Annual Report - 2000-2001

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					            Annual Report
Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research
        April 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001
                                    Annual Report

              Alberta Centre for Injury Control & Research
              April 1, 2000 – March 31, 2001
              Our Vision: Creating a Caring and Safe Alberta



Table of Contents


Annual Report                                                  Page

Executive Summary                                                3
Driving Forward in Injury Control                                5

Goal 1: Program Support                                          7
Goal 2: Research, Surveillance and Evaluation                   12
Goal 3: Information Sharing                                     14
Goal 4: Education                                               20

Appendix
Consolidated Financial Statement                                23
ACICR Advisory Body                                             25
ACICR Staff List                                                26
Safe Communities                                                27
ACICR Research Projects                                         28
ACICR Journal Publications                                      29
ACICR Community Injury Control Fund Grant Recipients            30

Project Overviews
       Program Support                                          31
       Research, Surveillance and Evaluation                    70
       Information Sharing                                      90
       Education                                               104




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Executive Summary

Preventable injury is the leading cause of death for Albertans under the age of 45. This
disease accounts for more potential years of life lost than any other disease in Alberta.

The Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research (ACICR) has worked over the past
three years to create a caring and safe Alberta by reducing the frequency and optimizing
the treatment and rehabilitation of injuries in Alberta. This report summarizes the past
year of the Centre’s accomplishments.

The fiscal year ending March 31, 2001 was a time of growth for the Centre with
increased core funding from Alberta Health and Wellness and the coordination of more
programs and projects. The following are highlights of the past year.

The ACICR continues to play a coordinating and facilitating role with the Regional Health
Authority (RHA) and Safe Community Safety Promotion Network. The Network is
comprised of one representative from each of Alberta’s seventeen RHA’s and nine Safe
Communities. It is designed to foster cooperation and collaboration in safety promotion
among communities and regions, and strengthen and formalize supportive relationships.
The Network met three times during the 2000-2001 fiscal year.

In September, an exciting new injury control fund for community safety projects was
launched. The ACICR Community Injury Control Fund (CICF) is supported by funding
from Alberta Health and Wellness and is administered by ACICR. The Fund provides
$50,000 in minor grants (under $1000 each) and $200,000 for larger grants (up to
$10,000 each). The program supports grant application writing as well as program
planning, implementation and evaluation. It also provides ongoing support to grant
recipients throughout the duration of their projects. To date there are a total of forty-six
recipients, twenty-three in each category.

The Traffic Services Pilot Project is an initiative of the Traffic Committee of the Canadian
Association of Chiefs of Police, the RCMP Headquarters in Ottawa, including RCMP ‘K’
Division in Alberta, and other stakeholders. The project is intended to examine the
delivery of quality traffic services within a community-based service delivery
environment. The main partners on the project in Alberta are the ACICR, the Alberta
Motor Association (AMA), and the regional health authorities. ACICR’s role on the
project is that of supporting research and evaluation to the Southern Alberta Pilot
Project, while AMA supports the program coordination. ACICR has committed a staff
member to this project through a secondment to the RCMP.

ACICR, in partnership with various stakeholders across the province and Alberta Health
and Wellness formed the Provincial Trauma Working Group. This group is committed to
the development of an organized and integrated trauma system for the province of
Alberta. Recommendations by this group for a comprehensive provincial trauma system
were drafted into the Provincial Trauma System Proposal and submitted to the
government in late March. Through accreditation, policy development and dedicated
resources, the working group proposes development an efficient and comprehensive
trauma system to reduce morbidity and mortality resulting from trauma.

With the support of Alberta Health and Wellness, the ACICR has produced the 1997
Injury in Alberta Data Report as well as two accompanying data subset reports. The


                                                                                               3
Report is designed to assist in identifying the causes of injury-related deaths, inpatient
hospitalizations, and emergency room visits. This information can be used to guide
program planning and aid in evaluation. Two special data reports were also produced,
the first was on suicide and the second was on children’s injury.

Undertaking Qualitative Research, a textbook written by Dr. Peter Rothe, ACICR Senior
Research Associate, was published last year. The book introduces the theory and
practice of qualitative research and highlights the pros and cons of such methods.
Several graduate-level courses are currently using this book as a learning tool.

As a representative on the organizing committee, along with other governmental and
regional partners, the ACICR was involved in organizing and hosting the Second Alberta
Rural Safety Forum in March 2001. ACICR received a $5000 grant from Health
Canada’s Rural and Remote Health Innovations Initiative to host the Forum. The one-
day Forum included 54 representatives of government organizations, community safety
groups, educational institutions and other individuals interested in farm safety. The
meeting resulted in the establishment of the Alberta Rural Safety Network.

In 2000, the ACICR brought together eight organizations to produce a provincial
awareness campaign highlighting injuries as a public health concern to Albertans. The
Steering Committee developed a communications strategy that called for the
development of two thirty-second advertisements, a nine-minute video, a two-minute
looped video, and Internet website for the general publication, and supporting print
materials. The campaign launched in April 2001with the support of many RHA’s and
Safe Communities across the province.

In 2000, ACICR embarked upon a new service initiative supporting a central provincial
registry and referral service for speakers, presenters and workshop leaders. The Alberta
Injury Control Speakers Registry connects organizers of meetings, workshops, seminars
and conferences with people who are knowledgeable on various aspects of injury
control. Currently, 15 speakers have registered with the service.

ACICR partnered with the British Columbia Injury Prevention and Research Unit
(BCIRPU) to host the Canadian Conference on Injury Prevention and Control – 2000.
The conference was held in Kananaskis, Alberta and was host to 301 delegates of
national and international representation. The conference featured internationally
acclaimed plenary speakers, over twenty-five concurrent sessions and over fifty poster
presentations.

The Canadian Injury Prevention and Control Curriculum (CIPCC) Project is led by the
ACICR and Plan-It Safe: Child & Youth Injury Prevention Centre. Funded by Health
Canada’s Population Health Fund, this project of the Canadian Collaborative Centres for
Injury Prevention and Control (CCCIPC) is a three-year initiative dedicated to producing
a flexible, modular curriculum to be used by community practitioners in injury prevention
and control across Canada. The goal is to develop a national injury control curriculum
that is generic enough to be offered to all injury prevention practitioners, yet flexible
enough to meet their specific needs.




                                                                                             4
Driving Forward in Injury Control

The burden of injury in Alberta not only comes with a high economic cost to society, but
also reflects physical, mental and emotional costs to the individual. Injury remains the
leading cause of death for people in Alberta aged 1 to 44 years and accounts for more
potential years of life lost that any other disease in Alberta. More than 1300 people in
Alberta needlessly lose their lives due to injury each year. Whether intentional or
unintentional, fatal or non-fatal, injury results in tremendous losses in Alberta and across
the nation. These events are preventable and predictable and ACICR is beginning the
process

A province-wide, multi-sectoral, multi-disciplinary Advisory Body guides vision, policy
and priorities activities of the ACICR. The Centre’s vision is to create a caring and safe
Alberta by reducing the frequency and optimizing the treatment and rehabilitation of
injuries in Alberta. Thus the Centre addresses the full continuum of injury control, from
injury prevention, through emergency medical services, to acute care management of
the injured individual, to the rehabilitation and re-integration of the injured individual in
society.

Over the last three years, ACICR has supported the injury control community in Alberta
through its coordination and leadership, building on strengths through multi-sectoral
partnerships, cooperation, and collaboration, using community-based approaches.
Provincial coordination and support provided by the ACICR helps strengthen the efforts,
overall initiatives, and activities of provincial, regional and community agencies,
practitioners, and other key stakeholders throughout Alberta.

ACICR carries out its activities in four core areas, which include: program support;
information sharing; research, surveillance and evaluation; and education.

Recognizing that the needs across the province are truly diverse in nature, priority
setting is critical and has guided the Centre’s activities over the last three years.
ACICR’s priority areas of focus are determined by a set of criteria to ensure capturing
the needs of the entire province. Priority setting criteria take the following factors into
consideration:

•   Severity and incidence of injury
•   Evidence and research results (i.e. potential for success, effectiveness of strategies)
•   Equity in geographical distribution
•   Community-identified needs and expressed interest to work with the ACICR
•   Opportunities for partnership
•   Availability of human and financial resources
•   The ability to further ACICR goals and alignment with the objectives of the business
    plan.

Identified priority areas within which ACICR conducts its core activities and focuses its
injury initiatives include: Traffic, Suicide, Aboriginal communities, Falls and Farming.

In carrying out its vision and mission, ACICR demonstrates excellence in the programs
and services it provides by applying a relevant and ethical scientific approach in its
research, education and advocacy. ACICR sets measurable objectives and monitors



                                                                                                5
outcomes that result in effectiveness in all programs and services. Innovative and
flexible approaches to the work and development of partnerships allows the Centre to
continue to grow and meet the needs of the province. ACICR recognizes the
contributions of its stakeholders and respects their views and approaches to injury
control.




                                                                                       6
Goal 1: Program Support
ACICR will provide leadership and support in the development, implementation,
dissemination and evaluation of injury control programs and initiatives through
community mobilization, consultation, partnering, and capacity building.

Objective 1.1 To establish and maintain a multi-sectoral partnership approach to
injury control.

The Centre continues to collaborate and partner with organizations, government
departments, agencies and community groups across the province and the country. New
alliances in the past year have included working with the Canadian Coalition for
Agricultural Safety and Rural Health, and the Canadian Collaborative Centres for Injury
Prevention and Control.


Objective 1.2 To facilitate the community development process to establish Safe
Communities in Alberta.

Regional Health Authority and Safe Community Safety Promotion Network

The ACICR plays a coordinating and facilitating role with the Regional Health Authority
(RHA) and Safe Community Safety Promotion Network. The Network is comprised of
one representative from each of Alberta’s seventeen RHA’s and nine Safe Communities
(See Appendix page 26). It is designed to foster cooperation and collaboration in safety
promotion among communities and regions, and strengthen and formalize supportive
relationships. The Network allows practitioners to share their program knowledge and
skills with one another, enhances skills through educational opportunities, updates on
current programs, and the activities of injury control stakeholders. The meetings are
organized and co-chaired by ACICR staff and a member of the Network. The Network
met three times during the 2000-2001 fiscal year.

International Safe Community Work

Having received accreditation from the World Health Organization (WHO) as the first of
seven Affiliate Safe Community Support Centres around the world, ACICR has the
responsibility to support and assist with the understanding and adoption of the
International Safe Community Model in Alberta. Ongoing communication and
partnership with Alberta Safe Communities, the WHO Collaborating Centre on
Community Safety Promotion at Karolinska Institute in Sweden, and the other Affiliate
Support Centres around the world enables ACICR to support global networking among
injury control advocates, and promote community-based action on injury control.

Community Action Guide and Workshops

Initiated in 1999, the ACICR continues to lead a joint international effort to develop a
Guide for Community Action on Safety Promotion. The manual will provide a guide for
establishing and sustaining community action to design and implement community-
based safety promotion programs. ACICR facilitated three pilot workshop sessions
based on the draft guide in Alberta over the last year. The workshops, held in Edson,
Coronation and Stettler, were used for gathering feedback to aid in the development and
revision of the guide. It is intended that this guide will be used or adapted by


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communities throughout the province, country and around the world. The completed
guide will be available in the summer of 2001.


Objective 1.3 To support the development, implementation, and evaluation of
prioritized injury prevention, emergency medical services, acute care and
rehabilitation programs and initiatives.

ACICR Community Injury Control Fund

In September, an exciting new injury control fund for community safety projects was
launched. The ACICR Community Injury Control Fund (CICF) is supported by funding
from Alberta Health and Wellness and is administered by the ACICR. The Fund
provides $50,000 in minor grants (under $1000 each) and $200,000 for larger grants (up
to $10,000 each). Minor grants are reviewed by program staff on an on-going basis until
the allocated funds are expended. Larger grant applications were due in November
2000. A Grant Review Committee made up of representatives from various parts of the
province reviewed the larger grant applications and made funding decisions. (See
Appendix page 29).

The CICF supports three types of community projects:
1. Projects designed to develop and implement injury prevention strategies.
2. Projects that build or strengthen local involvement in and support for community
   injury prevention coalitions, action groups, alliances or networks
3. Projects that develop or strengthen local systems and information to support injury
   prevention efforts.

This program supports grant applicants in grant application writing as well as program
planning, implementation and evaluation. It also provides ongoing support to grant
recipients throughout the duration of their projects. To date there are a total of forty-six
recipients, twenty-three in each category.

Injury Prevention Programs Available to Alberta Communities

A collection of one-page profiles on injury prevention programs available to Alberta
communities has been produced and compiled by ACICR in a practical binder format,
with room for the addition of materials as new programs are identified or developed.
Updated or new program pieces will be distributed to all recipients of the binders. The
profiles identify those programs that provide packages, kits or other information and
resources that will assist communities in their implementation. This program support
resource allows the Alberta injury control community to coordinate programs and
services within individual communities without having to ‘reinvent the wheel’. Thirty
binders were initially distributed at no charge to each regional health authority and Safe
Community in Alberta, and to date, another fifteen have been purchased by provincial,
national and international stakeholders.

ACICR Injury Control Photograph Bank

The Centre receives many calls from injury stakeholders requesting photographs to use
in presentations, documents, displays, and other resources. In order to fill these needs,
the Centre shares photographs from the Health Canada Healthy Images programs as


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well as some existing photograph, however, many requests could not be met because
the photographs did not exist or due to copyright. As a result, the ACICR has begun
development of a bank of injury control-related photographs that can be used in a variety
of communications pieces, using the services of a professional photographer. A total of
twenty new photographs will be taken in the first phase of the project. They will be
available as both prints and electronic files for use by the injury control community.

Alberta Rural Safety Forum - also meets Objective 3.1

Prevention Strategies

Supporting Injury Control in Aboriginal Communities

The Centre continues to enjoy a collaborative relationship with the Aboriginal Network
for Safe Communities (ANSC). The Network has continued to provide key advice and
partnership on ACICR’s Aboriginal community development work.

To raise awareness about injuries among First Nations peoples, and to make community
leaders aware of the safety promotion support available to them, the ACICR and ANSC
sent information packages to all First Nations communities in Alberta. The packages
contained information about the ACICR and its services, the ANSC, as well as a copy of
an Aboriginal injury fact sheet. Ninety packages were distributed to each of the health
centres and Administration of forty-five First Nations communities.

As a member of the ANSC, the ACICR has completed a second edition of the Aboriginal
injury prevention and control facilitator guide. The guide, entitled A Journey:
Strengthening Aboriginal Communities Through Injury Prevention, provides guidance for
community practitioners to lead an injury prevention workshop. The guide offers a
flexible course which can be customized to either a one-day injury awareness
orientation, or a three-day community mobilization workshop. With input from the ANSC
and users of the previous addition, the new guide has improved upon its content, and
updated data.

ACICR plays a coordinating role in the Aboriginal Seat Belt Initiative as a key component
of its community mobilization strategy. The goal of seat belt initiative is to increase the
seat belt wearing rate of on-reserve residents in four participating First Nation
communities in Alberta. The initiative is comprised of three phases:
1) A preliminary survey to assess the local seat belt wearing rate of drivers in the
     community.
2) An educational approach with community schools where students are targeted for
     awareness of seat belt wearing and presented with safety messages and seat belt
     demonstrations. Students are then encouraged to share this information with family
     members.
3) An evaluation component to assess whether the wearing rate increased following the
     school initiative.
One of the communities has continued forward on a subsequent project involving an
infant/child car seat program. Overall, this project is a step towards further mobilization
of Alberta’s First Nations communities.

Traffic Services Pilot Project



                                                                                         9
The Traffic Services Pilot Project is an initiative of the Traffic Committee of the Canadian
Association of Chiefs of Police, the RCMP Headquarters in Ottawa, including RCMP ‘K’
Division in Alberta, and other stakeholders. The project is intended to examine the
delivery of quality traffic services within a community-based service delivery
environment. The main partners on the project in Alberta are the ACICR, the Alberta
Motor Association (AMA), and the regional health authorities. ACICR’s role on the
project is that of supporting research and evaluation to the Southern Alberta Pilot
Project, while AMA supports the program coordination. ACICR has committed a staff
member to this project through a secondment to the RCMP.

A survey of detachment and traffic members was carried out across the province,
collecting general knowledge and attitude information with respect to traffic safety. A
public opinion survey, conducted in Southern Alberta, gathered similar information.
Results of these surveys and the three-day training sessions were used to re-direct
initiatives in traffic services, both provincially and nationally.

STEP Campaigns

Following the completion of the training sessions, two Selective Traffic Enforcement
Program (STEP) campaigns on seatbelt and stop sign awareness were carried out in the
southern part of the province, one in May and the other in October. Both campaigns
showed a dramatic increase in seatbelt wearing in post-observational surveys.

Training Sessions

Three-day training sessions were provided for all RCMP ‘K’ Division traffic members and
regional health authority representatives. The sessions focused on identifying the issues
in traffic safety in Alberta and provided time for discussion about what is currently being
done to increase safety. Participants were challenged to look at the provision of traffic
services in a new way and to realize the discrepancy between current services and the
true issues. Training sessions were held in the pilot project area, as well as in the
northern Alberta division to prepare for the provincial roll-out of the program.

Nighttime Drinking Drivers Survey

This survey will determine the number of drivers in Alberta who have had alcohol prior to
driving. The RCMP and ACICR revised the internationally accepted survey methodology
for urban environments, for roadside surveys to be used in rural settings in August 2001.

Pilot Project Evaluation

A comprehensive evaluation of the pilot project is being undertaken to determine if the
new strategy is having any effect. A new database has been developed to closely track
motor vehicle-related fatalities in the province in a very timely manner. Data from 2000 -
2005 will be analyzed as part of an overall project evaluation.

A follow up to the 1999 Rural Alberta Seat Belt Survey will be conducted in 2001 to
determine if the work in the southern part of the province has had impact on seat belt
wear rates. Results will be compiled and analyzed in July 2001.
Acute Care Strategies



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Last year, the ACICR assessed the current needs of acute care practitioners in the
province, leading to the development of a set of ‘Guidelines for Care’. The success and
usefulness of this set of four guidelines and poster package is evident, as the requests
continue for multiple sets from the 96 emergency departments across the province, and
nation-wide.

ACICR, in partnership with various stakeholders across the province and Alberta Health
and Wellness formed the Provincial Trauma Working Group. This group is committed to
the development of an organized and integrated trauma system for the province of
Alberta. Recommendations by this group for a comprehensive provincial trauma system
were drafted into the Provincial Trauma System Proposal and submitted to the
government in late March. Through accreditation, policy development and dedicated
resources, the working group proposes developing an efficient and comprehensive
trauma system to reduce morbidity and mortality resulting from trauma. Such a system
would streamline the pre-hospital care and enhance the resuscitative and rehabilitative
phases of care provided for trauma patients. Approval and funding of the proposal is
pending.

The acute care program manager at the Centre is also the Northern Alberta Coordinator
of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) physician education course. ATLS is
internationally renowned and is the highest level of physician trauma education
available, teaching a concise approach to assessing and managing the multiple injury
patient. Seven student courses and two instructor’s courses were provided in the last
year, educating over one hundred and forty participants. Audit placements incorporate
other members of the community, such as emergency medical personnel, nurses,
military members and members of the public.

The ACICR acute care program offers workshops to support the professional
development of trauma care providers. Designed for nurses, the workshops focussed
on clinical issues in injury treatment and incorporating injury prevention in acute care
settings. A total of six workshops were hosted in Grande Prairie and Edmonton during
2000-2001.

Rehabilitation Strategies

Brain Injury Awareness Week (BIAW) is celebrated on an annual basis to draw attention
to brain injury, the impact on the survivor and community, and promote prevention as the
best cure. ACICR participated on the planning committee for BIAW, which took place
June 4-10, 2000, and financially supported the designing and printing of posters which
promoted brain injury prevention. The posters were distributed to Alberta communities
involved in BIAW activities.

ACICR’s dedication to supporting the rehabilitation community continued with its
involvement on the newly established Brain Injury Coalition Action Group in partnership
with other stakeholders across the province. The development of an Action Plan by this
group, Making Choices: An Action Plan for Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, emerged
from the acknowledgement that issues affecting individuals with brain injury have been
discussed for years yet little action had resulted. The Action Plan indicates the need for
proper funding, supports, and services for brain injury survivors in Alberta.
Recommendations in the Action Plan were compiled from over two hundred and fifty
stakeholders, family members, and survivors of brain injury in Alberta. By identifying


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and investigating gaps in services and programs, the Action Plan yields great hope for
the brain injury community at large.

The need for a comprehensive directory enabling individuals and family members of
persons with acquired brain injury to connect with service providers was identified by the
Brain Injury community. The Brain Injury Directory for Alberta is a joint initiative with the
North Alberta Brain Injury Society (NABIS) and will include listings of services such as
education, residential services, community supports and much more. The listing will be
available through ACICR, NABIS and other major service providers across the province.

Emergency Medical Services Strategies

The Directory for Alberta Emergency Departments and Emergency Medical Services,
developed and produced by ACICR as a result of numerous requests by nurse
managers, educators and other health care professionals, will be updated and re-printed
on an annual basis. The latest edition was completed in March 2001, and distributed to
all ninety-six Emergency Departments across the province. The directory contains
information on emergency departments, ambulance services, and contact persons in
one convenient listing. The directory will help facilitate professional collaboration and
information sharing among practitioners of pre-hospital and emergency personnel,
province-wide.




