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Disability Access and Inclusion Plan - Insurance Commission of

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					            Disability Access and
            Inclusion Plan
            2007−2008 to 2011−2012




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Disability Access and Inclusion Plan
2007–2008 to 2011–2012

Version              Release Date               History
1.0                  February 2007              Draft

2.0                  May 2007                   Final


Distribution
Insurance Commission of Western Australia Board of Commissioners
Insurance Commission of Western Australia Executive Committee Members
Insurance Commission of Western Australia Disability Access and Inclusion Planning
Committee
Disability Services Commission



Alternative Formats
This document is available upon request in alternative formats such as large print,
electronic format (disk or emailed), audio or Braille.


Acknowledgements
This Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) was developed with the assistance of
the Disability Services Commission, the Insurance Commission of Western Australia‘s
Disability Access and Inclusion Planning Committee, employees, and people with
disabilities and customers.




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Table of Contents
Foreword ..................................................................................................................... 4

Summary ..................................................................................................................... 5

Background................................................................................................................. 6
Overview of the Insurance Commission of Western Australia ...................................... 6
Our Functions ............................................................................................................... 8
Our Services ................................................................................................................. 9
Our Customers ........................................................................................................... 10
Our Values.................................................................................................................. 10
Trends in disability ...................................................................................................... 11
Planning for better access .......................................................................................... 11
Progress since 1995 ................................................................................................... 11

Access and Inclusion Policy Statement ................................................................. 12

Development of the Disability Access and Inclusion Plan ................................... 13
Consultation Process .................................................................................................. 14
Findings of the consultation ........................................................................................ 14
Responsibility for implementing the DAIP ................................................................... 15
Communicating the plan ............................................................................................. 15
Review and evaluation mechanisms .......................................................................... 15
Reporting on the DAIP ................................................................................................ 16

Strategies to improve access and inclusion .......................................................... 17

Feedback form .......................................................................................................... 20

Appendices ............................................................................................................... 22
Appendix A: Schedule 1 — Principles applicable to people with disabilities ............... 22
Appendix B: What is a disability? ................................................................................ 23
Appendix C: What are core activities? ........................................................................ 24
Appendix D: Progress since 1995 under the Disability Services Plan ........................ 26
Appendix E: Glossary ................................................................................................. 30

Attachment A – Information from Senses Foundation (Inc.) ................................ 31

Attachment B – Sample of Licence and Third Party Insurance Policy ................ 41




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Foreword




I have great pleasure in presenting our Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2007–
2008 to 2011–2012.

This Plan demonstrates our commitment to embracing the spirit and principles of, and
meeting the objectives of the Disability Services Act 1993 (as amended in 2004).

An Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers
(2003), found that an estimated 405,000 Western Australians have disabilities (20.6
per cent of the total population).

The purpose of preparing this Plan is to document our resolve to ensuring that people
with disabilities can access all information, services and facilities we provide.

To that end, we intend to deliver facilities and services that are open and available and
accessible to the whole community, regardless of ability, ethnicity, gender, age or any
other perceived difference.

We look forward to working with the community over the next five years to improve
access and foster inclusiveness, enabling us to strengthen customer relationships and
continue to operate successfully in Western Australia.

Our Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2007–2008 to 2011–2012 is a dynamic Plan
and we welcome your feedback at any time.




Vic Evans
Managing Director
May 2007




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Summary
In 1996, the Insurance Commission developed and implemented a Disability Service
Plan (DSP), in which the strategies to improve access to our services and facilities for
people with disabilities were documented.

Following amendments to the Disability Services Act in 2004, a Disability Access and
Inclusion Plan is now required to further the principles and meet the objectives of the
Disability Services Act 1993. (Refer to Appendix A)

Our Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2007–2008 to 2011–2012 has been
developed with the specific aim of ensuring that the Insurance Commission‘s services,
facilities and information are accessible, with the objectives of increased
independence, opportunities and inclusion for people with disabilities within the
community.

This five-year plan is part of our customer service commitment and was developed
with research and consultation with employees, customers, stakeholders, disability
service providers, and the Disability Services Commission (WA).

We have adopted the six desired outcomes specified in the Disability Services
Regulations 20041:

1. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access our
   services and events.
2. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access our
   offices and other facilities.
3. People with disabilities receive information from us in a format that will enable them
   to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.
4. People with disabilities receive the same level and quality of service from our
   employees as other people.
5. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to make
   complaints to us.
6. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to participate in
   any public consultation we may undertake.


Looking ahead
We will continue to improve the accessibility of our facilities, services, events and
information for all our customers. We will achieve this by utilising this Plan to identify
any barriers and documenting strategies to address the barriers.



1
 Schedule 3 of the Regulations — Desired outcomes of disability access and inclusion plans
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Background

Overview of the Insurance Commission of Western
Australia
The Insurance Commission of Western Australia is a statutory authority that was
established and operates in accordance with the Insurance Commission of Western
Australia Act 1986.

The Insurance Commission‘s office is located within The Forrest Centre, 221 St
Georges Terrace, Perth, Western Australia.

The Minister with responsibility for the Insurance Commission is the Minister for
Government Enterprises.

We directly employ approximately 300 people.

We have two Insurance Divisions:
    Motor Vehicle Personal Injury (MVPI) Division; and
    RiskCover Division.

These two Insurance Divisions each have a dedicated Fund; the Third Party Insurance
Fund and the RiskCover Fund, and are supported by six Service Divisions (Finance
and Administration; Human Resources; Information Technology; Special
Investigations; Investments; Commission Executive).

