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					    CULTURAL RESOURCES REPORT COVER SHEET

Author: J. Jeffrey Flenniken and Pam J. Trautman

Title of Report: Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Enhancement
Project Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

Date of Report: May 2011

County: Kitsap

Section 25 & 25, Township 24 North, Range 01 East

Quad:   Bremerton East, Bremerton West

PDF of report submitted (REQUIRED)      Yes

Historic Property Files submitted on WISAARD? Yes

Archaeological Site(s)/Isolate(s) Found or Amended? No

TCP(s) found? No

Replace a draft? No

Satisfy a DAHP Archaeological Excavation Permit requirement? No


DAHP Archaeological Site #:          x Submission of paper copy is required.

                                     x Please submit paper copies of reports
                                       unbound.

                                     x Submission of PDFs is required.

                                     x Please be sure that any PDF submitted to
                                       DAHP has its cover sheet, figures,
                                       graphics, appendices, attachments,
                                       correspondence, etc., compiled into one
                                       single PDF file.

                                     x Please check that the PDF displays
                                       correctly when opened.
                                                       Cultural Resource Survey of
                              City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                                                               Mosquito Fleet Trail
                                          Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

                                                                     Pam Trautman, M.S.
                                        J. Jeffrey Flenniken, Ph.D., Principal Investigator
                                                               Connie Walker-Gray, M.A.




Lithic Analysts Report 1101-3, May 2011

For
GeoEngineers
1101 South Fawcett Avenue, Suite 2000
Tacoma, WA 98402


By
Lithic Analysts
659 Old Dallas Road
Royal, AR 71968-9661
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

AUTHOR:         Pam Trautman, J. Jeffrey Flenniken, Connie Walker-Gray, Lithic Analysts
DATE:           January 2011
LOCATION:       NE and NW, Section 25 and NE 26, Township 24 North, Range 01 East, W. M.
COUNTY:         Kitsap County, Washington
USGS:           Bremerton East and Bremerton West Quadrangles, WA 7.5’ 1981

Executive Summary

The City of Port Orchard Public Works Department proposes to construct a multi-use
trail along the waterfront, generally following the alignment of Bay Street in downtown
Port Orchard, along the southern shore of Sinclair Inlet (Appendix A, All Figures). The
new trail will accommodate bicycle and pedestrian traffic along the waterfront between
ferry terminals located in Annapolis and downtown Port Orchard. It will also provide
recreational opportunities along the waterfront for residents and visitors to the
community.

This portion of the trail will be one part of a comprehensive system of non-motorized
transportation routes that skirt the eastern shoreline of Kitsap County connecting historic
Mosquito Fleet docks along the waterfront from Kingston in the north to Southworth in
the south, connecting the historic docks and shoreline communities along the way
(Macleod Reckord et al. 2001).

The trail construction process involves a determination whether the proposed activity will
adversely affect any cultural resources through compliance with Section 106 of the
National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) of 1966, as amended. Lithic Analysts
conducted background archival research and in-field pedestrian survey of the proposed
project area during the spring of 2010 and January 2011. Twelve structures over 50 years
of age (Table 3) were inventoried and recorded on Department of Archaeology and
Historic Preservation’s (DAHP) historic property inventory (HPI) online database.
Copies of the HPI forms are included as Appendix B. None are eligible for inclusion in
the National Register of Historic Places. Cultural materials were not identified as a result
of this investigation. Lithic Analysts recommends a determination of "no historic
properties" for the project.

Area of Potential Effect (APE) and Project Description

The project is located in the City of Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington. The
proposed trail generally follows the shoreline of Sinclair Inlet in the Puget Sound, from
the Port Orchard Ferry Dock at Sidney Avenue to the Annapolis Foot Ferry Dock where
Bay Street becomes Beach Drive East (Figures 1 – 13). In some locations, the trail will be
immediately adjacent to Bay Street while in other locations it will follow the meanders of
the shoreline more closely where Bay Street remains further inland. The project is located
in the NW ¼ and NE ¼ of Section 25 as well as the NE ¼ of Section 26 in Township 24
North and Range 1 East, W.M. (Figure 1).

The project will primarily be located within existing right-of-way (ROW) associated with
Bay Street in some locations, while other places require purchase of additional ROW

Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                     Page 1
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

and/or other land owner agreements. The Bay Street ROW contains existing
transportation and utility features including a two-lane roadway, overhead utilities
(telephone, electricity, cable) and underground utilities (sanitary sewer, storm sewer and
water). Agreements from property owners for easements have been obtained by the City
in areas where the proposed trail diverges from the Bay Street ROW on parcels not
currently owned by the City. These areas are primarily located in the central segment of
the project, between Blackjack Creek/Etta Turner Park and Waterfront Park (Figures 2a
and 2b). Adjacent properties to the project consist of single-family residences, multi-
family residential buildings and retail/commercial space. In some areas, the only land use
is for transportation along Bay Street adjacent to shorelands (Figures 2c – 2e).

The proposed project will create a multi-use trail along the waterfront in Port Orchard,
extending from the Port Orchard Ferry Terminal to the Annapolis Ferry Dock. The
proposed alignment proceeds east from the Port Orchard Ferry Terminal along an
existing boardwalk (the “marina boardwalk”) toward Waterfront Park (Figure 3). The
trail traverses this park and then continues up the slope to the east to join the Bay Street
right-of-way (ROW) for a short distance before descending back down (north) towards
the waterfront/shoreline in newly acquired ROW associated with Rockwell Avenue
(Figures 2a and 2b). The trail follows the shoreline around the Westbay Shopping Center
(Figure 5) and then spans the mouth of Blackjack Creek via a bridge approximately 125
feet in length of which 100 feet will be over water (Figures 2b and 6). From Etta Turner
Park on the east side of Blackjack Creek, the trail will primarily be located adjacent to the
shoreline all the way to its eastern terminus at the Annapolis Ferry Dock (Figures 2b – e
and 7 – 13). the trail will remain adjacent to Bay Street (Figures 2d and 2e) at locations
where existing residences are built upon overwater structures extending waterward
beyond the ordinary high water mark/mean higher high water (OHWM/MHHW),

Due to spatial constraints between Bay Street and the shoreline, much of the eastern
length of the trail will need to be cantilevered over water and support piles will be
required in a few places. Pile installation and removal is necessary for renovation of an
existing deck that will support the trail in one area and for additional trail support in two
other areas. The area of proposed deck renovations is located at trail station 62+40 to
63+00 where approximately 21 existing wooden and concrete piles of varying sizes
(ranging from 8” to 15” in diameter) will be replaced with 10” diameter steel piles. This
will provide a more efficient support structure resulting in a reduced number of piles.
Approximately eight new piles will be placed below OHWM/MHHW for trail support at
trail station 63+10 to 64+70. At trail station 54+70 to 55+10, three additional new piles
are proposed for trail support between two residential structures. There is also potential to
relocate an existing deck (currently supported by three timber piles) that would require
two additional steel piles. In all, construction of the project will involve the removal of
approximately 21 – 24 existing derelict wooden and concrete piles to be replaced with
approximately 16 – 18 new 10” diameter steel piles.

The new pedestrian bridge foundation will likely consist of four 16” diameter steel piles
(two each side) placed in upland locations within existing fill, with a concrete foundation.
In addition, a utility pole and two guy anchors will be relocated and replaced in-kind.

Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                     Page 2
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

Beginning at the western terminus of the project at the Port Orchard Ferry Terminal, the
proposed trail will be constructed on an existing boardwalk elevated over the shoreline
environment (Figure 2a and 3). At the east end of the boardwalk, the trail will enter
Waterfront Park and will be located landward of the shoreline environment. The trail will
traverse this park and then ascend the slope to the southeast to join Bay Street within
existing ROW (Figures 2a and 4).

The proposed trail will descend from the Bay Street ROW toward the shoreline
environment at Rockwell Avenue in newly-acquired ROW. There will also be improved
public access to the existing beach provided at this location, as well as four new public
parking spots (Figures 2a and 4). From Rockwell Avenue to Blackjack Creek, the
shoreline is generally very abrupt and defined by riprap armoring placed on fill material,
with a few exceptions (Figures 2b and 5). There is a 200-foot section of shoreline just
east of the Rockwell Avenue ROW with some landscaped vegetation (mowed grass and
ornamental shrubs) above the riprap armoring. Other than this area, the shoreline buffer
has generally been cleared with bare ground, pavement and buildings positioned right up
to the edge of the riprap revetment and only minor amounts of mowed grass and weedy
roadside vegetation.

The trail will span Blackjack Creek via a new pedestrian bridge (Figures 2b and 6).
Existing conditions at the bridge location include historical fill and riprap-armored
shoreline with a thin buffer of weedy vegetation (primarily grasses) above the riprap
between the creek and adjacent shopping center developments as well as some
landscaping associated with Etta Turner Park.

East of Blackjack Creek (Figures 2b – 2e), the proposed trail will be located immediately
adjacent to the shoreline to the eastern project terminus at the Annapolis Ferry Dock
(Figures 7 – 13). For the 600 feet northeast of Blackjack Creek, the shoreline is separated
from Bay Street by the Westbay Shopping Center (Figure 2c). The shoreline in this area
is comprised of riprap for most of its length with a 200-foot public-access beach lacking
bank armoring and comprised of sandy beach substrate with some large woody
debris. East of the beach, the trail will re-join the Bay Street ROW immediately adjacent
to the shoreline. Shoreline conditions from here to the eastern terminus are armored with
riprap or concrete bulkhead (Figures 7 – 12). Several residential structures over 50 years
of age (Table 3) are also present, located on fill material or overwater structures
waterward of the historical shoreline.

National Historic Preservation Act (NRHP)

The objective of this inventory is to assist the landowner in compliance Section 106 of
the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended. This review involves a
determination whether the proposed activity will adversely affect any cultural resources
through compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA)
of 1966, as amended. Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 27.53.060 provides protection
of cultural resources on private and public lands in the State of Washington. In addition,
36 CFR Part 800 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires that any
Federal agency having direct or indirect jurisdiction over a proposed Federal or Federally

Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                     Page 3
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

assisted undertaking, or issuing licenses or permits, must consider the effect of the
proposed undertaking on historic properties. Section 106 of 36 CFR 800 provides the
process by which this must be accomplished.

Traditional Cultural Properties (TCPs) are recognized as eligible for inclusion in the
NRHP because of “association with cultural practices or beliefs of a living community
that (a) are rooted in that community’s history, and (b) are important in maintaining the
continuing cultural identity of the community” (NPS Bulletin 38).