Goal 2: Research, Surveillance and Evaluation
ACICR will be a leader in conducting injury control research and surveillance.

Objective 2.1 To compile, analyze, evaluate and disseminate timely, relevant and
comprehensive injury control data.

Injury Data Reports

With the support of Alberta Health and Wellness, the ACICR has produced the 1997
Injury in Alberta Data Report. The Report is designed to assist in identifying the causes
of injury-related deaths, inpatient hospitalizations, and emergency room visits. This
information can be used to guide program planning and aid in evaluation. Data is
reported provincially and by region, and details factors such as age and gender.

To complement the overall data report, the Centre also published special data reports on
suicide and children’s injuries using 1997 data.

The Suicide Data Report was completed in partnership with the Suicide Information and
Education Centre, Alberta Health and Wellness, and Health Canada (Medical Services
Branch). The report details populations at risk, the ranking of suicide as a cause of
death, and the incidences of suicide attempts and self-inflicted injury. The
complementary summary report also explains warning signs, risk factors, and support
agencies.
A Children’s Injury Data Report was the product of collaboration between ACICR and
KIDSAFE Connection. The report provides data on injuries to children under 20 years of
age. Data is presented by region, injury type, age and gender. The summary report


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offers a summary of the data as well as educational information and injury prevention
tips.

Data requests

ACICR staff have continued to provide injury data support for practitioners in the
province. The Centre responded to 215 requests for data in the past year from
community members, partners and stakeholders. Requests for data range from simple
queries to more complex ones that require detailed reporting. Overall, the number of
simple queries has decreased since detailed data has been posted on the ACICR
website. Data specific to each regional health authority, ACICR’s injury FACT sheets
and data links are all accessible on the website.


Objective 2.2 To conduct, support, disseminate, evaluate and apply injury control
research.

Leadership in research, surveillance and evaluation has been enhanced at ACICR,
through the work of its research associates and students affiliated with the Centre. The
ACICR is involved in over 25 research projects (See Appendix page 27) that are
currently underway, recently completed or are pending grant funding. The Centre
conducts and supports research on a variety of topics including: traffic safety and traffic
priorities, pedestrian injuries, farming and agricultural injuries, falls, Aboriginal issues,
sport-related injuries, emergency medical services, acute care, rehabilitation, data
collection and surveillance, and spinal cord injury. Collaboration on research projects
involves provincial and national stakeholders, as well as international connections with
the World Health Organization.

In the last year ACICR and its associates published ten papers in a variety of academic
journals, such as the New England Journal of Medicine; Canadian Journal of Public
Health; Journal of Public Affairs; International Journal of Trauma Nursing and, Journal of
Clinical Epidemiology. (See Appendix page 28).

Undertaking Qualitative Research

Undertaking Qualitative Research, a textbook written by Dr. Peter Rothe (ACICR Senior
Research Associate), offers an outstanding guide to a methodology that can bridge the
gap between quantitative and qualitative research. Th book introduces the theory and
practice of qualitative research and highlights the pros and cons of such methods, using
examples drawn from everyday life and extensive field experience. This book
represents a new approach that may help in understanding situations in more human
terms, and pave the way to more effective injury prevention. This thorough, one-volume
resource is intended for students and professionals in the social sciences, education,
injury prevention and control, insurance, community health, medicine and nursing fields.
Several graduate-level courses are currently using this book as a learning tool.

A second textbook written by the same author will be published in the coming year. This
book is a collection of proceedings on traffic priorities.
Objective 2.3 To develop a comprehensive and coordinated injury control
surveillance system in Alberta.



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Canadian Agricultural Injury Surveillance Project (CAISP)

ACICR is the provincial contact for the Canadian Agricultural Injury Surveillance Project
(CAISP). The purpose of this research is to collect and interpret information on
agricultural injuries from across Canada. This year, the ACICR has conducted a chart
review of the records at the Medical Examiner’s Office, in order to collect all farm-related
deaths in Alberta over the ten-year period from 1990-1999. Currently, the project is
focusing on the collection of circumstantial information surrounding agricultural injuries
that have resulted in death. The inclusion of Alberta data in the CAISP report will help to
illustrate the truly national perspective on farm-related injuries and death. The new
edition of the report will be produced in 2001 and will highlight and compare all farm-
related deaths across the country from1990-98, as some provinces did not report 1999
data.




Goal 3: Information Sharing
ACICR will provide leadership in communicating accurate, timely, uniform and relevant
injury control information to its target audience.

Objective 3.1 To provide leadership and coordination in building and maintaining
information networks among injury control stakeholders and practitioners and
ensure consistent information and effective dissemination of injury control
information and resources.

Alberta Rural Safety Forum (also see Objective 1.3)

As a representative on the organizing committee, along with other governmental and
regional partners, the ACICR was involved in organizing and hosting the Second Alberta
Rural Safety Forum in March 2001. ACICR received a $5000 grant from Health
Canada’s Rural and Remote Health Innovations Initiative to host the Forum.

The Forum organizers invited stakeholders in the issue of rural safety to attend a
meeting intended to facilitate the sharing of rural safety promotion program knowledge,
skills and experience; foster cooperation and collaboration in rural safety promotion
among organizations, communities and regions; and strengthen supportive relationships
and formalize a rural safety network within Alberta.

The one-day Forum included 54 representatives of government organizations,
community safety groups, educational institutions and other individuals interested in farm
safety. The meeting resulted in the establishment of the Alberta Rural Safety Network
modeled after the Alberta Regional Health Authority and Safe Community Safety
Promotion Network.



Injury Control in Alberta Awards

The Injury Control in Alberta Annual Awards are presented to recognize the excellent
injury control work happening in Alberta. As in past years, ACICR distributed nomination


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packages to injury control partners in the province. Practitioners had the opportunity to
nominate people, programs, or coalitions in four award categories. An independent
selection committee reviewed all nominations and chose six recipients. The awards
were presented at the Canadian Conference on Injury Prevention & Control – 2000 in
Kananaskis, Alberta.

Award Recipients - 2000

Innovation Award
The Innovation Award was created to recognize innovation, initiative, and vision in injury
control programming or activities by an individual, organization or coalition in Alberta.
• Blood Tribe P.A.R.T.Y. Program
• Donna Christensen, Past President of People Against Impaired Driving (P.A.I.D)

Dr. John H. Read Award
This high profile award is inspired by the work of Dr. Read, Past Director of Calgary
Research Unit and a professor of community health sciences at the University of
Calgary, Alberta. The award recognizes people who advance injury control in Alberta
through programs, research, or the influence of policy, etc. It honours long-time
proponents of injury control who have made a significant impact on injury efforts in
Alberta.
• Dr. Brian H. Rowe, University of Alberta

Media Award for Excellence in Injury Control Reporting
The Media Award for Excellence was created to recognize excellence in the reporting of
injury awareness and control programs and activities within the province of Alberta. This
award also recognizes the way in which injury issues are reported, including avoiding the
term ‘accident’, and including prevention information where appropriate.
• Valerie Oczkowski, CFRN News, Edmonton
• Lisa Player, CJAY 92. Calgary

Safe Community Spirit Award
The Safe Community Spirit Award recognizes a community’s collective efforts and
commitment to reduce the frequency and severity of injuries where its members live,
learn, work and play.
• Crossroads Injury Control Program

A new award category was also developed to recognize the contribution past ACICR
Executive Director Joanne Vincenten made to injury control in the province. Annually,
the Joanne A. Vincenten Injury Control Student Scholarship of $1000 will be presented
to a student working in the area of injury control.

Injury Control Alberta Newsletter

Injury Control Alberta supports the Centre’s mandate to provide stakeholders, partners
and the general public with injury control information, and data. The newsletter is also
used as a regular tool for dissemination of information on the Centre’s events and
provides timely, accurate and interesting injury control issues, new research, data
surveillance, program activities, educational opportunities, updates and coming events,
activities and initiatives to its stakeholders and partners. This 4-page, monthly



                                                                                        15
publication is received by over 1100 subscribers, free of charge, at a provincial, national
and international level. Currently, the newsletter is in its third issue of production and
has published 31 issues in the last three years. It is distributed in three formats, fax,
hardcopy or email, and all issues can be viewed on the ACICR website.

Monthly Teleconferences

The ACICR organizes and provides the provincial injury control community with one-
hour long, interactive teleconferences on major issues in the field each month from
September through June. The teleconferences have also expanded to include
participants and speakers from across the country. Teleconference speakers provide
personal insight and share information on pressing injury control issues, programs and
initiatives. Participation in the teleconferences offers networking, information sharing,
educational opportunities and discussion amongst professionals in the field. Topics
presented and discussed over the last teleconference season have included such issues
as fundraising for injury control initiatives, the economics of injury, school-based injury
prevention, Alberta’s suicide framework, and impaired driving issues. Attendance at the
teleconferences has continued to grow with an average of thirty participants each month.

Website (also see Objective 3.5)

The ACICR reaches the desktops of Alberta’s injury control practitioners and community
members while maintaining a worldwide presence via the Internet. The Centre’s website
continued to grow this year, and is now updated on a monthly basis. The site has also
been used more often over the past year as a primary dissemination tool for injury
control information, Centre activities, upcoming events and injury data. The site is
designed to be easily navigated and is also kept technically simple to ensure efficient
loading by users of the most basic computer systems. The site received a total of 5372
visits over the past year, averaging 14 visits per day – an increase of 60% over last year.
The website can be accessed at www.med.ualberta.ca/acicr

Speakers Registry

In 2000, ACICR embarked upon a new service initiative supporting a central provincial
registry and referral service for speakers, presenters and workshop leaders. The Alberta
Injury Control Speakers Registry connects organizers of meetings, workshops, seminars
and conferences with people who are knowledgeable on various aspects of injury
control. When speakers register with the service, they are asked to include a list of
injury control related topics about which they would be willing to speak. When ACICR
receives a request for speakers, staff compare the needs against the speakers list to
determine potential speakers for the function. Contact information is shared, and all
further arrangements are made between the organizer and speaker. Currently, 15
speakers have registered with the service.




Resource Room

ACICR’s Resource Room is available on a drop-in basis to students, partners and
stakeholders interested in injury prevention and control. The creation of a new database


                                                                                         16
allows the Centre to track its over 1800 books and videos. Resource books include
those on specific injury topics as well as many on injury theory, program development
and evaluation issues. The room offers over 500 other resource materials as well such
as, journals, newsletters, slides and overheads. In the last year, over 100 materials
have been borrowed from the Resource Room and users are afforded a material lending
period of four weeks. Visitors to the Resource Room utilize added features such as a
workspace and study area, computer, photocopier and telephone access. The
Resource Room is open during regular office hours and is maintained through the help
of one of many students working with the Centre.

Databases

ACICR designed a new central database system for tracking all contacts. The new
database allows for more efficient data entry and report generation and interfaces with
other software more easily. ACICR also reviewed the database and updated group lists
to maintain a current and efficient system.

Injury in Alberta Conference

The Canadian Conference on Injury Prevention and Control – 2000, held October 19-21,
2000 in Kananaskis, Alberta highlighted a program rich with information on research,
practice and policy. ACICR partnered with the British Columbia Injury Prevention &
Research Unit (BCIRPU) to facilitate the event. ACICR staff led the Steering
Committee, made up the Local Organizing Committee and provided overall conference
management and coordination. Sponsorship for the conference was drawn from several
partners and stakeholders, including: Health Canada, Safe Kids Canada with Johnson &
Johnson, Alberta Health & Wellness, the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical
Research, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Over 310 conference delegates of national and international representation attended the
conference, with several of the twelve plenary speakers being of international acclaim.
Over 42% of the delegates were from Alberta. The conference featured over twenty-five
concurrent sessions and over fifty poster presentations on injury programs and research
initiatives from across the nation. Session highlights included the presentation and
discussion of People’s Right to Safety: A Historical Perspective, Populations at Risk,
Global Injury Surveillance, Issues and Challenges on Health Policy and more.

The conference also provided networking opportunities for colleagues and
acquaintances from across the country to meet and re-connect. Such opportunities
presented themselves at the Welcome Reception, the theatrical display of ABCs of the
ER, and the Conference Banquet which featured the presentation of the Annual Injury
Control Alberta Awards and other presentations of recognition.

Feedback and response from conference participants was overwhelmingly positive and
many delegates suggested that the event be held on an annual or more regular basis.
The conference theme ‘Building Networks for a Safer Canada’ allowed for a memorable
time and the inspiration to work together to make Canada a safer place to live, travel,
work and play!

RHA Injury Control Survey



                                                                                     17
In an effort to learn more about RHA injury control structures and gather information on
community safety coalitions, the ACICR began to individually survey the key contacts
within regions. The telephone survey gathered information on key RHA injury control
personnel and their organization. Most RHA’s have different organizational structures,
funding levels, and mandates which can impact on communications with the RHA’s. As
well, ACICR wanted to develop a complete list of community safety coalitions beyond
the formal Safe Communities. In the process of completing the survey, many individuals
expressed an interest in learning how other RHA’s are structured and agreed to have the
ACICR share their information, so the survey information will be distributed among the
RHA primary injury control contacts. The survey is expected to be complete in the
coming year.

Lifesavers 19 Conference – also meets Objective 4.1


Objective 3.2 To communicate effectively with key influencers related to injury
control to advance healthy public policy.

Effective Communication with Key Influencers

The ACICR has been consistently and progressively involved in advancing healthy
public policy, demonstrated by its practice of communication with key government
officials and private organizations across the province and the country. The Centre
responded to the dissolution of Health Canada’s Secretariat for Injury Prevention by
sending letters to all of Alberta’s federal MP’s, the Minister of Finance, Health and
Justice, the Prime Minister, the Deputy Minister of Health, and the Assistant Deputy
Minister of Health. The Centre has responded to requests for input from many
government departments, and has researched and submitted responses to, or
advocated for issues on traffic safety, gun control, school safety, bike helmets, cellular
telephone usage while driving, rural health research, premature infant transport safety
issues, children’s rights, and the National Framework on Injury Prevention and Control.

Policy and Political Influence

ACICR has recognized a need for the development of firm policy statements to use as a
basis for responding to policy issues and thus a policy drafting system is currently under
development. The ‘School Bus Seatbelt Safety’ issue is the first of the policies to be
drafted. All ACICR policies will be based on current research and data and will be
reviewed by stakeholders.

ACICR also engaged in the submission of numerous resolutions to the Alberta Urban
Municipalities Association and the Alberta Public Health Association (APHA) to further
influence political agendas, policy, and legislation. Last year’s resolution, ‘Increased Risk
of Collision from Use of Cellular Phones While Driving’ was submitted to and accepted
by the APHA. Two new resolutions, ‘Suicide: A major public health issue in Alberta’ and
‘Aging Drivers in Alberta’ have been submitted for the upcoming year.
In January, the Centre partnered with Canada Post Corporation, Canadian Union of
Postal Workers, the Safe Community Coalition of Strathcona County, and the Strathcona
County Seniors Board to advocate for a snow removal by-law in Strathcona County.
The by-law is still under consideration by the County.



                                                                                          18
Objective 3.3 To communicate regularly with media throughout the province to
increase their awareness of injury control issues of prevention, emergency
medical services, acute care and rehabilitation.

Media Relations

The ACICR has continued to build relationships with the media across Alberta. The
Centre was mentioned in over 80 articles in Alberta newspapers over the past year. The
Centre was featured as a source of injury data, prevention information, and policy-
related statements.

The Centre distributed media releases to promote activities such as the launch of the
Community Injury Control Fund (CICF) and the annual award winners.

To stay attuned to injury events and issues in Alberta, ACICR contracts a media
monitoring service and reviews newspaper clippings and electronic media summaries on
a daily basis. ACICR received an average of 330 injury-related clippings per month.


Objective 3.4 To communicate regularly with Albertans to enhance their
awareness and knowledge of injury control issues.

Alberta Injury Awareness Video Project (also see Objective 3.5)
Preventable Injuries – They’re Killing Us

The ACICR brought together eight organizations to produce a provincial awareness
campaign highlighting injuries as a public health concern to Albertans. Consultation with
stakeholders and a formal needs assessment showed that practitioners wanted an
awareness campaign focussed on the nature of injuries to assist them in their local work.
Video and print resources were developed to create an understanding that injuries are a
major public health concern in Alberta.

The Steering Committee developed a communications strategy that called for the
development of two thirty-second advertisements, a nine minute video, a two minute
looped video, an Internet website for the general public, and supporting print materials.
The campaign launched in April 2001 at a press conference and partner recognition
event. Formative evaluation was conducted through market research as well as focus
testing. A base-line study was also conducted to test awareness and a follow-up will be
conducted after program implementation for evaluation purposes. The Steering
Committee also maintained on-going communications with members of the Alberta
Regional Health Authority and Safe Community Safety Promotion Network. All members
of this network received supplies of the print materials and copies of the videos to use
locally to support the provincial message. There were varying levels of participation in
the project among communities ranging from the distribution of materials to the purchase
of additional commercial air time for their communities.
Sponsors:

Gold Plus - $30,000
Braithwaite Boyle



                                                                                        19
Gold – $25,000
Alberta Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission
Alberta Blue Cross
The Tegler Trust

Silver Plus - $15,000
Alberta Transportation

Silver - $10,000
Calgary Injury Prevention Coalition
Capital Health Authority
Mistahia Health Region

Friend - up to $5000
X dot C Technologies
Lakeland Regional Health Authority


Objective 3.5 To communicate regularly with Albertans about the activities and
strategies of the ACICR.

Website – also meets Objective 3.1

Alberta Awareness Video Project – also meets Objective 3.4




Goal 4: Education
ACICR will provide leadership for high quality injury control education throughout
Alberta.

Objective 4.1 To develop, deliver and support educational opportunities for injury
control practitioners.

Lifesavers 19 Conference (see also Objective 3.1)

This year, ACICR, along with a number of other organizations, was invited by the
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to participate in planning for the
Lifesavers 19th National Conference on Highway Traffic Safety Priorities. This annual
conference is dedicated to reducing the tragic toll of deaths and injuries on roadways.
ACICR staff participated on the Planning Committee for the conference’s Safe
Communities track providing assistance with determining the program topics. In
addition, the ACICR representative had an opportunity to deliver a presentation on social
marketing to conference delegates. The conference program incorporated plenary
sessions, over four-hundred exhibitors and awards ceremony and a diverse range of
over fifty workshops all in a three day period. Over 1500 delegates attended the
conference held in Denver, Colorado in March 2001.

Canadian Injury Prevention and Control Curriculum (CIPCC) Project



                                                                                      20
The Canadian Injury Prevention and Control Curriculum (CIPCC) Project is led by the
ACICR and Plan-it Safe: Child & Youth Injury Prevention Centre. Funded by Health
Canada’s Population Health Fund, this project of the Canadian Collaborative Centres for
Injury Prevention and Control (CCCIPC) is a three-year initiative dedicated to producing
a flexible, modular curriculum to be used by community practitioners in injury prevention
and control across Canada. The goal is to develop a national injury control curriculum
that is generic enough to be offered to all injury prevention and control practitioners, yet
flexible enough to meet their specific needs.

Currently, the CIPCC project is at the halfway mark of development, and much progress
has been made in the last year. An initial assessment of the educational needs of the
injury prevention and control community was completed. It identified the need for a
flexible, modular curriculum, providing current and reliable information with the
underlying principle of evidence-based information, for the community practitioner. An
international environmental scan for existing curricula was conducted and information
about the curricula was collected on a detailed survey tool. Curriculum information
received was then subsequently reviewed and appraised for compatibility with the
results of the needs assessment.

A request for proposal was developed, proposals were received and a team of adult
educators was chosen in September to write the curriculum. The team is currently
developing the core components of the curriculum. In addition, several working groups
of experts from across Canada have been established to assist the writers. They are
developing topic-specific case studies and examples that reflect injury issues associated
with seniors, children, youth, traffic, intentional and agricultural injury. These case
studies and examples will allow the curriculum to be flexible in meeting the needs of its
audience. The core curriculum content will be finalized in 2001.


Objective 4.2 To collaborate with educational institutions and agencies to develop,
implement, and support injury control education for Albertans.

The ACICR has continued its commitment to advanced education in the area of injury
control with recent involvement with University courses and internships.

ACICR staff taught an elective titled “Injury Awareness” to pre-medicine students at the
University of Alberta, facilitated an internship for a Health Education student from
Dalhousie University, and supported a Masters level nursing student practicum. Centre
staff also supported a student in the successful completion of a Masters thesis in
Epidemiology, and continue to support a Ph.D. student in Epidemiology. The Centre
also enlists the support of several university students over the year to assist in research
and resource room activities.




