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Course Descriptions - Cornell University

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Course Descriptions - Cornell University Powered By Docstoc
					    Course #            Course Title
                    Contemporary
AEM 2000            Controversies in the
                    Global Economy
                    International Trade
AEM 4300
                    Policy
                    Agriculture and Food
AEM 4310
                    Policy
                    Towards a Sustainable
                    Global Food System:
AEM 4450
                    Food Policy for
                    Developing Countries
                    Economics of
AEM 4640
                    Agricultural
Cross-listed with
                    Development
                    Globalization, Food
AEM 6420
                    Security, and Nutrition

                    Livestock in Tropical
AN SC 4000
                    Cropping Systems

                    Cultural Diversity and
ANTHR 2400
                    Contemporary Issues


                    Medicine, Culture and
ANTHR 2468
                    Society


                    Sex and Gender in
ANTHR 3421          Cross-Cultural
                    Perspective


                    Anthropology of the
ANTH 3465
                    Body


                    Anthropology of
ANTHR 4437
                    Development


                    Healing and Medicine
ANTHR 4862
                    in Africa


                    The Past and Present
ASRC 2306
                    of Precolonial Africa

ASRC 2308           Caribbean History


                    Politics of Global
ASRC 3200
                    Africa


                    Women and Gender
ASRC 4602
                    Issues in Africa


                    The Family and
ASRC 4606
                    Society in Africa
   Course #       Course Title

              Education and
ASRC 5020
              Development in Afria


              Marriage and Divorce
ASRC 6304
              in the African Context


              Ethical Issues in
BSOC 2051
              Health and Medicine

              Human Growth and
BSOC 3470
              Development
              Engineering for a
BEE 2510
              Sustainable Society
              Sustainable
BEE 3299      Development: A Web-
              based course
              Renewable Energy
BEE 4010
              Systems
              Basic Immunology
BIOG 3050
              Lectures
              Immunology of
BIOG 7060
              Infectious Diseases
              The Normal Microbes
BIOMI 3210    of the Human Body in
              Health and Disease
BIOMI 4090    Principles of Virology

BIOMI 4310    Medical Parasitology
              The State of the
BIONB 3210
              Planet
              Issues in Social
              Biology: from Diet to
BIOPL 1120
              Diseases, SNA to
              Deforestation
              Natural Remedies in
BIOPL 2210
              Ethnohealth

BSOC 2101     Plagues and People

              Sustainable Water
CEE 2550
              Supply Project
              Water Supply
CEE 4520
              Engineering
              Sustainable Small-
CEE 4540
              scale Water Supplies
              Sustainable Water
CEE 4550
              Supply Project
              Engineers for a
CEE 4920
              Sustainable World
              The Global City:
              People, Production,
CRP 1101
              and Planning in the
              Third World
   Course #       Course Title

              Gender and
CRP 3650
              Globalization

              20th-Century Italy:
CRP 3720
              Politics and Society

CRP 3760      Latin American Cities

              Transformations in the
CRP 4740
              Global South
              Issues in African
CRP 4770
              Development
              Gender and
CRP 6140      International
              Development
              Tropical Cropping
CSS 4140
              Systems
DSOC 2010     Population Dynamics
              International
DSOC 2050
              Development
              Sociology of Health of
DSOC 2200
              Ethnic Minorities
              Agriculture, Food and
DSOC 3400
              Society
              Health and Survival
DSOC 4100
              Inequalities
              Theories of
DSOC 4210
              Reproduction
              Global Conflict and
DSOC 4810
              Terrorism
              Climate and Global
EAS 2680
              Warming
              Economic
ECON 3710
              Development
              Women in the
ECON 4570
              Economy
              Economics of
ECON 4640     Agricultural
              Development
              Economics of Hunger
ECON 4740
              and Malnutrition
              Engineering for a
ENGRD 2510
              Sustainable Society
ENTOM 2100    Plagues and People

              Medical and Veterinary
ENTOM 3520
              Entomology


              Agriculture in
FDSC 4020
              Developing Nations I

              Sex and Gender in
FGSS 3210     Cross-Cultural
              Perspective
              Contemporary Issues
FGSS 3500
              in Women's Health
              Gender and
FGSS 3600
              Globalization
   Course #       Course Title
              Health and Survival
FGSS 4100
              Inequalities
              Theories of
FGSS 4210
              Reproduction
              Gender and
FGSS 6140     International
              Development

              Marriage and Divorce
FGSS 6304
              in the African Context


GOVT 2947     Global Thinking

              Issues behind the
              news: An
              Interdisciplinary
GOVT 3553
              Analysis of
              International Current
              Events
              Introduction to Peace
GOVT 3937
              and Conflict Studies
              Human Growth and
HD 3470
              Development
              Social Inequalities in
HD 3570       Physical and Mental
              Health
              Culture and Human
HD 4520
              Development
              Fieldwork in Diversity
              and Professional
HE 4060       Practice: The Culture
              of Medicine and Public
              Health
              Leadership in the non-
HE 4070
              profit sector
HE 4900       Multicultural Practice
              Culture, Medicine and
              Professional Practice
HE 4950
              in a Diverse World:
              New York

HIST 2308     Caribbean History

              International
HIST 2791
              Humanitarianism
IARD 2020     Perspectives in IARD
              Tropical Cropping
IARD 4140
              Systems

              Agriculture in
IARD 4020
              Developing Nations I



IARD 4800     Global Seminar
    Course #            Course Title
                    Agriculture in
IARD 6020
                    Developing Nations II
                    Safety and the
ILR Extension 367
                    Workplace
                    Work, Labor, and
ILRIC 2350          Capital in the Global
                    Economy
                    Women in the
ILRLE 4450
                    Economy
                    Social and Economic
ILRLE 4470
                    Data


LATA 2308           Caribbean History


                    Transformations in the
LATA 4740
                    Global South
                    Agriculture in
LATA 6020
                    Developing Nations II
                    International
                    Organizations and
LAW 6561
                    International Human
                    Rights
                    Intrernational Human
LAW 7855
                    Rights Clinic
                    Sociology of Health of
LSP 2200
                    Ethnic Minorities
                    Sustainability as a
                    Driver for Innovation in
NBA 5190
                    the Entrepreneurial
                    Organization
                    Sustainable Global
NBA 6030
                    Enterprise
                    Maternal and Child
NS 3220
                    Nutrition
                    Nutrition Problems of
NS 3060
                    Developing Nations
                    Human Growth and
NS 3470
                    Development
                    Epidemiology in
NS 3500
                    Context
                    Towards a Sustainable
                    Global Food System:
NS 4450
                    Food Policy for
                    Developing Countries

NS 4500             Public Health Nutrition
                    Health, Poverty and
NS 4570
                    Inequality
                    Global Health,
                    Development and
NS 4630
                    Policy Issues in
                    Tanzania
                    Epidemiology of
NS 6370
                    Nutrition
   Course #       Course Title
              Globalization, Food
NS 6420
              Security, and Nutrition
              Global Ecology and
NTRES 3220
              Management
              Low-Income Families:
PAM 3350      Qualitative and Policy
              Perspectives