To determine if the project area contains any significant cultural deposits eligible for the
NRHP, an extensive investigation was conducted for the project area. This investigation
included archival research and a systematic on-ground cultural resource survey of the
proposed project APE. Lithic Analysts conducted background research and in-field
pedestrian survey of the proposed project area during the spring of 2010 and January
2011.

Environmental Setting

The project area is located in the Puget Trough Province, one of 15 regional
physiographic provinces. These provinces are broad stratifications of relatively
homogeneous areas used to designate geographic areas in the Pacific Northwest. The
Puget Trough Province extends the entire length of Washington and beyond into Oregon
and the Willamette Valley. The Puget Sound basin in the northern portion of the
province, including the project APE, was formed by a series of glaciations that occurred
over several epochs, the last about 11,000 B.P. The Vashon glaciation occurred most
recently, with a terminal moraine that extended about 16 miles south of Olympia. This
last glaciation formed the geology and topography of the entire area (Franklin and
Dyrness 1973).

Much of the project APE is located within imported fill. The upland areas of the APE not
within fill are classified by the Soil Survey of Kitsap County Area as “63—Urbanland-
Alderwood Complex” found on beaches and low terraces on broad uplands, formed in
glacial till. Those portions of this complex that are not urban are very gravely loam.
Moderately deep and well drained above a hard pan. Permeability of the soil is
moderately rapid above the hard pan, but slow in the hard pan. Native vegetation consists
of mixed conifers and hardwoods. The native soils nearby are “16—Hartstine gravelly
sandy loam” formed in sandy glacial till and found at elevations from 0 to 400 feet along
drainageways. The surface layer of soil is “very dark grayish brown gravelly sandy loam
about ½ inch thick. The subsoil is brown and dark yellowish brown gravelly sandy loam
about 32 inches thick. The substratum is grayish brown, strongly-silica-cemented
gravelly loamy sand about 5 inches thick over compact, weakly cemented glacial till
(McMurphy 1980).




Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                     Page 4
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

Ethnographic Context

Culturally, the project area is located within the Northwest Coast cultural area extending
from California to Alaska in the traditional territory of several Native American tribes
with shared language similarities who are referred to as the Southwestern Coast Salish.

The Southwestern Coast Salish also share a similar culture including subsistence, mode
of travel and transportation, clothing and adornment, construction techniques and other
technology, as well as similar social and political organizations, religion and
ceremonialism. Permanent villages were located along the shores of local rivers, bays and
lakes—almost always on the water’s edge, salt or fresh water. Villages were made up of a
single line of houses within a few paces of the high water mark and accessible by canoe.
The houses were in full view of the canoes beached on the shore. Canoes were central to
their lives and provided transportation from place to place over water, thus avoiding the
difficult, dense and wet undergrowth of the forest (Hadja 1990, Storm 1991). Generally,
Southwestern Coast Salish people lived and hunted in the open coastal shores, rivers and
their tributaries and the sheltered waters of the many saltwater shores. Water defined their
lives as these areas provided an abundance of salmon and other fish and shellfish, which
were a mainstay in their diet. This was supplemented by land mammals and local edible
plants such as crabapples, several kinds of roots, cow parsnip and berries. Other foods,
such as camas were obtained through trade with other tribes.

The earliest inhabitants of the area were the ancestors of the Suquamish many of whom
today reside on the Port Madison Indian Reservation. Their traditional territory in Central
Puget Sound extends from “Gig Harbor north to Appletree Cove, between Hood Canal
and Admiralty Inlet as far south as Case and Carr Inlets, and on Black, Bainbridge, and
Whidbey Islands”. Their language is Lushootseed. The Suquamish had many autonomous
winter villages, including the best-known one at Suqua on the shores of Agate Passage,
the location of Old Man House. Old Man House was a large communal house about 500
feet by 60 feet in which several families lived. This house was burned by federal agents
in the 1870s. Chief Seattle and Chief Kitsap both lived at Old Man House. Today, the
Suquamish are planning a new community house in the tradition of Old Man House
(Ruby and Brown 1992, Suquamish Tribe 2011). They also had many seasonal temporary
camps for fishing, hunting and berry gathering. The name of their principal village,
Suqua, translates to “clear salt water” and they are therefore, “people of the clear salt
water”. They are well-known for their traditional basket making. The arrival of George
Vancouver to Bainbridge Island marked the earliest Suquamish contact with non-native
people (Suquamish Tribe 2011).

The Squamish have many Lushootseed, or Puget Salish, place names in the area. Just
west of Ross Creek which is west of the project area is a blunt promontory named
Tc3lcadxu which means “a star” and the creek itself was referred to as Ca’bdup, “dry
ground” which also may have been the word used for Blackjack Creek. Before the town
was dredged and filled, there was a long spit in front with white shells. The spit is gone
and shells are covered with mud. The Lushootseed name for the promontory above the
center of town was Qw3Eq3ks, or “white point”. The first creek east of town,


Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                     Page 5
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

Tciya’tclbEd, was known be frequented by wild men who caught salmon there. The
upper or west end of Sinclair Inlet was referred to as “rolling logs to the water” probably
because canoe timbers were cut on this flat area. One informant stated this was the same
term applied to the inlet as a whole. Many other Lushootseed names line the waters, bays
and harbors of the traditional Suquamish territory (Waterman 2001).

Sinclair Inlet was utilized by the Suquamish for procurement of many resources including
berries, many diverse species of shellfish and fish as well as mammals such as deer. The
only archaeological site recorded along the shoreline of Sinclair Inlet is known as the Bay
Street Midden. It is located about 1400 meters southwest of the west end of the project
APE near the Port Orchard City Hall. The site was located near the edge of the bluff top,
and refuse would have been over the edge to the base of the slope below. Midden
deposits also suggest that the adjacent beach surface was used for clam and fish
processing. This site likely predates the ethnohistoric period (Lewarch 1998).

The city of Seattle is named after the most well-known Suquamish/Duwamish Chief who
helped the early pioneers survive in their new and unfamiliar environment. Once the
Oregon Donation Land Claim Act was enacted, non-native settlers rushed into the area.
They began building sawmills, first along the water, then inland, to harvest the great
stands of timber. The Suquamish had to quickly adapt to the changes happening before
their eyes. In order to make a living, many Suquamish cut and delivered logs to nearby
mills. A mere four years after the city of Seattle was founded Territorial Governor Isaac
Stevens began the treaty-making process with the tribes of the Pacific Northwest. The
Suquamish signed the Treaty of Point Elliott whereby relinquishing title to much of the
land in return for the “acknowledgement and protection of their fishing and hunting
rights, health care, education” as well as the Port Madison Indian Reservation. Many
tribes, unhappy with the treaties, took up arms against the settlers the military, but the
Suquamish under Chief Seattle stayed home and did not participate in the attack the
people living at Elliot Bay. In gratitude, the people named the city after him. Many
stresses have been placed on the Suquamish people by actions of the U.S. Government in
the ensuing years, but they have persevered despite this and recently have been
experiencing a cultural revival which includes plans to rebuild Old Man House,
mentioned above (Suquamish 2011).

Historic Context

First contact with non-natives occurred when Captain George Vancouver sailed the
waters of Puget Sound in 1792. Ship’s clerk and surveyor, Harry Masterman Orchard,
first noted the entrance to the large natural harbor that Vancouver named after him. Over
58 years later, timber barons descended into the area to log the vast stands of timber
located there. The first lumber mill was established there in 1854 by William Renton. The
earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent
residence in 1885. A relative of Clines, Frederick Stevens, platted the town in 1886 on
88.5 acres he had purchased. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but
later the name was changed to Port Orchard. The Cline’s influence on the establishment
and success of the community in the early days cannot be overstated. Cline opened the
town’s first storey, then a partnership in a fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post

Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                     Page 6
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded the Kitsap County’s first
newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important businesses
such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early
streets of Seattle. (Hinchliff 2010).

Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after,
the name was changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.

Thomas Cline’s wharf was constructed at a time when, for the most part, roads did not
exist in Kitsap County. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major
transportation corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999). The Sinclair
Inlet and surrounding vicinity was the home of many small communities besides Sydney
such as Charleston, Retsil, Annapolis, Waterman, Manchester and Olalla. Steamer
services began in 1888, about the time that Cline first constructed his wharf, and business
was brisk. There were so many vessels of all sizes running here and there across the
water that people thought they looked like a swarm of mosquitoes, and the fleet of
steamers became known as the Mosquito Fleet. Wharves and docks sprung up along the
waterfront in the region to facilitate the transport of settlers and troops, with a wide
assortment of produce, livestock, machinery, timber, mail, and construction products and
equipment. A foot ferry still operates today connecting Port Orchard with Annapolis and
Bremerton (CPO n.d., Johnson 1999). Regular passenger and freight service continued
into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies remained in the ferry
industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County Transportation
Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in
1935 by a debilitating strike. Eventually in 1951, the State of Washington took over ferry
service in all but one Puget Sound Navigation Company route, the Port Angeles to
Victoria Black Ball route (WSDOT n.d.).

Sydney incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in
Kitsap County. One of the early matters taken up by the newly formed town government
was what to do about the streets. Basically, there were none. At the time Bay Street was
inundated by tidewater twice a day. Two creeks flowing into Sinclair Inlet, Blackjack
Creek and Pottery Creek, essentially divided the town into three parts. First project was to
grade Sydney Hill, placing fill in an area 16 feet wide and several blocks long at the base
of the hill and provide a level downtown area to Harrison Street. A trolley railroad was
once located from Rockwell Avenue over a salt march to Blackjack Creek, east of
Rockwell. Grading continued over the years. The salt marsh between Rockwell and
Harrison was filled creating more business area and necessitate the construction of a
bridge over Blackjack Creek. Rockwell was known locally as Sand Cut Hill. Sand from
this cut would wash hundreds of tons of sand across Bay Street whenever there were
heavy rains. Eventually the road was blacktopped and gutters installed, which alleviated
the problem (CPO n.d., Hinchcliff 2010).



Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                     Page 7
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

Port Madison was the original seat of Kitsap County, a severe slump in the lumber
industry left the town nearly uninhabited. Sydney was then able to wrest the honor from
Port Madison by popular vote 1893 in an election fraught with controversy. To secure the
plan, citizens of Sydney donated land, constructed the courthouse and deeded the
completed building to Kitsap County (Hinchliff 2010).

After much study by the United States government, the Port Orchard Naval Yard was
located about one mile across Sinclair Inlet from Sydney in 1894. The shipyard, today
called the Puget Sound Naval Yard, provided jobs and profits to the local area, all the
while contributing to increasing population over the years (Hinchliff 2010).

