Major Works Data Sheet Beowulf - PDF - PDF by wgg37116

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									Summer Reading Annotation Requirements

This annotation assignment is required for all books that are SPECIFICALLY designated for all English classes grades
nine through twelve. This IS NOT a requirement for the library’s summer reading program. You will, however,
take a test on your chosen book for the library’s summer reading program. Therefore, annotation might help you
perform better on those tests. If you are unable to buy a personal copy of the text to annotate in, you may use
post-it notes for your annotations.

The annotated books should be brought to class on the FIRST day of school. Your English teacher will collect your
books on this day and return them to you when they are graded; therefore, if you check books out from the
library, you may want to renew them before you submit them to your teacher. You must write your name in
permanent marker on the outer binding of the book. If you use post-it notes, your teacher will collect these after
grading. You will also take assessments on your English summer reading on the first day of school.

As with all work you do, your summer reading annotations and notes must be your own. We enforce the English
Department’s plagiarism policies.

Plagiarism policy for HTHS English department:

Any evidence of plagiarism on ANY portion of the assignment will result in a “0” for the entire summer reading
project, as well as disciplinary action. This course of action applies to all parties involved.

English Summer Reading Selections (listed by grade level)

Ninth Grade (Christy.Dooley@trussvillecityschools.com; Lacey.Johnson@trussvillecityschools.com;
Michelle.McCombs@trussvillecityschools.com)

General Ninth Grade will read the book listed below, as well as a book you choose from the library’s list.

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

Pre-AP Ninth Grade will read the books listed below, as well as a book you choose from the library’s list.

Heroes, Gods, and Monsters by Bernard Evslin

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

Tenth Grade (Tonya.Capps@trussvillecityschools.com; Eric.Jenkins@trussvillecityschools.com )

General Tenth Grade will read the book listed below, as well as a book you choose from the library’s list.

Geeks by Jon Katz

Pre-AP Tenth Grade will read the book listed below, as well as a book you choose from the library’s list.

Geeks by Jon Katz

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Eleventh Grade (Leslie.Terrell@trussvillecityschools.com or Simona.Herring@trussvillecityschools.com)

General Eleventh Grade will read the book listed below, as well as a book you choose from the library’s list.

Jake Reinvented by Gordon Korman

Pre-AP Eleventh Grade will read the books listed below, as well as a book you choose from the library’s list.

Jake Reinvented by Gordon Korman

The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch

Eleventh Grade –AP (Jennifer.Cardwell@trussvillecityschools.com) will read the books listed below, as well as a
book you choose from the library’s list.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

All Over But the Shoutin’ by Rick Bragg

You also must read any ten essays from 100 Great Essays by Diyanni (make sure to get the latest edition) and
respond to FIVE from one of the prompts at the conclusion of the essay. You must choose a prompt that will
require you to incorporate text into your response. There should also be evidence of annotation of the twenty
essays that you read; however, you will not need to adhere to all of the standards from the novel annotation
requirements. Of the ten that you read, please include essays from the following writers: Russell Baker, James
Baldwin, Joan Didion, Frederick Douglass, WE.B. DuBois, Queen Elizabeth I, Ellen Goodman, Martin Luther King, Jr.
(“Letter from Birmingham Jail”), George Orwell, Richard Rodriguez, Brent Staples, and James Thurber. Remember,
ten essays must show evidence of annotation, but only five of the essays must have a hand-written essay
response.

One more thing to add (that will be fun!). We will communicate this summer through facebook. Please “add me”
                                          st
to the page “Jennifer Cardwell” by June 1 .

General Twelfth Grade (Helen.Henderson@trussvillecityschools.com ) will read the books listed below, as well as
a book you choose from the library’s list.