              Contemporary Issues
PAM 3500
              in Women's Health


              Reproductive Health
PAM 4050
              Policy

              The U.S. Health Care
PAM 4350
              System
              Economics of Health
PAM 4370
              Policy
              Economics of Public
PAM 4380
              Health
              Violence against
              Women: Policy
PAM 4440
              Implications and
              Global Perspectives
              Contemporary Moral
PHIL 1450
              Issues
PHIL 1940     Global Thinking
PHIL 2450     Ethics and Healthcare
PLPA 4090     Principles of Virology

              Ecology of Infectious
PLPA 4330
              Diseases

              Ethical Issues in
STS 2051
              Health and Medicine


STS 3111      Sociology of Medicine



SOC 2160      Health and Society


SOC 2202      Population Dynamics


              International
SOC 2206
              Development

SOC 3130      Sociology of Medicine

              Health and Survival
SOC 4100
              Inequalities


              Theories of
SOC 4210
              Reproduction
   Course #       Course Title

              The Family and
SOC 4780
              Society in Africa

              Ethical Issues in
STS 2051
              Health and Medicine
              Basic Immunology
VETMI 3150
              Lectures
VETMI 4090    Principles of Virology
VETMI 4310    Medical Parasitology

              Immunology of
VETMI 7190
              Infectious Diseases
                                                                                                              Description
Aims to stimulate critical thinking and cogent writing and speaking about contemporary controversies that attract regular attention in the international press and among key private and public sector decision-makers. Students
read and discuss competing arguments about current issues such as patenting and pricing of pharmaceuticals worldwide, controls on commercial and humanitarian distribution of genetically modified foods, and immigration
restrictions. Students write a series of short briefing papers and give regular oral briefs, which are evaluated for quality of communication and content.
Examines the economic principles underlying international trade and monetary policy, and the policies, practices, and institutions that influence trade and foreign exchange markets. Also emphasizes applications to current
topics in international trade policy, to trade in primary commodities, and to both developed and developing countries.
Acquaints students with current and historically important U.S. policies related to agriculture and food, including subsidies and regulations related to markets, production, and the environment. Explores methods of policy
analysis, and students learn to critique policies and write policy briefs.


Comprehensive presentation and discussion of policy options for a sustainable global food system, with focus on developing countries. Topics include economic policy related to nutrition, health, consumption, production,
natural resource management, trade, markets, gender roles, armed conflict, and ethics. A social entrepreneurship approach bases on case studies and active participation by students will be used. Cross-listed with NS 4450.


Provides an understanding of the economics of the agricultural sector in low-income countries. Also covers more general issues of economic development beyond the agricultural sector to provide the necessary context for an
understanding of rural problems. Topics include the nature of development and technical change, welfare and income distribution, land reform, food and nutrition policy, food security and food aid, competition with more
developed countries and international markets, the effect of U.S. policy on agricultural development, and the role of international institutions. Uses examples from a wide variety of developing countries to illustrate the basis for
economic analysis.                                                                                                 Cross-listed with ECON 4640
Directed readings course with a weekly 50-minute discussion session. The course is aimed at graduate students in nutrition, agricultural economics, and other relevant fields, who wish to explore how globalization may affect
poverty, food security, and nutrition in developing countries and how national policies and international agreements and institutions may influence the outcome. The discussion sessions are based on assigned readings for
each week.                                                                 Cross-listed with NS 6420.
Comprises analyses of constraints on livestock production in developing countries of the tropics, economic objectives and risk, and methods of management. The 2006–2007 editions focus on livestock systems in the Yucatán
Peninsula. Emphasis is on strategic use of animal and plant resources, animal performance with inputs restricted, and decision making. Principles, field study, independent study projects and classroom interactions aided by
videoconferencing with Mexican partners facilitate problem-solving to improve welfare of rural households. Interactions with Mexican farmers and other professionals during a 10-day field-study trip provide context and
opportunities forintroduce studentsprojects aligned and significance of forms farmers. diversity for the understanding of contemporary issues. Drawing from films, videos, and selected readings, students will be confronted with
This course will developing study to the meaning with needs of Yucatecan of cultural
different representational forms that portray cultures in various parts of the world, and they will be asked to examine critically their own prejudices as they influence the perception and evaluation of cultural differences. We shall
approach has become the language and the inseparability which we address a broad rangeandboth individual and societal complaints. Interest in this ―medicalization of life‖ (e.g.,be one of the America, that West). Among the
Medicine cultures holistically, assuming practice through of economies, kinship, religion, of politics, as well as interconnections and dependencies between world areas may Africa, Latin reasons the medical anthropology
is currently the fastest growing sub-field in anthropology. This course encourages students to examine concepts of disease, suffering, health and wellbeing cultural integrity.
issues considered: ―political correctness‖ and truth; nativism and ecological diversity; race, ethnicity, and sexuality; sin, religion, and war; global process andin their immediate experience and beyond. In the process, students
will gain a working knowledge of ecological, critical, phenomenological, and applied approaches used by medical anthropologists. We will investigate what is involved in becoming a doctor, the sociality of medicines,
controversies over new medical technologies, and the politics of medical knowledge. Our readings will address medicine in North America as well as other parts of the world. The universality of biomedicine (or hospital
medicine) will not be taken for granted, but rather we will examine the plurality generated by the various political, economic, social, and ethical demands under which biomedicine has developed in different places and at
different times. In addition, biomedical healing and expertise will be viewed in relation to other kinds of healing and expertise.

