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Sutton 6

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Sutton 6 Powered By Docstoc
					 THE GENTLEMAN BANDIT
Based on a True Story
          by
     Richard Gold




       P.O. Box 5004
       Basking Ridge, NJ 07920
       Tel: (201) 602-2525
       E-Mail: Lqdassets@aol.com
                                                             1

FADE IN:

EXT. STREET -- DAY
THE STOREFRONT -
has a sign that reads "M. Rosenthal & Sons, Jewelers 1637
Broadway." The store is not open for business, as the
shades in the window are drawn.
SUPER IN/OUT - "OCTOBER 28, 1930, NEW YORK CITY"
WILLIE SUTTON, in his late twenties, short, medium-build,
moustache, glasses, wearing a Western Union messenger's
uniform, and carrying a pouch, approaches the front glass
door of the store.
Willie knocks on the glass door and CHARLES LEWIS, a black
man, comes to the door.
Willie pulls an envelope and receipt from the pouch and
holds it to the window.
Charles opens the door and Willie hands him the envelope,
the receipt, and a pencil.
                         WILLIE
             You have to sign for it.
Charles takes the envelope and receipt then proceeds to
sign.
SUDDENLY -
Willie pushes a revolver into Charles's stomach.
                         WILLIE (CONT'D)
             Back right in and don't say a word.
Charles backs up into the store as Willie follows him in,
keeping the revolver pointed at Charles.
INT. JEWELRY STORE -- DAY
Willie closes the door behind him.
                       WILLIE
               (motions with his
                gun toward the
                showcases)
           Stand there. My partner's coming
           right in.
                                                               2

Charles is surprisingly calm as he steps behind the
showcase, where he cannot be seen from the door.

MOMENTS LATER -
The front door opens and MARCUS BASSETT enters wearing an
overcoat, a gray hat, gray silk gloves, and carrying a black
bag.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
              (to Marcus)
          Watch him while I check for the
          alarms.
Marcus takes off his overcoat and places it along with the
black bag on the showcase. He pulls out a revolver and
points it at Charles.
Willie methodically looks under the showcases, then goes
toward the back corner, where he opens a closet door,
revealing a safe. He looks along the inside of the closet,
where he sees a push-button and wires. Then he walks back
to Marcus and Charles.
                      MARCUS
          You find them all?
                      WILLIE
          Got the showcases and the safe
          alarms.
                      MARCUS
              (to Charles)
          Are there any more alarms here?
                      CHARLES
          Just the one in the back room.
                      MARCUS
              (to Willie)
          We don't have to worry about that.
          We'll keep everyone here in the
          front.
                      WILLIE
              (to Charles)
          What time do the men come in?
                      CHARLES
          Around nine o'clock.
                      WILLIE
          What is the name of the man who
          opens the safe?
                                                               3

                      CHARLES
          Mr. Fox.

                      WILLIE
          Turn and face the window.
Charles walks to the window.
Willie crouches down next to where Charles is standing, with
his gun still drawn.
Marcus takes the black bag, walks to the back, and crouches
down behind the showcase close to the safe.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Open the shades and don't try to hit
          any alarms or we'll bump you off.
Charles opens the shades.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          We don't want to hurt any of the
          other fellows. We know what we came
          for and we're going to get it
          without getting caught.
                      CHARLES
          What shall I do if a police officer
          shakes the door as they often do?
                      WILLIE
          Let him in and we'll take care of
          him.
                      CHARLES
          Here comes Mr. Woods.   He's the
          watchmaker.
                      WILLIE
          Let him in and get away from the
          door fast.
Charles opens the door and GEORGE WOODS, an elderly man,
enters. Charles locks the door.
Willie leans over and points the gun into George's stomach
and motions over to Marcus in the back.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
              (to George)
          Walk back over there and keep quiet.
George, visibly frightened, walks over to Marcus.
                                                               4

                      MARCUS
          Get down on your knees.

George slowly kneels.
                      GEORGE
          Please don't shoot me.    Please
          don't.
                      CHARLES
          Don't hurt him. He's an old man.
                      WILLIE
              (to Marcus)
          Don't hurt him.
Marcus takes picture wire from the black bag and ties
George's hands and feet, then props him against the wall,
out of sight.
                      CHARLES
          Here comes Mr. Fox.
Charles opens the door and JULIUS FOX, a young man, enters.
Charles locks the door.
Willie leans over and points the gun at Julius.
                      WILLIE
          Walk to the back and open the safe.
A terrified Julius walks to the back.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
              (to Charles)
          Give me the keys and walk to the
          back.
Charles drops the keys and looks as Willie, who merely
smiles and motions for Charles to pick them up.
Charles picks up the keys, hands them to Willie and walks to
the back.
Willie rises, places the keys in the door lock and proceeds
to the back of the store.
Marcus motions Charles towards where George is seated.
                      MARCUS
              (to Charles)
          Sit down.
                                                               5

Charles sits next to George, as Marcus ties Charles's hands
and feet.

Willie stands behind Julius as he opens the closet where the
safe is located.
                      WILLIE
          We know about the alarm.   So just
          open the safe.
                      JULIUS
          I don't know the combination.
                      WILLIE
          Don't lie to me. I know you know
          it, so open it right away.
Julius starts to fumble with the dial, but stops.

                      JULIUS
          I can't open it.
                      WILLIE
          You're stalling. You open it right
          now or I'll pump you full of lead.
                      JULIUS
          I'm too nervous I tell you.    I can't
          do it.
                      CHARLES
          Julius do as you are told.    Don't
          take any chances.
Julius takes a deep breath, turns the dial and opens the
safe.
Willie motions Julius to where George and Charles are
sitting.
                      WILLIE
          Sit over there.
Marcus tosses the black bag to Willie, then ties Julius's
hands and feet.
Willie empties the contents of the drawers from the safe
into the black bag.
Willie closes the bag and hands it to Marcus, who heads to
the front door, unlocks it, leaving the keys in, then walks
out.
                                                                6

Willie peels the fake moustache from    his face, removes his
messenger cap and glasses. He takes     the overcoat that
Marcus left on the showcase, puts it    on over his messenger
uniform, and stuffs the props in his    coat pocket.
Willie goes to the front door, takes the keys, walks out and
locks the door from the outside.
EXT.   BO WEINBERG'S APARTMENT -- DAY
Willie, smoking a cigarette, sits at a table with BO
WEINBERG. There is a pack of Chesterfield cigarettes and a
black briefcase on the table next to Willie.
                      BO
          The Dutchman is coming right up with
          the appraiser. He's got a key.
                      WILLIE
          Thanks for setting this up, Bo. I
          need to be careful who I lay the
          stuff with.
                      BO
          He'll take care of you. Remember,
          don't call him Dutch or Mr. Schultz.
          Call him Arthur.
DUTCH SCHULTZ and JERRY walk in the door. They both remove
their overcoats and fedoras, tossing them on the sofa. As
they approach the table, Bo and Willie stand up. Dutch
extends his hand to Willie and they shake.
                      DUTCH
          Willie, I heard a lot of good things
          about you. Jerry here is going to
          look over what you got.
Willie shakes hands with Jerry, and all four men sit down.
Willie opens the brief case and passes it to Jerry.
Jerry removes the contents from the briefcase, takes an eye
loupe from his pocket and examines the diamonds and jewelry.
                      BO
          Willie's been doing real good these
          days.
                      DUTCH
          I hear you did some time upstate.
          When did you get out?
                                                               7

                      WILLIE
          Got out last year.

                      DUTCH
          You got pinched with Eddie Wilson,
          right?
                       WILLIE
          Yeah. Eddie's a good man. He's
          still away. Got a couple of more
          years to go.
Jerry puts down the loupe and looks up.
                      JERRY
          I make this at about one thirty.
                      DUTCH
          A hundred thirty. I figure we can
          get about seventy five for it.
Dutch nods to Bo, who stands up and goes into the other
room.
                      DUTCH (CONT'D)
              (to Willie)
          I'll give you thirty-five thousand
          for it. Now, if I unload it for
          more than seventy five, I'll throw
          you some more.
                      WILLIE
          We've got a deal.
Bo enters with a briefcase and passes it to Dutch.
Dutch opens the briefcase, takes out some neatly wrapped
piles of cash and places it on the table in front of Willie.
                      BO
          Willie just became a father last
          week.
                       DUTCH
          Boy?
                       WILLIE
          Baby girl.
                      DUTCH
          As those guineas would say
              (pause)
          mazel tov.
                                                              8

All the men in the room chuckle.