                                                                                         21
Appendix




           22
Consolidated Financial Statement
April 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001

Revenue
Alberta Health & Wellness          Funding                                $1,350,000.00

ACICR Generated Funds
Centre Operations                  Sales of Resources & Miscellaneous        $11,300.00
Lawyers Fund                       Donations                                 $15,050.00
Program Support                    Grants                                    $24,625.00
Research Surveillance              Contracts for Services and Grants         $20,321.00
Information Sharing                Conference & Grants                     $143,966.00
Education                          Grants                                    $78,963.00
TOTAL ACICR Generated Funds                                                $294,225.00
TOTAL COMBINED REVENUE                                                    $1,644,225.00

Expenditures
Centre Operations                  Salaries                                $280,390.40
                                   Benefits                                 $49,309.73
                                   Consultant & Professional Services       $41,638.71
                                   Supplies & Services                      $33,790.65
                                   Telephone & Long Distance                $31,614.74
                                   Printing, Duplicating & Photocopying     $35,248.93
                                   Equipment & Hardware                     $35,455.34
                                   Furniture                                 $9,385.00
                                   Travel - Advisory Body & Conference      $37,552.61
                                   Equipment & Leases                        $3,756.80
                                   TOTAL CENTRE OPERATIONS                 $558,142.91

Program Support                    Salaries                                $124,639.30
                                   Benefits                                 $21,542.87
                                   Activity Expenses                        $34,324.70
                                   Community Grants Expenses                 $3,191.00
                                   Grants Issued                           $219,159.00
                                   Travel                                    $3,070.02
                                   TOTAL PROGRAM SUPPORT                   $405,926.89

Research Surveillance,             Salaries                                $215,844.60
& Evaluation                       Benefits                                 $29,024.66
                                   Activity Expenses                        $37,709.57
                                   Travel                                    $4,986.00
                                   TOTAL RESEARCH                          $287,564.83
                                   SURVEILLANCE
                                   AND EVALUATION

Information Sharing                Salaries                                 $30,513.83
                                   Benefits                                  $4,910.91
                                   Activity Expenses                        $28,674.89
                                   Injury Awareness Program                 $80,959.00
                                   Conference 2000                          $91,177.00
                                   Travel                                    $5,283.12
                                   TOTAL INFORMATION SHARING               $241,518.75 *



                                                                                      23
Education                                Salaries                                  $29,317.58
                                         Benefits                                   $5,630.46
                                         Activity Expenses                         $28,953.24
                                         Travel                                     $3,290.00
                                         TOTAL EDUCATION                           $67,191.28 **

TOTAL EXPENDITURES                                                               $1,560,344.66
BALANCE                                                                            $83,880.00 >

> Balance reflects $ obtained through ACICR generated funds currently allocated to on-going projects.

* Includes Preventable Injuries – They’re Killing Us Campaign
** Includes Canadian Injury Prevention and Control Curriculum




                                                                                             24
ACICR Advisory Body
                                       Ms. Jeanette Espie-Lefebvre
Dr. Louis Francescutti, Chair          (alternate)
Associate Professor, Dept. of Public   Alberta Transportation
Health Sciences
Division of Emergency Medicine         Dr. Don Schopflocher (Ex-officio)
Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry        Health Surveillance Branch
University of Alberta                  Alberta Health and Wellness

Dr. Richard Musto, Vice-Chair          Mr. Neil MacDonald (Ex-officio)
Deputy Medical Officer of Health       Population Health Strategies
Calgary Regional Health Authority      Alberta Health and Wellness

Mr. Richard Ramsay                     Dr. Gerry Predy
Professor                              Medical Officer of Health
Faculty of Social Work                 Capital Health Region
University of Calgary
(Chair as of April 1, 2001)            Mr. Robert Taylor
                                       Vice-President
Mr. Jim Cardinal                       Advocacy and Community Services
Health Director                        Alberta Motor Association
Little Red River Cree Nation
                                       Mr. Bill Walker
Chief Doug Hancock                     Fire Chief
Chief of Police                        Grande Prairie Fire Department
Coaldale Police Service
                                       Dr. Mary vanWijngaarden-Stephens
Dr. Paul Hasselback                    Director Alberta Trauma Registry
Medical Officer of Health & Vice-      Associate Clinical Professor
President                              Dept. of Surgery
Chinook Regional Health Authority      Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
                                       University of Alberta
Mr. Gregg Hook
Transportation Safety Board            Dr. Hilary Wynters
Alberta Transportation                 Medical Officer of Health
                                       Mistahia and Peace Health Regions




                                                                           25
ACICR Staff

Alison Barnfather
Conference Coordinator                  Dr. Peter Rothe
                                        Assistant Professor (Epidemiology)
Kathy Belton
Research Associate/                     Nan Shybunka
Prevention Coordinator                  Rehabilitation Coordinator

Kim Borden                              Kim Stemmler
Data Manager                            Administrative Secretary/
                                        Technical Support (until Nov. 2000)
Brenda Bush
Research Associate                      Liza Sunley
                                        Education & Communications
Cate Burant-Fernuik
                                        Coordinator
Project Assistant
                                        Dr. Gus Thompson
Jennifer Callum
                                        Associate Professor
Project Coordinator
                                        Terri Vaive
Dorothy Cochrane
Acute Care Program Manager              Administrative Secretary/
                                        Technical Support
Jennifer Drozdowski
Community Development Manager           Joanne Vincenten
                                        Executive Director (until Nov. 2000)
Laureen Elgert
Research Associate                      ACICR Associates

Joyce Fersovitch                        Dr. Linda J. Carroll
Aboriginal Liaison Coordinator          Associate Professor (Epidemiology)

Cathy Gladwin                           Dr. J. David Cassidy
Policy Analyst                          Associate Professor (Epidemiology)
(Acting Executive Director Nov 2000-
March 2001)                             Oksana Colson
                                        Administrative Secretary
Stella Lunseth
Injury Data Analyst                     Lori Giles
                                        Research Associate
Rose MacNeill
Office Manager                          As of April 1, 2001:

Shannon McCourt                         Dr. Louis Francescutti
Project Coordinator (until Aug. 2000)   Director

Tania Nichol                            Rachel Foster
Communications Assistant                Associate Director - Operations

Micheline (Mike) Payne
Community Grants Coordinator


                                                                               26
Safe Communities


1.   Safe Community Coalition of South Eastern Alberta
2.   Empress Safety Coalition
3.   High River District Safe Community Association
4.   Safe Community of Strathcona County
5.   Lakeland Safety First
6.   Wood Buffalo Safe Healthy Community Network
7.   Grande Prairie and Area Safe Communities
8.   Calgary Safer City Initiative
9.   Rocky View Safe Communities



*Leduc Nisku Safe Communities and Westview Safe Communities are other Safe Communities
in discussion this year.




                                                                                    27
ACICR Research Projects

Current Research Projects

1. Driver Characteristics, Belief Systems and Driver Behavior in Rural, Urban and Suburban
    Locales
2. Influences on Crash Site Bystander Involvement in Rural and Urban Locales
3. Red Light Cameras in Edmonton and Calgary: A Longitudinal Study of Intersection Trends
4. A Baseline Study of Dispatch Traffic on Alberta Highways
5. Bicycle Helmet Observational Study
6. Case-Control Study of Farm Machinery Injuries
7. United Farmers of Alberta (UFA) Rural/Farm Family Safety Program Evaluation Advisory
    Committee
8. Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey (SHBPS)
9. Population-based, inception cohort study of traffic injuries in Saskatchewan (PICSTIS)
10. An Outcomes Assessment of Treatment and Rehabilitation After Traffic Injuries in
    Saskatchewan
11. World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Neurotrauma Task Force on Mild Brain
    Injury
12. WHO Collaborating Centre Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders
13. Economic Burden of Unintentional Injury in Alberta
14. 1997 Data Sub Set Reports
15. 1997 Alberta Injury Data Report
16. Canadian Agricultural Injury Surveillance Program (CAISP)
17. Data Analysis at Request
18. Dynamic Influences of Pre Hospital Care in Alberta

Research Projects: Status Pending

1. Emergency Staff Survey on Their Role in Pediatric Injury Prevention Education
2. Self-report of Diagnosis Versus Chart Review
3. An Analysis of Surgical Outcomes Following Regionalization in the Canadian Health Care
   System
4. Documentation of Injury in an Emergency Department
5. Sledding Injuries in the Capital Health Region
6. Snowmobile Injury in the Capital Health Region
7. Evaluation of the ACCS Database
8. Subacute Rehabilitation - Resource Allocation and Outcomes
9. Falls in the Elderly Screening Model




                                                                                            28
ACICR Journal Publications

1. Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ, Côté P, Lemstra M, Berglund A, Nygren Å. Effects of eliminating
   compensation for pain and suffering on outcome of insurance claims for whiplash injury. N
   Engl J Med 2000;342:1179-1186.

2. Côté P, Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ. The factors associated with neck pain and its related
   disability in the Saskatchewan population. Spine 2000;25:1109-1117.

3. Mercado AC, Carroll LJ, Cassidy JD, Côté P: Factors Associated with Combinations of
   Active and Passive Coping of Neck and Low Back Pain Sufferers in the General Population.
   19:4 333-338.

4. Carroll, L; Cassidy, JD; Cote, P; The Saskatchewan health and back pain survey. The
   prevalence and factors associated with depressive symptamology in Saskatchewan adults.
   Canadian Journal of Public Health 91: 6 1-9.

5. Cote, P; Cassidy, JD; Carroll, L; Is a lifetime history of neck injury in traffic collision
   associated with prevalent neck pain, headache and depressive symptamology? Accident
   Analysis and Prevention 32: 151-159.

6. Cote, P; Hogg-Johnson, S; Cassidy, JD; Carroll, L; Frank, JW; The association between
   neck pain intensity, physical functioning, depressive symptamology and time-to-claim
   closure after whiplash. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 53: 1-12.

7. Mercado, A: Carroll, L; Cassidy, JD; Cote, P: Coping with neck and low back pain in the
   general population. Health Psychology 19: 4 333-338.

8. Hader, W; Cassidy, JD; Carroll, L; Peleso, P; The Saskatchewan M.S. Drugs Exceptional
   Drug Status Program and health outcomes evaluation project. In: Drug Information
   Association. 2000/09/19; Saskatoon, SK.

9. Cochrane, Dorothy A., Hypothermia – A real cold injury. International Journal of Trauma
   Nursing, Mosby. 7: 1 pp 8-13.

10. Dryden DM. Francescutti LH. Rowe BH. Spence JC. Voaklander DC. Epidemiology of
    women's recreational ice hockey injuries. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.
    32(8):1378-83, 2000 Aug. 20403278




                                                                                                 29
ACICR Community Injury Control Fund
2000-2001 Grant Recipients

Category A: Larger Grants (over $1000)

Camrose and District Support Services - SAFE PARK
Municipal District of Rocky View No. 44 - Risk Watch
Safe Community Coalition of South Eastern Alberta - Community P.R.I.D.E
Slave Lake Safe Communities Coalition - Strategies Against Impaired Driving
North American Farm and Envrionmental Safety Centre - Grain Auger Injury Project
Edmonton Catholic Social Services - Community Needle Safety Project
Some Other Solutions Society for Crisis Prevention - Mighty Mouse Mats
Some Other Solutions Society for Crisis Prevention - Born an Original – Here for Life
Empress Safety Coalition - Empress Centennial Park Project
Grande Cache Fire Department - Risk Watch/Learn Not to Burn
Alberta Snowmobile Association - SLED SMART Snowmobile Safety Awareness Campaign
Jasper and District Family and Community Support Services - Creating a Culture of Safety
Bighorn Emergency Services – Fire Department - Risk Watch, Bow Valley
 County of Thorhild Agriculture Service Board - Thorhild & District Rural Safety Program
Edwin Parr Composite Community School - The PARR Project
Edmonton Operation Red Nose - Operation Red Nose Volunteer Recruitment and Training
Bonnyville Regional Fire Authority - Safe Kids for a Safe Future
Agricultural Society of Delia - Injury Control Workshop

Category B: Minor Grants (under $1000)
Canadian Red Cross Society, Medicine Hat - Red Cross Snow Rangers
Southern Alberta Brain Injury Society - Brain Injury Awareness Poster Contest
Safe Community Coalition of South Eastern Alberta - Steady As You Go / Wise Owls for Seniors
Camrose & District Support Services Yellow Ribbon Program - Vive la Video
Medicine Hat 4-H Light Horse Club - Helmets for Equine Rider Safety
Canadian Red Cross Society, Calgary - Red Cross Snow Rangers
County of Thorhild Family Outreach Program - Thorhild Childproofing Project
Lloydminster Agricultural Exhibition Association - Project Safety
North American Farm and Environmental Safety Centre - Protect Your Health, Wear the Gear
MADD Canada, Medicine Hat and District Chapter - Educational/Motivational Media
Health Promotion Association of Lethbridge & Area - Think Think Again Education Video
Translation into Low German
Grande Prairie & Area Safe Communities - Risk Watch Poster Contest
Redwater and Area PARTY Program Society - Junior PARTY Project
AIDS Bow Valley - Sexual Orientation and Suicide (SOS) Workshop
University of Alberta, Rehabilitation Medicine - Increasing Awareness and Effectiveness of
Physicians in Identifying Medically At-Risk Drivers
RCMP Southern Alberta District Traffic Services, Banff - PARTY Program Enhancement
Northern Alberta Brain Injury Society - Brain Injury Awareness Week Poster Contest
Safe Community Coalition of South Eastern Alberta (Brooks and District) - Brooks Helmet and
Bicycle Safety Campaign
St. Francis of Asissi School Council Association - The SAFE Program
St. Pius X School Parent Association - The SAFE Program
Lauderdale Elementary Association for Parents (LEAP) - The SAFE Program




                                                                                           30
Program Support
 Project Overviews




                     31
                                 Aboriginal Injury Prevention

                                       Project Overview


Background/History:
In 1998 ACICR established an Aboriginal Liaison position as an indication of their commitment
to working with Aboriginal communities to reduce injuries. A partner relationship was
established with the Aboriginal Network for Safe Communities (ANSC), an Aboriginal advisory
committee that was inherited from the former Injury Prevention Centre. The Aboriginal Network
for Safe Communities is also represented on the ACICR Advisory Body. This “partnership” of
ACICR and the aboriginal committee was based on a shared vision and commitment to the goal
of reducing injuries in aboriginal communities.

Goal:
To mobilize Aboriginal communities in Alberta toward community based injury prevention
initiatives.

Objectives:
1. Information Sharing:
    (a) To increase awareness of the magnitude of Aboriginal injury, its impact on the health
        and safety of communities, and on the overall Alberta injury picture
    (b) To enhance understanding of injury prevention and control
    (c) To inform Aboriginal communities about ACICR supports and resources
    (d) To inform Aboriginal communities about current networks and linkages with other
        resources
    (e) Presentations at injury control conferences (regional, provincial, national)
2. Promote Community Based Action
(a) Collaborate with Community Health Centre staff
(b) Share other community initiatives and projects supported by ACICR
(c) Encourage action research projects that target specific injury issues i.e. Community Seat
    Belt Project that focuses on motor vehicle injuries
(d) Promote community action through partnership strategies
(e) Promote “Safe Community” concepts that encourage sustained action
3. Build Capacity for Community Based Initiatives
    (a) Facilitate training workshops that provide community participants with a 10 Step
        framework for developing a community action plan
    (b) Educate community participants on the importance of research
    (c) Train community teams in basic research/survey/interview techniques as required by
        specific projects
    (d) Build sustainability through on-going support to the community teams
Strategy:
A community development approach is employed with an emphasis on partnership and
community consultation. A key principle of this process is connecting with the community and
identifying those most ready to become “mobilized” for injury prevention initiatives.
Steps:
Host the Second & Third Aboriginal Injury Prevention Conference.
Identify all First Nations communities in Alberta and prepare and disseminate information kits.
Establish a network of aboriginal community contacts in Alberta.




                                                                                                  32
Contact, collaborate with, and identify aboriginal communities ready to proceed with community
initiatives.
Establish Seat Belt Pilot Project in First Nations communities
Conduct regional injury prevention workshops for aboriginal community practitioners
Establish a “Safe Communities” Pilot Project (community development model)
Establish community injury surveillance
Evaluate and share information & experience
Promote the “community development model” for use in other aboriginal communities

Partners:
• Aboriginal communities
• Aboriginal Network for Safe Communities
• ACICR




                                                                                            33
                                 Provincial Trauma Proposal

                                       Project Overview


Background/History: Organization and responsibility for trauma services varies across the
Province. Organized trauma systems which standardize care of the seriously injured, prioritize
access to emergency diagnostic and surgical services and rigorously measure performance as
part of a trauma quality improvement program have again and again reduced mortality and
morbidity. Introduction of such a system in Alberta represents a tremendous opportunity to
reduce death and disability.

Goal: To develop an organized and efficient all-inclusive trauma system for the Province of
Alberta.

Objectives: The main objectives of the Provincial Working Group are to:
-obtain dedicated resources for the development and sustainability of the
provincial trauma system
-obtain tertiary and district trauma centre designation and accreditation by the Trauma
Association of Canada in the areas outlined; and
-formulate destination policies for patient transfers and transports.
Strategy:
-circulated Draft Proposal to all Provincial Stakeholders: Chief Executive Officers,
Medical Chiefs of Staff, Nursing Administrators/Educators; Alberta Health and
Wellness; Pre-hospital; Regional Health Authorities
Steps:-currently awaiting responses from above stakeholders. Requesting stakeholder
support for the Proposal before proceeding any further.

Partners: as above




                                                                                              34
                               Advanced Trauma Life Support

                                      Project Overview


Background/History:
The Advanced Trauma Life Support Course provides the participant with a safe, reliable method
for immediate management of the injured patient and the basic knowledge necessary to assure
that optimum trauma care is provided. The course is intended for physicians who deal with
injured patients.

Goal: To provide medical education in terms of both skills and knowledge when caring for an
injured patient.

Objectives:
To orient the participants to the initial assessment and management of the trauma patient.




                                                                                             35
                                   Injury Control Photo Bank

                                         Project Overview



Project Goal:

To create a collection of photos related to injury control

Project Objectives:

To have a bank of photos to use when developing ACICR materials

To have a bank of photos that can be shared with partners for their use

Rationale:

Internally, ACICR staff does not have adequate access to photographs that can be used in
presentations or printed materials on a broad basis. It is important that staff have access to
print versions as well as electronic versions of injury control-related photographs to enhance
their work. The photos must be appropriate for use in both black and white, and colour
circumstances.

The ACICR also receives many requests from its partners for photos to use in printed materials,
presentations, displays, and other materials. It is becoming increasingly difficult to provide
assistance on these requests.

The ACICR has also made use of the Healthy Images program from Health Canada but has
found a shortage in injury control specific photos.

Photographer:

The ACICR has contracted Flemming Kristensen to take the photographs. The photographer
will receive recognition of his role in all Photo Bank promotional materials such as
presentations, printed advertisements and newsletter articles.

Model Permission:

It is critical that the photos included in the Injury Control Photo Bank are able to be used broadly
and by other injury stakeholders. To do so, adequate permission and release forms must be
signed by the subjects and the ACICR must monitor use of the photos by its partners.

Photographic Rights:

The ACICR may use the photos freely on ACICR materials.

External stakeholders may use the photos, with acknowledgement to the ACICR.

Example of adequate acknowledgement: Courtesy of ACICR



                                                                                                 36
Project Development:

The development of the Injury Control Photo Bank will be coordinated by the ACICR Education
& Communications Coordinator. A process for storing the photos will be confirmed and shared
with staff and stakeholders after the photos are complete.

Timeline:

The Injury Control Photo Bank will be developed in two phases.

Phase One (January/February 2001):

Photograph scenes that are better taken during winter

Phase Two (May/June 2001):

Photograph scenes that are better than during spring/summer

After these two phases are complete, the ACICR will promote the use of the Injury Control
Photo Bank and monitor it to determine if it is successful and if there are additional photos
missing. Photos will then be added as budget and requirements dictate.

Photograph Context:

The ACICR will endeavour to ensure all photos contained in the Photo Bank adhere to the
Healthy Images guidelines published by Health Canada.
The photos used by the ACICR and others should reflect the diversity of people in Alberta in
terms of age, ethnicity, and physical and mental ability.




                                                                                                37
                       Alberta Occupant Restraint Program (AORP)

                                      Project Overview


Objective: To reduce death and injury related to nonuse or misuse of occupant restraint
systems in motor vehicles, through a coordinated provincial approach.

Project Description: Through an integrated approach to occupant restraints and by using the
strategies of communication and awareness, enforcement, evaluation and research,
engineering and standards, advocacy AORP hopes to achieve an occupant restraint wear rate
of 95% by 2010.

Outcome and Impact: Increasing the rural seatbelt wearing rate from 69.5% and the urban rate
of 89% to 95% by 2010.

Key People/Organizations/Involved:
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Alberta Health and Wellness
Alberta Motor Association
Alberta Transportation
Municipal police forces
KIDSAFE Connection
Regional Health Authorities
Transport Canada
Insurance Bureau of Canada

ACICR Role: To provide direction and decision making for the implementation and
maintenance of AORP at the Steering Committee and Consortium levels. In addition, ACICR
co-chair’s the Evaluation and Research sub-committee.




                                                                                          38
                              Alberta Traffic Safety Foundation

                                       Project Overview


Objective: To improve the quality of life in Alberta through preventative, synergistic and
focused traffic safety initiatives.

Project Description: To assist in funding small community traffic safety and traffic injury
prevention programs that are somewhat unique and leading edge in terms of advancing the
cause of traffic injury reduction in Alberta and in the local community.

