of mathematics,
science and engineering principles of the discipline of Agricultural and
Biological Engineering                                                     Campus
by a thorough understanding and comprehension of mathematics,
science and engineering principles of the discipline of Agricultural and
Biological Engineering                                                     Campus

by a thorough understanding and comprehension of mathematics,
science and engineering principles of the discipline of Agricultural and
Biological Engineering                                                     Campus

by applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content knowledge to plan and
conduct scholarly activities that make original contributions to the
knowledge base in the field of study by identifying components or
processes of agricultural and/or biological systems to meet desired
needs within realistic economic, environmental, social, political, ethical,
health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability constraints.        Campus

by applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content knowledge to plan and
conduct scholarly activities that make original contributions to the
knowledge base in the field of study by identifying components or
processes of agricultural and/or biological systems to meet desired
needs within realistic economic, environmental, social, political, ethical,
health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability constraints.        Campus




by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                     Campus




by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                     Campus




by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                     Campus




by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                     Campus
by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                  Campus


by displaying ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity , teamwork,
professional conduct and communication                                  Campus

Competency in contemporary and foundational theory and research in
their selected specialization by a thorough understanding and
comprehension of subject matter relevant to the discipline.             Campus
Application of evolving concepts and philosophies in their selected
specialization by applying, analyzing, and synthesizing content
knowledge to solve problems by identifying component parts,
relationships and ideas.                                                Campus

Effective use of instructional materials and methods with emphasis on
application of visual and nonvisual techniques.                          Campus
Application of Concepts and principles related to design, implementation
and evaluation of formal and non-formal education and/or training and
development programs.                                                    Campus

Application of principles, practices and strategies for conducting
behavioral research in agricultural and natural resource professions.   Campus




Outstanding professional character by displaying ethical behaviors,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional conduct and communication. Campus
Acquire a core knowledge base in the plant sciences, with a deeper
knowledge in a chosen specialization (genetics/breeding,
physiology/biochemistry, ecology, management and nutrition).         Campus
Acquire the knowledge to design and execute an innovative research
plan and to analyze, synthesize and interpret research results using
appropriate experimental designs and statistical analyses.                 Campus




Acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to address and solve issues
related to crop production and resource management and to become
respected professionals and leaders in the discipline (in academia,
government, or the private sector).                                        Campus




Excellence in critical thinking, scientific writing, experimental techniques,
data collection, data analysis and synthesis.                                 Campus
Excellence in oral and written communication and interpersonal
relationships.                                                              Campus




Professional and ethical conduct will be evident in all scholarly activities.
Collegiality, cultural sensitivities, and ethical behaviors and practices will
be demonstrated in the conduct of all scholarly activities including
teaching, research, and outreach.                                              Campus

Thorough understanding of the principles of molecular and cellular
biology and their application to comparative biology.                       Campus


Thorough understanding of the principles of molecular and cellular
biology and their application to comparative biology.                       Campus

Ability to design, conduct and draw sound conclusions on scientific
experiments.                                                                Campus


Ability to design, conduct and draw sound conclusions on scientific
experiments.                                                                Campus

Interaction with peers and instructors with honesty, cultural sensitivity
and effective communication.                                                Campus
Interaction with peers and instructors with honesty, cultural sensitivity
and effective communication.                                                Campus




Thorough understanding of animal sciences.                                  Campus




Thorough understanding of animal sciences.                                  Campus




Ability to apply scientific methods to problems in animal sciences and
develop new solutions to such problems.                                     Campus




Competence in research methodologies for applying the scientific
method to solve problems and generate new knowledge.                        Campus




Understanding of grantsmanship.                                             Campus




Display professional conduct including ethical behaviors, cultural
sensitivity, and ability to work well independently or in a team.           Campus
Professional communication.                                                  Campus




Demonstrate thorough understanding of the development of the
discipline of Anthropology and in-depth knowledge of a subfield.             Campus




Demonstration of mastery of professional communication through the
presentation of research at a regional, national or international
conference.                                                                  Campus
Complete coursework in research methods.                                     Campus

1. Broaden the knowledge of historical and contemporary art and the
understanding of the theoretical, cultural and historical contexts of art
through researching, speaking, and writing on advanced levels. 2.
Master processes of generating and solving problems in art history
writing; analyze, interpret and question traditional methodologies and of
art and art making on an advanced level.                                  Campus


Acquire the ability to develop a research topic in a specific field of art
history.                                                                     Campus

Master and understanding of what it means to be a professional art
historian; develop an advanced understanding of the demands and
expectations of the art profession and art field including: • use research
libraries, their archives and their contents efficiently • make
discriminating use of specialist online databases and other online
resources • construct sophisticated arguments and defend these in
substantial pieces of writing using proper academic conventions • apply
visual discrimination to the analysis and interpretation of images. •
utilize and interact with the services, facilities and technologies offered
throughout the University as well as those provided by the School of Art
and Art History.                                                            Campus
Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the fundamental astrophysics covered by the core
curriculum in our department.                                             Campus




Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the fundamental astrophysics covered by the core
curriculum in our department.                                             Campus

Students will develop and demonstrate the ability to conduct original,
independent research in astrophysics.                                     Campus
Upon completion of the Ph.D. students will have demonstrate the skills
necessary to obtain research or teaching positions in the field of
astrophysics.                                                             Campus




Students will develop and demonstrate the ability to write and publish
refereed journal articles based upon their research.                      Campus




Students will develop and demonstrate the ability to clearly
communicate their research in oral presentations in a style appropriate
for conferences.                                                          Campus




Students will develop and demonstrate the ability to clearly
communicate their research in oral presentations in a style appropriate
for conferences.                                                          Campus
Students will develop and demonstrate the ability to clearly
communicate their research in oral presentations in a style appropriate
for conferences.                                                          Campus

Students will develop and demonstrate the ability to clearly
communicate their research in oral presentations in a style appropriate
for conferences.                                                          Campus

There are no enrolled students, and this program will be terminated.      Campus

There are no enrolled students, and this program will be terminated.      Campus

There are no enrolled students, and this program will be terminated.      Campus

There are no enrolled students, and this program will be terminated.      Campus

There are no enrolled students, and this program will be terminated.      Campus

There are no enrolled students, and this program will be terminated.      Campus


an ability to develop a broad-based knowledge of Biomedical
Engineering problems                                                      Campus




an ability to critically read Biomedical Engineering literature           Campus


an ability to use apply fundamental engineering principles to identify,
analyze and solve biomedical engineering problems                         Campus


an ability to design and conduct scientific and engineering experiments,
and to analyze and interpret the resulting data                          Campus
an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility and the
impact of clinically significant engineering solutions                   Campus
an ability to communicate effectively and work collaboratively            Campus




Demonstrate a solid underpinning of biostatistics concepts and methods,
which will enable students to learn and develop new concepts and
methods on their own, as well as to apply them in collaborative work.   Campus




Ability to learn and develop new biostatistical concepts and methods
largely on one’s own, as well as the ability to apply the concepts and
methods in collaborative work.                                            Campus




Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct and communication.                                                Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus

CALS will no longer be offering a degree in Botany. Therefore, SLOs are
not needed. Al Wysocki 392-1963.                                          Campus
Ph.D. recipients will be effective researchers in industrial or academic
environments, specifically students will understand the technical tools
(theory, methodology, statistical analyses, and reporting norms)
essential to the departmental area of study.                               Campus
Ph.D. recipients will be effective researchers in industrial or academic
environments, specifically students will utilize technical tools to create
new knowledge through original research.                                     Campus
Ph.D. recipients will be effective communicators of advanced knowledge
in their area of specialization, specifically students will communicate
specialized information from their field of expertise verbally and in
writing and students will communicate specialized information from
their field of expertise verbally at a level understandable by an educated
layman or university undergraduate student.                                Campus


Ability to identify a problem.                                           Campus


Abilty to formulate a problem.                                           Campus


Ability to solve engineering problems.                                   Campus

An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice at an advanced level.                 Campus




An ability to communicate effectively.                                   Campus
Demonstrate the ability to formulate new research ideas and carry them
out in the laboratory.                                                 Campus




Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the fundamental science of
the declared sub-discipline within chemistry (physical, biochemistry,
organic, inorganic and analytical chemistry)                             Campus




Demonstrate ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork,
professional conduct and high level communication skills.                Campus




Students will demonstrate an ability to critically read engineering
literature in the student’s graduate program area (Civil Engineering
Materials, Water Resources, Geotechnical Engineering, Construction,
Public Works, Structures, and Transportation); and an ability to identify,
formulate new solutions to engineering problems in the student’s
program area                                                               Campus




Students will demonstrate an ability to develop new techniques, skills,
and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice at an
advanced level in the students program area (Civil Engineering Materials,
Water Resources, Geotechnical Engineering, Construction, Structures,
and Transportation).                                                      Campus
Students will demonstrate an ability to communicate in a professional
manner within the student’s graduate program area (Civil Engineering
Materials, Water Resources, Geotechnical Engineering, Construction,
Public Works, Structures, and Transportation)                             Campus




Students will be able to exhibit and maintain professional behavior and
conduct as TAs in the department's undergraduate courses.                 Campus




Students will have an expert proficiency in Greek and Latin.              Campus

Students will have an expert understanding of the history, literature, and
culture of ancient Greece and Rome.                                        Campus




Students will be able to produce original research in the field and explain
the significance of this research for future studies.                       Campus




Students will present original scholarship to an outside audience.        Campus


Students will present original scholarship to an outside audience.        Campus


Students will present original scholarship to an outside audience.        Campus

Students will present original scholarship to an outside audience.        Campus
Students will demonstrate an ability to critically read engineering
literature in Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering and an ability to
identify, formulate new solutions to engineering problems in Coastal and
Oceanographic Engineering.                                               Campus




Students will demonstrate an ability to develop new techniques, skills,
and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice at an
advanced level in Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering.                  Campus




Students will demonstrate an ability to communicate in a professional
manner within the student's graduate program area of Coastal and
Oceanographic Engineering.                                            Campus
Graduates of the program will demonstrate the ability to develop
appropriate research designs and methods to answer questions derived
from theory based aims.                                               Campus


Graduates of the program will demonstrate the ability to develop
appropriate research designs and methods to answer questions derived
from theory based aims.                                              Campus
Graduates of the program will demonstrate the ability to communicate
theoretical understandings and the evidence for them to audiences
which may include members with varying degrees of experience and/or
expertise.                                                           Campus

Graduates of the program will demonstrate the ability to critically
evaluate research design and discuss impact of research findings on
relevant theory.                                                          Campus


Graduates of the program will demonstrate the ability to critically
evaluate research design and discuss impact of research findings on
relevant theory.                                                          Campus

Graduates of the program will demonstrate the ability to obtain an
academic, research or professional position and secure grant funding.     Campus


Graduates of the program will demonstrate the ability to publish original
data-based research in top-tier peer-reviewed journals.                   Campus
Ability to identify, formulate, and solve computer science and
engineering problems.                                                     Both




Ability to critically read computer science and engineering literature.   Both


Ability to use techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computer
science and engineering practice at an advanced level.                    Both


Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.                 Both

Ability to communicate effectively.                                       Both

The department has learning outcomes and assessment strategies per
our accrediting body. These learning outcomes and assessment
strategies are available in the Department upon request.                  NULL

The department has learning outcomes and assessment strategies per
our accrediting body. These learning outcomes and assessment
strategies are available in the Department upon request.                  NULL
(1) Demonstrate broad understanding and application of criminological
and law and society theories (2) Demonstrate broad understanding and
application of criminological and law and society research methods (3)
Demonstrate in-depth understanding in their primary track of interest
(either Crime & Justice or Law & Society)                              Campus
(1) Demonstrate broad understanding and application of professional
ethics (2) Demonstrate broad understanding and application of the role
of the professional criminologist                                      Campus
(1) Demonstrate broad understanding and application of professional
ethics (2) Demonstrate broad understanding and application of the role
of the professional criminologist                                      Campus

(1) Demonstrate advanced competencies in conducting independent
empirical research with scientific integrity (2) Demonstrate advanced
competencies in applying substantive criminological and law and society
knowledge in critical thinking, analysis, and communication             Campus

(1) Demonstrate advanced competencies in conducting independent
empirical research with scientific integrity (2) Demonstrate advanced
competencies in applying substantive criminological and law and society
knowledge in critical thinking, analysis, and communication             Campus




The student will demonstrate mastery of scholarly breadth of research
about teaching and learning and neighboring academic fields.            Campus
The student will demonstrate expertise of an original and significant
question and issue in education.                                           Campus




The student will demonstrate clarity of written and oral expression in the
qualifying examination and the dissertation.                               Campus




The student will address professional audiences through membership in
professional organizations, research presentations, and/or scholarly
publications.                                                         Campus




Students must demonstrate indepth knowledge within their individual
discipline.                                                                Campus

Students will demonstrate the oral, written and critical thinking skills
required of doctoral faculty and researchers within their individual
discipline.                                                                Campus




Students will demonstrate the oral and written professional skills
required of faculty and researhers within their individual discipline.     Campus
Ph.D. recipients will be effective researchers in industrial or academic
environments, specifically students will understand the technical tools
(theory, methodology, statistical analyses, and reporting norms)
essential to the departmental area of study.                               Campus
Ph.D. recipients will be effective researchers in industrial or academic
environments, specifically students will utilize technical tools to create
new knowledge through original research.                                     Campus
Ph.D. recipients will be effective communicators of advanced knowledge
in their area of specialization, specifically students will communicate
specialized information from their field of expertise verbally and in
writing and students will communicate specialized information from
their field of expertise verbally at a level understandable by an educated
layman or university undergraduate student.                                Campus

Students will demonstrate advanced levels of knowledge of the core
curricular areas of educational leadership including: school finance and
law, human resources, technology, data-driven decision-making,
diversity, organizational theory, supervision, evaluation, and research.   Campus




Candidate demonstrates clarity of written and oral expression to include
advanced levels of skill in the core areas of educational leadership,
evaluation and dissertation research.                                    Campus




Candidates will participate in professional organizations and will
demonstrate ethical behavior, professional conduct and communication. Campus
Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who
have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by
understanding the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural
issues.                                                                  Campus

Candidate successfully demonstrates competencies and skills of
instructional leadership, operational leadership and school leadership by
applying knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students.    Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                           Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                           Campus

Program termination form submitted for approval.                           Campus




Ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems              Both




Ability to critically read and integrate engineering research literature   Both
Ability to use applied mathematical and/or modern experimental
techniques                                                                 Both




Ability to use modern engineering tools for practice at an advance level   Both




Ability to communicate effectively                                         Both

Students effectively compete to present at professional meetings and/or
publish their work.                                                     Campus




Students have a deep knowledge of their subject area                       Campus




Students are able to identify and develop significant projects in their
field.                                                                     Campus
Students are able to construct and successfully teach a course in their
field at the lower division level.                                        Campus

Students will be able to devise and successfully complete a book length
manuscript in their field.                                                Campus




Demonstrate knowledge of insects, other arthropods and/or nematodes,
including their relationship with the environment and humans.        Campus




Demonstrate knowledge of insects, other arthropods and/or nematodes,
including their relationship with the environment and humans.        Campus




Demonstrate an understanding of experimental design and execution.        Campus




Demonstrate an understanding of experimental design and execution.        Campus




Demonstrate an understanding of experimental design and execution.        Campus




Develop skills in communicating science orally and in written form.       Campus
Develop skills in communicating science orally and in written form.   Campus




Develop skills in communicating science orally and in written form.   Campus




Develop skills in teaching science in informal and formal venues.     Campus




Develop skills in teaching science in informal and formal venues.     Campus

Interacting with professional peers with honesty, ethical behavior,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, and effective communication.          Campus




Interacting with professional peers with honesty, ethical behavior,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, and effective communication.          Campus
Knowledge an ability to identify, formulate, and solve environmental
problems using scientific and engineering methods and tools              Campus




Skills o an ability to critically read and evaluate engineering or science
literature o an ability to use the techniques, methods, and appropriate
professional tools necessary for professional practice at an advanced
level o an ability to communicate effectively.                             Campus




Professional Behavior o an understanding of professional and ethical
responsibility                                                           Campus




Ability to design and interpret epidemiologic research studies to answer
health-related research.                                                 Campus
Ability to design and interpret epidemiologic research studies to answer
health-related research.                                                 Campus




Demonstrate a thorough understanding of epidemiology concepts.            Campus




Demonstrate a thorough understanding of epidemiology concepts.            Campus




Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct and commuication.                                                 Campus




Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct and commuication.                                                 Campus
Students can effectively communicate and work in teams with peers,
interacting honestly, ethically, and with cultural sensitivity. Students will
be able to translate skills, knowledge, and motivation into observable
behaviors related to achieving success in specific situations.                Campus




Students will be able to effectively communicate in both written and oral
form.                                                                     Campus




Students will be able to effectively communicate in both written and oral
form.                                                                     Campus
Students demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
the subject matter relevant to their discipline.                   Campus




Students demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
the subject matter relevant to their discipline.                   Campus




Students will demonstrate their competence in research by applying the
scientific method and the appropriate methodologies to the generation
of new knowledge.                                                      Campus




Students will develop an understanding of proper experimental design
and execution.                                                         Campus




Students develop critical thinking, including understanding and
evaluating spoken and written communications.                          Campus
After successful completion of the program students will be able to
identify relevant economic problems.                                  Campus




The program students will be able to identify the relevant theory
applicable to a problem and possible quantitative approaches to be
used.                                                                 Campus
Conduct a research project which generates original results which
contribute to the discipline’s knowledge and communicate those results
to an appropriate audience.                                            Campus


Conduct a research project which generates original results which
contribute to the discipline’s knowledge and communicate those results
to an appropriate audience.                                            Campus




Advanced comprehension and mastery of several components and
interactions of food and health.                                        Campus




Advanced comprehension and mastery of several components and
interactions of food and health.                                        Campus




Development of critical thinking skills.                                Campus




Development of critical thinking skills.                                Campus
Demonstration of ethical behavior in all areas of conduct; displaying
respect, fellowship, and cooperation among peers as well as among
faculty and staff.                                                      Campus
Demonstration of ethical behavior in all areas of conduct; displaying
respect, fellowship, and cooperation among peers as well as among
faculty and staff.                                                      Campus




Demonstration of ethical behavior in all areas of conduct; displaying
respect, fellowship, and cooperation among peers as well as among
faculty and staff.                                                      Campus




Competency in research planning, methodologies, performance, and
interpretation for the discovery of new information.                    Campus




Competency in research planning, methodologies, performance, and
interpretation for the discovery of new information.                    Campus




Competency in research planning, methodologies, performance, and
interpretation for the discovery of new information.                    Campus

Competency in major-specific and related subject matter areas relevant
to the individualized focus of the degree program, e.g. physiology,
genetics, ecology, economics, geomatics, management, environmental
education, silviculture, pathology, and policy.                        Campus

Competency in major-specific and related subject matter areas relevant
to the individualized focus of the degree program, e.g. physiology,
genetics, ecology, economics, geomatics, management, environmental
education, silviculture, pathology, and policy.                        Campus
Competence in critical evaluation of literature, analysis and synthesis of
information, understanding and applying experimental and/or
descriptive research methodologies, creating new knowledge through
discovery, and effectively communicating information and ideas relevant
to their specific program of study.                                        Campus

Competence in critical evaluation of literature, analysis and synthesis of
information, understanding and applying experimental and/or
descriptive research methodologies, creating new knowledge through
discovery, and effectively communicating information and ideas relevant
to their specific program of study.                                        Campus

Honest, ethical, and culturally sensitive behavior and practices in all
scholarly activities including teaching, research, and outreach.          Campus




Honest, ethical, and culturally sensitive behavior and practices in all
scholarly activities including teaching, research, and outreach.          Campus




Knowledge 1 Students will master the core knowledge for the Genetics
& Genomics Graduate Program (genetics, genomics, bioinformatics,
statistics, ethics). Knowledge 2 Students will master the discipline
and research project-related knowledge to complete their dissertation
research.                                                             Campus
Skills 1 Students will master the ability to read, interpret, and critically
analyze the published literature of their selected field. They will master
the skill in presenting analysis of the literature in a formal, structured
class-like setting.                                                          Campus




Professionalism 1 Students will demonstrate professionalism in their
conduct of research, specifically knowledge of and adherence to ethical
conduct in research and adherence to appropriate safety, administrative,
and regulatory rules.                                                    Campus




Knowledge 2 Students will master the discipline and research project-
related knowledge to complete their dissertation research.                Campus


Skills 2: Students will master the skill of the scientific method:
formulating hypotheses based on their ability to explore and interpret
primary literature, their own experimental observations, and those of
others; designing a technically sound and up-to-date experimental plan
with appropriate controls; executing the experimental plan in a
technically proficient manner; interpreting the data; and then
reformulating hypotheses.                                                 Campus




Students will demonstrate professionalism in their presentation of their
own research results in oral and written formats.                        Campus
Students demonstrate knowledge of the subject matter related to their
discipline.                                                                 Campus




Students think critically about the emerging science in their discipline.   Campus




Students will exhibit professional behavior and ethical practice during
the conduct of their research.                                              Campus




Students are able to articulate orally and in writing the results and
applications of their research and scholarship. They should know the
basic concepts, theories, and observational findings related to Earth
materials and processes as they pertain to the student’s research
emphasis that forms the foundation of a doctoral dissertation.              Campus




Students are able to articulate orally and in writing the results and
applications of their research and scholarship. They should know the
basic concepts, theories, and observational findings related to Earth
materials and processes as they pertain to the student’s research
emphasis that forms the foundation of a doctoral dissertation.              Campus


Students are able to articulate orally and in writing the results and
applications of their research and scholarship. They should know the
basic concepts, theories, and observational findings related to Earth
materials and processes as they pertain to the student’s research
emphasis that forms the foundation of a doctoral dissertation.              Campus
Demonstrate problem solving skills by: Analyzing data in the published
literature; Synthesizing analog and digital datasets to produce original
geologic maps and/or datasets; Applying the scientific method to
analysis of published and self-generated data.                           Campus




Demonstrate problem solving skills by: Analyzing data in the published
literature; Synthesizing analog and digital datasets to produce original
geologic maps and/or datasets; Applying the scientific method to
analysis of published and self-generated data.                           Campus




Students will demonstrate professional attributes such as: attending
local, regional or national conferences and skills such as
writing/preparing professional communications; conducting research in
an ethical and responsible manner                                           Campus
Students will demonstrate professional attributes such as: attending
local, regional or national conferences and skills such as
writing/preparing professional communications; conducting research in
an ethical and responsible manner                                           Campus
Students will demonstrate professional attributes such as: attending
local, regional or national conferences and skills such as
writing/preparing professional communications; conducting research in
an ethical and responsible manner                                           Campus

SLO Stated in Measurable Terms: Demonstrate a thorough
understanding and comprehension of the core areas of German literary
and cultural studies for a specific area of research within this field for the
Ph.D., as agreed upon by the faculty of the department.                        Campus

SLO Stated in Measurable Terms: Literary/Cultural Studies: Demonstrate
the ability to analyze and interpret German literary and cultural
products, apply results to broader context and engage in academic
discourse via writing and oral presentation.                           Campus
SLO Stated in Measurable Terms: Display knowledge of ethical human
data collection, professional conduct and ethical academic writing skills
(as established by the Modern Language Association).                        Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject
matter relevant to the discipline – exercise physiology, biobehaviorial
science, health behavior, recreation, parks and tourism, or sport
management.                                                                 Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
traditional and current research methods in their discipline - exercise
physiology, biobehaviorial science, health behavior, recreation, parks
and tourism, or sport management.                                           Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in the use of appropriate research methods as
determined by the discipline and faculty committee.                         Campus

Articulate orally and in writing the results of their research and
scholarship.                                                                Campus


Articulate orally and in writing the results of their research and
scholarship.                                                                Campus

Demonstrate proficiency in ethical conduct of research that is suitable
for their discipline.                                                       Campus


Students will achieve Competency in the Theory and Methods of Health
Services Research                                                    Campus

Students will demonstrate understanding of health and health care
systems.                                                                    Campus




Students will demonstrate competency for conducting health service
research.                                                                   Campus
Students will demonstrate ethical research conduct.                          Campus




 To develop an understanding of: •the role of higher education is
society •the broad sector of higher education at a national, state,
regional, and institutional level •the institutional functioning of higher
education institutions including issues related to leadership and
governance, funding, the role of the government as well as issues
pertaining to students, faculty, and administrators •major global and
national trends affecting higher education                                   Campus
To acquire a working knowledge of: •the literature in the field of higher
education •qualitative and quantitative research methodologies applied
to the study of higher education                                          Campus
To develop an ability to relate and apply major concepts and theories in
the literature to specific higher education issues, cases and settings   Campus
To develop skills of analysis, synthesis, research, and communication
(verbal and written) concerning issues and topics related to higher
education                                                               Campus
To write academically according to APA style and to other audiences
effectively                                                           Campus




• To display ethical behaviors according to professional standards
related to research and publishing and practice • To demonstrate
cultural sensitivity, awareness, and empathy • To abide to the
expectations and norms of the discipline and profession               Campus
Students will demonstrate basic knowledge of major issues in the history
of their fields of study as well as mastery of the relevant body of
historiography.                                                          Campus


Students will demonstrate an ability to design and teach courses as
teaching assistants or primary instructors.                               Campus

Students will demonstrate an ability to contribute to the international
community of historians in their field through the publication of their
research.                                                                 Campus




Students will demonstrate a mastery of the methods and practices of
historical research and writing.                                          Campus




Knowledge: Students will obtain contemporary and relevant knowledge
in the various disciplines of Horticultural Sciences including understand
plant physiology and plant genetics as related to horticultural plant
growth and development, and the integration of structure and function
of the whole plant.                                                       Campus




Students will be able to demonstrate problem-solving skills through
experimental design and data analysis required for successful production
of fruits, vegetables and ornamental crops.                              Campus
Professional Behavior: Understand and display ethical behaviors, cultural
sensitivity, teamwork, and professional conduct.                          Campus




Students will become knowledgeable of new techniques and
technologies from associated disciplines.                                 Campus




Students will understand how to evaluate horticultural systems,
components and/or processes to meet industry and societal needs
within realistic economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health
and safety, manufacturability and sustainability constraints.                Campus




Students will develop effective communication skills when
communicating technical data and design information to other students,
scientists, and the public.                                            Campus
Each student must develop a depth of expertise and specialization in a
selected area of research focus within the field of operations research
and industrial engineering.                                               Both
Students should be proficient in independent research on methodologies
and applications in operations research and industrial engineering.    Both
Students should be prepared for a career in academia, industry, or
government agency. With respect to academic positions, each student
should be capable of teaching at the university level and serving on
academic committees. With respect to the industry and government
organizations, students should be able to provide contributions of value
to these professional organizations. In either case, students should be
well prepared for lifelong service to the Industrial and Systems
Engineering community.                                                   Both




Thorough understanding of the components, processes, and interactions
of the social-ecological system.                                      Campus




Thorough understanding of the components, processes, and interactions
of the social-ecological system.                                      Campus
Thorough understanding of the components, processes, and interactions
of the social-ecological system.                                      Campus




Thorough understanding of the components, processes, and interactions
of the social-ecological system.                                      Campus




Competence in research methodologies for applying the scientific
method to the generation of new knowledge.                          Campus




Competence in research methodologies for applying the scientific
method to the generation of new knowledge.                          Campus
Interacting with professional peers with honesty, ethical behavior,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, and effective communication.                Campus




Interacting with professional peers with honesty, ethical behavior,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, and effective communication.                Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of the core
areas of linguistic study, as agreed upon by the faculty of the
department, and of a specific area of research within the field.   Campus

Demonstrate the ability to critically analyze and interpret language and
language-related data, apply results to broader context and engage in
academic discourse via writing and oral presentation                        Campus
Display knowledge of ethical human data collection, professional
conduct and ethical academic writing skills (as established by Linguistic
Society of America Ethics Statement)                                        Campus
Common core curricular experiences and demonstrated knowledge in
each of the eight common core curricular areas are required of all
students in the program                                                Campus




Professional practice, which includes practicum and internship, provides
for the application of theory and the development of counseling skills
under supervision. These experiences will provide opportunities for
students to counsel clients who represent the ethnic and demographic
diversity of their community.                                            Campus
1. PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION AND ETHICAL PRACTICE—studies that
provide an understanding of all of the following aspects of professional
functioning a. history and philosophy of the counseling profession; b.
professional roles, functions, and relationships with other human service
providers, including strategies for interagency/interorganization
collaboration and communications c. counselors’ roles and
responsibilities as members of an interdisciplinary emergency
management response team during a local, regional, or national crisis,
disaster or other trauma-causing event; d. self-care strategies
appropriate to the counselor role; e. counseling supervision models,
practices, and processes; f. professional organizations, including
membership benefits, activities, services to members, and current
issues; g. professional credentialing, including certification, licensure,
and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public
policy on these issues; h. the role and process of the professional
counselor advocating on behalf of the profession; i. advocacy
processes needed to address institutional and social barriers that
impede access, equity, and success for clients; and j. ethical standards
of professional organizations and credentialing bodies, and applications
of ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling             Campus




Development of a thorough understanding of mass communication
theory and proficiency in research methods surrounding a specific area
of expertise in the mass communication field                           Campus




Development of a thorough understanding of mass communication
theory and proficiency in research methods surrounding a specific area
of expertise in the mass communication field                            Campus
Demonstrate, thorough understanding of communication subject and
methodology, the ability to successfully complete research studies
through conceptualization, methodological expertise, analysis and
submission to professional conferences and publication in peer-reviewed
journals.                                                               Campus
Demonstrate, thorough understanding of communication subject and
methodology, the ability to successfully complete research studies
through conceptualization, methodological expertise, analysis and
submission to professional conferences and publication in peer-reviewed
journals.                                                               Campus
Display of ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity and appreciation for
diverse viewpoints, leadership, independent and creative thinking.        Campus




Participation in professional and academic service activities that develop
leadership skills                                                          Campus




An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.        Both




An ability to critically read engineering literature                      Both




An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice at an advanced level.                  Both




An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.              Both
An ability to communicate effectively.                                     Both




(1) Acquire an understanding of mathematics across a broad range of
subjects.    Measured by whom: Course instructors. (2) Achieve a
deeper understanding of mathematics in chosen specialties. How
measured: Comprehensive written examinations in two chosen areas.
Desired level: 100% pass both examinations. Measured by whom:
Examination committees.                                                    Campus




Skills (1) Demonstrate skill in formulation of problems and their
solution, along with an appreciation of their origins and relationships.
How measured: Doctoral dissertation. Measured by whom: Doctoral
supervisory committee. (2) Demonstrate skills in the oral presentation
of mathematics to faculty and peers.      How measured: Oral
examinations on dissertation and related material; seminar talks.
Measured by whom: Doctoral supervisory committee; seminar
organizers.                                                              Campus




 (1) Develop proficiency in the teaching of undergraduate mathematics
at various levels; initially in cooperation with coordinators, progressively
independent. How measured: Observation, student evaluations.
Measured by whom: Course coordinators, undergraduate coordinator. Campus




Ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems Ability to
critically read and integrate engineering research literature              Campus
Ability to use applied mathematical and/or modern experimental
techniques Ability to use modern engineering tools for practice at an
advance level                                                           Campus




Ability to communicate effectively                                      Campus




Students will master the core knowledge for the entire Interdisciplinary
Program (genetics, cell biology, biochemistry/molecular biology)
followed by concentration-specific core knowledge (genetics, molecular
cell biology, immunology/microbiology, physiology/pharmacology,
biochemistry/molecular biology, or neuroscience).                        Campus
Students will master the discipline- and research project-related
knowledge to complete their dissertation research.                            Campus
Students will master the ability to read, interpret, and critically analyze
the published literature of their field. They will master the skill in
presenting analysis of the literature in a formal, structured class-like
setting.                                                                      Campus




Students will master the skill of the scientific method: formulating
hypotheses based on their ability to use the literature, their own
experimental observations, and those of others; designing a technically
sound and up-to-date experimental plan with appropriate controls;
executing the experimental plan in a technically proficient manner;
interpreting the data; and then reformulating hypotheses.                     Campus




Students will demonstrate professionalism in their conduct of research,
specifically knowledge of and adherence to ethical conduct in research
and adherence to appropriate safety, administrative, and regulatory
rules.                                                                        Campus




Students will demonstrate professionalism in their presentation of their
own research results in oral and written formats.                        Campus
Knowledge: Common core curricular experiences and demonstrated
knowledge in each of the eight common core                             Campus




Professional practice, which includes practicum and internship, provides
for the application of theory and the development of counseling skills
under supervision. These experiences will provide opportunities for
students to counsel clients who represent the ethnic and demographic
diversity of their community.                                            Campus
1. PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION AND ETHICAL PRACTICE—studies that
provide an understanding of all of the following aspects of professional
functioning a. history and philosophy of the counseling profession; b.
professional roles, functions, and relationships with other human service
providers, including strategies for interagency/interorganization
collaboration and communications c. counselors’ roles and
responsibilities as members of an interdisciplinary emergency
management response team during a local, regional, or national crisis,
disaster or other trauma-causing event; d. self-care strategies
appropriate to the counselor role; e. counseling supervision models,
practices, and processes; f. professional organizations, including
membership benefits, activities, services to members, and current
issues; g. professional credentialing, including certification, licensure,
and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public
policy on these issues; h. the role and process of the professional
counselor advocating on behalf of the profession; i. advocacy
processes needed to address institutional and social barriers that
impede access, equity, and success for clients; and j. ethical standards
of professional organizations and credentialing bodies, and applications
of ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling             Campus




Thorough understanding of the molecular genetic, biochemical and
cellular basis of life.                                                  Campus




Thorough understanding of the molecular genetic, biochemical and
cellular basis of life.                                                  Campus




Competence in research methodologies for applying the scientific
method to the generation of new knowledge.                               Campus
Competence in research methodologies for applying the scientific
method to the generation of new knowledge.                                  Campus




Interacting with professional peers with honesty, ethical behavior,
cultural sensitivity, teamwork, and effective communication.                Campus




Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject
matter and theory relevant to the student's disciplinary focus, including
historical and contemporary trends in the field.                            Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of research
methods in the student's disciplinary focus, and apply that knowledge to
formulate a cogent research project for the dissertation.                Campus

Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of the
application of historical and/or ethnographic research methods in
Musicology/Ethnomusicology as applied to a specific research project
and be able to present research in a professional environment               Campus




Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of subject
matter relevant to the discipline, including music education research,
practice, historical, measurement and contemporary trends in music
education                                                                   Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding of and comprehension of
traditional and current research methods in music education.             Campus
Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of the
application of research methods in Music Education as applied to a
specific research project, and be able to present research in a
professional environment.                                                Campus




An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.       Both




An ability to critically read engineering literature                     Both




An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice at an advanced level.                 Both




An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.             Both
An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.              Both




An ability to communicate effectively.                                    Both




A PhD Graduate will possess the knowledge to advance science in
nursing and related fields both within and outside the health sciences.   Campus

A PhD graduate will possess the skills necessary to conduct research and
disseminate findings through scholarly presentations and publications. Campus




A PhD graduate is competent to assume a leadership position in nursing
and healthcare.                                                        Campus
Advanced comprehension and mastery of the components and
interactions of food and health.                                        Campus




Advanced comprehension and mastery of the components and
interactions of food and health.                                        Campus




Development of critical thinking skills.                                Campus




Development of critical thinking skills.                                Campus




Competency in research planning, methodologies, performance, and
interpretation for the discovery of new information.                    Campus




Competency in research planning, methodologies, performance, and
interpretation for the discovery of new information.                    Campus




Competency in research planning, methodologies, performance, and
interpretation for the discovery of new information.                    Campus
Demonstration of ethical behavior in all areas of conduct; displaying
respect, fellowship, and cooperation among peers as well as among
faculty and staff.                                                      Campus
Demonstration of ethical behavior in all areas of conduct; displaying
respect, fellowship, and cooperation among peers as well as among
faculty and staff.                                                        Campus




Demonstration of ethical behavior in all areas of conduct; displaying
respect, fellowship, and cooperation among peers as well as among
faculty and staff.                                                        Campus




Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge related to a specific discipline
within the pharmaceutical sciences                                        Campus




Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge related to a specific discipline
within the pharmaceutical sciences                                        Campus


Demonstrate the ability to evaluate a research problem that is related to
a discipline within the pharmaceutical sciences.                          Campus




Demonstrate the ability to effectively convey information when talking
about a topic that is related to a discipline within the pharmaceutical
sciences.                                                                 Campus
Specialist knowledge of one or more recognized major subfields in
philosophy, understood to include the following areas, divided into the
three broad categories of history, theoretical philosophy, and matters of
value: history (ancient, medieval, modern, 19th century, 20th century);
theoretical (metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of science,
philosophy of mind, philosophy of language); value (normative ethics,
metaethics, aesthetics, political).                                       Campus




Ability to pursue an original and sustained line of philosophical research
that results in a contribution to the body of philosophical knowledge.     Campus




Ability both to produce original research and to prepare it in a way that
makes it adequate for presentation at a professional conference.            Campus
Ability to design, teach, and manage an undergraduate course in
philosophy entirely on one's own.                                         Campus




The experience of participating in professional activities such as (i)
publishing in a professional journal; (ii) presenting work at a conference;
(iii) commenting on someone else's work at a conference; (iv) helping
with the organization of a conference.                                      Campus




Students demonstrate overall knowledge of the field of physics            Campus




Students are required to demonstrate that they can synthesize their
knowledge of physics, and apply it to new areas of physics.               Campus
Students will demonstrate ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity and
professional conduct and be able to communicate their work orally as
well as in writing.                                                     Campus




Students demonstrate fundamental knowledge in plant biochemistry,
cell and developmental biology, genetics and genomics, molecular
biology and general plant biology.                                      Campus




Students demonstrate fundamental knowledge in plant biochemistry,
cell and developmental biology, genetics and genomics, molecular
biology and general plant biology.                                      Campus




Students can critically evaluate the primary scientific literature.     Campus




Students can critically evaluate the primary scientific literature.     Campus
Students can effectively communicate and work in teams with peers
interacting honestly, ethically, and with cultural sensitivity.            Campus




Students can effectively communicate and work in teams with peers
interacting honestly, ethically, and with cultural sensitivity.            Campus




