Gilman-Deviant-Globalization

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					Deviant Globalization: The Unpleasant Underside of Transnational
Integration
Political Science 123A, Spring 2007, course control number 772239
University of California, Berkeley
Wednesdays 5:30-8:00 pm
Conference room, Institute for International Studies, Moses Hall

Nils Gilman, Practitioner, Monitor 360, nils_gilman@monitor.com
Jesse Goldhammer, Practitioner, Monitor 360, jesse_goldhammer@monitor.com
Steven Weber, Professor of Political Science and Director of Institute for International Studies,
steve_weber@berkeley.edu

This course examines the various covert uses and manifestations of the overt processes and
systems of globalization. We consider aspects of transnational integration that mainstream
discussions of economic and cultural globalization rarely address—topics such as the
international organ trade, the global sex industry, pandemics, smuggling networks,
transnational gangs, and failed states. Rather than rehash theoretically and morally hackneyed
questions associated with proliferating commodities in rich countries and sweltering
sweatshops in the Global South, this course explores topics where the categories of exploiter
and exploited, winner and loser, are much more ambiguous. We also ask how these sordid
manifestations of globalization intersect with questions of identity: whereas the other of
mainstream globalization is unambiguously coded as poor, dark-skinned, and likely female, the
actors in these other forms of globalization have much more ambiguous and fluid identities.

This course pushes the ethical debate over globalization beyond the classic modernist binaries
of dominance and exploitation. In this standard model of globalization, the “Subject” (i.e., the
active initiator, and winner) of globalization is coded as a multilingual, overeducated, wealthy,
airport-hopping white man. Likewise, in the standard model, the “Object” (i.e., passive “victim”)
of globalization is coded as a poor person of dark skin, working in a sweatshop in the Third
World or marginalized in a de-industrializing slum in the First World. In the standard model, in
short, winners and losers (and the ethical implications) are well-defined and understood. By
contrast, the subjects and objects of deviant globalization offer a very different set of binaries, of
winners and losers. Sometimes the subject of deviant globalization may be a corrupt Swiss
banker – not so different from the standard subject of globalization. But the subject of deviant
globalization may be also a suicidal young jihadi, or a teenage German hacker, or even a
microbe. Each of these subjects in turns suggests a different object of deviant globalization: a
first world drug user, random riders on the Tube, computer users the world over, or anyone
living in a place without a solid public health system. In sum, the topic of dark globalization
forces us to traverse a much more uneven ethical topography than the clearly demarcated,
evenly graded ethical landscape charted by mainstream political theories of globalization.

Assignments
Every student in the class will co-lead one weekly seminar. The week they lead the seminar,
they will also deliver a 5-page, double-spaced, written “contextual review” of that week’s
required and supplemental readings (25%). Each student will also write a 10-15 page research
paper on the globalization subject of their choice (60%). Participation will account for the last
15% of the grade.

Texts to buy at MLK Student Union Bookstore
       Gargi Bhattacharyya, Traffick: The Illicit Movement of People and Things
     Moisés Naím, Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global
      Economy
Course reader: available at Copy Central

January 17: Introduction to the themes of the course; sign up for weekly assignments.

January 24: Globalization: The Mainstream Debate
Required reading:
    1. Thomas Friedman, The World is Flat (2005), ch. 2 (“The Ten Forces That Flattened the
       World”). In course reader.
    2. Vandana Shiva, “Ecological Balance in an Era of Globalization,” in Frank J. Lechner and
       John Boli, eds., The Globalization Reader (2004). In course reader.
Supplemental reading:
    3. Jagdish Bhagwati, In Defense of Globalization (2004), p. 1-50 (“Coping with Anti-
       Globalization”)
    4. H. Richard Friman and Peter Andreas, The Illicit Global Economy and State Power (1999).
    5. James Davison Hunter and Joshua Yates, “In the Vanguard of Globalization: The World
       of American Globalizers,” in Peter L. Berger and Samuel Huntington, eds., Many
       Globalizations: Cultural Diversity in the Contemporary World (2003).
    6. Robert O. Keohane and Joseph S. Nye, Jr., “Globalization: What's New? What's Not?
       (And So What?),” Foreign Policy 118. (2000).
    7. Naomi Klein, No Logo: No Space, No Choice, No Jobs (2000).
    8. Jurgen Osterhammel and Niels P. Petersson, Globalization: A Short History (2005).
    9. Roland Robertson, Globalization (2001).
    10. Martin Wolf, Why Globalization Works, esp. ch. 2, 5, 7.