Outcome and Impact: Eight projects ranging from awareness to research have been funded
from 1998 to 2000.

Key People/Organizations/Involved:
Alberta Motor Association
Alberta Transportation
3M Canada
Calgary Police Service
Edmonton Police Service
Alberta Solicitor General
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Insurance Bureau of Canada

ACICR Role: Currently as Co-chair to provide direction and decision making for the
implementation and maintenance of the Foundation. In addition, ACICR provides secretariat
services for the Foundation.

Other activities:
• Currently reviewing manuscript for submission to the Journal of the Air and Waste
  Management Association on the Tire Crumb Project.
• Drafting an article for submission on the Needs Assessment conducted for the
   National Curriculum Project.
• Co-chair the Alberta Regional Health Authority and Safe Community Promotion
   Network.
• Completed an evaluation of the Provincial Network.




                                                                                              39
                                Traffic Services Pilot Project

                                      Project Overview


1) RCMP Member Opinion Survey — 1999

Objective: To conduct a survey of all RCMP traffic and detachment officers in Alberta to
determine awareness and perceptions of traffic safety issues and community based service
delivery.

Project Description: A mail survey to the 1212 RCMP traffic and detachment members in
Alberta was conducted using the Dillman survey methodology. The survey was composed of
four components: demographic information, enforcement practices, traffic safety knowledge and
support issues.

Outcome and Impact: A final report including results, conclusions and recommendations was
completed. The report has been reviewed by the Commanding Officer and the OIC of Criminal
Operations and discussions are taking place regarding the implementation of the
recommendations.

Key People/Organizations Involved:
RCMP
Ontario Provincial Police
Transport Canada & RCMP Headquarters (Ottawa)
ACICR/PHS

ACICR Role: To develop the survey tool, implement the survey process, compile and analyze
the results, and to report the findings.

Status: Completed. Results to be presented at the Tenth International Conference on Safe
Communities. Writing article for publication.


2) Public Opinion Survey — 2000

Objective: To conduct a survey of Southern Alberta road users to determine their perceptions
of public safety on Alberta roadways and satisfaction with the services provided by the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police.

Key People/Organizations Involved:
RCMP
Ontario Provincial Police
Transport Canada & RCMP Headquarters (Ottawa)
ACICR/PHS
University of Alberta Population Research Laboratory
Project Description: A telephone survey of 800 residents of Southern Alberta was conducted
using the University of Alberta Population Research Laboratory. The public opinion survey was
designed to determine the level of awareness and perceptions of the general public regarding
traffic safety issues and level of satisfaction with the current service delivery.



                                                                                           40
Outcome and Impact: A final report including results, conclusions and recommendations is
being completed. The report is being finalized and will be reviewed by the Commanding Officer
and the OIC of Criminal Operations.

ACICR Role: To develop the survey tool, liaise with the U of A Population Research
Laboratory, which implemented the survey process and compiled the results and analyze the
results, and to report the findings.

Status: Report to be completed June 2001. Delays due to other priorities and workload.
Results to be presented at the Tenth International Conference on Safe Communities.


3) Southern Alberta Pilot Project Evaluation Plan

Objective: To develop an evaluation plan designed to assess the impact of the K Division
Traffic Service Pilot Project is to develop and implement, and evaluate a pilot project designed
to enhance the quality of traffic services in the RCMP.
Key People/Organizations Involved:

Project Description: To develop a plan to assess the degree to which traffic services are
enhanced and re-aligned with identified traffic safety issues. Essentially this evaluation will
provide information to facilitate policy-making, guide funding decisions, and make program
improvements.
The evaluation will:
• Establish benchmarks from which effectiveness of the Pilot Project can be measured;
• Establish data and information sets from which measures can be derived;
• Create a project memory of activities, tools and protocols.
Evaluation strategies will include:
• Analysis of statistics generated by the RCMP and Alberta Infrastructure;
• Data collection (qualitative and quantitative) and analysis of Member experiences;
• Data collection (qualitative and quantitative) and analysis of the traffic safety partners
   experiences;
• Primary research of Alberta drivers’ knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours regarding traffic
   safety.

Outcome and Impact: An evaluation plan has been developed which will guide the evaluation
of the Southern Alberta Pilot Project. An interim and final reports including results, conclusions
and recommendations will be completed according to the evaluation plan.

Key People/Organizations Involved:
RCMP
Transport Canada & RCMP Headquarters (Ottawa)

ACICR Role: To develop the evaluation plan, implemented the data gathering process, guide
the evaluation process and compiled the data and analyze the results, and to report the
findings.
Status: Project in progress.




                                                                                                  41
4) Evaluation of Selective Traffic Enforcement Programs 2000 – Seat belts

Objective: To gather information on the effectiveness and impact of the selective traffic
enforcement programs on seat belts.

Project Description: Selective traffic enforcement programs combine awareness and
enforcement to impact behaviour change. The program focuses on promoting public awareness
regarding the ability of seatbelts and child restraints to reduce injuries and save lives in motor-
vehicle collisions.
The evaluation will consist of four components: traffic citations, media impressions, observed
seat belt wearing and traffic collisions.

Outcome and Impact: Observed seatbelt usage increased from 67.5% (baseline) to 72.7%
following the first program and to 70.7% following the second, for a combined result of 71.8%.
Seatbelt wearing rates in passenger cars increased from 76.0% to 80.4% first STEP and 79.8%
second STEP. The number of tickets written during the first program was 9,979 and 11,756
during the second STEP. Approximately 65% of these tickets were seatbelt offences.

Key People/Organizations/Involved:
RCMP members Southern Alberta District
Alberta Occupant Restraint Program
Mission Possible

ACICR Role: To develop the evaluation plan, implemented the data gathering process, guide
the evaluation process and compiled the data and analyze the results, and to report the
findings.

Status: Completed. Results to be presented at the Tenth International Conference on Safe
Communities. Writing article for publication.



5) Roadside Survey of Nighttime Drivers

Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine the nature and extent of drinking and
driving in rural Alberta. For the purposes of this study “rural Alberta” is defined as those
communities with a population of less than 15,000.

Project Description: Using the internationally accepted methodology a random sample
nighttime drivers in rural Alberta will be surveyed regarding drinking and driving. The survey is
scheduled to take place in late August 2001 with a pilot test of the methodology in April 2001.

Outcome and Impact: A greater understanding of the magnitude and characteristics of the
night time drinking driver in rural Alberta will lead to the development of a more focused
initiative. The survey will also provide baseline data from which we can evaluate the success of
any initiatives put in place.

Key People/Organizations/Involved:
RCMP



                                                                                                42
Transport Canada
ACICR
University of Melbourne

ACICR Role: To develop the methodology, implemented the data gathering process, guide the
process and compiled the data and analyze the results, and to report the findings.

Status: Pilot test to take place in April 2001. Ethics submission to be done in May 2001.


6) Rural Seat Belt Survey — 2001

Objective: To obtain a reasonably accurate estimate of the proportion of drivers and right front
seat passengers of light-duty passenger vehicles using seat belts during the five day period 18-
22 June 2001.

Project Description: An observational survey of seat belt use in rural Alberta will be
conducted. The following data will be recorded through direct observations: classification of
vehicle, driver gender and whether using seatbelt or not, right front seat passenger gender and
whether using seatbelt use or not, and at stop sign controlled intersections only whether the
driver brought the vehicle to a full stop or not.

Outcome and Impact: Results from this survey will be compared to the 1999 survey and will
provide information on the effectiveness of the current traffic safety initiatives in terms of
increasing the seatbelt-wearing rate.

Key People/Organizations/Involved:
RCMP
Transport Canada
Mission Possible
Regional Health Authorities

ACICR Role: To implement the methodology developed for the 1999 survey, to monitor the
data gathering process, guide the survey process and compiled the data and analyze the
results, and to report the findings.

Status: Survey to take place 18 – 22 June.


7) Implementation of Pilot Project in NAD and Nationally

Objective: To implement the pilot project in the Northern Alberta District and Nationally.

Project Description: To implement the pilot project process of problem identification and
problem solving based on empirical evidence and efficacy of interventions in the Northern
Alberta District and Nationally in RCMP jurisdictions.

Outcome and Impact: The intended outcome is that decisions will be made based on
evidence and the enforcement will be based on those interventions that have proven effective in




                                                                                              43
saving lives and preventing injuries. The expected impact is saving lives and preventing
injuries, in addition empowerment of the front-line members may increase job satisfaction.


Key People/Organizations/Involved:
RCMP
Ontario Provincial Police
Transport Canada

ACICR Role: To provide input into the implementation process and to facilitate some of the
training activities. To develop and implement a feedback process for the training sessions.

Status: Training sessions planned for Saskatchewan, Manitoba and PEI. Planning meetings
underway with British Columbia.


8) Rural Road Safety Strategy

Objective: To develop a multi-stakeholder rural road safety strategy that will provide the vision
for rural traffic safety in Alberta.

Project Description: The Alberta Rural Road Safety Strategy is the provincial vision for the
implementation of the National Road Safety Vision 2001 and is intended to mirror traffic safety
strategies at a national and international level. Targets include: a 95% seatbelt wearing rate by
2009, a 40% reduction in fatalities or seriously injuries crashes involving alcohol, a 20%
reduction in fatalities or serious injuries involving intersection related crashes, a 5% decrease in
overall speed. The strategies employed in the implementation of the plan are: data and
research, occupant restraints, impaired driving, intersection and roadway safety, speed
management, strategy management and coordination, and resources.

Outcome and Impact: The expected outcome is that there will be a coordinated approach to
rural road safety in the Province. This coordinated effort is expected to have an increased
impact, fewer collisions, more lives save injuries prevented than if the stakeholders carried out
activities in isolation.

Key People/Organizations/Involved:
RCMP
Alberta Justice
Alberta Motor Association

ACICR Role: To support the data and research strategy. Other expectations are to be
determined.

Status: Draft two of the strategy has been circulated for feedback.


9) Fatality Database

Objective: To develop a database to collect the information from the collision report form that
will enable RCMP members to analyze the circumstances regarding fatal collisions.



                                                                                                  44
Project Description: The Fatality Database is an ACCESS 2000 database, which captures all
the information currently captured on the collision report form. The database will allow the
tracking and analysis of variables not already covered in the Alberta Collision Information
System housed by Alberta Infrastructure, such as place of residence versus place of death. In
addition the database will allow for greater analysis of the circumstances of the collision.

Outcome and Impact: The expected outcome is that decisions will be made based on the
evidence and not perception. The expanded information regarding the circumstances of the
collision will allow for the development of targeted interventions and strategies.

Key People/Organizations/Involved:
RCMP
ACICR Role: To implement the database developed, to monitor the data gathering process,
guide the survey process and compiled the data and analyze the results, and to report the
findings.

Status: Data entry for year 2000 database complete.


10) Review of the Collision Reconstruction Program

Objective: To conduct a review of the RCMP Collision Reconstruction Program in Alberta to
determine internal and external satisfaction levels with the program.

Key People/Organizations Involved:
RCMP

Project Description: A survey will be distributed to traffic and detachment members as well as
external clients such as prosecutors, law firms, insurance companies, chief medical examiners
office, etc. in Alberta. The survey will be composed of the four components: satisfaction levels,
report quality, service quality, and suggested changes.

Outcome and Impact: A final report including results, conclusions and recommendations will
be completed. This report will present a comparison of internal and external client satisfaction.

ACICR Role: To develop the survey tool, advise on the survey process, compile and analyze
the results, and to report the findings.

Status: First draft of the survey tool completed and sent for review.


11) Evaluation of the Criminal Collision Investigation Teams (CCIT)

Objective: To conduct an evaluation of the CCIT to determine if CCIT is an effective measure
to address criminal collisions in Alberta. Effectiveness will be measured by a cost benefit
analysis

Key People/Organizations Involved:
RCMP



                                                                                               45
Crown Prosecutors

Project Description: An evaluation plan is to be developed.

Outcome and Impact: A final report including results, conclusions and recommendations will
be completed.

ACICR Role: To develop the evaluation plan, implement the process, compile and analyze the
results, and to report the findings.


12) RCMP Member Opinion Survey - 2001

Objective: To conduct a survey of all RCMP traffic and detachment officers in Alberta to
determine awareness and perceptions of traffic safety issues and community based service
delivery.

Key People/Organizations Involved:
RCMP
Transport Canada
ACICR/PHS

Project Description: A mail survey to the 1212 RCMP traffic and detachment members in
Alberta will be conducted using the Dillman survey methodology. The survey will be composed
of the same four components: demographic information, enforcement practices, traffic safety
knowledge and support issues as the 1999 survey.

Outcome and Impact: A final report including results, conclusions and recommendations will
be completed. This report will present a comparison with the results of the 1999 survey.

ACICR Role: To develop the survey tool, implement the survey process, compile and analyze
the results, and to report the findings.


13) Public Opinion Survey -2002

Objective: To conduct a survey of Alberta road users to determine their perceptions of public
safety on Alberta roadways and satisfaction with the services provided by the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police.

Key People/Organizations Involved:
RCMP

Project Description: The public opinion survey will be designed to determine the level of
awareness and perceptions of the general public regarding traffic safety issues and level of
satisfaction with the current service delivery.

Outcome and Impact: A final report including results, conclusions and recommendations will
be completed.




                                                                                               46
ACICR Role: To revise the survey tool used in the, liaise with the U of A Population Research
Laboratory, which implemented the survey process and compiled the results and analyze the
results, and to report the findings.


14) Evaluation of Selective Traffic Enforcement Programs 2001 – Seat belts

Objective: To gather information on the effectiveness and impact of the selective traffic
enforcement programs on seat belts.

Project Description: Selective traffic enforcement programs combine awareness and
enforcement to impact behaviour change. The program focuses on promoting public awareness
regarding the ability of seatbelts and child restraints to reduce injuries and save lives in motor-
vehicle collisions.
The evaluation will consist of five components: traffic citations, media impressions, observed
seat belt wearing, traffic collisions and cost-benefit.

Outcome and Impact: Yet to be determined but a final report including results, conclusions
and recommendations will be completed.

Key People/Organizations/Involved:
RCMP members Southern Alberta District
Alberta Occupant Restraint Program
Mission Possible

ACICR Role: To develop the evaluation plan, implemented the data gathering process, guide
the evaluation process and compiled the data and analyze the results, and to report the
findings.

Status: STEP’s to be conducted in April and September 2001.




                                                                                                47
                                Brain Injury Awareness Week

                                       Project Overview


Background/History:
Brain Injury Awareness Week, BIAW was established in Edmonton 12 years ago as a method of
bringing awareness to the public in regards to brain injury in Alberta. Prevention plays a major
role in the decreasing the number of Brain injuries in Alberta. Through this campaign and
initiative the committee has expanded to include many members from BI organization as well as
survivors. Brain Injuries continue to add to the number of injuries occurring in Alberta, Brain
Injury Awareness Week offers all members of Alberta an opportunity to support and increase
understanding and awareness of the issues relating brain Injury.

The Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research partners with the many organizations to
increase awareness and prevention of brain injury in Alberta through the Brain Injury Awareness
Week campaign.

Goal:
To increase awareness and prevention of brain injury in Alberta.


Objectives:
Objective 1
Hire a practicum student to assist with the development and coordination of Brain Injury
                    Awareness Week activities February 28, 2001 to June 30, 2001.
Objective 2
Work at including rural communities in the activities of brain injury awareness week in
                    Edmonton. To assist with further education and awareness by providing
                    resource kits with information on brain injury, support groups and prevention
                    and awareness.

Objective 3
Contribute to the organizing and implementing of activities during brain injury awareness week
in Edmonton.

Strategy:
Work in collaboration with the organization in planning and implementing the activities of
Brain Injury Awareness Week.

Steps:
The responsibilities were divided among the committee members to work on different areas of
Brain Injury Awareness Week.

Identify focus of Brain Injury Awareness Week Campaign for the year 2001.
Negotiate responsibilities
Organize and support the activities of Brain Injury Awareness Week.




                                                                                              48
Partners:
Edmonton Brain Injury Relearning Society, Ponoka Hospital- Brain Injury Rehabilitation,
DECSA, Northern Alberta Brain Injury Society, Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research,
Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital,

Sponsors:
Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, DECSA, Glenrose Hospital,




                                                                                            49
                                Pediatric Brain Injury Workshop

                                        Project Overview


Background/History:
Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury is still under represented and little has been done in terms of
research in to the effects of pediatric brain injury through out the life cycle. Many stakeholders
were brought together to discuss the research possibilities relating to Pediatric Acquired Brain
Injury in Canada.

Goal:
Develop research proposals in the area of pediatric acquired brain injury and to develop
the necessary linkages between organizations and professionals to collaborate and
assist in the development of the process.

Objectives:
1. Bring professionals together to identify the issues in a 3 day workshop
2. Make appropriate linkages
3. Take ownership of the research proposals
4. Continue a network of pediatric acquired brain injury professionals, researchers and
   stakeholders through a Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury web site.
5. Possibility to work with other professionals in developing research proposals.

Strategy:
By increasing collaboration and interest amongst stakeholders new and exciting
research topics could be established.
Steps:
Round table discussions relating topic area to increase interest and understanding.

Develop working groups to discuss relevant topics according to professional designation.

Identify whom will be responsible for the development and follow through of research initiatives
and grant proposals.

Partners:
Partners in the workshop included many health care professional, rehabilitation professional,
teachers, Doctors and research specialists from all over Canada, the Province of Alberta, and
Edmonton.

Sponsors:
Glenrose Hospital




                                                                                                 50
                                 RDC- Caregiver Curriculum

                                       Project Overview


Background/History:
Red Deer College invited a member of ACICR to participate in the sharing of information and
assistance with the development of brain injury resources module for their course being
developed to support caregivers of persons with brain injury in Alberta.

Goal:
Goal of this project is to develop a course for caregivers of individuals with a brain
injury, to increase caregivers understanding of brain injury, and the resources available
in their communities and in Alberta.

Objectives:
1. Develop a resource list of service providers in the Central Alberta region who offer services
   to individuals with a brain injury and their families.
2. Identify whom provider’s organizations with funding to better assist parents and caregivers
   in assisting individuals with brain injury.
3. Developing a resource guide for the central Alberta region to assist persons in finding the
   necessary and appropriate services.
Steps:
   • Find all service providers in Central Alberta who provide assistance to persons with brain
        injury and their families.

   •   Identify the services offered by each organization.

   •   Organize all service providers by domain.

   •   Identify the funders of each organization to assist families and caregivers in search of a
       service provider or assistance.


Partners:
Red Deer College, Catholic Social Services (Red Deer), Central Alberta Brain Injury Society and
Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research

Sponsors:
Central Alberta Bran Injury Society and Red Deer College




                                                                                               51
                              Brain Injury Coalition Action Group

                                        Project Overview


Background/History:
Gene Zwosdesky, Minister of Community Development wrote a report “Building Better Bridges”,
in his report he mentioned the need for a review into the services and supports for individuals
with Brain Injury in the province of Alberta.

Soon after was the formation of the Brain Injury Coalition Action Group. Stakeholders from
across Alberta were invited participate in the review of services for persons with brain injury in
Alberta.

Goal:
To identify the issues persons with brain injury in Alberta encounter.


Objectives:
Identify the gaps in services persons with brain injury are facing in Alberta.

Identify the needs of persons with brain injury in Alberta.

Through focus groups and a forum come up with ways to decrease the current gaps and
provide increase funding and service opportunities to persons with a brain injury and their
families.

Final report submitted to Alberta Health and Wellness (now Community Development) for
discussion and identification of the needs of Albertans with a brain injury, their families and the
services providers in Alberta.

Strategy:
Developed the Brain Injury Coalition Action Group to discuss the current situation of services,
funding and daily lives of persons with a brain injury.
 Brain Injury Coalition Action group gave input and assisted with the development of the “Making
Choices” report, which was then distributed to the forum group members for further discussion.

Focus Groups across Alberta were developed to discuss the issues persons with brain injury
are facing in the province of Alberta. Discussion focused around the needs and gaps in service
that currently exist and perhaps, identify the needs and wants of the individuals, family
members, caregivers and stakeholders.

Forum of 250 people was held to further identify the issues and look at possible models to
propose to increase services and eliminate some of the existing gaps in service.
The models were then taken back to the Coalition Action Group and the Coalition Action Group
then discussed and decided on a model that would then be proposed to Alberta Health and
Wellness for funding dollars.

Steps:




                                                                                                  52
   •   Identify present supports and services for persons with brain injury in Alberta.
   •   Identify the gaps in service delivery, or lack of services available to persons with brain
       injury in Alberta.
   •   Identify the needs of persons with a brain injury in Alberta.
   •   Develop possible service models
   •   Provincial input into the process through focus groups and a forum
   •   Making Choices action plan submitted to Alberta Health and Wellness for services and
       funding for Albertans with a brain injury.
   •   Report submitted to the Alberta Government
   •   Funding received for the year 2001

Partners:
There were many partners during this process brain injury stakeholders, service providers,
survivors, family members and caregivers from across the province and brain injury survivors.

Sponsors :
Alberta Health and Wellness




                                                                                                53
                          Provincial Brain Injury Resource Directory

                                         Project Overview


Background/History:
With the new initiative in Alberta working toward supporting persons with Brain Injury in Alberta
a need was recognized to have a more cohesive and better understanding or the services
available to persons with a brain injury, family and caregivers. Caregivers, survivors and family
are often unaware of the service in their area and who may be able to provide the necessary
services to the individual. By providing a provincial directory, organizations, caregivers and
survivors will be better able to connect with services in and outside of their area.