Introduction to the study of sex roles cross-culturally and to anthropological theories of sex and gender. Examines various aspects of the place of the sexes in social, political, economic, ideological, and biological systems to
emphasize the diversity in gender and sex-role definitions around the world. Cross-listed with FGSS 3210.
This course examines a range of texts that treat the body as the subject and object of cultural, technological, political and ethical processes. Students investigate the cultivation of physical and social bodies through
ethnographic and historical materials concerning healing and medicine, discipline and labor, governance and religion, aesthetics and desire. The production and reproduction of bodies and embodied practices have long been
central to the way that power works. In this class, we will read and discuss a range of approach to the body. There is much contention over how work, politics, environment, technologies, and violence shape the body and the
senses. We will debate how histories of the body are intertwined with histories of gender, race, class, sexuality, (post)coloniality, modernization, science, transnationalism, and the webs of institution, ideas, and capital that
comprise these phenomena. Some readings will investigate the complex mediations that account for the body as icon, text, metaphor, commodity, and raw material. Others will contend that serious attention to the production
and reproduction of the body across different times and spaces challenge traditional notions of materiality and physicality. Because and considering them thehistorical context, we will examine ethnographic accounts of
This course provides an anthropological perspective on international development. After reading orthodox theories of development every examination of in body rests—implicitly or explicitly—in a theoretical and
postcolonial development that draw on political economy and poststructuralist traditions. The final portion of the course looks critically at the emergence of discourses such as participation, empowerment, social capital, civil
society, and sustainability in mainstream development.
This class will examine historical and contemporary forms of therapy in Africa, and contests over the conceptual and material resources that have shaped health and healing on the continent. Our readings and discussions will  Not
explore the ways in
offered 2009-2010. which healing and medicine are simultaneously individual and political, biological and cultural. Medicine and healing pose questions about the intimate ways that power works on bodies, the processes
through which history and politics shape the possibilities of life and the context of death, and the forms of threat, violence, possibility and liberation that have constituted the shifting social, economic, and ethical regimes of the
past century. Examining these questions in relation to Africa draws them into debates on postcoloniality and discussions about the place of ―Africa‖ in today’s world. We will look at Africa not only as a site of epidemics, poverty
and violent wars, but also as a site of innovation and creative survival, which is central to the biopolitics of the contemporary global order. Through accounts of the expansion of biomedicine, the continuities and changes
embodied in traditional medicine, and the relationship between medicine, science and law, this course explores the frictions that inhere in broad historical shifts propelled by colonialism, nationalism, civil war, environmental
Cross-listed with SOC 4780.
This course provides an historical overview of the Caribbean beginning with a brief examination of indigenous society and the impact of European colonization. Most of our attention will focus on the development of the
plantation economy, slavery, post-emancipation and post-colonial society. Readings pay particular attention to the ways in which race, gender, and ethnicity shape the histories of the peoples of the region. The course uses a
pan-Caribbean approach by focusing on three islands—Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica—that belonged to competing empires. Although their histories are shaped in distinct ways by their former metropoles, they share certain common
features. Therefore, we examine the differences the study of twoof their histories as they evolved from plantation based colonies to independent nations. Cross-listed both HIST 2308 & and Eastern Diaspora. The Diaspora of
This course will combine the study of Africa with and similarities Diasporas. The Diaspora of Enslavement concerns enslaved Africans and descendents of slaves in with the Western LATA 2308.
Colonization concerns demographic dispersal as a result of colonialism. African Americans are part of the Diaspora of Enslavement. Algerian immigrants into France are part of the Diaspora of Colonization. Jamaicans and
Trinidadians in Briton are a double-Diaspora—products of both enslavement and colonialism. This course will also examine the debate about whether the African peoples are owed reparations by either the West of the Arabs
or both. This course will address of the status and role of women in Africa. One view portrays African race, gender, religion, and exploited by men. According to another view women have a 6200.
There are two contrasting views the following areas of comparative Black experience: the politics of women as dominated liberation, language, civil rights and postcoloniality. Also ASRC favorable social position in Africa:
indigenous ideologies consider women to be the foundation of society, they are economically active and independent and they have an identity independent of men. In this seminar we discuss the status and role of women in
Africa historically as well as in the contemporary period. Topics include women in non-westernized/precolonial societies; the impact of colonial policies on the status of women; gender and access to schooling, participation in
the economy and politics; women and the law; women and health issues; gender issues in southern Africa; womanism and feminism; the United Nations Decade of Women; and the four World Conferences on Women (Mexico
1975, Copenhagen 1986, Nairobi 1985, and Beijing 1995). historical, socioeconomic, political, and cultural factors. Course topics include the concepts of the nuclear and extended family, the roles, rights and obligations of
The family, as a social institution, is structured according to
different age groups and generations; and marriage and its related issues, including parenthood, child rearing, and gender roles. Other issues examined are reproductive health, family planning, sexuality and fertility
(particularly during adolescence), family codes, and legal implications. The course deals also with structural change and continuity, the impact of westernization, urbanization, formal education, and the contemporary economy
on the structure and challenges of the family in Africa. Finally, the legacy of African family values and traditions in the African Diaspora, with a focus on the African-American experience, is discussed.
Cross-listed with SOC 4780.
                                                                                                             Description
Examines the relationship between education and individual and national development. Besides human capital theory, different paradigms of development, including modernization and dependency theories, and Third World
Forum, are examined. Issues discussed include schooling and nonformal education; the role of primary, secondary, and higher education in development; and the issues related to employment, national migration and
international brain drain, language, equity in access, output, and outcome based on social class, ethnicity, race, gender, and nationality. Finally, the information and communication technologies (ICTs), indigenous knowledge
systems, and the role of higher education in the national, regional, and international contexts and cooperation are discussed.                                                                       Cross-listed with EDUC 5020
Marriage was the widely expected norm within African societies. The institution was an important marker of adulthood, linking individuals and lineages in a network of mutual cooperation and support. Marriage practices and
their concomitant gender expectations varied significantly between societies, and over time. As a result, marriage and divorce are especially rich terrain for exploring social history, women’s agency, discursive constructions of
―woman,‖ masculinity, and gender relations of power. This course explores some of the newest scholarship on marriage by Africanist scholars. The readings demonstrate the wide cultural variety in marriage as well as the
dynamic relationship between marriage and historical change. They especially highlight women’s roles and expectations in marriage, masculinity and the ways men and women negotiated the rules and boundaries of marriage.
In today’s rapidly changing world of health and medicine, complex ethical issues arise in many contexts—from the private, interpersonal interactions between doctor and patient to the broad, mass-mediated controversies that
Cross-listed with FGSS 6304.
make medicine into headline news. This course examines ethical problems and policy issues that arise in contemporary medicine, health care, and biomedical research. Tools for ethical analysis are applied to a variety of
cases and fundamental questions in bioethics. Perspectives from social science, history, and law also inform the course. The course explores ethical questions that arise in a number of substantive contexts, including the
doctor-patient relationship, medical decision making near the end of life, human experimentation, genetics and reproductive technology, public health, and the allocation of scarce resources.
Cross-listed with STS 2051.
Cross-listed with HD 3470 and NS 3470.
Case studies of contemporary environmental issues including pollutant distribution in natural systems, air quality, hazardous waste management, and sustainable development. Emphasis is on the application of math, physics,
and engineering sciences to solve energy and mass balances in environmental sciences. Introduces students to the basic chemistry, ecology, biology, ethics, and environmental legislation relevant to the particular
environmental problem. BEE students must complete either BEE 251 or BEE 260 according to their academic plan. BEE students who complete both BEE 251 and BEE 260 receive engineering credit for only one of these
courses.
Sustainable development is the dominant economic, environmental, and social issue of Cross-listed with ENGRD 2510.
                                                                                         the 21st century. This course develops the concepts of sustainable development as an evolutionary process, demanding the integration