Two localities petitioned the state Legislature for the name of Port Orchard. Sydney
wanted the name because of Syndey’s connection with Port Orchard Bay. But, the town
of Charleston, which had been known as Port Orchard, petitioned first so the petition to
Sydney was denied. Not to be thwarted, Sydney tried another tactic petitioning the U.S.
Post Office Department for a name change to the Port Orchard Post Office. This was
granted, and the U.S. Navy started routing mail through Port Orchard. After several years
of confusion, negotiations and another petition to the Legislature in 1902-1903, Sydney
became Port Orchard officially (Hinchliff 2010).

The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in
1895, and Port Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Telephones, electricity, and city
water were in full force by the early part of the 20th Century, even though cattle could
still roam the streets as long as their cowbells were removed between the hours of 9 p.m.
and 5 a.m. The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard contributed to the economic stability of Port
Orchard through World War I and World War II. It remains a larger employer of
residents of the town today. Other residents commute to Seattle and Tacoma. Port
Orchard draws many visitors during the summer to enjoy its pretty setting along the
harbor (Hinchliff 2010).

The Retsil Veteran’s Home at Annapolis was completed and opened on February 22,
1910. This facility was originally constructed for Civil War veterans and their wives after
fierce competition between the towns of Port Orchard and Anacortes. In the days before
social security and the advances of medical science, Civil War veterans suffered from
both physical and emotional scars of the battles they fought. After the monetary crises of
1906-1907, veterans were in more dire straights, so the state legislature enacted the
Enabling Act of 1907 that established the Washington Veteran’s Home. The facility was
constructed on the hill above Sinclair Inlet. Improvements and additions were made
through the years, and a hospital was formally opened in 1929. The next decade brought
continued expansion of the Veteran’s Home and a cemetery. Today, ten buildings are
situated there. Member population now includes veterans from many wars. The first
Vietnam veteran was admitted in 1976 (Bogumill 1980).




Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                     Page 8
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

Archival Research

DAHP Archival Research – Local Previously Recorded Archaeological Sites

An archival file and literature research was conducted of all documentation relevant to
the project area. A search was conducted of archaeological records pertaining to the
project vicinity and housed at the Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation
(DAHP) in Olympia. The DAHP database, site forms, GIS and standing files revealed
that previously recorded archaeological sites are not located within the project APE. To
date, Traditional Cultural Properties (TCPs) are not recorded or documented at DAHP
within the project area or vicinity that have been evaluated for Bulletin 38 criteria (NPS
1996).

However, two previously recorded archaeological sites are located very near the proposed
project area, one at each end of this section of the trail. One site, 45KP115 (Table 1), is a
shell midden located near the western terminus of the project APE (Lewarch and
Forsman 1998). The site has been determined eligible for inclusion in the NRHP
(Lewarch et al. 1998). It was initially noted during preliminary geotechnical work for the
new City of Port Orchard Municipal Building. Subsequent archaeological data recovery
excavations revealed cultural deposits on the top of the bluff and at the toe of the slope
below the bluff. This pre-contact shell midden contained evidence of three broad
occupational periods between approximately 130 and 800 years ago (Lewarch et al.
2002). Another site, 45KP140, is a pre-contact burial located near the eastern terminus of
the proposed Mosquito Fleet Trail (Schumacher 2004). This site was identified during
mechanical cutting of the hillside slope during a construction project. Post discovery
investigations resulted in the recovery of additional remains. All remains appear to
represent a single individual. Their condition suggests they were heavily disturbed long
before discovery in 2004. They were transferred to the Suquamish Tribe and interred in a
cementer on the Port Madison Reservation (Schumacher and Hartmann 2005).

Table 1. Recorded archaeological sites within one-half mile of APE.
Year Author                 Site #           Site Type
1998   Lewarch, Dennis      45KP115          Shell Midden
2004   Schumacher, James    45KP140          Burial, Pre-contact

DAHP Archival Research—Previous Cultural Resource Surveys in Vicinity

Sixteen cultural resource surveys have been conducted within one-half mile of the
proposed project APE. Two of those surveys were conducted as a result of inadvertent
discoveries (Lewarch et al. 2002, Schumacher and Hartmann 2005). Archaeological
deposits were not noted in the other survey projects. A segment of the Mosquito Fleet
Trail APE at the eastern end of the project was previously surveyed for cultural resources
in 2004 by Western Shore Heritage Services, Inc. The author concluded that the project
would “primarily occur close to the modern surface or in modern fill material
immediately adjacent to Bay Street” and that properties eligible for inclusion in the
NRHP are not located in the project APE or the immediate vicinity (Hartmann 2004).


Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                     Page 9
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

General Land Office Maps and Land Use of Project Area

The Donation Land Act of 1850 was instrumental in encouraging settlement in the
region. This law granted a half section (320 acres) of public land to each male American
citizen 18 years or older. A wife could receive an additional half section in her name. In
order to prove up, the homesteader must occupy, cultivate, and improve the land for four
years before title was granted.

The first U.S. Department of Interior General Land Office (GLO) cadastral survey was
implemented beginning with the setting of the Willamette Meridian. The township, range,
and section lines for Township 24 North, Range 01 East were set in the current project
area in 1858 (USSG 1884) and certified by the U. S. Department of Interior in 1884.
Structures were not noted in the project APE. The Master Title Index indicates that land
first left the public domain in 1872 in Section 25 and in 1875 in Section 26 (BLM 2004).
This corroborates historical documentation that the area was not settled until just before
1885 when Port Orchard was platted (Hinchcliff 2010).

Table 2. Cultural resource survey reports within one-half mile of APE.
Year Author           Title
                       Data Recovery Excavations at the Bay Street Shell Midden
2002 Lewarch, et al.   (45KP115), Kitsap County, Washington
                       Kitsap County Administration Building Archaeological Resources
2003 Kaehler, et al.   Assessment
                       Cultural Resources Assessment of the Port Orchard Intermodal
2004 Hartmann          Terminal
                       Cultural Resources Assessment of the Port Orchard Bay Street
2004 Hartmann          Pedestrain Path
                       Recovery of Human Remains Identified at the Port Orchard
2005 Schumacher        Wastewater Treatment Plant
                       Archaeological Monitoring for the Sinclair Inlet Marina Pile Project,
2006 Chambers          Port Orchard, Washington
                       Archaeological Survey for Veterans Memorial Park Ball Field
2006 Schumacher        Improvements, Kitsap County
                       Cultural Resources Survey for Karcher Creek Reclaimed Water
2007 Schumacher        Distribution System, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington
                       SR 166 Sidney Avenue Signal Replacement, Port Orchard, CRP
2008 Kiers             Report No. 08-14
     Schwab &          Cultural Resources Survey, WSDOT, Sidney Avenue Signal
2008 Kiers             Replacement, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington
                       Data Recovery Excavations at the Bay Street Shell Midden
2002 Lewarch, et al.   (45KP115), Kitsap County, Washington
                       Kitsap County Administration Building Archaeological Resources
2003 Kaehler, et al.   Assessment
                       Cultural Resources Assessment of the Port Orchard Intermodal
2004 Hartmann          Terminal
                       Cultural Resources Assessment of the Port Orchard Bay Street
2004 Hartmann          Pedestrain Path
                       Recovery of Human Remains Identified at the Port Orchard
2005 Schumacher        Wastewater Treatment Plant

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     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington


Expectations

A segment of the APE for the Mosquito Fleet Trail located at the eastern end of the
project was previously surveyed for cultural resources in 2004 by Western Shore
Heritage Services, Inc. The author concluded that the project would “primarily occur
close to the modern surface or in modern imported fill material immediately adjacent to
Bay Street” and that properties eligible for inclusion in the NRHP are not located in the
project APE or the immediate vicinity (Hartmann 2004). In addition, the project APE is
located on fill or previously disturbed streets and sidewalks. In view of this information
revealed in the archival research, it was determined that the project APE has a low
probability for the discovery of archaeological resources, but structures older than 50
years of age are likely to be located in the project APE.

Methods

The entire Mosquito Fleet Trail APE (Figures 1 and 2a-e) was surveyed by two
archaeologists, J. Jeffrey Flenniken and Pam Trautman, walking two to five meter
meandering transects. The weather was cloudy and rainy. The completion of the
pedestrian survey confirmed that the project APE passes through areas with low
probability for archaeological resources. The pedestrian survey commenced at the
western end of the APE in the parking lot west of Seattle Avenue, and proceeded
eastward to the project terminus (Figures 3 – 13).

The entire length of the Mosquito Fleet Trail APE, which generally comprises the ground
surface between Bay Street and the shoreline, appears to be highly disturbed and
composed mostly of modern fill and rip-rap. The waterfront area on both sides of
Blackjack Creek and behind existing buildings (Comfort Inn, St. Vincent De Paul, Bay
Ford, Westbay Building etc.) appears to be modern fill covered with rip-rap. Both banks
of the mouth of Blackjack Creek in the areas of the proposed new trail bridge also appear
altered, filled, and covered with rip-rap. Northeast of the Westbay Shopping Center, the
APE parallels the exposed and rip-rap armored shoreline of Sinclair Inlet, in between the
shoreline and Bay Street. The exposed shoreline in this area also exhibited modern trash
such as glass, metal, plastic, bricks, etc., and most likely results from fill pushed into
Sinclair Inlet to provide a wider area for the construction of Bay Street. The eastern end
of the APE, between the ninety degree turn to the east and the end of the project is
situated between Bay Street on the south and numerous buildings on the north. From the
ninety degree turn to the east, the elevation increased and few exposed areas were noted.

All exposed surface areas (flower beds, play areas, shoreline, cut banks, beaches, vacant
lot [west and adjacent to the Comfort Inn], etc.) were closely examined for indications of
historic and prehistoric artifacts, as well as for evidence (shell, bone, black soil, etc.) of
remnant prehistoric shell middens.

To identify potential historic properties (structures) within the APE, a reconnaissance-
level field study was conducted. DAHP defines reconnaissance-level surveys as “visual


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     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

or predictive surveys that identify the general distribution, location, and nature of cultural
resources within a given area” (DAHP 2010). The survey generally does not include
ownership information; historic use or name of the property; the study unit theme
(provided in the HPI forms); the names of the architect, builder, or engineer; an in-depth
statement of significance; or a bibliography. The survey involved examining and
photographing every building within the APE that was determined to be constructed
before 1960 (Table 3). Construction and building information was provided by the Kitsap
County Assessor’s database. Construction and building information was provided by the
Kitsap County Assessor database.

Results and Recommendations

Systematic archival research for the Mosquito Fleet Trail Project revealed that recorded
archaeological sites or other cultural resources are not previously recorded in the project
APE. Historic and prehistoric artifacts were not found within the Mosquito Fleet Trail
APE.

