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					It Takes A Village
To Raise A Reader
   From Brooklyn Public Library to
      Amagansett Free Library,
        from ECRR to ECRR2
                  - Jeanne McDermott
Overview
• How BPL used ECRR to create Weekend Stories for
  Preschoolers
  • The need
  • ―Selling‖ the program
  • Curriculum
  • Evaluation
  • Findings

• Making the transition from ECRR to ECRR2, from
  Brooklyn to Amagansett
  • The community
  • Ideas
BPL: The confluence of events
• STAFF: "Where have all the preschoolers and their
  parents gone?"

• PARENTS: "I work during the week, so why don't you
  have programs on the weekends when I can bring my
  child?"

• FUNDER: "You have great programs, but they are all
  'drop-in' programs. How can you be sure you are making
  an impact if you only count attendance and you aren't
  tracking how people changed their behavior over time?‖

• PLA/ALSC: Launches Every Child Ready to Read (ECRR)
BPL: The confluence of events
 ECRR provided
   • Research
   • Identified the parent as the child’s best first
     teacher
   • 6 skills / curriculum ideas
   • Goals that could be translated into
     measurement tools
Weekend Stories was conceived:
• A series of 6 sessions for parents and children ages 3-5,
  in 14 BPL locations identified as high-need

• A curriculum and outcome based evaluation (OBE) tools
  were created

• Each session focused on one of the ECRR early literacy
  skills:
   o print motivation
   o letter knowledge
   o vocabulary
   o phonological awareness
   o narrative skills
   o print awareness
BPL: ―Selling‖ the idea

• To the funder

• To the BPL staff

• To community organizations

• To the public
Weekend Stories Curriculum

• Each program includes:
  o Storytime suggestions (books, rhymes, fingerplays and
    songs to share)
  o Tips for parents
  o An activity to promote skills after the program and at
    home
  o Take home sheets
  o A free book
  o Surveys
           What a Day for Word Play!
Introductions: Introduce yourself and the program. Let the children know we are going to be playing
    with words today, reading rhyming books, and having fun with silly sounds.
To the adults: Today we are going to look an important early literacy skill: phonological awareness,
    which is being able to break words into smaller sounds. Singing, rhyming, and playing word games
    all help to develop this skill.

Sing: "Willoughby Wallaby Woo" by Raffi
    Willoughby Wallaby Wee / An elephant sat on me
    Willoughby Wallaby Woo / An elephant sat on you
    Willoughby Wallaby Wommy / An elephant sat on Mommy . . . etc
To the adults: ―Willoughby Wallaby Woo‖ is a fun song to sing with children even though it uses silly
    rhyming words. Research has shown that children who play with the sounds of words are better
    prepared to read when they get to school.

Read/Sing: I Ain't Gonna Paint No More! by Karen Beaumont, illustrated by David Catrow
To the adults: We are reading fun rhyming books today, because rhyming develops phonological
    awareness skills and helps children hear that words can sound alike. This will help when they start
    to read and spell words.

Play a Game: “Say it Fast, Say it Slow”
    Choose a two-syllable word (hotdog, monkey, airplane, etc) for which you have cards made up. Tell
    the child you are going to say the word slow and then say it fast. When you say the word slow,
    clearly separate the two parts of the word clearly (i.e. hot- dog, mon- key, air- plane) and the cards.
    When you say it fast, bring the two pieces of the cards together.
To the adults: This game helps children with ―segmentation,‖ breaking words into smaller sounds. This
    is a part of phonological awareness. Children who can play with the smaller sounds in words
    become stronger readers.
Outcome Based Evaluation (OBE)
Outcomes information was a condition of funding
• Outputs (quantitative)
• Outcomes (impact / qualitative)

   o   Serve 500 adults and 635 children
         50% attend 3 or more programs
         50% increase time spent reading together
         Report an increase in singing, rhyming, playing
         Increase participation in other literacy activities
          (attend other programs at the library)
OBE Tools
• Introductory survey

• Weekly survey

• Program evaluation

• Follow-up phone interviews


KEY: No stories without numbers, no numbers without
stories. (Rensselaerville Institute)
 Findings
• Parents were rarely able to attend all 6 sessions, thus
  learning each of the 6 skills.
• No one reported having a better understanding of the
  skill.
• However, parents reported feeling more comfortable
  with practices:
   – Reading
   – Talking
   – Singing
   – Playing
   – Writing
Findings: Practices
READING:
―The program helped me become more imaginative
    about reading and also putting more action and drama
    into the stories we read.‖
―I learned to be more animated when reading—to not
    only use voices but animate my face.‖

TALKING
―I … interact more with my daughter when reading. I
   have my daughter point things out and we talk.‖
―I don’t force my way through the books. Now I listen to
   [my daughter] when she wants to talk about the
   pictures.‖
Findings: Practices
SINGING
―The program has helped in reading, sharing songs, and
  rhyming more often than before.‖

PLAYING / WRITING
―We play more with letters and words.‖
           What a Day for Word Play!
Introductions: Introduce yourself and the program. Let the children know we are going to be playing
    with words today, reading rhyming books, and having fun with silly sounds.
To the adults: Today we are going to look an important early literacy skill: phonological awareness,
    which is being able to break words into smaller sounds. Singing, rhyming, and playing word games
    all help to develop this skill.

Sing: "Willoughby Wallaby Woo" by Raffi
    Willoughby Wallaby Wee / An elephant sat on me
    Willoughby Wallaby Woo / An elephant sat on you
    Willoughby Wallaby Wommy / An elephant sat on Mommy . . . etc
To the adults: ―Willoughby Wallaby Woo‖ is a fun song to sing with children even though it uses silly
    rhyming words. Research has shown that children who play with the sounds of words are better
    prepared to read when they get to school.

Read/Sing: I Ain't Gonna Paint No More! by Karen Beaumont, illustrated by David Catrow
To the adults: We are reading fun rhyming books today, because rhyming develops phonological
    awareness skills and helps children hear that words can sound alike. This will help when they start
    to read and spell words.

Play a Game: “Say it Fast, Say it Slow”
    Choose a two-syllable word (hotdog, monkey, airplane, etc) for which you have cards made up. Tell
    the child you are going to say the word slow and then say it fast. When you say the word slow,
    clearly separate the two parts of the word clearly (i.e. hot- dog, mon- key, air- plane) and the cards.
    When you say it fast, bring the two pieces of the cards together.
To the adults: This game helps children with ―segmentation,‖ breaking words into smaller sounds. This
    is a part of phonological awareness. Children who can play with the smaller sounds in words
    become stronger readers.
FROM BROOKLYN TO
AMAGANSETT
• Smaller population

• Different demographic
  – Homogenous
  – Higher socio-economical level
  – Higher educational attainment

• Excellent Preschools
ECRR2: Plan of action
Offer parent workshops to
   – Introduce the five early literacy practices and how
     they promote the

   – 6 skills

   – Emphasize the new findings: the difference
     between constrained (letter knowledge,
     phonological awareness, concept of print) and
     unconstrained (vocabulary, background
     knowledge, comprehension)

   – Stress the ―from birth‖ part of ECRR2
ECRR2: Plan of action
• Work-in tips in a broad way in story time and
  throughout the library

• Re-examine how materials in the library are clustered
  to encourage each of the practices

• Introduce more opportunities for activities, for
  example: ―writing‖

• Make ECRR2 information available on the web site
ECRR2: Plan of action
• Look forward to sharing ideas with
  my colleagues!

				
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posted:1/22/2012
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