of the physical sciences and engineering with the biological and social sciences for design of systems. Topics include the nature of ecosystems, global processes, sustainable communities, and industrial ecology and life cycle
analysis.
Introduces energy systems with emphasis on quantifying costs and designing renewable energy systems to convert environmental inputs into useful forms of energy. Covers solar energy, small-scale hydropower, wind, bio-
conversion processes, house energy balances. Focuses on the technologies and small-scale system design, not policy issues. Use of spreadsheets is extensive.
Survey of immunology, with emphasis on the cellular and molecular bases of the immune response. More information is available at the BIO G 3050 courseinfo web site.
Cross-listed with VETMI 3150.
Focuses on molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the immunity to infectious diseases caused by viral, bacterial, protozoan, and helminth pathogens. How the host immune system responds to infection and how
pathogens manipulate immunity are considered. Specific topics include immune response initiation; antigen presentation pathways; T cell subsets in protection and pathology; mechanisms of cytolysis; manipulation of signaling
in the immune system; vaccines. Lectures are based on recent advances in the field and are accompanied by relevant readings from the current literature.                               Cross-listed with VETMI 7190.
The human body is coated with microbes outnumbering ―our own‖ cells 10 to 1, providing us with capacities we have not had to evolve on our own. This course will introduce the microbes of the human body, discuss their
origins, adaptations to the body, molecular interactions, and associations with health and disease.
Covers the principles of virology, focusing mainly on animal viruses but also including plant viruses and bacteriophage. Topics include the classification of viruses, virus entry, genome replication and assembly, and virus
pathogenesis. Particular emphasis is placed on virus-host cell interactions and common features between different viral families.
Cross-listedstudyPLPA 4090 and VETMI 4090. helminth parasites of public health importance, with emphasis on epidemiologic, clinical, and zoonotic aspects of these parasitisms.
Systematic with of arthropod, protozoan, and
Cross-listed with VETMI 4310.
This interdisciplinary course is intended for any student with concern for the global crises we collectively face. During this course you will be introduced to current data and engaged in analysis of those data, establish a global
context for your specialized education, and provided a toolbox to bring awareness, analysis and action to your lives and careers beyond graduation.
An analysis of current issues of biological relevance and the biological science behind these issues. Topics will include issues such as food and nutrition, antioxidants, organic produce, disease prevention, athletic enhancers,
genetic testing, cancer, stem cells and animal cloning, genetically modified crops, bacteria and antibiotics, viruses, risk, statistics and epidemiology, photosynthesis and global warming, extinction and overpopulation, invasive
species, resource over-utilization. The topics will vary according to current issues.
This course is an introduction to two aspects of ethnomedicine/ethnohealth: (1) the study of biology of health disparities like diabetes, cancer, and infectious diseases in Latinos/as, African Americans and American Indians in
the United States, (2) and the botany, culture, and medical anthropology of plants and other natural remedies used by ancient cultures in the Americas and also currently used throughout the United States and the Americas.
Human diseases transmitted by insects and related forms (arthropods) have affected human lives and society through history. This course focuses on the pathogens, parasites, and arthropods causing human plagues. Those
plagues that have had the greatest impact on human culture and expression are emphasized. Lectures are supplemented with readings and films. Also addresses emerging diseases, bioterrorism, and future plagues. Students
taking the course for 3 credits participate in readings, presentations/discussions each week (on Fridays), weekly readings, and quizzes and have a comprehensive final project. Cross-listed with ENTOM 2100.
Meets with CEE 4550 and offered for non-engineering studnets, or those not enrolled in an engineering class concurrently.
Analysis of contemporary threats to human health from water supplies. Covers criteria and standards for potable-water quality; water-quality control theory; design of water supply facilities.
Not offered 2008-2009.
This course covers the design and analysis of small-scale drinking water supply systems. We explore the technical, economic, and social constraints that form the sustainable space—i.e., the set of viable technologies that
could be adopted progressively to improve the availability and quality of water. Students work in teams to design water supply and treatment systems.
Student teams conduct research, build working models, design full-scale prototypes, create design algorithms, and create educational materials for technology transfer to improve drinking water quality in Honduras. For more
information see aguaclara.cee.cornell.edu.                                                                                                                                If you are not an engineer or taking an engineering class
concurrently, enroll group service projects offer real-life engineering research and design experience, from problem formulation through implementation. They may be international or local, and may relate to any kind of
Engineering-based in CEE 2550.
engineering. Students work on interdisciplinary teams with a project supervisor and a partner community organization. Course readings and a writing assignment cover the relationship between engineering and international
development, the philosophy and politics of technology, and ethics in engineering practice.
Critical look at the physical and social development of giant cities in the Third World. Their origins, roles, contributions, and shortcomings are examined. Their place in world political economy is evaluated. Policy prescriptions
for their principal problems are discussed.
                                                                                                            Description
This course invites students to think globally about gender issues and to trace the connections between global, national and local perspectives. Emphasis will be given to: understanding processes of globalization (economic,
political, cultural); discussing ways in which these processes interact with the dynamics of gender differentiation; understanding how globalization affects women’s and men’s paid and unpaid work; discussing the significance of
women’s location in global markets; looking at the importance of culture and social construction of gender in shaping the ways in which globalization affects people’s lives and gender relations; introducing regional differences
and similarities; discussing the gender dimensions in the debates on ―the clash of civilizations‖; introducing questions of global governance and examining cases that illustrate women’s role in the shaping of international
Comprehensive survey of Italian society today, starting with Italy’s geography and the historical forces that shaped the nation. Discussion includes north-south tensions and such broad features of Italian social life as
debates.                                                                                                   Cross-listed with FGSS 3600.
community structure, urban development, and family forms. The course also reviews selected institutional issues, such as gender, the system of education, problems of criminality and justice, economic reform, social class,
This course politics.
religion, andoffers students an opportunity to understand urban dynamics in a rapidly changing region of the world. We ask how colonial powers, the nation-state, and global economic forces have shaped Latin American urban
landscapes and the patterns of daily life in the city. The first part of this course explores the social, political, and spatial rural-urban flows, socio-spatial segregation, housing environment and employment. The second half of
the course focuses on responses to these social and economic transformations; violence and repression, coping strategies, social movement, and transmigration.
Cross-listed with LATA 6740.
Examines a broad range of critical concerns in contemporary Africa including food production, human resource development, migration, urbanization, environmental resource management, economic growth, and policy
guidance. The weekly presentations are made by invited specialists. Students are required to write a term paper.
The four main objectives are to (1) analyze the location of women in development processes and to understand the centrality of gender in each case; (2) examine theoretical and conceptual frameworks for the analysis,
including an understanding of gender divisions and their interaction with other forms of inequality such as class, race, and ethnicity; (3) reflect upon the linkages between the global economy and the macro and micro
processes of development from a gender perspective; and (4) provide a basis for research, practical action, and policy formulation and for evaluating directions and strategies for social change.
                                                                                                                                           Not offered 2009-2010.
Cross-listed with FGSS 6140.traditional shifting cultivation; lowland rice-based systems; upland cereal-based systems; smallholder mixed farming including root crops and livestock; plantation fruit and oil crop systems; and
Characterizes and discusses
agroforestry. In addition to species diversity and domestication, factors such as climate, land quality, soil management, land tenure, labor, and markets are considered. Evaluates the impact of tropical cropping systems on the
environment.
Cross-listed with SOC 2202.                                Cross-listed with IARD 4140.
Cross-listed with SOC 2206.
Discusses the health status of minorities in the United States. Explores intragroup diversity such as migration, economic status, and the influence of culture and the environment on health status and access to health care.
Although special attention is given to Latino populations, discussion encompasses other minorities who face similar problems.                                              Cross-listed with LSP 2200.
Changing food and agricultural systems reflect the development patterns and social organization of an increasingly global society. Sociological questions include: What are major trends? What drives them? What benefits and
costs accrue to people, communities, and ecosystems? How do we evaluate issues? What development strategies might better manifest shared values?
Cross-listed with SOC 4100 and FGSS 4100.