We manage and underwrite the following four Funds:
   Third Party Insurance Fund;
   Compensation (Industrial Diseases) Fund2;
   Insurance Commission General Fund; and
   Government Insurance Fund3 (GIF).

We also manage but do not underwrite the RiskCover Fund and Community Insurance
Fund4 on behalf of the Government of Western Australia.

Motor Vehicle Personal Injury Division

The Insurance Commission is the sole provider of Motor Vehicle Third Party (Personal
Injury) Insurance, commonly referred to as Compulsory Third Party (CTP) insurance,
in Western Australia.

2
  The Compensation (Industrial Diseases) Fund is managed by RiskCover‘s Industrial Diseases Team.
3
  The Government of Western Australia indemnifies the Insurance Commission for any deficit in the
Government Insurance Fund.
4
  The RiskCover Fund and Community Insurance Fund are both managed by the Insurance
Commission‘s RiskCover Division.
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CTP Insurance is compulsory in all States and Territories of Australia. Our Motor
Vehicle Personal Injury Division (MVPI Division) deals with all personal injury and
fatality claims resulting from motor vehicle crashes that involve Western Australian
registered vehicles.

As at 30 June 2006, there were approximately two million registered vehicles in
Western Australia, including approximately 370,000 caravans and trailers. An
unlimited indemnity policy of insurance is issued on the combined ‗Licence and Third
Party Insurance Policy‘ (refer to Attachment B for a sample invoice). The Department
for Planning and Infrastructure and its agents issue the CTP policies and collect the
premiums on our behalf.

The enabling legislation is the Motor Vehicle (Third Party Insurance) Act 1943, and we
are responsible for its administration.

Without doubt, the most misunderstood aspect of Motor Vehicle Third Party Insurance
system in Western Australia is the type of cover provided to the policyholder. The
policy does not cover the driver for injuries he/she receives as a result of his/her own
negligence, nor does it cover damage to vehicles or other property. The policy does
however indemnify drivers/owners of motor vehicles against liability for personal bodily
injury claims made against them. Negligence must be established against the owner
or driver of a Western Australian registered motor vehicle for personal injury or fatality
claims to be successful.

RiskCover Division

We manage a self-insurance and risk management enterprise under the name
‗RiskCover‘ on behalf of Western Australia‘s Department of Treasury and Finance.
The RiskCover Division was established in July 1997 to manage and administer the
self-insurance and risk management arrangements of Western Australian public
authorities on behalf of the State Government.




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Our Functions
Our main statutory functions, as defined by the Insurance Commission of Western
Australia Act 1986, are:

      to issue, or cause to be issued, and undertake liability under policies of
       insurance as required by the Motor Vehicle (Third Party Insurance) Act 1943;

      to issue and undertake liability under policies of insurance as required by
       section 163 of the Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Act 1981,
       (i.e. pneumoconiosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma);

      to manage and administer insurance and risk management arrangements on
       behalf of public authorities;

      to manage and administer insurance and risk management arrangements on
       behalf of eligible community organisations;

      to provide services, facilities and advice to those public authorities in respect of
       the management of claims against them or against funds maintained or
       administered by them under any written law;

      to initiate, or participate in, and promote programmes and schemes for:

               (i)     research into the treatment of industrial diseases and personal
                       injury; and

               (ii)    research into, education for, and promotion of public awareness
                       relating to the prevention of industrial diseases, personal injury
                       and accidental death,

       being programmes and schemes relevant to risks in respect of which the
       Insurance Commission is to provide insurance;

      to provide advice to the Government on matters relating to insurance and risk
       management; and

      to invest and manage moneys and other property under its control.




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Our Services
The Insurance Commission provides the following services:

Insurance and risk management:
       We provide owners and drivers of Western Australian registered motor
        vehicles with unlimited protection in the event that their negligent driving
        causes injury to other persons.

       We manage and settle the personal and fatal injury claims of those injured or
        killed in motor vehicle crashes involving Western Australian registered vehicle.

       We manage and administer the insurance and risk management arrangements
        of Western Australian State Government public authorities who are members
        of the RiskCover Fund.

       We manage and administer the insurance and risk management arrangements
        of eligible Western Australian based community organisations.

       We provide workers‘ compensation insurance and a claims management
        service to the mining industry in Western Australia for the industrial diseases of
        pneumoconiosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma.

       We manage the claims of those who contract the industrial diseases of
        pneumoconiosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma.


Advice to government:
       We provide advice to the Government on matters relating to insurance and risk
        management.


Community education and research:
       We provide funding for road safety initiatives endorsed by the Western
        Australian Road Safety Council and funding for research into mesothelioma.


Investments:
       We invest and manage moneys and other property under our control.




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Our Customers
We deal with the following customer groups:

Policyholders

Our policyholders include any person or company holding a policy of insurance
underwritten by the Insurance Commission. These include owners/drivers of Western
Australian registered motor vehicles; Western Australian Public Authorities who are
members of the RiskCover Fund; not-for-profit Community groups who are members
of the Community Insurance Fund; and mining companies who have policies of
insurance for certain industrial diseases.


Claimants

Claimants include any person, company or State Government department, authority
and instrumentality that makes a claim for compensation or damages through the
Insurance Commission.


State Government Clients

Almost every State Government department, authority and instrumentality are our
clients. The RiskCover Division manages the self-insurance arrangements of the State
Government and provides professional risk management and insurance services.


Service Providers

Professional bodies and individual service providers are engaged to assist with
insurance and operational matters. These include medical service providers such as
doctors, physiotherapists etc., legal service providers and other professional bodies.



Our Values
In everything we do our Core Values are:
               Simplicity
               Teamwork
               Accountability
               Integrity and Openness
               Respect and Compassion



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Trends in disability
The number of Western Australians with disabilities is increasing.