Goal:
To have all services providers and organizations that offer services to persons with a
brain injury list in a provincial directory.

Objectives:

December 2000-
Begin researching the services offered to persons with a brain injury across the province of
Alberta.

January 2001-
Decide on the format and information to printed in the directory

January 2001-
Continue researching and organizing the services according the domains

July 2001-
Work on inputting the information into a database to then be develop and published.

September 2001
Produce the directory – hard copy
Find a source that will produce the information and have it accessible on a website and or help-
line (NABIS)

Strategy:
To develop and disseminate the directory
Incur the initial cost of production
Update manual as necessary

Steps:
Explore all current service providers in Alberta to identify if they offer services to persons with a
brain injury and what services they offer.

Organize all organizations by chosen domain (residential, recreation, support, advocacy,
funding, transportation etc.. )

Develop a format for imputing the information



                                                                                                   54
Have document printed

Distribution

Partners:
Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research




                                                 55
               Injury Prevention Programs Available to Alberta Communities

                                       Project Overviews



Project goal / objectives:

• To help make others in Alberta aware of injury prevention programs that already have
information and resources developed and available to adopt or adapt rather than having them
using their resources to develop their own programs.
• To reduce duplication in program development and increase the use of successful or “tried
and true” injury prevention programs.

Background and rationale:

In the effort to reduce the frequency and severity of unintentional and intentional injuries, a
number of programs have been developed by various groups and organizations over the years.
If a program is deemed successful, groups and organizations sometimes “package” and market
the program so other groups and communities can replicate, adopt or adapt it. They may
provide a program kit, program materials, program guidebooks, training, and other resources
and supports. Farm Safety 4 Just Kids…Risk Watch…Safe and Caring Schools…Steady As
You Go…Mission Possible @ Work…Operation Red Nose…Heads Up: Head Injury and
Trauma in Sports. These are all injury prevention programs that are already developed and
available to Alberta communities. Some charge for the programs; others do not.

Program development is a time-consuming, often costly undertaking and most organizations
and groups working in the injury prevention field have limited resources. Too often, they use up
their resources by developing programs that have already been developed and refined, thereby
“reinventing the wheel”.

Many practitioners are unaware of programs that are already available and have limited time
and resources to spend trying to track down program information. ACICR staff are frequently
asked if we are aware of a program that addresses a particular issue or target group. At network
meetings of Alberta practitioners, we found that people were starving for information on good
programs that are available for them to use in their communities.

Strategy:

ACICR collects information on available programs on a one page “Available Injury Prevention
Programs” form. It includes profiles only on programs that provide packages, kits or other
information and resources that will assist others in carrying out the program. The collection also
includes profiles on some large-scale campaigns or “movements” such as Safe Communities
and Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD). The profiles provide information on the program
title, acronym, subject area, target group, originator/lead, year developed, partners, where it is
available from, goal, description, support materials/resources and order forms, cost, evaluation,
and training.

The information on the forms is then shared with Alberta injury prevention practitioners and
community action groups or coalitions who may decide to look into implementing or adapting the



                                                                                               56
program for use in their community. They can obtain the information on the ACICR website or
by purchasing the collection in a practical binder format. Names of those who purchase the
collection are put on a mail / email list to receive new forms and revised table of contents that
can easily added to the original binder.

This is not an exhaustive inventory of every program that has been carried out by any group or
organization in the province. We only collect information on programs that are already
“packaged” in a format that can be shared, which narrows down the scope substantially. That
means information and resources on “how to” carry out the program are readily available. We
are also not attempting to gather information on the wide range of “program resources” available
(such as videos, posters, etc.) as there are so very many, however, if an entire program is
based on one particular resource, it may be included.

Currently, we have forms completed for over 25 programs and we are seeking information on
about 10 more. We don’t expect this will ever be a complete inventory, as new programs are
being developed all the time. Instead it is a “living” project to which we will keep adding as we
get more information.

Steps:

1. Identify injury prevention programs (via the internet, conference presentations, word of
   mouth, meetings, newsletters, journals, etc.)
2. Identify a reliable source of information about the program (website, brochure, article,
   someone who has used the program, program originator or distributor).
3. Determine if the program is actually available in a format that can be adopted or adapted by
   others.
4. Fill in the program profile form with initial information obtained.
5. Send the program profile to the program originator / distributor to make any changes and fill
   in any blanks.
6. Finalize the form and send to the distributor for final approval and written authorization to
   include and distribute the profile in our collection (in our binder and website).
7. Add new profiles to the binder and adjust the table of contents.
8. Email new profiles and table of contents to anyone who already has a binder.




                                                                                                57
                                Alberta Rural Safety Network

                                       Project Overview



Project goal / objectives:

• To facilitate the sharing of rural safety promotion knowledge, skills and experience.
• To foster cooperation and collaboration in rural safety promotion among organizations,
communities and regions.
• To strengthen supportive relationships and formalize a rural safety network within Alberta.

Background and rationale:

Rural safety initiatives across Alberta have been fairly fragmented. Although there are a
number of programs that occur on a regional or local basis, there has been little cooperation,
coordination or communication among volunteer groups, agencies, producer groups and other
stakeholders throughout the province. In March of 2000, the Women of Unifarm worked with
ACICR to host a forum that brought together rural safety stakeholders from across the province.
The forum was an opportunity for stakeholders to meet each other and share information about
their rural safety issues, programs, and needs. The 25 forum participants agreed that the
process was extremely worthwhile and should be continued. They also agreed on the need for
more communication and networking among rural safety practitioners. Several participants,
including an ACICR representative volunteered to form an organizing committee to brainstorm
ideas and plan a second meeting in 2001.

The organizing committee hosted the second forum in March 2001. Since the Women of
Unifarm had disbanded, ACICR was asked and agreed to administer the one-day event.
Health Canada provided a grant for administrative costs and travel bursaries. Attendance more
than doubled with 54 people attending. The day included presentations, displays, time for
participants to give verbal updates about their safety programs, and a discussion and
questionnaire about establishing an Alberta Rural Safety Network. The event was covered by
several media outlets.

The forum evaluation indicated that 91% of respondents rated the forum as excellent or very
good. 85% indicated they would be interested in joining a formalized Alberta Rural Safety
Network and attending future network meetings similar to the forum. Preference was to have a
one-day meeting of the network once a year with March being the preferred month. When
asked what participants got out of the day, they said new contacts (100%), new sources of
information, resources and support (95%), new information (88%), new ideas (85%), new
resources (73%), new or renewed motivation, inspiration, hope or enthusiasm (71%), and new
opportunities for collaboration and cooperation (68%).

ACICR was asked if they would be willing to set up and coordinate the network using a similar
model and process as used with the successful RHA and Safe Community Safety Promotion
Network. As this fits within the ACICR core activity areas of Program Support, Information
Sharing and Education, ACICR agreed to provide this service.




                                                                                                58
Steps:

1. A group of seven volunteers offered to assist with organizing the next network meeting to be
    held in conjunction with the Injury in Alberta X / 7th Annual Canadian Farm and Rural Health
    Conference to be held November 4 – 6, 2001in Edmonton.
2. ACICR sent out minutes of the meeting indicating the decision to formalize a network.
3. ACICR will prepare a draft terms of reference for the network based on the network
    questionnaire results.
4. ACICR will provide the draft terms of reference and network questionnaire results to the
    seven member group for review / discussion / revision.
5. The draft terms of reference will be sent out to 100+ people on the mailing list for review
    with an invitation to attend the brief meeting in conjunction with the conference.
6. The seven member group will organize the meeting with the main purpose being to finalize
    and adopt the terms of reference and set an organizing committee for the March 2002
    meeting.
7. The November meeting will be held.
8. Revisions will be made to the terms of reference and the organizing committee will plan the
    March 2002 meeting.
9. The March 2002 meeting invitations, Alberta Rural Safety Network terms of reference, and
    membership application forms will be sent out to the 100+ mailing list.
10. An Alberta Rural Safety Network mailing list and email group list will be set up by ACICR.
11. The March 2002 meeting will be held.

Staff involvement / partners:

Jennifer Drozdowski, ACICR Community Development Manager, will be the facilitator /
coordinator for the Alberta Rural Safety Network.




                                                                                             59
                        “Creating Your Safe Community” Workshop

                                       Project Overview



Project goal / objectives:

• To build and strengthen the capacity of community safety promotion and injury control
stakeholders in Alberta to develop, implement, and sustain comprehensive, multi-sectoral,
collaborative, community-based approached to address local injury issues.
• To increase the number of communities and organizations in Alberta successfully addressing
injury control issues through comprehensive, multi-sectoral, collaborative, community action.
• To promote, strengthen and support the safe community movement in Alberta.

Background and rationale:

As a designated Affiliate Support Centre of the World Health Organization’s Safe Community
Network, The Alberta Centre for Injury Control & Research (ACICR) is committed to fostering
the international “Safe Community” movement in Alberta. ACICR understands that community
involvement, commitment, and action are some of the most powerful tools in tackling the injury
problem. It is the people who live, learn, work and play in a community who best understand
their community’s specific problems, needs, assets, and capacities. Strong collaboration at the
local level has been proven to be the most effective way to identify and mobilize resources to
create effective, comprehensive, and coordinated action on injuries. Yet, some communities
lack the knowledge and skills to successfully create and sustain community action on injuries.

When a spark is lit in a community to address the issues of injuries and safety, it is important
that the community has the support it needs to create and maintain momentum. Often the
various stakeholders who are, could be or should be involved have varying levels of knowledge,
understanding and experience about the injury problem and the ways a community can most
successfully address the problem. Sometimes those in the “champion” or “leader” roles have an
idea about what needs to be done, but are unsure about the steps to getting there – and just
how and where to begin.

To assist communities with the steps to community action on injuries, a number of guides or
handbooks have been published over the past ten years. Harborview Injury Prevention and
Research Center (Seattle) published a 10-step manual called “You Can Do It: A Community
Guide for Injury Prevention”. In 1992, ACICR’s predecessor, the Injury Prevention Centre
(Edmonton), worked with the Harborview centre to jointly publish the Canadian version of the
guide. The copyright is held by Harborview. In 1997 The Injury Prevention Centre developed a
more detailed 10-step guide “A Journey: Strengthening Aboriginal Communities through Injury
Prevention”. In 1997, the Safe Communities Foundation (Toronto) published a 10 step guide
“Creating Your Safe Community”, largely based on the IPC/Harborview guide. In 1998, the BC
Ministry of Health also developed a 10 step handbook “You Can Make a Difference” based
largely on the IPC Aboriginal guide.

Although these and many other guides have been developed, some are outdated and others
are out of production. More work has been done in the field, so new information is available
regarding the steps to creating community action on injuries. Also, more people are becoming



                                                                                              60
involved at the community level, so sometimes a guide or manual isn’t the most useful format
for reaching a community. Over the past two years, ACICR has been asked to provide
community presentations or workshops on the steps to creating a safe community, including
some baseline knowledge about the injury issue. This appeared to be a good opportunity to
update the information, pilot it with communities in a workshop format, evaluate it and make
adjustments and revisions. Eventually the information could be published as a handbook.

Plan:

1. Identify, obtain and review previously currently available resources on community action,
   coalition building, community development, safe communities, etc. including guides,
   handbooks, videos and other tools.
2. Develop PowerPoint workshop “Creating your Safe Community” including optional
   introductory presentation “Ten Things Everyone Needs to Know about Injuries”. Make
   format flexible to allow for focussing on differing issues, presenting to differing groups, and
   fitting into differing lengths of time.
3. Pilot content as presentations and workshops of varying lengths (one hour to one day) in the
   fall of 2000 in Edson, Coronation and Stettler.
4. Present overview of content to international audience at Tenth International Conference on
   Safe Communities in Anchorage in May 2001.
5. Adjust content based on feedback, new information, self-evaluation of content, flow, etc.
6. Pilot revised workshop in the fall of 2001 (Hanna).
7. Publicize the availability of the workshop to other communities in Alberta (flyer or brochure,
   network presentation, newsletter article).
8. Develop project proposal to write handbook based on workshop content.




                                                                                               61
                        ACICR Community Injury Control Fund (CICF)

                                        Project Overview



Purpose of the project:

The purpose of the ACICR Community Injury Control Fund is to stimulate and support local
action to increase awareness and reduce the frequency and severity of injuries within Alberta
communities. It is intended for specific, time-limited projects or activities that assist with
meeting unmet needs in injury prevention programming.

Objectives

• To mobilize communities and organizations in Alberta and stimulate activity to identify and
address the leading causes of injuries in their communities through sustainable, multi-sectoral,
collaborative, coordinated, community-based planning and action.

• To build and strengthen the capacity of organizations and communities in Alberta to develop,
deliver, and evaluate initiatives that are promising in increasing awareness of and reducing
injuries in their communities.

• To improve coordination, focus efforts, fill gaps, and reduce duplication of injury control
initiatives in the community.

• To encourage communities and organizations to share their injury control efforts and results
with other communities and organizations for knowledge development and as possible models
for replication or adaptation.

Background and rationale:

As a designated Affiliate Support Centre of the World Health Organization’s Safe Community
Network, The Alberta Centre for Injury Control & Research (ACICR) is committed to fostering
the international “Safe Community” movement in Alberta. ACICR understands that community
involvement, commitment, and action are some of the most powerful tools in tackling the injury
problem. It is the people who live, learn, work and play in a community who best understand
their community’s specific problems, needs, assets, and capacities. Strong collaboration at the
local level has been proven to be the most effective way to identify and mobilize resources to
create effective, comprehensive, and coordinated action on injuries.

As a result, and with funding from Alberta Health and Wellness, the Centre launched the ACICR
Community Injury Control Fund (CICF) in the fall of 2000. The CICF provides $250,000 a year
in grants to support Alberta communities that want to make their communities safer. The fund is
aimed at increasing individual and community safety and reducing both intentional and
unintentional injuries by assisting communities with the resources they need in order to
undertake community-based solutions to the injury problem. It is not intended to duplicate or
replace the excellent work that is already going on in many Alberta communities. Rather, it is
meant to build on, enhance and strengthen existing work as well as stimulate new activity. The




                                                                                                 62
resulting initiatives will demonstrate the benefits of working together to prevent injuries where it
works best – at the community level.

Ultimately, the fund may provide grants to address all components of injury control – which
includes prevention, emergency response, acute care, and rehabilitation initiatives. However,
based on priority needs information gathered over the past few years, the initial focus will be on
reducing the frequency and severity of injuries through efforts in the area of prevention.

The ACICR Community Injury Control Fund represents a sound investment in Alberta
communities by supporting a movement to make the places we live, learn, work and play safer
for all of us.

Strategy:

Categories

Category A: Larger grants – Grants over $1000 are available for projects or initiatives proposed
for a maximum of one year. The majority of grants awarded in this category will be in the range
of $5,000 but may be as high as $10,000. A total of $200,000 is available in Category A in each
funding cycle for community injury control initiatives throughout the province.

Category B: Minor grants – Minor grants of up to $1000 are available for smaller injury
prevention projects or activities or for specific components of larger projects. Funded projects
or activities must be fully completed within a year of receiving the funding. Applications for
Category B are accepted and reviewed on an ongoing first come, first served basis until a total
of $50,000 in minor grants has been awarded in each fiscal year (April 1 – March 31).

Priority Issues

Initiatives should:

        1. Address local issues and needs of the community; and
        2. Align with at least one of the priority issues* set out in the ACICR business plan
           which include:
           • Suicide
           • Traffic-related injuries
           • Falls
           • Injuries to Aboriginals
           • Farm and agricultural injuries

        * Consideration will also be given to initiatives that address other issues if a need

specific to a community is identified and can be clearly supported and demonstrated as a local

priority in the application.

Eligible Applicants

Grants will only be issued to or through an organization that is:
       • incorporated as a society or association with the Government of Alberta;


                                                                                                  63
       • a non-profit registered charitable organization; or
       • a publicly funded organization or institution*.

In the case that a community action group, coalition, alliance, or network that would like to seek
funding for a project is not incorporated, the application may be submitted by an eligible
member/partner organization who will sponsor the project on its behalf.

*Regional health authorities (RHAs) are eligible as applicants only if they are sponsoring the
application on behalf of a community action group, coalition, alliance, or network that is
otherwise ineligible to access the funds, as RHAs are already funded by Alberta Health and
Wellness.

Organizations with a regional or provincial mandate are eligible to receive grants if their
proposed project will be carried out within and in partnership with a specific community.

Preference will be given to applications submitted by, on behalf of, or that will result in
establishment of, a broad, multi-sectoral community action group, coalition, alliance, or network
that has a long-term commitment to continue its efforts to reduce injuries in the community.

Eligible Projects

The fund is intended for specific, time-limited project funding. Grants may be provided for
development of new and innovative pilot projects or replication of “tried and true” projects.
Although the project does not have to be new and original, it should be new to the particular
community. Funding will be provided for the following types of projects or activities.

Type 1 Projects: Developing and implementing injury prevention strategies
          a. Education and Awareness (e.g. public awareness campaigns or materials, school
             programs, training workshops)
          b. Environment and Engineering (e.g. changes in the environment, technological
             advances)
          c. Enactment and Enforcement (e.g. policies, regulations, laws)

Type 2 Projects: Building or strengthening local involvement in and support for
                   community injury prevention coalitions, action groups, alliances, or
                   networks.
(e.g. community presentations, coalition member recruitment activities and orientation sessions,
organizational meetings, planning sessions, communication tools, promotional materials).

Type 3 Projects: Developing or strengthening local systems and information that
                    support injury prevention efforts
(e.g. systems for collecting, analyzing and sharing local injury data, systems for coordinating
and sharing injury prevention program information, needs assessments, community profiles,
focus groups).




                                                                                                  64
                    RHA and Safe Community Safety Promotion Network

                                        Project Overview



Project goal / objectives:

• To foster cooperation and collaboration in safety promotion among communities and regions.
• To facilitate the sharing of safety promotion program knowledge, skills and experience.
• To strengthen supportive relationships and formalize a safe community and regional health
authority (RHA) safety promotion network within Alberta.
• To enhance knowledge and skills through educational opportunities.
• To provide and receive updates on the safety promotion programs, services and activities of
the Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research (ACICR), safe communities, regional health
authorities and other groups and organizations.

Background and rationale:

Prior to regionalization of the health system in Alberta, Alberta Health facilitated semi-annual
meetings of various groups of public health program managers such as home care, health
promotion, dental program, and public health nursing managers. Meetings were usually two
days long, twice a year. They were generally held in Edmonton or Calgary. Each of the 27
health units was invited to have a program manager or alternate representative attend each
meeting. The groups were co-chaired by an Alberta Health Manager and one of the health unit
managers.

Through these meetings, managers shared information about activities, initiatives and
resources. They discussed their successes and mistakes and shared knowledge about insights
and opportunities. They provided support to each other through challenging and discouraging
times. They identified areas of mutual concern and need and developed action plans, position
papers, and proposals. Often a speaker was arranged to make a presentation or facilitate a
workshop on a topic of mutual interest for part of each meeting. The meetings were also an
opportunity for Alberta Health representatives to share information and resources.

One of the common concerns expressed by injury control practitioners is the gap left when
these meetings were discontinued after regionalization. People felt there was nothing in place
to facilitate information sharing and they often did not know what else is going on in the
province, or found out by coincidence. Those who were not part of the system prior to
regionalization also identified the need for formalized networking opportunities. Often they were
not aware of others working on similar issues and they may have been duplicating efforts in
developing programs and resources.

In a membership survey conducted by the Alberta Public Health Association in the fall of 1997,
members, many of whom work in the area of injury prevention, identified the same need.

During the Provincial Health Council of Alberta’s consultations about injury prevention, it heard
the same message. In the Council’s June 1998 report, Injury Prevention and the Health
System, Recommendation #4 specified “Mechanisms must be put in place to encourage and




                                                                                                65
support inter-regional cooperation and collaboration including formalized networking
opportunities to share program and management knowledge, experience and support”.

This need was voiced again by regional practitioners who attended a Regional Network meeting
at the Traffic Safety Summit in the fall of 1998. It was reiterated by regional health authority key
injury prevention/control contacts in individual consultations about regional and community
needs with the ACICR Community Development Manager.

Other factors considered:

1. Alberta Health has no current or future plans to facilitate this type of networking.

2. ACICR is in a position to facilitate this role, and, in fact, it is a strategy that would help
   ACICR meet a number of its business plan goals and objectives.

3. All health regions have practitioners working within at least some of the areas of injury
   control (prevention, emergency medical services, acute care and rehabilitation). Bringing
   together even one representative of each of these groups from each region would create a
   group of an unmanageable size and an extremely wide range of interests.

4. Only a few health regions have established an overall injury control leadership position that
   represents and works with all four groups in the region. In these regions, the injury control
   position generally has a strong prevention focus and shares more interests and issues with
   prevention practitioners than EMS, acute care or rehab practitioners.