Dutch reaches into his pocket, pulls out a wad of bills,
counts a few and hands it to Willie.
                         DUTCH (CONT'D)
             Go buy your kid something nice.
Willie accepts the money, extends his right hand, as he and
Dutch engage in a handshake.
                         DUTCH (CONT'D)
             I like your style Willie. Too bad
             you don't come and work for me.
             We're both careful people and these
             days you got to be careful.
                         WILLIE
             Thanks, Arthur. Right now I just
             work with one partner, and even that
             worries me.
EXT.   APARTMENT BUILDING -- DAY
Marcus walks out the front entrance of 588 West End Avenue
with his wife KATHRYN BASSETT, where Marcus points to a
brand-new 1930 car parked in front of the building.
                      KATHRYN
              (Excitedly)
          Is this ours?
                         MARCUS
             It's ours, baby.
Kathryn jumps into Marcus's arms and starts kissing him.
                          KATHRYN
             A new apartment and a new car!
             What's next?
Marcus looks at her and smiles.
INT. ROSELAND NIGHT CLUB -- NIGHT
THE CLUB -
is filled with tables and booths surrounding a dance floor.
A BAND is playing swing music and COUPLES are dancing.
Marcus is seated in a booth in the back with MARGARET
ARLINGTON, a sexy brunette. \
                                                              9

THE FRONT DOOR -

opens and Willie walks in. He pauses, looks around, and
heads over to Marcus's table.
                       WILLIE
              (to Margaret)
          Hello Margaret. I need to speak
          with Marcus for a moment. We're
          going outside and we'll be back in a
          few minutes.
Marcus stands up, gives Margaret a kiss, takes his overcoat
and hat, then heads out with Willie.
EXT. ROSELAND NIGHT CLUB -- NIGHT
Marcus and Willie are standing outside the club, wearing
their coats and fedora hats. Both are smoking cigarettes.
                      MARCUS
          What's so important?
                      WILLIE
          You're getting careless, partner.
                      MARCUS
          What do you mean, careless?
                      WILLIE
          Look at how you're tossing around
          money. What do you think will
          happen if Kathryn finds out about
          Margaret? I'll tell you. She'll go
          to the police and tell them what she
          knows.
                      MARCUS
          She'd never do that. Besides,
          Margaret's set up in an apartment on
          West Eighty-Third. Come on. You
          never run around on Louise?
                        WILLIE
          No, Marcus.    I don't.
                      MARCUS
          All right. Relax. You worry too
          much.
                                                                10

INT. WILLIE'S APARTMENT -- DAY

Willie is sitting at his kitchen table, holding his infant
daughter JEANE. His wife LOUISE, sits down on a chair next
to him with a cup of coffee.
                      WILLIE
              (to Jeane)
          When you get to be a big girl,
          Daddy's going to teach you how to
          dance.
                      LOUISE
          Kathryn called again yesterday.   She
          calls every day and gets more
          hysterical each time.
                      WILLIE
          I already talked to her. I calmed
          her down. But Marcus is getting
          stupider every day.
                      LOUISE
          You need to talk to Marcus.    Tell
          him to go home nights.
                      WILLIE
          I talked to him. He doesn't listen
          to me. I think when he gets back
          from Buffalo I'm going to tell him
          we'll go our separate ways.
Willie stands up and hands Jeane to Louise.
He then takes out a cigarette and lights it up.
                      LOUISE
          Good. I don't want to risk you
          getting sent away again because of
          Marcus's stupidity.
                      WILLIE
          Yeah, I know. We have Jeane to
          think of now.
A phone RINGS.   Willie walks over and picks up the receiver.
                       WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Hello?
Willie shakes his head as he listens to the person on the
other end of the phone.
                                                              11

                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Kathryn. Listen to me. Calm down.
          Meet me tomorrow morning at Child's
          Restaurant in the Ansonia over on
          Seventy-Third and Broadway.
Willie nods his heads.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          That's right. Nine o'clock.
          Everything will be all right. Just
          calm down.
              (pause)
          All right. I'll see you tomorrow.
          Good-bye.
Willie hangs up the phone, sits back down and lights up
another cigarette.

                      LOUISE
          She doesn't know where Marcus keeps
          his guns, does she?
                      WILLIE
              (shaking his head)
          I sure as hell hope not.
              (pause)
          I got to get ready to head into the
          city. I'll be back for dinner.
INT. RESTAURANT -- DAY
Willie is sitting by himself in a booth facing the front
door, drinking coffee and smoking a cigarette.
Two tough-looking thugs walk in with bulges in their
jackets. They pause, look around the place, then walk
toward Willie. They glance at him and continue walking
toward the back of the restaurant, where they sit in a rear
booth.
Willie looks at his watch, puts out his cigarette, leaves
some money on the table and walks out the front door.
EXT. RESTAURANT -- DAY
Willie is standing outside the restaurant and sees Dutch
Schultz walking toward him. Willie quickly walks to Dutch
before he reaches the restaurant and they stop.
                      DUTCH
          I thought I told you to wait for me
          inside. Come on I'm hungry.
                                                              12

                      WILLIE
          I was in there. Two mugs walked in
          packing heat. I didn't want you to
          take the chance of walking into an
          ambush so I came out here.
Dutch's expression changes from that of anger to a smile.
                      DUTCH
          You're all right, Willie Sutton.
Dutch puts his arm around Willie.   They turn and walk away
from the restaurant.
INT. CHILDS RESTAURANT -- DAY
SUPER IN/OUT - "NOVEMBER 25, 1930, NEW YORK CITY"
Kathryn Bassett and Willie are seated at a booth in the
restaurant.
                      KATHRYN
          Don't lie to me Willie. I know that
          Marcus is running around with this
          who-uh, Margaret.
                      WILLIE
          Kathryn look. We were pals with her
          husband Ray before he got himself
          killed up in Sing Sing. We're just
          helping her out a little. That's
          all it is.
                      KATHRYN
          You're not telling me everything.
          He's been spending time at her
          apartment. Now he's on a trip to
          Buffalo. Is she with him?
                      WILLIE
          Look. You're upset. Now is not the
          time to get hysterical.
Two New York plain clothes detectives, EGGOLT and RIKEMAN
approach the booth. Both present badges to Willie.
                      EGGHOLT
          William Sutton. Place both your
          hands on the table.
Willie puts both his hands on the table.
He shoots a look across at Kathryn, who just looks down.
                                                               13

Willie shakes his head in disgust.

Eggholt reaches into the inside of Willie's jacket and pulls
out a revolver.
INT. POLICE HEADQUARTERS -- DAY
CAPTAIN MOSHER of the Pinkerton Detective Agency, wearing a
suit and tie, holding an overcoat over a briefcase,
approaches a desk where Detective Eggholt is seated and
Detective Rikeman is standing.
                      MOSHER
          Detectives Eggholt and Rikeman?
                      RIKEMAN
          That's us. I'm Rikeman.
Mosher places a business card on the desk.
                      MOSHER
          Captain Herb Mosher, Pinkerton
          Agency. You both arrested William
          Sutton on the Rosenthal jewelry
          heist?
Eggholt nods and motions Mosher to a seat. Mosher and
Rikeman both sit down.
                      EGGHOLT
          Hysterical woman walks in one
          morning. Identifies herself as
          Kathryn Bassett, living at 588 West
          End Avenue. Goes on that her husband
          Marcus robbed a jewelry store and is
          up in Buffalo with some other broad.
                      MOSHER
          How did you tie him into the
          Rosenthal job?
                      RIKEMAN
          She said her husband was keeping
          this dame at 57 West 83rd Street.
          So we checked it out. Landlord tells
          us a man fitting Bassett's
          description rented the place under
          the name of Patterson.
                      EGGHOLT
          We get into the apartment and find a
          trunk with a Western Union uniform,
          couple of pistols, and a floor plan
          of the Rosenthal Jewelry shop.
                                                          14

                      MOSHER
          But you knew that two men pulled the
          job.
                      EGGHOLT
          Right. So we pressed Mrs. Bassett
          and she gave us Sutton's name.
                      RIKEMAN
          So we convinced her to set him up
          for us.
                      EGGHOLT
          Here's the report so far.
Eggholt passes Mosher a folder.   Mosher starts reading
through it.
                      MOSHER
          So Mrs. Bassett knew where her
          husband would be in Buffalo and you
          had him picked up and brought back
          here.
                      EGGHOLT
          Right. He had the dame with him
          too. Name's Margaret Arlington.
Mosher reads further.
                      RIKEMAN
          She didn't know much, but we got
          Bassett to talk.
Mosher looks up.
                      MOSHER
          Bassett admitted to the job and told
          you Sutton was his partner?
                        RIKEMAN
          Yeah.    He was very quick to talk.
                      MOSHER
          Did he tell you who they used to
          fence the jewelry?
                      EGGHOLT
          No. He said Sutton handled that
          alone. Never told him who the fence
          was.
                      MOSHER
          No statement from Sutton?
                                                             15

Rikeman and Eggholt look at each other and smile.

