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Expanded Public Works Programme _EPWP_ Environment _ Culture

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									  Expanded Public Works
        Programme
           (EPWP)
Environment & Culture Sector
Working on Waste Programme
  Green Economy Summit
      18 – 20 May 2010


         Presented By: Alice Makaba
                      CONTENTS

•   EPWP Introduction
•   EPWP Environment & Culture Sector
•   Working on Waste Programme
•   Food for Waste Programme
•   Pilot Project in Thulamela Local Municipality
                 INTRODUCTION
• EPWP is one of the Government’s short to medium
  term strategies aimed at addressing unemployment
  and poverty.
• It is a Presidential program that started in 2004
• The 1st phase started in 2004 and ended in 2009
  (5yrs).
• The 2nd phase started in 2010 to 2014 (5yrs).
• Department of Public Works plays a role of being the
  overall coordinator of the program.
• The program is expected to be implemented by State
  and Non State organizations.
              EPWP OBJECTIVES

• Creation of work opportunities through employment
  of local people on temporary/contract basis.
• Encourage implementation of projects using labour
  intensive methods.
• Training & skills development
                EPWP SECTORS


•   Infrastructure
•   Environment and Culture
•   Social
•   Non - State
                 EPWP TARGETS
• Phase 1 – work opportunities to be created was
1 000 000 across all the sectors and the target was met.
• Phase 2 – the target is 4 920 000 across all the
   sectors.
• Target for Environment and Culture Sector over 5 yrs
   is 1 156 000
  ENVIRONMENT AND CULTURE SECTOR

• Deals with projects which have an impact on our
  natural resources (water; land and air); e.g. waste
  management; clearing of invasive plants;
  rehabilitation of wetlands; greening; fire fighting; land
  care; people and parks; e.t.c.
• Also deals with art and culture related projects; e.g.
  beads and craft work; cultural games; e.t.c.
      SECTOR NATIONAL DEPARTMENTS

Sectors Departments           Sector programmes

DEA (Sector Lead)       Social responsibility programme

DAC                           Investing in culture

DAFF                    LandCare; CASP; Working of fire

Department of Tourism         Working for Tourism

DWA                            Working for Water
             OBJECTIVES OF THE SECTOR
To achieve immediate social benefits of overall EPWP,
deliver beneficial outputs in the field of environment and cultural heritage.

• Create 1 156 000 work opportunities (5yrs) and providing training
  through these jobs to facilitate long-term employment
• Create 325 652 FTEs (5yrs)
• Creating land-based livelihoods
• Preservation of natural resources
• Promoting community-based natural resource management
• Encourage cultural heritage activities
• Promoting tourism
WORKING ON WASTE PROGRAMME
   WASTE MANAGEMENT BACKGROUND
• Waste Management was identified as one of the
  areas the sector could perform better and expand.
• It is because of its nature of being highly labour
  intensive.
• Poor reporting of waste management projects was
  identified.
• Most of the municipalities outsource/contract this
  function of which is a fundamental principle of EPWP.
• The country is faced with a bag lock in rendering the
  service.
      SERVICE DELIVERY NEED AND EPWP
               OPPORTUNITY
Province Municipa        Households     EPWP      If 75%
          lities         not serviced   Opp.     Servicea
                                        Jobs        ble
   KZN          55         1,118,119    3,200     2,400
    LP          27         1,111,446    3,180     2,385
   EC           31          964,769     2,760     2,070
   GP            9          555,641     1,580     1,185
   NW           14          503,273     1,440     1,080
   MP            9          427,824     1,220      915
    FS          20          315,399      900       675
   NC           24          102,390      300       225
   WC           20          150,988      440       330
  TOTAL        209         5,249,849    15,020    11,265
75% Households targeted: 3,937,386
              SECTOR INITIATIVES
An assignment was commissioned to look at community
  based waste collection models to be adopted in order
  to address the backlog in household waste collection
  services.
• Scope:
   – An evaluation of different models of community-
     based waste collection programmes currently in
     operation in the Country
   – The identification of key issues that contribute to
     the success and enhance the effectiveness of
     each programme
   – The identification of issues that will increase
     and/or contribute to risk of failure
         SECTOR INITIATIVES CONT…
• The production of a “best case” report highlighting the
  success and risk issues and commenting on
  applicability and suitability of each model in other
  Municipalities in RSA
PARTICIPATING ORGANIZATIONS
              IDENTIFIED MODELS
• Management Contracting Model - A main
  contractor employs local subcontractors to undertake
  the works. Example: The Ekhuruleni Programme
• Managed Contract Model - A managing agent is
  appointed by the Municipality to plan and administer
  SME contract services that are provided by SMEs
  who are contracted directly to the Municipality.
  Example: eThekwini
• Collection and disposal of waste and recycling of
  recyclables incorporating a management contracting
  model. Example: Gauteng EPWP pilot project
       IDENTIFIED MODELS CONT…
• SME based programme managed Departmentally.
  Example: The Cape Town Programme
• Community Cooperative Model. Example: Nelson
  Mandela Metro
• Food for Waste Programme . Example: KZN Pilot
          ASSIGNMENT ACHIEVEMENTS
•   DEAT was the lead department in the exercise.
•   The team managed to secure funds from Treasury.
•   The project is piloted in Mafikeng (2009).
•   Considered Managed Contract Model with
    amendments/Improvements.
•   Implementing agent is contracted to DEAT.
•   Implementing agent appoints SMMEs
•   Each SMME appoints 20 – 50 labourers.
•   MoA signed between DEAT and the municipality.
•   Funding is on phase down mechanism between DEAT & the
    Municipality.