Students can complete plant biology research of sufficient quality to be
published in peer-reviewed journal articles.                               Campus




Students can complete plant biology research of sufficient quality to be
published in peer-reviewed journal articles.                               Campus
Students develop critical thinking to evaluate research and design
experiments.                                                              Campus




Students develop critical thinking to evaluate research and design
experiments.                                                              Campus




Students develop effective scientific writing and oral presentation skills. Campus




Students develop effective scientific writing and oral presentation skills. Campus
Acquire knowledge and critical understanding of the science of Plant
Pathology, its literature, theories, and ideas.                        Campus




Acquire knowledge and critical understanding of the science of Plant
Pathology, its literature, theories, and ideas.                        Campus
Develop cognitive analytical and decision making skills necessary to
utilize the scientific method to conduct experimental research.        Campus




Develop effective skills in oral and written communication             Campus




Develop teaching skills for course development, organization and
delivery                                                               Campus
Students will develop and exhibit professional behavior and ethical
practices in the conduct of their research and scholarship.                Campus




A thorough understanding and comprehension of scope, the
epistemologies and methodologies of political science, proficiency in the
core literature of political theory and quantitative analysis up to
regression analysis, as well as mastery of two fields in political science
and proficiency in a third field.                                          Campus

Ability to conduct quantitative and/or qualitative research to address
theoretical questions in political science.                                Campus




Attend and present work at professional conferences and workshops;
attend department orientation on professional development which
covers academic honesty, ethics, collegiality, and cultural sensitivity.   Campus




Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of subject matter in clinical psychology and in the
student’s area of specialization.                                          Campus
Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of subject matter in clinical psychology and in the
student’s area of specialization.                                        Campus


Students will demonstrate skills in the delivery of a broad variety of
assessment, intervention, and consultaion services                       Campus


Students will demonstrate skills in the delivery of a broad variety of
assessment, intervention, and consultaion services                       Campus


Students will contribute to the knowledge base of clinical psychology
through production of empirical research                                 Campus


Students will contribute to the knowledge base of clinical psychology
through production of empirical research                                 Campus


Students will contribute to the knowledge base of clinical psychology
through production of empirical research                                 Campus


Students will contribute to the knowledge base of clinical psychology
through production of empirical research                                 Campus




Students will deliver professional services to patients and conduct
research in a manner that shows dedication to applicable ethical,
professional practice, and legal standards                               Campus




Students will deliver professional services to patients and conduct
research in a manner that shows dedication to applicable ethical,
professional practice, and legal standards                               Campus
Students will deliver professional services to patients and conduct
research in a manner that shows dedication to applicable ethical,
professional practice, and legal standards                            Campus




Students will deliver professional services to patients and conduct
research in a manner that shows dedication to applicable ethical,
professional practice, and legal standards                            Campus




Demonstrate Competency in Models, Theories and Concepts of Public
Health                                                                Campus




Demonstrate Competency in Models, Theories and Concepts of Public
Health                                                                Campus




Develop competencies for conducting and analyzing Public Health
Research                                                              Campus


Develop competency for teaching at the undergraduate level, and in
entry level professional graduate programs.                           Campus


Develop competency for teaching at the undergraduate level, and in
entry level professional graduate programs.                           Campus




Demonstrate ethical research conduct.                                 Campus
Demonstrate ethical research conduct.                                 Campus


Demonstrate understanding of role of a doctoral level Public Health
Professional                                                          Campus




Demonstrate Competency in models and theory of Rehabilitation
Science                                                               Campus




Develop competencies for conducting rehabilitation research.          Campus




Develop competencies for conducting rehabilitation research.          Campus

Develop competency for teaching at the undergraduate level, and in
entry level professional graduate programs.                           Campus


Demonstrate competency in a focused area of rehabilitation science that
can be applied in a research study.                                     Campus




Demonstrate ethical research conduct.                                 Campus




Demonstrate understanding of role of academic researcher.             Campus
Students will become fully conversant with classical and contemporary
methods and theories in the study of religion.                               Campus


Students will become fully conversant with classical and contemporary
works, approaches, and debates in the sub-fields of religions of Asia,
religions of the Americas, and religion and nature.                          Campus




Students will gain competence in at least one research language other
than English as approved by their dissertation committees.                   Campus




Students will gain competence in at least one research language other
than English as approved by their dissertation committees.                   Campus




Students will develop the ability to articulate orally and in writing the
results, significance, and applications of their scholarship and research.   Campus




Students will develop the ability to articulate orally and in writing the
results, significance, and applications of their scholarship and research.   Campus




Students will develop the ability to become effective teachers-scholars
at research universities, teaching colleges, and other equivalent
educational institutions in their particular sub-fields, as well as in the
broad field of comparative religions.                                        Campus
Students will demonstrate the ability to produce original research and
scholarship that meet the professional standards of the field.           Campus


Majors will achieve a thorough understanding of the concepts, methods
and issues in educational measurement and assessment, evaluation, and
research methodology.                                                 Campus

Majors will apply their understanding of the research process by
formulating hypotheses, planning and designing methodological
research studies, analyzing data, and reporting results.                 Campus




Majors will participate in professional organizations, research
presentations, or scholarly publications.                                Campus

FRENCH MAJOR: Demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the core areas of French and Francophone linguistic
and/or literary studies, and of a specific area of research within those
fields, as agreed upon by the faculty of the department. SPANISH
MAJOR: Demonstrate a thorough understanding and comprehension of
the core areas of Hispanic linguistic and/or literary studies for the MA
(with optional secondary-foci in Luso-Brazilian studies), or of a specific
area of research within those fields for the Ph.D., as agreed upon by the
faculty of the department.                                                 Campus
FRENCH: Literary/Cultural Studies: Demonstrate the ability to analyze
and interpret French and Francophone literary and cultural products,
apply results to broader context and engage in academic discourse via
writing and oral presentation. French and Francophone Linguistics:
Demonstrate the ability to analyze and interpret French and
Francophone language and language-related data, apply results to
broader context and engage in academic discourse via writing and oral
presentation. SPANISH: Literary/Cultural Studies: Demonstrate the
ability to analyze and interpret Hispanic/Latino literary and cultural
products (with optional secondary foci in Luso-Brazilian studies), apply
results to broader context and engage in academic discourse via writing
and oral presentation. Hispanic Linguistics: Demonstrate the ability to
analyze and interpret Hispanic language and language-related data (with
optional secondary foci in Portuguese), apply results to broader context
and engage in academic discourse via writing and oral presentation.      Campus




Display knowledge of ethical human data collection, professional
conduct and ethical academic writing skills (as established by Linguistic
Society of America Ethics Statement and/or Modern Language
Association).                                                               Campus




Candidates demonstrate professional knowledge in each of the eight
common core curricular areas and at least one specialty area within the
counselor education context.                                            Campus




Candidates demonstrate proficiency in counselor education and
supervision skills by developing a personal philosophy of teaching and
learning; course design, delivery, and evaluation methods appropriate to
course objectives; and by assessing the needs of counselors in training
and develop techniques to help candidates develop into competent
counselors.                                                              Campus
Candidates will demonstrate professional behavior in the field of
counselor education and supervision by engaging in: (a) professional
organizations, including membership benefits, activities, services to
members, and current issues; (b) professional credentialing, including
certification, licensure, and accreditation practices and standards, and
the effects of public policy on these issues; (c) ethical standards of
professional organizations and credentialing bodies, and applications of
ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling                Campus


Candidates will demonstrate knowledge of core school psychology
content areas including: psychological foundations, assessment,
consultation, academic and behavioral interventions, counseling,
professional and ethical standards.                                        Campus




Candidates will demonstrate proficiency in using psychological
assessment results to design, implement, and evaluate an empirically
validated intervention.                                                    Campus

Candidates will demonstrate proficiency to present orally and in writing
the results and applications of their research and scholarship.          Campus


Candidates will demonstrate proficiency to present orally and in writing
the results and applications of their research and scholarship.          Campus

Candidates will demonstrate professional behaviors and attitudes
consistent with School Psychology professional standards and ethical
principles including: effective communication and interpersonal skills,
respect for diversity and individual differences, and responsive to
supervisory feedback.                                                      Campus

Demonstrate broad understanding and application of sociological
theories                                                                   Campus

Demonstrate broad understanding and application of sociological
research methods                                                           Campus
Demonstrate in-depth understanding and application of one primary and
one secondary specialty sub-field in sociology                        Campus

Demonstrate advanced competencies in conducting independent
empirical research with scientific integrity                               Campus

Demonstrate advanced competencies in applying substantive
sociological knowledge in critical thinking, analysis, and communication   Campus


Demonstrate broad understanding and application of professional ethics Campus



Demonstrate broad understanding and application of professional ethics Campus




Demonstrate broad understanding and application of professional ethics Campus



Demonstrate broad understanding and application of the role of the
professional sociologist                                                   Campus




Demonstrate comprehensive understanding in soil and water sciences.        Campus




Demonstrate problem solving skills by applying, analyzing, and
synthesizing content knowledge by identifying component parts,
relationships and ideas.                                                   Campus
Display ethical behaviors, cultural sensitivity, teamwork, professional
conduct and communication.                                                Campus

Candidates will demonstrate advanced levels of knowledge in the
following core areas: (a) trends and issues in Special Education and their
relationship to practice, policy, and research; (b) acquisition,
organization, and interpretation of information about research in Special
Education; c) identification of research questions and methodology
emanating from different knowledge paradigms; and, (d) critique of
Special Education research and practice from various knowledge
paradigms.                                                                 Campus
Candidates will attain the technical knowledge and skills to become
independent scholars capable of conducting research and evaluating
educational programs, products, and practices.                             Campus




Candidates will give a presentation to other professionals or submit a
paper for publication based on a research project.                        Campus




Acquire core knowledge in statistical theory, methods, and applications. Campus
Conduct independent research in the development of new statistical
theory and/or methodology.                                               Campus


Clearly and effectively present ideas in speech and writing concerning
statistical theory, methodology, and applications.                       Campus




Write statistical theory, methodology, and applications papers for
peer-reviewed statistical and biostatistical journals and
interdisciplinary journals.                                              Campus


 Compete successfully for research and teaching positions in academic
institutions, federal and state agencies, or private institutions.    Campus




Students will obtain the necessary technical skills knowledge and
attitudes to obtain suitable employment or pursue advanced education. Campus
Students will learn to think critically when evaluating new information
and ideas contained in books and journal articles as well as information
and ideas presented at scientific meetings, seminars, or informal
discussions with other scientists.                                             Campus




Students will learn to think critically when evaluating new information
and ideas contained in books and journal articles as well as information
and ideas presented at scientific meetings, seminars, or informal
discussions with other scientists.                                             Campus




Students will learn to think critically when evaluating new information
and ideas contained in books and journal articles as well as information
and ideas presented at scientific meetings, seminars, or informal
discussions with other scientists.                                             Campus

Students will learn speaking skills needed to communicate effectively,
insert after settings, within formal, or informal settings, to their peers,
their students, and to the general public.                                     Campus

Students will learn speaking skills needed to communicate effectively,
insert after settings, within formal, or informal settings, to their peers,
their students, and to the general public.                                     Campus

Students will learn scientific writing skills to effectively communicate
with their peers and, as well, will learn the skills needed to explain their
research to the general public.                                                Campus
Students will learn scientific writing skills to effectively communicate
with their peers and, as well, will learn the skills needed to explain their
research to the general public.                                                Campus
Students will learn appropriate body of knowledge in their area of
specialization within the broader areas of animal health, animal biology,
and biomedical science.                                                   Campus
Students will exhibit ethical and professional behavior during their
studies and research.                                                     Campus


Students will exhibit ethical and professional behavior during their
studies and research.                                                     Campus




Students will “learn how to learn” independently of any formal courses
to prepare them to learn independently for the rest of their lives.       Campus




Students will learn the etiquette of constructive criticism, including both
how to provide appropriate constructive criticism in a professional
manner and likewise how to respond to constructive criticism in a
professional manner. The latter case will include responses accepting
and revising in accordance to constructive criticism as well as disagreeing
with such criticism and a professional manner.                              Campus




Students will achieve a thorough understanding and comprehension of
wildlife ecology and conservation science, and demonstrate mastery of
methods and techniques in a specialization.                               Campus
Students will demonstrate ability to plan, conduct and analyze
independent/original research.                                             Campus




Students will demonstrate problem–solving skills by application and
analysis using quantitative, spatial or qualitative research approaches for
addressing wildlife ecology and conservation problems.                      Campus




Students will demonstrate proficiency and productivity in oral and
written communication.                                                     Campus

Students will display ethical behaviors and professional conduct to
contribute as responsible professionals in the field of wildlife ecology
and conservation.                                                          Campus
Students will display ethical behaviors and professional conduct to
contribute as responsible professionals in the field of wildlife ecology
and conservation.                                                          Campus




Students will demonstrate knowledge of the basic fundamentals of
biology and a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of zoology.       Campus




Students will demonstrate the ability to design a research project, collect
data, analyze and interpret the results. They will be able to present the
results of original research in oral and written form.                      Campus

Students will demonstrate the ability to design a research project, collect
data, analyze and interpret the results. They will be able to present the
results of original research in oral and written form.                      Campus

Students will demonstrate ethical behaviors, professional conduct.; they
will be able to interact and communicate with professionals at scientific
conferences.                                                              Campus
Assessment Method



Students will submit a passing score on the
PRAXIS examination in audiology.



Students will submit a passing score on the
PRAXIS examination in audiology.



 Students will submit a passing score on the
PRAXIS examination in audiology.
Students will demonstrate their knowledge
by achieving passing scores on final exams
based on the grading rubrics designed by
the instructors for each of the courses in the
program.
Students will demonstrate their knowledge
by achieving passing scores on final exams
based on the grading rubrics designed by
the instructors for each of the courses in the
program.
Students will demonstrate their knowledge
by achieving passing scores on final exams
based on the grading rubrics designed by
the instructors for each of the courses in the
program.

Students will achieve passing scores on
written comprehensive exams in 7 major
areas of clinical audiology reviewed by
individual faculty members with expertise in
the field and scored on a faculty-designed
rubric.

Students will achieve passing scores on
written comprehensive exams in 7 major
areas of clinical audiology reviewed by
individual faculty members with expertise in
the field and scored on a faculty-designed
rubric.
Students will achieve passing scores on
written comprehensive exams in 7 major
areas of clinical audiology reviewed by
individual faculty members with expertise in
the field and scored on a faculty-designed
rubric.

Students will achieve passing scores on
written comprehensive exams in 7 major
areas of clinical audiology reviewed by
individual faculty members with expertise in
the field and scored on a faculty-designed
rubric.

Students will achieve passing scores on
written comprehensive exams in 7 major
areas of clinical audiology reviewed by
individual faculty members with expertise in
the field and scored on a faculty-designed
rubric.

Students will achieve passing scores on
written comprehensive exams in 7 major
areas of clinical audiology reviewed by
individual faculty members with expertise in
the field and scored on a faculty-designed
rubric.



Students will achieve passing scores on
clinical case presentations and discussions
which include the steps in their
management of these cases, and the
evidence base for these management steps
in each course. Scoring of these case
presentations/discussions is accomplished
using rubrics designed by the faculty and
published in each course.
Students will achieve passing scores on
clinical case presentations and discussions
which include the steps in their
management of these cases, and the
evidence base for these management steps
in each course. Scoring of these case
presentations/discussions is accomplished
using rubrics designed by the faculty and
published in each course.



Students will achieve passing scores on
clinical case presentations and discussions
which include the steps in their
management of these cases, and the
evidence base for these management steps
in each course. Scoring of these case
presentations/discussions is accomplished
using rubrics designed by the faculty and
published in each course.
Students will acheive a passing score
according to the faculty-designed rubric
scored by at least two audiology faculty for
the case-presentation portion of the
comprehensive exams.
Students will acheive a passing score
according to the faculty-designed rubric
scored by at least two audiology faculty for
the case-presentation portion of the
comprehensive exams.
Students will acheive a passing score
according to the faculty-designed rubric
scored by at least two audiology faculty for
the case-presentation portion of the
comprehensive exams.

Students will attain passing scores on
written comprehensive exams in 7 major
areas of clinical audiology reviewed by
individual faculty members with expertise in
the field using a faculty-designed rubric.
Students will attain passing scores on
written comprehensive exams in 7 major
areas of clinical audiology reviewed by
individual faculty members with expertise in
the field using a faculty-designed rubric.

Students will attain passing scores on
written comprehensive exams in 7 major
areas of clinical audiology reviewed by
individual faculty members with expertise in
the field using a faculty-designed rubric.

Students will successfully complete and
defend an audiology research project in
which evidence is generated to support or
refute a clinically relevant hypothesis.

Students will successfully complete and
defend an audiology research project in
which evidence is generated to support or
refute a clinically relevant hypothesis.

Students will successfully complete and
defend an audiology research project in
which evidence is generated to support or
refute a clinically relevant hypothesis.

Students will achieve passing scores on all
written and verbal assignments including on
audiological research and clinical case
presentations in nine separate classes which
are evaluated by faculty and facilitators
using a faculty-designed rubric published in
the syllabi.

Students will achieve passing scores on all
written and verbal assignments including on
audiological research and clinical case
presentations in nine separate classes which
are evaluated by faculty and facilitators
using a faculty-designed rubric published in
the syllabi.
Students will achieve passing scores on all
written and verbal assignments including on
audiological research and clinical case
presentations in nine separate classes which
are evaluated by faculty and facilitators
using a faculty-designed rubric published in
the syllabi.
Students will achieve passing scores
according to the faculty-designed rubric on
the case-presentation portion of the
comprehensive exam.
Students will achieve passing scores
according to the faculty-designed rubric on
the case-presentation portion of the
comprehensive exam.
Students will achieve passing scores
according to the faculty-designed rubric on
the case-presentation portion of the
comprehensive exam.



NULL

Students will pass (achieve a grade of 80%
or higher) each of the standardized, written
comprehensive exams in plant pathology,
entomology/nematology and
plant/soil/weed science. These exams will
be evaluated by a group of faculty utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.

Students will achieve a passing grade (80%
or higher) on the comprehensive oral exam
administered by their supervisory
committee which tests their ability to solve
plant health problems of all types.
Evaluation of the comprehensive oral
examination will be based on a rubric
developed by the faculty.
Students will demonstrate professionalism
in the practice of plant medicine through
their performance in core and elective
internships and the comprehensive oral
exam administered by their supervisory
committee. Observation by the faculty of
professional behavior during their
internships and the comprehensive oral
examination will be based on a rubric
developed by faculty and shared by the
faculty with the supervisory committee.

The doctoral committee will evaluate
student performance on written and oral
qualifying exams to determine if the student
demonstrates adequacy or excellence in
knowledge & understanding of professional
literature, clarity of expression, critical
mindedness, creativity and application for
all examination questions.

A panel of faculty will judge the defense of a
capstone project that communicates the
results of practitioner research focused on a
context-based problem of practice to
determine if a satisfactory rating is
acheived.

A panel of faculty will evaluate the defense
for a capstone project that communicates
the results of practitioner research focused
on a context-based problem of practice to
determine if a satisfactory rating was
achieved.

The faculty members of the doctoral
committees will evaluate student
performance on written and oral qualifying
exams to determine if each student
demonstrates adequacy or excellence in
knowledge and understanding of
professional literature, clarity of expression,
critical mindedness, creativity and
application for all examination questions.
A panel of faculty will judge the defense for
a capstone project that communicates the
results of practitioner research focused on a
context-based problem of practice by
determining whether satisfactory rating was
achieved.

A panel of faculty will evaluate the defense
for a capstone project that communicates
the results of practioner research focused
on a context-based problem of practice to
determine if satisfactory ratings were
achieved.

Candidates will successfully complete the
qualifying examination as measured by the
candidates' university faculty advisory
committee.

Candidates will demonstrate successful
completion of the qualifying exam and oral
demonstration of research knowledge as
measured by the candidates’ university
faculty advisory committee.

Candidates will demonstrate successful
completion of EAS tasks and ratings, as well
as successfully complete the Qualifying
Exam and Oral Defense as measured by the
university faculty advisory committee.
Candidates will successfully complete all
assigned tasks and ratings in the Educator
Assessment System (EAS)as measured by
the candidates' university faculty advisory
committee.

Candidates will demonstrate successful
completion of EAS tasks and ratings, as well
as successfully complete the Qualifying
Exam and Oral Defense as measured by the
university faculty advisory committee.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
How will it be measured? Knowledge will be
assessed via three methods: coursework,
qualifier examination, and dissertation
completion. Coursework: knowledge will
be measured through 1) written
assignments including literature reviews,
journal and book critiques, program and
research proposals, reflection papers, pilot
studies and examinations. 2) oral
assignments including presentations and
class participation. Qualifier examination:
the qualifier examination is a take-home,
essay questions exam designed for each
student according to the core content
knowledge of the program, the knowledge
of the specific dissertation topic of the
student, and research methodology
proficiency expected to complete a
dissertation. Dissertation: the dissertation
is assessed by its relevance to the literature
on the topic, significance, soundness of the
research methodology and results, and level
of relevance of the results to the field of
higher education in terms of implications to
research, practice, and policy. A sound
dissertation should reflect adequate
knowledge proficiency. What is the
desired level of achievement? All students
How will it be measured? Knowledge will be
assessed via three methods: coursework,
qualifier examination, and dissertation
completion. Coursework: knowledge will
be measured through 1) written
assignments including literature reviews,
journal and book critiques, program and
research proposals, reflection papers, pilot
studies and examinations. 2) oral
assignments including presentations and
class participation. Qualifier examination:
the qualifier examination is a take-home,
essay questions exam designed for each
student according to the core content
knowledge of the program, the knowledge
of the specific dissertation topic of the
student, and research methodology
proficiency expected to complete a
dissertation. Dissertation: the dissertation
is assessed by its relevance to the literature
on the topic, significance, soundness of the
research methodology and results, and level
of relevance of the results to the field of
higher education in terms of implications to
research, practice, and policy. A sound
dissertation should reflect adequate
knowledge proficiency. What is the
desired level of achievement? All students
How will it be measured? Skills
competency will be assessed via three
methods: coursework, qualifier
examination, and dissertation completion.
Coursework: skills competency will be
measured through 1) written assignments
including literature reviews, journal and
book critiques, program and research
proposals, reflection papers, pilot studies
and examinations. 2) oral assignments
including presentations and class
participation. Qualifier examination: the
qualifier examination is a take-home, essay
questions exam designed for each student
according to the core content knowledge of
the program, the specific dissertation topic
of the student, and research methodology
proficiency expected to complete a
dissertation. Skills competency will be also
evaluated during the qualifier examination.
Dissertation: the dissertation is assessed by
its relevance to the literature on the topic,
significance, soundness of the research
methodology and results, and level of
relevance of the results to the field of higher
education in terms of implications to
research, practice, and policy. A sound
dissertation should reflect adequate skills




How will it be measured? Professional
behavior will be assessed through the
quality of academic work and through the
interactions with classmates, peers, and
faculty in the program and within the field
of higher education at large. What is the
desired level of achievement? All students
are expected to demonstrate satisfactory
professional behavior in all interactions and
circumstances as well as in al academic and
professional work. Who will measure?
Faculty members teaching courses in the
program, dissertation chairs and committee
members, peers in the field and classmates.
How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.



How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.
How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.



How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.
How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.




How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.

Majors will achieve an average grade of B+
in courses within the major and receive
passing scores from faculty on their written
and oral qualifying exams.
Students will successfully complete their
dissertation and receive a satisfactory
review from program faculty.

Majors will meet one or more of the
following goals by the end of their third
year: become a member of at least one
professional organization, attend a national
convention, contribute to a review of a
journal manuscript submission, be an author
or coauthor of at least one conference
presentation, or be an author or coauthor of
at least one journal article.

Candidates must receive a score of 80% or
higher from their individual doctoral
committee on both the Counselor Education
Written Qualifying Examination and
Counselor Education Specialty Examination



The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR)is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.




Candidates will seek membership in the
American Counseling Association and/or
make satisfactory progress toward
becoming National Board Certified
counselors.
90% of candidates will obtain a passing
score (167 or higher) on the Praxis II exam in
School Psychology.

90% of candidates will receive a mean rating
of 2.5 (2=Proficient skills; 3=Exemplary skills)
from two faculty members on a rubric
evaluating an assessment case study and
intervention case study completed as part of
the School Psychology Professional
Portfolio.

90% of candidates will submit a manuscript
for publication in a peer refereed journal

90% of candidates will receive a mean rating
of 4.0 (Above Average) on the Professional
Behavior items included on the end-of-year
Internship Appraisal form completed by a
field-based supervisor.




Candidates will earn satisfactory ratings on
qualifying examinations as determined by
the doctoral committees.
Candidates will earn satisfactory ratings on
the dissertation defense as determined by
doctoral committees.

Candidates will present at a national, state,
or local conference or submit a paper for
publication. The doctoral committees will
determine satisfactory completion.

Education Specialist Committee will
evaluate (satisfactory/unsatisfactory,
pass/fail) the culminating portfolio/project,
written, or oral exit examination.
The Instructor for Supervised Research or
Portfolio Practicum and Education Specialist
Committee will evaluate the research paper
or inquiry/research project. The expectation
is that students will achieve a grade of "B"
or higher on the research paper or
inquiry/research project.

Education Specialist Committee will
evaluate: (1) the culminating
portfolio/capstone project; or (2) national,
state, local conference or meeting
presentations; or (3) the preparation of a
professional manuscript. Students will: (1)
achieve a satisfactory assessment of their
culminating portfolio/project; or (2)
successfully present at local, state, or
national conferences or meetings; or (3)
successfully submit a professional
manuscript for publication.

Candidates will achieve satisfactory scores
from their respective university faculty
advisory committees on the qualifying
exam.

Candidates will achieve satisfactory scores
from their respective university faculty
advisory committee on the qualifying exam.



Candidates will demonstrate successful
completion of all assigned tasks and ratings
in the Educator Assessment System (EAS)
and successful completion of the qualifying
examination as measured by the candidates’
university faculty advisory committee.

Candidates will achieve satisfactory scores
from their respective university faculty
advisory committee on the qualifying exam.
Candidates will demonstrate successful
completion of all assigned tasks and ratings
in the Educator Assessment System (EAS)
and successful completion of the qualifying
examination as measured by the candidates’
university faculty advisory committee.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Not actively admitting students.
Not actively admitting students.
Not actively admitting students.

Candidates will successfully passing the exit
interview that is composed of: (a) a written
integrative paper, (b) a video presentation
of the examinee's clinical work, (c) and oral
defense to faculty questions about the
paper and the video.



The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR)is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.
Candidates will seek membership in
professional organizations (e.g., American
Counseling Association).

Candidates will successfully pass the exit
interview that is composed of:(a) a written
integrative paper,(b) a video presentation of
the examinee's clinical work,(c) and oral
defense to faculty questions about the
paper and the video.



The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR) is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.




Candidates will seek membership in
professional organizations (e.g., American
Counseling Association).
Program termination form in process.
Program termination form in process.
Program termination form in process.
Candidates will successfully pass the exit
interview that is composed of: (a) a written
integrative paper, (b) a video presentation
of the examinee's clinical work, (c) and
group oral defense to faculty questions
about the paper and the video.



The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR) is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.




Candidates will seek membership in
professional organizations (e.g., American
Counseling Association, American School
Counseling Association).

Candidates will obtain a passing score (167
or higher) on the Praxis II exam in School
Psychology at first administration.
Candidates will submit official Praxis II score
reports to the SP Program Director prior to
degree completion.

Candidates will receive a mean rating of 2.5
(2=Proficient skills; 3=Exemplary skills) from
two faculty members on a rubric evaluating
an assessment case study and intervention
case study completed as part of the School
Psychology Professional Portfolio.
Candidates will receive a mean rating of 4.0
(Above Average) on the Professional
Behavior items included on the end-of-year
Internship Appraisal form completed by a
field-based supervisor.

Program participants will receive a score of
at least 80/100 points on the
implementation of an intervention in which
they teach a learning strategy to a struggling
learner as a project required in EEX 6936
Teaching Learning Strategies. Course
instructor will provide initial assessment for
each candidate using a rubric developed for
the project. Panel of program faculty will
review results of participants across
program.
Program participants will receive passing
ratings on oral and written exit exams with
items covering the area of interest as well as
the broader context of special education.
Supervisory committees consisting of 2
members will rate the written and oral
exams.



Participants will receive scores of at least 95
/ 120 points on the Assessment/Instruction
project in EEX 6233 in which program
participants will conduct academic and
behavioral assessments of a struggling
learner. The project requires participants to
apply knowledge gained through
coursework in a PK-12 school setting, and
the course instructor will provide initial
assessment for each candidate using a rubric
developed for the project. A panel of
program faculty will review results of
participants across program.
Program participants will receive passing
ratings on oral and written exit exams with
items covering the area of interest as well as
the broader context of special education.
Supervisory committees consisting of 2
members will rate the written exam and the
project.



Program participants will receive passing
ratings on 1-3 page professional reflections
on their collaborative, participatory, and
leadership experiences. At least one
experience in each category is required.
Reflection papers will be rated using a rubric
designed by program faculty.
Program termination form in process.
Program termination form in process.
Program termination form in process.
NULL
NULL

This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of a Final Report for the Engineer-
Chemical Engineering students.

This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of a Final Report for the Engineer-
Chemioal Engineering students.

This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of a Final Report for the Engineer-
Chemical Engineering students.

This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of a Final Report for the Engineer-
Chemical Engineering students.

This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of a Final Report for the Engineer-
Chemical Engineering students.
Evaluate in assignments and exams of
COT5405 (Analysis of Algorithms)
Compile a paper surveying the literature on
a selected topic from COT5405 (Analysis of
Algorithms)
Evaluate through required homework,
projects, and other deliverables from
COT5405 (Analysis of Algorithms).

Evaluate before graduation in an exam
consisting of questions related to ethics.
Evaluate during the exit interview.
Degree will be canceled, N/A
Degree will be canceled, N/A
Degree will be canceled, N/A

85% of all Ph.D. students will pass a
comprehensive written examination
administered and evaluated by a committee
of four (4) faculty members.

85% of the students will demonstrate
satisfactory ability to present the results of
their thesis or project research in writing
and orally at the time of their defense.
80% of randomly selected students will
demonstrate a 3.0 GPA average.

Students are able to articulate in writing the
knowledge gained from their coursework.
45% of the students will publish a peer-
reviewed journal article or conference
proceeding.
Students demonstrate through class
assignments an understanding of the latest
developments in environmental engineering
and science.

90% of students will apply proper statistical
evaluations of data to support integrity of
data collection and presentation.
Random assignments will be checked for
plagiarism.
Random assignments will be checked for
plagiarism.
Beyond maintaining strong classroom
performance, all Engineer Degree students
must pass an oral examination administered
by a faculty committee. In addition, the
department’s graduate committee,
comprised of four graduate faculty
members, performs an annual review
assessing the academic performance of each
Engineer Degree student, and issues an
evaluation letter to the student. These
examinations and reviews assess the
student’s progress in achieving expected
learning outcomes throughout the program.
Each student will be evaluated by their
faculty committee on a five-point Likert
scale with respect to each learning
outcome. This evaluation will be performed
no earlier than six months prior to
graduating, and will require each student to
be rated on their proficiency level in applied
research, preparation for a career in
industry or at a government agency, ability
to contribute to the profession, and
preparation for service to the Industrial and
Systems Engineering community.
Beyond maintaining strong classroom
performance, all Engineer Degree students
must pass an oral examination administered
by a faculty committee. In addition, the
department’s graduate committee,
comprised of four graduate faculty
members, performs an annual review
assessing the academic performance of each
Engineer Degree student, and issues an
evaluation letter to the student. These
examinations and reviews assess the
student’s progress in achieving expected
learning outcomes throughout the program.
Each student will be evaluated by their
faculty committee on a five-point Likert
scale with respect to each learning
outcome. This evaluation will be performed
no earlier than six months prior to
graduating, and will require each student to
be rated on their proficiency level in applied
research, preparation for a career in
industry or at a government agency, ability
to contribute to the profession, and
preparation for service to the Industrial and
Systems Engineering community.
Beyond maintaining strong classroom
performance, all Engineer Degree students
must pass an oral examination administered
by a faculty committee. In addition, the
department’s graduate committee,
comprised of four graduate faculty
members, performs an annual review
assessing the academic performance of each
Engineer Degree student, and issues an
evaluation letter to the student. These
examinations and reviews assess the
student’s progress in achieving expected
learning outcomes throughout the program.
Each student will be evaluated by their
faculty committee on a five-point Likert
scale with respect to each learning
outcome. This evaluation will be performed
no earlier than six months prior to
graduating, and will require each student to
be rated on their proficiency level in applied
research, preparation for a career in
industry or at a government agency, ability
to contribute to the profession, and
preparation for service to the Industrial and
Systems Engineering community.
NULL
NULL
NULL

Through written examinations administered
and evaluated by law faculty members,
ninety percent of students will demonstrate
a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the fundamental rules,
policies and issues relevant to U.S. law.
Through a substantial written research
project evaluated by law faculty members,
ninety percent of students will demonstrate
the ability to conduct, apply and
communicate legal research and
scholarship.
Ninety percent of students will demonstrate
satisfactory awareness and comprehension
of such rules and responsibilities through
their attendance at, and participation in,
stuctured presentations on such rules and
responsibilities, organized and evaluated by
law faculty members.

Through written examinations administered
and evaluated by environmental and land
use faculty members, ninety percent of
students will demonstrate a thorough
understanding and comprehension of the
fundamental rules, policies and issues
relevant to environmental and/or land use
law.

Through a substantial written research
project of publishable quality evaluated by
environmental and land use faculty
members, ninety percent of students will
demonstrate the ability to conduct, apply
and communicate environmental and/or
land use research and scholarship.



Ninety percent of students will demonstrate
satisfactory awareness and comprehension
of such rules and responsibilities through
their attendance at, and participation in, the
Environmental Capstone Colloquium,
organized and evaluated by environmental
and land use faculty members.



Through written examinations administered
and evaluated by international tax faculty
members, ninety percent of students will
demonstrate a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the fundamental rules,
policies and issues relevant to international
taxation.
Through a substantial written research
project evaluated by international tax
faculty members, ninety percent of students
will demonstrate the ability to conduct,
apply and communicate international tax
research and scholarship.



Ninety percent of students will demonstrate
satisfactory awareness and comprehension
of such rules and responsibilities through
their attendance at, and participation in,
structured presentations on such rules and
responsibilities, organized and evaluated by
international tax faculty members.

Through written examinations administered
and evaluated by tax faculty members,
ninety percent of students will demonstrate
a thorough understanding and
comprehension of the fundamental rules,
policies and issues relevant to taxation.

Through a substantial written research
project evaluated by tax faculty members,
ninety percent of students will demonstrate
the ability to conduct, apply and
communicate tax research and scholarship.

Ninety percent of students will demonstrate
satisfactory awareness and comprehension
of such rules and responsibilities through
their attendance at, and participation in,
structured presentations on such rules and
responsibilities, organized and evaluated by
tax faculty members.
Three essay questions administered by a
committee of at least two Department of
Anthropology graduate faculty as part of
comprehensive exam required for the
Masters degree.
Review of paper conducted by Department
of Anthropology graduate faculty with
expertise in the Masters candidate’s primary
field of study as part of annual evaluation of
Masters students.
Receive a passing grade.
NULL

Students will pass the following: A. first year
review, as evaluated by the program faculty
B. completion and defense of final project,
as evaluated by the thesis committee.
Students will write, submit and successfully
defend a proposal for the final research
projects, as evaluated by the program
faculty.
Pass final teaching portfolio, as evaluated by
the program faculty.
Students will pass the oral presentation of
the first year review, as evaluated by the
program faculty.
Pass the following, as evaluated by the
supervisory committee: A. Thesis B. Thesis
Defense C. Final submission of project
report.
Pass the following, as evaluated by the
supervisory committee: A. Thesis B. Thesis
Defense C. Final submission of project
report.
Pass the following, as evaluated by the
supervisory committee: A. Written thesis B.
Thesis Defense C. Final submission of
project report.

Pass the following, as evaluated by the
supervisory committee: A. Thesis paper B.
Thesis defense




N/A
N/A




N/A
Students will pass the comprehensive
reading examination in Greek, set and
graded by a committee of department
faculty, using the rubric established by the
department.

Students will pass the comprehensive
reading examination in Latin, set and graded
by a committee of department faculty, using
the rubric established by the department.

Students will successfully defend the MA
thesis before a committee of at least two
Graduate faculty members, using the rubric
established by the department.

Students will successfully defend the MA
thesis before a committee of at least two
Graduate faculty members, using the rubric
established by the department.

Teaching assistants will receive satisfactory
scores on student evaluations and
satisfactory annual reviews by the TA
supervisor, based upon the criteria
established by the department.

Students will submit an abstract to a
graduate student conference or a meeting
of a regional academic association.
Students will deomonstrate knowledge in
these areas by achieving grades of B or
better on in class examinations and
demonstration projects graded by faculty
using a rubric published in the syllabus.




Students will achieve passing grades in their
clinical rotations as assessed by the faculty
using a standard performance rubric.



Students will obtain a passing grade, as
defined within a faculty-designed grading
rubric, on the program’s comprehensive
exam.
Students will achieve grades of B or better in
their practicum courses based on faculty-
designed rubrics for assessing student
competencies.
Students will achieve passing grades based
on faculty-designed rubrics for assessing
performance in their clinical rotations in
which the students are providing the
relevant intervention(s).

Students will demonstrate mastery in these
areas by achieving passing scores on
comprehensive examinations using a rubric
created by the faculty.

Students will demonstrate mastery in these
areas by achieving passing scores on
uniform assessments of clinical skills in their
practicum rotations.



Students will demonstrate mastery in these
areas by achieving passing scores on
uniform assessments of clinical skills in their
practicum rotations.
Students will complete and pass their MA
oral thesis (or non-thesis project) defense
within two years of matriculation.



Students will complete and pass their MA
oral thesis (or non-thesis project) defense
within two years of matriculation.



Students will complete assigned projects in
substantive specialty seminars within the
term enrolled.