                      EGGHOLT
          Captain Feeney took him over to the
          Centre Street Station for special
          interrogation.
INT. POLICE STATION BASEMENT -- DAY
Willie is handcuffed to a pipe hanging from the basement
ceiling. He is stripped naked and there are bruises on his
back. CAPTAIN FEENEY drives his fist into Willie's side.
Two DETECTIVES stand behind Willie and take turns hitting
his back with rubber hoses.
                      FEENEY
          Look you punk. You're going to talk
          to me one way or another. Now tell
          me who fenced the jewelry for you?
                      WILLIE
          I told you I don't know what you're
          talking about.
There a KNOCK on the basement door.
                      FEENEY
              (to one of the
               detectives)
          Go see who that is.
The detective walks in the direction of the door.
                      FEENEY (CONT'D)
              (to Willie)
          I don't care how long we've got to
          keep working on you down here.
          You're going to talk.
The detective walks back over to Feeney.
                      DETECTIVE
          There's a Pinkerton Agent named
          Mosher upstairs. He wants to see
          you about talking to Sutton.
                       FEENEY
          All right.   Clean him up.
INT. INTERROGATION ROOM -- NIGHT
Mosher is seated across the table from Willie, who shows
signs of fatigue, although no visible bruises on his face.
                                                              16

                      MOSHER
          Sutton, the insurance company hired
          us to recover the jewelry.
Mosher passes his business card across the table to Willie,
who picks it up and glances at it.
                      MOSHER (CONT'D)
          I think we could help each other out
          here.
Mosher holds out a pack of cigarettes to Willie, who
grimaces from pain as he reaches and takes one out.
Mosher leans over and lights it.
                      MOSHER (CONT'D)
          They worked you over?

                      WILLIE
          That Feeney is a sadistic son of a
          bitch.
                      MOSHER
          The case against you is pretty
          strong. Bassett confessed. We found
          your things at the 83rd Street
          apartment, and two witnesses picked
          you out of a line-up. You're looking
          at up to thirty years.
                      WILLIE
          So you have everything you need.
          What do want from me?
                      MOSHER
          Give me the name of your fence.
Willie takes a long, painful drag of his cigarette.
                      WILLIE
          Those bastard cops beat me for three
          days, asking about a fence.
                      MOSHER
          If you tell me who moved the jewelry
          for you, the DA will agree to give
          you only eighteen months.
                      WILLIE
          You must have me mistaken for some
          rat, Captain.
                                                              17

EXT. SING SING PRISON -- DAY

Sing Sing Prison, on the Hudson River is like a castle with
its big concrete walls and huge front gate that slowly
closes shut to a loud BANG.
INT. SING SING PRISON YARD -- DAY
INSERT - DAILY NEWS NEWSPAPER, NOVEMBER 9, 1932
Headline reads "For President: Roosevelt, For Governor:
Lehman, For Senator: Wagner, For Mayor: O'Brien"
RETURN TO SCENE
Willie, smoking a cigarette, is in the prison yard where
INMATES congregate in small groups. He approaches JOHN
EGAN, an inmate around his own age. They are all wearing
jackets.
                      WILLIE
          Let's take a stroll, Johnny.
They walk through the yard.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Have you thought about it?
                      EGAN
          Yeah. I'm in. I can get us the
          hacksaws and tools you need to pick
          the locks from the repair shop.
          That's easy. But we'll never get a
          ladder big enough to get us over the
          wall.
Egan nods toward the prison wall.
                      WILLIE
          There are two five-foot ladders in
          the mess hall basement. If you can
          get some strong rope or wire, we can
          tie them together.
                      EGAN
          I'll find something. What about the
          tower guards?
                      WILLIE
          Between ten at night and six in the
          morning, they only keep half the
          number of guards up there. The
          northwest corner is unmanned.
          That's where we'll go over.
                                                             18

                      EGAN
          What about after we get over? Where
          do we go from there? How will we
          get away?
                      WILLIE
          Leave that to me. When the time
          comes, I'll make all the
          arrangements.
EXT. SING SING VISITORS ROOM -- DAY
There are tables and chairs set up where inmates sit and
chat with visitors. There is nothing separating an inmate
from his visitor.
A GUARD is seated at an elevated desk overseeing the room,
but not close enough to hear any conversations.

Louise sits across a table from Willie.   They lean toward
each other.
                      WILLIE
          They're going to transfer me up to
          Dannemora. I'll never survive
          thirty years up there. I'm going to
          need you to help me.
                      LOUISE
          What do you want me to do?
                      WILLIE
          I'm busting out of here on the
          twelfth with another fellow. Get
          word to Eddie Wilson so he can have
          a car waiting for us up the hill.
                       LOUISE
          All right.
Louise reaches over and holds Willie's hand.
                      WILLIE
          There's going to a lot of heat on
          you after I make the break.
                     LOUISE
          I know. I'm going to move up in the
          Bronx. Jeane will stay with my
          mother.
                                                               19

                      WILLIE
          That's good. They won't be able to
          associate her with me through you.
          You know that after I'm out, we may
          never be able to see each other
          again. It will be too dangerous.
          You're going to be watched.
                     LOUISE
          I know. But let's just get you out
          of here.
                      WILLIE
          Okay. Tell Eddie to rent a place
          for me under an alias. When he
          comes up with the car, have him
          bring two sets of clothes. Egan is
          about the same size as me. Except
          he's got big feet. About two sizes
          bigger than me.
                      LOUISE
          Okay.
                      WILLIE
          If everything goes as planned, we'll
          be coming over the wall about
          midnight.
              (pause)
          Will you be all right?
                      LOUISE
          Since Jeane will be living with my
          mother, I'll get a job. That's the
          best for everyone. I can never
          raise her alone.
                      WILLIE
          When Jeane is old enough, I want you
          to tell her about me. Tell her that
          I don't know when, but some day I
          will see her. That's a promise and
          one that I intend to keep.
INT. WILLIE'S CELL -- NIGHT
SUPER IN/OUT - "DECEMBER 12, 1932, SING SING PRISON"
Willie stuffs pillows and newspapers under his blanket,
giving the appearance that a body is underneath sleeping.
He goes to the lower left of the cell entrance and twists up
the sawed cell bar, slips through the opening, and twists
the bar back down in place.
                                                               20

EXT. SING SING PRISON WALL -- NIGHT

Willie and John Egan climb down a rope over the wall and run
up a hill.
EXT. STREET -- DAY
Willie is walking down the block and stops to look at the
City Exchange Bank across the street. He lights up a
cigarette and stares for a few moments. He shakes his head,
puffs his cigarette and continues walking.
After taking a few steps he stops and looks at the bank
again. He takes another puff on his cigarette, then smiles.
INT. EDDIE WILSON'S APARTMENT -- NIGHT
Willie is sitting at a table with EDDIE WILSON. A hand-drawn
diagram is on the table with notes, as Willie is showing it
to Eddie.
                      WILLIE
          The bank is on West 110th right off
          Broadway. There's a subway station
          on the corner. The only problem is
          they've got fourteen employees. Too
          many to handle for the two of us.
                      EDDIE
          I got a good third man for us. Joe
          Perlango. He knows how to handle
          himself.
Willie lights up a cigarette and takes a drag.
                      WILLIE
          Look Eddie. Up until now, I've only
          worked with people I know. I don't
          know this Perlango.
                      EDDIE
          Who else are you going to get?
          Remember, you're an escaped con.
          It's not like you can go out
          recruiting.
                      WILLIE
          You trust this Perlango?
                       EDDIE
          Yeah.   He'll do fine.
                                                                   21

EXT. STREET -- DAY

GEORGE SMITH, a black man, approaches the City Exchange
Bank, and is about to use his key to open the front door.
SUPER IN/OUT - "JULY 8, 1933, NEW YORK CITY"
SUDDENLY -
A man in a policeman's uniform walks up next to him.
When George looks up he sees Willie disguised as a policeman
with a gun pointed at him in a very discreet manner.
                         WILLIE
             You'd like to see your family again.
             Wouldn't you?
George, startled, nods his head.
                         WILLIE (CONT'D)
             Good. Then just open the door and
             let's go inside.
Eddie, carrying a briefcase, and JOE PERLANGO, a younger man
with a dark complexion and moustache, approach the bank as
George opens the door. Both men are wearing suits and
fedoras.
George walks in with Willie right behind him, as Eddie and
Joe follow.
                                                    DISSOLVE TO:
INT. BANK OFFICE -- DAY
Five MEN and six WOMEN are seated in chairs with their hands
and feet bound with picture wire. Joe watches over them with
his gun pointed out. Willie is standing by the office door
looking out.
One of the women, AGNES OWENS, starts CRYING.
                      AGNES
              (hysterically)
          Let me out of here.    Let me out of
          here.
                         JOE
             Keep her quiet or we'll lock all of
             you in the vault.
CATHERINE WALSH, who is seated right next to Agnes leans
over to her.
                                                              22

                      CATHERINE
          Agnes, it's going to be all right.
          They just want the bank's money and
          then they'll leave. Calm down and
          nobody will get hurt.
Agnes quiets down and sniffles.
                      JOE
          That's better.
Willie walks over to Catherine.   He smiles at her.
                      WILLIE
          Thank you Catherine.    You're a smart
          lady.
The clock on the wall shows 8:45 a.m.