N.B. DPW adopted Food for Waste Concept.
Food for Waste Programme
    FOOD FOR WASTE BACKDGROUND

• The concept originate from Curitiba, Brazil “Garbage
  that is not Garbage”.
• Community collecting waste which they exchange for
  food parcels in return (value of wage).
• In 2006 KZN (DoT), the concept was adapted to the
  South African context by the Expanded Public Works
  Programme (EPWP) under the Siyazenzela Food for
  Waste banner.
    FOOD FOR WASTE BACKDGROUND
               CONT…
• Since April 2007 to date KZN (DoT) piloted the
  Programme in the three Municipalities which are
  Hibiscus Coast, Msunduzi and Ladysmith under the
  banner of the “Siyazenzela” Food for Waste
  Programme.
• Project beneficiaries work a maximum of two days
  per week and in return receive food parcels and
  vegetables.
          PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES

• Extend waste removal services to communities not
  currently receiving such services in order to reduce
  refuse removal backlog.
• Improve environmental cleanliness among local
  communities and ensuring a safe and healthy
  environment.
• Mobilize and engage communities in the collection of
  their own waste.
• Reduce the level of poverty among communities
  through job creation.
• Increase awareness on waste management.
 DPW PROGRAMME SUPPORT FUNCTIONS

• Programme model has been developed
• Funding model has been developed
• Programme requirements to be met:
   – Council resolution provided;
   – Funding duration is 3yrs on a phased down
     mechanism;
   – Minimum of 100 beneficiaries to be employed per
     annum;
   – Beneficiary must participate in compulsory training;
DPW PROGRAMME SUPPORT FUNCTIONS
            CONT…
- Number   of households to be serviced 4000 – 5000
(existing)
 – New municipalities 8000 – 10000 households to
   be serviced
 – Waste minimisation must be promoted (reduce,
   re-use/recycling)
 – Tripartite MOA (Municipality, NDPW & IDT)
 – The programme should target un-serviced
   households;
 – Utilisation of EPWP framework
 – Municipal contribution be outlined.
               PROGRAMME MODEL
• Beneficiaries are employed for 3 days a week.
   – Day 1-2 they do household collection.
   – Day 3: clean up the surrounding environment; e.g.
     grass cutting; litter picking and sweeping.
• Beneficiaries collect waste and receive food parcels as
  incentives (value of wage).
• Compensation takes place once a month.
• Encourages recycling/waste minimization activities
• Municipalities provide both primary and secondary
  trucks for collection.
        PROGRAMME MODEL CONT…
• Supervision is conducted by the municipal waste
  management unit as a way of mainstreaming the
  programme within the municipal services.
• Area assessment is conducted to monitor cleanliness
  and the impact of the project.
            FUNDING MODEL