Students will successfully complete sexual
harassment training compliance within the
first term of matriculation Students will
successfully complete the training module in
FERPA Basics within the first term of
matriculation Students will successfully
complete the Institutional Review Board’s
required reading for all researchers within
the first term of matriculation Students will
successfully complete a teaching
assistantship, research assistantship, or
other graduate training experience before
graduation Students will complete the
Proseminar course (CCJ 6001 Proseminar in
Criminology & Law) within the first year of
matriculation




Students will complete, submit and defend a
thesis or final project tha twill be evaluated
by the supervisory committee.

Students will complete, submit and defend a
thesis or final project tha twill be evaluated
by the supervisory committee.

Students will complete, submit and defend a
thesis or final project tha twill be evaluated
by the supervisory committee.
N/A




N/A




N/A

Students will complete a track form showing
successful coursework with both a
concentration on a single area of knowledge
and breadth of knowledge
Students receive a satisfactory review from
a supervisor and comprehensive scores from
student evaluations of at least 3.8 in one
course.

Students who apply to continue
postgraduate work are accepted to PhD or
other appropriate postgraduate programs.
Students complete and defend an MA
thesis.



Comprehensive Exam developed and graded
by a committee of faculty members
Non-thesis MA: Oral component of the
comprehensive exams –administered by
committee of faculty members Thesis MA:
Thesis approved by chair and committee
member
Non-thesis MA: Oral component of the
comprehensive exams –administered by
committee of faculty members Thesis MA:
Thesis approved by chair and committee
member



All students: Successful completion of a
graduate seminar, including completion of a
paper that represents a significant piece of
independent research. Also, annual
discussion and evaluation of student’s
ethical behavior done by the faculty at the
meeting of graduate student assessment.
Students will demonstrate accuracy in the
conduct of their research during the defense
of their thesis as assessed by their
supervisory committee following
department standards.
Students will conduct their research based
on the instruction of their supervisory
committee chair and other related faculty
members.

Students will conduct their research with
professionalism taught by their supervisory
committee.



Assessment Method: Successful completion
of a graduate seminar including completion
of a paper that represents a significant piece
of independent research. Also, annual
discussion and evaluation of students’
ethical behavior done by the faculty at the
meeting of graduate student assessment.



MA: Comprehensive Exam developed and
graded by a committee of faculty members

Assessment Method: Non-thesis MA: Oral
component of the comprehensive exams
–administered by committee of faculty
members Thesis MA: Thesis approved by
chair and committee member
Non-thesis MA: Oral component of the
comprehensive exams –administered by
committee of faculty members Thesis MA:
Thesis approved by chair and committee
member

Students will pass MA examinations in their
final semester.

Demonstrated with the completion and oral
defense of a substantial essay based on
original research using primary sources
which has been overseen and evaluated by a
committee of faculty.

Demonstrated with the completion and oral
defense of a substantial essay based on
original research using primary sources
which has been overseen and evaluated by a
committee of faculty.
The MAN 6973 Project-in-Lieu-of-Thesis is
required for all students completing the
program and is supervised by Dean John
Kraft. Students will select a global company
and analyze the company using a series of
questions in three strategic module
assignments. Explicit questions in the
strategic module assignments are designed
to help students define the company,
analyze the industry in which it operates,
perform an internal analysis of the
company/division, and define the strategies
and company organization. The project will
result in the development of a case study of
the company. The questions will map to
specific learning goals of the MAIB program.
Our accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is
lower than the faculty would prefer (e.g.,
<75% meet or exceed the standard),
adjustments to content in a course, or set of
courses, can be made. If the percentage of
students meeting or exceeding is
The MAN 6973 Project-in-Lieu-of-Thesis is
required for all students completing the
program and is supervised by Dean John
Kraft. Students will select a global company
and analyze the company using a series of
questions in three strategic module
assignments. Explicit questions in the
strategic module assignments are designed
to help students define the company,
analyze the industry in which it operates,
perform an internal analysis of the
company/division, and define the strategies
and company organization. The project will
result in the development of a case study of
the company. The questions will map to
specific learning goals of the MAIB program.
Our accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is
lower than the faculty would prefer (e.g.,
<75% meet or exceed the standard),
adjustments to content in a course, or set of
courses, can be made. If the percentage of
students meeting or exceeding is
The mandatory MAN6958 Study Tour is
designed to provide students with a brief,
but intensive international immersion
experience. Through lectures and visits to
businesses and governmental organizations,
students will gain an understanding of the
country's business environment and how it
has been influenced by political, cultural,
and historical factors. Prior to the trip,
students will attend pre-departure sessions
led by faculty leaders to provide them with
an overview of the country and program
itinerary. Students will complete pre-trip
and post-trip assignments. The faculty
leader will submit a scoring rubric to the
MAIB program office in July. The faculty
leader will score the post-trip assignment
using a defined rubric and will submit the
data to the MAIB program office in
December. Our accrediting body (AACSB)
recommends placing students in the
following categories: does not meet
standards, meets standards, and exceeds
standards. The MBA committee reviews the
data in regards to what percentage of
students are meeting or exceeding the
standard. If the percentage is lower than the
faculty would prefer (e.g., <75% meet or
The executive summary assignment in
GEB5212 requires students to extract the
most salient and persuasive ideas from a
Harvard Business Review management
article. Students must refine and focus
information to promote action in this
document. They need to select and present
information clearly, concisely, and
coherently according to the reader’s needs
and goals and the business context. The
assignment tests such higher order thinking
skills as evaluation and synthesis. The
Communications faculty will score these
written summaries and provide the data to
the MBA Committee for review by the
faculty. Our accrediting body (AACSB)
recommends placing students in the
following categories: does not meet
standards, meets standards, and exceeds
standards. The MBA committee reviews the
data in regards to what percentage of
students are meeting or exceeding the
standard. If the percentage is lower than the
faculty would prefer (e.g., <75% meet or
exceed the standard), adjustments to
content in a course, or set of courses, can be
made. If the percentage of students meeting
or exceeding is unexpectedly high (e.g., 50%
The persuasive presentation assignment in
GEB5215 requires students to deliver and
structure an internal business presentation
that persuades the audience to adopt the
presenter’s proposal or recommendation.
Students must determine the purposes for
presenting, analyze the audience, and use
appropriate and compelling information
that is logically structured. They need to use
well constructed PowerPoint slides and
demonstrate a number of delivery skills.
The assignment tests their ability to design
compelling and persuasive presentations
and deliver them dynamically. The
Communications faculty will score these
presentations and provide the data to the
MBA Committee for review by the faculty.
Our accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is
lower than the faculty would prefer (e.g.,
<75% meet or exceed the standard),
adjustments to content in a course, or set of
courses, can be made. If the percentage of
We will target 50% of our admissions as
students with foreign language proficiency
or who have lived or studied outside their
home country for a minimum period of 10
weeks.

Students will pass the comprehensive
reading examination in Latin, set and graded
by a comittee of department faculty, using
the rubric established by the department.

Students will successfully defend the MA
thesis before a committee of at least two
Graduate faculty members, using the rubric
established by the department.
Students will successfully defend the MA
thesis before a committee of at least two
Graduate faculty members, using the rubric
established by the department.

Teaching assistants will receive satisfactory
scores on student evaluations and
satisfactory annual reviews by the TA
supervisor, based upon the criteria
established by the department.

Students will submit an abstract to a
graduate student conference or a meeting
of a regional academic association.



MA LAS Students will complete a thesis
related to Latin American Studies
demonstrating knowledge of the scholarly
literature and issues relevant to the thesis
topic. The thesis is evaluated and approved
by a committee composed of a thesis
director and two committee members who
also supervise an oral defense of the thesis.

MA LAS students are required to complete a
thesis evaluated and approved by a
committee composed of a thesis director
and two committee members who also
supervise an oral defense of the thesis.

All MA LAS students are required to
complete a thesis evaluated and approved
by a committee composed of a thesis
director and two committee members who
also supervise an oral defense of the thesis.

MA LAS students must formally present and
defend their MA thesis before a faculty
committee composed of a thesis director
and two committee members whio also
supervise an oral defense.
MA LAS Students will present their research
in a Center-sponsored poster session or
another scholarly conference.

Comprehensive exam developed and graded
by the Department's Comprehensive
Examination Committee.

Non-thesis MA: Paper read and approved by
2 faculty members OR Oral exit exam
administered by 2 faculty members based
on topics taken from reading list



Thesis MA: Thesis approved by chair and
committee member.



Pass rubric exam or project as part of
Introduction to Graduate Research (Lin6084)
program under review for closure
program under review for closure
program under review for closure




Pass the following, as evaluated by the
supervisory committee: A. Thesis/Project
Proposal B. Thesis or Project C.
Thesis/Project Oral Defense
A. Pass the Internship as evaluated by the
supervisory committee chair




A. Pass the Internship as evaluated by the
supervisory committee chair
The comprehensive exam for the MA
consists in the conjunction of several
written final exams, built into a set of
required courses and assessed by means of
a departmental rubric. The requirement is to
take one of each of the following pairs of
courses: Ancient Philosophy 1 (PHP5005)
and Ancient Philosophy 2 (PHP5015),
Modern Philosophy 1 (PHH5405) and
Modern Philosophy 2 (PHH5406), PHP5785
(Foundations of Analytic Philosophy) and
PHI5365 (Epistemology). The final exam in
each of these courses is assessed by the
departmental rubric as either unsatisfactory,
satisfactory, good, or outstanding. The
target for the program is the percentage of
all enrolled students who (i) have taken at
least one of these exams and (ii) has
received at least a "good" assessment on
every one of these exams taken.



The required course in Graduate Logic
(PHI5135) includes a comprehensive final
exam, assessed by means of a departmental
rubric. That exam is assessed by the rubric
as either unsatisfactory, satisfactory, good,
or outstanding. The target for the program
is the percentage of all enrolled students
who have taken the exam and received at
least a "good" assessment.



The required Graduate Proseminar course
(PHI5935) requires a final substantial paper,
assessed by means of a departmental rubric.
That paper is assessed by the rubric as
either unsatisfactory, satisfactory, good, or
outstanding. The target for the program is
the percentage of all enrolled students who
have completed a final paper for the
proseminar and received at least a "good"
assessment.
Each student serves at least some time as a
Teaching Assistant, and each term served as
a TA his or her supervisor assesses the
student's performance as a TA, which
includes all three professional behaviors
specified. The supervisor's assessment
follows a departmental rubric and shall
deem the student's performance as either
unsatisfactory, satisfactory, good, or
outstanding. The target for the program is
the percentage of all enrolled students who
have served as a TA and who (i) have never
received less than a satisfactory TA
assessment and (ii) whose TA assessments
are "good" or better at least 50% of the
time.

Satisfactory completion of core courses and
comprehensive exam (with oral and written
components) or thesis demonstrating
proficiency in both applied and academic
knowledge.

Satisfactory completion of core courses and
comprehensive exam (with oral and written
components) or thesis demonstrating
proficiency in both applied and academic
knowledge.

compliance among employees with FERPA
and sexual harassment; attendance at the
department orientation; attending
professional conferences or lectures and
workshops by their second semester

Students will take and be evaluated in
INR6607, POS6736, STA6126, and at least
two survey subfield seminars and other
relevant courses for a total of 36 credit
hours. Students will successful complete
a two-day written and oral comprehensive
examinations or submit and defend a thesis
completed according to Graduate School
guidelines.
Students will successfully complete a two-
day written and oral comprehensive
examination or submit and defend a thesis
completed according to Graduate School
guidelines

Attend conferences and workshops; attend
department orientation; comply with FERPA
and UF programs to prevent sexual
harassment
NULL
NULL

Students must pass exams in the Method
and Theory I and II course sequence
according to a departmentally approved
grading rubric.



Students will successfully complete their MA
thesis, providing a comprehensive review of
the pertinent literature, and defend it orally
before their supervisory committee,
following the criteria stipulated in the
Religion Department’s Student Handbook.



Students will serve as teaching assistants in
at least one undergraduate introductory
course, such as “Introduction to World
Religions,” “Religions of Asia,” or
“Introduction to Islam.” Students serving as
teaching assistants must receive positive
evaluations from the supervising faculty.
Students will present a paper at a public
forum or workshop organized by the
Religion Department.

Students will complete and successfully
defend a thesis or professional research
article within two years of matriculation

Students will complete and successfully
defend a thesis or professional research
article within two years of matriculation
Students will complete and successfully
defend a thesis or professional research
article within two years of matriculation

Students will complete and successfully
defend a thesis or professional research
article within two years of matriculation

Students will complete and successfully
defend a thesis or professional research
article within two years of matriculation
Students will successfully complete sexual
harassment training compliance within the
first term of matriculation
Students will successfully complete the
training module in FERPA Basics within the
first term of matriculation
Students will successfully complete the
Institutional Review Board’s required
reading for all researchers within the first
term of matriculation

Students will complete the departmental
professionalization seminar within the first
term in the graduate program




Comprehensive Exam developed and graded
by a committee of faculty members




Non-thesis MA: Oral component of the
comprehensive exams –administered by
committee of faculty members Thesis MA:
Thesis approved by chair and committee
member
Successful completion of the Introduction to
Graduate studies within their discipline.
Also, annual discussion and evaluation of
student’s ethical behavior done by the
faculty at the meeting of graduate student
assessment.




Procedures: How will it be measured?
Assessment of students will be ongoing over
the course of their two-year MA program.
Faculty members will offer feedback on
students’ assigned written work and review
their academic progress at the close of each
semester. The thesis or non-thesis project
will provide the culminating work to be
assessed by the students’ MA committee
members. The oral defense of MA thesis or
non-thesis project, open to all CWSGR
faculty and graduate students, provides a
final opportunity for committee members to
assess students’ knowledge of gender in
culture and society. What is the desired
level of achievement? The objective is for
students to demonstrate a thorough
comprehension of the subject matter of
gender in culture and society, with special
expertise in their focused area of study.
Who will measure? CWSGR faculty
members will measure attainment of
interdisciplinary knowledge in the area of
gender in culture and society
Procedures: How will it be measured?
CWSGR faculty members will assess
students’ critical thinking, research, and
writing skills, and their ability to navigate
theoretical and analytical work, both as
readers and writers (providing written
comments on assigned work). Students’
communication skills will be assessed as
instrumental to their ability to function as
scholars and world citizens. Their ability to
meet deadlines and academic commitments
will be assessed as key to future success.
What is the desired level of achievement?
The objective is for students to demonstrate
critical thinking and writing skills, with
special expertise in methods used in their
focused area of study. They are also
expected to demonstrate communication
skills and an ability to meet deadlines and
academic commitments. Who will
measure? CWSGR faculty members will
measure students’ critical thinking,
research, writing and communication skills,
and their success in meeting academic
responsibilities.




Procedures: How will it be measured?
Frequent interaction of CWSGR faculty
members with graduate students will allow
for assessment of students’ professional
development and contribution to the life of
the CWSGR. Faculty members will serve as
mentors and models of professionalism.
What is the desired level of achievement?
The objective is for students to demonstrate
professional behavior and collegiality, as
measured by the quality of their
participation in the CWSGR, at professional
conferences, and so on. Who will
measure? CWSGR faculty members will
measure graduate students’ professional
development and collegial behavior.
The faculty members of the student's MAE
committee will evaluate whether the
student's defense of the thesis or project in
lieu of thesis is satisfactory.
The faculty members of the student's MAE
committee will evaluate whether the
student's defense of the thesis or project in
lieu of thesis is satisfactory.
The faculty members of the student's MAE
committee will evaluate whether the
student's defense of the thesis or project in
lieu of thesis is satisfactory.

Candidates will successfully complete the
qualifying exam, as measured by students’
advisory committee (includes at least three
faculty members) using an established rating
guide. The qualifying examination will
ensure that each candidate demonstrates
knowledge of Early Childhood subject
matter during the oral and written review
process.

Candidates will successfully complete the
Action Research Project or thesis, as
measured by students' advisory committee
(includes at least three faculty members)
using an established rating guide.

Candidates will successfully complete the
oral and written qualifying exam, as
evaluated by candidates’ advisory
committee (includes at least three faculty
members), using an established rating guide.

Candidates will successfully design and
deliver a professional development
presentation, which will be evaluated by the
participants of the presentation.

Candidates will successfully complete
assigned tasks and ratings in the Educator
Assessment System (EAS) and achieve
passing scores on the Comprehensive Final
or successfully defend a Master’s Thesis.
Candidates will successfully complete and
receive satisfactory ratings from program
faculty on Educator Assessment System
(EAS) tasks, as well as achieve passing scores
on the Comprehensive Final or successfully
defend a Master’s Thesis.

Candidates will successfully complete and
receive satisfactory ratings from program
faculty on Educator Assessment System
(EAS) tasks, as well as achieve passing scores
on the Comprehensive Final or successfully
defend a Master’s Thesis.

Candidates will successfully complete and
receive satisfactory ratings from program
faculty on Educator Assessment System
(EAS) tasks, as well as achieve passing scores
on the Comprehensive Final or successfully
defend a Master’s Thesis.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.

The students' Master's theses will be
evaluated as satisfactory or unsatisfactory
by MAE committee members.

The students' Master's theses will be
evaluated as satisfactory or unsatisfactory
by MAE committee members.

The students' Master's theses will be
evaluated as satisfactory or unsatisfactory
by MAE committee members.

The students' Master's theses will be
evaluated as satisfactory or unsatisfactory
by MAE committee members.
Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.

Candidates will successfully pass the exit
interview that is composed of: (a) a written
integrative paper, (b) a video presentation
of the examinee's clinical work, (c) and oral
defense to faculty questions about the
paper and the video.



The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR)is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.
Candidates will seek membership in
professional organizations (e.g., American
Counseling Association).

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Candidates will successfully pass the exit
interview that is composed of: (a) a written
integrative paper, (b) a video presentation
of the examinee's clinical work, (c) and oral
defense to faculty questions about the
paper and the video.



The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR) is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.
Candidates will seek membership in
professional organizations (e.g., American
Counseling Association).

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis, as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis, as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis, as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Majors will achieve an average grade of B+
in major courses completed.



Majors will receive satisfactory evaluations
of their completed thesis from faculty.
Majors will receive satisfactory evaluations
of their thesis and oral defense of thesis
from faculty.

Candidates will successfully pass the exit
interview that is composed of: (a) a written
integrative paper, (b) a video presentation
of the examinee's clinical work, (c) and
group oral defense to faculty questions
about the paper and the video.
The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR) is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.




Candidates will seek membership in
professional organizations (e.g., American
Counseling Association, American School
Counseling Association).
Candidates will successfully complete core
coursework in school psychology with a
minimum GPA of 3.25

Candidates will submit a manuscript for
publication in a peer refereed journal
Candidates will receive an average rating of
3.5 (Above Average) on Work
Performance/Professional Behavior items
included on the Graduate Assistantship
Annual Evaluation completed by a faculty
supervisor.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.
Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the written thesis or project, as well as the
oral presentation and defense of the thesis
or project as rated by the faculty members
on the student’s MAE committee.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Students will receive a satisfactory rating on
the defense of the thesis or project in lieu of
thesis as rated by the faculty members on
the student’s MAE committee.

Program participants will receive a score of
at least 80/100 points on the
implementation of an intervention in which
they teach a learning strategy to a struggling
learner as a project required in EEX 6936
Teaching Learning Strategies. The course
instructor will provide initial assessment for
each candidate using a rubric developed for
the project. A panel of program faculty will
review the results of participants across the
program.
Participants will receive scores of at least
95/120 points on the
Assessment/Instruction project in EEX 6233
in which program participants conduct
academic and behavioral assessments of a
struggling learner. The project requires
participants to apply knowledge gained
through coursework in a PK-12 school
setting, and the course instructor will
provide the initial assessment of each
student using a rubric developed for the
project. A panel of program faculty will
review the results of participants across the
program.



Program participants will receive 40/40
points on an educational plan designed
using the data from the assessment project.
The course instructor will provide an initial
assessment for each candidate using a rubric
developed for the project. A panel of
program faculty will review results of
participants across the program.



Program participants will receive scores of
at least 80 / 100 points on an assignment to
monitor student progress while
implementing an intervention project. Data
collected by the candidate are used to make
and justify instructional decisions. The
course instructor will provide an initial
assessment for each candidate using a rubric
developed for the project, and a panel of
program faculty will review results of
participants across the program.

1.Student actively participates in
professional organizations via conferences,
workshops, and membership 2.Student
actively presents student affairs-related
work in professional conferences,
workshops, and class
Student has to complete a take-home exam
based on essay exams that cover five basic
areas of student affairs core knowledge
areas: student development theory,
research methods, assessment, counseling,
and crisis management.

1. Student completes course written and
oral assignments. This may include, but not
limited to, literature reviews, journal and
book critiques, program proposals,
reflection papers, and presentations

All master’s students will successfully
complete and defend a thesis or project in
lieu of thesis that is unanimously accepted
by the students’ thesis or project committee



Students placed in professional positions or
doctoral programs

All students completing the program will
create a conceptual thesis or project in lieu
of thesis addressing issues in the
communication field that demonstrate a
synthesis of knowledge gained from the
program. This knowledge will be measured
through a thesis or project in lieu of thesis
and the defense with the students’
committee

All students completing the program will
create a conceptual thesis or project in lieu
of thesis addressing issues in the
communication field that demonstrate a
synthesis of knowledge gained from the
program. This knowledge will be measured
through a thesis or project in lieu of thesis
and the defense with the students’
committee
These behaviors are incorporated into at
least two of our core courses. A satisfactory
grade in these classes must be achieved to
reach this competency as measured by the
graduate faculty.
Three essay questions administered as part
of comprehensive exam required for the
Masters degree.

Receipt of a passing grade for the
completion of departmental coursework
providing training in an Anthropological
research method. This includes laboratories,
field schools, supervised research and
research project courses.
Review of paper conducted by sub-field
faculty as part of annual evaluation of
Masters students.



Comprehensive Exam developed and graded
by a committee of faculty members




Non-thesis MA: Oral component of the
comprehensive exams –administered by
committee of faculty members Thesis MA:
Thesis approved by chair and committee
member



All students: Successful completion of a
graduate seminar, including completion of a
paper that represents a significant piece of
independent research. Also, annual
discussion and evaluation of student’s
ethical behavior done by the faculty at the
meeting of graduate student assessment.
degree is not offered.
degree not offered.
degree not offered.
Students will pass the comprehensive
reading examination in Latin, set and graded
by a committee of department faculty,
based upon the rubric established by the
department.

Students will pass the comprehensive
written and oral examination on Latin
literature and culture, set and graded by a
committee of department faculty, using the
rubric established by the department.

Students will pass the comprehensive
written and oral examination on Latin
literature and culture, with questions on
Latin pedagogy, set and graded by a
committee of department faculty, using the
rubric established by the department.
Students will submit an abstract to a
graduate student conference or a meeting
of a regional association.
NULL
program under review. We have one that
will be getting this in the Summer
program under review. We have one that
will be getting this in the Summer
program under review. We have one that
will be getting this in the Summer
The comprehensive exam for the MA
consists in the conjunction of several
written final exams, built into a set of
required courses and assessed by means of
a departmental rubric. The requirement is to
take one of each of the following pairs of
courses: Ancient Philosophy 1 (PHP5005)
and Ancient Philosophy 2 (PHP5015),
Modern Philosophy 1 (PHH5405) and
Modern Philosophy 2 (PHH5406), PHP5785
(Foundations of Analytic Philosophy) and
PHI5365 (Epistemology). The final exam in
each of these courses is assessed by the
departmental rubric as either unsatisfactory,
satisfactory, good, or outstanding. The
target for the program is the percentage of
all enrolled students who (i) have taken at
least one of these exams and (ii) has
received at least a "good" assessment on
every one of these exams taken.



The required course in Graduate Logic
(PHI5135) includes a comprehensive final
exam, assessed by means of a departmental
rubric. That exam is assessed by the rubric
as either unsatisfactory, satisfactory, good,
or outstanding. The target for the program
is the percentage of all enrolled students
who have taken the exam and received at
least a "good" assessment.



The required Graduate Proseminar course
(PHI5935) requires a final substantial paper,
assessed by means of a departmental rubric.
That paper is assessed by the rubric as
either unsatisfactory, satisfactory, good, or
outstanding. The target for the program is
the percentage of all enrolled students who
have completed a final paper for the
proseminar and received at least a "good"
assessment.
Each student serves at least some time as a
Teaching Assistant, and each term served as
a TA his or her supervisor assesses the
student's performance as a TA, which
includes all three professional behaviors
specified. The supervisor's assessment
follows a departmental rubric and shall
deem the student's performance as either
unsatisfactory, satisfactory, good, or
outstanding. The target for the program is
the percentage of all enrolled students who
have served as a TA and who (i) have never
received less than a satisfactory TA
assessment and (ii) whose TA assessments
are "good" or better at least 50% of the
time.

NULL




Comprehensive Exam developed and graded
by a committee of faculty members
Oral component of the comprehensive
exams –administered by committee of
faculty members; Thesis approved by chair
and committee member

All students: Successful completion of the
Introduction to Graduate studies within
their discipline. Also, annual discussion and
evaluation of student’s ethical behavior
done by the faculty at the meeting of
graduate student assessment.

Students completing their coursework will
successfully defend their thesis before a
minimum of 2 Graduate Research Faculty
(GRF) in the department.
Students completing their coursework will
successfully defend their thesis before a
minimum of 2 Graduate Research Faculty in
the department.
Students will develop professional skills
through the Internship and Practicum
(studio).

Students will pass all core curriculum
courses with a C or better. The supervisory
committee will assess the knowledge gained
by the student as part of a successful
student project defense utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.

Students will successfully present in a paper
and orally to a panel of FRE faculty the
findings from an internship project utilizing a
faculty developed rubric.
During the degree program, students adhere
to the University of Florida’s Honor Code.
Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
project work, internship, and project
defense. These observations will be shared
with the supervisory committee and
evaluated based on a faculty-developed
rubric.




This course embedded measurement was
conducted Tax Research (TAX 5065). The
instrument used was a case covering the
potential tax consequences of transactions.
The assignment was completed by students
individually and was used as a component of
their course grade. This outcome has two
components (interpret, and apply
authority). Each component was evaluated
using by a point scale ranging from 0 to 3
points. Students earning 3 or greater were
deemed to exceed expectations; students
earning 2 were deemed to meet
expectations; and students earning one or
less were deemed below expectations.
This course embedded measurement was
conducted biannually in Accounting
Institutions and Professional Literature (ACG
5815). The instrument used was a case
assigned as part of the course. The case was
mapped to each of the three assessment
measurements of this learning objective.
Results were compiled separately for each
assessment measurement. Students scoring
greater than or equal to 85% were deemed
to exceed standards, students scoring less
than 85% but greater than or equal to 50%
were deemed to meet standards, and
students scoring less than 50% were
deemed to be below standards.



This outcome is assessed using two
measures. The first, an input measure, is
selection. Effective with the 2009-2010
academic year, a minimum requirement for
admission will be achieving a minimum
score of four on the Analytical Writing
Assessment section of the GMAT.
Exceptions to this minimum requirement
will only be permitted with approval of the
School’s Admission committee. It is
anticipated that exceptions to this minimum
requirement will be few. The second
assessment is a course-embedded
measurement evaluated in Writing for
Accountants. The emphasis of this
assessment is for students respond to a
situational- and audience-specific executive
summary writing assignment designed to
test students’ command of writing skills and
understanding of rhetorical strategies. The
assignment is evaluated using the
standardized 100 point rubric.
Speaking skills are assessed using a course-
embedded measure in Tax Research (Tax
5065). The rubric is based upon an
evaluation of a persuasive presentation.
Eight elements are evaluated with a point
scale ranging from one point to five points
possible for each element. Students must
demonstrate a well structured presentation,
strong evidence using relevant supportive
data, critical thinking, a clear argument,
dynamic delivery, and effective use of
PowerPoint.



This outcome is assessed with a
comprehensive indirect output measure of
accounting and business knowledge which
consists of overall pass rates for the Uniform
Certified Public Accountants examination
(CPA). This assessment was conducted by
analyzing the most recently released overall
CPA performance for MAcc graduates and
comparing the results to the national
average pass rates and our pass rates
ranked relative to that of our peer schools.
This outcome is assessed as a course-
embedded measure in MAN6724. The
assessment is under development and will
be completed May 2011
The first part of this course embedded
measurement is conducted biannually in
Accounting Institutions and Professional
Literature (ACG 5815). The instrument is the
final exam for the course. The exam is
mapped to the two assessment
measurements of this learning objective.
Results are compiled separately for each
assessment measurement. Students scoring
greater than or equal to 80% are deemed to
exceed standards, students scoring less than
80% but greater than or equal to 60% are
deemed to meet standards, and students
scoring less than 60% are deemed to be
below standards. The second part of this
course embedded measurement is
conducted biannually in Commercial Law for
Accountants (BUL 5832). The instrument
used is the final exam for the course.
Pertinent questions from the exam are
mapped to the three assessment
measurements of this learning objective.
Results are compiled separately for each
assessment measurement. Students scoring
greater than or equal to 80% are deemed to
exceed standards, students scoring less than
80% but greater than or equal to 60% are
deemed to meet standards, and students

All master’s students will successfully
complete and defend a thesis or project in
lieu of thesis that is unanimously accepted
by the students’ thesis or project committee
Students placed in professional positions or
doctoral programs
A satisfactory grade in classes incorporating
these behaviors must be achieved to reach
this competency as measured by the
graduate faculty.
All students completing the program will
create a conceptual thesis or project in lieu
of thesis addressing issues in advertsing that
demonstrate a synthesis of knowledge
gained from the program. This knowledge
will be measured through a thesis or project
in lieu of thesis and the defense with the
students’ committee




Assessment Method: Successful
achievement of project oriented problems
that require interpretation and integration
of knowledge from within and outside the
discipline. Studio discussions and juried
(outside critiques) evaluations and
assessments of project proposals are
conducted to assess how students are
engaged and resolve the project challenges.
75% to 100% of the students must
demonstrate ‘ability to’ levels of
understanding of core curricular objectives
to continue in the program. Secondary
curricular objectives are measured at the
‘understanding of’ level of comprehension.
Measurement is conducted by faculty,
visiting scholars and practicing architects
who are regularly engaged in the evaluation
of students at mid-term and final reviews.
Results: 80% will pass the architecture
registration examination within 10 years.
Assessment Method: Successful
achievement of project oriented problems
that require interpretation and integration
of knowledge from within and outside the
discipline. Studio discussions and juried
(outside critiques) evaluations and
assessments of project proposals are
conducted to assess how students are
engaged and resolve the project challenges.
75% to 100% of the students must
demonstrate ‘ability to’ levels of
understanding of core curricular objectives
to continue in the program. Secondary
curricular objectives are measured at the
‘understanding of’ level of comprehension.
Measurement is conducted by faculty,
visiting scholars and practicing architects
who are regularly engaged in the evaluation
of students at mid-term and final reviews.
Results: 80% will pass the architecture
registration examination within 10 years.
Assessment Method: Successful
achievement of project oriented problems
that require interpretation and integration
of knowledge from within and outside the
discipline. Studio discussions and juried
(outside critiques) evaluations and
assessments of project proposals and how
students are engaged and resolve the
project challenges. Tracking of student
participation in elective courses and
individual areas of focus. Weekly meetings
are conducted with Masters Research
Project committee. 100% of the students
must demonstrate ‘ability to’ levels of
understanding of core curricular objectives
to graduate from the program. Secondary
curricular objectives are measured at the
‘understanding of’ level of comprehension.
This may take additional time within the
curriculum. Measurement is conducted by
faculty, visiting scholars and practicing
architects who are normally engaged in
evaluating the students during mid-term
and final reviews. Results: Positive
feedback from professionals hiring our
students 80% will pass the architecture
registration examination within 10 years.




Assessment Method: Regular interaction
and discourse with active professionals
regarding the role of architects in society
and the responsibility of the ‘licensed
professional’ within culture. The successful
completion of course Professional Practice
(ARC 6281). Regular weekly meetings are
conducted with Masters Research Project
committee. 100% of the students must
demonstrate ‘ability to’ levels of
understanding of core curricular objectives
to graduate from the program. Secondary
curricular objectives are measured at the
‘understanding of’ level of comprehension.
This may take additional time within the
curriculum.
During their final term of each year, all MBA
students will be required to complete a
Capstone course that builds upon the key
concepts in each of the core business
disciplines. The course is designed to show
how the various disciplines are
interconnected, and will provide the
students with “hands-on” opportunities to
engage in real-world type problem solving
exercises. These include cases, simulations,
and other group-based activities. By
reinforcing these key concepts and by giving
students a broader opportunity to apply
these concepts, the intent is to strengthen
the students’ business foundations and to
have them better prepared for their
subsequent careers. The Capstone course
will provide an excellent opportunity for the
College to assess the extent that the
students are accomplishing each of the
program goals and objectives. The course is
currently under development and will be
piloted in Spring 2011. Following the pilot,
the course will be gradually implemented
across the MBA programs. Our accrediting
body (AACSB) recommends placing students
in the following categories: does not meet
standards, meets standards, and exceeds
During their final term of each year, all MBA
students will be required to complete a
Capstone course that builds upon the key
concepts in each of the core business
disciplines. The course is designed to show
how the various disciplines are
interconnected, and will provide the
students with “hands-on” opportunities to
engage in real-world type problem solving
exercises. These include cases, simulations,
and other group-based activities. By
reinforcing these key concepts and by giving
students a broader opportunity to apply
these concepts, the intent is to strengthen
the students’ business foundations and to
have them better prepared for their
subsequent careers. The Capstone course
will provide an excellent opportunity for the
College to assess the extent that the
students are accomplishing each of the
program goals and objectives. The course is
currently under development and will be
piloted in Spring 2011. Following the pilot,
the course will be gradually implemented
across the MBA programs. Our accrediting
body (AACSB) recommends placing students
in the following categories: does not meet
standards, meets standards, and exceeds
During their final term of each year, all MBA
students will be required to complete a
Capstone course that builds upon the key
concepts in each of the core business
disciplines. The course is designed to show
how the various disciplines are
interconnected, and will provide the
students with “hands-on” opportunities to
engage in real-world type problem solving
exercises. These include cases, simulations,
and other group-based activities. By
reinforcing these key concepts and by giving
students a broader opportunity to apply
these concepts, the intent is to strengthen
the students’ business foundations and to
have them better prepared for their
subsequent careers. The Capstone course
will provide an excellent opportunity for the
College to assess the extent that the
students are accomplishing each of the
program goals and objectives. The course is
currently under development and will be
piloted in Spring 2011. Following the pilot,
the course will be gradually implemented
across the MBA programs. Our accrediting
body (AACSB) recommends placing students
in the following categories: does not meet
standards, meets standards, and exceeds
The executive summary assignment in
GEB5212 requires students to extract the
most salient and persuasive ideas from a
Harvard Business Review management
article. Students must refine and focus
information to promote action in this
document. They need to select and present
information clearly, concisely, and
coherently according to the reader’s needs
and goals and the business context. The
assignment tests such higher order thinking
skills as evaluation and synthesis. The
Communications faculty will score these
written summaries and provide the data to
the MBA Committee for review by the
faculty. Our accrediting body (AACSB)
recommends placing students in the
following categories: does not meet
standards, meets standards, and exceeds
standards. The MBA committee reviews the
data in regards to what percentage of
students are meeting or exceeding the
standard. If the percentage is lower than the
faculty would prefer (e.g., <75% meet or
exceed the standard), adjustments to
content in a course, or set of courses, can be
made. If the percentage of students meeting
or exceeding is unexpectedly high (e.g., 50%
The persuasive presentation assignment in
GEB5215 requires students to deliver and
structure an internal business presentation
that persuades the audience to adopt the
presenter’s proposal or recommendation.
Students must determine the purposes for
presenting, analyze the audience, and use
appropriate and compelling information
that is logically structured. They need to use
well constructed PowerPoint slides and
demonstrate a number of delivery skills.
The assignment tests their ability to design
compelling and persuasive presentations
and deliver them dynamically. The
Communications faculty will score these
presentations and provide the data to the
MBA Committee for review by the faculty.
Our accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is
lower than the faculty would prefer (e.g.,
<75% meet or exceed the standard),
adjustments to content in a course, or set of
courses, can be made. If the percentage of

The Assessment will be measured by:
Assignments, exams, and presentations.
The level of achievement is: 75% of
students will earn a minimum grade of B in
all courses to assure a minimum 3.0 GPA
required for graduation. It will be
measured: Instructor.



The Assessment will be measured by:
Assignments, exams, and presentations.
The desired level of achievement: 75% of
students will earn a minimum grade of B in
all courses to assure a minimum 3.0 GPA
required for graduation. The course
instructor will measure the achievement.
The assessment will be measured through:
Team based assignments. The desired
level of achievement: 90% of students will
successfully complete peer review of a team-
based project to assure a minimum 3.0 GPA
required for graduation. The instructor and
students will measure the achievement.



There are three tracks available for ME
degree in aerospace engineering - (i) Solid
mechanics, design & manufacturing, (ii)
dynamics, systems & control, and (iii)
thermal sciences & fluid dynamics. In each
track two core courses are identified, one
each in the Fall and Spring semester. The
outcome will be assessed in these courses.
Specific homework and exam questions will
be used to assess the outcome. Student
performance will assigned a score based on
the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3(good),
4(very good) and 5 (excellent). Scores of 3
or better are the target.



There are three tracks available for ME
degree in aerospace engineering - (i) Solid
mechanics, design & manufacturing, (ii)
dynamics, systems & control, and (iii)
thermal sciences & fluid dynamics. In each
track two core courses are identified, one
each in the Fall and Spring semester. The
outcome will be assessed in these courses.
Specific homework and exam questions will
be used to assess the outcome. Student
performance will assigned a score based on
the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3(good),
4(very good) and 5 (excellent). Scores of 3
or better are the target.
No method

by departmental review of Plans of Study.
by examination during final defenses.
by examination during final defenses.
by observation during departmental
seminars and final defenses by observing
participation in professional societies. by
contacts with employers

80 % of randomly selected students will pass
the thesis examination by the supervisory
committee, or pass the final project
examination by the faculty supervisor.

80 % of randomly selected students will pass
the thesis examination by the supervisory
committee, or pass the final project
examination by the faculty supervisor.