George walks into the office followed by Eddie leading PAUL
MILLER, the bank manager, by the arm. Willie approaches
them and faces Miller.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Are you Mr. Miller?
                      MILLER
          Yes.
                      WILLIE
          What time do you open the vault?
                      MILLER
          About a quarter to nine.
                      WILLIE
          Good. Let's go open it.
Willie turns to the other employees.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Just sit hear quietly and nobody
          gets hurt. We are here for the
          bank's money and everything here is
          insured.
Willie takes Miller by the arm and starts to lead him out.
                      MILLER
          I can't open it by myself. I only
          have one half of the combination.
          August Melicher, the head teller,
          has the other half.
                                                              23

Willie turns around and faces the employees.

                      WILLIE
          Which one of you is Melicher?
AUGUST MELICHER seated on the other side of Agnes looks up.
                      MELICHER
          I am.
Willie looks at Eddie and nods.
Eddie walks over to Melicher, unties and escorts him,
following Willie and Miller out of the office.
Joe remains standing guard over the bound employees.
INT. POLICE HEADQUARTERS -- DAY

Feeney is seated at a desk reading a report, then he hands
the sheet to a DETECTIVE sitting in front of the desk.
                      FEENEY
          Look at this one, the robber was
          dressed in a postman's uniform.
The detective looks over the report.
                      FEENEY (CONT'D)
          Last month there was one dressed up
          as a window washer. Then the one in
          the postman's uniform.
Feeney slams his fist on the desk.
                      FEENEY (CONT'D)
          Willie Sutton. I had that punk sent
          up for thirty years. So he thinks
          he can just break out of prison and
          start robbing banks in my city
          again. Well, I'm going to find him
          and when I do, he'll never pull
          another job again.
              (pause)
          I can just see him enjoying that
          money right now.
INT. NIGHTCLUB -- NIGHT
A BAND is playing SWING MUSIC and COUPLES are dancing up a
storm.
Willie is seated at a table with a twenty-year-old IRENE
SADVARY. Both are smoking cigarettes.
                                                             24

                      IRENE
          I really came to New York to be a
          singer.
                      WILLIE
          Where do you come from?
                      IRENE
          Braddock, Pennsylvania.    It's near
          Pittsburgh.
Eddie and his girlfriend, NINA MIRANDA, approach the table
and sit down.
                      WILLIE
          Irene, say hello to my good friend,
          Eddie and his girl, Nina.
                        IRENE
          Hello.
                      EDDIE
          Hello yourself, Irene.
                      NINA
          You new in town, kid?
Irene nods.    Willie takes her by the hand and stands up.
                       WILLIE
              (to Irene)
          Let's dance.
EXT. STREET -- DAY
Louise is walking down the street as a police car pulls up
at the corner she is about to approach.
Captain Feeney steps out and walks in front of Louise.
Louise stops and has a frightened look on her face
                      FEENEY
          Do you remember me?
Louise nods.
                      LOUISE
          Yes. You're Captain Feeney.     How
          can I forget you?
Feeney leans over closer to Louise.
                                                              25

                      FEENEY
          Don't worry. I make sure people
          don't forget me. So why don't you
          be a good girl and tell me where
          that no-good husband of yours is
          hiding out?
                      LOUISE
          If you're talking about Willie
          Sutton, he is no longer my husband,
          and I don't know where he is.
                      FEENEY
          All right girlie. But if you do
          happen to talk to him, tell him he's
          going to slip up. When he does,
          I've got a bullet waiting for him.
Feeney cracks a sinister smile and taps his hand on his
side-holstered gun.
INT. EDDIE WILSON'S APARTMENT -- NIGHT
Willie is sitting at a table with Eddie.   Both are smoking
cigarettes.
                      WILLIE
          It's getting too risky. The police
          are circulating bulletins about our
          routine. The banks are wise to it.
                      EDDIE
          How about a jewelry store?
                      WILLIE
          We're too hot. Nobody would want to
          fence the goods for us.
                      EDDIE
          So what do we do?
                      WILLIE
          First I'm going to take Irene to
          visit her family. Then we'll head
          back this way, but stop in Philly.
          We'll stay there while I case a few
          banks.
                      EDDIE
          You're going to move to
          Philadelphia?
                                                              26

                      WILLIE
          I'll take a look around and see if
          we can do anything down there. If I
          think it's worth it, I'll call you
          down.
                      EDDIE
          What do I tell Joe in the meantime?
                      WILLIE
          Don't tell him anything. The fewer
          people that know where I am, the
          better. That's goes for Nina too.
                      EDDIE
          What do I tell them if they ask?
                      WILLIE
          Tell them Irene and I ran off to get
          married and we're on a long
          honeymoon.
INT. NIGHTCLUB -- NIGHT
Willie and Irene are sitting in a booth at a Philadelphia
night club. A BAND is playing, some PATRONS are dancing, as
others are socializing at booths and tables.
                      WILLIE
          I figure we stay here six months. A
          year, tops. I cased a few jobs but
          I can't pull them too close
          together. Now that I've got Eddie
          and Joe down here, we can get to
          work. Once we have enough dough
          we'll blow this town and move to
          Braddock.
                      IRENE
          Do you trust Eddie?
                      WILLIE
          I've known Eddie all my life. He's
          all right in my book. A stand-up
          guy.
                      IRENE
          That girl of his, Nina is nothing
          but trouble. Running all around,
          acting like she's some high-society
          broad. What about Joe?
                                                   27

                      WILLIE
          Perlango? He's handled himself well
          with us so far. Besides, Eddie
          really trusts him.
                      IRENE
          He worries you. Don't he?
                      WILLIE
              (smiling)
          You're a sharp kid. Yeah, he worries
          me. I didn't like it that Eddie
          brought him over. I didn't want him
          to know where we live. But we need
          him and it's not like I have any
          other choices.
                      IRENE
          Yes you do. You can pull off
          smaller jobs that just you and Eddie
          can do.
Willie shakes his head.
                      WILLIE
          The smaller jobs have the same risk
          but a smaller take. We'd also have
          to stay in Philly much longer to
          make the kind of dough we need.
                      IRENE
          I never asked you this before.     But
          why do you do it?
Willie takes a long drag of his cigarette.
                      WILLIE
          You know how you described that
          feeling you have when you sang and
          after the song was over, how
          everyone applauded?
                      IRENE
          Yeah. It felt like I was alive.
          Really alive.
                      WILLIE
          When I'm in a bank, and that vault
          opens, it's a feeling I just can't
          describe. I feel most alive when
          I'm robbing a bank.
                                                               28

                           IRENE
             Is that it?    That's why you rob
             banks?
Willie reaches over, grabs Irene's hand and looks deeply
into her eyes.
                         WILLIE
             Sweetheart, I rob banks, because
             that's where the money is.
EXT. BUILDING ROOF -- NIGHT
Willie, Eddie and Joe are on the roof of the Corn Exchange
Bank and Trust Company building at the corner of 60th and
Ludlow in Philadelphia. They are wearing overcoats, fedoras
and each carrying black bags.
INT. BANK -- DAY
CHRISTIAN MADSEN, wearing a bank guard uniform enters
through the glass door at the entrance.
SUDDENLY -
Eddie emerges from the shadows alongside the door, sticks
his gun in Madsen's ribs and takes Madsen's gun from his
side holster.
                         EDDIE
             Lock the door behind you.
Madsen locks the door.
                         EDDIE (CONT'D)
             Now turn around and walk toward the
             staircase.
Madsen walks toward a staircase leading downstairs. Willie
and Joe are both crouching a few steps down from the head of
the stairs, each holding a machine gun.
                         WILLIE
             I'm going to ask you some questions
             and you better give me the right
             answers.
                           MADSEN
             All right.
                         WILLIE
             What time do they open the vault?
                                                             29

                      MADSEN
          Eight-thirty or a little after that.

                      WILLIE
          Who opens it?
                         MADSEN
          The manager.     Mr. Munshower.
                      EDDIE
              (chuckling)
          Munchausen? Like Baron Munchausen?
                      MADSEN
          No. Munshower. Clarence Munshower.
                      WILLIE
          He opens it by himself or does
          anyone else have to help him?
                         MADSEN
          By himself.     Always by himself.
                        WILLIE
          All right.    You stand by the door
          and let the   employees in as they
          arrive. If    you do as we tell you,
          nobody gets   hurt.
Eddie nudges Madsen with his pistol and motions him back
toward the door, then returns to the shadows out of sight.
                      EDDIE
          Just do like we say and tell me when
          Munchausen or whatever his name is
          gets here.
LATER -
Madsen is standing by the door as CLARENCE MUNSHOWER
approaches.
Madsen looks over to the shadows where Eddie is barely
visible.
                      MADSEN
              (whispers)
          Here he is.
Madsen opens the door as Munshower enters.
                      MUNSHOWER
          Good morning, Christian.
                                                               30

Madsen motions with his head toward Eddie, who emerges.