Cross-listed with SOC 4210 and FGSS 4210.
Reviews and discusses issues concerning global development and its relationship to conflict and terrorism. Each class session focuses on a specific topic presented by either a faculty member or a guest speaker leading the
discussion and actively engaging the students. The weekly discussion section focuses on discussing in greater depth the reading assignments.
Familiarizes students from a range of disciplines with such contemporary issues in climatology as global warming and El Niño. Introduces the natural greenhouse effect, past climates, and observed and projected climate
changes and impacts. Also covers natural climate variations (e.g. El Niño) and their consequences and predictability. Weekly student-led discussions of issues appearing in journals such as Nature.
Studies the problem of sustaining accelerated economic growth in less-developed countries. Emphasizes trade-offs between growth, welfare, and equity; the legacy of colonialism; relevance of history and economic theory;
problems of capital formation, economic planning and international specialization; and the interaction of industrialization, agricultural development, and population change.
Cross-listed with ILRLE 4450 and FGSS 4460.


Cross-Listed with AEM 4640.

Focuses on the analysis of global hunger and malnutrition. Students analyze the dimensions, causes, and solutions to hunger and malnutrition, particularly in developing countries. Grades are based on a midterm and a final
exam, a term paper, and class participation.                                                                                                                                    Cross-listed with NS 4570.
Cross-listed with BEE 2510.
Human diseases transmitted by insects and related forms (arthropods) have impacted human lives and society through history. This course focuses on the pathogens, parasites and arthropods causing human plagues.
Special attention is paid to those plagues that have had the greatest impact on human culture and expression. Lectures are supplemented with readings and videos. Emerging diseases, bio-terrorism, and future plagues are
addressed.                                                       Cross-listed with BSOC 2101.
This course can be taken with the lab (ENTOM 353) or lecture (ENTOM 352) separately. The course offers a contemporary overview of insects and related forms and how they impact human and animal health.Concepts in
medicine, entomology, genetics and evolution will be discussed within the context of public health.This is a good course for students interested in vector biology, medical school or careers in veterinary medicine
Acquaint students with the major issues and problems in international agriculture and rural development and to demonstrate how problems in development are being addressed in the Gulf Region of Mexico and India. The
lectures/discussions establish the global and regional contexts for sustainable agricultural development and focus on development challenges in Latin America and Asia through cases in southern Mexico and India. This
course may be taken as a stand-alone survey course in international agriculture and rural development. However, it is primarily a preparatory course for participants selected to participate in the spring semester course
Agriculture in the Developing Nations II (IARD 6020), which includes concurrent field trips to the Gulf Region of Mexico and India during the January intersession.
Cross-listed with IARD 4020.
Introduction to the study of sex roles cross-culturally and to anthropological theories of sex and gender. Examines various aspects of the place of the sexes in social, political, economic, ideological, and biological systems to
emphasize the diversity in gender and sex-role definitions around the world. Cross-listed with ANTHR 3421.

Cross-listed with PAM 3500.

Cross-listed with CRP 3650.
                                                                                                            Description
Cross-listed with DSOC 4100 and SOC 4100.

Cross-listed with DSOC 4210 and SOC 4210.


Cross-listed with CRP 6140.

Marriage was the widely expected norm within African societies. The institution was an important marker of adulthood, linking individuals and lineages in a network of mutual cooperation and support. Marriage practices and
their concomitant gender expectations varied significantly between societies, and over time. As a result, marriage and divorce are especially rich terrain for exploring social history, women’s agency, discursive constructions of
―woman,‖ masculinity, and gender relations of power. This course explores some of the newest scholarship on marriage by Africanist scholars. The readings demonstrate the wide cultural variety in marriage as well as the
dynamic relationship between marriage and historical change. They especially highlight women’s roles and expectations in marriage, masculinity and the ways men and women negotiated the rules and boundaries of marriage.
Cross-listed with ASRC 6304.
Existing nation-states face many challenges that cross their borders, including environmental degradation, international terrorism, and global market forces. This course considers the possibility and desirability of a world
government. Students evaluate the practical achievability of different world-level political structures, paying particular attention to contemporary theories of international relations, and to related questions of social-scientific
evidence. Students also evaluate the ethical status of potential world-level political structures, evaluating the normative value of existing states compared to the likely dangers and benefits of several visions of world
government. (IR)                                                                                       Cross-listed with PHIL 1940.
The course will cover international current events as they unfold during the semester. Faculty from across the university will be invited to contextualize and deepen students’ understanding of elections, wars, complex
humanitarian emergencies, international agreements, global health issues and other relevant international events that are in the news. The course will respond flexibly to unforeseen events. Special attention will be devoted to
U.S. foreign policy issues and how U.S. foreign policies are formulated and implemented. The course will strive to expose students to different points of view on these issues


This course serves as an introduction to the study of war, peace, and peacemaking. We will study different theories of peace and war from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The course will cover definitions of peace and
war, causes of conflict, and modes of conflict prevention and resolution. The concepts will be applied to a range of historical and current conflicts. Students will prepare analyses of specific conflicts or instances of
peacemaking for class presentation. (IR)physical and psychological growth and development in humans during infancy. Considers intrinsic and extrinsic causes of variations in growth, including various forms of stimulation.
Concerned with the interrelationships of
Also examines the consequences of early growth and its variations for current and subsequent behavioral, psychological, and physical development are examined. The interaction between physical and behavioral or
psychological factors is emphasized throughout the course.                                                                                                                Cross-listed with NS 3470 and BSOC 3470.
This course is an introduction to physical and mental health inequalities in the United States, the causes of these inequalities, and their impact on individual development across the life course. Lectures will focus on the
relationship between socioeconomic status and rates of physical and mental illness in social groups, exposure to psychosocial stress across the life course, and the protective role of social integration.
This seminar takes an interdisciplinary approach to address the central role of culture in human development. It draws on diverse theoretical perspectives, including psychology, anthropology, education, ethnography, and
linguistics, to understand human difference, experience, and complexity. It takes empirical reflections upon major developmental topics such as cultural aspects of physical growth and development; culture and cognition;
culture and language; culture, self, and personality; cultural construction of emotion; culture issues of sex and gender; and cultural differences in pathology.
This course is part of the Urban Semester Program in New York City. Students learn through a cycle of experience and reflection. Over the course of eight weeks, students learn how to implement experience-based learning
techniques and perspectives to enhance their competencies as initiates of professional practice. Students spend four days each week in an internship of their own choosing. One day each week, students have discussions with
professionals who represent different aspects of the New York City economy. This exposure enables students to explore a variety of professional perspectives and practices. Students participate in reflections seminars with the
director of the program to explore student internship experiences and learning.
Concerned with the interrelationships of physical and psychological growth and development in humans during infancy. Considers intrinsic and extrinsic causes of variations in growth, including various forms of stimulation.
Also examines the consequences of early growth and its variations for current and subsequent behavioral, psychological, and physical development are examined. The interaction between physical and behavioral or
psychological factors is emphasized throughout the in New York City. Students explore the intersection of organizational culture with issues of diversity. They investigate the nature of organizational culture and how it engages
This course is part of the Urban Semester Program course.
and includes or does not include diversity. Students report back in seminars their understanding and analysis of their internship organizations and their industry’s role in creating conditions and environments of inclusion or
exclusion. The course explores the conditions and processes that have brought about inclusion or exclusion.
This course is part of the Urban Semester Program in New York City. Students participate in several experiential learning environments related to medicine over the course of the semester. Students rotate in a four-week unit,
supported by Pastoral Care and ER, as well as several other choices through the semester. Medical and health-related practitioners make presentations throughout the semester.