80 % of randomly selected students will pass
the thesis examination by the supervisory
committee, or pass the final project
examination by the faculty supervisor.

80 % of randomly selected students will pass
the thesis examination by the supervisory
committee, or pass the final project
examination by the faculty supervisor.
Successful evaluation of final report in
BME6010, clinical preceptorship

80 % of randomly selected students will pass
the thesis examination by the supervisory
committee, or pass the final project
examination by the faculty supervisor.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of a Final Report for the ME
students.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of a Final Report for the ME
students.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of a Final Report for the ME
students.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of a Final Report for the ME
students.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of a Final Report for the ME
students.




Students will be assessed through selected
examination questions in 4 fundamental
courses. The following four courses will be
used for assessment to span the breadth of
the CE program specialties: CES 6106
Advanced Structural Analysis; CEG 5115
Foundation Engineering; CGN 6156
Construction Engineering 1; CGN 5606
Public Works Management. The professor
will use a Likert Scale to evaluate a student’s
performance on the selected examination
questions. The scale will be 5=Outstanding;
4=Above Average; 3=Average; 2=Below
Average; and 1=Unacceptable. The resulting
assessment is demonstrated by the students
achieving acceptable performance with a
Likert Score of 3 or better.
Students will be assessed through selected
software-based projects in 4 fundamental
courses. Engineering analysis software and
standards assessed as follows: CES 6106 –
Visual Basic Analysis of Structural Frames;
CEG 5115 – FB Pier analysis of Pile
Foundations; CGN 6156 Construction
Engineering 1 – Microsoft Project analysis or
scheduling and critical path techniques; CGN
5606 Public Works Management – TRB
(Transportation Research Board) standards
assessed in class term paper. The professor
will use a Likert Scale to evaluate a student’s
performance. The scale will be
5=Outstanding; 4=Above Average;
3=Average; 2=Below Average; and
1=Unacceptable. The resulting assessment is
demonstrated by the students achieving
acceptable performance with a Likert Score
of 3 or better.



Students will be assessed through selected
reports and presentations in 4 fundamental
courses. The following four courses will be
used for assessment to span the breadth of
the CE program specialties: CES 6106
Advanced Structural Analysis; CEG 5115
Foundation Engineering; CGN 6156
Construction Engineering 1; CGN 5606
Public Works Management. . The professor
will use a Likert Scale to evaluate a student’s
performance. The scale will be
5=Outstanding; 4=Above Average;
3=Average; 2=Below Average; and
1=Unacceptable. The resulting assessment is
demonstrated by the students achieving
acceptable performance with a Likert Score
of 3 or better.
Students will be assessed through selected
examination questions in 2 fundamental
courses. The following courses will be used
for assessment to assess outcomes in
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering
Master’s students: OCP 6165 Ocean Waves
1; OCP 6295 Estuarine and Shelf
Hydrodynamics. The professor will use a
Likert Scale to evaluate a student’s
performance on the selected examination
questions. The scale will be 5=Outstanding;
4=Above Average; 3=Average; 2=Below
Average; and 1=Unacceptable. The resulting
assessment is demonstrated by the students
achieving acceptable performance with a
Likert Score of 3 or better.

Students will be assessed through selected
software-based projects in fundamental
course OCP 6165. The professor will use a
Likert Scale to evaluate a student’s
performance. The scale will be
5=Outstanding; 4=Above Average;
3=Average; 2=Below Average; and
1=Unacceptable. The resulting assessment is
demonstrated by the students achieving
acceptable performance with a Likert Score
of 3 or better.



Students will be assessed through a term
paper in the fundamental course- OCP 6295.
The professor will use a Likert Scale to
evaluate a student’s performance. The scale
will be 5=Outstanding; 4=Above Average;
3=Average; 2=Below Average; and
1=Unacceptable. The resulting assessment is
demonstrated by the students achieving
acceptable performance with a Likert Score
of 3 or better.
Evaluate in assignments and exams of
COT5405 (Analysis of Algorithms).
Compile a paper surveying the literature on
a selected topic from COT5405 (Analysis of
Algorithms).
Evaluate through required homework,
projects, and other course deliverables from
COT5405 (Analysis of Algorithms).

Evaluate before graduation in an exam
consisting of questions related to ethics.
Evaluate during the exit interview.
Assessment Plan: There are 5 research areas
within the ECE department: Computer
Engineering, Devices, Electromagnetics and
Energy Systems, Electronics, and Signals &
Systems. While there is no single course
required for the MS degree, nearly every
one of our students will take at least one of
the following 9 key courses spread across
the 5 research areas: EEE 5320 - Bipolar
Analog IC Design, EEE 5322 - VLSI Circuits
and Technology, EEL 5544 - Noise in Linear
Systems, EEL 5525 - Foundations of Digital
Signal Processing, EEE 5400- Future of
Microelectronics Technology, EEE 5426-
Introduction to Nanodevices, EEL 5718 -
Computer Communications EEL 5764 -
Computer Architecture, EEL 6486 -
Electromagnetic Field Theory and
Applications I. Nearly every single ECE
student will take one of these courses and
95% of our students will take two or more
of these courses. The outcome will be
assessed in these courses. Rubric: Specific
homework and exam questions will be used
to assess the outcome. Student
performance will be assigned a score based
on the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3
(good), 4 (very good) and 5 (excellent).
Assessment Plan: The outcome will be
assessed in the courses mentioned above.
Rubric: Specific homework and exam
questions will be used to assess the
outcome. Student performance will be
assigned a score based on the Likert scale: 1
(poor), 2 (fair), 3 (good), 4 (very good) and 5
(excellent). Program Metric: 80% of
students in the class should exhibit a score
of 3 or above. Each course that is part of
the graduate outcome assessment process
will have a course committee. Each
semester the course committee will meet to
evaluate how well the outcome has been
met.

Assessment Plan: The outcome will be
assessed in the courses mentioned above.
Rubric: Specific homework and exam
questions will be used to assess the
outcome. Student performance will be
assigned a score based on the Likert scale: 1
(poor), 2 (fair), 3 (good), 4 (very good) and 5
(excellent). Program Metric: 80% of
students in the class should exhibit a score
of 3 or above. Each course that is part of
the graduate outcome assessment process
will have a course committee. Each
semester the course committee will meet to
evaluate how well the outcome has been
met.



N/A
For M.E. with thesis-- Evaluated in the thesis
and the final oral defense by the supervisory
committee. Rubric: Clear demonstration
that this SLO is achieved in statement of the
hypotheses, performance of research, and
conclusions drawn. Metric: Unanimous
decision of passing grade for thesis and
exam by the supervisory committee. For
M.E. non-thesis -- Evaluated in the final
exam administered by the supervisory
committee chair. Rubric: Test questions
that are specific to the student’s focus area.
Metric: Passing grade




For M.E. with thesis -- Evaluated in the
thesis and the final oral defense by the
supervisory committee Rubric: Clear
demonstration that this SLO is achieved in
literature review, methods, presentation of
results and conclusions drawn. One journal
article submitted to a refereed journal.
Metric: Unanimous decision of passing
grade for thesis and exam by the
supervisory committee For M.E. non-thesis -
- Evaluated in the final exam administered
by the supervisory committee chair. Rubric:
Test questions that are specific to the
student’s focus area. Metric: Passing grade.
for M.E. with thesis -- Evaluated in the thesis
and the final oral defense by the supervisory
committee Rubric: Clear demonstration
that this SLO is achieved in the ethical and
professional completion of the dissertation
specifically avoiding plagiarism and
demonstrating honesty in performance and
documentation of the research. Metric:
Unanimous decision of passing grade for
thesis and exam by the supervisory
committee. For M.E. non-thesis --
Evaluated in the final exam administered by
the supervisory committee chair Rubric:
Test questions that pertain to professional
and ethical responsibility Metric: Passing
grade
Outcome 1: In addition to maintaining
satisfactory classroom performance (all
students are required to obtain 3.0 grade
point average in order to graduate) through
their coursework, (which includes a
minimum of 15 credits in Industrial and
Systems Engineering), each student will be
evaluated by a graduate faculty member on
a five-point Likert scale with respect to
Outcome 1. This evaluation will be
performed no earlier than six months prior
to graduating, and will require each student
to be rated on their proficiency level in the
core methodological and application areas
of operations research. Outcome 2:
Students must satisfy a comprehensive exit
examination in the form of successful
completion of a designated project course.
The department has a set of six designated
project courses, each of which requires
completing a major course project involving
a final written and oral report. All students
will be evaluated on their communication
skills (oral and written), based on their final
oral and written project reports, by a
graduate faculty member (again, on a five-
point Likert scale).
Outcome 1: In addition to maintaining
satisfactory classroom performance (all
students are required to obtain 3.0 grade
point average in order to graduate) through
their coursework, (which includes a
minimum of 15 credits in Industrial and
Systems Engineering), each student will be
evaluated by a graduate faculty member on
a five-point Likert scale with respect to
Outcome 1. This evaluation will be
performed no earlier than six months prior
to graduating, and will require each student
to be rated on their proficiency level in the
core methodological and application areas
of operations research. Outcome 2:
Students must satisfy a comprehensive exit
examination in the form of successful
completion of a designated project course.
The department has a set of six designated
project courses, each of which requires
completing a major course project involving
a final written and oral report. All students
will be evaluated on their communication
skills (oral and written), based on their final
oral and written project reports, by a
graduate faculty member (again, on a five-
point Likert scale).
Outcome 1: In addition to maintaining
satisfactory classroom performance (all
students are required to obtain 3.0 grade
point average in order to graduate) through
their coursework, (which includes a
minimum of 15 credits in Industrial and
Systems Engineering), each student will be
evaluated by a graduate faculty member on
a five-point Likert scale with respect to
Outcome 1. This evaluation will be
performed no earlier than six months prior
to graduating, and will require each student
to be rated on their proficiency level in the
core methodological and application areas
of operations research. Outcome2:
Students must satisfy a comprehensive exit
examination in the form of successful
completion of a designated project course.
The department has a set of six designated
project courses, each of which requires
completing a major course project involving
a final written and oral report. All students
will be evaluated on their communication
skills (oral and written), based on their final
oral and written project reports, by a
graduate faculty member (again, on a five-
point Likert scale).



Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student is able to identify
unknown aspects of structure-property-
processing relationships for a materials
system and formulate an approach to
elucidating those aspects using engineering
and/or scientific principles at a level
appropriate to a masters student.

Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student can obtain
information from primary literature and
technical reports, and can integrate that
information to reach conclusions regarding
the current state of the art and areas in
which further research is needed.
Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student demonstrates
proficiency on appropriate experimental or
computational techniques used for
materials characterization, and uses these
techniques to investigate structure-property-
relationships in material systems at a level
appropriate to a master's student.

Evaluated in thesis research or final
examination paper. Rubric: Student is able
to follow requirements for writing reports
and research papers, and does so based on
ethical standards regarding appropriate
citation and plagiarism.

Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student is able to write
and/or orally present the results of a
research project or literature review in a
manner that clearly communicates one or
more of the following: current state of the
art, areas in which additional research is
needed, research objectives, procedures,
results, and conclusions.



There are three tracks available for ME
degree in mechanical engineering - (i) Solid
mechanics, design & manufacturing, (ii)
dynamics, systems & control, and (iii)
thermal sciences & fluid dynamics. In each
track two core courses are identified, one
each in the Fall and Spring semester. The
outcome will be assessed in these courses.
Specific homework and exam questions will
be used to assess the outcome. Student
performance will assigned a score based on
the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3(good),
4(very good) and 5 (excellent). Scores of 3
or better are the target.
There are three tracks available for ME
degree in mechanical engineering - (i) Solid
mechanics, design & manufacturing, (ii)
dynamics, systems & control, and (iii)
thermal sciences & fluid dynamics. In each
track two core courses are identified, one
each in the Fall and Spring semester. The
outcome will be assessed in these courses.
Specific homework and exam questions will
be used to assess the outcome. Student
performance will assigned a score based on
the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3(good),
4(very good) and 5 (excellent). Scores of 3
or better are the target.
No Method



Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student is able to identify
unknown aspects of nuclear technology,
nuclear science, or appropriate engineering
sciences (including materials sciences and
thermal sciences) and formulate an
approach to elucidating those aspects using
engineering and/or scientific principles at a
level appropriate to a masters student.

Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student can obtain
information from primary literature and
technical reports, and can integrate that
information to reach conclusions regarding
the current state of the art and areas in
which further research is needed.



Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student demonstrates
proficiency on appropriate experimental,
theoretical or computational techniques
used for nuclear engineering (including
materials science and thermal sciences) at a
level appropriate to a masters student.
Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student is able to follow
requirements for writing reports and
research papers, and does so based on
ethical standards regarding appropriate
citation and plagiarism.

Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student is able to write
and/or orally present the results of a
research project or literature review in a
manner that clearly communicates one or
more of the following: current state of the
art, areas in which additional research is
needed, research objectives, procedures,
results, and conclusions.



How will it be measured? Evaluation of
culminating portfolio/project or Evaluation
of synthesis/research paper in curriculum
course What is the desired level of
achievement? 100% of students will receive
a grade of B or higher on the culminating
portfolio/project using an evaluation rubric
or on the synthesis paper. Who will
measure? Master’s Portfolio Evaluation
Committee or Curriculum course instructor
How will it be measured? Evaluation of the
student developed and implemented
curriculum unit and Evaluation of the
master teacher component of the
culminating portfolio/project or Evaluation
of assignments in curriculum course(s)
requiring development and implementation
of instructional lessons What is the desired
level of achievement? 100% of students will
achieve a grade of “B” or higher on the
student-developed curriculum unit AND
culminating portfolio/project focused on
teaching and learning. or 100% of
students will achieve a grade of “B” or
higher on assignments requiring
development and implementation of
instructional lessons Who will measure?
Instructor(s) for curriculum course(s) AND
Master’s Portfolio Evaluation Committee




How will it be measured? Evaluation of
culminating portfolio/project or Evaluation
of collaborative group work and written
reflection papers required in curriculum
course(s) What is the desired level of
achievement? Students will achieve grade
of “B” or higher on their culminating
portfolio/project using the TLSI Portfolio
Evaluation Rubric OR Will achieve a grade
of “B: or higher on collaborative group work
and written reflection papers required in
curriculum course(s) Who will measure?
Master’s Portfolio Evaluation Committee or
Curriculum course instructors

Candidates will obtain a satisfactory score
on the Prekindergarten-Primary subject area
test of the Florida Teacher Certification
Examination. Program faculty review the
exam results by competency area.
Candidates will satisfactorily complete the
full time internship as indicated by a score
no lower than a 3 on the Student Teaching
Evaluation Form completed by the
candidates' cooperating teachers and UF
field supervisors.
Candidates will score no lower than a 3 on
Section IV of the Student Teaching
Evaluation Form as measured by the
candidates’ cooperating teacher and UF
Field Supervisor.

Candidates will participate in the end-of-
semester reflection meetings and submit
written metacognitive letters. The faculty
advisor facilitating the reflection meeting
will document attendance and participation.

Candidates will successfully complete and
receive satisfactory ratings from program
faculty on Educator Assessment System
(EAS) tasks, as well as achieve passing scores
on the Comprehensive Final or successfully
defend a Master’s Thesis. OR Candidates
will successfully complete all assigned tasks
and ratings in the Educator Assessment
System (EAS) and achieve passing scores on
the Florida Educational Leadership Exam
(FELE).




Candidates will successfully complete and
receive satisfactory ratings from program
faculty on Educator Assessment System
(EAS) tasks, as well as achieve passing scores
on the Comprehensive Final or successfully
defend a Master’s Thesis. Or Candidates
will receive a Satisfactory Evaluation of EDA
6948, The Practicum, from their approved
university advisor and program faculty.
Additionally, candidates will demonstrate
successful completion of EAS tasks and
ratings and passing scores on the Florida
Educational Leadership Exam (FELE).
Candidates will successfully complete and
receive satisfactory ratings from program
faculty on Educator Assessment System
(EAS) tasks, as well as achieve passing scores
on the Comprehensive Final or successfully
defend a Master’s Thesis. OR Candidates
will receive a Satisfactory Evaluation of EDA
6948, The Practicum, from their approved
university advisor, school-based supervisor,
and UF program faculty. Additionally,
candidates will demonstrate successful
completion of EAS tasks and ratings and
passing scores on the Florida Educational
Leadership Exam (FELE).




Candidates will successfully complete and
receive satisfactory ratings from program
faculty on Educator Assessment System
(EAS) tasks, as well as achieve passing scores
on the Comprehensive Final or successfully
defend a Master’s Thesis. OR Candidates
will receive a Satisfactory Evaluation of EDA
6948, The Practicum, from their approved
university advisor, school-based supervisor,
and UF program faculty. Additionally,
candidates will demonstrate successful
completion of EAS tasks and ratings and
passing scores on the Florida Educational
Leadership Exam (FELE).
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
As part of program completion, students will
take the Professional Education and Subject
Area components of the Florida Teacher
Certification Exam. The Florida Department
of Education administers and scores these
exams and reports data by program to the
College of Education’s Office of Student
Services.

Instructor ratings of course assignments
aligned with the Florida Educator
Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) are
recorded in the College of Education
Educator Assessment System (EAS).
Students will meet expectations on FEAP
assignments assessing methods and content
as indicated in the EAS.

Field Based Supervisor and University Based
Supervisor will provide a summative
evaluation of the graduate internship as
measured by the Student Teaching
Performance Evaluation instrument. The
expectation is that students will achieve an
overall evaluation of meets expectations on
the instrument.



University-Based Supervisor and Field-Based
Supervisor for the graduate internship will
evaluate professional behavior during field
experiences as measured by Section 4
(Teacher Professionalism) on the Student
Teaching Performance Evaluation
instrument. The expectation is that students
will achieve an overall evaluation of meets
expectations on Section 4.

Students will achieve a passing score on the
Professional Education Component and
English Language Arts Subject Area test of
the Florida Teacher Certification Exam
administered and scored by the Florida
Department of Education.
Students will meet expectations on the
summative Student Teaching Performance
Evaluation instrument completed by the
student’s Field Based Supervisor and
University Based Supervisor at the
culmination of the graduate field
experience.

Students will meet expectations on Section
IV: Teacher Professionalism of the Student
Teaching Performance Evaluation
instrument completed by the student’s Field
Based Supervisor and University Based
Supervisor at the culmination of the
graduate field experience.

Candidates will successfully pass the exit
interview that is composed of: (a) a written
integrative paper, (b) a video presentation
of the examinee's clinical work, (c) and oral
defense to faculty questions about the
paper and the video.



The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR) is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.




Candidates will seek membership in
professional organizations (e.g., American
Counseling Association).
Students will achieve a passing score on the
Professional Education Test and
Mathematics Subject Area Test of the
Florida Teacher Certification Exam
administered and scored by the Florida
Department of Education.
Students will meet expectations on the
summative Student Teaching Performance
Evaluation instrument completed by the
student’s Field Based Supervisor and
University Based Supervisor for the
culminating field experience in Mathematics
Education.
Students will meet expectations on Section
IV: Teacher Professionalism on the Student
Teaching Performance Evaluation
instrument completed by the student’s Field
Based Supervisor and University Based
Supervisor during the culminating field
experience.




Candidates will seek membership in
professional organizations (e.g., American
Counseling Association).

Candidates will successfully pass the exit
interview that is composed of: (a) a written
integrative paper, (b) a video presentation
of the examinee's clinical work, (c) and oral
defense to faculty questions about the
paper and the video.
The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR) is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.

Students will achieve a passing score on the
Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE)
Subject Area test administered and scored
by the Florida Department of Education.
Students will meet expectations on the
Literacy Instruction Feedback Template
(LIFT) instrument as evaluated by the
student’s Field Based Supervisor and
University Based Supervisor for the reading
practicum.
Students will meet expectations on the
Literacy Instruction Feedback Template
(LIFT) instrument as evaluated by the
student’s Field Based Supervisor and
University Based Supervisor for the reading
practicum.

Majors will achieve an average grade of B+
in courses within the major.
Students will achieve satisfactory
performance on a comprehensive exam
evaluated by faculty.

Majors will receive satisfactory evaluations
of their completed thesis and oral defense
of thesis from faculty.
Candidates will successfully pass the exit
interview that is composed of: (a) a written
integrative paper, (b) a video presentation
of the examinee's clinical work, (c) and
group oral defense to faculty questions
about the paper and the video.



The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR) is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.




Candidates will seek membership in
professional organizations (e.g., American
Counseling Association, American School
Counseling Association).
Candidates will successfully complete core
coursework in school psychology with a
minimum GPA of 3.25.

Candidates will submit a manuscript for
publication in a peer refereed journal
Candidates will receive an average rating of
3.5 (Above Average) on Work
Performance/Professional Behavior items
included on the Graduate Assistantship
Annual Evaluation completed by a faculty
supervisor.
Students will achieve passing scores on the
Professional Education Test and appropriate
content area components of the Florida
Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE)
administered and scored by the Florida
Department of Education.

Students will meet expectations on the
summative Student Teacher Performance
Evaluation Instrument completed by the
student’s Field Based Supervisor and
University Based Supervisor for the
culminating graduate field experience.

Students will meet expectations on Section
IV: Teacher Professionalism on the Student
Teaching Performance Evaluation
instrument completed by the student’s Field
Based Supervisor and University Based
Supervisor for the culminating graduate field
experience.
Students will achieve a passing score on the
Professional Education test and Social
Science 6-12 Subject Area test of the
Teacher Certification Exam administered
and scored by the Florida Department of
Education.
Students will meet expectations on the
summative Student Teaching Performance
Evaluation instrument completed by the
student’s Field Based Supervisor and
University Based Supervisor for the
culminating field experience in Social
Studies Education.

Students will meet expectations on Section
IV: Teacher Professionalism of the Student
Teaching Performance Evaluation
instrument completed by the student’s Field
Based Supervisor and University Based
Supervisor for the graduate field experience
in Social Studies Education.
Program participants will receive a passing
score on the Florida Teacher Certification
Exam in Exceptional Student Education K-12.
The exam is administered by the Florida
Department of Education, and scores are
reported to the College of Education and
reviewed in the Office of Student Services as
well as by the ESE program coordinator.

 Program participants will receive ratings of
at least 3 of 4 on all domains on the Student
Teacher Performance Evaluation. Field and
University-based internship supervisors will
complete the Evaluation form.

Program participants will receive ratings of
at least 3 of 4 on all domains on the Student
Teacher Performance Evaluation. Field and
University-based internship supervisors will
complete the Evaluation form.

Program participants will receive ratings of
at least 3 of 4 on all domains on the Student
Teacher Performance Evaluation. Field and
University-based internship supervisors will
complete the Evaluation form.

Student has to complete a take-home exam
based on essay exams that cover five basic
areas of student affairs core knowledge
areas: student development theory,
research methods, assessment, counseling,
and crisis management.

Student completes course written and oral
assignments. This may include, but not
limited to, literature reviews, journal and
book critiques, program proposals,
reflection papers, and presentations
Student actively participates in professional
organizations via conferences, workshops,
and membership 2.Student actively presents
student affairs-related work in professional
conferences, workshops, and class
Pass the following, as evaluated by the
supervisory committee A. First Year
Reviews B. Second Year Review C. Project
–in –lieu of Thesis D. Project –in –lieu of
Thesis Defense E. Final submission of
project report.
Pass the following, as evaluated by the
supervisory committee A. First Year
Reviews B. Second Year Review C. Project
–in –lieu of Thesis (exhibition) D. Project –in
–lieu of Thesis Defense E. Final submission
of project report.
Pass the following, as evaluated by the
supervisory committee: A. Mount a thesis
Exhibition, complete with a project report
and oral defense.
Students will complete and defend a thesis
that will be either a substantial portion of a
well-written novel or book-length poetry
manuscript.
Students will submit work for publication
and/or competitive awards, residencies or
prizes.
Students complete at least two public
readings.

Students will pass the following, as
evaluated by the supervisory committee: A.
Written comprehensive exam B. completion
and defense of project in lieu of thesis.

Students will successfully pass the following:
A. Performance assignments in school
productions, as evaluated by production
director; B. semester jury and/or portfolio
review (depending of area of study) as
evaluated by school faculty.
Students will pass the internship, as
evaluated by the on-site internship
coordinator.

Students will successfully take all
coursework listed in their supervisory
committee-approved 'Program of Study'.
Students are graded by faculty instructors.
A grade of “B” is required and student
performance is reviewed annually by the
student’s major professor and supervisory
committee. Both oral and written
assessments are provided to the student.
The supervisory committee assesses the
student’s ability to evaluate the primary
scientific literature utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.

Students will successfully pass a final written
and oral examination, administered by their
supervisory committee, utilizing a faculty-
developed rubric.

During their degree program, students
adhere to the University of Florida’s Honor
Code. Observations will be made by faculty
of professional behavior during class
activities, the Annual FAS Graduate Student
Spring Symposium, project work, final
examination, exit seminar, and participation
in professional societies. These
observations will be shared with and
evaluated by the student's supervisory
committee, utilizing a faculty-developed
rubric.
Written communication skills will be
assessed by the approval of the student's
project proposal and technical paper by
their supervisory committee, and by the
successful completion of their coursework,
which includes numerous papers and
written exams. Student observations of
written communication skills will be shared
with the supervisory committee and
evaluated utilizing a faculty-developed
rubric.



Oral communication skills will be assessed
during the student's required annual oral
presentation at the FAS Graduate Student
Spring Symposium and during their required
exit seminar. Evaluations will be performed
by members of their supervisory committee,
utilizing a faculty-developed rubric.
Students will successfully prepare, present,
and defend their technical project or paper
to their supervisory committee, and will be
evaluated utilizing a faculty-developed
rubric.



Students will successfully prepare their
project proposal, conduct all required field,
laboratory and office work, appropriately
analyze any pertinent data, and prepare and
defend their project/technical paper to their
supervisory committee. This will be
evaluated by a faculty-developed rubric.
Students will be evaluated at annual
meetings by their supervisory committee,
and at the time of their final written and
oral examination, utilizing a faculty-
developed rubric.

Supervisory Committee evaluation of
individualized Programs of Study (scope,
depth, rigor) utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
Supervisory Committee evaluation of
project defense and final examination
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

Supervisory Committee evaluation of
individualized Programs of Study (scope,
depth, rigor) utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.



Supervisory Committee evaluation of
written examination and project defense
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

Compliance with University of Florida
Student Honor Code.

Faculty observations of behavior and
practices in the classroom, at meetings and
seminars, in the conduct of scholarly work,
and during all examinations. These
observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
Evaluation of the student's program of study
by the supervisory committee using a
faculty-developed rubric.

Evaluation of the student's knowledge
during the presentation of the non-thesis
project by the supervisory committee using
a faculty-developed rubric.

Evaluation of student performance in their
program of study by the supervisory
committee using a faculty-developed rubric.

Evaluation of the student's knowledge as
expressed during the presentation of the
non-thesis project by the supervisory
committee using a faculty-developed rubric.
Successful completion of a non-thesis
project as judged by a supervisory
committee using a faculty-developed rubric.
Development of one or more materials for
submission at professional conferences or
workshops, as training materials or
programs, as EDIS publications, or as
recommendations to organizations and
groups.

Successful completion and presentation of a
non-thesis project as judged by a
supervisory committee using a faculty-
developed rubric.

Development of one or more materials for
submission at professional conferences or
workshops, as training materials or
programs, as EDIS publications, or as
recommendations to organizations and
groups to be evaluated by a group of faculty
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
Consistent adherence during the degree
program to the University of Florida's Honor
Code.

Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
practicums or internships, final examination
and in professional organizations.
Observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated based
on a faculty-developed rubric.
MHA students will earn grades of B or better
in courses.

Students complete competency assessment
surveys three times--upon entering the
program, at the mid-point of the program,
and upon exiting the program. Ratings for
all comptencies will increase between entry
and mid-point surveys and between mid-
point and exit surveys.
Rating of 4.0 on preceptor's evaluation of
intern's performance.
Students will successfully complete and
defend their thesis.

Students will finish all required course work
and successfully complete a thesis proposal.
At least two faculty members will assess
student's professional communication and
technical abilities.




 Pass rate on comprehensive examination



Grade of B or better achieved on written
scholarly paper and oral presentation of the
capstone project

Grade of B or better achieved on the written
assignment, “My Therapeutic Presence”
within the Diversity in Health Care unit in
the Trends and Issues in Health Care course
NULL



How will it be measured? Assignments,
exams, and comprehensive final exam.
What is the desired level of achievement?
75% of students will earn a minimum grade
of B in all courses to assure a minimum 3.0
GPA required for graduation. Who will
measure? Instructor.

How will it be measured? Research paper.
What is the desired level of achievement?
100% of students ultimately achieve a
passing grade for their research paper
Who will measure? Faculty Advisor.
How will it be measured? Assignments,
exams, and comprehensive final exam.
What is the desired level of achievement?
75% of students will earn a minimum grade
of B in all courses to assure a minimum 3.0
GPA required for graduation. Who will
measure? Instructor.
How will it be measured? Research paper
presentation. What is the desired level of
achievement? 90% of students will achieve
a passing grade for the research paper
presentation. Who will measure? Faculty
Advisor.



How will it be measured? Comprehensive
final exam. What is the desired level of
achievement? 90% of students will achieve
a passing grade for the comprehensive final
exam. Who will measure? Instructors.
90% Develop a research proposal which is
passed by the thesis Chair and committee
member

90% Defend a thesis which is passed by the
thesis Chair and committee member

25% Demonstrate evidence of engaging in
field experience; Assessed through
evaluations from internship supervisors or
others overseeing field experiences

90% of MID students completing field
experience will receive good or excellent
performance reviews from their supervisors

100% of MID students conducting research
with human subjects will submit their
proposal to the IRB review committee

100% of MID students who are engaging in
human-based research will gain IRB
approval to conduct their research
Students will submit an abstract to a
graduate student conference or a meeting
of a regional association.

Students will pass the comprehensive
reading examination in Latin, set and graded
by a committee of department faculty, using
the rubric established by the department.

Students will pass the comprehensive
written and oral examination on Latin
literature and culture, set and graded by a
committee of department faculty, using the
rubric established by the department.

Students will pass the comprehensive
written and oral examination on Latin
literature and culture, set and graded by a
committee of department faculty, using the
rubric established by the department.

How will it be measured? 1) Landscape
Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB)
program Review; and 2) Faculty review.
What is the desired level of achievement?
MLA students should integrate research and
theory into all applicable coursework Who
will measure? 1) Landscape Architecture
Accreditation Board (LAAB); and 2)
Faculty members.



How will it be measured? Landscape
Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB)
Review of curriculum standard. What is
the desired level of achievement? 1)
Thesis topics selected by individual students
reflect specialization; and 2) satisfactory
performance in the diversity of core
landscape architectural curriculum as
identified and evaluated by LAAB. Who
will measure? 1) Landscape Architecture
Accreditation Board (LAAB); 2) Faculty
members; and 3) Professional Landscape
Architects on juries, internships, etc.
How will it be measured? It will be
measured by: 1) Landscape Architecture
Accreditation Board (LAAB); 2) Faculty
reviews; and 3) Internships. What is the
desired level of achievement? We strive for
all of our students to find internships and
permanent employment in the profession.
Who will measure? 1) Landscape
Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB); 2)
Faculty members; and 3) Professional
Landscape Architects.



How will it be measured? It will be
measured by: 1) Landscape Architecture
Accreditation Board (LAAB); 2) Faculty
reviews; and 3) Internships. What is the
desired level of achievement? We strive for
all of our students to find internships and
permanent employment in the profession.
Who will measure? 1) Landscape
Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB);
2) Faculty members; and 3) Professional
Landscape Architects.



How will it be measured? It will be
measured by: 1) Landscape Architecture
Accreditation Board (LAAB); 2) Faculty
reviews; and 3) Internships. What is the
desired level of achievement? We strive for
all of our students to find internships and
permanent employment in the profession.
Who will measure? 1) Landscape
Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB);
2) Faculty members; and 3) Professional
Landscape Architects.
How will it be measured?         1) Landscape
Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB)
Review; 2) pertinent coursework (such as
professional practice and service learning
projects) and thesis; and 3) internship
letters of evaluation. What is the desired
level of achievement? Students express
ethical decision-making and thus behave
ethically, are culturally sensitive and are
collaborative team players. Who will
measure? 1) Landscape Architecture
Accreditation Board LAAB; 2) Faculty
members; and 3) Professional Landscape
Architects in internships.
Students will take a comprehensive
examination upon completion of program
course work that will be evaluated by the
area faculty.
Students will also perform a final recital that
will be evaluated by the supervisory
committee.
Students will also perform a final recital that
will be evaluated by the supervisory
committee.

Successful completion and defense of final
research project, as evaluated by the
program faculty.

Students will write, submite and defend a
proposal for a final research project, as
evaluated by the program faculty.

Students wil write, submit and defend a
proposal for a research project that will be
evaluated by the program faculty.



Oral Comprehensive Examination, as
evaluated by the supervisory committee
Scholarly paper and poster demonstrating
knowledge gained and application




Presentation demonstrating knowledge
gained and application
Performance on the American Occupational
Therapy Association Fieldwork Evaluation
form.

Performance on the National Board for the
Certification of Occupational Therapist,
national certification exam.

SAtisfactory construction of program
portfolio project

Performance of applicable items on the
American Occupational Therapy Association
Fieldwork Evaluation form and Occupational
Therapy Attributes Scale. .
90% of MPH students who take the national
CPH exam will pass the exam
90% of MPH students who take the national
CPH exam will pass the exam
90% of MPH students who take the national
CPH exam will pass the exam
90% of MPH students who take the national
CPH exam will pass the exam

Cumulative achievement of 80% or better
on MPH core competencies

Cumulative achievement of 80% or better
on MPH core competencies

Cumulative achievement of 80% or better
on MPH core competencies

Cumulative achievement of 80% or better
on MPH core competencies
Grade of "A" on special project reports



Grade of "A" on special project reports



Grade of "A" on special project reports



Grade of "A" on special project reports
Cumulative achievement of 80% or better
on professional behavior scale
Cumulative achievement of 80% or better
on professional behavior scale
Cumulative achievement of 80% or better
on professional behavior scale
Cumulative achievement of 80% or better
on professional behavior scale



There are three tracks available for MS
degree in aerospace engineering - (i) Solid
mechanics, design & manufacturing, (ii)
dynamics, systems & control, and (iii)
thermal sciences & fluid dynamics. In each
track two core courses are identified, one
each in the Fall and Spring semester. The
outcome will be assessed in these courses.
Specific homework and exam questions will
be used to assess the outcome. Student
performance will assigned a score based on
the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3(good),
4(very good) and 5 (excellent). Scores of 3
or better are the target.
There are three tracks available for MS
degree in aerospace engineering - (i) Solid
mechanics, design & manufacturing, (ii)
dynamics, systems & control, and (iii)
thermal sciences & fluid dynamics. In each
track two core courses are identified, one
each in the Fall and Spring semester. The
outcome will be assessed in these courses.
Specific homework and exam questions will
be used to assess the outcome. Student
performance will assigned a score based on
the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3(good),
4(very good) and 5 (excellent). Scores of 3
or better are the target.
No Method

by departmental review of Plans of Study
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

by departmental review of Plans of Study
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
 by examination during final defenses by
supervisor committee utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.
 by examination during final defenses by
supervisor committee utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.




by examination during final defenses by the
supervisory committee utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.




by examination during final defenses by the
supervisory committee utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.
by observation during departmental
seminars and final defenses. These
observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
by observation during departmental
seminars and final defenses. These
observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
by observing participation in professional
societies. These observations will be shared
with the supervisory committee and
evaluated utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
by observing participation in professional
societies. These observations will be shared
with the supervisory committee and
evaluated utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
by contacts with employers. These
observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
by contacts with employers. These
observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination or completion of
thesis and defense utilizing a rubric designed
by faculty.
Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination evaluated by
group of faculty utilizing a rubric designed
by faculty.

Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination or completion of
thesis and defense evaluated by the
supervisory committee utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.

Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination examination
evaluated by group of faculty utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.
Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination or completion of
thesis and defense evaluated by the
supervisory committee utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.

Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination or completion of
thesis and defense evaluated by the
supervisory committee utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.

Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination or completion of
thesis and defense evaluated by the
supervisory committee utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.
Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination evaluated by
group of faculty utilizing a rubric designed
by faculty.
Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination or completion of
thesis and defense.

Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination.
Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination or completion of
thesis and defense.
Satisfactory completion of major project and
final written examination evaluated by
group of faculty utilizing a rubric designed
by faculty.
Grades in coursework will be indicators of
acquired knowledge, with the requirement
that a B grade is maintained. All students
will take at least one course in each of three
topical areas: Genetics and Plant Breeding,
Plant Physiology/Biochemistry and Plant
Ecology/Management/Nutrition. Student
Learning Outcomes will be distributed to
each graduate Supervisory Committee and
the committee will be charged with the
responsibility of ensuring that each
component of the outcomes is addressed
within the context of the specific student’s
program. The graduate Supervisory
Committee will be the primary evaluator of
outcomes for graduate education with
formal assessments made through the final
exam and thesis defense utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty. Formal, written
evaluations of the performance of all
graduate students are made by the
Supervisory Committee at the end of the
student’s first semester and on an annual
basis in following years.
The Supervisory Committee will evaluate
the quality of the research program as
reported in the M.S. thesis and as discussed
during the final exam and thesis defense
utilizing a rubric designed by faculty. M.S.
graduate students also present two graded,
departmental seminars during their
programs. The first seminar, presented in
the second semester of the graduate
program, is a presentation of a detailed
research plan/proposal and the second
seminar, presented in the last semester
before completing degree requirements, is a
presentation of the results of the research
that was conducted and reported in the
thesis. Written abstracts of both seminars
are prepared and presented to students,
faculty and the instructor. Presentations and
written abstracts are evaluated by both peer
graduate students and the faculty of the
department and student performance is
assessed by a letter grade for the course
utilizing a rubric designed by faculty.

Job placement and advanced degree success
will be monitored within job placement
categories including entry into other
graduate programs and careers in the public
and private sectors.

Skills will be assessed by departmental
faculty, and especially by the major advisor
and the graduate Supervisory Committee.
Performance will be graded in various
courses, departmental seminars and the
final exam and thesis defense utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.
Skills will be assessed by departmental
faculty, and especially by the major advisor
and the Supervisory Committee.
Performance will be graded in various
courses, departmental seminars and the
final exam and thesis defense utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.