                      EDDIE
          Well good morning, Baron. Come on
          in. You've kept us waiting long
          enough.
                      MUNSHOWER
              (to Madsen)
          Clarence. Where is everyone?
                      EDDIE
          Don't ask him. Everyone is
          downstairs by the vault. Now you
          are going to walk to the stairs, and
          my partner will take you from there.
Munshower motions with his head toward Clarence.

                      MUNSHOWER
          What's going to happen to him?
                      EDDIE
          Clarence? He's going to stay up
          here and keep me company, while you
          go down and open the vault for us.
Eddie motions with his pistol toward the stairs.
                      EDDIE (CONT'D)
          Now get going.
Munshower walks toward the stairs where a crouching Willie
is waiting for him, pointing his machine gun.
LATER -
INT. BANK BASEMENT -- DAY
Nine bank EMPLOYEES are seated on the floor, each handcuffed
to the bars of the gate entrance to the vault. Joe is
standing over the employees, while Willie is standing next
to Munshower in front of the vault.
Joe pulls out his pocket watch, looks at it and puts it back
in his vest pocket.
                      JOE
          It's eight-thirty.
Willie nudges Munshower with the nose of his gun pushing him
closer to the vault.
                                                               31

                      WILLIE
              (to Munshower)
          All right. We've been here long
          enough. Get busy and open the time-
          lock.
Munshower works the combination lock dial and opens the
vault.
EXT. FRONT DOOR OF BANK -- DAY
Willie, Eddie, and Joe leave the bank each carrying shopping
bags.
INT. POLICE HEADQUARTERS -- DAY
Feeney is seated at a desk when a DETECTIVE enters his
office, holding a sheet of paper.

                      DETECTIVE
          We finally located Edward Wilson.
          Looks like he recently came into
          some dough. He just bought his
          girlfriend, Nina Miranda, a new mink
          coat.
                       FEENEY
          What else?   What about Sutton?
                      DETECTIVE
          No sight of Sutton. But Wilson has
          been seen in the company of Joseph
          Perlango. He lives on Chrystie
          Street. Flashy dresser and just
          bought a new car. Sticks out like a
          sore thumb in that part of town.
                      FEENEY
          But no Sutton?
                      DETECTIVE
          No Sutton. But we may have a break.
          The manager and some tellers from
          the bank on 110th looked at the
          photos of Wilson and Perlango. They
          think they're two of the three men
          that held them up last July.
                      FEENEY
          Pick up Wilson and Perlango. One of
          them will tell me where Sutton is.
                                                               32

EXT. NEW YORK CITY STREET -- NIGHT

Several POLICEMEN with guns drawn approach a vehicle with
Eddie behind the wheel, Nina in the passenger seat, and Joe
in the rear.
SUPER IN/OUT - "FEBRUARY 4, 1934, BRONX, NEW YORK"
Eddie pulls a gun, and a policeman fires two SHOTS, one
hitting Eddie in the face.
Nina starts SCREAMING and flees from the car, as a policeman
grabs her and holds her aside.
Joe holds his hands up in the rear seat.
                      JOE
              (yelling)
          Don't shoot. Don't shoot.
MOMENTS LATER -
A police car pulls up and SCREECHES to a halt.
Feeney steps out and walks up to Eddie's car, as the other
policemen still have their guns drawn.
Feeney walks over to a stretcher, where Eddie is laying,
bleeding from his face, but alive.
Feeney turns and faces Nina and looks at her very closely up
and down.
                      NINA
              (annoyed)
          Why the hell are you looking at me
          like that?
                      FEENEY
          I just want to make sure you're not
          Willie Sutton dressed up in woman's
          clothes.
Feeney then walks over to Joe, who is facing the car with
his legs spread and hands on the hood. A policeman is
pointing a gun at him.
                       FEENEY (CONT'D)
               (to a policeman)
          Only the three of them were in the
          car?
                                                                  33

                        POLICEMAN
            Yes sir. The driver pulled a gun
            and I fired two shots.
                         FEENEY
                 (to Joe)
            All right punk. Turn around real
            slow and let's take a look at your
            mug.
Joe turns around.
                        FEENEY (CONT'D)
                (smiling)
            Well what have we got here?   You're
            an Eye-talian, ain't you?
Joe nods.

Feeney walks right up to Joe's face, puts his hand under
Joe's chin and raises his head so they are looking eye to
eye.
                          FEENEY (CONT'D)
            Well   you fucking guinea, I've got
            some   news for you. We're going to
            take   you down to headquarters and
            then   you're going to sing to me.
                                                   DISSOLVE TO:
INT. WILLIE'S PHILADELPHIA APARTMENT -- DAY
Willie is packing a bag, as Irene is standing alongside
watching.
                        WILLIE
            Word is out that Eddie, Nina and Joe
            got caught in the Bronx. I don't
            know how.
                        IRENE
            So why do we have to leave? They're
            in New York and you're here in
            Philly.
                        WILLIE
            I know Eddie. He'll never talk. But
            I can't take a chance with Joe. He
            knows where we live.
                        IRENE
            Where will we go? Braddock?
                                                             34

                         WILLIE
             Yeah. We'll go there and figure out
             what to do next. That's the last
             place anyone will look for us.
                         IRENE
             Are we going to be all right?
                         WILLIE
             If we pack and leave right now we
             will be.
SUDDENLY -
The apartment door BURSTS open and two Philadelphia
POLICEMEN rush in with guns drawn. They are followed in by
DETECTIVE CAPTAIN CREEDON, an older man, with wire-rim
glasses, a suit, fedora, with a handkerchief in his breast
pocket.
                         CREEDON
             William Sutton, you are under
             arrest.
                          WILLIE
             You're making a mistake. My name is
             Richard Courtney. Ask anyone. Ask
             my landlord.
Then he turns and reaches into the open trunk behind him.
Feeney walks through the door and smiles.
                         FEENEY
             Why don't you tell Captain Creedon
             here to ask me?
Willie freezes and his face shows fear.
Feeney pulls his revolver and points it at Willie.
Irene jumps in front of Willie, shielding him from a
potential bullet.
                      IRENE
              (screaming)
          No! If you shoot, shoot me, too!
Willie turns back around empty-handed.
Irene turns and embraces Willie.
A policeman takes Irene, as Feeney walks right up to
Willie's face.
                                                               35

                       FEENEY
           Your pal Wilson got shot in the
           face. He'll be blind for the rest
           of his life. I only wish you would
           have been in that car with him.
                       WILLIE
               (sarcastically)
           Sorry I disappointed you.
                       FEENEY
           You're lucky that Philadelphia wants
           you, because if I got to take you
           back to New York, there wouldn't be
           any trial.
INT.   COURT ROOM -- DAY
Willie stands with his LAWYER, who is seated at a
rectangular table in the front of the courtroom facing the
raised stand where JUDGE HARRY S. MCDEVITT is seated. A
name plate reading "Judge Harry S. McDevitt" is in front of
the judge.
Across the aisle from Willie, the PROSECUTOR sits behind a
rectangular table. SPECTATORS are seated in the courtroom.
Among them is Feeney.
Judge McDevitt stares hard at Willie.
                       JUDGE MCDEVITT
               (harshly)
           I have been criticized by spineless
           men and weak-minded women for
           imposing maximum sentences on
           individuals like you. I think it is
           the only deterrent that crime has.
           My answer to that criticism is to
           give you everything that the law
           allows.
The smiling prosecutor looks across the aisle at Willie, who
does not return the look.
                       JUDGE MCDEVITT (CONT'D)
           On the February 1933 robbery, you
           will serve not less than ten nor
           more than twenty years in Eastern
           State Penitentiary.
Willie hangs his head.
                                                               36

                      JUDGE MCDEVITT (CONT'D)
          At the conclusion of that, on the
          robbery of January 15, 1934, you
          will start another sentence of not
          less than ten and not more than
          twenty years in solitary confinement
          and hard labor.
There is WHISPERING amongst the spectators.
Judge McDevitt bangs his gavel and the crowd silences.
                      JUDGE MCDEVITT (CONT'D)
          At the expiration of that, there is
          a special sentence in Pennsylvania
          for carrying a machine gun that
          carries a ten-year sentence. After
          you have served twenty to forty
          years on the robberies, then you
          will start to serve not less than
          five nor more than ten years on the
          machine gun count.
Willie's lawyer looks up at him.
                      LAWYER
              (softly to Willie)
          You could get out in twenty-five
          years. Maybe less.
Judge McDevitt bangs his gavel, as Willie and his lawyer
jerk their heads and face him.
                      JUDGE MCDEVITT
          In the meantime I propose to have
          you indicted as a fourth offender
          and after your indictment, trial,
          and sentence, you will serve the
          rest of your natural life in the
          Eastern State Penitentiary.
          Commence today.
Judge McDevitt bangs his gavel.
Feeney rushes out of his seat and approaches the wooden gate
separating the spectators from the front of the courtroom.
He leans over toward Willie.
                      FEENEY
          You're going to rot for the rest of
          your life in Philly, but remember
          this. It's still better than what
          you would have got if you came back
          to New York with me.
                                                               37

Willie doesn't even turn around, but just stares straight
ahead.