January 31: The Twisted Ethics of Deviant Globalization
Required reading:
    1. Peter Andreas, “Illicit International Political Economy: The Clandestine Side of
       Globalization,” Review of International Political Economy 11:3 (2004). In course reader.
    2. Georges Bataille, “The Notion of Expenditure,” in Visions of Excess, ed. Allan Stoekl, Carl
       R. Lovitt, and Donald M. Leslie, Jr. (1985). In course reader.
    3. Gargi Bhattacharyya, Traffick: The Illicit Movement of People and Things, ch. 1-2 (“How Did
       We Get Here” and “The Underbelly of the Global”)
    4. Alphonso Lingis, “Flesh Trade,” parallax 7:1 (2001). In course reader.




Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 2
    5. Moisés Naím, Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global
       Economy, ch. 1-2 (The Wars We Are Losing” and “Global Smugglers Are Changing Your
       World”)
    6. Susan Pozo, “Below the Surface: Underground Economic Activity,” Harvard International
       Review 27:4 (2006). In course reader.
Supplemental reading:
    7. Georges Bataille, “The Psychological Structure of Fascism,” in Visions of Excess, ed. Allan
       Stoekl, Carl R. Lovitt, and Donald M. Leslie, Jr. (1985). In course reader.
    8. Melinda Cooper, “On the Brink: From Mutual Deterrence to Uncontrollable War,”
       Contretemps 4 (2004).
    9. R. T. Naylor, Wages of Crime: Black Markets, Illegal Finance and the Underworld Economy
       (2005).
    10. William Schweiker, “A Preface to Ethics: Global Dynamics and the Integrity of Life,”
        Journal of Religious Ethics, 32:1. In course reader.
    11. Phil Williams, “Crime, Illicit Markets, and Money Laundering,” in P. J. Simmons and C.
        de Jonge Oudrat, eds., Managing Global Issues (2003). Available at:
        http://www.ceip.org/files/pdf/mgi-ch3.pdf.


Theme I: “Unpleasant Goods”
February 7: Deviant medicine: the global organ bazaar
Required reading:
    1. Nancy Morgan, “Human Organs: Another Chinese Export, World Report, July 7, 2000. In
       course reader.
    2. David J. Rothman, “The International Organ Traffic,” New York Review of Books 45:5
       (1998). In course reader.
    3. Nancy Scheper-Hughes, “The Ends of the Body: Commodity Fetishism and the Global
       Traffic in Organs,” SAIS Review 22:1 (2002). In course reader.
    4. Movie to see in class: “Transplant Tourism” (2003).
Supplemental reading:
    5. Ed Brassard, Body For Sale: An Inside Look At Medical Research, Drug Testing, And Organ
       Transplants And How You Can Profit From Them (1996).
    6. Michele Goodwin, Black Markets: The Supply and Demand of Body Parts (2006)
    7. Nancy Scheper-Hughes, “Kidney kin: inside the transatlantic transplant trade,” Harvard
       International Review 27:4 (2006).
    8. Nancy Scheper-Hughes, “Theft of Life: The Globalization of Organ Stealing Rumours,”
       Anthropology Today 12:3 (1996).
    9. Nancy Scheper-Hughes, “Parts unknown: Undercover ethnography of the organs-
       trafficking underworld,” Ethnography 5:1 (2004).
    10. Nancy Scheper-Hughes, “Rotten trade: millennial capitalism, human values and global
        justice in organs trafficking,” Journal of Human Rights 2:2 (2003).




Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 3
February 14: Deviant commerce: narcotics trafficking
Required reading:
    1. Peter R. Andreas, et al., “Dead-End Drug Wars,” Foreign Policy 85 (1992). In course
       reader.
    2. Gargi Bhattacharyya, Traffick: The Illicit Movement of People and Things, ch. 4 (“Drugs,
       Territory and Transnational Networks”).
    3. Tom Blickman, “The Global Ecstasy Industry: Exploring the Global Market,”
       Transnational Institute (2004). Available in course reader and at:
       http://www.tni.org/reports/drugs/crime1.pdf.
    4. Alfred W. McCoy, “The Stimulus of Prohibition: A Critical History of the Global
       Narcotics Trade,” in Michael Steinberg et al., eds., Dangerous Harvest: Drug Plants and the
       Transformation of Indigenous Landscapes (2004). In course reader.
    5. Moisés Naím, Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global
       Economy, ch. 4 (“No Business Like Drug Business”).
Supplemental reading:
    6. Michael Agar, “Going for the Global: The Case of Ecstasy,” Human Organization 62:1
       (2003). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/yhlj4m.
    7. Roberto Araújo, et al., “Social and Cultural Dimensions of Drug Trafficking,” UNESCO,
       Globalisation, Drugs and Criminalisation (2002). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/y6h2n3.
    8. Manuel Castells, “The Perverse Connection: The Global Criminal Economy,” in Castells,
       End of Millenium (2000).
    9. Jorge Chabat, “Mexico’s War on Drugs: No Margin for Maneuver,” Annals of the
       American Academy of Political and Social Science 582 (2002).
    10. Rosaleen Duffy, “Criminalisation and the Politics of Governance: Illicit Gem Sapphire
        Mining in Madagascar” (2005). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/w3fa8.
    11. Alan Dupont, “Transnational Crime, Drugs, and Security in East Asia,” Asian Survey
        39:3 (1999).
    12. Paul R. Kan, “Webs of Smoke: Drugs and Small Wars,” Small Wars and Insurgencies 17:2
        (2006).
    13. Chris Lyttleton, “Relative Pleasures: Drugs, Development and Modern Dependencies in
        Asia's Golden Triangle,” Development and Change 35 (2004).
    14. Curtis Marez, Drug Wars: Political Economy of Narcotics (2004).
    15. Kim Murphy. “Forging Ahead in Moscow,” Los Angeles Times, 10 July 2006. Available at
        http://tinyurl.com/s3uj9 .
    16. Willem Van Schendel and Itty Abraham eds., Illicit Flows and Criminal Things: States,
        Borders, and the Other Side of Globalization (2005).
    17. John R. Wagley, “Transnational Organized Crime: Principal Threats and U.S.
        Responses,” Congressional Research Service (2006).
    18. Matthew Zook, “Underground Globalization: Mapping the Space of Flows of the
        Internet Adult Industry,” Environment and Planning A 35 (2003).




Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 4
February 21: Deviant militarism: the global weapons trade
Required reading:
    1. Gargi Bhattacharyya, Traffick: The Illicit Movement of People and Things, ch. 5 (“Nuclear
       Holocaust or Drive-By Shooting?”).
    2. Douglas Farah and Stephen Braun, “The Merchant of Death,” Foreign Policy (2006). In
       course reader.
    3. Moisés Naím, Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global
       Economy, ch. 3 (“Small Arms and Loose Nukes”).
Supplemental reading:
    4. Mike Bourne, et al., “Reviewing Action on Small Arms 2006: Assessing the First Five
       Years of the UN Programme of Action,” International Action Network on Small Arms
       (2006).
    5. Gordon Corera, Shopping for Bombs: Nuclear Proliferation, Global Insecurity, and the Rise and
       Fall of the A.Q. Khan Network (2006).
    6. William W. Keller and Janne E. Nolan, “The Arms Trade: Business as Usual?” Foreign
       Policy 109 (1997).
    7. David Kinsella, “Mapping the Small Arms Trade: Insights from Social Network
       Analysis,” (2004).
    8. Rachel J. Stohl, “Fighting the Illicit Trafficking of Small Arms,” SAIS Review 25:1 (2005).