There are twelve buildings within the APE that were constructed prior to 1970. None are
recommended eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). All
of the buildings within the APE have been significantly modified to the point that they no
longer retain sufficient integrity to convey their historic significance. All the buildings
evaluated here are located on the sliver of land between Bay Street and the Sinclair Inlet.
The majority of these buildings were constructed in the 1930s and 1940s, with the
exception of one highly modified building constructed in 1910, another built in 1907, and
a building constructed in 1955. Table 3 (Appendix B) provides an overview of these
structures. An overview of the physical description and integrity of each property is also
provided in the table. Each property has been recorded on the Department of DAHP
historic property inventory (HPI) online database. Copies of the HPI forms are included
as Appendix B.

1001 Bay Street (Figure 2a)
This two-story house was constructed in 1907. It is built on pilings over the Sinclair Inlet.
It features horizontal wood siding, vinyl sliding and fixed-pane sash, and a slight front-
gabled composition shingle roof. The house has been highly modified since its original
construction. The facade that faces the street includes a recessed ground-level walkway
that leads to side doors. The second story features an unadorned wall, with the exception
of four quadrangle windows beneath the gable peak. This view of the building also
includes the detached gabled, wood clad, two-car garage. The side facades include sliding
vinyl sash, and wood railings along the first floor. The facade facing the water includes
large fixed and sliding vinyl sash, a large wood deck with railings, and partially covered
porches. It appears that the house been added onto over time, and all windows and doors
have been replaced. The porch, deck, and railings are unoriginal.

This house retains little integrity of materials, design, workmanship, or feeling. It is not
recommended eligible for listing in the NRHP.



Lithic Analysts                                                                      May 2011
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     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

1021 Bay Street (Figure 2a)
Constructed in 1932, this is a gabled single story building built on pilings over the
Sinclair Inlet. The house has been modified since its period of construction. It is clad with
horizontal wood siding, has a steeply, slightly flared side gabled composition shingle
roof, and varied fenestration, including some original pairs of six-light casement wood
sash, other multi-light wood sash, and fixed-pane aluminum sash windows. The house is
located down below the street, and the primary entry is sheltered by a gabled roof
supported by wood columns. A secondary entry is also visible and is behind by an
aluminum screen door. The main door is obscured. Around the house on the street side is
a wood porch and walkway.

The water side of the house is dominated by a large enclosed addition with large, fixed-
pane aluminum sash windows. Also a large, non-original wrap-around deck spans this
side of the house.

1693 Bay Street (Figure 2d)
Constructed in 1935, this is a small, one-bedroom building built on pilings over the
Sinclair Inlet. It is a single story building with horizontal wood siding (two different
types), a mostly flat composition roof that slopes gently toward the water, and varied
fenestration, including fixed-pane wood sash and one-over-one vinyl sash. The recessed
entry is located at the northeast corner of the house, sheltered by a flat overhanging roof
supported by an unadorned wood beam. A large shed roof deck spans the entire
waterfront (west) façade. The south façade is dominated by a narrow deck that is likely
used for watercraft storage.

This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or
workmanship. Many of the windows have been replaced with vinyl sash, the siding on
the western half of the building does not appear to be original, and the large deck has
been modified. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it does
not retain sufficient integrity.

1699 Bay Street (Figure 2d)
Constructed in 1930, this is a one and a half story house constructed largely on pilings
over the Sinclair Inlet. It has a horizontal wood siding, varied vinyl sash, and a side-
gabled composition roof, which slopes down to a flat-roof addition on the waterfront
(west) façade. There is a wrap-around porch along the entire south and west facades. The
entry is on the Bay Street (east) façade. A small, square, flat-roofed addition has been
built on the south side of the house to connect it with the adjacent garage. The garage and
addition feature the same siding as the primary house, single-light window openings, and
composition roof shingles. The garage has a large double-door vehicle opening.

This house has been highly modified, and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or
workmanship. The windows are not original, and the floor plan has been modified with
additions on the north and west elevations. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in
the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient integrity.



Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
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     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

1763 Bay Street (Figure 2e)
Constructed in 1943, this two story house is constructed on a concrete slab over pilings
over the Sinclair Inlet. It is clad with horizontal wood siding, has vinyl slider and fixed
pane windows, and a front-gable composition roof. The entry is flush against the east
façade, with a small projecting shelter unsupported by pillars or columns. Fenestration is
varied, and asymmetrical. The waterfront (west) side of the house includes an enclosed
porch and has a full-façade concrete slab patio. A large single-story flat roof garage with
a paneled door has been added to the south end of the house.

This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or
workmanship. Some windows have been replaced, and the north and rear additions are
not original. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it does not
retain sufficient integrity.

1777 Bay Street (Figure 2e)
This building is currently occupied by Venture Charters, a fishing boat charter business.
Constructed in 1938, this one and a half story house is constructed partially on pilings
over the Sinclair Inlet. The house is clad with horizontal wood siding, has replacement
vinyl sliding and fixed pane windows, and a cross-gabled composition roof. The front
entry is asymmetrically located on the east façade and is accessed by a modern wood
deck with lattice and a corrugated metal shed roof. The west façade was not visible from
the street.

This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or
workmanship. Nearly all of the windows have been replaced, and entry porch has been
highly modified. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it
does not retain sufficient integrity.

1803/1805 Bay Street (Figure 2e)
Constructed in 1935, this building was built on the sliver of land between Bay Street and
the Sinclair Inlet. This house is clad with both horizontal and vertical wood siding,
features vinyl sash in a varied fenestration pattern, and an irregular roof line, including
gabled, pyramid, and hipped. A large second story addition is visible from the street. A
prominent brick chimney is visible on the west elevation. Although the front façade is
largely blocked by a six-foot fence, the entry is visible on the south façade, and appears
to feature a nine-light door behind an aluminum screen door. A single-car hipped-roof
garage with a paneled door is attached to the east side of the house. The north, waterfront
façade is not visible from the public right of way.

This house has been highly modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or
workmanship, or feeling. The house has been modified with a large second-story
addition, new windows, multiple rooflines, and some replacement siding. It is not
recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient
integrity.




Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                    Page 14
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

1811 Bay Street (Figure 2e)
Constructed in 1940, this building was built on the sliver of land between Bay Street and
the Sinclair Inlet. It is a one and a half story house clad with aluminum siding with one
over one vinyl windows and a front gable roof. The front (east) façade is dominated by a
large single-story flat composition front gabled roof garage, which extends
perpendicularly from and attaches to the house. The south façade also includes the front
entry which is sheltered by a composition shed overhang that is also attached to the
garage. The north façade is not easily visible from the public right of way, but appears to
be a full façade deck or open porch.

This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or
workmanship. The siding and windows are likely unoriginal, and the form has been
modified when the garage was extended to attach to the house. It does not meet NRHP
eligibility criteria, and is not recommended NRHP eligible.

1825 Bay Street (Figure 2e)
Constructed in 1936, this building was built on the sliver of land between Bay Street and
the Sinclair Inlet. It is a small, single story house clad in stucco with vinyl one-over-one
windows flanked by wood shutters, an overhanging gable with an enclosed portico
pathway leading to the entry, and a composition front gabled roof. Only the front façade
is visible from the public right of way.

This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or
workmanship. The cladding and windows are not original. It is not recommended as
eligible for listing in the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient integrity.

1833 Bay Street (Figure 2e)
Constructed in 1955, this multi-family dwelling unit was built on the sliver of land
between Bay Street and the Sinclair Inlet. It is a two story apartment building clad with
multiple materials, including Roman brick, concrete, and horizontal and diagonal wood
siding. It has a flat composition roof. The windows are three-light vinyl sash and the
entries are slightly recessed and accessed by three steps. The waterfront side of the house
includes a full-façade second story wood deck supported by thin, unadorned beams.

This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or
workmanship. The horizontal and diagonal wood siding does not appear to be original.
The windows also have likely been replaced. It is not recommended as eligible for listing
in the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient integrity.

1883 Bay Street (Figure 2e)
Constructed in 1935, this commercial building was built on the sliver of land between
Bay Street and the Sinclair Inlet. The resource has a primary building, which was the
original commercial building, flanked by attached garage structures. The primary
building is single story clad in wood siding with a flat composition roof. The entry door
is in the center of the building flanked by four large storefront windows, two on each
side. All these windows appear to be single-pane sash except the one immediately left of


Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
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     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

the door, which is three-light. Above the door and storefront windows are covered
transoms. Wall cladding gives the appearance of a cornice. To the left of the primary
building is a single-bay garage structure and to the right is a double-bay garage structure.
All feature horizontal wood siding. Two of the garage doors appear to be sided shut, but
the one to the far right still opens. The right bay has had part of its siding removed on the
side exterior wall, revealing varied windows.

This building has been highly modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials,
or workmanship. The primary building has had its storefront windows replaced and the
transom windows covered. The garage structures are newer than the primary building,
and have significantly altered the building footprint. It is not recommended as eligible for
listing in the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient integrity.

1961 Bay Street (Figure 2e)
Constructed in 1910, the commercial building was built on the sliver of land between Bay
Street and Sinclair Inlet. The building is single-story with a prominent false front, and is
clad with Roman brick and horizontal wood siding. Behind the false front is a
composition hipped roof. The storefront windows are large fixed-pane aluminum sash,
and the recessed entry door is asymmetrically situated on the front (south) façade. Above
the storefront windows and door are covered transom windows. The false front is clad
with wood boards and sheets with a wood kayak attached for signage.

This building has been highly modified and does not retain integrity of feeling, design,
materials, or workmanship. The building’s original form is almost unidentifiable from the
public right of way; the false front, replaced storefront windows and doors, Roman brick,
and covered transoms completely obscure the original wood clad, hipped roof building
behind it. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it does not
retain sufficient integrity.

Cultural Resources Eligible for the NRHP Recorded or Observed: None

Thus, it is determined that “no historic properties” will be impacted by this project. Any
utility installation or upgrades or any improvements by private property landowners in
the APE may proceed. Further cultural resources work is not needed.

However, if archaeological deposits are encountered at any time during the course of
ground-disturbing or other construction activity, work should stop immediately, the area
secured, and an archaeologist should be called to assess the situation. The Department of
Archaeology and Historic Preservation and appropriate tribes should be notified.

A copy of this report should be forwarded to the Department of Archaeology and Historic
Preservation in Olympia. Survey notes and photographs of this cultural resource
assessment are kept on file at Lithic Analysts.




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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

References Cited

Bogumill, Donna
   2005 Washington Veterans Home 1910 – 1980, 70th Anniversary Historical
          Summary. Prepared for State of Washington, Department of Veterans Affairs,
          Washington Veterans Home.

Bozanich, Mark
   2009 Highways of Washington State. Electronic document, available on-line at
          www.anglefire.com/was/hwysofwastate. Assessed December 2009.