During the next 20 years, the number of older Western Australians with disabilities will
increase substantially as the ‗baby boomers‘ move into age groups in which disability
is more prevalent. There will be an estimated overall increase of 115.7 per cent from
136,700 in 2006 to 294,800 in 2026.

Creating a community that is accessible and inclusive will minimise the effect of
disability.

Refer to Appendix B and Appendix C for further information.



Planning for better access
Our Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) outlines the ways in which we will
strive to ensure that people with disabilities have equal access to our facilities and
services.



Progress since 1995
We are committed to facilitating the inclusion of people with disabilities through the
improvement of access to our information, services and facilities. We adopted our first
Disability Service Plan (DSP) in 1995 to address the barriers for people with
disabilities wanting to access our services and facilities. The DSP addressed both our
statutory requirements under the Western Australian Disability Services Act 1993 and
our obligations under the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act (1992).

Since the adoption of the initial DSP, we have implemented many initiatives and made
significant progress towards better access. These are outlined in Appendix D under
the outcome headings of the 1995 DSP.




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Access and Inclusion Policy
Statement
The Insurance Commission of Western Australia is committed to:

      ensuring that people with disabilities, their families and carers are able to fully
       access our services and facilities, providing them with the same opportunities,
       rights and responsibilities enjoyed by all other people in the community;

      consulting with people with disabilities, their families and carers and where
       required, disability organisations to ensure that barriers to access and inclusion
       are addressed appropriately;

      ensuring that our agents and contractors work towards the desired access and
       inclusion outcomes in the Disability Access and Inclusion Plan; and

      achieving the six desired outcomes of our Disability Access and Inclusion Plan.

The six desired outcomes are:

       1. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to
          access our services and events.

       2. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to
          access our buildings and other facilities.

       3. People with disabilities receive information from us in a format that will
          enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able
          to access it.

       4. People with disabilities receive the same level and quality of service from
          our employees as other people.

       5. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to
          make complaints to us.

       6. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to
          participate in any public consultation we may carry out.




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Development of the Disability
Access and Inclusion Plan

Responsibility for the planning process
In January 2007 we established a Disability Access and Inclusion Planning Committee
(DAIP Committee) to oversee the development, implementation, review and
evaluation of its plan. The Committee comprised the following members:

      Manager, Motor Vehicle Personal Injury Division – representing the Insurance
       Divisions.

      Employee Manager, Human Resources Division – representing the Service
       Divisions.

      Property Investments Manager – representative for issues pertaining to building
       access.

      Public Relations Manager – DAIP Coordinator.

The DAIP Committee reported to the Insurance Commission‘s Executive Committee.

Prior to the establishment of the DAIP Committee, the Public Relations Manager had
several meetings with employees of the Community Access and Information Branch of
the Disability Services Commission to obtain knowledge, information, advice and
support with respect to developing the DAIP. Their advice, information, resources and
support was invaluable in the development of our DAIP.

The Committee met regularly to complete the steps involved in developing a DAIP. It
has scheduled to meet regularly to ensure proper implementation and monitoring of
the DAIP.




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Consultation Process
In 2006-2007 we reviewed our DSP, consulted with key stakeholders and drafted a
new DAIP to guide further improvements to access and inclusion. The consultation
ensured that any barriers faced by our customers in relation to access and inclusion
were identified. The consultation, conducted in February and March 2007, included
the following activities:

      The community was informed through The West Australian newspaper and our
       public website that we were developing a DAIP to address the barriers that
       people with disabilities and their families experience in accessing our functions,
       facilities and services. The community was invited to provide input into the
       development of our DAIP, with suggestions against all six desired outcomes
       encouraged.

      We sought feedback on our draft DAIP from Disability Service Providers in
       Western Australia.

      An article was published in our corporate internal newsletter ‗Intercom‘ and on
       our internal Intranet website – both publications reach all employees.



Findings of the consultation
As a result of our consultation, we received feedback from one disability service
provider – the Senses Foundation (Inc) – an organisation that provides services to
people with disabilities, particularly those who are blind or deafblind. The Senses
Foundation sent us an email and attached some information which may assist us in
providing services to people who are deafblind. (Refer to Attachment A). We read
through this information and checked that our Draft DAIP met the majority of the
suggestions.

Overall, the review and consultation found that most of the objectives our first
Disability Services Plan (DSP) had been achieved and that a revised and updated
plan was required to ensure currency and relevance.

Our new plan not only addresses current access barriers but also reflects
contemporary values and practices, such as striving for inclusion and meeting more
than the minimum compliance with access standards. It also addresses relevant
legislative and regulatory changes.




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Responsibility for implementing the DAIP
Implementation of the DAIP is the responsibility of our Executive Committee. Some
strategies in the DAIP will apply to all areas of the Insurance Commission while others
will apply to a specific Division. The DAIP planning committee will guide the overall
implementation of the plan.


Communicating the plan
To ensure that our DAIP was clearly communicated to employees and people with
disabilities, the following initiatives were undertaken:

In February 2007, feedback of the Draft DAIP was sought from:

      the Community Access and Information Branch of the Disability Services
       Commission;

      Disability Service Providers and Associations based in Western Australia; and

      the Insurance Commission‘s employees and customers (via posting it on our
       public website)

The final version was reviewed and endorsed by the Insurance Commission‘s
Executive Committee at its March 2007 meeting. The endorsed DAIP was then
submitted to the Disability Services Commission on 6 June 2007.

In May 2007 the final version of our DAIP was then posted on our public website –
www.icwa.wa.gov.au and on our internal Intranet website.