February 28: Deviant immigration: contemporary slavery and human smuggling networks
Required reading:
    1. Gargi Bhattacharyya, Traffick: The Illicit Movement of People and Things (2005), ch. 6
       (“Circulating Bodies in the Global Marketplace”).
    2. Moisés Naím, Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global
       Economy (2005), ch. 5 (“Why Is Slavery Booming in the 21st Century?”).
Supplemental reading:
    3. Kevin Bales, Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy (2005), ch. 1 (“The New
       Slavery”).
    4. Grace Chang, “Global Exchange: The World Bank, ‘Welfare Reform,’ and the Trade in
       Migrant Women,” in Disposable Domestics: Immigrant Women Workers in the Global
       Economy (2000).
    5. Johanna Granville, “From Russia without Love: The ‘Fourth Wave’ of Global Human
       Trafficking,” Demokratizatsiia 12 (2004). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/yz8l4x.
    6. Richard Gunde, “The Dark Side of Globalization: Trafficking & Transborder Crime to,
       through, and from Eastern Europe,” UCLA International Institute. Available at
       http://tinyurl.com/ya5xxk.
    7. Timothy Lim, “The Smuggling and Trafficking of Korean Women to the United States: A
       Preliminary Study,” IOM Seoul Public Symposium on Korean Victims of Trafficking (2006).
    8. Kristiina Kangaspunta, “Mapping the Inhuman Trade: Preliminary Findings of The
       Database On Trafficking In Human Beings,” Forum on Crime and Society 3:1 and 3:2
       (2003).



Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 5
    9. Rey Koslowski, “Economic Globalization, Human Smuggling, and Global Governance,”
       in David Kyle and Rey Koslowski, eds., Global Human Smuggling: Comparative
       Perspectives (2001).
    10. John Salt, “Trafficking and Human Smuggling: A European Perspective,” International
        Migration, Special Issue 2000/1.
    11. John Salt and J. Stein, “Migration as a Business: The Case of Trafficking,” International
        Migration (1997).
    12. “Trafficking in Persons Report,” United States Department of State (2006).

March 7: Deviant dumping: the global flow of garbage
Required reading:
    1. Jennifer Clapp, Toxic Exports: The Transfer of Hazardous Wastes and Technologies from Rich
       to Poor Countries (2001), ch. 1 (“Hazardous Transfer from Rich to Poor Countries). In
       course reader.
    2. Moisés Naím, Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global
       Economy, ch. 8 (“What Do Orangutans, Human Kidneys, Garbage and Van Gogh Have
       in Common?”).
    3. Kate O’Neill, “Radioactive ‘Trade’: Globalizing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle,” SAIS Review
       22:1 (2002). In course reader.
    4. Lydia Polgreen and Marlise Simons, “Global Sludge Ends in Tragedy for Ivory Coast,”
       New York Times, 2 October 2006. Available at: http://tinyurl.com/yetrgd.
Supplemental reading:
    5. Jennifer Clapp, “The Illicit Trade in Hazardous Wastes and CFCs: International
       Responses to Environmental ‘Bads,’” in Peter Andreas and Richard Friman, eds., The
       Illicit Global Economy and State Power (1999).
    6. Alistair Iles, “Mapping Environmental Justice in Technology Flows: Computer Waste
       Impacts in Asia,” Global Environmental Politics 4:4 (2004).
    7. Simon Levin and Anastasios Xepapadeas, “Transboundary Pollution Flows, Capital
       Mobility and the Emergence of Regional Inequalities.” Available at:
       http://tinyurl.com/yzkxzb.
    8. William Langewiesche, “The Shipbreakers,” Atlantic Monthly 286:2 (2000). Available at:
       http://www.wesjones.com/shipbreakers.htm.
    9. Kate O’Neill, “Globalization and Hazardous Waste Management: From Brown to
       Green?” in Dynamics of Regulatory Change: How Globalization Affects National Regulatory
       Policies. Available at: http://tinyurl.com/yauhhp.