                                                DISSOLVE TO:
EXT. EASTERN STATE PENITENTIARY -- DAY
The prison stands sturdy with its solid concrete walls and
big, iron, front gate.
INT. WARDEN'S OFFICE -- DAY
WARDEN HERBERT SMITH, a heavy set, gray-haired man sits at
his desk, smoking a cigar. Willie, wearing his prison
uniform, is standing in front of the desk with a uniformed
prison GUARD behind him.
                      WARDEN SMITH
          Eastern State Penitentiary has been
          around since the early eighteen
          hundreds. You're going to be with
          us for a long time.
Willie looks around the room.
                      WARDEN SMITH (CONT'D)
          I know what you're thinking Sutton.
          As long as I've been the Warden
          here, no one has ever escaped. The
          floors are five feet of solid
          concrete. The outside wall goes
          fourteen feet into the ground and
          the guard towers are manned with
          some of the best marksmen in the
          Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
                      WILLIE
          I'm not going to try anything,
          Warden.
                      WARDEN SMITH
          Well I'm not going to take any
          chances with you. I'm putting you
          in isolation for eighteen months.
          After that, you'll go to cell block
          seven, but you will not be permitted
          in any workshops. I don't want you
          around any tools you might try to
          use to break out of here.
                                                              38

                                               DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. PRISON YARD -- DAY
The prison yard is filled with INMATES. Willie is walking
with TOMMY KLING, a man about Willie's age. Both are
smoking cigarettes.
                      TOMMY
          You heard about Dutch Schultz?
                      WILLIE
          Yeah. A couple of gunmen got him in
          a Newark restaurant.
                      TOMMY
          That Dutchman sure was one tough
          cookie.

                      WILLIE
          He sure was. Never would've thought
          he could get caught off guard like
          that. He had a lot of enemies, but
          he was always good to me. He's made
          sure my family's been taken care of
          since I've been away.
                      TOMMY
          I get out in two weeks. I've got
          something for you.
                      WILLIE
          What have you got Tommy?
                      TOMMY
          I made a desk in the wood shop. When
          I leave, I'll tell the guards I'm
          giving it to you.
                      WILLIE
          Thanks. A desk will make it easier
          when I write letters.
Tommy leans closer to Willie.
                      TOMMY
          Willie, this ain't no ordinary desk.
          Like I said, I made it myself.
Willie smirks and straightens up.
                                                     39

                      TOMMY (CONT'D)
          When I put it together, I built a
          hidden compartment where you could
          stash a few things. A few years
          into my sentence, when I was trying
          to figure a way to bust out, I hid
          tools in there.
                      WILLIE
          The tools still there?
                      TOMMY
          No. After I found out I was up for
          early parole, I got rid of them.
          Didn't want to take a chance. But I
          have something better in there.
Tommy looks around then leans back over to Willie.

                      TOMMY (CONT'D)
          A map of the basement that leads to
          where you can get to the main sewer
          line. That's one way out of here.
                      WILLIE
          How'd you get into the basement.
                      TOMMY
          They had me working down there for
          three months. There's a loose
          concrete slab that you have to pull
          up. It's on the map, but you'll
          need at least one other to help.
                      WILLIE
          You know me. I can't trust too many
          people here. Do you know how many
          stoolies have come up to me saying
          they know a way out? The warden
          sends them as spies.
                      TOMMY
          There's two fellows here you can
          count on. Freddy Tenuto and
          Clarence Klinedinst. You know,
          Kliney.
                      WILLIE
          Yeah. I know them. Kliney, he's
          got the cell at the end of the
          block. Works in the plaster shop.
          Tenuto's connected with the Philly
          mob.
                                                              40

                      TOMMY
          Right. When I was planning a break,
          they were going to come in on it.
          They never said a word to anyone.
                      WILLIE
          What about going over the wall?
                      TOMMY
          How are going get out of your cell
          at night?
Willie just looks at Tommy and smiles.
                       WILLIE
          I'll look you up when I get out of
          here, Tommy.
                                               DISSOLVE TO:
INT. WILLIE'S CELL -- NIGHT
It appears that Willie is sleeping on his cot in the cell.
But he is standing on his desk, reaching up to the ceiling
window, and twisting one of the bars downward. There is a
life-like mask with hair and flesh paint on the pillow with
the blankets fluffed up.
As Willie slips through the opening in the window, we hear
sirens BLASTING.
Willie slips back down quickly, bends the bar back in place
and jumps to the floor.
He grabs the mask from the pillow, puts it back in the
hidden compartment of the desk, then leaps back in bed.
Loud FOOTSTEPS are heard as two GUARDS approach Willie's
cell and shine a flashlight on him.
                      GUARD
              (shouting down the
               cell block)
          He's here.
                      WILLIE
          What's going on?
                      GUARD
          A couple of morons tried to go over
          the wall. We thought you might have
          been with them.
                                                                  41

                      WILLIE
          Haven't you learned by now? I'm not
          going to try to get out of this
          place.
The guards look at each other, then walk off.
INSERT - DAILY NEWS NEWSPAPER, OCTOBER 6, 1941
Headline reads "Yanks Win, 7-4, Owen's Error in 9th Loses
Game."
                                                   DISSOLVE TO:
INT. WARDEN'S OFFICE -- DAY
Warden Smith is sitting behind his desk, smoking a cigar.
Alongside of Smith stands DR. PHILLIP ROCHE, prison
psychiatrist. Willie is standing in front of the desk
facing them both.
                      WARDEN SMITH
          Willie, I've allowed you to take
          some of those correspondence
          courses. How is your typing?
                      WILLIE
          I'm able to type well.
Warden Smith nods in the direction of Dr. Roche.
                      WARDEN SMITH
          This here is Dr. Roche, the prison
          psychiatrist. He needs someone who
          can type for him two days a week.
                      DR. ROCHE
          Willie, from your records, you
          impress me as someone who can be
          trusted with confidential records.
          Such a person is not easy to find in
          a prison.
                       WILLIE
          All right.
                      DR. ROCHE
          Wonderful. I'll arrange for you to
          be brought to my office tomorrow and
          we can get started.
                                                             42

                      WARDEN SMITH
          In case you're wondering, a guard is
          always stationed right outside the
          doctor's office.
Willie smiles.
INT. WILLIE'S CELL -- DAY
Willie is reading "Rebel Without a Cause." There are other
books on his desk by Freud, Jung, and Menninger.
FREDDY TENUTO, a dark-complexioned, dark-haired, short,
muscular man in his late twenties enters Willie's cell.
Willie looks up.
                      WILLIE
          What do you say Freddy?
                      FREDDY
          There's something you've got to see.
                        WILLIE
          Right now?
                        FREDDY
          Yeah.    You're going to really like
          this.
MOMENTS LATER -
INT. KLINEY'S CELL -- DAY
Kliney is sitting on his cot as Willie and Freddy, both
smoking cigarettes, enter the cell and sit on the cot.
                      FREDDY
              (to Willie)
          Kliney's got something to show you.
                      WILLIE
          What have you got Kliney?
Kliney points to the wall.
                      KLINEY
          That wall is a hundred feet to the
          outside of the south wall. A
          hundred feet leaves you just close
          enough to the wall, so if a guard is
          looking out, he won't see you.
Willie takes a drag of his cigarette.
                                                              43

                      WILLIE
          You thinking about a tunnel?