5. Besides regional health authorities, many other organizations, groups and individuals are
   doing injury control work within regions. This includes coalitions like Safe Communities and
   Safe Kids, NGOs like St. John Ambulance and Red Cross, grassroots organizations like
   MADD, suicide and family violence prevention programs, service club projects like Safety
   Cities, police, firefighters, coalitions such as Safe Communities and Safe Kids, business and
   industry, individual advocates, independent consultants, and more.

6. ACICR has particular obligations to our funder, Alberta Health, to provide services to the 17
   health regions. ACICR also has an obligation to provide support to established and
   potential Safe Communities in Alberta, as we are designated as an Affiliate Support Centre
   of the WHO Safe Community Network. Safe Communities are independent of RHAs. In
   some Safe Communities, the RHA plays a major role through staff involvement, funding or
   by providing other resources; however, in other Safe Communities, RHAs play a less
   significant role.

Considering all the above factors, it was important to carefully define the group to ensure it was
manageable, feasible, efficient and appropriate in terms of size, interests, needs and costs. A
number of options were considered resulting in the recommendation that an initial meeting be
held to include one representative from each of the 17 regional health authorities (an identified
injury control or prevention leadership position in the region with as broad an injury control or
prevention scope as possible) and one representative from each established Safe Community.

Steps:




                                                                                                    66
1. The first meeting of the proposed network was held in Edmonton in June 1998. The group
   discussed the various aspects and options of a terms of reference.
2. At the second meeting of the network in January 1999, the group approved the terms of
   reference.
3. Revisions have been made on two occasions resulting in the following structure and
   processes:

TERMS OF REFERENCE (as of April 2002)

   Membership:

       Meeting attendance is limited to injury prevention / control representatives of Alberta’s
       regional health authorities and safe community coalitions. At least one safety promotion
       practitioner contact will be identified from each RHA and safe community as their
       primary contact for all meeting and between meeting correspondence, however other
       RHA or safe community representatives may join the network to receive communications
       and attend meetings. Requests to attend a meeting by anyone outside the membership
       guidelines will be considered on an individual basis depending on the agenda topics,
       space, etc. Such requests should go to the Network Facilitator or a member of the
       Coordinating Team.

       As regional and community representation is limited, network meeting participants are
       expected to act as a link between the network and other key injury control players and
       partners in their regions/communities. Representatives are therefore asked to share
       information and resources from the meeting (both proactively and reactively) when they
       go back to their regions/ communities and also share any relevant information of which
       they are aware from their region with the network. Contact information for the RHA and
       safe community primary network contacts may be given out identifying them as the
       network contact for their region/community.

   Chairmanship

       Meetings will be co-chaired by an ACICR staff representative and a representative of an
       RHA or safe community.

       The RHA or safe community co-chair position will rotate among the RHA and safe
       community representatives on a volunteer basis.

   Coordination

       The ACICR Community Development Manager will be the Network Meeting Facilitator.

       A Network Meeting Coordinating Team will organize each meeting. That team will
       consist of the Network Meeting Facilitator, the ACICR co-chair(s) and whoever is the
       rotating co-chair for the upcoming meeting.

   Meetings

       The group will generally meet face to face once or twice a year.




                                                                                              67
       Meetings will generally be held in Edmonton, but may be held elsewhere if the group so
       decides (in conjunction with another event, for example).

       Meetings will generally be held on a Thursday and Friday, with a portion of the Friday
       being dedicated to a specific injury issue or target group or to an educational
       opportunity.

       Between face to face meetings, teleconferences may be set up if deemed necessary or
       beneficial to the group.

   Secretariat

       ACICR will be responsible for preparing and distributing agendas and minutes for face to
       face meetings and for ensuring records of meetings and other activities of the group are
       maintained in good order.

       ACICR will maintain the contact list of network members which may be shared among
       network members. ACICR is authorized by the network to share this contact list with
       others using discretion in judging that the purpose and individual or group making the
       request are relevant and appropriate to the network. If any network member does not
       want his/her contact information given out in this way, they should let ACICR know in
       writing.

   Sub-committees / task groups

       Sub-committees or task groups may be struck with the approval of the network. They
       will report to the network and shall be for the time period of their specific task. They will
       be responsible for coordinating, chairing and keeping records of their own meetings or
       tasks.

   Finances

       Participants are responsible for their own travel and subsistence arrangements and
       costs to attend meetings.

       ACICR will provide or cover the costs associated with the meeting room.

   Decision-making

       Decisions will generally be made by consensus. Consent may also be achieved by a
       majority vote (50% plus 1). Each RHA and Safe Community in attendance will have one
       vote, including the rotating co-chair. ACICR will have one vote.


Staff involvement / partners:

Jennifer Drozdowski, ACICR Community Development Manager is the network facilitator. Liza
Sunley, Communications Coordinator, and Kathy Belton, Research Associate, are the rotating
co-chairs. Alberta RHAs and Safe Communities are partners / participants.




                                                                                                  68
                                   Brain Injury and Addiction

                                        Project Overview


Background/History:
Presently, in Alberta there is a lack of services and funding for persons with brain injury.
Approximately 50% of all persons with a brain injury have an addiction. However, there are no
programs or supports for persons with a brain injury and an addiction. Brain injury coupled with
an addiction pose many different symptoms and put the survivor at greater risk to reinjure.
Presently, in Alberta services for persons with a brain injury and addiction are obsolete, there is
very little literature or community supports in place to successfully assist individuals.

The Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research is partnering with the interagency group of
Edmonton to research further into the issues affecting persons with a brain injury and addiction.

Goal:
Identify a course of action, which would increase supports, awareness and education for
individuals with a brain injury and addiction.

Objectives:
Winter 2001- Group collaboration begins, exploring the issue of brain injury an
addiction.

Spring 2001- Identify the needs of persons with BI and addictions.

August 2001- Literature review completed and proposal writing started.

September 2001- Funding proposal submitted.
Strategy:
 Through a collaborative effort the Interagency Committee will be able to identify the
issues and develop a proposal for a pilot project to assist persons with a brain injury and
an addiction.

Steps:
   • Stakeholder collaboration
   • Identify models that have existed in the past
   • Looking at possible models for development in Edmonton
   • Identify the possible pitfalls and opportunities of differing models
   • Develop a direction (model) and goal
   • Collect necessary literature and stakeholder input
   • Proposal writing
   • Grant proposal submitted
   • Development of a case management initiative (pilot)
   • Prevention, Education and Information Sharing initiative

Partners:
Edmonton Brain Injury Relearning Society, Northern Alberta Brain Injury Society, Capital Health
Region, Glenrose Hospital, DECSA, AADAC, Ponoka Hospital, Alberta Centre for Injury Control
and Research.


                                                                                                 69
Research, Surveillance and Evaluation
           Project Overviews




                                        70
                        Driver Characteristics, Belief Systems and Driver
                        Behavior in Rural, Urban and Suburban Locales

                                           Project Overview


Basis of the Study:
Focus groups will be conducted in rural, urban and suburban locales in the Northern, Central and
Southern regions of Alberta. This will enable us to speak with people from as wide a range of locales as
possible in order that environmental, social, economic and cultural differences between them are
represented to the greatest degree possible. In the focus groups participants will be asked questions
designed to identify significant belief systems that influence drivers, that lead to certain attitudes about
life in general and of traffic in particular that influence roadway user behavior. Focus groups will also be
conducted with professionals and service providers in each area in order to provide more insight into how
behavior is embedded in the moral code and beliefs of average drivers.

Progress Report:
• The objectives, methodology, participant documentation and interview questions have been finalized.
• Ethics approval for the study was submitted March 23 and granted May 3, 2001.
• The full literature review is approaching completion.
• Data collection will begin May 14, 2001 with 2 focus groups organized in Coronation.
• Contacts have been established in all of the areas where we are planning to do focus groups. There is
   a lot of enthusiasm about the study on behalf of professionals in the field. These contacts are
   currently coordinating participant recruitment, dates, times and places for the focus groups in their
   respective areas.
• We anticipate that data collection will continue through the end of June.

Partners:
Mission Possible




                                                                                                         71
Influences on Crash Site Bystander Involvement in Rural and Urban Locales

                                          Project Overview


Basis of the Study:
This study is designed to facilitate a better and more complete understanding of how Albertans
think in regards to bystander involvement at motor vehicle crash sites. The literature has
provided some discussion on different internal and external factors that inhibit and motivate
bystander involvement and how widespread knowledge about effective and appropriate
techniques for bystander intervention is. However, most of the evidence found in the literature
is based on experimental observation and generally does not involve in-depth interviewing and
qualitative analysis. These methods of data collection and analysis have the potential to
expand the current findings and make them a more meaningful force for designing policies and
initiatives in an Albertan context. Rural and Urban Albertans will be interviewed about their
experiences as past bystanders at motor vehicle crash sites. The findings that emerge from
these interviews will be the basis for a telephone questionnaire that will be administered to a
larger, stratified sample.

Progress Report:
• The objectives, methodology, participant documentation and interview questions have been finalized.
• The ethics proposal is poised for submission on the May 25 deadline.
• The full literature review is in progress.
• A student research assistant has been formally appointed to assist with the interviewing.
• Potential contacts that will be assisting ACICR in the recruitment of interview participants are being
   explored and contacted.
• We are aiming to conduct the interviews in July and August.

Partners:
Mission Possible




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                         Red Light Cameras in Edmonton and Calgary:
                          A Longitudinal Study of Intersection Trends

                                          Project Overview


Basis of the Study:
This study is composed of two phases that seek to understand the epidemiological and social implications
of the increasingly widespread use of Red Light Cameras in Alberta. The study will be conducted as a
time lapse series with baseline data collection and 3 waves of subsequent data collection over a 5-year
time span. The first phase will use a range of data sources in order to assess the incidence and type of
collisions and motor vehicle casualties at intersections at the baseline point and how these crash
characteristics change over the 5 years. The second phase will involve assessing the attitudes of the
general public about the cameras, and how they perceive the cameras to have an effect on their own
driving behavior. The second phase will be executed using a short survey that will be conducted with
individuals after they have passed through an intersection equipped with a red light camera and then
turned into a parking lot. Here, the drivers will be approached by the researchers to conduct the
interview.

Progress Report:
• The objectives, methodology, participant documentation and interview questions have been finalized.
• The ethics proposal is poised for submission on the May 25 deadline.
• The full literature review has been completed.
• We have received a listing of all Red Light Cameras in the City of Edmonton and the City of Calgary.
   We are currently choosing appropriate sites for the research based on interviewer safety, traffic flow
   and consent of site custodians.
• We anticipate that the on site surveys will be conducted during the end of June and the beginning of
   July.

Partners:
Mission Possible
City of Edmonton




                                                                                                      73
                  A Baseline Study of Dispatch Traffic on Alberta Highways

                                          Project Overview


Basis of the Study:
This study aims to measure the extent to which dispatch traffic represents the traffic volume and
crashes on Alberta’s primary highways outside major urban centres. This is the first phase of a
broader research effort to provide a descriptive analysis on the extent to which dispatch drivers
follow different rules of behavior, have different motives and expect different outcomes than
regular drivers, for whom most of the safety messages are addressed. This first phase of the
overall research program then is to measure the extent of the dispatch traffic problem. This will
be done using three sources of observational data: traffic volume counts, RCMP collision
reports and a random sample of videotaped license plates from selected highways. These three
data sources will be used to address three study goals.

1) To provide a reasonable estimate of the amount of dispatch traffic on Alberta’s major highways;
2) To examine the magnitude of dispatch traffic versus non-dispatch traffic collision issue on Alberta’s
   highways overall;
3) To flag any high casualty collision hot spots involving dispatch traffic.

Progress Report:
• The objectives and methodology have been finalized.
• The ethics proposal is poised for submission on the May 25 deadline.




                                                                                                      74
                                 Bicycle Helmet Observational Study

                                           Project Overview


Objective: To gather information on bicycle helmet usage in Alberta.

Project Description: An observational survey of bicycle helmet use by cyclists of all ages in various
locations within the Greater Edmonton and Greater Calgary areas.

Outcome and Impact: A summary report including results, information on the effectiveness of helmets,
and a call to action regarding bicycle helmet legislation has been produced.

Key People/Organizations Involved:
KIDSAFE Connection
Departments of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics, U of A

ACICR Role: To provide input into the study methodology, implementation and reporting of the
findings. This study has been presented at three conferences with both national and international
audiences and a paper is being drafted for submission.




                                                                                                        75
                         Case-Control Study of Farm Machinery Injuries

                                             Project Overview


Objective: To conduct a case-control study of occupational farm machinery injuries occurring among
adult male and female farmers in the Prairie Region of Canada with the purpose of identifying potentially
modifiable risk factors associated with the individual, the environment and the farm machine, aimed at
applying this knowledge to injury control strategies.

Project Description: We plan to study 600 cases of persons hospitalised for injury as a result of farm
machinery-related events to be collected from participating study hospitals in Alberta, Saskatchewan and
Manitoba. The identified study hospitals will be tertiary care and regional hospitals in the three provinces.
One control subject for each case will also be studied.

Outcome and Impact: The significance of the project relates to the numbers of persons involved and to
the high rate of injuries sustained by persons living on or involved in farms or agriculturally-related
occupations. Information from this project has the potential of a positive impact on the quality of life for
farmers and rural persons in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and across Canada. Injury has
significant potential economic impact in terms of lost productivity in the agricultural sector, and increased
health care costs in the Provinces concerned.

Key People/Organizations Involved:
       Principle Investigator: Dr. James Dosman, University of Saskatchewan
       Co-investigators               Dr. Don Voaklander, University of Melbourne
                                      Dr. A. Senthilselvan, University of Alberta
                                      Dr. Helen McDuffie, University of Saskatchewan
                                      Dr. Lesley Day, University of Monash
                                      Dr. Punam Pahwa, University of Saskatchewan
                                      Dr. Ted Redekop, Manitoba Labour
                                      Dr. W.A. Harrell, University of Alberta
                                      Dr. Trevor Crowe, University of Saskatchewan
       Project Engineer:              Mr. Jim Wasserman, Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute
       Project Co-ordinator: Ms. Louise Hagel, University of Saskatchewan
       Research Engineer:             Mr. Mark Ingram, University of Saskatchewan
       Project Manager/SK:            Ms. Lynn Dwernychuk, University of Saskatchewan
       Project Manager/AB: Ms. Kathy Belton, Alberta Centre for Injury Control & Research
       Research Nurse/MB:             Ms. Valerie Cook, Winnipeg, MB



ACICR Role: To manage the data collection process in Alberta including site, case and control
recruitment and to provide input into the study process.




                                                                                                          76
                      United Farmers of Alberta (UFA) Rural/Farm Family
                       Safety Program Evaluation Advisory Committee

                                            Project Overview


Objective: To provide guidance and advice regarding the evaluation of the United Farmers of Alberta
Rural/Farm Family Safety Program. The program has a goal to reduce the number of farm/agricultural-
related injuries or deaths through increased awareness and education.

Project Description: The evaluation is to provide direction and recommendations to the UFA in the area
of program practices, policies and procedures. In addition the evaluation project entails a review of the
relevant literature and research and best practices from Alberta and other national and international
jurisdictions.

Outcome and Impact: Essentially this evaluation will provide information to facilitate policy-making,
guide funding decisions, and make program improvements.

Key People/Organizations Involved:
Jim Watt, United Farmers of Alberta
Linda West, Family & Community Support Services
Jan Fawcett, Nanton Health Unit
Beth Borthwick, Claresholm Health Unit
Peggy Good, Cremona, AB
Mary-Frances Wright, Health Canada
Henryk Ficner, United Farmers of Alberta
Kathy Belton, ACICR
Howard Research, Evaluation Consultants

ACICR Role: To provide advice and recommendations regarding the selection of an evaluation
consultant, the development of an evaluation plan, reviewing the results of the evaluation.




                                                                                                        77
                 Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey (SHBPS)

                                      Project Overviews


The SHBPS is a population-based, age-stratified, mailed survey of spinal disorders in a probability
sample of Saskatchewan adults. It consists of a three-stage follow-up survey conducted at 6-month
intervals from September 1995 to September 1996, using the Saskatchewan Health Insurance
Registration File as the sampling frame. The survey is designed to estimate the prevalence,
incidence, determinants, treatment and natural history of neck and low back pain. It is a
comprehensive inventory, with valid measurements of pain-related severity and disability, health-
related quality of life, depressive symptomatology, health-related coping, comorbid illness, treatment
received and socioeconomic status. Data collection is complete and several papers have been
published or submitted. It has also formed the basis for several graduate student theses.


1. Mercado AC, Carroll LJ, Cassidy JD, Côté P: Factors Associated with Combinations of Active
    and Passive Coping of Neck and Low Back Pain Sufferers in the General Population. (in
    submission), 2000.
2. Côté P, Cassidy JD, Carroll L. The epidemiology of neck pain in Saskatchewan. What have we
    learned in the past five years? (in press) J Manip Physiol Therap 2001.
3. Côté P, Cassidy JD, Carroll L. The treatment of spinal pain: Who seeks care? Who goes where?
    (in press) Medical Care 2001.
4. Côté P, Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ. The factors associated with neck pain and its related disability in
    the Saskatchewan population. Spine 2000;25:1109-1117.
5. Carroll LJ, Cassidy JD, Côté P. The Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey. The Prevalence
    of depressive symptomatology and its association with pain in Saskatchewan adults. Can J Public
    Health 2000;91:459-464.
6. Mercado AC, Carroll LJ, Cassidy JD, Côté P. Coping with neck and low back pain in a general
    population. Health Psychology 2000;19:333-338.
7. Côté P, Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ. The Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey. The Prevalence
    of Neck Pain and Related Disability in the Saskatchewan Adults. Spine 1998;23:1689-1698.
8. Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ, Côté P. The Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey. The Prevalence
    of Low Back Pain and Related Disability in the Saskatchewan Adults. Spine 1998;23:1860-1867.
9. Côté P. The Prevalence and Determinants of Chronic Neck Pain in the Saskatchewan Adult
    Population. M.Sc. in Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Saskatchewan, defended July 1996.
10. Mercado AC. Coping With Chronic Pain: The Determinants of Coping Style in a General Adult
    Population. M.A. in Clinical Health Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, defended, October
    1997.
11. George C. The Six Month Incidence Low Back Pain in the Saskatchewan Adult Population.
    M.Sc. in Community Health and Epidemiology, University of Saskatchewan, Defended January
    1999.
12. Mercado AC. Coping as a Determinants of Recovery from Neck and Back Pain and Injury. PhD
    in Clinical Health Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, in progress.




                                                                                                   78
 Population-based, inception cohort study of traffic injuries in Saskatchewan (PICSTIS)

                                            Project Overview


PICSTIS is an incidence cohort study of all adult traffic injury claims made to Saskatchewan Government
Insurance (SGI) between July 1, 1994 and December 31, 1995. SGI is the only insurer of traffic injuries
for the approximately 1 million Saskatchewan inhabitants. On January 1, 1995 the insurance
compensation system was changed from tort to no fault. PICSTIS includes 9,006 injury claims, of which
7,462 (83%) are for neck pain. The cohort also includes 2,110 claimants with mild head injury, 6,015
with post-traumatic headache, 4,473 with post-traumatic low back pain and 1,327 claimants with post-
traumatic temporomandibular joint complaints. Baseline information is available on the entire cohort,
including sociodemographic information, collision-related information (impact direction, seat belt use,
headrest use, collision severity, road surface condition), hospitalization, pre and post-injury symptoms
(symptom checklist), general health and a pain drawing. The time-to-claim-closure is also available for
the entire cohort, and has been shown to closely reflect health recovery in whiplash claims. A symptom
checklist, pain drawing, pain intensity, pain-related disability, health-related quality of life, depressive
symptomatology, and health coping behaviour is available for those that consented to the one-year follow
up. Analyses of the follow-up data showed little evidence of selection bias. Data collection is complete
and the cohort has been linked to Saskatchewan Health Services data (hospitalization, drug plan and
physician/chiropractor services). The first two papers and thesis on whiplash are published, a third paper
is submitted and a second thesis is in progress. An analysis of injuries other than whiplash has begun
(incidence, prognosis and effect of the insurance system) and an analysis of the effect of health services
on recovery is underway.

    1. Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ, Côté P, Lemstra M, Berglund A, Nygren Å. Effects of eliminating
       compensation for pain and suffering on outcome of insurance claims for whiplash injury. N Engl
       J Med 2000;342:1179-1186.
    2. Côté P, Hogg-Johnson S, Cassidy JD, Carroll L, Frank JW. The association between neck pain
       intensity, physical functioning, depressive symptomatology and claim duration after whiplash. J
       Clin Epidemiol 2001;54:174-85.
    3. Lemstra M. A Study of Traffic Injury Claims in Saskatchewan. M.Sc. in Physical Medicine and
       Rehabilitation, University of Saskatchewan, defended July, 1999.
    4. Cassidy JD, Carroll LJ, Côté P, Berglund A, Nygren Å. A prospective study of low-back pain
       after traffic collisions. (in submission), 2001.
    5. Côté P. Patterns of Care and Recovery From Whiplash. Ph.D. in Epidemiology and Biostatistics,
       Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, in progress.