Theme II: “Dual Use”
March 14: Deviant tourism: global sex trade
Topics for Research Papers Due
Required reading:
    1. Meredith May, “Diary of a Sex Slave,” San Francisco Chronicle (October 2006). Available
       at: http://www.sfgate.com/sextrafficking/.



Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 6
    2. Saskia Sassen, “Global Cities and Survival Circuits,” in Barbara Ehrenreich and Arlie
       Russell Hochschild, eds., Global Woman: Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New
       Economy (2004). In course reader.
Supplemental reading:
    3. Karen Beeks and Delila Amir, Trafficking and the Global Sex Industry (2006).
    4. Denise Brennan, “Selling Sex for Visas: Sex Tourism as a Stepping-stone to International
       Migration,” in Barbara Ehrenreich & Arlie Russell Hochschild, eds., Global Woman:
       Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy (2004).
    5. Ralf Emmers, “Globalization and Non-Traditional Security Issues: a Study of Human
       and Drug Trafficking in East Asia,” IDSS working paper 62.
    6. Kathryn Farr, Sex Trafficking: The Global Market in Women and Children (2004)
    7. Timothy Lim, “The Smuggling and Trafficking of Korean Women to the United States: A
       Preliminary Study.” IOM Seoul Public Symposium on Korean Victims of Trafficking (2006).
       Available at: http://tinyurl.com/y6d79w.
    8. Victor Malarek, The Natashas: Inside the New Global Sex Trade (2003).
    9. Rhacel Salazar Pareñas, Servants of Globalization: Women, Migration and Domestic Work
       (2001).
    10. Chris Ryan and Colin Michael Hall, Sex Tourism: Marginal People and Liminalities (2001).
    11. Nancy A. Wonders and Raymond Michalowski, “Bodies, Borders, and Sex Tourism in a
        Globalized World: A Tale of Two Cities—Amsterdam and Havana,” Social Problems 48:4
        (2001).


March 21: Deviant banking: transnational money laundering
Required reading:
    1. Moisés Naím, Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global
       Economy, ch. 7 (“The Money Washers”).
    2. R. T. Naylor, Wages of Crime: Black Markets, Illegal Finance, and the Underworld Economy
       (2002), ch. 4 (“Offshore Havens, Bank Secrecy and Money Laundering”). In course
       reader.
Supplemental reading:
    1. Financial Action Task Force, “Trade Based Money Laundering.” Available at:
       http://www.fatf-gafi.org/dataoecd/60/25/37038272.pdf.
    2. Rob McCusker, “Underground Banking: Legitimate Remittance Network or Money
       Laundering System?” Trends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice 300 (2005).
    3. Paul Allan Schott, “The Financial Intelligence Unit,” Reference Guide to Anti-Money
       Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism (2006.)
    4. William R. Schroeder, “Money Laundering,” Law Enforcement Bulletin 70:5 (2001).
    5. Phil Williams, “Crime, Illicit Markets, and Money Laundering.” Available at:
       http://www.ceip.org/files/pdf/mgi-ch3.pdf.