This course provides an historical overview of the Caribbean beginning with a brief examination of indigenous society and the impact of European colonization. Most of our attention will focus on the development of the
plantation economy, slavery, post-emancipation and post-colonial society. Readings pay particular attention to the ways in which race, gender, and ethnicity shape the histories of the peoples of the region. The course uses a
pan-Caribbean approach by focusing on three islands—Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica—that belonged to competing empires. Although their histories are shaped in distinct ways by their former metropoles, they share certain common
features. Therefore, international humanitarian and human rightsof their histories as they evolved from plantation based colonies to independent nations. Cross-listed with ASRC 2308 & LATA 2308.
This course studies we examine the differences and similarities activities from their origins to the present. The ideological and social roots of humanitarian thought and action receive attention, as does the often-overlapping,
sometimes conflictual relationship between humanitarianism and human rights advocacy. Case studies will include the anti-slavery movement, the activities of faith-based groups, biographical studies of pioneering individuals,
and theto discuss both contemporary and genocides. (EM) issues and the need for an integrated, multidisciplinary team approach in helping farmers and rural development planners adjust to the ever-changing food needs of
Forum international response to various future world food
Cross-listed with CSS 4140.
Acquaint students with the major issues and problems in international agriculture and rural development and to demonstrate how problems in development are being addressed in the Gulf Region of Mexico and India. The
lectures/discussions establish the global and regional contexts for sustainable agricultural development and focus on development challenges in Latin America and Asia through cases in southern Mexico and India. This
course may be taken as a stand-alone survey course in international agriculture and rural development. However, it is primarily a preparatory course for participants selected to participate in the spring semester course
Agriculture in the Developing Nations II (IARD 6020), which includes concurrent field trips to the Gulf Region of Mexico and India during the January intersession.                                                           Cross-
listed with FDSC 4020.to development pressures that have increasingly disrupted natural systems leading to widespread concerns about the long-term viability of important environmental services, including those critical to
Modernization has led
food security worldwide. This multidisciplinary course uses case studies to explore interrelationships among social, economic, and environmental factors basic to sustainable development. Cases examine contemporary issues
such as population growth, genetically modified foods, biodiversity, sustainable marine fisheries, tourism, global warming, and global responsibility. Cornell faculty members lead discussions in each of the major topic areas. In
addition, students participate in discussions and debates with students from Sweden, Costa Rica, Honduras, South Africa, and Australia through live interactive videoconferences and electronic discussion boards. Cross-listed
with also FDSC/NTRES 4800.
                                                                                                              Description
Designed to provide students with an opportunity to observe agricultural development in tropical Mexico or India and to promote interdisciplinary exchange among faculty, staff, students and their Mexican and Indian
counterparts. A two-week field-study trip in January is followed by discussions, written projects and oral presentations dealing with problems in food, agriculture and livestock production in the context of social and economic
conditions of the Gulf Region of Mexico and India.                                                                                     Cross-listed with LATA 6020.
Provides basic education and training in workplace safety and health. Focuses on applicable federal and state laws, standards for safety and health, industrial hygiene, and such health concerns as asbestos, radon, and AIDS.
Practical experience is provided through workplace walk-through safety and health inspections and in use of industrial hygiene equipment to measure noise, temperature, humidity, airflow, and airborne toxins.
Provides an introduction to how globalization is changing the nature of work, labor, and capital. It examines both contemporary and historical debates about globalization, but also covers a number of interrelated issues,
including the regulation of labor standards, the mobility of capital, the rise of global production systems, and international labor migration. Lectures and discussion for the topics mentioned above will be grounded in the
experiences of different countries, firms, workplaces, industrial sectors, and individuals.
Examines the changing economic roles of women and men in the labor market and in the family. Topics include a historical overview of changing gender roles; the determinants of the gender division of labor in the family;
trends in female and male labor force participation; gender differences in occupations and earnings; the consequences of women’s employment for the family; and a consideration of women’s status in other countries.
Cross-listed with ECON 4570to acquire and transform raw information into social and economic data. Legal, statistical, computing, and social science aspects of the data ―manufacturing‖ process are treated. The formal U.S.,
Teaches the basics required and FGSS 4460.
Eurostat, OECD, and UN statistical infrastructure is covered. Major private data sources are also covered. Topics include basic statistical principles of populations and sampling frames; acquiring data via samples, censuses,
administrative records, and transaction logging; the law, economics, and statistics of data privacy and confidentiality protection; data linking and integration techniques (probabilistic record linking; multivariate statistical
matching); analytic methods in theoverview of the Caribbeanis based onwith a brief examination of indigenous society and the impact of European colonization. Most of our attention will focus on the development of the
This course provides an historical social sciences. Grading beginning a group term project.
plantation economy, slavery, post-emancipation and post-colonial society. Readings pay particular attention to the ways in which race, gender, and ethnicity shape the histories of the peoples of the region. The course uses a
pan-Caribbean approach by focusing on three islands—Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica—that belonged to competing empires. Although their histories are shaped in distinct ways by their former metropoles, they share certain common
features. Therefore, we and the post-colonial political similaritiescontinually reshaping urban societies and landscapes in colonies toSouth, often by relegating everydaywith to the margins HIST 2308.
Economic globalization examine the differences and order are of their histories as they evolved from plantation based the global independent nations. Cross-listed life ASRC 2308 & and shrouding it in illegality. This course
focuses on the spatial, social, and political dimensions of urban transformations, paying particular attention to such topics as competition among cities for international capital and its implications for sociospatial organization;
dynamic interrelations between informality in labor markets and in housing urban environmental challenges and municipal efforts to address them; and issues related to governance, social movements, and new formulation of
citizenship.                                                                      Cross-listed with CRP 4740.
Cross-listed with IARD 6020.
The course comprises two segments: (a) international organizations and (b) International Human Rights. In the first segment, the course provides a comprehensive legal analysis of problems concerning membership, the
structure of the United Nations organization, and its functions in the context of the United Nations Charter. It also considers the use of force under international law with specific reference to the United Nations Charter. The
course further considers the structure, jurisdiction, and functions of the International Court of Justice. The objective of the second segment is to introduce the theory, norms, and institutions central to the international human
rights legal regime. The course explores the emergence and the enforcement of international human rights norms, the international machinery for the protection of human rights in the world community including the United
In this clinic students learn substantive human rights law as well as human rights lawyering and advocacy skills. Students the International issues in human rights terms, formulate demands and of municipal courts are studied
Nations Human Rights Committee, the European Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, and learn to describe Criminal Court. Relevant decisions of these courts using human rights accountability
tools, and develop strategies that utilize key features of human rights law. Students develop their international research and writing, and communication skills by working in teams on projects for international NGOs, particularly
in South Asia. The projects may involve legal action such as impact litigation, legal assistance and counseling, or legislative advocacy or be geared towards community education, media outreach, fact-finding, and reporting.
Note: This course may require off-premises travel. The student is responsible for travel to and from the sites.
Cross-listed with DSOC 2200.
This one credit eight-session course will give the student an overview of the emerging sustainable business model. Using the teacher’s business as an example along with appearances from other business leaders, the class
focuses on principles of Sustainability and how leaders are transforming their own organizations. While the U.S. version of capitalism has succeeded in providing unprecedented wealth throughout the 20th century, this class
will evaluate the potential of ―tweaking‖ capitalism to benefit not only the owners but the whole of society in a manner different than ―trickle‖ economy. Using the Hegelian notion of thesis, antithesis, and synthesis, this class will
explore capitalism as practiced today as the thesis. The antithesis will be from environmental and social movement concepts. The principles of sustainability will be synthesized as the potential ―new normal‖ for business in the
future. Students will learn that in addition to traditional financial analysis, business decisions can benefit from taking into account the impacts of social capital and ecological capital as well. Students will learn using dialogue
and presentations about actual cases and sustainability‖ and business strategy—the model is being constructed.
Explores the connections between ―global the logic of how the sustainable business unlimited business opportunities in solving the world’s most difficult problems. Through a combination of cases, readings, lectures, videos,
and simulations, class sessions will engage students in discussions aimed at developing strategy models and applying new strategy tools that incorporate principles of environmental management and social performance.
Focuses on the biological bases of nutritional requirements in pregnancy, lactation, infancy, and childhood through adolescence. Stresses critical analyses of beneficial and adverse outcomes of diverse nutrient intakes and
dietary patterns, assessment of nutritional status, and the integration of nutrition, other life sciences, and social conditions in understanding nutritional needs during these life stages. Topics include oral contraception and
health; relationships between maternal diet and pregnancy outcomes; breast- and formula feeding; childhood and adolescent obesity; and the nutritional needs of young children and adolescents.
Students gain an overview of the most important nutrition problems facing developing countries today and an in-depth understanding of the nutrition problems of one country, chosen as a case study for the course. The course
uses the health/care/nutrition framework to analyze the causes of these nutrition problems. Instruction is through lectures and readings. Evaluation is through individual assignments, a group project, and exams.
Cross-listed with HD 3470 and BSOC 3470.
Provides the conceptual tools to critically analyze the controversies related to a wide range of contemporary health and social issues in the United States and global context. Basic principles of epidemiology are illustrated via
case studies of nutritional and biomedical interventions, environmental toxins, and social issues.