In addition, in June 2007 an advertisement was also placed in The West Australian to
notify the public that our DAIP was now available on our website.


Review and evaluation mechanisms
Our DAIP will be reviewed at least every five years.

Our DAIP Implementation Plan may be amended on a more regular basis to reflect
progress and any access and inclusion issues which may arise.

Whenever the DAIP is amended, a copy of the amended DAIP will be lodged with the
Disability Services Commission.

Review and monitoring




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   The DAIP Committee will meet quarterly in the first year and as required
    thereafter to review progress on the implementation of the strategies identified in
    our DAIP.

   The review of our DAIP will be included in our next five year DASIP (DAIP 2012–
    2013 to 2017–2018) which will be submitted to the Disability Services
    Commission in 2011. The report will outline what has been achieved under our
    DAIP 2007–2008 to 2011–2012.

   Status reports will be provided to the Executive Committee.

Evaluation

   The Executive Committee will consider any reports on the disability access and
    inclusion implementation process.

   In seeking feedback the committee will also seek to identify any additional
    barriers that were not identified in the initial consultation.

   If requested or considered necessary, the DAIP committee will use some of the
    consultation processes used during the initial consultations.

   Our employees will also be requested to provide feedback on how well they
    believe the strategies are working and to make suggestions for improvement.


Reporting on the DAIP
We will report on the implementation of our DAIP through our Annual Report, which
will outline progress made towards the six desired outcomes of our DAIP.




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Strategies to improve access and
inclusion
The following overarching strategies will guide us from 2007 – 2012 towards improving
access to our services, buildings and information. The six desired outcomes provide a
framework for improving access and inclusion for people with disabilities.

Outcome 1: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to
           access our services and events.


 Strategy                                                         Timeline

 Establish a Disability Access Committee to guide the             January 2007
 implementation of DAIP activities

 Ensure that people with disabilities are provided with an        February 2007
 opportunity to comment on access to services.

 Develop an Access and Inclusion policy to ensure it supports     March 2007
 equitable access to services by people with disabilities.

 Incorporate the objectives of the DAIP into our strategic        June 2007
 business planning, budgeting processes, and procedures and
 policies.

 Ensure that our employees and contractors are aware of our       Ongoing
 DAIP and relevant policies and strategies.

 Ensure that events conducted by, or on behalf of, the            Ongoing
 Insurance Commission, are accessible to people with
 disabilities.




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Outcome 2: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to
           access our offices.


 Strategy                                                           Timeline

 Ensure that our offices are accessible and meet the legislative    Ongoing
 and access standards for accessibility.

 Ensure that our signage is clear and easy to read                  Ongoing




Outcome 3: People with disabilities receive information from us in a format that will
           enable them to access the information as readily as other people are
           able to access it.


 Strategy                                                           Timeline

 Improve community awareness that our information is                Ongoing
 available in alternative formats upon request.

 Improve our employees‘ awareness of accessible information         June 2008
 needs and how to obtain information in other formats.

 Establish a process for ensuring that, when requested, the         December 2007
 use of specialist support is made available at meetings.

 Maintain website accessibility to a minimum of W2C priority.       December 2007

 Ensure that our printed information is accessible to people        Ongoing
 with disabilities.




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Outcome 4: People with disabilities receive the same level and quality of service from
           our employees as other people receive.


 Strategy                                                            Timeline

 Improve employee awareness of disability and access issues          December 2007
 and relevant legislation.

 Improve skills to better our service to people with disabilities.   June 2008

 Maintain employee awareness of disability and access issues.        Ongoing




Outcome 5: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to
           make complaints to us.


 Strategy                                                            Timeline

 Ensure that our Complaints System and Policy are accessible         June 2009
 for people with disabilities.

 Improve employees‘ knowledge so they can facilitate the             June 2009
 receipt of complaints from people with a disability.




Outcome 6: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to
           participate in any public consultation we may carry out.


 Strategy                                                            Timeline

 Commit to ongoing monitoring of our DAIP to ensure                  August 2007
 implementation and satisfactory outcomes.

 Improve inclusive opportunities for people with disabilities to     Ongoing
 participate in any public consultation we may undertake.




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Contact details
If you would like to comment on our Disability Access and Inclusion Plan, make
suggestions to improve access or compliment us on an initiative, please use the
feedback form provided. Alternatively, you are welcome to contact us by one on the
following methods:

                         E-mail:
                         customer@icwa.wa.gov.au




                          Mail:
                          Public Relations Manager
                          Insurance Commission of Western Australia
                          GPO Box U 1908
                          PERTH WA 6845




                         Phone: (08) 9264 3333

                         Freecall: 1800 643 338




                          Fax: (08) 9264 3522




                         Internet: www.icwa.wa.gov.au




Feedback form
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We welcome your feedback at any time.

Have you experienced any barriers to access that we have not identified?
Situation




Reason for difficulty



Is there an initiative that you would like to compliment us on?
Initiative:



Why do you think it is a good initiative?




Do you have any other comments or suggestions?




To help us analyse your comments, please tick which category best describes your
interest in our Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 2007–2008 to 2011–2012.
Customer/Claimant with a                    Insurance Commission employee
disability
Carer                                       Insurance Commission contractor
Disability Service Provider                 Insurance Commission service provider
Other (please specify)


If you would like to be included in future consultations, please provide your name and
contact details.




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Appendices
Appendix A: Schedule 1 — Principles applicable to
people with disabilities5
1.       People with disabilities have the inherent right to respect for their human worth
         and dignity.

2.       People with disabilities, whatever the origin, nature, type or degree of disability,
         have the same basic human rights as other members of society and should be
         enabled to exercise those basic human rights.