March 28: Spring Break




Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 7
April 4: Deviant NGOs: transnational gangs
Required reading:
    1. Gargi Bhattacharyya, Traffick: The Illicit Movement of People and Things, ch. 3 (“Winning
       the Cold War: The Power of Organized Crime in the Global Economy”).
    2. John Hagedorn, “The Global Impact of Gangs,” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice
       (2005). Available at: http://ccj.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/21/2/153.pdf.
    3. Robert J. Lopez, Rich Connell and Chris Kraul, “Gang Uses Deportation to Its
       Advantage to Flourish in U.S.,” Los Angeles Times, 30 October 2005. Available at:
       www.latimes.com/ms13gang.
    4. Andrew V. Papachristos, “Gang World.” Foreign Policy March/April 2005. Available at:
       http://tinyurl.com/woulp.
    5. Ryan Ramor, “Mara Salvatrucha, Social War and the Decline of the Revolutionary
       Movements in Central America,” Anarchism. Available at: http://tinyurl.com/y4kdge.
    6. Phil Williams, “Transnational Criminal Networks,” in John Arquilla & David F. Ronfeldt
       eds., Networks and Netwars: The Future of Terror, Crime, and Militancy (2002). Available at:
       http://tinyurl.com/v378j.
Supplemental reading:
    7. Jay Albanese, Transnational Crime (2005).
    8. Ana Arana, “How the Street Gangs Took Central America,” Foreign Affairs 84:3 (2005).
    9. Gregg Barak, “Crime and Crime Control in an Age of Globalization: A Theoretical
       Dissection,” Critical Criminology 10:1 (2001).
    10. H. Richard Friman, “The Great Escape? Globalization, Immigrant Entrepreneurship and
        the Criminal Economy,” Review of International Political Economy 11:1 (2004).
    11. Donald R. Liddick, The Global Underworld: Transnational Crime and the United States (2004).
    12. James H. Mittelman and Robert Johnston, “Global Organized Crime,” ch. 11 in James
        Mittleman, The Globalization Syndrome (2000).
    13. John T. Picarelli, “The Turbulent Nexus of Transnational Organised Crime and
        Terrorism: A Theory of Malevolent International Relations,” Global Crime 7:1 (2006).
    14. Thomas M. Sanderson, “Transnational Terror and Organized Crime: Blurring the Lines,”
        SAIS Review 24:1 (2004).
    15. Louise I. Shelley, “Transnational Organized Crime: The New Authoritarianism,” in Peter
        Andreas and Richard Friman, eds., The Illicit Global Economy and State Power (1999).
    16. John P. Sullivan, “Maras Morphing: Revisiting Third Generation gangs,” Global Crime
        7:3-4 (August-November 2006).
    17. Kimberly L. Thachuk, “The Sinister Underbelly: Organized Crime and Terrorism,” in R.
        L. Kugler and E. L. Frost. eds., The Global Century: Globalization and National Security
        (2001).
    18. Emilio C. Viano, Jose Magallanes, and Laurent Bridel, Transnational Organized Crime:
        Myth, Power, and Profit (2003).
    19. John R. Wagley, “Transnational Organized Crime: Principal Threats and U.S.
        Responses.” Congressional Research Service (2006).




Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 8
Theme III: “The Return of the Repressed”
April 11: Deviant militaries: global guerrillas, mercenaries and pirates
Required reading:
    1. John M. Glionna, “A friendly voice, when pirates strike,” Los Angeles Times, 13
       November 2006. Available at: http://tinyurl.com/y6o7xu.
    2. Bernadette Muthien and Ian Taylor, “The Return of the Dogs of War? The Privatization
       of Security in Africa,” in Rodney Bruce Hall and Thomas Bierstecker, eds., The Emergence
       of Private Authority in Global Governance (2002). In course reader.
    3. John Robb, “Green Guerrillas,” “Global Warriors,” “Mercenaries Unbound” and “Global
       Guerrilla Swarming,” Global Guerrillas blog. Available at:
       http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/.
    4. David Ronfeldt, “Al Qaeda and its affiliates: a global tribe waging segmental warfare?”
       First Monday 10:3 (2005). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/uzy3g.
    5. Marc Sageman, “Social Networks and the Jihad,” in Understanding Terror Networks (2006).
       In course reader.
    6. Yossi Sheffi, “Supply Chain Management under the Threat of International Terrorism.”
       The International Journal of Logistics Management 12:2 (2001). Available at:
       http://tinyurl.com/y4slvf.
    7. Video: “Dirty Kuffar”: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Nf7Ht7SIXyI
Additional reading:
    8. Kyle Ballard, “The Privatization of Military Affairs: A Look into the Private Military
       Industry.” Available at: http://tinyurl.com/y63n7s.
    9. Russell D. Howard and Reid L. Sawyer, Terrorism and Counterterrorism (2004).
    10. Robert Young Pelton, Licensed to Kill: Hired Guns in the War on Terror (2006).
    11. P. W. Singer, “Corporate Warriors: The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry and Its
        Ramifications for International Security,” International Security 26:3 (2001).
    12. John P. Sullivan, “Terrorism, Crime and Private Armies,” in Robert J. Bunker, ed.,
        Networks, Terrorism and Global Insurgency (2006).