BLM (Bureau of Land Management)
  2004 Master Title Index for Township 24 North, Range 01 West, Willamette
         Meridian. Records available on-line at the U.S. Bureau of Land Management,
         www.blm.gov/or/landrecords/survey/ySrvy1.php. Accessed January 2011.

CPO (City of Port Orchard)
  n.d. “Historic Port Orchard: Discover Port Orchard”. Electronic article available
          online at www.citofportorchard.us/historic portorchard.

Franklin, J. F., and C. T. Dyrness
   1973 Natural Vegetation of Oregon and Washington. Pacific Northwest Forest and
            Range Experiment Station, U.S. Forest Service, Portland, Oregon.

Hajda, Y.
   1990 Southwestern Coast Salish in Northwest Coast, edited by Wayne Suttles.
          Handbook of North American Indians, vol. 17, W. C. Sturtevant, general
          editor, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Hartmann, Glenn
   2004 Cultural Resources Assessment of the Port Orchard Bay Street Pedestrian
          Path. Letter Report 0410A-2 to Bruce Stirling, GeoEngineers, Inc., from
          Western Shore Heritage Services, Inc., Bainbridge Island.

Hinchliff, Catherine
   2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at
            www.historylink.org. Accessed January 2011.

Johnson, Larry E.
   1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at
          www.historylink.org. Accessed January 2011.

Kirk, Ruth, and Carmela Alexander
   1990 Exploring Washington’s Past: A Road Guide to History. University of
           Washington Press. Seattle



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     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

Lewarch, Dennis, Lynn L. Larson, and Leonard Forsman
   1998 Washington State Archaeology Site Inventory Form for archaeological site
          45KP115. On file at Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation.
          Olympia.

Lewarch, Dennis, and Leonard Forsman
   1998 National Register of Historic Places Registration Form for archaeological site
          45KP115. On file at Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation.
          Olympia.

Lewarch, Dennis E., Leonard A. Forsman, Stephenie K. Kramer, Laura R. Murphy, Lynn
          L. Larson, David R. Iversen, and Amy E. Dugas
   2002 Data Recovery Excavations at the Bay Street Shell Midden (45KP115), Kitsap
          County, Washington. Prepared by Larson Anthropological and Archaeological
          Associates, Limited, Gig Harbor, LAAS Technical Report #2002-01.
          Submitted to City of Port Orchard.

MacLeod Reckord, Marcia Sinclair, and Adolfson Associates
  2001 “The Mosquito Fleet Trail Master Plan” prepared for Kitsap County
         Department of Public Works, Port Orchard.

McMurphy, Carl J.
  1980 Soil Survey of Kitsap County Area, Washington. Published by the USDA Soil
        Conservation Service in cooperation with the Washington State Department of
        Natural Resources, and Washington State University, Agricultural Research
        Center

National Park Service (NPS)
   1996 National Register Bulletin No. 38. Guidelines for Evaluating and
           Documenting Traditional Cultural Properties. Prepared by Patricia L. Parker
           and Thomas F. King.

Reckord, MacLeod, Marcia Sinclair, and Adolfson Associates
   2001 The Mosquito Fleet Trail Master Plan. Prepared for Kitsap County
          Department of Public Works by Adolfson Associates.

Ruby, Robert H., and John A. Brown
   1992 “A Guide to the Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest.” Revised Edition.
         University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.

Schumacher, James
   2004 Washington State Archaeology Site Inventory Form for archaeological site
         45KP140. On file at Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation.
         Olympia.




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     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington

Schumacher, James, and Glenn Hartmann
   2005 Recovery of Human Remains Identified at the Port Orchard Wastewater
         Treatment Plant (45KP140), Kitsap County, Washington. Western Shores
         Heritage Services, Inc., Technical Report 0223. Bainbridge Island.

Suquamish Tribe
   2011 “History and Culture” Article available online at www.suquamish.org/

United States Surveyor General (USSG)
   1884 Cadastral plat map of Township 24 North, Range 01 West, Willamette
           Meridian. Land Status and Cadastral Records on-line at the U.S. Bureau of
           Land Management, www.blm.gov. Accessed January 2011.

WSDOT
  n.d. “History: Ferries of Puget Sound”. Electronic document available online at
       www.wsdot.wa.gov/ferries. Accessed January 2011.




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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




Appendix A – Figures




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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




  Figure 1. Area of Potential Effect, NE and NW, Section 25 and NE 26, Township 24 North,
            Range 01 East, W. M., Bremerton East and Bremerton West Quadrangles.

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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




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     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




Figure 3. West end of existing trail just east of Bremerton Ferry Dock. View facing east.




Figure 4. Bay Street alignment of trail will be on the southern shoulder (left) of Bay Street.
          View facing northeast.

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     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




  Figure 5.   Fill area west of Blackjack Creek. View facing west.




  Figure 6. Fill area at crossing for Blackjack Creek which will be just beyond the
            gazebo. View facing northwest.




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     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




  Figure 7. Bay Street towards Blackjack Creek, Etta James Park, and Westbay
            Shopping Center. Northern shoulder is armored with riprap, typical along
            shoreline. View facing northeast.




  Figure 8. Bay Street towards Annapolis. Northern shoulder is armored with riprap,
            typical along shoreline. View facing northeast.

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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




  Figure 9. Bay Street continuing towards Annapolis. Northern shoulder is armored
            with riprap, typical along shoreline. View facing northeast




  Figure 10. Typical conditions on eastern portion of project area in Annapolis. The
             road directly abuts the shoreline, which is characterized by several
             existing seawalls. Existing structures are on pilings or fill.

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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




  Figure 11. Fill area at 1833 Bay Street. View facing north.




  Figure 12. Arnold Avenue area at 1910 Bay Street. View facing east.



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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




  Figure 13. End of the trail. View facing northwest towards Bremerton.




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                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington




Appendix B – Historic Property Inventory Information




Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                    Page 33
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington


Table 3. Structures over 50 years of age located in Area of Potential Effect.
Address         Year Built    NRHP             Overview of               Photograph
                              Eligibility      Modifications

                                               Changes to
                              Does not meet
                                               windows, doors,
  1001 Bay                    NRHP
                    1907                       footprint, and
    Street                    eligibility
                                               decks.
                              criteria



                              Does not meet    Changes to
  1021 Bay                    NRHP             windows,
                    1932
    Street                    eligibility      footprint, and
                              criteria         decks.



                                               Changes to some
                              Does not meet
                                               windows,
  1693 Bay                    NRHP
                    1935                       exterior siding,
    Street                    eligibility
                                               and the side and
                              criteria
                                               rear decks.



                                               Large deck
                              Does not meet
                                               addition, changes
  1699 Bay                    NRHP
                    1930                       to some windows
    Street                    eligibility
                                               and exterior
                              criteria
                                               siding.



                              Does not meet
                                               Rear addition,
  1763 Bay                    NRHP
                    1943                       garage addition
    Street                    eligibility
                                               likely.
                              criteria




                              Does not meet    Multiple
  1777 Bay                    NRHP             additions,
                    1938
    Street                    eligibility      changes to some
                              criteria         windows.




Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                    Page 34
     Cultural Resource Survey of the City of Port Orchard Pedestrian Enhancement Project
                Mosquito Fleet Trail, Port Orchard, Kitsap County, Washington


                                               Large second
                              Does not meet
                                               story addition,
1803/1805 Bay                 NRHP
                    1935                       changes to some
    Street                    eligibility
                                               windows and
                              criteria
                                               exterior siding.




                              Does not meet
                                               Modified form,
  1811 Bay                    NRHP
                    1940                       replaced siding
    Street                    eligibility
                                               and windows.
                              criteria




                              Does not meet
                                               Modified entry,
  1825 Bay                    NRHP
                    1936                       changes to siding
    Street                    eligibility
                                               and windows.
                              criteria




                              Does not meet
  1833 Bay                    NRHP             Changes to first
                    1955
    Street                    eligibility      story windows.
                              criteria



                                               Changes to store
                                               windows,
                              Does not meet
                                               covered
  1883 Bay                    NRHP
                    1935                       transoms, some
    Street                    eligibility
                                               changes to
                              criteria
                                               exterior siding,
                                               large additions.



                              Does not meet
                                               Changes to
  1961 Bay                    NRHP
                    1910                       windows, siding,
    Street                    eligibility
                                               false front.
                              criteria




Lithic Analysts                                                                     May 2011
Report No. 1101-1                                                                    Page 35
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-11                                             DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name:
Property Address: 1001 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA 98366
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4053-015-001-0005
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage .5
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW          Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
T24R01E                    26                             Kitsap                      BREMERTON WEST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1113757
Northing: 812882
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                           Date Recorded: 04/17/2011
Field Recorder: Gray, Connie
Owner's Name: Port of Bremerton
Owner Address: 1001 Bay Street
City: Port Orchard                          State: WA                               Zip:       98366
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                            Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Sunday, April 17, 2011                                   Page 1 of 5
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Domestic - Single Family House                      Current Use:     Domestic - Single Family House
Plan: Rectangle                 Stories: 2                        Structural System: Balloon Frame
Changes to Plan: Moderate                                         Changes to Interior:
Changes to Original Cladding: Slight                              Changes to Windows: Extensive
Changes to Other: Moderate
Other (specify): garage and deck/porches
Style:                      Cladding:                     Roof Type:                     Roof Material:
Vernacular                   Wood - Clapboard              Gable - Front Gable           Asphalt / Composition -
                                                                                         Shingle
Foundation:                 Form/Type:
Post & Pier                  Single Family


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Architecture/Landscape Architecture
Date of Construction:            1907 Built Date                  Builder:

                                                                  Engineer:
                                                                  Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Sunday, April 17, 2011                                        Page 2 of 5
                                      Historic Inventory Report


Statement of             First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:            Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established there in 1854 by William Renton. Kitsap County was
                         formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of Lt. William Slaughter who died
                         during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was changed to Kitsap County for Chief
                         Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.


                         The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                         what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                         the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                         fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                         the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                         businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                         works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                         (Hinchliff 2010).


                         The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                         The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                         Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                         communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                         corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                         passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                         remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                         Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                         by a debilitating strike.


                         This house retains little integrity of materials, design, workmanship, or feeling. It is not recommended
                         eligible for listing in the NRHP.