Oedipus Rex by Sophocles

Twelfth Grade – Dual Enrollment (Stephen.McClurg@trussvillecityschools.com or
Jennifer.Cardwell@trussvillecityschools.com)

Beowulf (Seamus Heaney translation)

Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini, OR Boy’s Life by Robert McCammon

Oedipus Rex by Sophocles

Twelfth Grade – AP (Stephen.McClurg@trussvillecityschools.com)

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

Oedipus Rex by Sophocles
Beowulf (Seamus Heaney translation)

Mythology, Folklore, and Biblical References Project (DOWNLOAD this project document from Mr. McClurg’s
sharepoint site. Look on the left-hand side under the tab “Summer Assignments.” You must do this before the last
day of school, as the contents of our websites are deleted for a period during the summer.)

In addition to the annotation assignment, each student must complete a Major Works Data sheet on Invisible Man
and Oedipus Rex. DOWNLOAD this document from Mr. McClurg’s sharepoint site. Look on the left-hand side
under the tab “Summer Assignments.” You must do this before the last day of school, as the contents of our
websites are deleted for a period during the summer.

Annotation Requirements for all English students:

    1.   Main Idea

         You must write one sentence at the conclusion of each chapter that summarizes the main idea.

    2.   Setting

         Annotate all passages that pertain to setting. Pay special attention to the first time each setting is
         introduced. In the beginning of each chapter, questions, descriptions, and comments about setting
         should be in the margins or on yellow post-it notes.

    3.   Characters

         As you read, annotate passages directly and indirectly characterizing the main characters. Use annotation
         or pink post-it notes to mark character passages. In the margin directly beside the passage, write the
         name of the character about whom you are annotating.
         Noteworthy passages relating to character include the following information:
                  -    The first time a character is introduced
                  -    Character description (a particular dominant trait or several characteristics)
                  -    The character’s values, motives, goals, and beliefs
                  -    How the character interacts with other characters
                  -    How the character compares to other characters
                  -    The character’s thoughts and actions
                  -    Contradictions in the character’s thoughts, words, or actions

         After completing the book, inside the front cover of the book, write a character list of the main characters
         along with a short character description. Include at least two page references to key scenes or moments
         of character development.

    4.   Vocabulary

         As you read, locate unfamiliar words. Circle these unfamiliar words in the text. Use blue sticky notes if
         you are not writing in your book.

         In the back cover of your book, start a vocabulary list. List all circled unfamiliar words, the page # on
         which each was found, and the dictionary definition (denotation) of the word. You should have no fewer
         than ten words recorded here.
     5.     Questions/Comments
            Mark passages that intrigue, please, displease, or confuse you. Ask questions in the margins, make
            comments—talk back to the text. Since you are reading the novel over the summer, these questions will
            be of special value during class discussion. These questions and comments need not be limited to the
            text. Successful readers make text-to-world connections, text-to-text connections, and text-to-self
            connections as they read. If a character reminds you of your Uncle Fred, it is perfectly acceptable to write
            in the margin, “Uncle Fred.” If you are reminded of another book, movie, or television show, write the
            connection in the margin. If you think of something going on in the news or the world or have a question
            about how a passage may relate to the world, put that in the margin as well. If you are using sticky notes
            instead of writing in the book, use green sticky notes.

In Brief:

Inside Front Cover:

Character list with character summary and page references

Inside Back Cover:

Vocabulary Glossary (words and definitions)

Side Margins: Notes, questions, remarks, and connections should be written in the margins.

End of Each Chapter: Main idea sentence.

Every page should have notations or words circled. NOTE: You cannot just circle words, though, to receive credit.
There should be some writing at least every other page. The entire book should have a combination of the
aforementioned. You will not receive credit for just highlighting or simply writing words like “Cool” or “I Can’t
Believe that!” on every page.

For comments and/or questions, please email the teacher whose name is located next to grade level. You can also
find this information posted on our school’s website, under “Library,” as well. If you are unable to get in touch
with the grade-level teacher, please send email to Jennifer.Cardwell@trussvillecityschools.com or
Lacey.Johnson@trussvilleticyschools.com.

PLEASE NOTE: Students who sign up for honors courses and clearly demonstrate the ability to complete course
work (through analysis of standardized test scores) WILL NOT be allowed to change courses once the school year
begins. Please do not think you will be allowed to change your schedule just because you did not complete the
summer reading requirements.

								
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