April 18: Deviant public health: global diseases/pandemics
Required reading:
    1. Alexey Bobrik, “Prison Health in Russia: The Larger Picture,” Journal of Public Health
       Policy (2005). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/yzcx4y.
    2. Laurie Garrett, “The Next Pandemic?” Foreign Affairs (2005). Available at:
       http://tinyurl.com/ykbr8y.
    3. Maud Huynen, et al., “The Health Impacts of Globalisation: A Conceptual Framework.”
       Globalization and Health 1:14 (2005). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/yn4t92.
    4. Barry M. Popkin, “Technology, transport, globalization and the nutrition transition food
       policy.” Food Policy (2006). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/y5tphn.
    5. Lance Saker, et al., “Globalization and Infectious Diseases: A Review of the Linkages.”
       Special Topics in Social, Economic and Behavioral Research (2004). Available at:
       http://tinyurl.com/yzhzxe.


Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 9
Additional reading:
    6. Sherry Cooper, “Pandemics, Panic, and the Global Economy,” An Investor’s Guide to
       Avian Flu, BMO Nesbitt Burns Research (2005). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/756wc
    7. Hoosen M. Coovadia and Jacqui Hadingham, “HIV/AIDS: Global Trends, Global Funds
       and Delivery Bottlenecks.” Globalization and Health 1:13 (2005). Available at:
       http://tinyurl.com/ybf66t.
    8. Paul Farmer, “A Plague on All our Houses? Resurgent Tuberculosis inside Russia’s
       Prisons,” in Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor (2004).
    9. David P. Fidler, SARS, Governance and the Globalization of Disease (2004).
    10. David P. Fidler, “SARS: Political Pathology of the First Post-Westphalian Pathogen,”
        Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 31 (2003).
    11. Stacey Knobler, Adel A. F. Mahmoud, Stanley M. Lemon, eds., The Impact of Globalization
        on Infectious Disease Emergence and Control: Exploring the Consequences And Opportunities
        (2006).
    12. Kelley Lee, “The Global Dimensions of Cholera,” Global Change & Human Health 2:1
        (2001).
    13. Richard Lewontin and Richard Levins, “The Return of Old Diseases and The
        Appearance of New Ones,” in Matthew Gandy, ed., The Return of the White Plague: Global
        Poverty and the ‘New’ Tuberculosis (2004).
    14. Roy Smith, “The Impact of Globalization on Nutrition Patterns: a Case Study of the
        Marshall Islands,” in Kelley Lee, Health Impacts of Globalization: Towards Global
        Governance (2003).


April 25: Deviant authority: the new cast of actors in failed states
Required reading:
    1. Francis Fukuyama, “Nation-Building 101,” Atlantic Monthly (2004). Available in course
       reader and at: http://tinyurl.com/y4y8rr.
    2. Rodney Bruce Hall and Thomas Bierstecker, “The Emergence of Private Authority in the
       International System,” in Rodney Bruce Hall and Thomas Bierstecker, eds., The
       Emergence of Private Authority in Global Governance (2002). In course reader.
    3. Sebastian Junger, “Blood Oil,” Vanity Fair, February 2007. Available at:
       http://tinyurl.com/yy8byu.
    4. Robert Kaplan, “The Lawless Frontier,” Atlantic Monthly (2000). Available in course
       reader and at: http://tinyurl.com/yxzcgl.
    5. Robert I. Rotberg, “Failed States in a World of Terror,” Foreign Affairs 81:4 (2002). In
       course reader.
    6. Phil Williams, “Transnational Organized Crime and the State,” in Rodney Bruce Hall
       and Thomas Bierstecker, eds., The Emergence of Private Authority in Global Governance
       (2002). In course reader.
Additional reading:
    1. Steven Brayton, “Outsourcing War: Mercenaries and the Privatization of Peacekeeping,”
       Journal of International Affairs 55:2 (2002).



Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 10
    2. Robert H. Dorff, “Democratization and Failed States: The Challenge of
       Ungovernability,” Parameters (1996). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/yynqhw.
    3. Peter Eigen, “Corruption in a Globalized World,” SAIS Review 22:1 (2005).
    4. James D. Fearon and David D. Laitin, “Neotrusteeship and the Problem of Weak States,”
       International Security 28:4 (2004). Available at: http://tinyurl.com/ym2xhq.
    5. John Ghazvinian, “The Curse of Oil,” Virginia Quarterly Review (Winter 2007). Available
       at: http://www.vqronline.org/articles/2007/winter/ghazvinian-curse-of-oil/.
    6. Dietrich Jung, ed., Shadow Globalization, Ethnic Conflicts and New Wars: A Political Economy
       of Intra-State War (2003).
    7. Louise I. Shelley, “Crime and Corruption in the Digital Age,” Journal of International
       Affairs 51 (1998).
    8. Ron Stodghill, “Oil, Cash and Corruption.” New York Times, 5 November 2006. Available
       at: http://tinyurl.com/yypogy.
    9. “Transdniester Votes for Independence.” Power and Interest News Report, 19 September
       2006. Available at: http://tinyurl.com/yj2lj6.


May 2: Conclusion
Research Papers Due
Required reading:
    1. Moisés Naím, Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global
       Economy, ch. 9-13.


Appendix: Additional Deviant Globalization Readings
    1. Glenn Curtis and Tara Karacan, “The Nexus among Terrorists, Narcotics Traffickers,
       Weapons Proliferators, and Organized Crime Networks in Western Europe,” Federal
       Research Division of the US Library of Congress (2002).
    2. Mike Davis, Planet of Slums (2006).
    3. John M. Hagedorn, ed., Gangs in the Global City: Alternatives to Traditional Criminology
       (2006).
    4. G. Bruce Knecht, Hooked: Pirates, Poaching, and the Perfect Fish (2006).
    5. John Kerry, The New War: The Web of Crime That Threatens America’s Security (1998).
    6. Donald R. Liddick, The Global Underworld: Transnational Crime and the United States (2004).
    7. Jörg Raab and H. Brinton Milward, “Dark Networks as Problems,” Journal of Public
       Administration Research and Theory 13 (2003).
    8. Norrin M. Ripsman and T. V. Paul, “Globalization and the National Security State: A
       Framework for Analysis,” International Studies Review 7:2 (2005).
    9. Letizia Paoli, “The Development of an Illegal Market: Drug Consumption and Trade in
       Post-Soviet Russia,” The British Journal of Criminology 42 (2002).
    10. Nikos Passas and Neva R. Goodwin, “A Crime by Any Other Name,” in Passas and
        Goodwin, eds., It’s Legal but It Ain’t Right: Harmful Social Consequences of Legal Industries
        (2005).



Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 11
    11. Karl Schoenberger, “Emancipating the Slaves to Neoclassical Economics,” SAIS Review
        22:1 (2005).
    12. Susan K. Sell, “U.S. Intellectual Property Rights in Historical Perspective,” Private Power,
        Public Law: The Globalization of Intellectual Property Rights (2003).
    13. Louise I. Shelley, “Crime as the defining issue: voices of another criminology,”
        International Annals of Criminology 39:1/2 (2002).
    14. Michael K. Steinberg, et al., eds., Dangerous Harvest: Drug Plants and the Transformation of
        Indigenous Landscapes (2004).
    15. Phil Williams and Dimitri Vlassis, Combating Transnational Crime: Concepts, Activities and
        Responses (2001).
    16. Henry H. Willis, Evaluating the Security of the Global Containerized Supply Chain (2006).
    17. Adam J. Young, “Roots of Contemporary Maritime Piracy in Southeast Asia,” in Derek
        Johnson and Mark Valencia, eds., Piracy in Southeast Asia: Status, Issues, and Responses
        (2005).




Syllabus to Gilman, Goldhammer, Weber, “Deviant Globalization,” Spring 2007, p. 12

				
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