Description of           This two-story house was constructed in 1907. It is built on pilings over the Sinclair Inlet. It features
Physical                 horizontal wood siding, vinyl sliding and fixed-pane sash, and a slight front-gabled composition shingle
Appearance:              roof. The house has been highly modified since its original construction. The facade that faces the street
                         includes a recessed ground-level walkway that leads to side doors. The second story features an
                         unadorned wall, with the exception of four quadrangle windows beneath the gable peak. This view of the
                         building also includes the detached gabled, wood clad, two-car garage. The side facades include sliding
                         vinyl sash, and wood railings along the first floor. The facade facing the water includes large fixed and
                         sliding vinyl sash, a large wood deck with railings, and partially covered porches. It appears that the house
                         been added onto over time, and all windows and doors have been replaced. The porch, deck, and railings
                         are unoriginal.




Sunday, April 17, 2011                                          Page 3 of 5
                                      Historic Inventory Report


Major                    Hinchliff, Catherine
Bibliographic
                         2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
References:
                         Accessed January 2011.


                         Johnson, Larry E.
                         1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                         Accessed January 2011.




Sunday, April 17, 2011                                        Page 4 of 5
                         Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 2011                                              2011




 2011                                              2011




Sunday, April 17, 2011                     Page 5 of 5
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-12                                             DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name:
Property Address: 1021 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA 98367
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4053-015-010-004
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage .04
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW          Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
T24R01E                    26                             Kitsap                      BREMERTON WEST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1114013
Northing: 812937
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                           Date Recorded: 04/17/2011
Field Recorder: Gray, Connie
Owner's Name: Port of Bremerton
Owner Address: 8850 SW St Hwy 3
City: Port Orchard                          State: WA                               Zip:       98367
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                            Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Sunday, April 17, 2011                                   Page 1 of 5
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Domestic - Single Family House                      Current Use:     Domestic - Single Family House
Plan: Rectangle                 Stories: 1                        Structural System: Balloon Frame
Changes to Plan: Moderate                                         Changes to Interior: Unknown
Changes to Original Cladding: Slight                              Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other:
Other (specify):
Style:                      Cladding:                     Roof Type:                     Roof Material:
Vernacular                   Wood - Clapboard              Gable - Side Gable            Asphalt / Composition -
                                                                                         Shingle
Foundation:                 Form/Type:
Post & Pier                  Single Family - Side Gable


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Architecture/Landscape Architecture
Date of Construction:            1932 Built Date                  Builder:

                                                                  Engineer:
                                                                  Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Sunday, April 17, 2011                                        Page 2 of 5
                                      Historic Inventory Report


Statement of             First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:            Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established there in 1854 by William Renton. Kitsap County was
                         formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of Lt. William Slaughter who died
                         during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was changed to Kitsap County for Chief
                         Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.


                         The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                         what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                         the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                         fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                         the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                         businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                         works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                         (Hinchliff 2010).


                         The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                         The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                         Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                         communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                         corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                         passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                         remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                         Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                         by a debilitating strike.


                         This house has been modified with replacement windows, a large addition, and a modern deck. It does
                         not retain a high level of integrity of materials, design, workmanship, or feeling. Therefore, it is not
                         recommended eligible for listing in the NRHP.


Description of           Constructed in 1932, this is a gabled single story building built on pilings over the Sinclair Inlet. The house
Physical                 has been modified since its period of construction. It is clad with horizontal wood siding, has a steeply,
Appearance:              slightly flared side gabled composition shingle roof, and varied fenestration, including some original pairs
                         of six-light casement wood sash, other multi-light wood sash, and fixed-pane aluminum sash windows.


                         The house is located down below the street, and the primary entry is sheltered by a gabled roof
                         supported by wood columns. A secondary entry is also visible and is behind by an aluminum screen door.
                         The main door is obscured. Around the house on the street side is a wood porch and walkway.


                         The water side of the house is dominated by a large enclosed addition with large, fixed-pane aluminum
                         sash windows. Also a large, non-original wrap-around deck spans this side of the house.




Sunday, April 17, 2011                                           Page 3 of 5
                                      Historic Inventory Report


Major                    Hinchliff, Catherine
Bibliographic
                         2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
References:
                         Accessed January 2011.


                         Johnson, Larry E.
                         1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                         Accessed January 2011.




Sunday, April 17, 2011                                        Page 4 of 5
                         Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 2011                                              2011




 2011




Sunday, April 17, 2011                     Page 5 of 5
                                   Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-1                                               DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name:
Property Address: 1693 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4027-022-003-0002
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW           Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                     Quadrangle
T24R01E                     25                             Kitsap                     BREMERTON EAST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1116178
Northing: 814162
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                            Date Recorded: 02/05/2011
Field Recorder: C. Gray
Owner's Name: ARRIOLA, CARLOS & WAGNER, SALLY J
Owner Address: 1693 BAY ST
City: Port Orchard                           State: WA                                Zip:
                                                                                     98366
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                             Comments:
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:



Monday, February 07, 2011                                 Page 1 of 4
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Domestic - Single Family House                      Current Use:     Domestic - Single Family House
Plan: Rectangle                 Stories: 1                        Structural System:
Changes to Plan: Slight                                           Changes to Interior: Unknown
Changes to Original Cladding: Moderate                            Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other:
Other (specify):
Style:                      Cladding:                     Roof Type:                     Roof Material:
Vernacular                   Wood                          Flat with Eaves               Asphalt / Composition
Foundation:                 Form/Type:
Post & Pier                  Single Family


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Architecture/Landscape Architecture
Date of Construction:            1935 Built Date                  Builder:

                                                                  Engineer:
                                                                  Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 2 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Statement of           First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:          Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established in the area now known as Port Orchard in 1854 by
                       William Renton. Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
                       Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was
                       changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.
                       The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                       what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                       the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                       fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                       the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                       businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                       works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                       (Hinchliff 2010).
                       The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                       The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                       Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                       communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                       corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                       passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                       remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                       Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                       by a debilitating strike.
                       This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or workmanship. Many of
                       the windows have been replaced with vinyl sash, the siding on the western half of the building does not
                       appear to be original, and the large deck has been modified. It is not recommended as eligible for listing
                       in the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient integrity.
Description of         Constructed in 1935, this is a small, one-bedroom building built on pilings over the Sinclair Inlet. It is a
Physical               single story building with horizontal wood siding (two different types), a mostly flat composition roof that
Appearance:            slopes gently toward the water, and varied fenestration, including fixed-pane wood sash and one-over-
                       one vinyl sash. The recessed entry is located at the northeast corner of the house, sheltered by a flat
                       overhanging roof supported by an unadorned wood beam. A large shed roof deck spans the entire
                       waterfront (west) façade. The south façade is dominated by a narrow deck that is likely used for
                       watercraft storage.
Major                  Hinchliff, Catherine
Bibliographic
                       2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
References:
                       Accessed January 2011.
                       Johnson, Larry E.
                       1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 3 of 4
                            Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 side facade                                          front facade
 2011                                                 2011




Monday, February 07, 2011                     Page 4 of 4
                                   Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-2                                               DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name:
Property Address: 1699 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA 98366
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4027-022-001-0004
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW           Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
T24R01E                     25                             Kitsap                      BREMERTON EAST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1116208
Northing: 814209
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                            Date Recorded: 02/05/2011
Field Recorder: C. Gray
Owner's Name: Haynes, John
Owner Address: 1699 Bay St
City: Port Orchard                           State: WA                                  Zip: 98366
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                             Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Monday, February 07, 2011                                 Page 1 of 4
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Domestic - Single Family House                      Current Use:     Domestic - Single Family House
Plan: Irregular                 Stories: 1.5                      Structural System:
Changes to Plan: Extensive                                        Changes to Interior: Unknown
Changes to Original Cladding: Slight                              Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other:
Other (specify):
Style:                       Cladding:                    Roof Type:                     Roof Material:
Arts & Crafts                Wood                          Varied Roof Lines             Asphalt / Composition
Foundation:                  Form/Type:
Post & Pier                  Single Family - Side Gable


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Date of Construction:            1930 Built Date                  Builder:

                                                                  Engineer:
                                                                  Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 2 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Statement of           First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:          Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established in the area now known as Port Orchard in 1854 by
                       William Renton. Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
                       Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was
                       changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.
                       The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                       what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                       the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                       fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                       the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                       businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                       works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                       (Hinchliff 2010).
                       The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                       The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                       Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                       communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                       corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                       passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                       remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                       Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                       by a debilitating strike.
                       This house has been highly modified, and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or workmanship.
                       The windows are not original, and the floorplan has been modified with additions on the north and west
                       elevations. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient
                       integrity.


Description of         Constructed in 1930, this is a one and a half story house constructed largely on pilings over the Sinclair
Physical               Inlet. It has a horizontal wood siding, varied vinyl sash, and a side-gabled composition roof, which slopes
Appearance:            down to a flat-roof addition on the waterfront (west) façade. There is a wrap-around porch along the
                       entire south and west facades. The entry is on the Bay Street (east) façade. A small, square, flat-roofed
                       addition has been built on the south side of the house to connect it with the adjacent garage. The garage
                       and addition feature the same siding as the primary house, single-light window openings, and
                       composition roof shingles. The garage has a large double-door vehicle opening.
Major                  Hinchliff, Catherine
Bibliographic
                       2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
References:
                       Accessed January 2011.
                       Johnson, Larry E.
                       1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 3 of 4
                            Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 2011                                                 2011




Monday, February 07, 2011                     Page 4 of 4
                                   Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-3                                               DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name:
Property Address: 1763 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA 98366
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4027-023-017-0004
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW           Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
                                                           Kitsap                      BREMERTON EAST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1116487
Northing: 814627
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                            Date Recorded: 02/05/2011
Field Recorder: C. Gray
Owner's Name: Williams, Ocean & Arlene
Owner Address: 3901 S EDDY ST
City: Seattle                                State: WA                                  Zip: 98188
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                             Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Monday, February 07, 2011                                 Page 1 of 4
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Domestic - Single Family House                       Current Use:    Domestic - Single Family House
Plan: Irregular                 Stories: 2                         Structural System:
Changes to Plan: Extensive                                         Changes to Interior: Unknown
Changes to Original Cladding: Slight                               Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other:
Other (specify):
Style:                       Cladding:                    Roof Type:                     Roof Material:
Vernacular                   Wood                          Gable                         Asphalt / Composition
Foundation:                  Form/Type:
Post & Pier                  Single Family


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Date of Construction:            1943 Built Date                   Builder:

                                                                   Engineer:
                                                                   Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 2 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Statement of           First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:          Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established in the area now known as Port Orchard in 1854 by
                       William Renton. Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
                       Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was
                       changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.
                       The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                       what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                       the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                       fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                       the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                       businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                       works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                       (Hinchliff 2010).
                       The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                       The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                       Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                       communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                       corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                       passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                       remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                       Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                       by a debilitating strike.
                       This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or workmanship. Some
                       windows have been replaced, and the south north and rear additions are not original. It is not
                       recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient integrity.