Course instructors, major advisors, and
graduate Supervisory Committees expect
professional and ethical behavior of all
graduate students during all scholarly
activities. In courses, all students are made
aware of the UF honor code, the seriousness
of violating the code is discussed, and
adherence to the code is monitored.
Professional behavior will be evaluated,
especially by the major advisor and the
graduate Supervisory Committee during
seminars, participation and presentations at
professional meetings, scientific writings
and in interpersonal relationships.
Evaluation of the student's program of study
by the supervisory committee utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.
Evaluation by the supervisory committee
during thesis defense utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.
Evaluation of the student's program of study
by the supervisory committee utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.
Evaluation by the supervisory committee
during thesis defense utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.

Adherence to the University of Florida
Honor Code during the graduate program.
Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
research work, thesis defense, and
participation in professional societies. These
observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated based
on a faculty developed rubric.

Evaluation of the student's program of study
and M.S. thesis (for M.S. Thesis option only)
or assigned independent study project (for
M.S. Non-Thesis option) by the supervisory
committee and other faculty utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.



Evaluation of the student's performance in
the Professional Animal Scientist exam by
the Association of Professional Animal
Scientists or publication of a manuscript
from the student's original research in a
peer-reviewed journal (for M.S. Thesis
option only) or involvement of an external
examiner in the student's thesis exam (for
M.S. Thesis option only) or final exam (for
M.S. Non-Thesis option only) utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.

Evaluation of the solutions to assigned
special problems and the student's M.S.
thesis (for M.S. Thesis option only) or
assigned independent study project (for
M.S. Non-Thesis option only) by the
supervisory committee and other faculty
utilizing a rubric designed by faculty.
Successful completion of the MS thesis
examination (for M.S. Thesis option) or an
assigned independent study project (for
M.S. Non-Thesis option) as judged by the
supervisory committee utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.
Evaluation of the student's participation in a
journal club or a course involving
manuscript discussions by the supervisory
committee and other faculty utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.

Analysis of the student's annual evaluations
by the supervisory committee utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty and the student's
adherence to the UF honor code.

Evaluation of at least one paper at a
national/international professional scientific
meeting (for M.S. Thesis option only) and
one seminar presented during the Graduate
Seminar course and evaluated by the major
advisor and the Graduate Seminar
Coordinator, respectively, utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.

Successful written and oral defense of thesis
per department standards and guidelines.

Evaluation of performance in internship
and/or clinical experience per department
standards and guidelines.

Successful written and oral defense of thesis
per department standards and guidelines.
Successful completion of internship and/or
clinical experience per department
standards and guidelines.



Successful thesis presentation per
department standards and guidelines.

Successful written comprehensive final
exam per department standards and
guidelines.

Graduate students will pass the core courses
with a B average.
Students must complete a supervised
research project, culminating in an oral
presentation and a document in the style of
a journal article or conference proceeding
describing the project. These are presented
to a committee of faculty chosen by the
student and their advisor.

Students will make presentations in the core
courses and in AST 6936, which will be
graded by the faculty. Students will
demonstrate in these talks satisfactory
ability to make a scientific presentation.

Students will make presentations during
their second year on guided research
projects, demonstrating the ability to clearly
convey the results of their research. A
committee of three faculty members will
evaluate the quality of these presentation.

Second year students will present their
research during the department's annual
graduate research symposium. The advisor
and a second faculty member will provide
evaluations of student talks to both the
student and graduate coordinator. Students
will demonstrate the ability to give a
scientific talk to a large audience.

Students will submit a document in the style
of a journal article or conference
proceeding describing the results of the
supervised research project. A satisfactory
evaluation is required for completion of the
program.
Students must take at least two of the
following core courses: 1) BCH 5413 or BCH
6415 – Molecular Biology, 2) BCH 6206 -
Metabolism, and 3) BCH 6740 – Structural
Biology/Physical Biochemistry. Knowledge
in these areas will be assessed by written
examinations, homework assignments, and
oral examinations. Assessment of written
examinations and homework assignments
will be done in conjunction with the courses
above, and oral assessment will take place
during regular meetings with the student’s
graduate supervisory committee.
Discipline-related knowledge will be
assessed during regular meetings with the
student’s graduate supervisory committee.
These meetings will take place every 6
months and culminate in the student’s final
thesis defense.

Students will give oral presentations of
recent literature in their fields in Journal
club courses. Their knowledge will be
assessed by faculty and peers during these
presentations, and students will be provided
with critiques of their performance.
Students will be required to enroll in one
journal club every semester.



The ability of students to follow
experimental protocols, perform established
techniques, and analyze results will be
assessed on a regular basis (every 6 months)
during supervisory committee meetings in
which students will orally present their work
and findings to the committee. Writing skills
will be assessed by evaluation of the
student’s written M.S. thesis by the
supervisory committee.
The student’s primary research advisor,
supervisory committee, and other faculty
and peers who attend the student’s
presentation will provide the student with
an evaluation of his/her professionalism in
oral presentations.



The student’s primary research advisor and
supervisory committee will evaluate the
student’s professional conduct in research
during the course of the student’s regular
supervisory committee meetings which will
be held every 6 months. The student’s
adherence to safety and regulatory rules will
be assessed by the student’s research
advisor in the laboratory setting.

80 % of randomly selected students will pass
the thesis examination by the supervisory
committee, or pass the final project
examination by the faculty supervisor.

80 % of randomly selected students will pass
the thesis examination by the supervisory
committee, or pass the final project
examination by the faculty supervisor.

80 % of randomly selected students will pass
the thesis examination by the supervisory
committee, or pass the final project
examination by the faculty supervisor.

80 % of randomly selected students will pass
the thesis examination by the supervisory
committee, or pass the final project
examination by the faculty supervisor.
Successful evaluation of final report in
BME6010, clinical preceptorship

80 % of randomly selected students will pass
the thesis examination by the supervisory
committee, or pass the final project
examination by the faculty supervisor.
How measured: Passing MS written exam at
the end of the first year. Level of
achievement: 80% of PhD students who
take the written exam. Who will measure:
Graduate faculty, Department of
Biostatistics

How measured: Passing MS culminating
experience at the end of the second year.
Level of achievement: 95% of PhD students
who pass the written examination. Who will
measure: Graduate Faculty, Department of
Biostatistics

How measured: Student participation in the
biostatistical consulting course. Level of
achievement: 95% of PhD students who
pass the written examination. Who will
measure: Graduate Faculty, Department of
Biostatistics
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.




N/A
N/A




N/A
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of the thesis for the MS students
and the Final Report for the MS non-thesis
students.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of the thesis for the MS students
and the Final Report for the MS non-thesis
students.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of the thesis for the MS students
and the Final Report for the MS non-thesis
students.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of the thesis for the MS
sstudents and the Final Report for the MS
non-thesis students.

This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of the thesis and the final
presentation for the MS students and the
Final Report for the MS non-thesis students.
Requires graduate level effort within the
chosen sub-discipline and other fields of
chemistry. A 3.25 chemistry GPA is
required. Written thesis in the sub-
discipline is required. Students give
seminar(s) to the faculty.

A final oral exam with the presentation of
the written MS thesis concludes the degree
requirements. The MS thesis and final oral
exam are to be evaluated and certified by
the graduate committee.
Presentation of a minimum of one divisional
seminar with a B or better and the
professional oral presentation of the thesis
research and thesis before the graduate
committee at the final exam. The quality
of the thesis is certified by the graduate
committee.




Students will be assessed through selected
examination questions in 4 fundamental
courses. The following four courses will be
used for assessment to span the breadth of
the CE program specialties: CES 6106
Advanced Structural Analysis; CEG 5115
Foundation Engineering; CGN 6156
Construction Engineering 1; CGN 5606
Public Works Management. The professor
will use a Likert Scale to evaluate a student’s
performance on the selected examination
questions. The scale will be 5=Outstanding;
4=Above Average; 3=Average; 2=Below
Average; and 1=Unacceptable. The resulting
assessment is demonstrated by the students
achieving acceptable performance with a
Likert Score of 3 or better.
Students will be assessed through selected
software-based projects in 4 fundamental
courses. Engineering analysis software and
standards assessed as follows: CES 6106 –
Visual Basic Analysis of Structural Frames;
CEG 5115 – FB Pier analysis of Pile
Foundations; CGN 6156 Construction
Engineering 1 – Microsoft Project analysis or
scheduling and critical path techniques; CGN
5606 Public Works Management – TRB
(Transportation Research Board) standards
assessed in class term paper. The professor
will use a Likert Scale to evaluate a student’s
performance. The scale will be
5=Outstanding; 4=Above Average;
3=Average; 2=Below Average; and
1=Unacceptable. The resulting assessment is
demonstrated by the students achieving
acceptable performance with a Likert Score
of 3 or better.



Students will be assessed through selected
reports and presentations in 4 fundamental
courses. The following four courses will be
used for assessment to span the breadth of
the CE program specialties: CES 6106
Advanced Structural Analysis; CEG 5115
Foundation Engineering; CGN 6156
Construction Engineering 1; CGN 5606
Public Works Management. . The professor
will use a Likert Scale to evaluate a student’s
performance. The scale will be
5=Outstanding; 4=Above Average;
3=Average; 2=Below Average; and
1=Unacceptable. The resulting assessment is
demonstrated by the students achieving
acceptable performance with a Likert Score
of 3 or better.
Students will be assessed through selected
examination questions in 2 fundamental
courses. The following courses will be used
for assessment to assess outcomes in
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering
Master’s students: OCP 6165 Ocean Waves
1; OCP 6295 Estuarine and Shelf
Hydrodynamics. The professor will use a
Likert Scale to evaluate a student’s
performance on the selected examination
questions. The scale will be 5=Outstanding;
4=Above Average; 3=Average; 2=Below
Average; and 1=Unacceptable. The resulting
assessment is demonstrated by the students
achieving acceptable performance with a
Likert Score of 3 or better.

Students will be assessed through selected
software-based projects in fundamental
course OCP 6165. The professor will use a
Likert Scale to evaluate a student’s
performance. The scale will be
5=Outstanding; 4=Above Average;
3=Average; 2=Below Average; and
1=Unacceptable. The resulting assessment is
demonstrated by the students achieving
acceptable performance with a Likert Score
of 3 or better.



Students will be assessed through a term
paper in the fundamental course- OCP 6295.
The professor will use a Likert Scale to
evaluate a student’s performance. The scale
will be 5=Outstanding; 4=Above Average;
3=Average; 2=Below Average; and
1=Unacceptable. The resulting assessment is
demonstrated by the students achieving
acceptable performance with a Likert Score
of 3 or better.
Evaluate in assignments and exams of
COT5405 (Analysis of Algorithms).
Compile a paper surveying the literature on
a selected topic from COT5405 (Analysis of
Algorithms).
Evaluate through required homework,
projects, and other course deliverables from
COT5405 (Analysis of Algorithms).

Evaluate before graduation in an exam
consisting of questions related to ethics.
Evaluate during the exit interview.
Evaluate in assignments and exams of
COT5405 (Analysis of Algorithms).
Compile a paper surveying the literature on
a selected topic from COT5405 Analysis of
Algorithms).
Evaluate through required homework,
projects, and other course deliverables from
COT5405 (Analysis of Algorithms).

Evaluate before graduation in an exam
consisting of questions related to ethics.
Evaluate during the exit interview.

Students take their specialty written board
exam or an in-service exam which are
administered by the individual specialty
either right before or right after graduating
from the program. Target goal is 100% pass
rate. Where able, specific subject areas will
be reviewed to identify possible curriculum
weaknesses.

Patient records consisting of cases treated
by the student will be examined by
appropriate faculty and assessed for
completeness, quality of records, and
assessment of treatment outcomes. Target
goal is for all records to be complete, consist
of high quality records, and have a thorough
assessment of treatment outcomes as
measured by that specialty.
Residents are evaluated semi-annually both
didactically and clinically by the faculty, and
must maintain a B average.
All students must design, conduct, and
successfully defend a research thesis or
project. A faculty committee oversees each
student’s research.

Patient/record review by faculty to assess
ethical treatments. Students are evaluated
semi-annually on their behavior by faculty.
All students are expected to exhibit ethical
standards in their treatment and behaviors.

Self reporting through an alumni survey sent
by department at specified yearly intervals
for each program/specialty. It is hoped that
the majority of our graduates will indicate
participating in some organization, be
involved in some service or teach.
Evaluate in assignments and exams of
CAP5705 (Computer Graphics).
Compile a paper surveying the literature on
a selected topic from CAP5705 (Computer
Graphics).
Evaluate through required homework,
projects, and other course deliverables from
CAP5705 (Computer Graphics).

Evaluate before graduation in an exam
consisting of questions related to ethics.
Evaluate during the exit interview.
Assessment Plan: There are 5 research areas
within the ECE department: Computer
Engineering, Devices, Electromagnetics and
Energy Systems, Electronics, and Signals &
Systems. While there is no single course
required for the MS degree, nearly every
one of our students will take at least one of
the following 9 key courses spread across
the 5 research areas: EEE 5320 - Bipolar
Analog IC Design, EEE 5322 - VLSI Circuits
and Technology, EEL 5544 - Noise in Linear
Systems, EEL 5525 - Foundations of Digital
Signal Processing, EEE 5400- Future of
Microelectronics Technology, EEE 5426-
Introduction to Nanodevices, EEL 5718 -
Computer Communications EEL 5764 -
Computer Architecture, EEL 6486 -
Electromagnetic Field Theory and
Applications I. Nearly every single ECE
student will take one of these courses and
95% of our students will take two or more
of these courses. The outcome will be
assessed in these courses. Rubric: Specific
homework and exam questions will be used
to assess the outcome. Student
performance will be assigned a score based
on the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3
(good), 4 (very good) and 5 (excellent).



The outcome will be assessed in the courses
mentioned above. Rubric: Specific
homework and exam questions will be used
to assess the outcome. Student
performance will be assigned a score based
on the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3
(good), 4 (very good) and 5 (excellent).
Program Metric: 80% of students in the class
should exhibit a score of 3 or above. Each
course that is part of the graduate outcome
assessment process will have a course
committee. Each semester the course
committee will meet to evaluate how well
the outcome has been met.
The outcome will be assessed in the courses
mentioned above. Rubric: Specific
homework and exam questions will be used
to assess the outcome. Student
performance will be assigned a score based
on the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3
(good), 4 (very good) and 5 (excellent).
Program Metric: 80% of students in the class
should exhibit a score of 3 or above. Each
course that is part of the graduate outcome
assessment process will have a course
committee. Each semester the course
committee will meet to evaluate how well
the outcome has been met.



n/a

Students will pass a content-based exam
written by a group of faculty and
administered and graded by the student's
supervisory committee of at least two
faculty members at the end of the program
using a rubric designed by faculty.

Students will receive a satisfactory
evaluation of their performance in their
program each semester by their supervisory
committee of at least two faculty members
using a faculty-developed evaluation form.

Students will demonstrate the ability to
integrate and expand upon ideas critical to
their area of specialization through
successful completion of the end-of-
program oral exam administered by the
student's supervisory committee of at least
two faculty members based on a rubric
designed by faculty.
Students will demonstrate the ability to
critically read scientific publications and
understand experimental design as
evidenced by successful completion of
laboratory exercises in all core required
entomology courses based on a rubric
designed by faculty.
Students will prepare a research proposal
evaluated by a committee of faculty using a
standardized rubric.

Students will conduct scientifically rigorous
research that is evaluated each semester by
the student's supervisory committee of at
least two faculty members using a faculty-
developed evaluation form.

Students will demonstrate satisfactory
performance on the research proposal
seminar, in one subject matter seminar
course, in the thesis exit seminar, and in
professional society presentations as judged
by a group of faculty, using a rubric designed
by faculty.

Students will produce a high quality thesis,
and within one year after graduation, will
have prepared one or more manuscripts
judged ready for submission as conference
papers, refereed journal articles, EDIS
publications, etc.. by the supervisory
committee.

Students will satisfactorily complete the oral
and written assessments required in their
core entomology curriculum, using a rubric
designed by faculty.
Students will consistently adhere during the
degree program to the University of
Florida's Honor Code.
Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
research work, thesis defense, and
participation in professional societies.
These observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated based
on a faculty-developed rubric.
The Program Final Exam is required by all
students completing the program and is
reviewed by the program’s faculty steering
committee. The case will be selected by the
steering committee each year and will be
used to assess attainment of the program
learning goals and objectives. The case will
present data surrounding a potential new
venture opportunity and will be distributed
1-month prior to graduation. The students
will have 1-month to complete the following
4 exercises: • Evaluate the feasibility of the
new venture opportunity • Assign a value
the new venture opportunity • Develop a
business plan for the new venture
opportunity (no more than 10 pages) •
Develop an investor pitch for the new
venture opportunity (no more than 5
minutes) The students will turn in the
assignment containing #1-3 (feasibility
analysis, valuation and business plan) and
deliver an individual investor pitch. Our
accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
The Program Final Exam is required by all
students completing the program and is
reviewed by the program’s faculty steering
committee. The case will be selected by the
steering committee each year and will be
used to assess attainment of the program
learning goals and objectives. The case will
present data surrounding a potential new
venture opportunity and will be distributed
1-month prior to graduation. The students
will have 1-month to complete the following
4 exercises: • Evaluate the feasibility of the
new venture opportunity • Assign a value
the new venture opportunity • Develop a
business plan for the new venture
opportunity (no more than 10 pages) •
Develop an investor pitch for the new
venture opportunity (no more than 5
minutes) The students will turn in the
assignment containing #1-3 (feasibility
analysis, valuation and business plan) and
deliver an individual investor pitch. Our
accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
The Program Final Exam is required by all
students completing the program and is
reviewed by the program’s faculty steering
committee. The case will be selected by the
steering committee each year and will be
used to assess attainment of the program
learning goals and objectives. The case will
present data surrounding a potential new
venture opportunity and will be distributed
1-month prior to graduation. The students
will have 1-month to complete the following
4 exercises: • Evaluate the feasibility of the
new venture opportunity • Assign a value
the new venture opportunity • Develop a
business plan for the new venture
opportunity (no more than 10 pages) •
Develop an investor pitch for the new
venture opportunity (no more than 5
minutes) The students will turn in the
assignment containing #1-3 (feasibility
analysis, valuation and business plan) and
deliver an individual investor pitch. Our
accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
The Program Final Exam is required by all
students completing the program and is
reviewed by the program’s faculty steering
committee. The case will be selected by the
steering committee each year and will be
used to assess attainment of the program
learning goals and objectives. The case will
present data surrounding a potential new
venture opportunity and will be distributed
1-month prior to graduation. The students
will have 1-month to complete the following
4 exercises: • Evaluate the feasibility of the
new venture opportunity • Assign a value
the new venture opportunity • Develop a
business plan for the new venture
opportunity (no more than 10 pages) •
Develop an investor pitch for the new
venture opportunity (no more than 5
minutes) The students will turn in the
assignment containing #1-3 (feasibility
analysis, valuation and business plan) and
deliver an individual investor pitch. Our
accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or




for M.S. with thesis -- Evaluated in the thesis
and the final oral defense by the supervisory
committee. Rubric: Clear demonstration
that this SLO is achieved in statement of the
hypotheses, performance of research, and
conclusions drawn. Metric: Unanimous
decision of passing grade for thesis and
exam by the supervisory committee. For
M.S. nonthesis -- Evaluated in the final
exam administered by the supervisory
committee chair. Rubric: Test questions
that are specific to the student’s focus area.
Metric: Passing grade.
for M.S. with thesis -- Evaluated in the thesis
and the final oral defense by the supervisory
committee Rubric: Clear demonstration
that this SLO is achieved in literature review,
methods, presentation of results and
conclusions drawn. One journal article
submitted to a refereed journal. Metric:
Unanimous decision of passing grade for
thesis and exam by the supervisory
committee For M.S. nonthesis -- Evaluated
in the final exam administered by the
supervisory committee chair. Rubric: Test
questions that are specific to the student’s
focus area. Metric: Passing grade.




For M.S. with thesis - Evaluated in the thesis
and the final oral defense by the supervisory
committee Rubric: Clear demonstration
that this SLO is achieved in the ethical and
professional completion of the thesis
specifically avoiding plagiarism and
demonstrating honesty in performance and
documentation of the research. Metric:
Unanimous decision of passing grade for
thesis and exam by the supervisory
committee. For M.S. nonthesis -- Evaluated
in the final exam administered by the
supervisory committee chair Rubric: Test
questions that pertain to professional and
ethical responsibility Metric: Passing grade.

How measured:Pass written comprehensive
examination. Level of achievement: 90% of
MS students successfully pass the exam.
Who will measure: Faculty mentor and
other members of supervisory committee.
How measured: Demonstrate accuracy in
the conduct of research through successful
defense of a thesis. Level of achievement:
90% of students. Who will measure: Faculty
mentor and thesis committee.

How measured: Defined performance
criteria as applied to the conduct of thesis
research Level of achievement: 90% of
students achieve a passing score. Who will
measure: Faculty mentor.
Evaluation of the student's program of study
by the supervisory committee using a
faculty-developed rubric.
Evaluation of the student's knowledge as
expressed during the thesis defense by the
supervisory committee using a faculty-
developed rubric.

Evaluation of student performance in their
program of study by the supervisory
committee using a faculty-developed rubric.
Evaluation of student's knowledge as
expressed during the thesis defense by the
supervisory committee using a faculty-
developed rubric.
Successful defense of a thesis as judged by a
supervisory committee using a faculty -
developed rubric.

Preparation of one or more manuscripts or
posters judged ready for submission at
professional conferences, training programs,
EDIS publications, journal articles, or project
reports.
Successful defense of a thesis as judged by a
supervisory committee using a faculty-
developed rubric.

Preparation of one or more manuscripts or
posters judged ready for submission as
conference papers, journal articles, EDIS
publications, training materials or project
reports by the supervisory committee
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
Consistent adherence during the degree
program to the University of Florida's Honor
Code.

Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
research work, thesis defense and
participation in professional societies.
Observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated based
on a faculty-developed rubric.




Our accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is
lower than the faculty would prefer (e.g.,
<75% meet or exceed the standard),
adjustments to content in a course, or set of
courses, can be made. If the percentage of
students meeting or exceeding is
unexpectedly high (e.g., 50% exceeded the
standard), then the faculty committee might
recommend increasing the rigor of the
course(s) and/or rubric. The MSF Program
Director and AOL faculty committee will
assemble an exam designed to be very
similar in topical coverage and format as the
CFA Level II exam. The exam will be
administered to all students during the final
two weeks of study in the program.
Our accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is
lower than the faculty would prefer (e.g.,
<75% meet or exceed the standard),
adjustments to content in a course, or set of
courses, can be made. If the percentage of
students meeting or exceeding is
unexpectedly high (e.g., 50% exceeded the
standard), then the faculty committee might
recommend increasing the rigor of the
course(s) and/or rubric. Teams of students
develop an asset allocation designed to
outperform a predetermined benchmark
portfolio. The paper portfolios are tracked
from approximately October 1 to April 1.
Students actively manage the portfolios
through out the year and write monthly
performance evaluations. The exercises of
forming a portfolio, managing the portfolio,
and reporting on the portfolio performance
requires the students to (1) gather financial
and economic data and research markets in
real time so as to form assessments about
Our accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is
lower than the faculty would prefer (e.g.,
<75% meet or exceed the standard),
adjustments to content in a course, or set of
courses, can be made. If the percentage of
students meeting or exceeding is
unexpectedly high (e.g., 50% exceeded the
standard), then the faculty committee might
recommend increasing the rigor of the
course(s) and/or rubric. Teams of students
develop an asset allocation designed to
outperform a predetermined benchmark
portfolio. The paper portfolios are tracked
from approximately October 1 to April 1.
Students actively manage the portfolios
through out the year and write monthly
performance evaluations. The exercises of
forming a portfolio, managing the portfolio,
and reporting on the portfolio performance
requires the students to (1) gather financial
and economic data and research markets in
real time so as to form assessments about
Our accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is
lower than the faculty would prefer (e.g.,
<75% meet or exceed the standard),
adjustments to content in a course, or set of
courses, can be made. If the percentage of
students meeting or exceeding is
unexpectedly high (e.g., 50% exceeded the
standard), then the faculty committee might
recommend increasing the rigor of the
course(s) and/or rubric. Teams of students
develop an asset allocation designed to
outperform a predetermined benchmark
portfolio. The paper portfolios are tracked
from approximately October 1 to April 1.
Students actively manage the portfolios
through out the year and write monthly
performance evaluations. The exercises of
forming a portfolio, managing the portfolio,
and reporting on the portfolio performance
requires the students to (1) gather financial
and economic data and research markets in
real time so as to form assessments about

During the degree program, students adhere
to the University of Florida’s Honor Code.
Observations will be made by faculty of
professional behavior during class activities,
the Annual FAS Graduate Student Spring
Symposium, research work, final
examination/defense, exit seminar, and
participation in professional societies.
These observations will be shared with and
evaluated by the student's supervisory
committee utilizing a faculty-developed
rubric.
Students will successfully take all
coursework listed in their supervisory
committee-approved 'Program of Study'.
Students are graded by faculty instructors.
A grade of “B” is required and student
performance is reviewed annually by the
student’s major professor and supervisory
committee. Both oral and written
assessments are provided to the student.
The supervisory committee assesses the
student’s ability to evaluate the primary
scientific literature utilizing a faculty-
developed rubric.

Students will successfully pass a final
written/oral examination, administered by
their supervisory committee, utilizing a
faculty-developed rubric.

Written communication skills will be
assessed by the approval of the student's
written research proposal and thesis by
their supervisory committee, and by the
successful completion of their coursework,
which includes numerous papers and
written exams. Student observations of
written communication skills will be shared
with the supervisory committee and
evaluated utilizing a faculty-developed
rubric.



Oral communication skills will be assessed
during the student's required annual oral
presentation at the FAS Graduate Student
Spring Symposium and during their required
exit seminar. Evaluations will be performed
by members of their supervisory committee
utilizing a faculty-developed rubric.
Students will successfully prepare and
present their research proposal, and
prepare and defend their thesis to their
supervisory committee, and will be
evaluated utilizing a faculty-developed
rubric.
Students will successfully prepare their
research design/proposal, conduct all
required field and laboratory work,
appropriately analyze their data, and
prepare and defend their thesis to their
supervisory committee. This will be
evaluated by a faculty-developed rubric.
Students will be evaluated at annual
meetings by their supervisory committee,
and at the time of their final written/oral
examination utilizing a faculty-developed
rubric.

Students will pass all core curriculum
courses with a C or better. The supervisory
committee will assess the knowledge gained
by the student as part of a successful
student project defense utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.



Non-thesis students: students will
successfully present in a written document
and orally the results of a project completed
to a panel of faculty as part of an internship
with a food or agribusiness firm that
provides them the opportunity to use skills
acquired. Evaluation will based on a faculty
developed rubric. Thesis students:
students will successfully defend of his or
her thesis research project to their advisory
committee using a faculty developed rubric.
Course syllabus and materials will
emphasize importance of ethical behavior
on assignments. During the degree program,
students adhere to the University of
Florida’s Honor Code. Ethical considerations
will be required as part of the internship
project report Observations will be made by
the faculty regarding professional behavior
during class activities, seminars, thesis work,
internship, and project defense. These
observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated based
on a faculty-developed rubric.
Evaluation of the student’s complete
program of study by the Supervisory
Committee, the Department, the College,
and the University utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.

Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during the final Examination utilizing a
faculty developed rubric.

Evaluation of the thesis or project proposal
and thesis or project document by the
Supervisory Committee utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.

Evaluation of the thesis defense or final
Examination by the Supervisory Committee,
and presentation of a seminar utilizing a
faculty developed rubric.
Evaluation of thesis or project proposal,
research performance, and quality of thesis
or project document by the Supervisory
Committee utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
Evaluation during the thesis or project
defense or final Examination by the
Supervisory Committee utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.

Adherence to the University’s Student
Honor Code and Student Conduct Code.
Annual written evaluation of performance
and professional attitude by a faculty-
developed rubric.

Observation and feedback by faculty and
staff to the student’s supervisory committee
regarding the performance of course class
activities, the Final Examination, laboratory
activities, and participation in professional
societies utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

Supervisory Committee evaluation of
individualized Programs of Study (scope,
depth, rigor) utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.



Supervisory Committee evaluation of thesis
defense and/or final examination utilizing a
faculty developed rubric.

Supervisory Committee evaluation of
individualized Programs of Study (scope,
depth, rigor) utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.



Supervisory Committee evaluation of thesis
defense and/or final examination utilizing a
faculty developed rubric.

Compliance with University of Florida
Student Honor Code.

Faculty observations of behavior and
practices in the classroom, at meetings and
seminars, in the conduct of scholarly work,
and during all examinations utilizing a
faculty developed rubric.
Students will demonstrate accuracy in the
conduct of their research during the defense
of their thesis as assessed by their
supervisory committee following
department standards.
Students will conduct their research based
on the instruction of their supervisory
committee chair and other related faculty
members.

Students will submit abstracts and/or give
presentations/posters to regional, state and
national conferences. Students will
conduct their research with professionalism
taught by their supervisory committee.

Students will demonstrate satisfactory
ability to present the results of their
research and scholarship in their written
thesis and during an oral defense of their
work as determined by their supervisory
committee following agreed upon criteria.

Students will demonstrate accuracy in the
conduct of their research and scholarship
during the defense of their thesis as
assessed by their supervisory committee
following department standards.




Students will complete a thesis approved by
their graduate committee based upon
defined performance criteria.



Students will demonstrate satisfactory
ability to analyze data, synthesize maps and
apply the scientific method as measured by
performance during an oral defense of their
work as determined by their supervisory
committee following agreed upon criteria.

Students will demonstrate satisfactory
ability to analyze data, synthesize maps and
apply the scientific method as measured by
performance within a thesis approved by
their graduate committee based upon
defined performance criteria.
MSc graduate students will provide
documentation that they submitted an
abstract to a local, regional or national
conference. The student’s supervisory
committee evaluates completion of this
requirement at time of final thesis
examination.

Students will attend a department
Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)
orientation session
Successful thesis presentation per
department guidelines and standards.
Successful written comprehensive final
exam per department guidelines and
standards.
Successful presentation of thesis per
department guidelines and standards.
80% or higher on the written
comprehensive final exam per department
guidelines and standards.
Successful presentation of thesis per
department standards and guidelines.
End of semester electronic assessment of
student professional behavior by faculty in
core courses.



Assessment Method: The graduate
Supervisory Committee will be the primary
evaluator of the student’s ability to obtain
contemporary and relevant knowledge in
the various disciplines of Horticultural
Sciences with formal assessments made
through the final exam and thesis defense
utilizing a rubric designed by faculty.
Assessment Method: Student’s supervisory
committee will evaluate student’s problem
solving skills in coursework and scholarly
research activities in final examinations for
thesis students utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty. For non-thesis students, committee
will conduct oral and/or written exam prior
to completion of program to be evaluated
by the Supervisory Committee utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.



Assessment Method: In courses, all students
are made aware of the UF honor code, the
seriousness of violating the code is
discussed, and adherence to the code is
monitored. Professional behavior will be
evaluated, especially by the major advisor
and the graduate Supervisory Committee
during seminars, participation and
presentations at professional meetings,
scientific writings and in interpersonal
relationships utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.

Assessment Method: The graduate
Supervisory Committee will be the primary
evaluator of the student’s ability to become
knowledgeable of new techniques and
technologies with formal assessments made
through the final exam and thesis defense
utilizing a rubric designed by faculty.
Assessment Method: The graduate
Supervisory Committee will be the primary
evaluator of student’s ability to evaluate
horticultural systems formal assessments
made through the final exam and thesis
defense utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty.
Delivery Method: Campus Assessment
Method: Student’s supervisory committee
will evaluate student’s progress in
coursework and scholarly research activities
in final examinations for thesis students
utilizing a rubric designed by faculty. For non-
thesis students, committee will conduct oral
and/or written exam prior to completion of
program to be evaluated by the Supervisory
Committee utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty.
Outcome 1: In addition to maintaining
satisfactory classroom performance (all
students are required to obtain 3.0 grade
point average in order to graduate) through
their coursework, (which includes a
minimum of 15 credits in Industrial and
Systems Engineering), each student will be
evaluated by a graduate faculty member on
a five-point Likert scale with respect to
Outcome 1. This evaluation will be
performed no earlier than six months prior
to graduating, and will require each student
to be rated on their proficiency level in the
core methodological and application areas
of operations research.       Outcome 2:
Students must satisfy a comprehensive exit
examination in the form of successful
completion of a designated project course.
The department has a set of six designated
project courses, each of which requires
completing a major course project involving
a final written and oral report. All students
will be evaluated on their communication
skills (oral and written), based on their final
oral and written project reports, by a
graduate faculty member (again, on a five-
point Likert scale).
Outcome 1: In addition to maintaining
satisfactory classroom performance (all
students are required to obtain 3.0 grade
point average in order to graduate) through
their coursework, (which includes a
minimum of 15 credits in Industrial and
Systems Engineering), each student will be
evaluated by a graduate faculty member on
a five-point Likert scale with respect to
Outcome 1. This evaluation will be
performed no earlier than six months prior
to graduating, and will require each student
to be rated on their proficiency level in the
core methodological and application areas
of operations research. Outcome 2:
Students must satisfy a comprehensive exit
examination in the form of successful
completion of a designated project course.
The department has a set of six designated
project courses, each of which requires
completing a major course project involving
a final written and oral report. All students
will be evaluated on their communication
skills (oral and written), based on their final
oral and written project reports, by a
graduate faculty member (again, on a five-
point Likert scale).
Outcome 1: In addition to maintaining
satisfactory classroom performance (all
students are required to obtain 3.0 grade
point average in order to graduate) through
their coursework, (which includes a
minimum of 15 credits in Industrial and
Systems Engineering), each student will be
evaluated by a graduate faculty member on
a five-point Likert scale with respect to
Outcome 1. This evaluation will be
performed no earlier than six months prior
to graduating, and will require each student
to be rated on their proficiency level in the
core methodological and application areas
of operations research. Outcome 2:
Students must satisfy a comprehensive exit
examination in the form of successful
completion of a designated project course.
The department has a set of six designated
project courses, each of which requires
completing a major course project involving
a final written and oral report. All students
will be evaluated on their communication
skills (oral and written), based on their final
oral and written project reports, by a
graduate faculty member (again, on a five-
point Likert scale).
The ISM 6485 capstone course is required
by all students completing the program. The
course is offered in the Spring and Fall of
each year. The capstone course focuses on
managerial issues that require applying the
basic knowledge acquired throughout the
ISOM program applied to practical business
problems. Embedded in the course are a
number of cases used to assess student
ability to synthesize the knowledge gained
in the program in order to problem-solving,
decision-making, and critical thinking skills.
These also assess basic business knowledge.
Every second year (starting in the Spring of
2011), one of the cases selected by the
ISOM AOL committee will additionally be
used to assess attainment of the program
learning goals and objectives. The case will
present material consistent with assessing
the ISOM program learning goals and
objectives. Our accrediting body (AACSB)
recommends placing students in the
following categories: does not meet
standards, meets standards, and exceeds
standards. The MBA committee reviews the
data in regards to what percentage of
students are meeting or exceeding the
standard. If the percentage is lower than the
The ISM 6485 capstone course is required
by all students completing the program. The
course is offered in the Spring and Fall of
each year. The capstone course focuses on
managerial issues that require applying the
basic knowledge acquired throughout the
ISOM program applied to practical business
problems. Embedded in the course are a
number of cases used to assess student
ability to synthesize the knowledge gained
in the program in order to problem-solving,
decision-making, and critical thinking skills.
These also assess basic business knowledge.
Every second year (starting in the Spring of
2011), one of the cases selected by the
ISOM AOL committee will additionally be
used to assess attainment of the program
learning goals and objectives. The case will
present material consistent with assessing
the ISOM program learning goals and
objectives. Our accrediting body (AACSB)
recommends placing students in the
following categories: does not meet
standards, meets standards, and exceeds
standards. The MBA committee reviews the
data in regards to what percentage of
students are meeting or exceeding the
standard. If the percentage is lower than the
The executive summary assignment in
GEB5212 requires students to extract the
most salient and persuasive ideas from a
Harvard Business Review management
article. Students must refine and focus
information to promote action in this
document. They need to select and present
information clearly, concisely, and
coherently according to the reader’s needs
and goals and the business context. The
assignment tests such higher order thinking
skills as evaluation and synthesis. The
Communications faculty will score these
written summaries and provide the data to
the MBA Committee for review by the
faculty. Our accrediting body (AACSB)
recommends placing students in the
following categories: does not meet
standards, meets standards, and exceeds
standards. The MBA committee reviews the
data in regards to what percentage of
students are meeting or exceeding the
standard. If the percentage is lower than the
faculty would prefer (e.g., <75% meet or
exceed the standard), adjustments to
content in a course, or set of courses, can be
made. If the percentage of students meeting
or exceeding is unexpectedly high (e.g., 50%
The persuasive presentation assignment in
GEB5215 requires students to deliver and
structure an internal business presentation
that persuades the audience to adopt the
presenter’s proposal or recommendation.
Students must determine the purposes for
presenting, analyze the audience, and use
appropriate and compelling information
that is logically structured. They need to use
well constructed PowerPoint slides and
demonstrate a number of delivery skills.
The assignment tests their ability to design
compelling and persuasive presentations
and deliver them dynamically. The
Communications faculty will score these
presentations and provide the data to the
MBA Committee for review by the faculty.
Our accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is
lower than the faculty would prefer (e.g.,
<75% meet or exceed the standard),
adjustments to content in a course, or set of
courses, can be made. If the percentage of
The ISM 6485 capstone course is required
by all students completing the program. The
course is offered in the Spring and Fall of
each year. The capstone course focuses on
managerial issues that require applying the
basic knowledge acquired throughout the
ISOM program applied to practical business
problems. Embedded in the course are a
number of cases used to assess student
ability to synthesize the knowledge gained
in the program in order to problem-solving,
decision-making, and critical thinking skills.
These also assess basic business knowledge.
Every second year (starting in the Spring of
2011), one of the cases selected by the
ISOM AOL committee will additionally be
used to assess attainment of the program
learning goals and objectives. The case will
present material consistent with assessing
the ISOM program learning goals and
objectives. Our accrediting body (AACSB)
recommends placing students in the
following categories: does not meet
standards, meets standards, and exceeds
standards. The MBA committee reviews the
data in regards to what percentage of
students are meeting or exceeding the
standard. If the percentage is lower than the



Evaluation of the student's Program of Study
by the Supervisory Committee and the
School using the rubric developed by faculty
at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/masters.htm or
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/nonthesis.htm.
Evaluation of the student's Program of Study
by the Supervisory Committee and the
School using the rubric developed by faculty
at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/masters.htm or
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/nonthesis.htm.




Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during thesis or project defense using the
rubric developed by faculty at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/masters.htm or
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/nonthesis.htm




Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during thesis or project defense using the
rubric developed by faculty at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/masters.htm or
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/nonthesis.htm




Evaluation of the student's Program of Study
and the thesis or project defense based on a
rubric developed by faculty at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/masters.htm or
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/nonthesis.htm.
Evaluation of the student's Program of Study
and the thesis or project defense based on a
rubric developed by faculty at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/masters.htm or
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/nonthesis.htm.



Consistent adherence during the degree
program to the University of Florida's Honor
Code. Observation by the faculty of
professional behavior during class activities,
seminars, research work, and thesis or
project defense. These behaviors will be
evaluated over the duration of the student's
degree program by the members of the
Supervisory Committee and assessed
according to a faculty-developed rubric at
the time of the thesis or project defense.



Consistent adherence during the degree
program to the University of Florida's Honor
Code. Observation by the faculty of
professional behavior during class activities,
seminars, research work, and thesis or
project defense. These behaviors will be
evaluated over the duration of the student's
degree program by the members of the
Supervisory Committee and assessed
according to a faculty-developed rubric at
the time of the thesis or project defense.
During their final term of each year, all MBA
students will be required to complete a
Capstone course that builds upon the key
concepts in each of the core business
disciplines. The course is designed to show
how the various disciplines are
interconnected, and will provide the
students with “hands-on” opportunities to
engage in real-world type problem solving
exercises. These include cases, simulations,
and other group-based activities. By
reinforcing these key concepts and by giving
students a broader opportunity to apply
these concepts, the intent is to strengthen
the students’ business foundations and to
have them better prepared for their
subsequent careers. The Capstone course
will provide an excellent opportunity for the
College to assess the extent that the
students are accomplishing each of the
program goals and objectives. The course is
currently under development and will be
piloted in the MBA program in Spring 2011.
Following the pilot, the course will be
implemented in the MSM program. Our
accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
During their final term of each year, all MBA
students will be required to complete a
Capstone course that builds upon the key
concepts in each of the core business
disciplines. The course is designed to show
how the various disciplines are
interconnected, and will provide the
students with “hands-on” opportunities to
engage in real-world type problem solving
exercises. These include cases, simulations,
and other group-based activities. By
reinforcing these key concepts and by giving
students a broader opportunity to apply
these concepts, the intent is to strengthen
the students’ business foundations and to
have them better prepared for their
subsequent careers. The Capstone course
will provide an excellent opportunity for the
College to assess the extent that the
students are accomplishing each of the
program goals and objectives. The course is
currently under development and will be
piloted in the MBA program in Spring 2011.
Following the pilot, the course will be
implemented in the MSM program. Our
accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
The executive summary assignment in
GEB5212 requires students to extract the
most salient and persuasive ideas from a
Harvard Business Review management
article. Students must refine and focus
information to promote action in this
document. They need to select and present
information clearly, concisely, and
coherently according to the reader’s needs
and goals and the business context. The
assignment tests such higher order thinking
skills as evaluation and synthesis. The
persuasive presentation assignment in
GEB5215 requires students to deliver and
structure an internal business presentation
that persuades the audience to adopt the
presenter’s proposal or recommendation.
Students must determine the purposes for
presenting, analyze the audience, and use
appropriate and compelling information
that is logically structured. They need to use
well constructed PowerPoint slides and
demonstrate a number of delivery skills.
The assignment tests their ability to design
compelling and persuasive presentations
and deliver them dynamically. Our
accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:



Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student is able to identify
unknown aspects of structure-property-
processing relationships for a materials
system and formulate an approach to
elucidating those aspects using engineering
and/or scientific principles at a level
appropriate to a masters student.

Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student can obtain
information from primary literature and
technical reports, and can integrate that
information to reach conclusions regarding
the current state of the art and areas in
which further research is needed.
Evaluated in thesis research or final
examination paper. Rubric: Student is able
to follow requirements for writing reports
and research papers, and does so based on
ethical standards regarding appropriate
citation and plagiarism.

Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student is able to write
and/or orally present the results of a
research project or literature review in a
manner that clearly communicates one or
more of the following: current state of the
art, areas in which additional research is
needed, research objectives, procedures,
results, and conclusions.



Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student demonstrates
proficiency on appropriate experimental or
computational techniques used for
materials characterization, and uses these
techniques to investigate structure-property-
relationships in material systems at a level
appropriate to a master's student.

Observation, student evaluations.
Measured by whom: Course coordinators,
undergraduate coordinator.



1. How measured: Masters thesis (optional
alternative to written examinations) with
defense in applied field. Desired level:
Must pass, if option chosen. Measured by
whom: Masters supervisory committee. 2.
How measured: Faculty observation.
Desired level: Satisfaction of undergraduate
coordinator. Measured by whom:
Undergraduate course coordinators.
 .How measured: Two comprehensive
written examinations. Desired level: 100%
pass both examinations. Measured by
whom: Examination committees.



There are three tracks available for MS
degree in mechanical engineering - (i) Solid
mechanics, design & manufacturing, (ii)
dynamics, systems & control, and (iii)
thermal sciences & fluid dynamics. In each
track two core courses are identified, one
each in the Fall and Spring semester. The
outcome will be assessed in these courses.
Specific homework and exam questions will
be used to assess the outcome. Student
performance will assigned a score based on
the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3(good),
4(very good) and 5 (excellent). Scores of 3
or better are the target.



There are three tracks available for MS
degree in mechanical engineering - (i) Solid
mechanics, design & manufacturing, (ii)
dynamics, systems & control, and (iii)
thermal sciences & fluid dynamics. In each
track two core courses are identified, one
each in the Fall and Spring semester. The
outcome will be assessed in these courses.
Specific homework and exam questions will
be used to assess the outcome. Student
performance will assigned a score based on
the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3(good),
4(very good) and 5 (excellent). Scores of 3
or better are the target.
No Method
Assessments will be made through written
examinations in courses, small group
exercises in courses, journal club
participation, and regular committee
meetings. Mastery of knowledge is
continuous and assessment continues
throughout the candidacy period in
committee meetings, from the development
of a thesis project, until the defense of the
Masters thesis.

Discipline and research-focused knowledge
will be assessed at committee meetings of
the student, and ultimately at the Masters
thesis defense.

Skill in use of the literature will be assessed
via seminars and journal clubs, which are
mandatory for every semester throughout
the tenure of the student.

The scientific method will be assessed
primary via the student's committee at
regularly scheduled committee meetings,
and ultimately the Masters thesis defense.
However, certain formal courses may
include assessment of mastery of the
scientific method in exercises and
examinations.



Professionalism will initially be assessed via
the responsible conduct of research course
taken by all Masters students.
Professionalism will continually be
monitored by the student's committee and
all associated faculty. However, in terms of
safety and adherence to regulations, it will
be the primary mentor who will assess these
behaviors in the laboratory setting.
Oral and written presentation behaviors will
be assessed by the student's primary
adviser, the student's committee, and all
associated faculty who contact the student
during presentations.
Evaluation of the student’s Program of
Study by the Supervisory Committee and
the School utilizing a rubric developed by
the faculty:
http://microcell.ufl.edu/Students/graduate/
ms.shtml.

Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee of
thesis defense (M.S.-thesis) or technical
report or project (Non-thesis M.S.) utilizing a
rubric developed by the faculty:
http://microcell.ufl.edu/Students/graduate/
ms.shtml.

Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee of
the thesis defense and the preparation of a
manuscript for publication in a peer-
reviewed journal, or the technical report,
based on a rubric developed by faculty:
http://microcell.ufl.edu/Students/graduate/
ms.shtml



Consistent adherence during the degree
program to the University of Florida’s Honor
Code. Observation by the faculty of
professional behavior during class activities,
seminars, journal colloquia, research work,
thesis defense, and participation in
professional societies. These observations
will be based on a rubric developed by
faculty:
http://microcell.ufl.edu/Students/graduate/
ms.shtml and shared by the faculty with the
supervisory committee.
Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student is able to identify
unknown aspects of nuclear technology,
nuclear science, or appropriate engineering
sciences (including materials sciences and
thermal sciences) and formulate an
approach to elucidating those aspects using
engineering and/or scientific principles at a
level appropriate to a masters student.

Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student can obtain
information from primary literature and
technical reports, and can integrate that
information to reach conclusions regarding
the current state of the art and areas in
which further research is needed.



Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student demonstrates
proficiency on appropriate experimental,
theoretical or computational techniques
used for nuclear engineering (including
materials science and thermal sciences) at a
level appropriate to a masters student.

Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student is able to follow
requirements for writing reports and
research papers, and does so based on
ethical standards regarding appropriate
citation and plagiarism.

Evaluated in thesis or final examination
paper. Rubric: Student is able to write
and/or orally present the results of a
research project or literature review in a
manner that clearly communicates one or
more of the following: current state of the
art, areas in which additional research is
needed, research objectives, procedures,
results, and conclusions.
Students are required to pass (within 2
years) a written examination comprising 12
physics questions, set and graded by 12
faculty members. The pass/fail mark is
determined by the faculty as a whole.

For the MS (thesis option), a student's
application of knowledge of physics to a
new area is to be demonstrated by the
writing of a thesis read and examined by a
supervisory committee. For the MS (non-
thesis) option, a student's mastery of
physics at a high level is tested by an oral
examination of high level physics conducted
by the department Graduate Student Affair
committee.



For MS (with thesis), the student must
present the findings of his research orally to
a committee of faculty. The faculty will
question the student on how the research
was conducted and how it has been
presented to other audiences. For MS (non-
thesis), the student will be examined by the
Graduate Student Affairs Committee (5
faculty inside the Department of Physics),
who will determine that the student can
conduct him/herself appropriately and
communicate his/her knowledge of physics
orally as well as in writing.
Students must write and present a public
seminar on their theses, and pass an oral
exam with his/her advisory committee
following the rubric developed by PMCB
faculty.
Students must write and present a public
seminar on their theses, and pass an oral
exam with his/her advisory committee
following the rubric developed by PMCB
faculty.
Students must pass Journal Colloquia
courses each fall and spring semester they
are enrolled in the program. These courses
teach critical evaluation of the primary
literature in plant biology and research skills
that require critical thinking. Courses are
taught by individual and teams of faculty
who assess critical thinking skills of student
led discussions.

Students must pass Journal Colloquia
courses each fall and spring semester they
are enrolled in the program. These courses
teach critical evaluation of the primary
literature in plant biology and research skills
that require critical thinking. Courses are
taught by individual and teams of faculty
who assess critical thinking skills of student
led discussions.

Students complete research activities that
are written up in a thesis, and pass an oral
exam with his/her advisory committee
following PMCB faculty rubric.

Students complete research activities that
are written up in a thesis, and pass an oral
exam with his/her advisory committee
following PMCB faculty rubric.
Advisory committees assess student’s
theses and presentations in their theses
defenses following the rubric developed by
PMCB faculty.
Advisory committees assess student’s
theses and presentations in their theses
defenses following the rubric developed by
PMCB faculty.
During the degree program, students adhere
to the University of Florida’s Honor Code.
Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
research work, qualifying examination,
dissertation defense, and participation in
professional societies. These observations
will be shared with the supervisory
committee and evaluated based on a faculty-
developed rubric.

During the degree program, students adhere
to the University of Florida’s Honor Code.
Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
research work, qualifying examination,
dissertation defense, and participation in
professional societies. These observations
will be shared with the supervisory
committee and evaluated based on a faculty-
developed rubric.




Students complete formal laboratory work
and course work in journal colloquy in Plant
Pathology and related disciplines based on
reading and evaluating the primary scientific
literature. Additional courses within and
outside the major are completed requiring a
critical evaluation of the primary scientific
literature. Students are graded by faculty
instructors. A grade of “B” is required and
student performance is reviewed annually
by the student’s major professor and
supervisory committee. Both oral and
written assessments are provided to the
student. The supervisory committee
assesses the student’s ability to evaluate the
primary scientific literature utilizing a faculty
designed rubric.
 Students are required to formulate, present
and defend an original research proposal to
their supervisory committee and to the
department. Knowledge and skill pertaining
to experimental design and interpretation of
results are evaluated by the supervisory
committee during the proposal seminar,
qualifying exams, and during the thesis
defense utilizing a faculty developed rubric.



Students conduct research projects and
develop independence in experimentation
for testing original hypotheses. Knowledge
and skill of experimental design is evaluated
by the supervisory committee during
periodic meetings and during the thesis
defense. The major professor in conjunction
with the supervisory committee evaluates
student performance in research and
provides formal written and oral feedback
on an annual basis utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.



Students enroll in and complete courses in
colloquium in plant pathology, journal
colloquy in PMCB and the Graduate
Professional Development Seminar. These
courses are graded by faculty instructors.
Students are required to participate in and
present their research proposals in
departmental seminars. Students present
oral and written presentations of their
research at scientific meetings and
conferences. Students prepare and submit
manuscripts on their research for peer-
review publication. The supervisory
committee assesses student competence
through committee meetings and the final
thesis defense utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
Students are required to serve one semester
as a Teaching Assistant as a component of
their M.S. program. Their effectiveness is
evaluated by the faculty instructor utilizing a
faculty developed rubric and through
student evaluations. Oral assessments are
provided throughout the semester and
formal written evaluations are provided by
students at the end of the semester.



Students receive a copy of the departmental
Graduate Handbook upon admission to their
program. The UF Student Honor Code and
other expectations of professional and
ethical conduct are given here. Students are
encouraged to enroll in the seminar course
for Professional Development and in
University-wide workshops offered on an ad
hoc basis. Course instructors emphasize
ethical behavior on assignments and course
activities. Students are bound by the UF
honor code. Faculty instructors, the major
professor and the supervisory committee
ensure that its ethical standards are
followed.
Students will demonstrate knowledge
through satisfactory performance at the oral
and written thesis defense examinations
conducted by the faculty supervisory
committee
Students will demonstrate knowledge
through satisfactory performance at the oral
and written thesis defense examinations
conducted by the faculty supervisory
committee

Students will complete 3 to 4 core
practicum placements with supervisory
ratings indicating clinical competencies at or
above expected levels.
Students will complete 3 to 4 core
practicum placements with supervisory
ratings indicating clinical competencies at or
above expected levels.
Students will demonstrate mastery of
ethical and professional behavior through
ratings of performance by clinical and
research supervisors
Students will demonstrate mastery of
ethical and professional behavior through
ratings of performance by clinical and
research supervisors

Students will complete and successfully
defend an empirical thesis acceptable to a
faculty supervisory committee during the
first two years of the doctoral program

Students will complete and successfully
defend an empirical thesis acceptable to a
faculty supervisory committee during the
first two years of the doctoral program
The executive summary assignment in
GEB5212 requires students to extract the
most salient and persuasive ideas from a
Harvard Business Review management
article. Students must refine and focus
information to promote action in this
document. They need to select and present
information clearly, concisely, and
coherently according to the reader’s needs
and goals and the business context. The
assignment tests such higher order thinking
skills as evaluation and synthesis. The
persuasive presentation assignment in
GEB5215 requires students to deliver and
structure an internal business presentation
that persuades the audience to adopt the
presenter’s proposal or recommendation.
Students must determine the purposes for
presenting, analyze the audience, and use
appropriate and compelling information
that is logically structured. They need to use
well constructed PowerPoint slides and
demonstrate a number of delivery skills.
The assignment tests their ability to design
compelling and persuasive presentations
and deliver them dynamically. Our
accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
A comprehensive exam will be administered
during the Spring semester just prior to
graduation. The exam will include multiple
choice, short answer, and essay questions.
The multiple choice and short answer
questions are designed to test the student’s
knowledge and understanding of important
principles of construction methods and
materials, market analysis, real estate
finance and investment, real estate law, real
estate appraisal and business statistics. The
essay questions require students to apply
appropriate problem solving and decision-
making skills in a real estate context.
Additionally, at least one essay question will
require the students to analyze a situation
involving ethical or social responsibility
considerations. The MSRE faculty
committee will score the essay responses
utilizing primary trait analysis scoring guides
during the following Summer. Our
accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is
A comprehensive exam will be administered
during the Spring semester just prior to
graduation. The exam will include multiple
choice, short answer, and essay questions.
The multiple choice and short answer
questions are designed to test the student’s
knowledge and understanding of important
principles of construction methods and
materials, market analysis, real estate
finance and investment, real estate law, real
estate appraisal and business statistics. The
essay questions require students to apply
appropriate problem solving and decision-
making skills in a real estate context.
Additionally, at least one essay question will
require the students to analyze a situation
involving ethical or social responsibility
considerations. The MSRE faculty
committee will score the essay responses
utilizing primary trait analysis scoring guides
during the following Summer. Our
accrediting body (AACSB) recommends
placing students in the following categories:
does not meet standards, meets standards,
and exceeds standards. The MBA committee
reviews the data in regards to what
percentage of students are meeting or
exceeding the standard. If the percentage is

Successful thesis defense presentation per
department standards and guidelines.
Successful written comprehensive final
exam per department standards and
guidelines.
Successful professional paper per
department standards and guidelines.
Successful practicum per department
standards and guidelines.
Successful presentation and defense of
thesis research per department standards
and guidelines.
80% or higher on LEI 6108: Contemporary
Theories key paper.
80% or higher on final exam in LEI 6513:
Administrative Procedures.
Successful thesis defense presentation per
department standards and guidelines.
Successful written comprehensive final
exam per department standards and
guidelines.
80% or higher on HLP 6535 Research
Methods key paper.



Thesis: The scientific skills to conduct and
communicate research findings & synthesize
and interpret scientific findings are assessed
by the supervisory committee of M.S. thesis
students utilizing a faculty developed rubric.



Major paper (SWS 6905): The scientific skills
to conduct and communicate research
findings & synthesize and interpret scientific
findings are assessed by the supervisory
committee of M.S. professional students
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

M.S. professional students have to pass a
comprehensive exam administered by the
supervisory committee and evaluated
utilizing a faculty developed rubric. The
exam evaluates student’s knowledge in soil
and water science and ability to analyze and
synthesize knowledge to address
environmental problems.
SWS courses which offer labs provide
experiential learning experiences and assess
student’s skills to synthesize, evaluate, and
create in context of soil and water science
applications. Reading assignments are used
in various SWS courses to assess skills to
critically evaluate scientific data and
literature. Various SWS courses include
assignments, projects, problem sets and/or
case studies in which student’s independent
and team-skills are evaluated. These
methods also assess the ability of students
to develop new solutions to solve problems
in soil and water sciences. Students will
achieve a letter grade B or better in at least
1 lab-based course; 1 course which requires
a project/problem set/case study
assignments; and 1 course with reading
assignments utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.



M.S. thesis students are required to present
their research findings in form of an exit
seminar in the departmental seminar series
(seminar is optional for M.S. Professional
degree students). This seminar is evaluated
by a group of faculty (or supervisory
committee) utilizing a faculty developed
rubric. Faculty observations of behavior and
practices in classroom, at meetings and
seminars, in the conduct of scholarly work,
and during all examinations. These
observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

The behavior of all students will be
consistent with the University of Florida’s
Honor Code and is evaluated by the
student's supervisory committee.
Successful thesis defense presentation per
department standards and guidelines.
Successful written comprehensive final
exam per department standards and
guidelines.
Successful written comprehensive capstone
portfolio per department standards and
guidelines.

Successful thesis defense presentation per
department standards and guidelines.
Successful written comprehensive final
exam per department standards and
guidelines.
Successful written comprehensive capstone
portfolio per department standards and
guidelines.
80% or higher on HLP 6535 Research
Methods key paper.
80% or higher on SPM 5309:Sport Marketing
key paper.
80% or higher on SPM 5506:Sport Finance
key paper.

80% or higher on SPM
6158:Management/Leadership key paper.
80% or higher on SPM 6726: Issues in Sport
Law key paper.
Successful presentation and defense of
thesis research per department standards
and guidelines.

Successful internship and/or practicum per
department standards and guidelines.
Successful written comprehensive capstone
portfolio per department standards and
guidelines.
Determination of current employment or
advanced studies status by survey of former
MS degree students and/or their MS degree
supervisory committee chairs will result in
>90% of students either appropriately
employed in a position the makes use of
their MS degree or pursuing or having
pursed further education for which their MS
degree is an appropriate stepping stone.

Students will successfully complete one or
more “Journal club” type courses that
require reading and critical evaluation of
scientific papers including the presentation
and defense of their evaluation of the paper
to the Journal club group.

Students will demonstrate competence in
the interpretation and discussion of
scientific papers and other such materials in
both formal and informal discussions within
the laboratory in which they're pursuing
their thesis research. The assessment will be
made by the faculty member supervising
them in that laboratory.



Students will provide satisfactory
interpretation in the discussion section of
their MS thesis that covers both material
from their Introduction section, new
knowledge that they themselves discovered
in the course of generating this thesis, and
additional material appearing in the
discussion section of their thesis.
Assessment of satisfactory performance will
be made by the graduate supervisory
committee at the time of the thesis defense.

Students will make one or more
presentation at external scientific meetings
and or continuing education presentations.
 Graduate students serving as Teaching
Assistantship will receive satisfactory
performance evaluations by the course
coordinator concerning their ability to
communicate with students in the class.

Students who successfully complete the MS
degree will publish at least one paper in a
scientific journal is first author.
Students will complete a formal course on
the ethical conduct of research.

Student writings and presentations shall be
free of plagiarism and inappropriate biases
of the data presented.

Students will pass the knowledge portion of
their final examination for the MS degree.

During the course of their thesis research
students will learn how to delve into the
original literature, review articles,
databases, and various search engines to
obtain the information they need that is not
available in formal lectures. Their
competency in this regard will be assessed
by their research supervisors.




Students will learn the “art” of constructive
criticism by reviewing papers and journal
clubs as well as manuscripts produced by
their peers. Students will learn to accept and
respond to constructive criticism through
criticism of their draft manuscripts by their
peers, supervisors, and co-authors, as well
as criticism provided by referees of
manuscripts they have submitted for
publication in scientific journals. Evaluation
of their progress in this respect will be
provided by their research supervisors.
Students will demonstrate satisfactory
knowledge in their area of specializaion
through their final examination as assessed
by their graduate Supervisory Committee
using a rubric designed by the faculty.

Students will attain graduate Supervisory
Committee approval of research plan and
complete a thesis (MS-Thesis) as assessed
by their graduate Supervisory Committee
using a rubric designed by the faculty; or will
attain completion of technical paper or
project (MS Non-Thesis) as assessed by their
graduate Supervisory Committee using a
rubric designed by the faculty.

Students will defend thesis (MS-Thesis) or
complete technical report/project (MS Non-
Thesis) as assessed by their graduate
Supervisory Committee using a rubric
designed by the faculty.

Students will present research (MS Thesis)
or technical paper/project (MS Non-Thesis)
results at the WEC Master's Symposium and
these presentations will be evaluated by
faculty committee using a rubric designed
by the faculty.
Students will demonstrate a record of
written and oral productivity through
graduate student grants, awards, and
publications as assessed by their graduate
Supervisory Committee using a rubric
designed by the faculty.

Students will adhere to all safety, animal
and human subject guidelines as assessed by
having no IACUC or IRB compliance issues.
Students will adhere to the University of
Florida's Honor Code. Faculty will observe a
student's professional behavior during class,
seminars, research work, final examination,
thesis or project defense, and participation
in professional societies. These observations
will be shared with the graduate Supervisory
Committee and the WEC Chair as part of the
student's exit interview and evaluated based
on a rubric developed by the faculty.

Students will attend and give a presentation
at a local, national or international
conference at the time of graduation.
Documentation of this will be provided to
the supervisory committee.

Students will attend the graduate
orientation seminar that covers aspects of
professional behavior, including ethics.
Students will complete a thesis defense that
will be assessed by their supervisory
committee.

Students will demonstrate satisfactory
ability to conduct and present the results of
their research and scholarship by
completing and defending their written
thesis. This will be assessed by their
supervisory committee.
Successful achievement of thesis
methodologies that require interpretation
and integration of knowledge from targeted
areas supporting the discipline of
architecture. Committee discussions,
evaluations and assessments of research
proposals are conducted to assess how
students are engaged in and resolve the
thesis challenges. 100% of the students
must demonstrate ‘ability to’ levels of
understanding of core curricular objectives
to continue in the program. Secondary
curricular objectives are measured at the
‘understanding of’ level of comprehension.




Successful achievement of research oriented
problems that require interpretation and
integration of knowledge based on
measurements, observations and archival
research. Successful achievement of
thesis methodologies that require
interpretation and integration of knowledge
from targeted areas supporting the
discipline of architecture. Committee
discussions, evaluations and assessments of
research proposals are conducted to assess
how students are engaged in and resolve
the thesis challenges. 100% of the
students must demonstrate ‘ability to’ levels
of understanding of core curricular
objectives to continue in the program.
Secondary curricular objectives are
measured at the ‘understanding of’ level of
comprehension.
Regular interaction and discourse with
thesis committee. Thesis research actively
explores ethical issues as they relate to their
area of specialization. 100% of the
students must demonstrate ‘ability to’ levels
of understanding of core curricular
objectives to graduate from the program.
Secondary curricular objectives are
measured at the ‘understanding of’ level of
comprehension. This may take additional
time within the curriculum.

How will it be measured? Assignments,
exams, and presentations. What is the
desired level of achievement? 75% of
students will earn a minimum grade of B in
all courses to assure a minimum 3.0 GPA
required for graduation. Who will
measure? Instructor.

How will it be measured? Thesis. What is
the desired level of achievement? 100% of
students ultimately successfully defend a
thesis. Who will measure? Thesis
Committee.

How will it be measured? Assignments,
exams, and presentations. What is the
desired level of achievement? 75% of
students will earn a minimum grade of B in
all courses to assure a minimum 3.0 GPA
required for graduation. Who will
measure? Instructor.

How will it be measured? Team based
assignments.      What is the desired level
of achievement? 90% of students will
successfully complete peer review of a team-
based project. Who will measure?
Instructor and students.
• National certification exam. • Ratings on
clinical evaluations • Completed by
preceptors and faculty supervisors. •
Expectations: satisfactory for each graduate.

AACN/EBI Exit Survey

AACN/EBI Alumni Survey



Assessment of a student's performance by
faculty members of the student's home
department or thesis committee on student
skills in delivering an oral presentation that
is based on a simple rubric as unsatisfactory,
competent or excellent.

Document scores of each student on a
departmental preliminary and/or
comprehensive oral qualifying exam. The
oral exam will be constructed by members
of the host department and/or by the
student's thesis committee and graded
according to the rubric; unsatisfactory,
competent or excellent.

Document scores of each student on a
departmental preliminary and/or
comprehensive written qualifying exam. The
written exam will be constructed by
members of the host department and/or by
the student's thesis committee and graded
according to the rubric; unsatisfactory,
competent or excellent.

Document scores of each student on a
comprehensive final exam. The written
exam will be constructed by members of the
host department and graded according to
the rubric; unsatisfactory, competent or
excellent.
Assess each student's completion of a
research proposal and thesis or research
project report using a rubric as
unsatisfactory, competent or excellent.

Assess each student's completion of a
written assignment that requires the use of
problem-solving/critical thinking skills that
uses a rubric as unsatisfactory, competent
or excellent.

How measured? We assess via
performance on First year written exam
(FYE) and second year oral exam. The FYE
is assessed by the graduate committee and
the instructors of the core courses; the
second year oral exam by the student's
advisor and committee.
Completion of projects at a satisfactory level
in the consulting course (STA 6094). The
projects are assessed by a committee
consisting of the faculty member teaching
the consulting course and the student's
advisor.
This is assessed via an oral exam at the end
of the second year which also requires a
written project. The student's advisor and
committee will evaluate this exam and
project.
Students will be required to pass a written
exam on the core curriculum, which will be
graded by a committee of faculty teaching
these courses and reviewed by the full
graduate faculty.

Faculty members will sit in on labs and
lectures given by students serving as
teaching assistants, and will solicit both
written and verbal feedback from the
undergraduate students in these courses.
They will evaulate TA performance in
consultation with one another.
Students will make both oral and written
presentations during their second year on
either guided research or an astronomical
teaching internship, demonstrating the
ability to clearly convey the results of their
experience. A committee of three faculty
members will evaluate the quality of these
presentation.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.

Requires 36 hours of graduate level work
including chemistry and education classes.
The outcome of this work can be seen and
evaluated by the student's committee on-
demand at the end of the MST work.
Must take an internship in college teaching
for 6 hours as part of the degree. The
outcome of this work is assessed by the
student's committee.

All MST students give oral seminars and
present written work in graduate studies.
Students prepare written papers in
supervised research and advanced individual
problems as part of the MST degree that is
read, viewed and graded by their graduate
committee.
Students will demonstrate accuracy in the
conduct of their research during the defense
of their thesis as assessed by their
supervisory committee following
departmental standards.

Students will conduct their research with
guidance and instruction from vital faculty
members as it relates to their areas of study
following the latest scientific updates from
peers & other similar departments.

Students will submit abstracts and give
presentations/posters at regional, state &
national conferences. Students will exhibit
professional behavior and ethical practice
during the conduct of their research.

Students will complete a Minor in Education
in addition to required Geological Sciences
coursework and will demonstrate
satisfactory ability to present the results of
their scholarship (pertaining to both
completed coursework and the geosciences-
education related project) in their oral
examination as determined by their
supervisory committee following agreed
upon criteria.

students will develop and implement a
geosciences- education related project
pertaining to instruction, curricular
development, and/or assessment of
learning approved by their supervisory
committee based upon defined criteria. The
supervisory committee shall include at least
two geosciences faculty and one faculty
member of the College of Education

Students will demonstrate satisfactory
ability to analyze data, synthesize maps and
apply the scientific method as measured by
performance during completed coursework
and an oral exam as determined by their
supervisory committee following agreed
upon criteria.
Students will demonstrate satisfactory
ability to evaluate geosciences-education
content and curricula regarding pedagogy,
teaching methods and developmentally
appropriate instructional materials as
measured by evaluation of their submitted
geosciences- education related project and
performance during an oral exam as
determined by their supervisory committee
following agreed upon criteria.

MST graduate students will receive
satisfactory evaluation of their classroom
teaching as determined by their supervisory
committee following agreed upon criteria.



Students will attend a department
Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)
orientation session
program under review for closure
program under review for closure
program under review for closure

Students are required to pass (within 2
years) a written examination comprising 12
questions, set and graded by 12 faculty
members. The pass/fail mark is determined
by the faculty as a whole.

The student's teaching is reviewed by a) the
director of undergraduate labs, and b) a
faculty teacher, and together with the
student's supervisory committee they will
determine if the student is teaching in a
satisfactory manner.
The student is required to make an oral
presentation to their supervisory
committee. This committee of faculty will
judge if the student has conducted his/her
studies appropriately, and can communicate
what they have learned in a coherent
manner.
Students will pass a defense by their
supervisory committee.

Students will complete a teaching internship
or participate as a teaching assistant for one
semester. In addition, students will
complete a course in pedagogy in biology.
Finally, their ability to teach will be assessed
by their supervisory committee.

Students will attend the graduate
orientation seminar that covers aspects of
professional behavior, including ethics.

Students will attend a local, national or
international conference. Documentation of
this will be provided to the supervisory
committee.



How measured? Performance on First year
written exam (FYE) and second year oral
exam; at least GPA 3.0 in core courses.
What is the desired achievement level? All
students in the graduate program pass these
exams and achieve the target GPA Who
will measure? Faculty members will
measure these. In particular, the FYE is
assessed by the graduate committee and
the instructors of the core courses; the
second year oral exam by the student's
advisor and committee; the grades in the
core courses by the instructors of the core
courses.

How measured? Completion of projects at
a satisfactory level in the consulting course
(STA 6094). What is the desired
achievement level? All students in the
graduate program complete a satisfactory
project. Who will measure? These are
measured by faculty member teaching the
consulting course.
How measured? An oral exam at the end of
the second year which also requires a
written project. What is the desired
achievement level? All students in the
graduate program pass the oral part of the
exam and complete a satisfactory project.
Who will measure? The student's advisor
and committee.

Thesis proposal is an important required for
the PhD degree. The outcome will be
assessed in the thesis proposal by the thesis
committee. Based on student
performance the committee will assign a
score based on the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2
(fair), 3(good), 4(very good) and 5
(excellent). 100% of students in the class
should exhibit 3 or above.

Thesis proposal is an important required for
the PhD degree. The outcome will be
assessed in the thesis proposal by the thesis
committee. Based on student
performance the committee will assign a
score based on the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2
(fair), 3(good), 4(very good) and 5
(excellent). 100% of students in the class
should exhibit 3 or above.

Thesis proposal is an important required for
the PhD degree. The outcome will be
assessed in the thesis proposal by the thesis
committee. Based on student
performance the committee will assign a
score based on the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2
(fair), 3(good), 4(very good) and 5
(excellent). 100% of students in the class
should exhibit 3 or above.

by departmental review of Plans of Study
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

by departmental review of Plans of Study
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
by examination during qualifying exams and
during final defenses by supervisory
committees utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
by examination during qualifying exams and
during final defenses by supervisory
committees utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.




by examination during qualifying exams and
during final defenses by the supervisory
committee utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.




by examination during qualifying exams and
during final defenses by the supervisory
committee utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
by observation during departmental
seminars, qualifying exams and final
defenses. These observations will be shared
with the supervisory committee and
evaluated utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
by observation during departmental
seminars, qualifying exams and final
defenses. These observations will be shared
with the supervisory committee and
evaluated utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
by observing participation in professional
societies. These observations will be shared
with the supervisory committee and
evaluated utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
by observing participation in professional
societies. These observations will be shared
with the supervisory committee and
evaluated utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
by contacts with employers. These
observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
by contacts with employers. These
observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

Satisfactory completion of dissertation and
defense utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty.

Satisfactory completion of dissertation and
defense utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty.
Satisfactory completion of dissertation and
defense utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty.
Satisfactory completion of dissertation and
defense utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty.
Satisfactory completion of dissertation and
defense utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty.

During the degree program, students adhere
to the University of Florida’s Honor Code.
Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
research work, qualifying examination,
dissertation defense, and participation in
professional societies. These observations
will be shared with the supervisory
committee and evaluated based on a faculty-
developed rubric.
Grades in coursework will be indicators of
acquired knowledge, with the requirement
that a B grade is maintained. All students
will take at least one course in each of three
topical areas: Genetics and Plant Breeding,
Plant Physiology/Biochemistry and Plant
Ecology/Management/Nutrition. Student
Learning Outcomes will be distributed to
each graduate Supervisory Committee and
the committee will be charged with the
responsibility of ensuring that each
component of the outcomes is addressed
within the context of the specific student’s
program. The graduate Supervisory
Committee will be the primary evaluator of
outcomes for graduate education with
formal assessments made through
comprehensive written and oral qualifying
(candidacy) exams and the final dissertation
defense. Formal, written evaluations of the
performance of all graduate students are
made by the Supervisory Committee at the
end of the student’s first semester and on
an annual basis in following years utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.
The Supervisory Committee will evaluate
the quality of the research program as
reported in the Ph.D. dissertation and as
discussed during the final dissertation
defense utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty. Graduate students also present two
graded, departmental seminars during the
Ph.D. program. The first seminar, presented
in the second semester of the graduate
program, is a presentation of a detailed
research plan/proposal and the second
seminar, presented in the last semester
before completing degree requirements, is a
presentation of the results of the research
that was conducted and reported in the
dissertation. Written abstracts of both
seminars are prepared and presented to
students, faculty and the instructor.
Presentations and written abstracts are
evaluated by both peer graduate students
and the faculty of the department and
student performance is assessed by a letter
grade for the course utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.
Job placement and advanced degree success
will be monitored within job placement
categories including tenure track AAU,
tenure track non-AAU,
national/international research
organizations, industry, extension,
regulatory agency, and post-doc.

Skills will be assessed by departmental
faculty, and especially by the major advisor
and the graduate Supervisory Committee.
Performance will be graded in various
courses, departmental seminars, written
and oral qualify exams, and dissertation
defense exams utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty.
Skills will be assessed by departmental
faculty, and especially by the major advisor
and the Supervisory Committee.
Performance will be graded in various
courses, departmental seminars, qualifying
exams, and dissertation defense utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.




Course instructors, major advisors, and
graduate Supervisory Committees expect
professional and ethical behavior of all
graduate students during all scholarly
activities. In courses, all students are made
aware of the UF honor code, the seriousness
of violating the code is discussed, and
adherence to the code is monitored.
Professional behavior will be evaluated,
especially by the major advisor and the
graduate Supervisory Committee during
seminars, participation and presentations at
professional meetings, scientific writings
and in interpersonal relationships.
Evaluation of the student's program of study
by the supervisory committee utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.

Evaluation by the supervisory committee
during dissertation defense utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.
Evaluation of the student's program of study
by the supervisory committee utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.

Evaluation by the supervisory committee
during dissertation defense utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.

Adherence to the University of Florida
Honor Code during the graduate program.
Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
research work, dissertation defense, and
participation in professional societies.
These observations will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated based
on a faculty developed rubric.
Evaluation of the student's program of
study, Ph.D. candidacy exam, and
dissertation by the supervisory committee
and other faculty utilizing a rubric designed
by faculty.

Evaluation of the student's performance in
the Professional Animal Scientist exam by
the Association of Professional Animal
Scientists or publication of a manuscript
from the student's original research in a
peer-reviewed journal or involvement of an
external examiner in the student's
dissertation defense.