Comprehensive presentation and discussion of policy options for a sustainable global food system, with focus on developing countries. Topics include economic policy related to nutrition, health, consumption, production,
natural resource management, trade, markets, gender roles, armed conflict, and ethics. A social entrepreneurship approach based on case studies and active participation by students will be used.
Cross-listed with AEM 4450.

Public health nutrition is the major professional career track for nutritionists outside of dietetics. It deals with efforts to improve the diets and nutritional status of whole populations by working at the community, state, and
national levels. Course helps prepare students to work in public health nutrition by describing methods used in the assessment of nutrition problems, the development of nutrition-related policies, and the delivery of health,
nutrition, and food assistance programs.
Cross-Listed with ECON 4740.


Engages Global Health minors, IARD majors, and Tanzanian medical students in problem-based learning in a cross-cultural small group context in Tanzania. Develop and justify policy recommendations to address a current
issue related to global health, nutrition, food safety, or agriculture. Students will work in assigned teams of three to four, designed to mix Cornell and Tanzanian students.

Covers principles of nutritional epidemiology, impact assessment of nutrition intervention programs, and nutritional surveillance. Presents principles of using nutritional information in decision making. Shows how the
biochemistry and physiology of nutrition can be related to epidemiological assessment and research strategies.
                                                                                                               Description
Directed readings course with a weekly 50-minute discussion session. The course is aimed at graduate students in nutrition, agricultural economics, and other relevant fields, who wish to explore how globalization may affect
poverty, food security, and nutrition in developing countries and how national policies and international agreements and institutions may influence the outcome. The discussion sessions are based on assigned readings for
each week.                                                                   Cross-listed with NS 6420.
The subjects of biogeography, ecology, and biodiversity have patterns and processes that emerge only at the global scale. Recognizing the global importance of these patterns and processes is even more imperative in light of
the tremendous increase in the human population size and the effects of humans on the Earth. This course is an introduction to the field of global ecology. Topics include comparative ecology and biogeography, community
ecology, island biogeography, and ramifications of global climatic change.
Examines the experiences and challenges of low-income families in the contemporary United States as documented in qualitative and policy research. Also looks at policies designed to assist these families. Considers such
topics as the characteristics and causes of poverty, changes in family structure and the emergence of ―fragile families,‖ nonresident fathers’ relationships with their children, families’ participation in the welfare system and low-
wage labor market, and socioeconomic variations in parenting and child well-being.
Deals with the history of women in medicine and the historical and cultural treatment of women’s health problems. Also addresses health care research and the exclusion of women from research trials and protocols.
Reproductive issues, alternative approaches to treatment, medical problems, ethical issues, cancers, factors that contribute to post-traumatic stress disorders, health promotion behaviors, political issues, and routine medical
recommendations are also discussed in depth. Students may take the course for a fifth credit, which requires attending a discussion section every other week and observing 12 facilities (e.g., birthing center, mammogram, and
ultrasound center, wellness center, hospital labor and delivery unit, La Maze class, women’s self-defense class) that provide a variety of women’s health care. Some of these visits will be virtual visits available through the
course web site, others willprimarilyin-person attendance. Cross-listed with FGSS 3500.
This new course will focus require on domestic reproductive health policies, although limited international reproductive health policies will be addressed (such as the one-child-policy in China). Emphasis will be placed on
structural issues that impact reproductive health policies, health care reform, regulations that influence reproductive health policies, reproductive health services, scientific advancements, medical approaches, insurance,
health disparities, organizations that provide reproductive health, and demographic issues relating to reproductive health (such as teenage pregnancy, infant mortality, etc).
Introduction to the U.S. health care system. Covers the interrelatedness of health services, the financing of health care, and the key stakeholders in health care delivery, including regulators, physicians, hospitals, health plans,
employers, the pharmaceutical/biotech and medical device industries, and consumers. Describes the history and organization of health care, behavioral models of utilization, issues of health care reform, and current trends.
Provides an overview of key policy issues, including the uninsured, the rising cost of medical care, the value of medical care, and inadequate or variable quality of care.
Uses the economic tools of policy analysis to understand the health care system and critically evaluate current policy debates. In the past decade, some of the most controversial policies considered by state and federal
governments have involved issues that have been studied by health economists and health services researchers. Uses the United States as its main institutional framework but also pays attention to health care topics of
Uses the economic approach the AIDS epidemic.
international concern, such asto study public health policies. Public health policies focus on tobacco, obesity, alcohol, illicit drugs, gun violence, sexually transmitted diseases, and other major causes of death and disease.
Students will apply the concepts of market failures and the principles of cost-benefit analysis to public health problems. Students will examine how private sector advertising and public information campaigns, taxation,
regulation, prohibition, and litigation affect public health. The course alarming examine policiesagainst women both domestically andto socioeconomic status. the impact of legislative, public, social, or religious policies on the
Focuses on the historical and current reasons for and impact of the will also rate of violence to address health disparities related internationally. Considers
incidence of such violence. Considers rape, child sexual abuse, homicide, battering, hate crimes, gay bashing, kidnapping, ethnic cleansing, war crimes, forced prostitution, female genital mutilation, honor killings, public
beating, lashing, stoning, torture, female infanticide, trafficking of women, forced abortions, acid attacks, sexual slavery, and sati (self-immolation). Each student is required to evaluate the impact of one current policy and
critique the potential value of one pending policy relating to violence against women.                                                                                                                              Not offered 2009-
2010. course we will examine several contemporary moral problems, including abortion, capital punishment, euthanasia, affirmative action, and world hunger. We will approach these issues from a philosophical perspective by
In this
learning how to create and evaluate publicly accessible arguments and apply general moral principles to particular cases.
Cross-listed with GOVT 2947.
An introduction to the philosophical study of ethical problems that arise from the practice of medicine as such or that arise in response to developments within medicine and the larger world. Does it require that all have access
to approximately the same level of health care? In addition to learning how to arrive at and defend ethical positions, we reflect on the techniques and methods we use.
Cross-listed with BIOMI 4090 and VETMI 4090.