3.       People with disabilities have the same rights as other members of society to
         realise their individual capacities for physical, social, emotional, intellectual and
         spiritual development.

4.       People with disabilities have the same right as other members of society to
         services which will support their attaining a reasonable quality of life in a way that
         also recognises the role and needs of their families and carers.

5.       People with disabilities have the same right as other members of society to
         participate in, direct and implement the decisions which affect their lives.

6.       People with disabilities have the same right as other members of society to
         receive services in a manner that results in the least restriction of their rights and
         opportunities.

7.       People with disabilities have the same right as other members of society to
         pursue any grievance concerning services.

8.       People with disabilities have the right to access the type of services and supports
         that they believe are most appropriate to meet their needs.

9.       People with disabilities who reside in rural and regional areas have a right, as far
         as is reasonable to expect, to have access to similar services provided to people
         with disabilities who reside in the metropolitan area.

10.      People with disabilities have a right to an environment free from neglect, abuse,
         intimidation and exploitation.




5
    Disability Services Act 1993


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Appendices
Appendix B: What is a disability?
A disability is any continuing condition that restricts everyday activities. The Australian
Bureau of Statistics ‗2003 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers‘ found that 405,500
Western Australians reported having a disability.

Disability6 is defined as a condition:

    a) Which is attributable to an intellectual, psychiatric, cognitive, neurological,
       sensory, or physical impairment or a combination of those impairments;

    b) Which is permanent or likely to be permanent;

    c) Which may or may not be of a chronic or episodic nature; and

    d) Which results in:
                 i. a substantially reduced capacity of the person for communication,
                    social interaction, learning or mobility; and
                ii. a need for continuing support services.

Disabilities can affect a person‘s capacity to communicate, interact with others, learn
and get about independently. Disability is usually permanent but may be episodic.
Disabilities can be:

Sensory:                 affecting, for example, vision and/or hearing.
                         affecting a person‘s ability to control their movements, for
                         example, epilepsy and cerebral palsy.
Neurological:
                         affecting mobility and/or a person‘s ability to use their
                         body (e.g. upper or lower body).
Physical:
                         affecting a person‘s judgement, ability to learn and
                         communicate.
Intellectual:
                         affecting a person‘s thought processes, personality and
                         memory resulting, for example, from an injury to the
Cognitive:
                         brain.
                         affecting a person‘s emotions, thought processes and
                         behaviour, for example, schizophrenia and/or manic
Psychiatric:
                         depression.

6
 This definition of ‗Disability‘ was sourced from the ‗Disability Access and Inclusion Plans - Resource
Manual for State Government‘ published by Western Australia‘s Disability Services Commission.


859c79a0-0c7d-4e0c-9747-fd00a37605b1.doc                                 Page 23 of 43
Appendices
Appendix C: What are core activities?
Core activities include self care, mobility and communication.

      Self-care
       Self-care includes activities such as bathing or showering; dressing; eating; using
       the toilet and managing incontinence.

      Mobility
       Mobility includes activities such as moving around at home and away from home;
       getting into or out of a bed or chair; bending and picking up an object from the
       floor; and using public transport.

      Communication
       This is understanding and being understood by others, including strangers, family
       and friends.

A core activity restriction may be:
      Profound
       Where the individual is unable to perform a core activity or always needing
       assistance

      Severe
       Where the individual sometimes needs assistance to perform a core activity

      Moderate
       Where the individual does not need assistance, but has difficulty performing
       a core activity

      Mild
       Where the individual has no difficulty performing a core activity, but uses aids
       or equipment because of disability.

NB: ―Assistance‖ is defined as needing help or supervision.

Other activities affected by disabling conditions include restrictions in education and
employment. Examples of restrictions include:

Education:
   Difficulties at school.
   Attendance is affected.
   There is a need for at least one day a week off school on average.
   Special classes are attended.


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Appendices
Appendix C (continued)



Employment:
      Where employment is precluded or limited by the disability.
      Special assistance or equipment is required.
      Restriction in the number of hours a person can or could work.
      Assistance from a disability job placement program or agency is required.

People who experience an activity limitation in either a core activity area or in schooling
or employment are described by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) as having a
‗specific limitation or restriction‘. 85.5 per cent of Western Australians with disabilities
(346,900 people) experience specific limitations or restrictions due to their disability.

People can and do experience limitations in other activity areas, such as learning, social
interaction, and independent living. The diagram below illustrates the proportion of
Western Australians with disabilities, according to the presence and type of limitation or
restriction.

            Disability, Limitation and Restriction, Western Australia, 20037

                                                                Core activity
                                                                 limitation,
                                                                   15.3%




                                                                Schooling or
                                                               employment
                                                              restriction only,
                   No Disability,                                  2.3%
                     79.4%



                                                               Disability with
                                                              other restriction
                                                                only, 3.0%




7
 Unless otherwise stated, data items are sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2004, 2003
Disability Ageing and Carers, Australia: Summary of Findings – State Tables for Western Australia. 2003.
Cat. No. 4430.0. Canberra: ABS


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Appendices
Appendix D: Progress since 1995 under the Disability
Services Plan
The Insurance Commission published its Disability Services Plan in 1995 and it had five
key outcomes which are listed below. An objective for each outcome was also
documented in the DSP. Progress made since 1995 is reported below in terms of
progress made against the five outcomes and the objective for each outcome.

1. Existing services are adapted to ensure the needs of people with disabilities
   are met.

   The Insurance Commission‘s objective with respect to Outcome 1 of its DSP, listed
   above, was to ‗Adapt existing services to meet the needs of people with disabilities‘.