Evaluation of the student's Ph.D.
dissertation and their solutions to special
problems assigned by the supervisory
committee and other faculty utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.
Successful completion of the Ph.D.
candidacy and dissertation defense
examinations as judged by the supervisory
committee utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty.

Evaluation of the student's participation in a
grantsmanship workshop or course or
evaluation of a grant written by the student
by the supervisory committee utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty.

Analysis of the student's annual evaluation
by the supervisory committee utilizing a
rubric designed by faculty and the student's
adherence to the UF Honor Code.
Evaluation of abstracts and at least one oral
paper given at a national/international
professional scientific meeting and two
research seminars presented during the
Graduate Seminar course by the major
advisor and the Graduate Seminar
Coordinator, respectively, utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.
Three essay questions administered as part
of the PhD qualifying exam by a committee
of at least three Department of
Anthropology graduate faculty and one
graduate faculty member from another UF
unit.

Review of conference participation
conducted by sub-field faculty as part of
annual evaluation of doctoral students by
Department of Anthropology graduate
faculty with expertise in the doctoral
candidate’s primary field of study.
Receive a passing grade.




Students will pass the following, as
evaluated by the supervisory committee: A.
Qualifying Examination B. Dissertation C.
Oral Defense
Students will pass the following, as
evaluated by the supervisory committee: A.
Qualifying Examination B. Dissertation C.
Oral Defense




Students will pass the following, as
evaluated by the supervisory committee: A.
Qualifying Examination B. Dissertation C.
Oral Defense
Graduate students will pass the core courses
with a B average.



Students will pass a written comprehensive
exam testing their knowledge of the
material covered in the core courses, no
later than the end of the summer after their
second year, to continue in the Ph.D.
program. The exception is the course
Techniques in Observational Astronomy, for
which they are required to demonstrate
proficiency in hands-on exercises during the
course. The comprehensive exam will be
graded by the faculty members who teach
the core courses.
Students will write, present, and successfully
defend a Ph.D. dissertation to their
committee.
The graduate coordinator will continue to
track job placement for students completing
the program.

Students will submit papers to refereed
journals for publication. The graduate
coordinator will track papers written by
each student in the program.

Students will make presentations in the core
courses and in AST 6936, which will be
graded by the faculty. Students will
demonstrate in these talks satisfactory
ability to make a scientific presentation.

Students will make presentations during
their second year on guided research
projects, demonstrating the ability to
clearly convey the results of their research.
A committee of three faculty members will
evaluate the quality of these presentation.
Students in their second year and beyond
will present their research during the
department's annual graduate research
symposium. The advisor and a second
faculty member will provide evaluations of
student talks to both the student and
graduate coordinator. Students will
demonstrate the ability to give a scientific
talk to a large audience.

Students will give an oral defense of their
dissertation that will be evaulated by their
dissertation committee.
There are no enrolled students, and this
program will be terminated.
There are no enrolled students, and this
program will be terminated.
There are no enrolled students, and this
program will be terminated.
There are no enrolled students, and this
program will be terminated.
There are no enrolled students, and this
program will be terminated.
There are no enrolled students, and this
program will be terminated.
Passing of qualifying examination and
proposal defense; Successful defense of the
final dissertation; Both evaluated by a
supervisory committee.
Passing of qualifying examination and
proposal defense; Successful defense of the
final dissertation; Both evaluated by a
supervisory committee.

an ability to design and conduct scientific
and engineering experiments, and to
analyze and interpret the resulting data

an ability to design and conduct scientific
and engineering experiments, and to
analyze and interpret the resulting data
Successful evaluation of final report in
BME6010, clinical preceptorship
Passing of qualifying examination and
proposal defense; Successful defense of the
final dissertation; Both evaluated by a
supervisory committee.
How measured: Passing PhD written
preliminary examination. Level of
achievement: 80% of PhD students who
take the written progression Who will
measure: Graduate faculty, Department of
Biostatistics

How measured: Passing PhD oral
preliminary examination, which constitutes
a dissertation proposal. Level of
achievement: 95% of PhD students who
pass the written preliminary examination.
Who will measure: PhD Committee,
Department of Biostatistics

How measured: Student participation in
collaborative work with researchers in other
disciplines, and student interaction with the
dissertation committee. Level of
achievement: 95% of PhD students who
pass the oral preliminary examination. Who
will measure: Dissertation committee,
collaborative research supervisors or
colleagues.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
CALS will no longer be offering a degree in
Botany. Therefore, SLOs are not needed. Al
Wysocki 392-1963.
Annual review of student progress: Student
progress (e.g., course grades, research
performance) is periodically reviewed by the
department’s faculty. Each student is paired
with a major adviser who takes primary
responsibility for overseeing the process.
Accounting: At the end of each spring
semester, the department’s doctoral
dissertation committee meets to review the
progress of each student. Students who are
not meeting departmental requirements in
terms of grades, research performance, etc.
are counseled out of the program. FIRE:
Each student receives an annual letter of
evaluation. The Department’s major
retention decisions involve the
comprehensive exam (administered at the
end of the students’ first year) and the
second year paper, which is scheduled to be
completed and presented by early in the
student’s third year. ISOM: Each student
receives an annual evaluation letter which
provides an assessment for the past year
and specifies appropriate goals for the
students’ coming year. Management: Each
student receives an annual letter of
evaluation from the PhD coordinator,
drawing on input from the students' advisor
Annual review of student progress: Student
progress (e.g., course grades, research
performance) is periodically reviewed by the
department’s faculty. Each student is paired
with a major adviser who takes primary
responsibility for overseeing the process.
Accounting: At the end of each spring
semester, the department’s doctoral
dissertation committee meets to review the
progress of each student. Students who are
not meeting departmental requirements in
terms of grades, research performance, etc.
are counseled out of the program. FIRE:
Each student receives an annual letter of
evaluation. The Department’s major
retention decisions involve the
comprehensive exam (administered at the
end of the students’ first year) and the
second year paper, which is scheduled to be
completed and presented by early in the
student’s third year. ISOM: Each student
receives an annual evaluation letter which
provides an assessment for the past year
and specifies appropriate goals for the
students’ coming year. Management: Each
student receives an annual letter of
evaluation from the PhD coordinator,
drawing on input from the students' advisor
Annual review of student progress: Student
progress (e.g., course grades, research
performance) is periodically reviewed by the
department’s faculty. Each student is paired
with a major adviser who takes primary
responsibility for overseeing the process.
Accounting: At the end of each spring
semester, the department’s doctoral
dissertation committee meets to review the
progress of each student. Students who are
not meeting departmental requirements in
terms of grades, research performance, etc.
are counseled out of the program. FIRE:
Each student receives an annual letter of
evaluation. The Department’s major
retention decisions involve the
comprehensive exam (administered at the
end of the students’ first year) and the
second year paper, which is scheduled to be
completed and presented by early in the
student’s third year. ISOM: Each student
receives an annual evaluation letter which
provides an assessment for the past year
and specifies appropriate goals for the
students’ coming year. Management: Each
student receives an annual letter of
evaluation from the PhD coordinator,
drawing on input from the students' advisor
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of the thesis for the PhD
students.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of the thesis for the PhD
students.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of the thesis for the PhD
students.
This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of the thesis for the PhD
students.

This outcome will be judged through the
evaluation of the thesis and the final
presentation for the PhD students.
Passing of the oral qualifying exam by the
7th semester after enrollment. Passing the
final oral exam with the presentation of the
written PhD dissertation. The oral
qualifying exams are to be administered and
certified by the graduate committee.



Requires graduate level effort including
work within the chosen sub-discipline and
other fields of chemistry. A 3.25 chemistry
GPA is required. Passing of the written
qualifying exam in the sub-discipline.
Written qualifying exams are to be certified
by the faculty of the sub-discipline.
Presentation of a minimum of two divisional
seminars with a B or better and the
professional presentation of the dissertation
before the graduate committee at the final
exam.



The committee will use a Likert Scale to
evaluate a student’s performance on
Knowledge, Skill, and Professional
Communication at the student's final oral
defense. The scale will be 5=Outstanding;
4=Above Average; 3=Average; 2=Below
Average; and 1=Unacceptable. The resulting
assessment is demonstrated by the students
achieving acceptable performance with a
Likert Score of 4 or better.



The committee will use a Likert Scale to
evaluate a student’s performance on
Knowledge, Skill, and Professional
Communication at the student's final oral
defense. The scale will be 5=Outstanding;
4=Above Average; 3=Average; 2=Below
Average; and 1=Unacceptable. The resulting
assessment is demonstrated by the students
achieving acceptable performance with a
Likert Score of 4 or better.
The committee will use a Likert Scale to
evaluate a student’s performance on
Knowledge, Skill, and Professional
Communication at the student's final oral
defense. The scale will be 5=Outstanding;
4=Above Average; 3=Average; 2=Below
Average; and 1=Unacceptable. The resulting
assessment is demonstrated by the students
achieving acceptable performance with a
Likert Score of 4 or better.

Teaching assistants will receive satisfactory
scores on student evaluations and
satisfactory annual reviews by the TA
supervisor, based upon the criteria
established by the department.
Students will pass the comprehensive
reading examination in Greek and Latin, set
and graded by a committee of department
faculty, using the rubric established by the
department.
Students will pass the comprehensive
examination on the history of Classical
literature.

Students will successfully complete a public
defense of the dissertation before a
supervisory committee, approved by the
Graduate School, using criteria established
by the department.

Students will submit an abstract to a
graduate student conference or a meeting
of a regional academic association.
Students will submit an abstract to an
international conference or an annual
meeting of a national association.

Students will submit an original contribution
in a peer-reviewed journal.
Students will apply for external grants to
support their research.
The committee will use a Likert Scale to
evaluate a student’s performance on
Knowledge, Skill, and Professional
Communication at the student's final oral
defense. The scale will be 5=Outstanding;
4=Above Average; 3=Average; 2=Below
Average; and 1=Unacceptable. The resulting
assessment is demonstrated by the students
achieving acceptable performance with a
Likert Score of 4 or better



The committee will use a Likert Scale to
evaluate a student’s performance on
Knowledge, Skill, and Professional
Communication at the student's final oral
defense. The scale will be 5=Outstanding;
4=Above Average; 3=Average; 2=Below
Average; and 1=Unacceptable. The resulting
assessment is demonstrated by the students
achieving acceptable performance with a
Likert Score of 4 or better.



The committee will use a Likert Scale to
evaluate a student’s performance on
Knowledge, Skill, and Professional
Communication at the student's final oral
defense. The scale will be 5=Outstanding;
4=Above Average; 3=Average; 2=Below
Average; and 1=Unacceptable. The resulting
assessment is demonstrated by the students
achieving acceptable performance with a
Likert Score of 4 or better.
Students will achieve passing grades in their
research rotations as assessed by assigned
faculty mentors.

Students will achieve passing grades in each
of their statistics, research design and grant
writing courses as assessed by faculty
assigned to teach these courses.
Students in this program will make at least
two presentations based on their research
in local, state, national, or international
venues.
Students will achieve passing grades on
written and oral qualifying exams
administered by the student's supervisory
committee.

Students will compose and successfully
defend a dissertation based on original
research, as evaluated by the student's
dissertation committee.

Graduates will acquire positions in their field
within six months of graduation.

Students will submit at least two articles for
publication in peer-reviewed journals during
their graduate program.
Evaluate knowledge in the PhD final
dissertation defense.

Evaluate understanding relevant research
with respect to the PhD dissertation in the
PhD final dissertation defense.

Evaluate understanding of critical computer
science and engineering skills in the PhD
final dissertation defense.

Evaluate before graduation in an exam
consisting of questions related to ethics.

Evaluate in PhD final dissertation defense.




NULL




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Students will complete the core research
methods courses (CCJ6705 Research
Methods in Crime, Law, & Justice & CCJ7742
Research Methods in Crime, Law, & Justice II
within two years of matriculation. Students
will complete an additional course in
research methods within three years of
matriculation. Students will pass the “tool”
comprehensive exam (covering theory and
research methods) within four years of
matriculation into the Ph.D. program.
Students will complete substantive specialty
seminars. (For those in the Crime & Justice
track, the course is CCJ 6285 Criminal Justice
Process and for those in the Law & Society
track, the course is CJL 6090 Law and Social
Science). Students will pass a
comprehensive exam in their specialty track
(either Crime & Justice or Law & Society)
within four years of entry into the Ph.D.
program.
Students will successfully complete sexual
harassment training compliance within the
first term of matriculation Students will
successfully complete the training module in
FERPA Basics within the first term of
matriculation Students will successfully
complete the Institutional Review Board’s
required reading for all researchers within
the first term of matriculation Students will
successfully complete a teaching
assistantship, research assistantship, or
other graduate training experience before
graduation Students will take the
Proseminar course (CCJ 6001 Proseminar in
Criminology & Law) within the first year of
matriculation Students will take the
required course CCJ 7921 Professional
Development in Criminology, Law and
Society within 2 years of matriculation into
the Ph.D. program

Graduates will express their level of
satisfaction with the program on exit survey.



Students will complete and successfully
defend a dissertation within five years of
entry into the program.




Students will annually present empirical
research at a professional conference.

The faculty members of the doctoral
supervisory committees will evaluate the
students’ written and oral qualifying
examinations to determine if satisfactory
ratings has been achieved.
The faculty members of the doctoral
dissertation committees will evaluate the
students’ dissertation and dissertation
defense to determine if it achieves a
satisfactory rating.
The faculty members of the student’s
doctoral committee will evaluate the
students’ qualifying examinations and
dissertations to determine if satisfactory
ratings were achieved.

Students will be evaluated on the
"Expectations Beyond Coursework"
Instrument by the doctoral committee
faculty members to determine if satisfactory
ratings have been achieved.

Students completing their individual course
work will successfully complete their oral
and written qualification examinations.
Students completing their individual course
work will successfully defend their individual
doctoral dissertation "proposal".
Students completing their individual oral
and written qualification examinations will
successfully defend their doctoral
dissertation.

Students will develop a research agenda
that allows them to submit research or
pedagogical papers for professional
conferences and peer reviewed journals.
Students will develop a doctoral program (in
conjuntion with their doctoral committee)
that will provide research and teaching
opportunities within their individual
discipline while in the college doctoral
program.
Annual review of student progress: Student
progress (e.g., course grades, research
performance) is periodically reviewed by the
department’s faculty. Each student is paired
with a major adviser who takes primary
responsibility for overseeing the process.
Accounting: At the end of each spring
semester, the department’s doctoral
dissertation committee meets to review the
progress of each student. Students who are
not meeting departmental requirements in
terms of grades, research performance, etc.
are counseled out of the program. FIRE:
Each student receives an annual letter of
evaluation. The Department’s major
retention decisions involve the
comprehensive exam (administered at the
end of the students’ first year) and the
second year paper, which is scheduled to be
completed and presented by early in the
student’s third year. ISOM: Each student
receives an annual evaluation letter which
provides an assessment for the past year
and specifies appropriate goals for the
students’ coming year. Management: Each
student receives an annual letter of
evaluation from the PhD coordinator,
drawing on input from the students' advisor
Annual review of student progress: Student
progress (e.g., course grades, research
performance) is periodically reviewed by the
department’s faculty. Each student is paired
with a major adviser who takes primary
responsibility for overseeing the process.
Accounting: At the end of each spring
semester, the department’s doctoral
dissertation committee meets to review the
progress of each student. Students who are
not meeting departmental requirements in
terms of grades, research performance, etc.
are counseled out of the program. FIRE:
Each student receives an annual letter of
evaluation. The Department’s major
retention decisions involve the
comprehensive exam (administered at the
end of the students’ first year) and the
second year paper, which is scheduled to be
completed and presented by early in the
student’s third year. ISOM: Each student
receives an annual evaluation letter which
provides an assessment for the past year
and specifies appropriate goals for the
students’ coming year. Management: Each
student receives an annual letter of
evaluation from the PhD coordinator,
drawing on input from the students' advisor
Annual review of student progress: Student
progress (e.g., course grades, research
performance) is periodically reviewed by the
department’s faculty. Each student is paired
with a major adviser who takes primary
responsibility for overseeing the process.
Accounting: At the end of each spring
semester, the department’s doctoral
dissertation committee meets to review the
progress of each student. Students who are
not meeting departmental requirements in
terms of grades, research performance, etc.
are counseled out of the program. FIRE:
Each student receives an annual letter of
evaluation. The Department’s major
retention decisions involve the
comprehensive exam (administered at the
end of the students’ first year) and the
second year paper, which is scheduled to be
completed and presented by early in the
student’s third year. ISOM: Each student
receives an annual evaluation letter which
provides an assessment for the past year
and specifies appropriate goals for the
students’ coming year. Management: Each
student receives an annual letter of
evaluation from the PhD coordinator,
drawing on input from the students' advisor

Candidates will successfully complete the
qualifying exam as measured by the
candidates’ university faculty advisory
committee.

Candidates will demonstrate successful
completion of the qualifying examination
and oral demonstration of evaluation and
dissertation research as measured by the
candidates’ university faculty advisory
committee.

Candidates will attend and apply to present
research at professional conferences. The
candidate's faculty advisory committee will
determine whether candidate successfully
meets this outcome.
Candidates will demonstrate successful
completion of all assigned tasks and ratings
in the Educator Assessment System (EAS) as
determined by the faculty advisory
committee.
Candidates will demonstrate successful
completion of EAS tasks and ratings as
measured by the candidates’ university
faculty advisory committee.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.
Program termination form submitted for
approval.

The thesis proposal is an important
requirement for the PhD degree. The thesis
committee will assess this outcome using
the oral and written components of the
thesis proposal defense. Rubric: Based on
student performance the committee will
assign a score based on the Likert scale: 1
(poor), 2 (fair), 3 (good), 4 (very good) and 5
(excellent). Program Metric: 100% of the
students evaluated should exhibit 3 or
above

The thesis proposal is an important
requirement for the PhD degree. The thesis
committee will assess this outcome using
the oral and written components of the
thesis proposal defense. Rubric: Based on
student performance the committee will
assign a score based on the Likert scale: 1
(poor), 2 (fair), 3 (good), 4 (very good) and 5
(excellent). Program Metric: 100% of the
students evaluated should exhibit 3 or
above
The thesis committee will assess this
outcome using the oral and written
components of the thesis proposal defense.
Rubric: Based on student performance the
committee will assign a score based on the
Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3 (good), 4
(very good) and 5 (excellent). Program
Metric: 100% of the students evaluated
should exhibit 3 or above

The thesis committee will assess this
outcome using the oral and written
components of the thesis proposal defense.
Rubric: Based on student performance the
committee will assign a score based on the
Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3 (good), 4
(very good) and 5 (excellent). Program
Metric: 100% of the students evaluated
should exhibit 3 or above

The thesis committee will assess this
outcome using the oral and written
components of the thesis proposal defense.
Rubric: Based on student performance the
committee will assign a score based on the
Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3 (good), 4
(very good) and 5 (excellent). Program
Metric: 100% of the students evaluated
should exhibit 3 or above

Students will publish scholarly work and/or
present at scholarly conferences.

Students will complete a track form showing
course distribution and successful
completion of courses that include both an
in-depth study and breadth of knowledge.

Students will successfuly complete and
defend a dissertation acceptable to their
committee and/or will publish scholarly
work within seven years of program entry.
Student receives comprehensive evaluations
above 3.8 and a satisfactory external
evaluation from a supervisor.
Students will successfully defend a
dissertation within seven years of admission
to the program.

Students will receive a satisfactory
evaluation of their performance in their
program each semester by their supervisory
committee of at least four faculty members
using a faculty-developed evaluation form.
Students will pass their written and oral
qualifying examinations as judged by their
supervisory committee of at least four
faculty members using a faculty-developed
rubric.

Students will prepare and present orally and
in written form a research proposal
evaluated by a committee of faculty using a
faculty-developed rubric.

Students will conduct scientifically rigorous
original research that is evaluated each
semester by the student's supervisory
committee of at least four faculty members
using a faculty-developed evaluation form.
Students will demonstrate the ability to
critically read scientific publications and
understand experimental design as
evidenced by successful completion of
laboratory exercises in all core
entomology/nematology courses and in two
subject area seminar courses, using a faculty-
designed rubric.

Students will demonstrate satisfactory
performance on the research proposal
seminar, in two subject matter seminar
courses, in the dissertation exti seminar, and
in professional society presentations as
judged by a group of faculty, using a faculty-
developed rubric.
Students will produce a high quality
dissertation, as judged by a faculty-
developed rubric, and, within one year after
graduation, will have prepared one or more
manuscripts judged ready for submission as
refereed journal articles by the student's
supervisory committee.



Students will demonstrate the ability to
integrate and expand upon ideas critical to
their area of specialization through
successful completion of an end-of-program
oral exam administered by the student's
supervisory committee of at least four
faculty, using a faculty-developed rubric.

Students will be encouraged to serve as
teaching assistants and will be evaluated by
students at the end of the semester. At
least 80% of evaluated students will receive
at least 3.5 out of 5 on the evaluations.

Students will be encouraged to conduct
outreach activities to service the community
and will be evaluated on their participation
in these activities by their supervisory
committee using a faculty developed
evaluation form.
Students will consistently adhere during
their degree program to the University of
Florida's Honor Code.

Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
research work, qualifying examination,
dissertation defense, and participation in
professional societies. These observations
will be shared with the supervisory
committee and evaluated based on a faculty-
developed rubric.
Evaluated in the dissertation and the final
oral defense by the supervisory committee.
Rubric: Clear demonstration that this SLO is
achieved in statement of the hypotheses,
performance of research, and conclusions
drawn. Metric: Unanimous decision of
passing grade for dissertation and exam by
the supervisory committee.



Evaluated in the dissertation and the final
oral defense by the supervisory committee.
Rubric: Clear demonstration that this SLO is
achieved in literature review, methods,
presentation of results and conclusions
drawn. One journal article accepted in a
refereed journal. Metric: Unanimous
decision of passing grade for dissertation
and exam by the supervisory committee.




Evaluated in the dissertation and the final
oral defense by the supervisory committee.
Rubric: Clear demonstration that this SLO is
achieved in the ethical and professional
completion of the dissertation specifically
avoiding plagiarism and demonstrating
honesty in performance and documentation
of the research. Metric: Unanimous
decision of passing grade for dissertation
and exam by the supervisory committee.

How measured: 1. Study design questions
on written PhD progression examination. 2.
Article critique as part of written PhD
progression examination. Level of
achievement: 80% of PhD
students/graduates who take the written
progression. Who will measure: Graduate
facutly, Department of Epidemiology
How measured: 1. Study design questions
on written PhD progression examination. 2.
Article critique as part of written PhD
progression examination. Level of
achievement: 80% of PhD
students/graduates who take the written
progression. Who will measure: Graduate
facutly, Department of Epidemiology

How measured: Passing PhD written
progression examination. Level of
achievement: 80% of PhD
students/graduates who take the written
progression Who will measure: Graduate
faculty, Department of Epidemiology

How measured: Passing PhD written
progression examination. Level of
achievement: 80% of PhD
students/graduates who take the written
progression Who will measure: Graduate
faculty, Department of Epidemiology

How measured: Student participation in
local and non-local professional
organizations and/or community service
activities. Students discuss professional
and service activities with their mentors on
an annual basis. Level of achievement: All
students to participate in at least one
professional organization before graduation.
Who will measure: Mentor, Phd program
director, indicated on mentoring form.

How measured: Student participation in
local and non-local professional
organizations and/or community service
activities. Students discuss professional
and service activities with their mentors on
an annual basis. Level of achievement: All
students to participate in at least one
professional organization before graduation.
Who will measure: Mentor, Phd program
director, indicated on mentoring form.
During the degree program, students adhere
to the University of Florida’s Honor Code.
Observations will be made by faculty of
professional behavior during class activities,
the Annual FAS Graduate Student Spring
Symposium, research work, qualifying and
final examination/defense, exit seminar, and
participation in professional societies.
These observations will be shared with and
evaluated by the student's supervisory
committee utilizing a faculty-developed
rubric.




Written communication skills will be
assessed by the approval of the student's
written research proposal and dissertation
by their supervisory committee, by
successful passage of their written qualifying
exam, and by the successful completion of
their coursework, which includes numerous
papers and written exams. Students will
also be encouraged to publish their research
in peer-reviewed journals, prior to their
graduation. Student observations of written
communication skills will be shared with the
supervisory committee and evaluated
utilizing a faculty-developed rubric.



Oral communication skills will be assessed
during the student's required annual oral
presentation at the FAS Graduate Student
Spring Symposium and during their required
exit seminar. Evaluations will be performed
by members of their supervisory committee
utilizing a faculty-developed rubric.
Students will successfully take all
coursework listed in their supervisory
committee-approved 'Program of Study'.
Students are graded by faculty instructors.
A grade of “B” is required and student
performance is reviewed annually by the
student’s major professor and supervisory
committee. Both oral and written
assessments are provided to the student.
The supervisory committee assesses the
student’s ability to evaluate the primary
scientific literature utilizing a faculty-
developed rubric.
Students will successfully pass their written
and oral qualifying exam and final oral
examination, administered by their
supervisory committee, utilizing a faculty-
developed rubric.
Students will successfully prepare and
present their research proposal, prepare
and defend their dissertation to their
supervisory committee, and will be
evaluated utilizing a faculty-developed
rubric.

Students will successfully prepare their
research design/proposal, conduct all
required field and laboratory work,
appropriately analyze their data, and
prepare and defend their dissertation to
their supervisory committee. This will be
evaluated by a faculty-developed rubric.
Students will be evaluated at annual
meetings by their supervisory committee,
and at the time of their written/oral
qualifying examination and final oral
examination, utilizing a faculty-developed
rubric.
the student will write a research proposition
which will be submitted to a committee
identified by the graduate coordinator in
consultation with the student’s faculty
adviser. This proposition will be in the
student’s primary field of specialization: (1)
Agribusiness, (2) Agricultural Economics, (3)
Development Economics, or (4) Resource
and Environmental Economics, and will be
evaluated using a faculty developed rubric.



Students will successfully complete eighteen
hours of coursework focusing on
microeconomic theory (the analysis of the
actions of individuals or groups of
individuals in the market), macroeconomic
theory (the model of the operations of the
economy as a whole through such factors as
monetary and fiscal policy), mathematical
and numerical methods in economics, and
econometrics (the development of
statistical models of economic relationships
for either testing hypothesis regarding
economic relationships or parameterizing
models for policy analysis). After the
successful completion of the first two
semesters, the students will take an
examination over this core material
administered by the department. The
questions are submitted and graded by the
faculty who teach the core courses utilizing
a faculty developed rubric.
Students will present a proposed
dissertation topic to the department. This
proposal (1) states the problem and it’s
economic or policy relevance, (2) lays out
the appropriate economic theory and
quantitative procedures, (3) stipulates the
source of data, and (4) the anticipated
results and possible publication venues for
the results. Successful completion of the
dissertation proposal is established by
consensus of the student’s advisory
committee using a faculty developed rubric.
Upon successful defense of the will
complete their proposed research and
defend the results of their research to their
advisory committee using a faculty
developed rubric.
Evaluation of the student’s complete
program of study by the Supervisory
Committee, the Department, the College,
and the University utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.

Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during the written and oral Comprehensive
Examination and during the Defense of the
Dissertation and by the faculty during the
final Seminar.
Evaluation of the dissertation proposal and
final dissertation by the Supervisory
Committee utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.

Evaluation during the Comprehensive
Examination by the Supervisory Committee
and of the student’s final Seminar by the
faculty utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

Adherence to the University’s Student
Honor Code and Student Conduct Code
Annual written evaluation of performance
and professional attitude by the student’s
supervisory committee utilizing a faculty-
developed rubric.



Observations and feedback by faculty and
staff to the student’s supervisory committee
regarding the performance of course class
activities, the Comprehensive Examination
and Dissertation Defense, laboratory
activities, and participation in professional
societies utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

Evaluation of the student’s dissertation
proposal, research performance, and quality
of dissertation tome by the Supervisory
Committee utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.

Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during the Comprehensive Examination and
Defense of the Dissertation as well as the
final Seminar utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
Submission of at least one research abstract
to a professional meeting and submission of
at least one manuscript for publication that
meets the faculty developed criteria for
competency in research planning,
methodology, and discovery of new
information.

Supervisory Committee evaluation of
individualized Programs of Study (scope,
depth, rigor) utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.



Supervisory Committee evaluation of
qualifying exams and dissertation defense
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.
Supervisory Committee evaluation of
individualized Programs of Study (scope,
depth, rigor) utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.



Supervisory Committee evaluation of
written/oral exams, seminar, and
dissertation defense utilizing a faculty
developed rubric.

Compliance with University of Florida
Student Honor Code.

Faculty observations of behavior and
practices in the classroom, at meetings and
seminars, in the conduct of scholarly work,
and during all examinations utilizing a
faculty developed rubric.



Core knowledge will be assessed during the
fall and spring semesters of the first year via
written examinations and small group
exercises. The ability to integrate the
combined knowledge from the courses of
the first year will be tested during a
comprehensive first-year qualifying exam
that the students need to pass in order to be
allowed to continue their graduate studies.
During the entire graduate study
assessments will be made through written
examinations in courses, small group
exercises in courses, journal club
participation and presentation, regular
committee meetings, and ultimately in the
written and oral qualifying examination for
entry into candidacy. However, mastery of
knowledge does not cease with the
qualifying examination. Assessment
continues throughout the candidacy period
in committee meetings until the defense of
the dissertation.
Skill in use of the literature will be assessed
via journal clubs, which are mandatory
during every semester throughout the
tenure of the student.

Professional and ethical research conduct
will be covered initially during the ‘Ethics in
Genetics’ core course and as part of the
weekly journal club all students are required
to attend. Professionalism will continually
be monitored by the student's committee
and associated faculty as appropriate.
However, in terms of safety and adherence
to regulations, it will be the primary mentor
who will assess these behaviors in the
laboratory setting.

Mastery of the material covered in
additional advanced courses in year 2 will be
assessed based on exams and assignments.
Discipline and research-focused knowledge
will be assessed at the qualifying
examination, committee meetings of the
student, and ultimately at the dissertation
defense.

The scientific method will be assessed
primarily via the student's committee at
regularly scheduled committee meetings,
the qualifying examination, and ultimately
the dissertation defense. However, certain
formal courses may include assessment of
mastery of the scientific method in exercises
and examinations.

Oral and written presentation behaviors will
be assessed by the student's primary
adviser, the student's committee, the
faculty instructors of the weekly journal
club, and all associated faculty who contact
the student during presentations such as
research conferences.
Students will demonstrate satisfactory
ability to integrate and expand on ideas
critical to their area of specialization
through written and/or oral examinations
administered by their supervisory
committee using a rubric developed by the
program.

Students will demonstrate satisfactory
ability to present the results of their
research in their written dissertation and
during the oral defense of their work as
determined by their supervisory committee
following agreed upon criteria.

Students will give abstracts and
presentations/posters to regional, state and
national conferences. Students will conduct
their research with high levels of
professionalism as outlined by their
supervisory committee.



90% of the students will demonstrate
satisfactory ability to present the scientific
foundation of their research and scholarship
in a combined preliminary examination and
dissertation proposal defense as determined
by their supervisory committee following
agreed upon criteria.

90% of the students will demonstrate
satisfactory ability to present the results of
their research and scholarship in their
written thesis and during an oral defense of
their work as determined by their
supervisory committee following agreed
upon criteria.

90% of the students will demonstrate
accuracy in the conduct of their research
and scholarship during the completion and
defense of their dissertation as assessed by
their supervisory committee following
department standards.
90% of the students will demonstrate
satisfactory ability to analyze data,
synthesize maps and apply the scientific
method as measured by performance during
an oral defense of their work as determined
by their supervisory committee following
agreed upon criteria.

90% of the students will demonstrate
satisfactory ability to analyze data,
synthesize maps and apply the scientific
method as measured by performance within
a dissertation approved by their graduate
committee based upon defined
performance criteria.

80% of PhD graduate students will provide
documentation that they submitted a
research abstract to a local, regional or
national conference. The student’s
supervisory committee evaluates
completion of this requirement at time of
final thesis examination.

100 % of students will attend a department
Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)
orientation session



50% will attend Research Ethics workshops
etc., at professional meetings.

Assessment Method: PhD: Dissertation
read and approved by committee members;
dissertation successfully defended orally at
meeting of committee members

Assessment Method: PhD: Dissertation read
and approved by committee members;
dissertation successfully defended orally at
meeting of committee members
Assessment Method: Successful completion
of a graduate seminar including completion
of a paper that represents a significant piece
of independent research. Also, annual
discussion and evaluation of students’
ethical behavior done by the faculty at the
meeting of graduate student assessment.

Successful written and/or oral qualifying
exam per department standards and
guidelines.
Successful written dissertation proposal
submitted and presented to graduate
faculty per department standards and
guidelines.

Successful completion of dissertation per
department standards and guidelines.

Annually submit their research/scholarship
for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

Annually present their research/scholarship
at a state, national and/or international
professional meeting.

Successful completion of disseration per
department standards and guidelines.

80% of students will achieve passing grades
in required courses. 80% of students will
pass their Qualifying Examinations
80% of students receive passing grades in
required courses.80% of students pass their
Qualifying Examinations.
80% of students receive passing grades in
research methodology courses. 80% of
students pass qualifying examination.80% of
students reflect understanding in
dissertation proposal and in final
dissertation defense.
100% completion and passing on the IRB
and HIPPA training. No incidents of IRB or
HIPPA violations.
How will it be measured? Knowledge will be
assessed via three methods: coursework,
qualifier examination, and dissertation
completion. Coursework: knowledge will
be measured through 1) written
assignments including literature reviews,
journal and book critiques, program and
research proposals, reflection papers, pilot
studies and examinations. 2) oral
assignments including presentations and
class participation. Qualifier examination:
the qualifier examination is a take-home,
essay questions exam designed for each
student according to the core content
knowledge of the program, the knowledge
of the specific dissertation topic of the
student, and research methodology
proficiency expected to complete a
dissertation. Dissertation: the dissertation
is assessed by its relevance to the literature
on the topic, significance, soundness of the
research methodology and results, and level
of relevance of the results to the field of
higher education in terms of implications to
research, practice, and policy. A sound
dissertation should reflect adequate
knowledge proficiency. What is the
desired level of achievement? All students
How will it be measured? Knowledge will be
assessed via three methods: coursework,
qualifier examination, and dissertation
completion. Coursework: knowledge will
be measured through 1) written
assignments including literature reviews,
journal and book critiques, program and
research proposals, reflection papers, pilot
studies and examinations. 2) oral
assignments including presentations and
class participation. Qualifier examination:
the qualifier examination is a take-home,
essay questions exam designed for each
student according to the core content
knowledge of the program, the knowledge
of the specific dissertation topic of the
student, and research methodology
proficiency expected to complete a
dissertation. Dissertation: the dissertation
is assessed by its relevance to the literature
on the topic, significance, soundness of the
research methodology and results, and level
of relevance of the results to the field of
higher education in terms of implications to
research, practice, and policy. A sound
dissertation should reflect adequate
knowledge proficiency. What is the
desired level of achievement? All students
How will it be measured? Skills
competency will be assessed via three
methods: coursework, qualifier
examination, and dissertation completion.
Coursework: skills competency will be
measured through 1) written assignments
including literature reviews, journal and
book critiques, program and research
proposals, reflection papers, pilot studies
and examinations. 2) oral assignments
including presentations and class
participation. Qualifier examination: the
qualifier examination is a take-home, essay
questions exam designed for each student
according to the core content knowledge of
the program, the specific dissertation topic
of the student, and research methodology
proficiency expected to complete a
dissertation. Skills competency will be also
evaluated during the qualifier examination.
Dissertation: the dissertation is assessed by
its relevance to the literature on the topic,
significance, soundness of the research
methodology and results, and level of
relevance of the results to the field of higher
education in terms of implications to
research, practice, and policy. A sound
dissertation should reflect adequate skills
How will it be measured? Skills
competency will be assessed via three
methods: coursework, qualifier
examination, and dissertation completion.
Coursework: skills competency will be
measured through 1) written assignments
including literature reviews, journal and
book critiques, program and research
proposals, reflection papers, pilot studies
and examinations. 2) oral assignments
including presentations and class
participation. Qualifier examination: the
qualifier examination is a take-home, essay
questions exam designed for each student
according to the core content knowledge of
the program, the specific dissertation topic
of the student, and research methodology
proficiency expected to complete a
dissertation. Skills competency will be also
evaluated during the qualifier examination.
Dissertation: the dissertation is assessed by
its relevance to the literature on the topic,
significance, soundness of the research
methodology and results, and level of
relevance of the results to the field of higher
education in terms of implications to
research, practice, and policy. A sound
dissertation should reflect adequate skills
How will it be measured? Skills
competency will be assessed via three
methods: coursework, qualifier
examination, and dissertation completion.
Coursework: skills competency will be
measured through 1) written assignments
including literature reviews, journal and
book critiques, program and research
proposals, reflection papers, pilot studies
and examinations. 2) oral assignments
including presentations and class
participation. Qualifier examination: the
qualifier examination is a take-home, essay
questions exam designed for each student
according to the core content knowledge of
the program, the specific dissertation topic
of the student, and research methodology
proficiency expected to complete a
dissertation. Skills competency will be also
evaluated during the qualifier examination.
Dissertation: the dissertation is assessed by
its relevance to the literature on the topic,
significance, soundness of the research
methodology and results, and level of
relevance of the results to the field of higher
education in terms of implications to
research, practice, and policy. A sound
dissertation should reflect adequate skills




How will it be measured? Professional
behavior will be assessed through the
quality of academic work and through the
interactions with classmates, peers, and
faculty in the program and within the field
of higher education at large. What is the
desired level of achievement? All students
are expected to demonstrate satisfactory
professional behavior in all interactions and
circumstances as well as in al academic and
professional work. Who will measure?
Faculty members teaching courses in the
program, dissertation chairs and committee
members, peers in the field and classmates.
Evaluated by written and oral examinations
composed and assessed by a committee of
faculty
Measured by faculty supervisors who will
observe and review Teaching Assistants' and
Teaching Associates' performance in the
classroom.
Students will submit a journal article, a book
chapter, a book review, or an encyclopedia
article for publication before completing the
PhD.