              NDPW             MUNICIPALITY

 • Year 1   100% wage bill +    0% wage bill +
            other resources    other resources


 • Year     70% wage bill +    30% wage bill +
   2        other resources    other resources


• Year 3    30% wage bill +    70% wage bill +
            other resources    other resources
      DPW FOOD FOR WASTE PILOTS

DPW adopted the food for waste model and were
  piloted as follows:
• FY 2008/09: Thulamela and Fetakgomo Local
  Municipalities in Limpopo
• FY 2009/10: Lepelle Nkumpi LM in LP; Greater
  Kokstad LM in KZN and Mhlontlo and Umzimvubu
  LMs in Eastern Cape
• FY 2010/11: Expand further to NW and MP with 2
  municipalities each.
 CRITICAL STAKEHOLDER PARTICIPATION
• Municipality: Partners with funding body towards
  addressing the service backlogs;
• Dept. Agriculture/Health: Food nutrition advisory
  service;
• Environmental Health Officers
• Provincial Department of Public Works – identification
  of municipalities to participate in the program
• Business sector: Provision of goods/groceries
• Labour forums: Ensure compliance of the project to
  the special conditions of employment;
• Broader community: Assist in the identification of
  labour
         PROGRAMME ADVANTAGES
• Compensating Communities with food assures Food
  Security and protection of the vulnerable. Money can
  easily be misused and abused.
• It ensures reduced alcohol and substance abuse.
• Ensures a reasonable period of employment
  (minimum of 12 months or more).
• Beneficiaries have free time to pursue other
  economic activities (e.g. recycling).
• This programme does not benefit an individual but a
  household.
            ACHIVEMENTS TO DATE
• 6 pilot projects have been established to date;
• 600 community members got employment through
  this programme;
• 28, 430 households are now having access to waste
  collection service;
• 1,200 person days of training was completed on this
  pilots;
• The program is expanding further to 4 new
  municipalities in Mpumalanga and North West
  Provinces
• Minister has launched 3 food for waste projects
  (Thulamela; Fetakgomo and Kokstad Local
  Municipalities)
     Food for Waste
           in
Thulamela Local Municipal
                  INTRODUCTION
• Thulamela (a Karanga word ” A Place of Giving Birth”
  is the biggest municipality in Limpopo in terms of
  population and unfortunately also one of the poorest
  due to its historical background, with 91% of the total
  population of around ±650,000 living in rural areas.
• An unemployment figure running at ±30% and
  around 387,415(≥ 50%) people with a monthly
  income of between R0-00 to R400-00; and the list
  goes on and on of a litany of poverty statistics.
• Another very striking future is the resilient nature of
  its people to be part of the new SA and the
  willingness of the Municipality to co-operate in the
  provision of services with other arms of government.
   INCEPTION OF FOOD FOR WASTE
Food for Waste concept was introduced to the
municipality very late looking at the level of the
poverty in the area. The concept was introduced by
the National Department of Public Works EPWP unit.
A business plan was hastily put in place and a
resolution was passed to adopt the programme by
council. From that day the Municipality and DPW
went on overdrive to make sure that everything is put
in place to implement the programme.
       IDENTIFICATION OF AREAS
The program is targeting households not currently
receiving waste collection services.
The municipality further looked at the socio-economic
conditions and the population density of the areas
coupled with the high volume of waste generated.
The identified areas fall within the municipal nodal
point.
The municipality identified four areas with combined
households of 5,418 and population of around
28,000.
The areas are Mhingaville, Saselamani, Xikundu and
Tswinga villages; the first three being RDP areas.
       COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION
After obtaining a resolution from council; a project steering
committee was established composed of councilors and
civic structures.

A workshop was conducted on Food for Waste model in
order to explain the concept and to ensure that it is
understood by all the relevant stakeholders within the
municipality.