Description of         Constructed in 1943, this two story house is constructed on a concrete slab over pilings over the Sinclair
Physical               Inlet. It is clad with horizontal wood siding, has vinyl slider and fixed pane windows, and a front-gable
Appearance:            composition roof. The entry is flush against the east façade, with a small projecting shelter unsupported
                       by pillars or columns. Fenestration is varied, and asymmetrical. The waterfront (west) side of the house
                       includes an enclosed porch and has a full-façade concrete slab patio. A large single-story flat roof garage
                       with a paneled door has been added to the south end of the house.
Major                  Hinchliff, Catherine
Bibliographic
                       2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
References:
                       Accessed January 2011.
                       Johnson, Larry E.
                       1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 3 of 4
                            Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 front and side facades
 2011




Monday, February 07, 2011                     Page 4 of 4
                                   Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-4                                               DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name: Venture Charter
Property Address: 1777 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA 98366
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4027-032-001-0102
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW           Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
                                                           Kitsap                      BREMERTON EAST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1116543
Northing: 814716
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                            Date Recorded: 02/05/2011
Field Recorder: C. Gray
Owner's Name: Jones, Randy
Owner Address: 1777 Bay St.
City: Port Orchard                           State: WA 98366                            Zip:
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                             Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Monday, February 07, 2011                                 Page 1 of 4
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Domestic - Single Family House                       Current Use:    Commerce/Trade - Specialty Store
Plan: Irregular                 Stories: 1.5                       Structural System:
Changes to Plan: Moderate                                          Changes to Interior: Unknown
Changes to Original Cladding: Moderate                             Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other: Moderate
Other (specify): porch
Style:                      Cladding:                      Roof Type:                    Roof Material:
Arts & Crafts                Wood                          Gable - Cross Gable           Asphalt / Composition
                             Metal - Aluminum Siding
Foundation:                 Form/Type:
Post & Pier                  Single Family - Cross Gable


Narrative
Study Unit                                                 Other
Date of Construction:            1938 Built Date                   Builder:

                                                                   Engineer:
                                                                   Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 2 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Statement of           First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:          Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established in the area now known as Port Orchard in 1854 by
                       William Renton. Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
                       Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was
                       changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.
                       The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                       what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                       the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                       fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                       the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                       businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                       works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                       (Hinchliff 2010).
                       The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                       The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                       Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                       communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                       corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                       passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                       remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                       Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                       by a debilitating strike.
                       This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or workmanship. Nearly
                       all of the windows have been replaced, and entry porch has been highly modified. It is not recommended
                       as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient integrity.
Description of         This building is currently occupied by Venture Charters, a fishing boat charter business. Constructed in
Physical               1938, this one and a half story house is constructed partially on pilings over the Sinclair Inlet. The house is
Appearance:            clad with horizontal wood siding, has replacement vinyl sliding and fixed pane windows, and a cross-
                       gabled composition roof. The front entry is asymmetrically located on the east façade and is accessed by a
                       modern wood deck with lattice and a corrugated metal shed roof. The west façade was not visible from
                       the street.
Major
Bibliographic
                       Hinchliff, Catherine
References:
                       2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.
                       Johnson, Larry E.
                       1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.




Monday, February 07, 2011                                      Page 3 of 4
                            Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 south and west facades                               west facade
 2011                                                 2011




Monday, February 07, 2011                     Page 4 of 4
                                   Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-5                                               DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name:
Property Address: 1805 BAY St , Port Orchard, WA 98366
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4027-034-001-0009
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW           Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
                                                           Kitsap                      BREMERTON EAST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1116832
Northing: 814779
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                            Date Recorded: 02/05/2011
Field Recorder: C. Gray
Owner's Name: Marshall, Michelle
Owner Address: PO Box 430
City: Port ORchard                           State: WA                                  Zip: 98366
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                             Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Monday, February 07, 2011                                 Page 1 of 4
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Domestic - Single Family House                      Current Use:     Domestic - Single Family House
Plan: Irregular                 Stories: 2                        Structural System:
Changes to Plan: Extensive                                        Changes to Interior: Unknown
Changes to Original Cladding: Moderate                            Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other:
Other (specify):
Style:                       Cladding:                    Roof Type:                     Roof Material:
None                         Wood                          Varied Roof Lines             Asphalt / Composition
Foundation:                  Form/Type:
Concrete - Poured            Single Family


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Date of Construction:            1935 Built Date                  Builder:

                                                                  Engineer:
                                                                  Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 2 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Statement of           First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:          Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established in the area now known as Port Orchard in 1854 by
                       William Renton. Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
                       Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was
                       changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.
                       The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                       what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                       the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                       fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                       the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                       businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                       works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                       (Hinchliff 2010).
                       The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                       The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                       Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                       communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                       corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                       passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                       remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                       Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                       by a debilitating strike.
                       This house has been highly modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or workmanship,
                       or feeling. The house has been modified with a large second-story addition, new windows, multiple
                       rooflines, and some replacement siding. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because
                       it does not retain sufficient integrity.
Description of         Constructed in 1935, this building was built on the sliver of land between Bay Street and the Sinclair Inlet.
Physical               This house is clad with both horizontal and vertical wood siding, features vinyl sash in a varied
Appearance:            fenestration pattern, and an irregular roof line, including gabled, pyramid, and hipped. A large second
                       story addition is visible from the street. A prominent brick chimney is visible on the west elevation.
                       Although the front façade is largely blocked by a six-foot fence, the entry is visible on the south façade,
                       and appears to feature a nine-light door behind an aluminum screen door. A single-car hipped-roof garage
                       with a paneled door is attached to the east side of the house. The north, waterfront façade is not visible
                       from the public right of way.
Major                  Hinchliff, Catherine
Bibliographic
                       2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
References:
                       Accessed January 2011.
                       Johnson, Larry E.
                       1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 3 of 4
                            Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 front and side facades                               front facade
 2011                                                 2011




Monday, February 07, 2011                     Page 4 of 4
                                   Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-6                                               DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name:
Property Address: 1811 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA 98366
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4027-034-002-0008
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW           Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
                                                           Kitsap                      BREMERTON EAST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1116881
Northing: 814761
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                            Date Recorded: 02/05/2011
Field Recorder: C. Gray
Owner's Name: Marshall, Michelle
Owner Address: PO Box 430
City: Port ORchard                           State: WA                                  Zip: 98366
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                             Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Monday, February 07, 2011                                 Page 1 of 4
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Domestic - Single Family House                      Current Use:     Domestic - Single Family House
Plan: Irregular                 Stories: 1.5                      Structural System:
Changes to Plan: Moderate                                         Changes to Interior: Unknown
Changes to Original Cladding: Moderate                            Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other:
Other (specify):
Style:                      Cladding:                     Roof Type:                     Roof Material:
Arts & Crafts                Wood                          Gable - Front Gable           Asphalt / Composition
Foundation:                 Form/Type:
Concrete - Poured            Single Family


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Date of Construction:            1940 Built Date                  Builder:

                                                                  Engineer:
                                                                  Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 2 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Statement of           First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:          Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established in the area now known as Port Orchard in 1854 by
                       William Renton. Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
                       Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was
                       changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.
                       The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                       what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                       the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                       fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                       the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                       businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                       works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                       (Hinchliff 2010).
                       The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                       The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                       Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                       communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                       corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                       passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                       remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                       Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                       by a debilitating strike.
                       This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or workmanship. The
                       siding and windows are likely unoriginal, and the form has been modified when the garage was extended
                       to attach to the house. It does not meet NRHP eligibility criteria, and is not recommended NRHP eligible.
Description of         Constructed in 1940, this building was built on the sliver of land between Bay Street and the Sinclair Inlet.
Physical               It is a one and a half story house clad with aluminum siding with one over one vinyl windows and a front
Appearance:            gable roof. The front (east) façade is dominated by a large single-story flat composition front gabled roof
                       garage, which extends perpendicularly from and attaches to the house. The south façade also includes the
                       front entry which is sheltered by a composition shed overhang that is also attached to the garage. The
                       north façade is not easily visible from the public right of way, but appears to be a full façade deck or open
                       porch.
Major
Bibliographic
                       Hinchliff, Catherine
References:
                       2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.
                       Johnson, Larry E.
                       1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 3 of 4
                            Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 front facade and garage
 2011




Monday, February 07, 2011                     Page 4 of 4
                                   Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-7                                               DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name:
Property Address: 1825 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA 98366
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4027-034-005-0005
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW           Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
                                                           Kitsap                      BREMERTON EAST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1116939
Northing: 814704
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                            Date Recorded: 02/05/2011
Field Recorder: C. Gray
Owner's Name: CHRISTOFFELL, RONALD J & HUNTER, JULIE R
Owner Address: 409 16TH AVE E UNIT 26
City: Seattle                                State: WA                                  Zip: 98112
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                             Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Monday, February 07, 2011                                 Page 1 of 4
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Domestic - Single Family House                      Current Use:     Domestic - Single Family House
Plan: Rectangle                 Stories: 1                        Structural System:
Changes to Plan: Intact                                           Changes to Interior: Unknown
Changes to Original Cladding: Extensive                           Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other:
Other (specify):
Style:                      Cladding:                     Roof Type:                     Roof Material:
Vernacular                   Concrete                      Gable - Front Gable           Asphalt / Composition
Foundation:                 Form/Type:
Concrete - Poured            Single Family


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Date of Construction:            1936 Built Date                  Builder:

                                                                  Engineer:
                                                                  Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 2 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Statement of           First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:          Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established in the area now known as Port Orchard in 1854 by
                       William Renton. Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
                       Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was
                       changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.


                       The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                       what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                       the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                       fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                       the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                       businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                       works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                       (Hinchliff 2010).
                       The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                       The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                       Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                       communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                       corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                       passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                       remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                       Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                       by a debilitating strike.
                       This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or workmanship. The
                       cladding and windows are not original. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it
                       does not retain sufficient integrity.
Description of         Constructed in 1936, this building was built on the sliver of land between Bay Street and the Sinclair Inlet.
Physical               It is a small, single story house clad in stucco with vinyl one-over-one windows flanked by wood shutters,
Appearance:            an overhanging gable with an enclosed portico pathway leading to the entry, and a composition front
                       gabled roof. Only the front façade is visible from the public right of way.
Major                  Hinchliff, Catherine
Bibliographic
                       2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
References:
                       Accessed January 2011.
                       Johnson, Larry E.
                       1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.