Willie points to the floor.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          This floor is five solid feet of
          concrete. How are you going to get
          through there?
Kliney stands up, walks over to the wall, and points to the
framed two by two feet air vent in a discreet location of
the cell.
                      KLINEY
          Who said anything about going
          through the floor?
Kliney drops his cigarette on the floor and steps on it as
he motions Willie over.
                      KLINEY (CONT'D)
          Freddy, keep a watch out.
Freddy walks to the cell entrance and stands guard.
Kliney removes the framed vent from the wall, exposing a
large hole.
                      WILLIE
          When have you been doing this?
                      KLINEY
          After lights out. But it's more
          than a one-man job.
Willie pokes his head in the hole, then back out.
                      WILLIE
          The wall to the outside is fourteen
          feet deep into the surface. I would
          play it safe and go thirty feet down
          before digging across.
Kliney places the framed vent back in place, covering the
hole. Freddy comes over and they all sit back on the cot.
                      KLINEY
          That's what I was thinking. I'm
          about fifteen feet down now.
                                                               44

                      FREDDY
          We can do the digging during yard
          time. We need at least three
          others.
                      KLINEY
          One man can fit the hole going down.
          I'll continue at night and when I
          start going across, I'll cut it so
          two can work side by side.
                      WILLIE
          How long do you think it will take?
                      KLINEY
          We should be ready to start going
          across in about two months.
                      WILLIE
          How have you been getting rid of the
          dirt?
                      KLINEY
          That's been the problem. Up until
          now I flush some down the toilet and
          dump some from my pockets in the
          yard when nobody is looking. But
          it's getting to be too much.
Willie points to the toilet, which is a few feet to the left
of the air vent.
                      WILLIE
          All the toilets are in this line
          through the cell block. There's a
          sewer line right underneath.
Kliney smiles and nods.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          When we start digging across, we can
          go a little wider to the left.
          We'll hit some bricks. If we can
          remove one or two of them, we'll hit
          the sewer line and can dispose of
          the dirt there.
                      FREDDY
          What about going out through the
          sewer line? That would be much
          easier?
                                       45

            WILLIE
It's not the main sewer line. Too
narrow for a man to fit through.
            FREDDY
    (to Kliney)
What about the guards?
            KLINEY
They don't come by here that much.
Nobody bothers me. I figure we'll
need six of us. Two dig while the
other four stand around smoking and
talking. We take turns digging.
            FREDDY
We just have to be careful nobody
sees any of us going in or out of
the hole.
            KLINEY
Right. We move people in and out
fast and keep the vent cover on when
digging.
            WILLIE
Two months for you to set it up for
us to start going across. I figure
we should reach the wall about six
months after that.
            FREDDY
I got the three men. Van Sant,
Aikens and Waldron. They know how to
keep their mouths shut.
            WILLIE
All right. There's usually a lot of
people going in and out of that door
during yard time. So we'll start
spending that time visiting with
you, Kliney. This way, by the time
we're ready to start digging during
the day, it will seem natural that
we're congregating over here.
            FREDDY
So we dig the tunnel. When do we
make the break. Can't get out of
our cells at night.
                                                           46

                      WILLIE
          When we're ready, we go out as
          everyone is walking from the blocks
          to breakfast.
INT. DR. ROCHE'S OFFICE -- DAY
Willie walks up to Dr. Roche's desk and hands him a few
sheets of typewritten paper.
                      WILLIE
          All done, Doc.
                      DR. ROCHE
          Willie, sit down for a few minutes.
Willie sits in the chair across the desk from Dr. Roche.
                      DR. ROCHE (CONT'D)
          Willie, you've witnessed quite a bit
          working in this office. Seeing how
          imprisonment affects the human mind.
                       WILLIE
          Doc, I've seen a lot of stir-crazy
          cons. But you always know how to
          handle them.
                      DR. ROCHE
          Understanding the criminal mind is
          not an easy task.
                      WILLIE
          You understand it well enough. I've
          seen men brought in here like mad
          animals, and after talking to you,
          they walk out of here with a look of
          hope in their eyes.
                      DR. ROCHE
          Man was not put on this earth to be
          locked up like an animal. It's an
          important part of my work to remind
          a patient that even though he's an
          inmate, he's still a man.
                      WILLIE
          You've got a lot of guts, Doc. They
          bring some of the scariest
          characters in, and the first thing
          you do is tell the guards to take
          off the manacles.
                                       47

            DR. ROCHE
The patient-doctor relationship is
much different than the inmate-guard
relationship. I make it an
immediate point to let the patient
know that I'm here to help.
            WILLIE
Reminds me of how I'd pull a heist
dressed up as a harmless messenger
to get me in the door.
            DR. ROCHE
I understand where you're drawing a
similarity, but different
intentions. Have you been reading
the books I gave you?
            WILLIE
Sure. Psychiatry is a very
interesting topic. I'm learning a
lot about it.
            DR. ROCHE
Splendid. How are the
correspondence courses you've been
taking?
            WILLIE
I just finished the Spanish course.
            DR. ROCHE
I'm very impressed with you Willie.
The way you continue to educate
yourself while you're in here.
            WILLIE
You know the saying amongst inmates
"Don't serve time. Let time serve
you." That's all I'm doing.
    (pause)
Can I ask you a question, Doc?
             DR. ROCHE
Certainly.
            WILLIE
I've been working for you here for
two years. You must've formed an
opinion about me. If I ever get out
of here, do you think I'll be able
to lead an honest life?
                                                               48

                      DR. ROCHE
          What do you have to look forward to
          if you get out of here?
                      WILLIE
          Gee Doc, both my ex-wives got
          remarried. I haven't seen my
          daughter in years. That's a tough
          question to answer.
                      DR. ROCHE
          I think you know the answer. What
          excites you, Willie? What really
          gives you a thrill.
                      WILLIE
          Robbing a bank. I still feel the
          thrills I felt when I think about
          the heists I've pulled.
              (pause)
          But do you think I'll change?
                      DR. ROCHE
          You just answered the question
          yourself.
                      WILLIE
          Yeah. I guess you're right, Doc.
          But with the time I've got left to
          serve, I'll be too old to pull a
          bank job when I get out.
                      DR. ROCHE
          Did you figure out how to escape
          from here yet?
                      WILLIE
          Doc, you know I'm never busting out
          of here. This place is escape-
          proof.
                                                DISSOLVE TO:
EXT. EASTERN STATE PENITENTIARY -- DAY
Freddy emerges from a hole in the grass close to the prison
wall, swiftly moves along the wall and turns the corner.
SUPER IN/OUT - "APRIL 3, 1945, PHILADELHIA"
Kliney comes up through the hole and heads in the same
direction.
Willie comes through and walks in the opposite direction.
                                                                49

He crosses the street, turns a corner, where he is face to
face with two policemen.

Sirens BLAST.
                                                 DISSOLVE TO:
INT. SUPERINTENDENT BALDI'S OFFICE -- DAY
Willie, Freddy, Kliney, SPENCE WALDRON, and DAVE AIKENS are
standing in front of DR. BALDI, who is seated behind his
desk. On the desk is a name plate reading "Dr. Frederick S.
Baldi Superintendent of County Prisons." Standing alongside
of the desk is WARDEN ROBERT BEVERIDGE. Two guards are also
in the room.
INSERT -   DAILY NEWS NEWSPAPER, MAY 8, 1945
Headline reads "It's Over in Europe!   Proclamation Due at 9
A.M."
RETURN TO SCENE
                       DR. BALDI
           The five of you have been
           transferred to Holmesburg because
           you tried to escape from Eastern
           State and if you were to stay, there
           is no doubt you'd try again.
Dr. Baldi nods in the direction of Warden Beveridge.
                       DR. BALDI (CONT'D)
           Warden Beveridge here and I will see
           to it that you serve every day of
           your sentences.
Dr. Baldi stands up, walks around the desk and stands in
from of Willie.
                       DR. BALDI (CONT'D)
           Sutton, we know all about you. I
           didn't want you inside my walls.
           But you've been sent here, so now I
           have to deal with you. You will be
           watched, and if you try anything,
           the guards will shoot you. If you
           are seen anywhere near the wall,
           you'll be shot.
Dr. Baldi walks back behind his desk and sits back down.
                                                            50

                      DR. BALDI (CONT'D)
          You see, Holmesburg is a maximum
          security prison. Nobody has ever
          escaped since it was built in 1894.
              (pause)
          Nobody has every escaped from here
          and nobody ever will.
EXT. PRISON YARD -- DAY
It's cold as all the inmates are wearing heavy coats and
wool hats. Spence, Dave, Kliney, and Freddy are huddled
together as Willie walks up to them.
                      WILLIE
          I figured a way to get out of here.
The four men perk up and stare at Willie.