This is an advanced undergraduate course focused on the emerging field of disease ecology. The first offering of this course is planned for Fall semester, 2009. The course focuses on the nature and properties of infectious
agents and their environmental interactions as well as the transmission dynamics of pathogens within and between animal and plant populations. The course draws heavily upon concepts of population and community ecology,
vector biology, behavioral ecology, and environmental biology appropriate to the understanding of disease development among humans, plants, and animals in aquatic, terrestrial, and marine systems and how diseases
influence biodiversity in plant and animal communities. Emphasis is placed on new and emerging diseases and the impact of large scale environmental changes on disease transmission, especially on zoonotic diseases. The
course should be of interest to students in pre-med and pre-vet programs as well as those interested in wildlife biology, entomology, parasitology, microbiology, virology, fungal biology, plant and animal pathology, and ecology.
Cross-Listed with BSOC 2051
Provides an introduction to the ways in which medical practice, biomedical technology, and the medical profession are embedded in society and shaped by social phenomena. Accountability to patients and the public, and
struggles over the control of medical practice in a world where medicine is connected to gender, class, race, and personal autonomy are important overarching themes. This course examines the structure of the medical
profession; medical training and professional socialization; the social organization of the hospital; and doctor–patient interactions. Also explores how biomedical knowledge and technology are produced, assessed, and
introduced into clinical practice. Topics mayshape physical and mental unit, theFirst, we of surgeons, the regulationresearch on the relationship between health and status genetic testing, and priority setting in biomedical
This course will examine how social factors include the intensive-care health. training will review social scientific of pharmaceuticals, AIDS and breast cancer activism, characteristics, neighborhood and residential context,
employment, social relationships and support, religion, and health-related behaviors. We will devote particular attention to the development of research questions and methodological approaches in this work. Next, we will
science.                                                                                                                                         Cross-listed with SOC 3130.
directly examine the relationship between health and social factors using data from a nationally representative survey. Course instruction will include statistical analysis of survey data and social scientific writing. Students will
develop their own research exploring how social factors contribute to health.
Introduction to population studies. First reviews basic concepts and demographic principles and techniques, then focuses on how demographic processes (fertility, mortality, and migration) affect social and economic
outcomes. Discussions cover special topics related to population growth and distribution, including mass education, marriage and family formation, labor force participation, inequality and poverty, women’s status, resource
allocation, and the environment.                                                                                                                                                               Cross-listed with DSOC 2010.
Examines new questions concerning development models in the post–Cold War era from a comparative and global perspective on North-South relations. While the focus is the ―Third World,‖ the issues confronting it are often
global, even when they concern the most basic issue of food security. Using films and various theoretical perspectives, the course examines Southern societies (economies, ecologies, class/gender relations) and the impact of
global forces on Southern resources. Such forces include global food systems, new forms of export production, development agencies, multilateral institutions, local bureaucracies, transnational corporations, the debt crisis,
and new technologies. Also examines the new global justice movements, such as environmentalism, feminism, and landless workers, peasant, and grassroots activism.                                                                     Cross-
listed with DSOC STS 3111.
Cross-listed with 2050.
Reviews the ways of measuring such inequalities (life expectancy, age-specific death rates, cause specific mortality and morbidity, disability and so on) and some of the historical and contemporary socioeconomic markers of
such inequalities, including region, class, race, gender and age. Then examines some of the determinants of these differences, paying particular attention to notions of biology, poverty, and politics. Also considers the role of
medical advances in promoting or reducing health inequalities. Besides looking at macro-level determinants, the course covers some of the growing literature on individual and family behaviors that impinge on inequality in
health and survival—both unintentional (e.g., through differences in lifestyle) as well as deliberate (e.g., through active discrimination against certain categories of individuals, girls in parts of Asia). Policy prescriptions arising
from thesethe changingevaluated for feasibility and effectiveness and new innovative approaches proposed. any, few, and many children. The course begins with theoriesCross-listed with DSOC growth and changing fertility
Examines studies are nature of the debate on what makes populations grow and what makes families have                                                                             of historical population 4100 and FGSS 4100.
and then moves on to consider the economic, social, cultural, political, and biological theories applied to fertility and changing fertility in contemporary populations. Demographic concepts and factors believed to account for the
high fertility of many developing country populations and the extremely low fertility in many parts of the developed world are examined. Emphasis is given to ―sociocultural‖ and ―gender-based‖ explanations of reproductive
behavior, which activist groups and organizations have used to push political and social agendas. The course pays particular attention to the role of the state in population growth and its place in women’s lives.
Cross-listed with DSOC 4210 and FGSS 4210.
                                                                                                             Description
The family, as a social institution, is structured according to historical, socioeconomic, political, and cultural factors. Course topics include the concepts of the nuclear and extended family, the roles, rights and obligations of
different age groups and generations; and marriage and its related issues, including parenthood, child rearing, and gender roles. Other issues examined are reproductive health, family planning, sexuality and fertility
(particularly during adolescence), family codes, and legal implications. The course deals also with structural change and continuity, the impact of westernization, urbanization, formal education, and the contemporary economy
on the structure and challenges of the family in Africa. Finally, the legacy of African family values and traditions in the African Diaspora, with a focus on the African-American experience, is discussed.
Cross-listed with ASRC 4606.
Cross-Listed with BSOC 2051

Cross-listed with BIOG 3050
Cross-listed with BIOMI 4090 and PLPA 4090.
Systematic study of arthropod, protozoan, and helminth parasites of public health importance, with emphasis on epidemiologic, clinical, and zoonotic aspects of these parasitisms.
Cross-listed with BIOMI 4310.
Focuses on molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the immunity to infectious diseases caused by viral, bacterial, protozoan, and helminth pathogens. How the host immune system responds to infection and how
pathogens manipulate immunity are considered. Specific topics include immune response initiation; antigen presentation pathways; T cell subsets in protection and pathology; mechanisms of cytolysis; manipulation of signaling
in the immune system; vaccines. Lectures are based on recent advances in the field and are accompanied by relevant readings from the current literature.                                Cross-listed with BIOG 7060.

				
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