                                                                                                         79
    An Outcomes Assessment of Treatment and Rehabilitation After Traffic Injuries in
                                 Saskatchewan

                                           Project Overview



This is a second population-based, inception cohort study of traffic injury claims in Saskatchewan adults.
Entry into to the cohort occurs on the day of the injury and exit occurs at the time of claim closure.
Claimants complete a comprehensive baseline questionnaire, similar to the PICSTIS study, and follow-up
occurs at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 12 months by structured telephone interviews. In
addition, a comprehensive paper questionnaire is completed when claimants are admitted and discharged
from secondary and tertiary treatment centers. The main goal of the study is to examine the effect of a
province-wide rehabilitation program put in place to provide multidisciplinary outpatient (secondary
centers) and inpatient (tertiary centers) care for traffic injuries. Data collection commenced on December
1, 1997, with two years of inception and one year of follow up, and will be completed in November 2000.
The cohort includes 8,643 claims with over 80% follow-up to date. This study will document the
incidence of injuries and provide patient-centred data for prognostic modeling. Careful measurement of
treatment and rehabilitation program exposures, including primary care from physicians and therapists,
will allow an effectiveness assessment of the clinical practice guidelines proposed by the Quebec Task
Force in 1995. Currently data cleaning is underway.




                                                                                                       80
   World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Neurotrauma Task Force on Mild
                                      Brain Injury

                                          Project Overview


This is a five-year Task Force that will examine the economic costs, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and
prevention of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and post-concussion syndrome (PCS) due to closed
head injury. MTBI is usually defined as Glasgow Coma Scale 13-15, loss of consciousness of less than
30 minutes and duration of post-traumatic amnesia of less than 24 hours. It affects about 200/100,000
adults per year and is the source of considerable morbidity. There is evidence that it can result from a
whiplash injury mechanism, and there are similarities between the symptoms of chronic whiplash and
PCS. The MBI Task Force involves a systematic review of the world literature on MTBI and original
research by expert clinicians and methodologists from North America, England and Sweden. The main
focus of work is at the WHO Collaborating Centre for Neurotrauma within the Section for Personal Injury
Prevention at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. The project began in 1998 and will publish
clinical practice guidelines, based on the systematic review of the literature and supplemented by formal
clinical consensus meetings. Original research will include the analysis of the MTBI cohort of PICSTIS.
So far the Task Force has screened over 34,000 abstracts and critically reviewed over 500 papers using
software developed by Drs. Cassidy and Carroll.




                                                                                                      81
         WHO Collaborating Centre Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders

                                             Project Overview


This Task Force involves an international group of clinicians and methodologists, and is focused at the
Department of Public Health Sciences at the U of Alberta, the Institute for Work & Health in Toronto, the
UCLA School of Public Health in Los Angeles and the Section for Personal Injury Prevention at
Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. The Task Force will update the systematic review of the Quebec Task
Force on Whiplash and expand the review to include occupational neck pain and neck pain in the general
population. Three original research projects are now underway. Two of these projects use population-
based, Saskatchewan Health administrative data to estimate the risks associated with the two most
common treatments for neck pain. The first project will estimate the risk of hospitalization and/or death
from gastrointestinal hemorrhage associated with the use of prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory
drugs (NSAIDs) in a historical cohort of patients that have visited a physician or chiropractor for non-
specific back pain. The second project is a nested case-control study of the risk for posterior circulation
stroke after chiropractic manipulation for neck pain in the same historical cohort as the NSAIDs study.
Both projects will access and link hospitalization, prescription drug and physician/chiropractic services
between 1989 and 1999, and the protocols have been developed with Saskatchewan Health. Finally,
evidence from the systematic review and administrative data studies will be used in a decision-analytic
study, which will incorporate patient utilities and estimated costs, to develop a decision tree for neck pain
treatment. The Task Force will use all of this evidence, including formal consensus sessions, where
evidence is lacking, to produce new clinical practice guidelines.




                                                                                                          82
                        Economic Burden of Unintentional Injury in Alberta

                                             Project Overview


Background/History:
Working in partnership with SMARTRISK and in cooperation with Alberta Health & Wellness, an
Alberta specific report on economic burden of unintentional injury is being developed similar to the
currently published reports for Ontario and Canada as a whole.

Goal:
Produce an Alberta specific report that outlines the cost of injury within the province of Alberta

Objectives:
Utilize the Alberta specific report as a tool to identify the financial burden of injury, thus
to influence decision makers.

Strategy:
Use Alberta injury data for 1997 as well as linked RGN costs for 1997 to produce a report.

Target Audience:
RHA’s, ACICR, policy advisors and influencers, other concerned injury partners, Safe
Communities

Steps:
1.     Agreement has been signed with SMARTRISK.
2.     Approvals have been obtained for release of information have been obtained from Alberta Health
       & Wellness (May 2001).
3.     First level of data analysis has occurred.
4.     Forwarded to SMARTRISK for report completion.

Partners:
SMARTRISK
Alberta Health & Wellness




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                                     1997 Data Sub Set Reports

                                          Project Overview


Background/History:

At the request of the partners of ACICR, an agreement was made to develop a series of sub-set data
reports and summary brochures based on 1997 injury data. Three subset reports were agreed to:
1. Child & Teen Data Report – working in cooperation with KIDSAFE Connection.
2. Suicide Data Report – 1993 – 1997 – working in cooperation with Suicide Information & Education
    Centre.
3. Neurotrauma Data Report – 1997 – working in cooperation with Northern Alberta Brain Injury
    Society and Canadian Paraplegic Association (Alberta).

Goal:
Provision of useful injury specific information to injury prevention community within the
province of Alberta

Objectives:

1. Highlight specific injury groups.
2. Relationship building within Injury prevention community.
3. Provision of useful injury information.

Strategy:
Working with partners KIDSAFE Connection, NABIS, CPA (Alberta), SIEC, and
supported by Alberta Health & Wellness, develop outline of report, complete the data
analysis, text and graphics, review with partners, working with partners develop
summary brochures, print and distribute.

Target Audience:
These reports intended for the ACICR Advisory Body, injury prevention coordinators within the Regional
Health Authorities, Partners – KIDSAFE Connection, NABIS, CPA, SEIC, Safe Communities, Injury
Research Group

Steps:
1.     Set up initial working meetings to develop data report outline, content and expectations.
2.     Complete data analysis,
3.     Complete report – both text and graphics.
4.     Send out report for review and feedback.
5.     Incorporate changes into report, update report.
6.     Sign off report with partners.
7.     Assist partners with completion of Summary brochure
8.     Work with the printer to develop the design, layout requirements for report.
9.     Work with the graphic designer to develop the design, layout for the summary brochures.
10.    Develop a distribution plan.
11.    Distribute.
Partners:

Child & Teen Data Report – KIDSAFE Connection


                                                                                                   84
Suicide Data Report – Suicide Information & Education Centre
Neurotrauma Data Report – Northern Alberta Brain Injury Society, Canadian Paraplegic Association –
Alberta.




                                                                                                     85
                                  1997 Alberta Injury Data Report

                                          Project Overview


Background/History:

As part of the mandate of ACICR, the fourth edition of the Alberta Injury Data Report was completed
based on 1997 data.

Goal:
Provision of timely, useful information to injury prevention community within the province of Alberta

Objectives:
As possible, assist the Alberta injury prevention community. Compile and report injury
related information to assist them

Strategy:
Utilizing the data made available through Alberta Health & Wellness, the data was
organized and presented as agreed to by Alberta Health.
An electronic version of the Injury Data Report was made available on the ACICR
webpage.

Target Audience:
Advisory Body, injury prevention coordinators within the Regional Health Authorities,
Safe Communities, Injury Research Group, Alberta Health & Wellness Reference
Library. As this report is available on our webpage, the audience is worldwide.

Steps:
1.     Initial meetings were held with Alberta Health & Wellness to determine content and presentation.
       Agreement was made that the data analysis would be completed by ACICR and Alberta Health
       would be responsible for presentation and printing.
2.     Analysis completed, draft version presented to Alberta Health & Wellness
3.     Paper version returned from Alberta Health & Wellness
4.     Report distributed, currently seeking electronic version to ensure that the data available on the
       webpage matches the written documentation.

Partners: Alberta Health & Wellness




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                   Canadian Agricultural Injury Surveillance Program (CAISP)

                                            Project Overview


Background/History:

Working in cooperation with the Canadian Agriculture Surveillance Program to ensure that the collection
of farm fatality and farm injury data is collected for the province of Alberta.

Goal:

Collection of Alberta data to monitor the occurrence of farm fatalities and injuries in
Alberta, analysis by the CAISP team.

Objectives:
Working with CAISP team, ensure deadlines for Alberta data collection of farm fatality
and farm injuries in Alberta are met.

Strategy:
Farm Fatalities: Obtain list of farm fatalities from Alberta Agriculture.
1. Work with the Medical Examiner’s office to allow access of ACICR subcontracted staff to complete
    file reviews.
2. Collect data, enter and forward to CAISP office in Queen’s University.

Farm Injuries:
Obtain list of farm injuries from Alberta Health & Wellness

1. Arrange with individual hospitals to complete the data collection form on all farm fatalities.
2. Collect data, enter and forward to CAISP office in Queen’s University.

Steps: See above

Partners:
Canadian Agricultural Surveillance Program
University of Alberta

Sponsors:
CAISP




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                                      Data Analysis at Request

                                           Project Overview


Background/History:
As part of the mandate of ACICR, the Data Analysis Unit responds to individual information queries by
the Alberta population and injury prevention community. Data provided by Alberta Health & Wellness on
deaths, inpatient hospitalizations and emergency department visits is analyzed to answer queries.

Goal:
Provision of useful information to injury prevention community within the province of Alberta.

Objectives:
Assist the Alberta injury prevention community compile and report injury related
information.

Target Audience:
ACICR staff, Alberta injury prevention coordinators working within the Regional Health
Authorities, special interest groups such as NABIS, SIEC, Safe Communities, other
stakeholders and Albertans in general.

Utilizing the data made available through Alberta Health & Wellness, the Data Analysis
Unit prepares information to address the questions of the Alberta Injury Prevention
Community.

ACICR Staff Support: data is provided to ACICR staff to assist them

Steps:

1. On receipt of the data request, confirm the details in discussion with the requestor. Ensure that all
   involved are aware of the information request – why this information is required, who the intended
   audience is, required time frame.
2. Determine if question can be answered with data already published.
3. Review data, compile data, present data.
4. Send data to requestor. Be available to address any questions or queries.

Partners: Work with other ACICR staff to provide best level of information to requestor.




                                                                                                           88
                          Dynamic Influences of Pre Hospital Care in Alberta

                                            Project Overview



Goal:
To address the basic question “What does pre-hospital care look like in
defined parts of Alberta.”


Objectives:
To provide an in-depth definition of the social, cultural, regional and economic characteristics that
underpin the normative or everyday EMS services in Alberta.

To provide information that leads to an adequate understanding and of pre hospital everyday operations.

To determine the influence of community context in EMS.


Strategy:
Engage in on-site interviews with strategic pre-hospital/emergency medicine personnel in four selected
Alberta sites – EMS personnel, firefighters, police officers, ER personnel, community
leaders/politicians/administrators, school officials and local emergency workers.


Steps:
The study is nearly completed (data analysis, interpretation, report writing).
The final report is ¾ finished.




                                                                                                         89
Information Sharing
  Project Overviews




                      90
                              Advocating for Healthy Public Policy

                                         Project Overview


Background/History:
One role of the ACICR is to advance the development of healthy public policy related to injury
control. Means by which the Centre influences policy include championing an issue and actively
advocating for policy change regarding it, and, at the request of other agencies, reviewing
materials and providing input reflecting the policy position of the ACICR.

Goal: To encourage the development and adoption of public policy that will reduce the
frequency of and optimize the treatment and rehabilitation of injuries in Alberta.

Objectives:
To develop position statements that are statements of guiding principles adopted by the ACICR
on important injury topics or issues that give broad direction to ACICR in conducting its
operations and in providing services.

To develop position statements that identify principles that are relevant to the actions of other
stakeholders to achieve, in the Centre’s view, an effective societal response to the injury topic or
issue under consideration.

To develop a set of position statements which are a statements of key considerations adopted
by the ACICR presenting ACICR’s perspective and views on important injury topics or issues to
broadly inform staff, stakeholders, the media, and the general public on such matters.
Strategy:
To influence policy, the Centre requires a means for responding to matters which fall into two
categories: 1) proactive - those which the Centre identifies and pursues proactively and 2)
reactive - those which the Centre is asked for by other agencies as part of the other agencies’
input-gathering processes

Steps:

Process for Proactive Issues

1. Identification of Issues

Issues can be brought forward from staff through the policy analyst and from the Advisory Body
through the chair of the Advocacy Subcommittee. Semi-annually a call for issues can be made
in the Injury Control Alberta Newsletter to solicit ideas from partners and stakeholders.
2. Research

Information to be used in the analysis of issues will be gathered by ACICR staff. Information will
be gathered that is needed to prioritize the issue relative to other injury issues of concern to the
Centre. Some sources of relevant information are listed in the following section.

3. Analysis of Issues

Following are a set of criteria for identifying issues of priority and sources of information to be
examined in weighing the merit of an issue:


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1. Severity, prevalence and incidence of injury
   • surveillance data
2. Evidence and research results identifying changes in public policy as an effective strategy
• success in other jurisdictions
• success on similar issues
3. Policy of a provincial nature
• provincial laws, federal laws, or jurisdictional laws that are identified as having the potential
   to influence the entire province
4. Community-identified need and expressed interest to work in partnership with the ACICR
• input/feedback received from the community
5. Identifiable window of opportunity within policy-making organizations
• initiation of a legislative renewal process
• policy changes have been proposed by other groups/sectors
6. Availability of human and financial resources to support an appropriate advocacy strategy
   • assessment that a degree of support for change exists such that the required strategy is
        of a manageable size
7. Alignment with ACICR objectives
   • review of ACICR Business Plan.

The policy analyst, with direction from the advocacy subcommittee, will rank the issues in order
of priority. The subcommittee will determine which issues will be forwarded for drafting of policy
statements.

4. Drafting of Policy Statements

Following are a set of steps for the development of a policy statement:*
1. The policy analyst, with direction from the advocacy subcommittee, will create a policy draft
    with preamble, policy statement and rationale.
2. The policy draft will be forwarded to the Advisory Body for 1st Reading and turned back to
    the policy analyst or, if agreed upon, distributed to all staff and other designated
    stakeholders for review and feedback. Based on feedback the policy analyst will revise the
    document and return it to the Advisory Body
3. The Advisory Body will give it 2nd Reading. If additional work is required from the policy
    analyst, it will be revised by her and then returned to the Advisory Body for 3rd Reading. If
    no additional changes are recommended, the Advisory Body could go straight to 3rd Reading
    and approval.
*This process was suggested by Dick Ramsay based on a process that was used successfully
by AADAC.

5. Development of Advocacy Plans

The ACICR has devoted a .5 FTE position to policy analysis. Given the allocation of this
resource, it is anticipated that the Centre will be able to pursue two or three issues at any given
time. The issues to be pursued will be determined by the priority setting criteria and an
advocacy plan will be developed for each issue.

The policy analyst will prepare the advocacy plans with direction from the Executive Director
and the Advocacy Subcommittee. Each plan will be circulated to the Advisory Body for
comment prior to implementation.




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Process for Responding to Issues Upon Request (reactive)

The process to respond to requests for policy statements or for review of materials from other
organizations requires a different process than those issues taken on at the initiative of the
Centre. The timelines given for responding are often only a few days in length and the
responses often require an interpretation of ACICR policy rather than a direct quotation of it.
Thus, a rapid and flexible method of responding is required. Rather than outlining a specific
process, a set of general guidelines to follow has been defined.

Guidelines for Preparing Requested Responses
In preparing a response requested by another agency, the ACICR policy analyst will:
• review all existing policy statements
• conduct a search for relevant research results as is allowed by the timelines given
• draft a response with input from staff and the Executive Director and seek approval from
    either the Advisory Body, the Advocacy Subcommittee or the Advisory Body Chair, as time
    permits.

Complete copies of the responses submitted will be circulated to the Advocacy Subcommittee
and a summary of the responses will be circulated to the Advisory Body for discussion at each
Advisory Body meeting.


Note: An initial review of this proposed process was done by the Advocacy Subcommittee in
2000. No further action has taken place.




                                                                                                  93
                            Alberta Injury Awareness Video Project

                                         Project Overview


Background/History:

In Alberta, there lacks a serious public sense of urgency to recognize and prevent injuries.
There is no overall, comprehensive plan in place to directly impact Albertans and motivate them
to take steps to control injuries.

Issue-specific video resources and other communications materials to increase awareness
about injuries exist, but there are significant gaps with respect to the overall significance of
injury in Alberta and current high-priority injury issues.

The Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research is currently partnering with other
organizations to produce a series of video materials which will inspire Albertans to recognize
injuries as a public health concern and take steps to reduce their risks.

Goal:

To generate a critical mass of awareness regarding the cost and magnitude of
the injury problem in Alberta.

Objectives:

Objective 1.1
By December 31, 2001, 50% of Albertans, 25-59, will say injury is a significant public health
problem in Alberta.

Objective 1.2
By December 31, 2001, 50% of Albertans, 25-59, will be able to accurately state the financial
costs of injuries to the Alberta health system as well as numbers (statistics) that reflect the
magnitude of the problem.

Strategies:

•   Program Identity, including a theme line/slogan and visual identity that will be used to tie all
    aspects of the program together and create a unique “brand” that is separate from the
    ACICR but maintains a connection (e.g. small print that says, “A provincial campaign
    coordinated by the Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research”).

•   Two 30-second commercials for province-wide and local broadcast. The first one should
    introduce the idea that injuries are significant public health problem. It should quickly gain
    and keep the attention of the audience. A key outcome would be that people discuss it with
    people in their family, social group or on the job. The second commercial should address
    the financial and emotional impact of injuries on Albertans through statistical review of the
    impact of injuries in the province and testimonials from injury victims or survivors to raise
    awareness in an emotional fashion.




                                                                                                   94
•   Injury Control Website that provides more detailed information about the cost and
    magnitude of the injury problem in Alberta.

•   Collateral Materials, including poster, pamphlets and fact sheets that reflect the PSA
    images and messages. Pamphlets and fact sheets can be sent out in response to requests
    for more information. All collateral materials can be distributed to Injury Control Stakeholders
    for broad dissemination at the local level.

•   Launch Event. A province-wide event and/or local events will be planned to launch the PSA
    campaign, as a means of focusing media and the public attention on the key messages and
    encouraging people to watch for the PSAs.

Steps:
1. Raise necessary funds to produce, air, and promote series
2. Partner with production company and broadcaster
3. Determine an appropriate target audience for series
4. Determine specific injury issues, in order of priority, that will be addressed in the series in
   consultation with stakeholders
5. Communicate with injury control practitioners in Alberta regularly regarding status of project
6. Promote broadcasts provincially
7. Evaluate effectiveness of videos in raising awareness of injury and motivating individuals to
   take steps to minimize their risks for injury
8. Promote the use of the videos by a variety of injury control practitioners in workshops and
   other special events to increase life of project.
9. Identify opportunities for future injury-specific campaigns

Partners:

    Alberta Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission
    Alberta Blue Cross
    Alberta Centre for Injury Control & Research
    Capital Health
    David Thompson Regional Health Authority
    Mistahia Health Region
    Syncrude Canada
    The Robert Tegler Foundation

Sponsors:

Gold Plus
Braithwaite Boyle Injury Lawyers

Gold
Alberta Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission
Alberta Blue Cross
The Robert Tegler Trust




                                                                                                 95
Silver Plus
Alberta Transportation, Traffic Safety Initiative

Silver
Calgary Injury Prevention Coalition
Capital Health
Mistahia Health Region

Friend
Lakeland Regional Health Authority
x dot c technologies




                                                    96
                                         ACICR Website

                                        Project Overview


Goal:

Share injury control information with stakeholders

Objectives:
1. Share injury control information with Alberta injury practitioners to support their work
2. Provide injury prevention information to the public
3. Update Alberta injury practitioners on ACICR activities

Strategies:
1. Maintain the ACICR website (www.med.ualberta.ca/acicr) on a monthly basis to ensure it is
    up to date
2. Design a technically low-level site to ensure it is accessible and efficient by users of
    the most basic computer systems
3. Design an easy-to-navigate site to allow people with lower internet and computer skills to
    access the information

Key Information to Share:
   ACICR staff directory and updates
   ACICR program updates (i.e. CICF application, Traffic Safety Act discussion paper
   responses)
   Current Injury Control Alberta newsletters
   Alberta injury data
   New documents from ACICR or partners
   Links to injury control stakeholders’ websites




                                                                                              97
                          Alberta Injury Control Speakers Registry

                                       Project Overview


Project goal / objectives:

• To provide a central provincial registry and referral service for speakers, presenters and
workshop leaders who are willing to make presentations in the province of Alberta, Canada on a
wide range of topics related to injury control and safety promotion.
• To connect speakers with the organizers of meetings, workshops, conferences, symposia,
seminars, classes, forums and other gatherings, large and small.

Background and rationale:

On a fairly regular basis, ACICR receives requests for the names of people who are available to
speak on a wide range of injury control topics in Alberta. Depending on the request, staff would
sometimes spend quite a bit of time trying to track down names and contact information for
speakers. Staff identified a need to set up a system that would assist with and formalize this
process. In order to set up a system that was efficient and not too time consuming or
cumbersome, we spoke with administrators of several other speakers registries to get their
suggestions on what works, what doesn’t work and why.