   Since the DSP was written in 1995, we have adapted our existing services to meet
   the needs of people with disabilities through the following ways:

      Overall, the claims management services we provide to our customers (through
       our Motor Vehicle Personal Injury Division and RiskCover Division) have
       improved in many areas.

       All claimants for motor vehicle personal injuries or workers compensation claims
       have suffered some form of impairment, and in some cases, long-term or
       permanent disability.

      In April 2006, a dedicated Catastrophic Injuries Claims Team was established
       within our Motor Vehicle Personal Injury Division. The Officers in this Team are
       tasked with taking a more pro-active role in managing catastrophic injuries claims
       by more closely liaising with claimants and/or their families and legal, medical
       and allied services providers.

       One of the main outcomes sought is the development of expertise, knowledge,
       skills and networks necessary to ensure that the needs of catastrophically injured
       claimants are adequately met. Another key outcome is to have a good
       understanding and appreciation of the issues facing families and communities
       responsible for the ongoing care of severely injured people. Over time, a greater
       awareness and understanding of the role of rehabilitation during the various post-
       injury stages and the long term care requirements for catastrophically injured
       people is expected to be developed, to better respond to the needs of claimants
       who have suffered ―catastrophic injuries‖ as a result of being involved in a motor
       vehicle crash involving a Western Australian registered vehicle.




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Appendices
Appendix D (continued)

       Due to the overwhelming success of the team, it was made permanent after only
       six months of its commencement. The team‘s dedication to our Core Values, has
       produced positive feedback from clients, plaintiff and defendant solicitors.

       At the time of the implementation of this team, each catastrophic claim had to be
       identified and then allocated to one of the four team members.

       Initially, the Catastrophic Claims Team had a portfolio of approximately 120
       claims where:
        the claimants sustained either a spinal injury resulting in paralysis, acquired
         brain injury or limb amputation (or a combination of these); and
        the total estimate of the claim was greater than AUD$1 million.

       This clearly highlights that these customers (i.e. MVPI claimants) each have
       permanent, severe disabilities and core activity restriction is profound.

       Now it is part of our normal work processes that all notifications of claims
       where an injured party has sustained a catastrophic injury from the motor
       vehicle crash are forwarded to the Catastrophic Claims Team for
       management.

      The ‗Licence and Third Party Insurance Policy‘ issued by our agent, Department
       for Planning and Infrastructure, has a TTY number listed on it for customers who
       have a hearing impairment. Additionally, this invoice can be paid via the Internet
       (refer to www.dpi.wa.gov.au and go to the Licensing Services section).

       Refer to Attachment B for a sample invoice. As stated earlier in the ‗Overview of
       the Insurance Commission of Western Australia‘, the Department for Planning
       and Infrastructure and its agents issue the combined CTP policies/invoices and
       collect the premiums on behalf of the Insurance Commission.


2. Access to the Insurance Commission’s office premises has improved.

   The Insurance Commission‘s objective with respect to Outcome 2, listed above, of
   its DSP was to ‗Ensure that the building is accessible‘.

   We have ensured that the Forrest Centre building is accessible in the following
   ways:




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Appendices
Appendix D (continued)

       In 2002, the Insurance Commission‘s offices were completely refurbished. During
        this process, building access and signage barriers were addressed.

       Additionally, improved internal signage was installed as part of the refurbishment.

       The ground floor and the 27th floor of 221 St Georges Terrace each has a toilet
        which can be accessed by people with a disability. This enables our customers
        who have a disability the same access to toilets as any other person.

       The Forrest Centre public car park has five (5) dedicated accessible parking bays
        for people with a disability out of a total of 315 bays8.

       There is lift and ramp access from the car park to the Forrest Centre with the lifts
        having handrails on both sides.


3. Information about services and programs is provided in formats that assist the
   communication needs of people with disabilities.

    The Insurance Commission‘s objective with respect to Outcome 3 of its DSP was to
    ‗Provide information about the Insurance Commission‘s services in clear language
    and in alternative and accessible formats‘.

    We have made the following progress with respect to Outcome 4 and its objective:

       For a number of years, the Motor Vehicle Personal Injury Division has been
        reviewing and amending its entire ―standard‖ letters to ensure that they are easy
        to understand, written in simple and clear language (i.e. plain English and devoid
        of jargon). This has been an incremental, progressive process which is almost
        complete.


4. Information about services are delivered by employees who are aware of and
   understand the needs of people with disabilities.

    Our objective with respect to Outcome 4 of the DSP was to ‗Equip employees with
    the resources, skills and knowledge necessary to enable the requirements of people
    with disabilities to be met.‘

8
 Of the 315 car park bays, 100 are open to members of the public, including the five car park bays that
are dedicated for access to people with a disability. The remaining 215 bays are leased out to private
companies who are tenants of The Forrest Centre (219 and 221 St George‘s Terrace, Perth WA).


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Appendices
Appendix D (continued)

   We made the following progress with respect to Outcome 4 and its objective:

      Over the years since the DSP was written, the Insurance Commission has held a
       number of training sessions (workshops and lectures) for our claims employees,
       dealing with issues relating to injuries and injury management and how to deal
       with people under a disability although the training has been heavily focused on
       the claims management side of things.

      General awareness on this issue has increased amongst our employees, by
       virtue of our own Human Resource policies on issues such as discrimination and
       equal employment opportunities.

      Front reception employees have been informed of the existence and use of the
       Telephone Typewriter (TTY) relay service offered by the Australian
       Communication Exchange. Reception employees are equipped to deal with TTY
       calls.