Monday, February 07, 2011                                      Page 3 of 4
                            Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 front facade                                         Front facade partially blocked by privacy fence
 2011                                                 2011




Monday, February 07, 2011                     Page 4 of 4
                                   Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-8                                               DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name:
Property Address: 1833 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA 98366
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4027-034-006-0103
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW           Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
                                                           Kitsap                      BREMERTON EAST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1116990
Northing: 814678
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                            Date Recorded: 02/05/2011
Field Recorder: C. Gray
Owner's Name: TIBBETTS, JAMES G & CYNTHIA M
Owner Address: 8621 FAUNTLEE CREST SW
City: Seattle                                State: WA                                  Zip: 98136
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                             Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Monday, February 07, 2011                                 Page 1 of 4
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Domestic - Multiple Family House                    Current Use:     Domestic - Multiple Family House
Plan: Rectangle                 Stories: 2                        Structural System:
Changes to Plan: Slight                                           Changes to Interior:
Changes to Original Cladding: Moderate                            Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other:
Other (specify):
Style:                      Cladding:                     Roof Type:                     Roof Material:
Vernacular                   Brick - Roman                 Flat with Eaves               Asphalt / Composition
                             Concrete
                             Wood
Foundation:                 Form/Type:
Concrete - Poured            Multi-Family


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Date of Construction:            1955 Built Date                  Builder:

                                                                  Engineer:
                                                                  Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 2 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Statement of           First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:          Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established in the area now known as Port Orchard in 1854 by
                       William Renton. Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
                       Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was
                       changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.
                       The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                       what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                       the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                       fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                       the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                       businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                       works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                       (Hinchliff 2010).
                       The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                       The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                       Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                       communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                       corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                       passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                       remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                       Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                       by a debilitating strike.
                       This house has been modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or workmanship. The
                       horizontal and diagonal wood siding does not appear to be original. The windows also have likely been
                       replaced. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient
                       integrity.


Description of         Constructed in 1955, this multi-family dwelling unit was built on the sliver of land between Bay Street and
Physical               the Sinclair Inlet. It is a two story apartment building clad with multiple materials, including Roman brick,
Appearance:            concrete, and horizontal and diagonal wood siding. It has a flat composition roof. The windows are three-
                       light vinyl sash and the entries are slightly recessed and accessed by three steps. Only the front façade is
                       visible from the public right of way. The waterfront side of the house includes a full-façade second story
                       wood deck supported by thin, unadorned beams.
Major
Bibliographic
                       Hinchliff, Catherine
References:
                       2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.
                       Johnson, Larry E.
                       1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 3 of 4
                            Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 front facade                                         front and side facades
 2011                                                 2011




Monday, February 07, 2011                     Page 4 of 4
                                   Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MFT-9                                               DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name:
Property Address: 1883 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA 98366
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4027-034-013-0005
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW           Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
                                                           Kitsap                      BREMERTON EAST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1117202
Northing: 814551
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                            Date Recorded: 02/05/2011
Field Recorder: C. Gray
Owner's Name: PASSOW AARON
Owner Address: 1883 Bay St
City: Port Orchard                           State: WA                                  Zip: 98366
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                             Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Monday, February 07, 2011                                 Page 1 of 4
                                  Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Commerce/Trade - Specialty Store                    Current Use:     Commerce/Trade - Specialty Store
Plan: Rectangle                 Stories: 1                        Structural System:
Changes to Plan: Extensive                                        Changes to Interior: Unknown
Changes to Original Cladding: Slight                              Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other:
Other (specify):
Style:                       Cladding:                    Roof Type:                     Roof Material:
Commercial                   Wood                          Flat with Eaves               Asphalt / Composition
Foundation:                  Form/Type:
Concrete - Poured            Commercial


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Date of Construction:            1935 Built Date                  Builder:

                                                                  Engineer:
                                                                  Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 2 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Statement of           First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:          Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established in the area now known as Port Orchard in 1854 by
                       William Renton. Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
                       Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was
                       changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.
                       The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                       what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                       the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                       fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                       the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                       businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                       works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                       (Hinchliff 2010).
                       The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                       The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                       Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                       communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                       corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                       passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                       remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                       Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                       by a debilitating strike.
                       This building has been highly modified and does not retain integrity of design, materials, or workmanship.
                       The primary building has had its storefront windows replaced and the transom windows covered. The
                       garage structures are newer than the primary building, and have significantly altered the building
                       footprint. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in the NRHP because it does not retain sufficient
                       integrity.
Description of         Constructed in 1935, this commercial building was built on the sliver of land between Bay Street and the
Physical               Sinclair Inlet. The resource has a primary building, which was the original commercial building, flanked by
Appearance:            attached garage structures. The primary building is single story clad in wood siding with a flat composition
                       roof. The entry door is in the center of the building flanked by four large storefront windows, two on each
                       side. All these windows appear to be single-pane sash except the one immediately left of the door, which
                       is three-light. Above the door and storefront windows are covered transoms. Wall cladding gives the
                       appearance of a cornice. To the left of the primary building is a single-bay garage structure and to the
                       right is a double-bay garage structure. All feature horizontal wood siding. Two of the garage doors appear
                       to be sided shut, but the one to the far right still opens. The right bay has had part of its siding removed
                       on the side exterior wall, revealing varied windows.
Major                  Hinchliff, Catherine
Bibliographic
                       2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
References:
                       Accessed January 2011.
                       Johnson, Larry E.
                       1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 3 of 4
                             Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 north end of front facade                             front facade
 2011                                                  2011




Monday, February 07, 2011                      Page 4 of 4
                                   Historic Inventory Report


Location
Field Site No. MRT-10                                              DAHP No.
Historic Name:
Common Name: Dave's Boat Shack
Property Address: 1961 Bay St , Port Orchard, WA 98366
Comments:
Tax No./Parcel No. 4027-035-002-0005
Plat/Block/Lot
Acreage
Supplemental Map(s)


Township/Range/EW           Section 1/4 Sec 1/4 1/4 Sec    County                      Quadrangle
T24R01E                     25                             Kitsap                      BREMERTON EAST

Coordinate Reference
Easting: 1117405
Northing: 814499
Projection: Washington State Plane South
Datum: HARN (feet)

Identification
Survey Name: Mosquito Fleet Trail Survey                            Date Recorded: 02/05/2011
Field Recorder: C. Gray
Owner's Name: OPSTRUP, JEAN S
Owner Address: 1961 Bay St
City: Port Orchard                           State: WA                                  Zip: 98366
Classification: Building
Resource Status:                             Comments:
Survey/Inventory
Within a District? No
Contributing?
National Register:
Local District:
National Register District/Thematic Nomination Name:
Eligibility Status: Not Determined - SHPO
Determination Date: 1/1/0001
Determination Comments:

Monday, February 07, 2011                                 Page 1 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Description
Historic Use: Commerce/Trade - Business                           Current Use:     Commerce/Trade - Business
Plan: Rectangle                   Stories: 1.5                    Structural System:
Changes to Plan: Moderate                                         Changes to Interior: Unknown
Changes to Original Cladding: Moderate                            Changes to Windows: Moderate
Changes to Other: Moderate
Other (specify): false front
Style:                         Cladding:                  Roof Type:                    Roof Material:
Vernacular                     Wood                        Gable - Front Gable           Asphalt / Composition
                               Brick - Roman
Foundation:                    Form/Type:
Post & Pier                    Single Family
                               Commercial


Narrative
Study Unit                                                Other
Date of Construction:              1910 Built Date                Builder:

                                                                  Engineer:
                                                                  Architect:

Property appears to meet criteria for the National Register of Historic Places:No
Property is located in a potential historic district (National and/or local): No
Property potentially contributes to a historic district (National and/or local):




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 2 of 4
                                    Historic Inventory Report


Statement of           First European American settlement occurred after Captain George Vancouver sailed the waters of Puget
Significance:          Sound in 1792. The first lumber mill was established in the area now known as Port Orchard in 1854 by
                       William Renton. Kitsap County was formed in 1857. It was originally named Slaughter County in honor of
                       Lt. William Slaughter who died during the Indian Wars in 1855. However, not long after, the name was
                       changed to Kitsap County for Chief Kitsap of the Squamish Tribe.
                       The earliest settler did not stay, but Henry Cline and his family finally did take up permanent residence in
                       what is now known as Port Orchard in 1885. At first the town was called Sydney, after his father, but later
                       the name was changed to Port Orchard. Cline opened the town’s first storey, then a partnership in a
                       fishing venture and smokehouse, secured a post office and served as Sydney’s first postmaster, founded
                       the Kitsap County’s first newspaper, and built the first wharf in 1889. Other families opened important
                       businesses such as a drug store, a brick and tile factory, small lumber and shingle mills, and a pottery
                       works which manufactured sewer pipes, terra cotta ware and the bricks for the early streets of Seattle.
                       (Hinchliff 2010).
                       The town incorporated in 1890 and was the first to be both platted and incorporated in Kitsap County.
                       The town was forced to rebuild after a fire devastated much of the business district in 1895, and Port
                       Orchard, generally thrived over the years. Transportation between the many small towns and larger
                       communities around Puget Sound was by water, often by rowboat utilizing the major transportation
                       corridor of the Northwest (Hinchliff 2010, Johnson 1999), known as the Mosquito Fleet. Regular
                       passenger and freight service continued into the 1920s (Johnson 1999), but by 1929 only two companies
                       remained in the ferry industry, the Puget Sound Navigation Company and the Kitsap County
                       Transportation Company. The Kitsap County Transportation Company was forced out of business in 1935
                       by a debilitating strike.
                       This building has been highly modified and does not retain integrity of feeling, design, materials, or
                       workmanship. The building’s original form is almost unidentifiable from the public right of way; the false
                       front, replaced storefront windows and doors, Roman brick, and covered transoms completely obscure
                       the original wood clad, hipped roof building behind it. It is not recommended as eligible for listing in the
                       NRHP because it does not retain sufficient integrity.


Description of         Constructed in 1910, the commercial building was built on the sliver of land between Bay Street and
Physical               Sinclair Inlet. The building is single-story with a prominent false front, and is clad with Roman brick and
Appearance:            horizontal wood siding. Behind the false front is a composition hipped roof. The storefront windows are
                       large fixed-pane aluminum sash, and the recessed entry door is asymmetrically situated on the front
                       (south) façade. Above the storefront windows and door are covered transom windows. The false front is
                       clad with wood boards and sheets with a wood kayak attached for signage. The very rear of the property
                       features a shed addition, partially clad with wood shingles.
Major                  Hinchliff, Catherine
Bibliographic
                       2010 “Port Orchard – Thumbnail History”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
References:
                       Accessed January 2011.
                       Johnson, Larry E.
                       1999 “Puget Sound’s Mosquito Fleet”. Electronic document available online at www.historylink.org.
                       Accessed January 2011.




Monday, February 07, 2011                                     Page 3 of 4
                            Historic Inventory Report



Photos




 front facade                                         west facade
 2011                                                 2011




 rear of east facade
 2011




Monday, February 07, 2011                     Page 4 of 4

				
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