Students will complete and defend a
doctoral dissertation based on original
research which demonstrates a new and
unique interpretation of the material.

The graduate Supervisory Committee will be
the primary evaluator of the student’s
ability to obtain contemporary and relevant
knowledge in the various disciplines of
Horticultural Sciences with formal
assessments made through the final exam
and dissertation defense utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.

Student’s supervisory committee will
evaluate student’s problem solving skills in
their research program at regular
supervisory committee meetings; by
satisfactory performance on qualifying and
final examinations and in presentations in
formal seminar classes utilizing rubrics
designed by faculty.
In courses, all students are made aware of
the UF honor code, the seriousness of
violating the code is discussed, and
adherence to the code is monitored.
Professional behavior will be evaluated,
especially by the major advisor and the
graduate Supervisory Committee during
seminars, participation and presentations at
professional meetings, scientific writings
and in interpersonal relationships utilizing a
faculty developed rubric.
Assessment Method: The graduate
Supervisory Committee will be the primary
evaluator of the student’s ability to become
knowledgeable of new techniques and
technologies with formal assessments made
through the final exam and dissertation
defense utilizing a rubric designed by
faculty.
Assessment Method: The graduate
Supervisory Committee will be the primary
evaluator of student’s ability to evaluate
horticultural systems formal assessments
made through the final exam and
dissertation defense utilizing a rubric
designed by faculty.

Student’s supervisory committee will
evaluate student’s communication skills at
regular supervisory committee meetings; by
satisfactory performance on qualifying and
final examinations and in presentations in
formal seminar classes utilizing rubrics
designed by faculty
Beyond maintaining strong classroom
performance, all Ph.D. students must pass a
rigorous set of examinations at the end of
the first year of study in the core
methodological areas of Industrial and
Systems Engineering. By the end of the
third year of the program, each student
must pass an oral examination administered
by a faculty committee. In addition, the
department’s graduate committee,
comprised of four graduate faculty
members, performs an annual review
assessing the academic and research
performance of each Ph.D. student, and
issues an evaluation letter to the student.
These examinations and reviews assess the
student’s progress in achieving expected
learning outcomes throughout the program.
For the final examination, the student must
complete a dissertation and oral defense
before a faculty committee. Each student
will be evaluated by their faculty committee
on a five-point Likert scale with respect to
each learning outcome. This evaluation will
be performed no earlier than six months
prior to graduating, and will require each
student to be rated on their proficiency level
in independent research, preparation for a
Beyond maintaining strong classroom
performance, all Ph.D. students must pass a
rigorous set of examinations at the end of
the first year of study in the core
methodological areas of Industrial and
Systems Engineering. By the end of the
third year of the program, each student
must pass an oral examination administered
by a faculty committee. In addition, the
department’s graduate committee,
comprised of four graduate faculty
members, performs an annual review
assessing the academic and research
performance of each Ph.D. student, and
issues an evaluation letter to the student.
These examinations and reviews assess the
student’s progress in achieving expected
learning outcomes throughout the program.
For the final examination, the student must
complete a dissertation and oral defense
before a faculty committee. Each student
will be evaluated by their faculty committee
on a five-point Likert scale with respect to
each learning outcome. This evaluation will
be performed no earlier than six months
prior to graduating, and will require each
student to be rated on their proficiency level
in independent research, preparation for a
Beyond maintaining strong classroom
performance, all Ph.D. students must pass a
rigorous set of examinations at the end of
the first year of study in the core
methodological areas of Industrial and
Systems Engineering. By the end of the
third year of the program, each student
must pass an oral examination administered
by a faculty committee. In addition, the
department’s graduate committee,
comprised of four graduate faculty
members, performs an annual review
assessing the academic and research
performance of each Ph.D. student, and
issues an evaluation letter to the student.
These examinations and reviews assess the
student’s progress in achieving expected
learning outcomes throughout the program.
For the final examination, the student must
complete a dissertation and oral defense
before a faculty committee. Each student
will be evaluated by their faculty committee
on a five-point Likert scale with respect to
each learning outcome. This evaluation will
be performed no earlier than six months
prior to graduating, and will require each
student to be rated on their proficiency level
in independent research, preparation for a

Evaluation of the student's Program of Study
by the Supervisory Committee and the
School using the rubric developed by faculty
at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/doctoral.htm.

Evaluation of the student's Program of Study
by the Supervisory Committee and the
School using the rubric developed by faculty
at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/doctoral.htm.
Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during the qualifying examination and
dissertation defense using the rubric
developed by faculty at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/doctoral.htm.



Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during the qualifying examination and
dissertation defense using the rubric
developed by faculty at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/doctoral.htm.

Evaluation of the student's Program of
Study, the qualifying examination, and the
dissertation defense based on a rubric
developed by faculty at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/doctoral.htm.

Evaluation of the student's Program of
Study, the qualifying examination, and the
dissertation defense based on a rubric
developed by faculty at
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/curriculum.htm
and
www.snre.ufl.edu/graduate/doctoral.htm.
Consistent adherence during the degree
program to the University of Florida's Honor
Code. Observation by the faculty of
professional behavior during class activities,
seminars, research work, qualifying
examination, dissertation defense, and
participation in professional societies. These
behaviors will be evaluated over the
duration of the student's degree program by
the members of the Supervisory Committee
and assessed according to a faculty-
developed rubric at the time of the
dissertation defense

Consistent adherence during the degree
program to the University of Florida's Honor
Code. Observation by the faculty of
professional behavior during class activities,
seminars, research work, qualifying
examination, dissertation defense, and
participation in professional societies. These
behaviors will be evaluated over the
duration of the student's degree program by
the members of the Supervisory Committee
and assessed according to a faculty-
developed rubric at the time of the
dissertation defense




Dissertation approved by committee.



Dissertation defended and approved by
committee members.
Pass rubric exam or project as part of
Introduction to Graduate Research
(LIN6084)
How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.



How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.
How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.



All doctoral students will demonstrate
knowledge through successful completion of
at least 5 advanced-level courses (those
requiring a completed research project of
conference or publication level quality) as
measured by the graduate faculty and
outside reviewers of research.



All doctoral students will conceptualize,
carry out and successfully defend a
theoretical dissertation on a topic in his or
her area of expertise as measured by the
students’ doctoral dissertation committee



All students completing the program will
produce conference or publication level
research studies and dissertation.




Successful placement in academic or
professional research positions
These behaviors are incorporated into the
doctoral colloquium class. A satisfactory
grade in these classes must be achieved to
reach this competency as measured by the
graduate faculty.
Students submit an updated CV annually
documenting these activities. The CV is
submitted to both the students’ chairs and
to the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies
for review



Evaluated in dissertation. Rubric: Student is
able to identify unknown aspects of
structure-property-processing relationships
for a materials system and formulate an
approach to elucidating those aspects using
engineering and/or scientific principles at a
level appropriate to doctoral research.

Evaluated in dissertation. Rubric: Student
can obtain information from primary
literature and technical reports, and can
integrate that information to reach
conclusions regarding the current state of
the art and areas in which further research
is needed.



Evaluated in dissertation. Rubric: Student
demonstrates proficiency on appropriate
experimental or computational techniques
used for materials characterization, and uses
these techniques to investigate structure-
property-relationships in material systems
at a level appropriate to doctoral research.

Evaluated in dissertation research activities.
Rubric: Student demonstrates an ability to
work cooperatively with others, interact
with supervisors, follow guidelines for
appropriate management of data, and
follow safety requirements for working in a
research laboratory.
Evaluated in dissertation. Rubric: Student is
able to write and orally present the results
of a research project in a manner that
clearly communicates the project’s
objectives, procedures, results, and
conclusions.

1. How measured: Performance in 36 credits
of coursework at 6000-level and above. .
Measured by whom: Course instructors.
2. How measured: Comprehensive written
examinations in two chosen areas. High
Importance of dissertation,defense and
qualifying exams Measured by whom:
Examination committees.




1. How measured: Doctoral dissertation.
Desired level: 100% complete dissertation.
Measured by whom: Doctoral supervisory
committee. 2.How measured: Oral
examinations on dissertation and related
material; seminar talks. Desired level:
100% pass oral examinations; 100% present
seminars. Measured by whom: Doctoral
supervisory committee; seminar organizers.

How measured: Observation, student
evaluations. Desired level: 100% require
approval to progress to higher level and/or
greater responsibility. Measured by whom:
Course coordinators, undergraduate
coordinator.

Thesis proposal is an important required for
the PhD degree. The outcome will be
assessed in the thesis proposal by the thesis
committee. Based on student
performance the committee will assign a
score based on the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2
(fair), 3(good), 4(very good) and 5
(excellent). 100% of students in the class
should exhibit 3 or above.
Thesis proposal is an important required for
the PhD degree. The outcome will be
assessed in the thesis proposal by the thesis
committee. Based on student
performance the committee will assign a
score based on the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2
(fair), 3(good), 4(very good) and 5
(excellent). 100% of students in the class
should exhibit 3 or above.

Thesis proposal is an important required for
the PhD degree. The outcome will be
assessed in the thesis proposal by the thesis
committee. Based on student
performance the committee will assign a
score based on the Likert scale: 1 (poor), 2
(fair), 3(good), 4(very good) and 5
(excellent). 100% of students in the class
should exhibit 3 or above.




IDP-wide core knowledge will be assessed in
the core course of the fall semester of the
first year via written examinations and small
group exercises. Concentration-specific
knowledge will be assessed in courses
beginning in the spring semester of the first
year and through the advanced courses
afterwards. Assessments will be made
through written examinations in courses,
small group exercises in courses, journal
club participation and presentation, regular
committee meetings, and ultimately in the
written and oral qualifying examination for
entry into candidacy. However, mastery of
concentration-specific knowledge does not
cease with the qualifying examination.
Assessment continues throughout the
candidacy period in committee meetings
until the defense of the dissertation.
Discipline and research-focused knowledge
will be assessed at the qualifying
examination, committee meetings of the
student, and ultimately at the dissertation
defense.
Skill in use of the literature will be assessed
via journal clubs, which are mandatory for
every semester throughout the tenure of
the student.

The scientific method will be assessed
primary via the student's committee at
regularly scheduled committee meetings,
the qualifying examination, and ultimately
the dissertation defense. However, certain
formal courses may include assessment of
mastery of the scientific method in exercises
and examinations.



Professionalism will initially be assessed via
the responsible conduct of research course
taken by all IDP students. Professionalism
will continually be monitored by the
student's committee and all associated
faculty. However, in terms of safety and
adherence to regulations, it will be the
primary mentor who will assess these
behaviors in the laboratory setting.

Oral and written presentation behaviors will
be assessed by the student's primary
adviser, the student's committee, and all
associated faculty who contact the student
during presentations such as research
conferences.
How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.



How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.
How will it be measured? By writing
assignments, test examination, observation
in practicum and internship sites, and
evaluation in group and individual
supervision; class participation and other
methods of assessment determined by
CACREP standards and individual faculty
members; field supervisor; and or faculty
supervisor. What is the desired level of
achievement? Student must score 80% or
higher in each required assignment and/or
test in order to meet the standard
requirement Who will measure? Individual
faculty members; adjunct teaching the
content core courses; and/or field
supervisor.

Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during written qualifying examination, oral
qualifying examination, and dissertation
defense utilizing a rubric developed by the
faculty:
http://microcell.ufl.edu/Students/graduate/
phd.shtml.
Evaluation of the student’s Program of
Study by the Supervisory Committee and
the School utilizing a rubric developed by
the faculty:
http://microcell.ufl.edu/Students/graduate/
phd.shtml
Evaluation of the student’s Program of
Study by the Supervisory Committee and
the School based on a rubric developed by
faculty:
http://microcell.ufl.edu/Students/graduate/
phd.shtml:
Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during the qualifying examination, the
dissertation defense, and the preparation of
a manuscript for publication in a peer-
reviewed journal based on a rubric
developed by faculty:
http://microcell.ufl.edu/Students/graduate/
phd.shtml:

The course instructors will emphasize
importance of ethical behavior on
assignments. Students will be made aware
of UF honor code. The major professor and
supervisory committee will encourage and
discuss ethical standards in scholarship and
research with students.




Written and oral qualifying examination will
take place upon completion of program
course work (typically in third year). The
examination comprises written (closed book
and take home portions) followed by an oral
defense of the written examination. Faculty
committee will assess both written and oral
components of the examination.

students will write, submit and defend a
research proposal that will be evaluated by
the program faculty.




Complete, submit and defend the
dissertation to the faculty committee,

Students will successfully complete written
and oral qualifying exams that will be
evaluated by the program faculty. Students
will also complete and defend a dissertation
that will be evaluated by the supervisory
committee.
Students will write, submit and defend a
dissertation proposal that will be evaluated
by the program faculty.

Complete, submit, and successfully defend
the dissertation to faculty committee for
approval.



Evaluated in dissertation. Rubric: Student is
able to identify unknown aspects of nuclear
technology, nuclear science, or appropriate
nuclear-relevant engineering sciences
(including materials science and thermal
sciences) and formulate an approach to
elucidating those aspects using engineering
and/or scientific principles at a level
appropriate to doctoral research.

Evaluated in dissertation Rubric: Student
can obtain information from primary
literature and technical reports, and can
integrate that information to reach
conclusions regarding the current state of
the art and areas in which further research
is needed.



Evaluated in dissertation. Rubric: Student
demonstrates proficiency on appropriate
experimental or computational techniques
used for nuclear engineering, and uses these
techniques to investigate nuclear
technology, nuclear science, or appropriate
nuclear-relevant engineering sciences
(including materials science and thermal
sciences) at a level appropriate to doctoral
research.

Evaluated in dissertation research activities.
Rubric: Student demonstrates an ability to
work cooperatively with others, interact
with supervisors, follow guidelines for
appropriate management of data, and
follow safety requirements for working in a
research laboratory.
Evaluated in dissertation. Rubric: Student is
able to follow requirements for writing
reports and research papers, and does so
based on ethical standards regarding
appropriate citation and plagiarism.

Evaluated in dissertation Rubric: Student is
able to write and orally present the results
of a research project in a manner that
clearly communicates the project’s
objectives, procedures, results, and
conclusions.




Progression exam given after completion of
all core nursing science courses (This is after
the first year for full-time PhD study.) This
assesses the student’s ability to not only
recount information previously learned but
synthesize content across core courses and
produce a scholarly written product that is
evaluated independently by three faculty
member s who teach in the PhD program.
Qualifying examination given after all
coursework has been completed including
minor and elective courses. Students
present a draft of their dissertation proposal
that must be approved by their committee
prior to entering candidacy.

Dissemination of research during the 2010-
2011 academic year by PhD students.



Involvement in professional organizations
and College and University committees
while in the PhD program. Assumes
leadership in professional organizations
after graduation and appointment to a
faculty position at a College or University
Evaluation of the student’s complete
program of study by the Supervisory
Committee, the Department, and the School
utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during the written and oral Comprehensive
Examination and during the Defense of the
Dissertation and by the faculty during the
final Seminar.
Evaluation of the dissertation proposal and
final dissertation by the Supervisory
Committee utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.

Evaluation during the Comprehensive
Examination by the Supervisory Committee
and of the student’s final Seminar by the
faculty utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

Evaluation of the student’s dissertation
proposal, research performance, and quality
of dissertation tome by the Supervisory
Committee utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.

Evaluation by the Supervisory Committee
during the Comprehensive Examination and
Defense of the Dissertation as well as the
final Seminar utilizing a faculty developed
rubric.
Submission of at least one research abstract
to a professional meeting and submission of
at least one manuscript for publication that
meets the faculty developed criteria for
competency in research planning,
methodology, and discovery of new
information.

Adherence to the University’s Student
Honor Code and Student Conduct Code.
Annual written evaluation of performance
and professional attitude by the student’s
supervisory committee utilizing a faculty-
developed rubric.



Observations and feedback by faculty and
staff to the student’s supervisory committee
regarding the performance of course class
activities, the Comprehensive Examination
and Dissertation Defense, laboratory
activities, and participation in professional
societies utilizing a faculty developed rubric.

Document scores of each student on a
departmental preliminary and/or
comprehensive oral qualifying exam. The
oral exam will be constructed by members
of the host department and/or by the
student's thesis committee and graded
according to the rubric; unsatisfactory,
competent or excellent.

Document scores of each student on a
departmental preliminary and/or
comprehensive written qualifying exam. The
written exam will be constructed by
members of the host department and/or by
the student's thesis committee and graded
according to the rubric; unsatisfactory,
competent or excellent.
Assess each student's completion of a
research proposal and dissertation using a
rubric as unsatisfactory, competent or
excellent.



Assessment of a student's performance by
faculty members of the student's home
department or dissertation committee on
student skills in delivering an oral
presentation that is based on a simple rubric
as unsatisfactory, competent or excellent.
Satisfactory completion and defense of a
dissertation within normative time, where
the dissertation is assessed by the
dissertation committee, consisting of the
director, two internal members from the
department, and one external member.
The target for the program is the percentage
of all those who have been in the program
for that amount of time who have
completed and defended a satisfactory
dissertation in that time.



Satisfactory completion and defense of a
dissertation within normative time, where
the dissertation is assessed by the
dissertation committee, consisting of the
director, two internal members from the
department, and one external member.
The target for the program is the percentage
of all those who have been in the program
for that amount of time who have
completed and defended a satisfactory
dissertation in that time.



When submitting the dissertation, each
student is asked to hand in a paper (3000-
4000 words) suitable for presentation at a
conference, where this is assessed by the
graduate committee. The target for the
department is the percentage of all those
students who have handed in such a paper
whose paper was assessed by the
committee to be acceptable for
presentation at a professional conference.
The program requires that each student
receiving a PhD have the opportunity at
least once to teach his or her own course,
where this course is supervised by either the
Chair or Chair's designee. The supervisor
shall assess the student's conduct of the
course according to a departmental rubric
and shall deem the student's performance
as either unsatisfactory, satisfactory, good,
or outstanding. The target for the program
is the percentage of all enrolled students
who have managed their own class and who
(i) have never received less than a
satisfactory assessment for such classes and
(ii) whose TA assessments for such classes
are "good" or better at least 50% of the
time.



The graduate committee will maintain data
on students' participation in professional
activities. The target for the program is the
percentage of all students who have been in
the program for at least as long as
normative time and who have participated
in at least three such professional events,
where at least one of them is either
publication or presentation at a conference.

Students are required to pass (within 2
years) a written examination comprising 12
physics questions, set and graded by 12
faculty members. The pass/fail mark is
determined by the faculty as a whole.

All students who have passed the academic
requirements of the department are
required to take an oral examination, where
they present a plan for extending our
knowledge beyond that in the textbooks.
The examination is administered by 5
faculty members.
Students are required to give a written
report and oral presentation of their
research. This is examined by a team of at
least 5 faculty members. The faculty will
question the student on how the research
was conducted and how it has been
presented to other audiences. 80% of those
students who have passed the qualifying
examination will demonstrate this outcome.
At the end of the spring semester of their
first year, students must pass a written
examination at the Ph.D. level drawn from
content presented in the core courses. This
examination is evaluated by a faculty
committee.
At the end of the spring semester of their
first year, students must pass a written
examination at the Ph.D. level drawn from
content presented in the core courses. This
examination is evaluated by a faculty
committee.

Students must pass Journal Colloquia
courses each fall and spring semester they
are enrolled in the program. These courses
teach critical evaluation of the primary
literature in plant biology and research skills
that require critical thinking. Courses are
taught by individual and teams of faculty
who assess critical thinking skills of student
led discussions.

Students must pass Journal Colloquia
courses each fall and spring semester they
are enrolled in the program. These courses
teach critical evaluation of the primary
literature in plant biology and research skills
that require critical thinking. Courses are
taught by individual and teams of faculty
who assess critical thinking skills of student
led discussions.
During the degree program, students adhere
to the University of Florida’s Honor Code.
Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
research work, qualifying examination,
dissertation defense, and participation in
professional societies. These observations
will be shared with the supervisory
committee and evaluated based on a faculty-
developed rubric.

During the degree program, students adhere
to the University of Florida’s Honor Code.
Observation by the faculty of professional
behavior during class activities, seminars,
research work, qualifying examination,
dissertation defense, and participation in
professional societies. These observations
will be shared with the supervisory
committee and evaluated based on a faculty-
developed rubric.

Advisory committee assesses students’
dissertations and seminar describing their
thesis research according to the rubric
agreed upon by PMCB faculty. Students are
required to have a peer-reviewed, first
author publication accepted prior to
graduation.

Advisory committee assesses students’
dissertations and seminar describing their
thesis research according to the rubric
agreed upon by PMCB faculty. Students are
required to have a peer-reviewed, first
author publication accepted prior to
graduation.
Students must pass the Ph.D. candidacy
exam. This exam includes writing,
presenting and defending a grant-style
proposal on their dissertation research
project. Each student presents a public
seminar on this proposal and must pass an
oral exam with his/her advisory committee
following the rubric developed by PMCB
faculty.

Students must pass the Ph.D. candidacy
exam. This exam includes writing,
presenting and defending a grant-style
proposal on their dissertation research
project. Each student presents a public
seminar on this proposal and must pass an
oral exam with his/her advisory committee
following the rubric developed by PMCB
faculty.

Advisory committees assess student’s
proposal at Ph.D. candidacy exam,
presentations, and dissertation according
the rubric developed by faculty. Students
compete for a Best-presentation award at
the annual PMCB Workshop. Students
present their research at national and/or
international conferences.

Advisory committees assess student’s
proposal at Ph.D. candidacy exam,
presentations, and dissertation according
the rubric developed by faculty. Students
compete for a Best-presentation award at
the annual PMCB Workshop. Students
present their research at national and/or
international conferences.
Students complete formal laboratory work
and course work in journal colloquy in Plant
Pathology and related disciplines based on
reading and evaluating the primary scientific
literature. Additional courses within and
outside the major are completed requiring a
critical evaluation of the primary scientific
literature. Students are graded by faculty
instructors. A grade of “B” is required and
student performance is reviewed annually
by the student’s major professor and
supervisory committee. Both oral and
written assessments are provided to the
student. The supervisory committee
assesses the student’s ability to evaluate the
primary scientific literature utilizing a faculty
designed rubric.




Students are required to formulate, present
and defend an original research proposal to
their supervisory committee and to the
department. Students are evaluated by the
supervisory committee and through
anonymous evaluations from students and
faculty attending departmental research
proposal seminars. Knowledge and skill
pertaining to experimental design and
interpretation of results are evaluated by
the supervisory committee during the
proposal seminar, qualifying exams, and
during the dissertation defense utilizing a
faculty developed rubric.
Students conceive research projects and
conduct independent research projects that
test original hypotheses. Knowledge and
skill of experimental design is evaluated by
the supervisory committee during periodic
meetings and during the defense of the
dissertation. The major professor in
conjunction with the supervisory committee
evaluates student performance in research
and provides formal written and oral
feedback on an annual basis utilizing a
faculty developed rubric.




Students enroll in and complete courses in
colloquium in plant pathology, journal
colloquy in PMCB and the Graduate
Professional Development Seminar. These
courses are graded by faculty instructors.
Students are required to participate in and
present their dissertation research in
departmental seminars. Students present
oral and written presentations of their
research at scientific meetings and
conferences. Students prepare and submit
manuscripts on their research for peer-
review publication. The supervisory
committee assesses student competence
through committee meetings and the final
defense utilizing a faculty developed rubric.



Students are required to serve one semester
as Teaching Assistant for as a component of
their Ph.D program. Their effectiveness is
evaluated by the faculty instructor utilizing a
faculty developed rubric and through
student evaluations. Oral assessments are
provided throughout the semester and
formal written evaluations are provided by
students at the end of the semester.
Students receive a copy of the departmental
Graduate Handbook upon admission to their
program. The UF Student Honor Code and
other expectations of professional and
ethical conduct are given here. Students are
encouraged to enroll in the seminar course
for Professional Development and in
University-wide workshops offered on an ad
hoc basis. Course instructors emphasize
ethical behavior on assignments and course
activities. Students are bound by the UF
honor code. Faculty instructors, the major
professor and the supervisory committee
ensure that its ethical standards are
followed.
Satisfactory completion of core courses,
qualifying exams (with oral and written
components) in two fields, as well as writing
and orally defending a dissertation
prospectus and then the dissertation.
Desired level of achievement: Satisfactory
completion of dissertation prospectus as
judged by the students supervisory
committee
Completion of dissertation prospectus by
end of eighth semester and then
dissertation

Compliance among employees with FERPA
and sexual harassment; Attendance at the
department orientation; Attendance at
professional conferences by their eighth
semester

Students will pass an oral and written
qualifying examination conducted by their
supervisory committee that covers the
general area of clinical psychology and their
area of concentration by the end of their
third year of doctoral study.
Students will pass an oral and written
qualifying examination conducted by their
supervisory committee that covers the
general area of clinical psychology and their
area of concentration by the end of their
third year of doctoral study.

Students will receive satisfactory or above
ratings by clinical supervisors on all core and
advanced practica placements

Students will receive satisfactory or above
ratings by clinical supervisors on all core and
advanced practica placements
Students will successfully defend doctoral
dissertations before a faculty supervisory
committee before the end of their fifth year
in the program
Students will successfully defend doctoral
dissertations before a faculty supervisory
committee before the end of their fifth year
in the program
Students will successfully defend a master's
thesis before a faculty supervisory
committee before the end of their second
year in the program
Students will successfully defend a master's
thesis before a faculty supervisory
committee before the end of their second
year in the program

Students will demonstrate mastery of
professional and ethical conduct through
satisfactory and above ratings on clinical
performance rating scales compiled yearly
by the Clinical Progress Committee

Students will demonstrate mastery of
professional and ethical conduct through
satisfactory and above ratings on clinical
performance rating scales compiled yearly
by the Clinical Progress Committee
Students will demonstrate mastery of
professional and ethical conduct through
satisfactory and above ratings on their
conduct of mentored research projects by
their faculty research supervisors

Students will demonstrate mastery of
professional and ethical conduct through
satisfactory and above ratings on their
conduct of mentored research projects by
their faculty research supervisors
• Testing and papers across core theory
courses • Performance on core public
health theory question on Qualifying Exam
• Understanding will be reflected in
dissertation proposal and in final
dissertation defense
• Testing in statistics, research methods,
and scientific writing courses •
Performance on public health methodology
question on Qualifying Exam •
Understanding will be reflected in
dissertation proposal and in final
dissertation defense
• Testing in statistics, research methods,
and scientific writing courses •
Performance on public health methodology
question on Qualifying Exam •
Understanding will be reflected in
dissertation proposal and in final
dissertation defense

• Grades in teaching course • Performance
in supervised teaching experience •
Teaching evaluations and peer reviews

• Grades in teaching course • Performance
in supervised teaching experience •
Teaching evaluations and peer reviews
• Testing in Public Health Ethics course. •
Testing / maintenance of IRB and HIPPA
training • Observation of performance in
research activities
• Testing in Public Health Ethics course. •
Testing / maintenance of IRB and HIPPA
training • Observation of performance in
research activities

• All students receive professional positions
in the field of Public Health following
completion of the Ph.D. program
Testing and Paper in Rehabilitation Science
Theory Course. Performance on
Rehabilitation Science Question on
Qualifying Exam. Understanding will be
reflected in dissertation proposal and in final
dissertation defense.

Testing in statistics, research methods, and
scientific writing courses. Performance on
Rehabilitation Science Methods Question on
Qualifying Exam. Understanding will be
reflected in dissertation proposal and in final
dissertation defense.

Testing in statistics, research methods, and
scientific writing courses. Performance on
Rehabilitation Science Methods Question on
Qualifying Exam. Understanding will be
reflected in dissertation proposal and in final
dissertation defense.

Grades in teaching course. Performance in
supervised teaching experience.
Testing in courses related to student’s
research area. Performance on research
concentration area question on Qualifying
Exam.

Testing in research ethics course. Testing in
IRB and HIPPA training. Observation of
performance in research activities.

All students receive research positions (post
doctoral fellowships, junior faculty,
rehabilitation research center investigator)
following completion of the Ph.D. program.
Students must pass exams in the Method
and Theory I and II course sequence
according to a departmentally approved
grading rubric.

Students must pass four written qualifying
exams and an oral defense administered
and evaluated by a committee of the faculty
in their particular sub-field.

Students must pass with a designation of
“satisfactory” a timed translation test
administered and evaluated by a faculty
member competent in the foreign language.

As an alternative, students must successfully
complete a foreign language course
sequence (such as Sanskrit) at the
intermediate level, according to a
departmentally approved grading rubric.
Students will successfully defend a
dissertation proposal before a supervisory
committee, articulating research goals,
guiding questions, hypotheses, and
methods, after completing their qualifying
exams.

Students will successfully complete their
dissertation and defend it orally before their
supervisory committee, following the
criteria stipulated in the Religion
Department’s Student Handbook.

Students must teach undergraduate courses
in their particular sub-field in addition to
introductory courses such as “Introduction
to World Religions,” “Religions of Asia,” or
“Introduction to Islam.” Students who have
primary teaching responsibility for a course
must receive positive evaluations from the
supervising faculty.
Students will present a paper at a
conference, meeting, workshop, or
symposium of a major international,
regional, or national scholarly organization
in the fields of religion, Asian studies, Latin
American/Latino studies, and/or
environmental studies, as appropriate to
their tracks.

Students will achieve an average grade of B+
in courses within the major and receive
passing scores from faculty on their written
and oral qualifying exams.

Students will successfully complete their
dissertation and receive a satisfactory
review from program faculty.

Students will meet one or more of the
following goals by the end of their third
year: become a member of at least one
professional organization, attend a national
convention, contribute to a review of a
journal manuscript submission, be an author
or coauthor of at least one conference
presentation, or be an author or coauthor of
at least one journal article.




Dissertation read and approved by
committee members; dissertation
successfully defended orally at meeting of
committee members
PhD: Dissertation read and approved by
committee members; dissertation
successfully defended orally at meeting of
committee members

Successful completion of the Introduction to
Graduate studies within their discipline.
Also, annual discussion and evaluation of
student’s ethical behavior done by the
faculty at the meeting of graduate student
assessment.

Candidates must receive a score of 80% or
higher from their individual doctoral
committee on both the Counselor Education
Written Qualifying Examination and
Counselor Education Specialty Examination.



The Individual Supervisor End-of-Semester
Report Form (ISESR)is completed for each
candidate by the following: individual faculty
members, adjunct teaching the content of
practicum and internship, field supervisors
at practicum and internship sites, and
supervisor of group and individual
supervision. Candidates must score 4 points
or higher in each required area of the 10
areas stated in the ISESR in order to meet
the standard requirement.
Candidates will seek membership in the
American Counseling Association and/or
make satisfactory progress toward
becoming National Board Certified
counselors.

Candidates will obtain a passing score (167
or higher) on the Praxis II exam in School
Psychology. Candidates will submit official
Praxis II score reports to the SP Program
Director prior to degree completion.

Candidates will receive a mean rating of 2.5
(2=Proficient skills; 3=Exemplary skills) from
two faculty members on a rubric evaluating
an assessment case study and intervention
case study completed as part of the School
Psychology Professional Portfolio

Candidates will submit a manuscript for
publication in a peer refereed journal

Candidates will complete a presentation at a
national conference approved by the
candidate’s supervisory committee chair.

Candidates will receive a mean rating of 4.0
(Above Average) on the Professional
Behavior items included on the end-of-year
Internship Appraisal form completed by a
field-based supervisor

Students will pass a qualifying exam in
theory within four years of matriculation
Students will pass a qualifying exam in
research methods within four years of
matriculation
Students will pass a qualifying exam in the
primary specialty area and a qualifying exam
in the secondary specialty area within four
years of matriculation
Students will complete and successfully
defend a dissertation within six years of
matriculation
Students will complete and successfully
defend a dissertation within six years of
matriculation
Students will successfully complete sexual
harassment training compliance within the
first term of matriculation
Students will successfully complete the
training module in FERPA Basics within the
first term of matriculation
Students will successfully complete the
Institutional Review Board’s required
reading for all researchers within the first
term of matriculation

Students will complete the departmental
professionalization seminar within the first
term in the graduate program

• The student’s plan of study will be
evaluated by the supervisory committee.
The student must maintain a 3.0 GPA for all
course work approved by the committee. •
The student will be evaluated by written and
oral Qualifying Examinations administered
by the supervisory committee, utilizing
rubrics designed by faculty.



• Students will successfully defend their
dissertation before the supervisory
committee. • Students will pass an oral
Qualifying Examination administered and
evaluated by the Supervisory Committee,
utilizing rubrics designed by the faculty.
• PhD students are required to present their
research findings in form of an exit seminar
in the departmental seminar series. • The
behavior of all students will be consistent
with the University of Florida’s Honor Code
and this behavior will be evaluated,
especially by the major advisor and the
graduate Supervisory committee during
seminars, participation and presentations at
professional meetings, scientific writings,
and in interpersonal relationships.




Candidates will earn satisfactory ratings on
qualifying examinations as determined by
the doctoral committees.
Candidates will earn satisfactory ratings on
the dissertation defense as determined by
doctoral committees.

Candidates will present at a national, state,
or local conference or submit a paper for
publication. The doctoral committee will
determine satisfactory completion.



Via performance on the PhD written and
oral exam (Parts I and II). Students must
pass both exams. The Part I exam is
assessed by a committee composed of the
instructors of the PhD core courses and the
graduate coordinator; the Part II exam is
assessed by the student's PhD committee.
This is assessed by a successful defense of
dissertation and the number and quality of
papers peer-reviewed from dissertation
with quality assessed (to some extent) by
the journals. The student's PhD committee
will assess the defense of the dissertation;
the graduate committee will evaluate the
quality of the dissertations via publications
in high quality journals.

We assess via the oral defense of
dissertation and the dissertation itself. This
is assessed by the student's PhD committee.



The number and quality of papers peer-
reviewed from dissertation with quality
assessed (to some extent) by the journals
in addition to papers published after
graduation. The graduate committee will
evaluate the quality of the dissertations via
publications in high quality journals and the
graduate coordinator and chair will monitor
after graduation publications.
We monitor and record positions taken by
graduates. The graduate committee, along
with the program assistant, will record this
information.



Determination of current employment or
advanced study status by survey of former
PhD degree students and/or their PhD
degree supervisory committee chairs will
result in greater than 90% of students either
appropriately employed in a position that
makes use of their PhD degree are pursuing
further education, such as postdoctoral
training for which their PhD degree is
appropriate stepping stone.
Students will successfully complete one or
more Journal club type courses that require
reading and critical evaluation of scientific
papers, including the presentation and
defense of their evaluation of one or more
papers to a journal club group.



Students will demonstrate competence in
the interpretation and discussion of
scientific papers and other such materials in
both formal and informal discussions within
the laboratory in which they're pursuing
their dissertation research. The assessment
will be made by the faculty member
supervising them in that laboratory.



Students will provide satisfactory
interpretation of the discussion section of
their PhD dissertation that covers both
material from their introduction section,
new knowledge that they themselves
discovered in the course of generating of
their dissertation, and additional material
appearing in the discussion section of their
dissertation. Assessment of satisfactory
performance will be made by the graduate
supervisory committee at the time of the
dissertation defense.
Students will make two or more
presentations and external scientific
meetings and/or continuing education
presentations.

Students will make one or more
presentations before a nonscientific
audience.

Students who successfully complete thePhD
degree will publish at least two papers in
scientific journals as first author

Students will write one or more articles
aimed at general audiences.
Students will pass the knowledge portion of
their PhD qualifying examination.
Students will complete a formal course on
the ethical conduct of research.

Student writings and presentation shall be
free of plagiarism and inappropriate biases
of the data presented.

During the course of their dissertation
research students will learn how to delve
into the original literature, review articles,
databases, and various search engines to
obtain the information they need that is not
available informal lectures. Their
competency in this regard will be assessed
by their research supervisors.




Students will learn the “art” of constructive
criticism by reviewing papers in journal clubs
as well as manuscripts produced by their
peers. Students will learn to accept and
respond to constructive criticism through
criticism of their draft manuscripts by their
peers, supervisors, and co-authors, as well
as criticism provided by referees of
manuscripts they have submitted for
publication in scientific journals. Evaluation
of student progress in this respect will be
provided by their research supervisors.

The graduate Supervisory Committee will
evaluate the outcomes for graduate
education with formal assessments made
through the student's comprehensive
written and oral quallifying (candidacy)
exams and the final dissertation defense
using a rubric designed by the faculty.
The graduate Supervisory Committee will
evaluate the outcomes for graduate
education with formal assessments made
through comprehensive written and oral
qualifying (candidacy) exams and the final
dissertation defense using a rubric designed
by the faculty.

The graduate Supervisory Committee will
evaluate the quality of the student's
research program as presented in the
dissertation seminar, reported in the PhD
dissertation, and discussed during the final
dissertation defense using a rubric designed
by the faculty. Doctoral students also
present research results in the WEC Seminar
Series, and presentations are assessed by
faculty committee using a rubric designed
by the faculty.



The graduate Supervisory Committee will
evaluate the outcomes for graduate
education with formal assessments made
through comprehensive written and oral
qualifying (candidacy) exams and the final
dissertation defense using a rubric designed
by the faculty. Doctoral students also
present research results in the WEC Seminar
Series, and presentations are assessed by
faculty committee using a rubric designed
by the faculty.

Students will adhere to all safety, animal
and human subject guidelines as assessed by
having no IACUC or IRB compliance issues
Students will adhere to the University of
Florida's Honor Code. Faculty will observe a
student's professional behavior during class,
seminars, research work, qualifying
examination, dissertation defense, and
participation in professional societies. These
observations will be shared with the
graduate Supervisory Committee and the
WEC Chair as part of the student's exit
interview and evaluated based on a rubric
developed by the faculty.

Students will demonstrate satisfactory
ability to present the scientific foundation of
their research by passing their qualifying
exam. This will be assessed by their
supervisory committee.

Students will demonstrate the ability to
conduct and present the results of their
research and scholarship by completing
their written thesis and passing an oral
defense of their work. This will be assessed
by their supervisory committee.

Students will have a peer-reviewed
publication in press or published at the time
of graduation.

Students will attend the graduate
orientation seminar that covers aspects of
professional behavior, including ethics.

				
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