The concept was positively received by all the stakeholders
and it was adopted as the best waste management
approach in the municipality.
             RECRUITMENT PROCESS
• For recruitment purposes; ward councilors and community
  structures were involved.
• They were briefed on the type of qualifying beneficiaries in
  terms of EPWP guidelines and the use of EPWP model in
  recruitment.
• A reference was made to the municipal indigent register to come
  up with households that have no income.
• Recruitment process went very smooth and a list of 100
  beneficiaries obtained.
• The beneficiaries are composed of 79% women and 21% men
  with 49% of them being youth.
• Each beneficiary was allocated around 54 households. All
  beneficiaries signed employment contract with the municipality.
                     TRAINING

• The beneficiaries received a 2 days non accredited
  training on Waste Handling & Collection and
  Occupational Heath and Safety.
• The training was facilitated by Munitech. After the
  training beneficiaries were issued with attendance
  certificate.
• The training took place at Municipal Indoor Sport
  Centre.
                   FUNDING
• DPW developed a funding model on this program.
• The funding is for a period of 3years on phase down
  mechanism; in order to prepare the municipality to
  take over the project.
• The first year of the project DPW provided the funding
  for PPE; food parcels; project launch and training.
• The municipality provided funding for primary and
  secondary collection vehicles; refuse bags; push carts
  and other logistics.
              MONTHLY INCENTIVES
The incentives are in the form of food parcels, the grocery
  list was developed and agreed upon with all
  beneficiaries. Below is the list:
Quantity   Description
1X 50kg    Supper Maize-Meal

1X 5kg     White Sugar

1X 10kg    Tastic Rice

1X2l       Cooking Oil

6X 425g    Tinned Fish

1X Box     Minestrone Soup

1X 500g    Joke Tea

5 Dozen    Large Eggs

1X 2kg     Washing Powder

1x 500g    OMO Washing Powder

1X 900g    Apricot Jam

6X 400g    KOO Baked Beans

6X 100g    LUX Bath Soap

1X 100ml   Colgate Tooth Paste
              COLLECTION SYSTEM

• The beneficiaries are provided with refuse bags and
  push-carts by the municipality to use for collection of
  refuse from households.
• Households who can afford were encouraged to buy
  refuse bins which are available from the municipality
  to use for storage of refuse.
• Beneficiaries are collecting for three days in a week
  from households; the business centre and main
  roads.
• They are also expected to clean the surrounding of
  the households they are servicing.
               WASTE MINIMIZATION
• Although there is some form of recycling; the
  beneficiaries are not the main driver of this initiative
  at the moment.
• There are plans in place to make sure that they
  benefit out of the recycling within those areas.
• This is part of the Integrated Waste Management
  Strategy to dovetail all waste management processes
  with the minimization and re-use of waste material.
     TRANSPORTATION AND DISPOSAL

• The Municipality purchased a new 12m³ compactor at
  an amount of R977, 237-37 in order to assist in the
  transportation of waste to the landfill site.
• Waste is transported daily from project areas to the
  municipal permitted landfill site.
      INNOVATION BY THE MUNICIPALITY
• To maximize the effort and show commitment to the project,
  Thulamela came up with a number of initiatives which were not
  part of the project.
• There is a programme to plant indigenous trees in the project
  areas, and more than 700 trees have already been planted and
  more are still going to be planted in the areas.
• There is an effort to establish recycling initiatives that will be
  owned by the beneficiaries themselves. This will also serve as a
  project exit strategy after the contract period.
• There is an initiative to source out funding from the municipal
  coffers to replicate the programme to other unserviced areas.
              LESSONS LEARNED
• How to implement the project in line with EPWP
  principles.
• To harness human capacity to rally around waste
  management activities and succeed.
• The cheapest way of addressing waste management
  backlog; this model increased number of serviced
  households by almost 15%.
• Co-operative governance with other sector
  departments, especially DPW; and also working with
  IDT.
               PROJECT LAUNCH
• The project was officially launched by the Min. of
  Public Works, Geoff Doige in October 2008 at
  Thohoyandou.
• It was the biggest gathering and the most successful
  EPWP event in the province.
            FOR MORE INFORMATION

Contacts:

Official         : Alice Makaba
Office Tel       : 012 337 3000 ext 3001
Cell             : 082 958 5064
Fax              : 0866 240 439
Email address    : alice.makaba@dpw.gov.za

								
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