5. Opportunities are provided for people with disabilities to participate in public
   consultations, complaint and compliment mechanisms and decision-making
   processes.

   Our objective with respect to Outcome 5 (above) of our DSP was to ‗Allow people
   with disabilities to participate in public consultations, decision-making processes and
   feedback procedures.

   We have made the following progress with respect to Outcome 5 and its objective:

      The Insurance Commission has a Complaints System and Policy complies with
       the Australian Standard on Complaints Handling (AS 4269) and can be accessed
       in a range of ways. People can lodge a complaint with the Insurance Commission
       via telephone; in writing (e-mail; letter; or fax); in-person or on our website
       (www.icwa.wa.gov.au)

      Furthermore, people with disabilities can use an advocate. When a complaint is
       lodged, we request details of any special circumstances such as vision or
       hearing impaired. This ensures that our employees are aware of any special
       circumstances to cater for them so that customers who have a disability receive
       the same service and access to information as other people.




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Appendices

Appendix E: Glossary

Alternative formats         Information presented in formats other than the standard
                            printed format. Alternative formats include audiotape,
                            computer disk, e-mail, large print and Braille.

Audio Loop                  Magnetic field which helps prevent external sounds from
                            interfering with intended audio messages within a given
                            space. Loops are set up in particular rooms or auditoriums
                            to facilitate hearing by people who use a hearing aid.

CTP                         Compulsory Third Party, referring to CTP insurance.

DAIP                        Disability Access and Inclusion Plan.

DSA                         Disability Services Act 1993.

DSP                         Disability Services Plan.

DSC                         Disability Services Commission.

Inclusion                   Participating fully in an activity or the community.

MVPI                        Motor Vehicle Personal Injury.

TTY                         Telephone Typewriter – a device attached to a telephone
                            line which allows callers to communicate by typing
                            messages which are simultaneously seen by the person at
                            the other end of the line.




859c79a0-0c7d-4e0c-9747-fd00a37605b1.doc                       Page 30 of 43
Attachment A – Information from
Senses Foundation (Inc.)
  Accessibility Issues for People who are deafblind or
                          dual sensory impaired.

There has been recognition for some time of the need to include all people
in all aspects of community regardless of disability, age, gender etc…


There has been a steady rise in the rate of disability in Australia since the
first ABS Disability Survey in 1981 at which time 15% of Australians had a
disability. The most recent study showed that 20% of Australians have a
disability (3.9 million people). This is expected to rise to over 25% by 2051.


In 2003, the ABS survey of people with a disability revealed that a range of
social activities were undertaken, including visiting families and friends,
attending church, library, movies, sports, arts and crafts and other special
interest group. A large number of people reported that some assistance
was required for these activities.         We know that modifications to the
environment and communication strategies also increase peoples‘ ability to
access such activity. As community workers, there is a need for us to
understand disability and to modify our practices in order to become more
inclusive for disabilities groups.
    The Senses Foundation is a charitable, not for profit organisation
    which is the primary service provider and advocate for Western
    Australians who are deafblind and people who are blind with an
    additional disability.

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For some individuals, accessing the physical environment, activity and
communication can be extremely compromised due to a range of
disabilities. For people who are deafblind and dual sensory impaired, there
are a range of considerations for access and inclusion which will be
discussed in this paper. Deafblindness and dual sensory impairment do
not always occur in isolation, they may be coupled with a range of other
disabilities which compounds their vision and hearing difficulties.


Definitions:


    Deafblindness is described as a unique and isolating sensory
       disability resulting from the combination of both a hearing and vision
       loss or impairment which significantly affects communication,
       socialisation, mobility and daily living


    Dual sensory loss is most often used to describe those individuals
       with acquired vision and hearing impairment due to ageing.


    Vision impairment refers to low vision that cannot be corrected by
       regular eye glasses and is severe enough to impede performance of
       vocational, recreational and/or social tasks


    Hearing impairment refers to any alteration of hearing capacity.
       Hearing impairment can be of various degrees, including mild,
       moderate, severe, profound, or total. The degree of impairment
       typically is categorized by the loss of hearing sensitivity, that is, how
       loud sounds must be for a listener to hear them. The degree of
       impairment can refer either to the loss of hearing sensitivity for

859c79a0-0c7d-4e0c-9747-fd00a37605b1.doc              Page 32 of 43
       individual pitches of sounds for each ear separately, or to an overall
       loss of hearing sensitivity for both ears. Hearing impairment is further
       defined as unilateral if present in only one ear, and as bilateral if
       present in both ears.


    Additional Disability – refers to a coexisting disability for a person
       with vision impairment or the person who is deafblind.                This
       compounds the difficulties experienced and need to be taken into
       consideration when ensuring accessibility and inclusion.


    Communication Impairment – refers to reduced or lost ability to
       communicate in the standard way. Communication impairment is often
       a hidden disability which is both isolating and frustrating for the
       individual and their families. It can be the result of sensory, physical or
       cognitive difficulties.


    Forms of Communication


           Speech
           Sign language (In Australia, Auslan)
           Non-speech communication – pictures/electronic
              communication devices
           Non-verbal communication
           Touch cues/object cues
           Written language
           Moderated communication e.g. email, fax, memo, SMS etc…




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Recommendations for Organisations:


         Designate one person in your organisation to be responsible for
          issues relating to deafblind access and inclusion – this person can
          then be the contact for people in the community and the conduit
          with helping organisations.
         For every piece of information your organisation produces, ensure
          there is a contact person who can assist with alternative format
          production.
         Include     training   in   the   impact   of     deafblindness    in   your
          organisation‘s training calendar on a regular basis.
         Consult with stakeholder groups (or representatives of) or
          stakeholder       organisations     when        designing     environments,
          programs or brochures.