Steps:

The development of the registry is in three phases. Phase 1 (June – October 2000) involved
building the database of speakers and topics according to keywords and topics. Phase 2
(October 2000 – September 2001) involves publicizing and piloting the service. Phase 3
(October 2001) is an evaluation of the service with the possibility for revisions in how it is
operated.

Overview:

The registry includes speakers with expertise in various areas within the broad scope of injury
control from injury prevention to emergency response, to the treatment and rehabilitation of the
injured. The scope of injuries includes unintentional injuries such as those caused by motor
vehicle collisions, falls or poisoning for example, as well as intentional injuries such as those
that are self-inflicted or result from violence.

Anyone willing to speak or lead workshops on a topic related to injury control and safety
promotion at events such as those described above, may register as a speaker with the registry.
Speakers do not have to be from Alberta, but must be willing to speak in Alberta. The registry
requests speakers to complete a 2 sided registration form. Any or all of the information
submitted on the form may be given out by ACICR in response to requests for speakers; in
ACICR publications; and on the ACICR website. Speaker registration forms can be obtained by
contacting the Alberta Injury Control Speakers Registry at ACICR.

For each speaker, the registry collects / provides the name; contact information; geographical
availability; languages; injury control perspective; topics and areas of expertise on which they
are willing to speak or lead workshops; comments regarding expectations for remuneration; a
brief personal profile; and a brief overview of past experience as a speaker / workshop leader.


                                                                                                 98
Before contacting the registry for a speaker, event organizers should decide on one or more
topics related to injury control and safety promotion in which they are interested. They should
then contact the registry at ACICR. If they are uncertain about the topic, the registry can
provide a list of topics for which it has registered speakers. ACICR will then provide the names,
contact details and other information that has been submitted by speakers that have indicated a
willingness to speak on the topic(s).

When an event organizer accesses names and information for potential speakers from the
registry, it is up to the organizer to contact the potential speakers. Organizers and speakers are
responsible for discussing and agreeing upon all expectations, details, terms, conditions, and
arrangements. The registry is not involved in arranging or following up on specific details of any
speaking engagements resulting through the registry. The registry does not screen, evaluate,
promote or guarantee the speakers who register, therefore organizers may wish to request
references from potential speakers and check them before confirming the speaker.

There is no fee for either registering as a speaker or accessing the information contained in the
speakers registry. However, individual speakers may request some type of remuneration. A
variety of circumstances affect this – the length of the presentation, the amount of travel time
and distance involved, expenses that will be incurred, the size of the audience, how significant
or prestigious an event is it, whether the speaker makes his/her living doing speaking
engagements, whether it is part of their job, etc. Depending on those circumstances, speakers
may or may not request reimbursement for travel and subsistence expenses, an honorarium or
a fee. Some may simply request a perk like free attendance for the rest of the event at which
they are speaking. Still others may not expect anything at all, particularly if a request assists
them in meeting their work responsibilities or achieving personal or professional goals.

Although the speakers registry asks speakers to provide some general information about their
expectations on their registration forms, it is very important that speakers and event organizers
directly discuss and agree upon remuneration before finalizing a speaking engagement.




                                                                                               99
                              Injury Control Alberta Newsletter

                                       Project Overview


Background/History:
Injury Control Alberta is a free monthly newsletter published by the ACICR. The newsletter is
filled with interesting information on ACICR, injury control in general and the activities and
programs of our partners.

Goal:
To provide timely, accurate and relevant information to the injury control community across the
province.


Objectives:
   • To produce 4-page monthly newsletter
   • To create a recognizable and distinctive identity for the newsletter
   • To maintain a distribution database of contacts both provincially, nationally and
       internationally for receipt of the newsletter
   • To prepare and distribute the newsletter in 3 formats, fax, email and hardcopy
   • Communicate regularly with the injury control community

Steps:
1. Work with a formatter and designer for the ‘look’ of the newsletter
2. Gather interesting and important injury control articles
3. Gather important conference and events information and ACICR personnel and activities
   information to highlight in the newsletter
4. Distribute newsletter on a monthly basis

Partners:
Lacuna Publishing Solutions
Graphic Consulting & Service Ltd.




                                                                                            100
                                    Network Teleconferences

                                        Project Overview


Background/History:
The Network Teleconference arose out of a need identified by the participants of the Injury in
Alberta V Conference – to network and share information among people working in the field of
injury prevention and community development across the province. The first meeting was held
in November 1994, following review of the results of a needs assessment. Based on the results
of the needs assessment, it was decided that the original intent of the meetings would be to
provide updates of regional activities. These meetings were poorly attended, and a new format
was introduced with specific injury related topics and featured speakers. This new approach is
the same as the format used today and there is an average of 25 ports per meeting, with
anywhere from 30 to 60 participants on line.

Goal:
To develop and maintain an information sharing network for injury control
practitioners across the province.

Objectives:

To provide its participants with specific injury control-related information to help them work in the
field more effectively.

To allow for networking and discussion opportunities.

To update participants on current injury control issues

Steps:
   • Provide monthly one-hour teleconference sessions.
   • Determine specific injury issues that will be addressed throughout the season.
   • Determine and invite one or two speakers who are experts in the field on the
       topic of choice.
   • Communicate with individuals each month about the upcoming session.
   • Maintain a database of interested contacts for monthly and seasonal participants.
   • Evaluate the network teleconference on a regular basis
   • Organize and run teleconferences on a mostly cost-recovery basis
   • Identify important issues for future session topics




                                                                                                101
                                        Conference 2001

                                        Project Overview


Background/History:
Injury Prevention and Control 2001: Partnerships & Practice seeks to benefit the field of injury
prevention and control through increased knowledge, practice and partnerships among
community organizations, practitioners and researchers. The conference will address a diverse
range of injury control initiatives both intentional and unintentional, urban and rural.

Injury Prevention and Control 2001 will provide the opportunity for sharing, learning, and
networking within the Canadian injury prevention and control community.

Who should attend:
Injury Prevention and Control 2001 will be an information-sharing experience for a wide range of
professional groups and disciplines that have a stake in injury prevention and control. Among
these are hands-on practitioners, evaluators, health care providers, industry representatives,
researchers, government agencies, planners, law enforcers, producers, students, and other
stakeholders.

Goal:
Conference 2001 will benefit the field of injury prevention and control by increasing knowledge,
practice and partnerships among those dedicated to both rural and urban programs and
initiatives. Our goal is to bring forward results of the work accomplished in the areas of
agricultural safety, motor vehicle safety, suicide prevention, and professional development skills.
Conference 2001 will provide the opportunity for sharing, learning, and networking within the
Canadian injury prevention and control community.

Objectives:
a) To successfully combine the provincial Injury in Alberta X conference with the national 7th
   Annual Canadian Farm Safety & Rural Health Conference.
b) Partnership with the Canadian Coalition for Agricultural Safety and Rural Health, Alberta
   Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Mission Possible Traffic Safety Initiative and The
   Support Network and the Alberta Mental Health Board.
c) Serve as a bridge between community, practitioners and researchers working in injury
   prevention and control
d) Enable Albertans and Canadians to gain a heightened awareness of injury prevention and
   control

Strategy:
Four track themes have been developed to run concurrently throughout the conference:
   • Agricultural safety
   • Traffic safety
   • Suicide prevention
   • Professional development workshops




                                                                                              102
Steps:
Please see conference workplan attached.

Partners:
Injury Prevention and Control 2001 will be held in cooperation with the following partners:
Alberta Centre for Injury Control & Research, Canadian Coalition for Agricultural Safety and
Rural Health, Mission Possible Traffic Safety Initiative, The Support Network, The Alberta
Mental Health Board, and Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development.

Sponsors:
Sponsors are currently being sought and confirmed.




                                                                                               103
  Education
Project Overviews




                    104
                     Canadian Injury Prevention and Control Curriculum

                                         Project Overview


Background/History:
Through the cooperation and funding of Health Canada, the Canadian Injury Control Curriculum
Project will be carried out between September 1999-2002.
This curriculum is meant for adult learners who, because of their functions or responsibilities,
are likely to conduct research activities or develop, implement or evaluate programs aimed at
improving safety and reducing the frequency and severity of both intentional and unintentional
injury. In addition to increasing the number of individuals prepared with the same basic
understanding, we are hoping that the common preparation this initiative will provide will
enhance inter-sectoral collaboration.

Overall direction of the project is the joint responsibility of Alberta Centre for Injury Control and
Research (ACICR) and Plan-it Safe: Child & Youth Injury Prevention Centre at the children’s
hospital in Ottawa, Ontario. The ACICR acts as the general administrative centre for core
activities of the project.

Goal:
To develop and pilot test a national injury control curriculum that is generic enough to be offered
to all injury prevention and control practitioners, yet flexible enough to meet their specific needs.

This goal meets the intended outcome of the Population Health Fund by directly impacting
‘health’ services that promote injury control by increasing the knowledge and skills of individuals
working in injury prevention and control. It indirectly impacts on the social and physical
environments and personal health practices and coping skills of all life stages by strengthening
the community infrastructure that supports safe, supportive social and physical environments
and the creation of supportive community environments for action on the leading causes of
injury.

Objectives:

Objective 1: To determine current educational needs of injury control
practitioners across Canada.
The needs examination will look at injury control practitioners working with all life stages and in
all areas of injury control – those working with the host, the injury agent, and the social, physical
and economical environments.

Activity 1: establish expert advisory panel
Activity 2: design and disseminate a questionnaire
Activity 3: identify broad respondent groups of injury control practitioners and
injury survivors
Activity 4: enter and analyze responses
Activity 5: write a report regarding determined needs
Activity 6: decide on initial target audience (“one recommended group of injury
control practitioners”) for national curriculum




                                                                                                  105
Objective 2: To conduct a review of existing injury control curricula
available nationally and internationally.
All existing injury control curricula targeted at a broad spectrum of injury control practitioners
working with all life stages and in all areas of injury control – those working with the host, the
injury agent, and the social, physical and economical environments will be examined.

Activity 1: contact group of international experts on injury control regarding
existing curricula
Activity 2: post a request for information on existing curricula on various injury control focussed
listservs on the Internet and conduct a literature search
Activity 3: obtain copies of all curricula identified
Activity 4: develop a set of evaluation criteria for curricula based on needs assessment
Activity 5: evaluation and cross-referenced of curricula based on criteria.


Objective 3: To design and develop a flexible modular curriculum for adult
learners, which matches identified needs and, where possible, utilizes
existing resources.
The developed curriculum will specifically target one recommended ‘group’ of injury control
practitioners. Depending of the nature and breadth of the group selected, the target group will
serve one or more of the life stages and work in one or more area of injury control, those
impacting the host, the injury agent and/or the social, physical and economical environments.

Activity 1: make recommendations on content, learning objectives, format and
mechanism of delivery for prototype based on needs assessment and review of
existing curricula
Activity 2: contract adult educator to draft curriculum, facilitator’s manual,
participant workbook, teaching aids and resources.
Activity 3: form sub-committees representing all segments of the initial target
audience to develop segment appropriate examples, review the draft from their
segment's perspective and make recommendations for changes and/or additions
Activity 4: review and finalize curriculum prototype


Objective 4: To pilot the curriculum in four regions of Canada.
Again, the piloted curriculum will specifically target one recommended ‘group’ of injury control
practitioners. Depending of the nature and breadth of the group selected, the target group will
serve one or more of the life stages and working in one or more area of injury control – those
impacting the host, the injury agent and/or the social, physical and economical environments.

Activity 1:select four pilot sites in consultation with project partners
Activity 2: identify, hire and train four facilitators to conduct pilot workshops
Activity 3: advertise pilot workshops
Activity 4: conduct pilot workshops
Activity 5: modify workshop process and curriculum components based on
evaluation results
Activity 6: write up lessons learned as a guide for agencies looking at offering curriculum.
Activity 7: produce final version of curriculum kit in large enough quantity to
distribute to 250 regional partners at no cost.
Activity 8: produce final version of participant workbook in large enough quantity to make
available on a cost recovery basis to regional partners offering the curriculum.


                                                                                                 106
Activity 9: draft, discuss and agree on guidelines for course delivery.
Activity 10: review course content and delivery methods after year 1 operations.

Partners:
   • British Columbia Injury Prevention & Research Unit, Centre for Community Child
      Health Research
   • Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research
   • Saskatchewan Institute on Prevention of Handicaps
   • IM-PACT, The Injury Prevention Centre for the Children’s Hospital of Winnipeg
   • Plan-it Safe: the Child & Youth Injury Prevention Centre, Children’s Hospital of
      Eastern Ontario
   • Smartrisk, Ontario
   • Sécurité dans les milieux de vie, Centre de Santé publique de Québec
   • Nova Scotia Child Safety & Injury Prevention, IWK Grace Health Centre
   • Canadian Collaborative Centres on Injury Prevention and Control (CCCIPC)

This project will also require linking and collaboration with hospitals and community-based injury
control practitioners across Canada. Hospital-based practitioners include: emergency response
personnel, physicians, nurses and occupational and physical therapists. Community-based
practitioners include representatives from organizations such as fire, police and ambulance,
public health departments, insurance companies, safety councils, traffic departments, injury
survivors, etc.

Funding Source:

Health Canada, Population Health Fund




                                                                                              107
                         Proposed International Travelling Seminar

                                       Project Overview


Project goal / objectives:

To enable participants from around the world to appreciate the who, why, when, where and how
of injury and violence prevention by seeing with their own eyes what has been done in various
Alberta communities.

Background and rationale:

Safe Communities Travelling Seminars have been arranged by the WHO Collaborating Centre
on Community Safety Promotion, at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden since 1989. Each
travelling seminar is a “mobile school” which includes information on the hosting country’s safety
promotion and violence prevention program; site visits at safety promotion activities; and 15 –
20 minute presentations of papers by the international participants on their own country’s safety
promotion situation, experiences, and programs.

Seminars are generally held in conjunction with, and include participation at an International
Safe Communities Conference and World Injury Control Conference (the seminar usually ends
with the conferences). Seminar participants are expected to submit an abstract and present at
the conference(s).

Duration: Generally should not exceed 3 weeks including report writing, although past seminars
have ranged from 2 – 5 weeks.

Themes: Past seminars and resulting reports have been built around a theme in order to
provide a focus. For example, in 1989, the seminar and report focussed on formulating
guidelines for safe communities. In 1997, the theme revolved around violence.

Previous Travelling Seminars:

1.  1989 – Sweden – Thailand (Formulating guidelines for Safe Communities)
2.  1991 – Sweden
3.  1993 – Navajo Nation USA
4.  1994 – Sweden-Norway (How to Create Supportive Environments for Safety with Special
    Emphasis on Socially Exposed Groups
5. 1995 – Navaho Nation USA – Fort McMurray, Canada (Creating Safe Community Programs
    with Special Emphasis on Vulnerable Groups)
6. 1995 – Sweden (How can the Swedish Safe Community Program be adopted in countries of
    Central / Eastern Europe and South West Asia?)
7. Cancelled
8. 1996 – Australia (How to apply the WHO Safe Community approach to injury prevention in
    one’s own country)
9. 1997 – South Africa (Consolidating communities against violence: context and challenges)
10. 1998 – Austria – Netherlands (How to finance a Safe Community Program)
11. 2000 – Bangladesh – India (How can the Safe Community indicators be adopted for
    developing countries)



                                                                                             108
12. 2000 – Sweden – Mariestad – Katrincholhn (A Safe Community Program proposal for
    Rzhev, Russia, and Pakruijs, Lithuania)
13. 2001 – Sweden – Nacka – Ludvika

One of ACICR’s obligations as an Affiliate Support Centre for the WHO Safe Community is to
contribute to the international movement. Specifically, Leif Svanstrm expects ACICR to
participate in all international safe community conferences by attending and presenting, and to
host one or more international “safe community” events in Alberta/Canada as appropriate. Dr.
Svanstrm suggested ACICR work with the Rainy River Valley group in organizing their 2002
conference, however we declined for a couple of reasons including: 1 – our Executive Director
was already on the organizing committee for the Montreal conference to be held a week later; 2
– it was more logical for Safe Communities Foundation to be involved as they are in Ontario and
they are the Affiliate Centre involved with Rainy River Valley.

Currently, there are just ten Affiliate Support Centres of the WHO Safe Community Network
around the world. As a thriving, industrialized country with two affiliate support centres, Canada
is especially looked to for leadership and involvement by the network – particularly in supporting
developing countries.

Proposed Canadian Travelling Seminar:

Rainy River Safety Coalition in Ontario and Calgary Safer City Initiative would like to partner
with ACICR to host and organize a Canadian Travelling Seminar in conjunction with two
international conferences being held in Canada in 2002. The Safe Communities Foundation
has declined participation due to lack of resources.

Timing: The travelling seminar would be held in conjunction with and prior to the 11th
International Conference on Safe Communities being held in Fort Frances on May 7 – 9, 2002
with a pre-conference session on May 6 and the 6th World Conference on Injury Prevention and
Control being held in Montreal May 12 – 16, 2002.

Participants: About 20 (10 from industrialized countries and 10 from developing countries). The
WHO Collaborating Centre on Community Safety Promotion in Sweden gives advice on
selection of participants. The language is English, although an interpreter has been included
and funded for some previous seminars.

Location: It has been proposed that the travelling seminar begin in Alberta, and move into
Ontario and Quebec for the conferences.

Financing: Organizers are to try to get governmental funding to cover the costs of the 10
participants from developing countries including travel to Canada (“Only Apex flight tickets
should be used”). Participants register separately for the conference, however in some cases,
they are sponsored for the conference(s). Organizers try to keep a low budget by arranging for
meals to be sponsored by companies on site visits or by local coalition members; by having
participants share double rooms; and by getting local sponsors to assist with costs. University
or college housing or billeting is also a possibility.

Report: The seminar is to result in a report on the experience. All participants must contribute
to the writing, however one of the delegates is selected to be responsible for the coordination
and editing of the report. Participants need time for writing to be built in to the seminar as well
as access to computers. The report will be printed and distributed by the Collaborating Centre.


                                                                                                109
Organization: The travelling seminar organizing committee would be responsible for organizing
all aspects of the seminar including promotion, registration, sponsorships, finances, program
content, logistics related to transportation, lodging and food, travelling with the group for the
duration of the seminar, attending the conferences and ensuring the report is completed.

Roles and Responsibilities of the Canadian organizers:

-   Set dates so international conferences are included as part of the seminar
-   Organize all aspects of the travelling seminar except the conferences
-   Establish a theme for the seminar to narrow / focus the scope of potential topics, visits and
    resulting report
-   Work with the Collaborating Centre to develop invitation list
-   Invite about 20 participants (10 from developing countries)
-   Obtain funding to cover costs of those participants from developing countries
-   Include information on the hosting country’s safety promotion and violence prevention
    program and site visits at safety promotion activities
-   Provide site visits in the host country
-   Arrange all transportation, accommodation, and meals
-   Provide Canadian hosts who will travel with the group throughout the seminar in addition to
    Moa Sundstrm, Karolinska host
-   Provide opportunity for international participants to make 15 – 20 min. presentations on their
    own countries’ situation
-   Build in report writing time (during and after)
-   Designate one person to be responsible for coordinating and editing the report
-   Provide access to computers
-   Build in some time off and siteseeing (tourism) opportunities

Possible Itinerary

In order to get an idea of timing, this was prepared as a sample only. As it was prepared prior
to sending out the request for Indications of Interest, it is not based on those submissions.

Mon. Apr. 29                Issues in Injury Control course – Edmonton
                            Edmonton and area site visits (ACICR, Strathcona County –
                            IAPAC, red light cameras, RCMP, Royal Alexandra Hospital
                            Simulator, other?)
Tues. Apr. 30               RHA and Safe Community Network Meeting – give and receive
                            presentations - Edmonton
Wed. May 1                  Travel to Calgary (Red Deer Safety City? Calgary site visits?)
Thurs. May 2                Calgary site visits, workshop, etc. (Safer City, Trauma System,
                            STARS, SIEC, Poison Control Centre, ACAV, CIPC?)
Fri. May 3:                 Day trip to Banff (siteseeing)
Sat. May 4:                 Fly from Alberta to Ontario
Sun. May 5:                 Site-seeing, relaxation and/or writing – Fort Frances
Mon. May 6:                 Pre-conference session – Fort Frances
Tues, May 7 – Thurs. May 9: 11th International Conference on Safe Communities – Fort Frances
Fri. May 10:                Final writing; Conclusion of hosted portion of Travelling Seminar
Sat. May 11:                Travel to Montreal for those continuing on to conference.
Sun. May 12 – Thur. May 16: 6th World Conference on Injury Prevention and Control – Montreal



                                                                                              110
Next Steps:

1. Obtain and review input from communities to determine which, if any, are interested in being
   involved in the Travelling Seminar and what their community can offer in terms of activities,
   site visits, hosting, etc. (Indication of Interest submissions)
2. Present and discuss the possibilities at a meeting with Alberta, Ontario and Swedish
   representatives in Anchorage in May.
3. Make a decision as to whether we will proceed. Set organizing committee if decision is to
   proceed.
4. Set theme.
5. Put together a written proposal including itinerary and budget.
Reply to Alberta communities regarding their Indications of Interest.




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