Access to Communication

      Check with the individual or their support person what format they
       would like the information to be presented in
      If a person uses Braille, information can be transcribed and produced
       by using a Braille embosser connected to a computer


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      If a person can read large print, the font size in a document can
       easily be increased. Use of buff coloured paper will reduce glare to
       make written language easier to access,
      Telephone typewriter (TTY) devices communicate directly with each
       other similar to a conventional telephone
      Information can be recorded onto a cassette or video tape
      There are interpreter, communication facilitator and note taking
       services that people can access.       Organisations need to ensure
       interpreters used have experience with people who are deafblind
      Use of the National Relay Service – this service is used for callers
       who are deaf or have a hearing impairment or a communication
       impairment and can be made by telephoning 133 677.
      For people with a speech or communication impairment, calls can be
       made through the Speech Relay Service by telephoning 1300 555
       727.
      The Internet and mobile phone SMS (short messaging service) can
       be used to disseminate information
      Services can assist by providing clear signs at the front of the
       organisation, around and in lifts, toilets and reception areas
      Use of audioloops in meeting rooms e.g. council meeting rooms,
       libraries etc…
      The availability of other Assistive Listening Devices make it easier
       to communicate with a person who has reduced hearing
      TIME – Appointments need to be longer because of the extra time it
       takes an individual who is deafblind to process information. People
       deserve to be provided with this time and to receive information in the
       format that is most accessible, allowing them to ask questions, be



859c79a0-0c7d-4e0c-9747-fd00a37605b1.doc              Page 35 of 43
        involved in processes.             Essentially, this means treating each
        individual with respect.

(Some information from ABLE Australia website 2006)

www.able.fabricgroup.com.au




Language and Design Issues

Language

          Use simple concise language in any brochures/information
           produced
          Keep sentence length short
          Avoid ambiguity, what seems clear to you may not be clear to
           others

Style

          Make standard brochures or letters in 14 point size and have
           large print options available
          Many people with vision loss prefer bold print
          Ensure clear background good contrast of writing (e.g. black
           writing on buff background)


859c79a0-0c7d-4e0c-9747-fd00a37605b1.doc                  Page 36 of 43
          Use 1.5 spacing as standard
          Use readable fonts – Helvetica and Sans Serif fonts (such as
           Arial) are easier to read
          Avoid ‗busy‘ pictures and icons that can distract from the main
           message

Internet

          Web-page design needs to be considered
          Include options to change font size and contrast
          Include text to speech options
          Include explanations of pictures included on your site (as a large
           proportion of some sites contain pictures that will not be
           accessible)
          Ensure a plain background
          Ensure good contrast of written information to background
          Ensure link options are clearly highlighted

Face to Face Communication

          Ask the individual or their carer the preferred method of
           communication
          Have someone to interpret or facilitate the communication
           (professional services are available)
          Approach the person from the front, saying their name and
           introducing yourself
          Always face the person you are talking to, at eye level
          Ensure you have the person‘s attention
          Speak slowly and clearly


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         Pause between phrases (whether spoken or signed) to allow
          processing time
         Allow tactile information to be included in discussion when
          appropriate

Access to the Environment

The Built Environment

         Follow accessibility guidelines – these are freely available either
          on the web, or publications such as ―Design Right‖ (RNIB) detail
          how to make the built environment accessible.
         Ensure lighting is adequate.
         Reduce sources of glare (for example have diffusers on lights,
          cover windows with diffusing material)
         Reduce sources of reverberation (echo) – acoustic ceiling tiles,
          floor coverings etc… can assist in this area
         Use good contrast. For example, doors should contrast with the
          walls so that people with reduced vision can see where they are;
          paint different parts of the building (internal) in contrasting colours
          so a person can more easily recognise where they are
         Have tactile information in the building – for example tac-tiles on
          the floor to show where an entrance/exit/reception desk is is, and
          tactile signage on rooms
         Ensure safety is considered at all times. Do not move furniture
          from where it usually is; avoid rugs on floors; provide ramps for
          ease of access.

The Outside World – The General Environment


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         All paths, tracks should be accessible and this needs to be our aim
         Consider tactile signage for paths – both Braille for signs and tac-
          tiles to ‗label‘ the path
         Clearly mark paths in signage that has good contrast
         Keep overhanging branches well trimmed – they are a hazard to
          people who have low vision or vision impairment
         Report any raised footpaths, cracks etc… as these pose danger
          for people who are deafblind and vision impaired with additional
          disabilities.
         Offer maps and brochures describing the outside environment in
          alternative formats.

To ensure that the needs of deafblind and vision impaired clients are met, it
is imperative to make both the environment and information we provide to
clients is accessible. Contact your local service provider who will be able to
assist you with further information.




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In Summary

If Deafblindness could be described in one word, that word would be
isolation. The very nature of deafblindness cuts people off from the world.


Access for most people who are deafblind can only be achieved through
human resources with trained people who are skilled in specific and often
individualised communication methods, as well as sighted-guide.


All of the ramps, Braille labels, TTY‘s, large print, talking elevators and
textured footpaths in the world will not be enough for most people who are
deafblind to access their communities…skilled communication partners
who can facilitate communication and participation in the community are
needed for effective access.

Your local provider in Western Australia is:

SENSES FOUNDATION
Phone:        (08) 9473 5400                     TTY: 94735488
Facsimile: (08) 94735499                         www.senses.asn.au




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Attachment B – Sample of Licence
and Third Party Insurance Policy




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                                                           TTY
                                                           Number




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