                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          All we need is a pistol and some
          hacksaw blades.
                      DAVE
          We've been in this joint eighteen
          months. You see how close they
          watch us. How are we going to get
          our hands on a pistol?
                      WILLIE
          Spence, how often does your gal come
          to visit?
                        SPENCE
          Every week.
                      WILLIE
          Do you trust her?
                      SPENCE
          She's all right.
                      WILLIE
          If you ask her to get a pistol and
          five hacksaw blades and leave them
          hidden in a spot nearby the prison,
          will she do it?
                      SPENCE
          Yeah. She'll do it.    She'll do
          anything for me.
Willie turns around for a moment, then turns back to face
the group again.
                                                               51

                      FREDDY
          So what? She hides a pistol and
          some blades somewhere outside of
          here. How the fuck do we get our
          hands on them? How do we get them
          in here?
Willie motions with his eyes toward inmate JACK LANG walking
not far behind Willie carrying a PAINT CAN and other
supplies. He is heading in the direction of the front gate
of the prison.
                      FREDDY (CONT'D)
          Have you lost your mind? You want
          to trust that rat bastard, Lang. He
          fingered his whole crew when he got
          picked up.
                      KLINEY
          He got off on a light sentence, and
          now he's a trustee who can go work
          outside the walls. Everyone in the
          joint knows he's a rat.
                      WILLIE
          Listen up. He's the only con in
          this joint that goes outside. Right
          now he's painting the warden's
          house. Sure, nobody in here likes
          him. So, I became his friend. He
          needs a friend, and he'll help me.
                      FREDDY
          You don't think he'll set us up?
                      WILLIE
          Listen, I've been studying people.
          Think about it. Everyone thinks
          he's a rat and he's probably
          desperate to prove otherwise. He
          hasn't ratted on anyone in here and
          he won't rat on us. He knows he's a
          dead man if he does.   I think he'll
          help us.
INT. CELL BLOCK -- NIGHT
Freddy slips through an opening in his cell and bends the
bar back up in place. He is wearing a heavy coat, and a
wool cap. He walks briskly down the corridor toward a heavy
metal door.
                                                               52

SUPER IN/OUT - "FEBRUARY 10, 1947, PHILADELHIA"

Spence is hidden on one side of the door holding up a gun.
Freddy takes his place hiding on the other side of the door,
holding a homemade knife. He nods to Spence.
The door lock opens to the SOUND of the bolt dropping. The
door OPENS as SERGEANT WILLIAM SKELTON, a man in his
forties, wearing wire-frame glasses, proceeds to walk out.
SUDDENLY -
Freddy jumps out and slashes Skelton's hand.
Spence quickly emerges and puts the gun to Skelton's head.
Freddy reaches over, takes Skelton's keys, and then rushes
off, as Spence pushes Skelton back in the door.
EXT. PRISON YARD -- NIGHT
Heavy snow is falling as Spence walks through the yard
toward the prison wall with his gun pointed at two uniformed
guards in front him. The guards have their heads hung down.
Freddy and Dave are right behind carrying a ladder and rope.
They all approach the wall and set up the ladder.
SUDDENLY -
A searchlight SHINES on the men.
Spence stands behind both guards, with his gun pointed at
them. The guards still have their heads hung down.
                      SPENCE
              (shouting up)
          We got Skelton and Burns. Shut the
          light and keep it shut or they both
          get a bullet in the head.
A few seconds elapse and Spence moves the gun directly to
one guard's head.
                         SPENCE (CONT'D)
             I ain't going to say it again.   Off
             with the light.
The light goes off.
EXT. MILK TRUCK -- NIGHT
Snow continues to fall as a milk truck with a sign reading
"Engle's Dairies" is parked on a street.
                                                               53

INT. MILK TRUCK -- NIGHT

WILLIAM HERRON, wearing a milkman uniform is crouched over
toward the back of the truck as he arranges the milk crates.
The back door of the truck opens as Spence jumps in and
points his gun at Herron.
                      SPENCE
          Behave and you won't get hurt.
A guard enters next and looks up, revealing that it is
Willie dressed in a guard's uniform.
The second guard enters, revealing the face of Kliney.
Willie gets behind the wheel of the truck as Freddy and Dave
pile in, closing the back door.

Freddy takes a bottle of milk and starts to drink it.
                      WILLIE
              (looking back)
          Hey. If you're going to drink the
          man's milk, pay him for it.
                      FREDDY
              (laughs)
          Are you kidding me?
                      WILLIE
          Robbing a bank is one thing. This
          man has a family to feed. Pay him
          for the milk.
Freddy reaches into his pocket, pulls out a dollar bill and
hands it to Herron.
                      FREDDY
          Here you go mister.
INT. SUPERINTENDENT BALDI'S OFFICE -- DAY
Kliney, Spence, and Dave are in Dr. Baldi's office with
Warden Beveridge, Sergeant Skelton, his hand wrapped in a
bandage, and three other GUARDS.
                       DR. BALDI
              (to Kliney, Spence,
               and Dave)
          I'm not going to waste my time
          asking you where the other two are.
          But you three will be dealt with
          accordingly.
                                                             54

Dr. Baldi nods in the direction of the three guards.

                      DR. BALDI (CONT'D)
          Get them out of here.
The three guards escort the three captured convicts out of
the office.
                      WARDEN BEVERIDGE
          The milk truck driver, William
          Herron, was checked out. He's
          clean.
                      SKELTON
          We were two guards short, because an
          inmate, George Perry had to be taken
          to the hospital.
                      WARDEN BEVERIDGE
          That's right. Dr. Morrison reported
          this to me and I authorized Perry
          taken to the hospital. As you know
          it's procedure for two officers to
          go along.
                      DR. BALDI
          It just seems too much of a
          coincidence that this escape was
          made when we were two guards short.
          As if it was part of the plan.
                      SKELTON
          Perry really was having a heart
          attack. Also, he never associated
          with any of that crowd.
                      DR. BALDI
          I don't suppose anyone knows how the
          hell they got a gun in here.
                      WARDEN BEVERIDGE
          There's a citywide manhunt for
          Tenuto and Sutton. They couldn't
          have gotten too far.
                      DR. BALDI
          Sutton is like a ghost. He's
          probably long gone by now and won't
          be found for a long time.
                                                             55

                                             DISSOLVE TO:

INT. CORRIDOR -- NIGHT
A man seen from behind sweeps the floor of the dimly lit
corridor with a broom.
A radio is lit up on a table.
                      WINCHELL (O.S.)
          Good evening Mr. and Mrs. America
          from border to border and coast to
          coast and all the ships at sea.
          Let's go to press. The search
          continues for the five men
          responsible for the Brink's robbery
          up in Boston. None of the thieves
          could be identified because they
          were wearing Halloween masks. This
          is said to be the work of Slick
          Willie Sutton and his gang. Also
          known as Willie the Actor, since his
          daring escape from a Philadelphia
          prison over two years ago, Sutton is
          still at large. There was a recent
          report of him being spotted in
          Boston. His picture has been in
          newspapers across the country. But
          he is yet to be apprehended.
The man continues sweeping.
                      WINCHELL (O.S.) (CONT'D)
          So where is Willie Sutton and where
          has he been the past two years?
The man stops sweeping and slowly turns around, revealing
the face of Willie. His hair is jet black, and he has a
black moustache.
INSERT - DAILY NEWS NEWSPAPER, OCTOBER 7, 1947
Headline reads "Yanks Champs, Dodgers Beaten, 5-2; McPhail
Retires."
                                             DISSOLVE TO:
INT. FARM COLONY CAFETERIA -- DAY
Several elderly men and women are seated at tables. Some
are eating. Willie walks over to MR. ROSS, a man sitting
alone at a table.
                                                              56

                      WILLIE
          How are you feeling today, Mr. Ross?

                      MR. ROSS
          Eddie, at my age and condition if I
          wake up in the morning, I consider
          myself a lucky man.
Willie sits down in a chair across the table from Mr. Ross.
                      WILLIE
          You're doing fine here. In another
          few months it'll be baseball season
          and the Dodgers will win the World
          Series.
                      MR. ROSS
          Eddie, if I live long enough to see
          them bums win the World Series,
          that, my boy will truly be a
          miracle. How many times can we say
          wait until next year?
                      WILLIE
          I think they've got a good chance
          this year. You wait and see.
Mr. Ross and Willie lean forward toward each other.
                      MR. ROSS
          At one time I was a very wealthy
          man, Eddie. I was an honest
          businessman with a big house, a wife
          and daughter.
                      WILLIE
          I never knew that about you.
                      MR. ROSS
          I don't like to talk much about
          those days, now that I'm here at the
          Poor Farm. But you've been very
          kind to me, Eddie. I can talk to
          you.
                      WILLIE
          I'm happy anytime I can help you.
                                                 57

                      MR. ROSS
          Let me continue.
              (pause)
          Shortly after the crash in twenty-
          nine, I lost everything. I mean
          everything. My wife lost her mind
          and took her own life. I couldn't
          support my daughter, so they took
          her away.
                      WILLIE
          Have you seen her since then?
                      MR. ROSS
          No. I've been living with guilt ever
          since that day. If I could have one
          wish, it would be to see my little
          girl one more time before I depart
          from this world.
                      WILLIE
          Do you have any idea where to find
          her?
                      MR. ROSS
          Unfortunately I do not. But it's
          probably best that she doesn't see
          her father in this place.
              (pause)
          We all have our pasts. I was once
          someone and now I'm not that same
          person.
Willie shoots a worried look at Mr. Ross.
                      MR. ROSS (CONT'D)
              (whispering)
          Yes, Edward Lynch. I know. But
          there is no need for you to worry,
          I'm just an old man and you've
          always been kind to me.
                      WILLIE
          Does anyone else here know?
                      MR. ROSS
          You know me. I don't mingle all
          that much. But you have to assume
          that if someone else doesn't already
          know, people read the newspapers
              (pause)
          As much as I'll miss you, it may be
          time for you to move on.
                                                               58

                      WILLIE
          I think you may be right.

Willie stands up as Mr. Ross reaches over and holds Willie's
hand.
                      MR. ROSS
          Good luck and thank you.
Willie smiles and looks directly in Mr. Ross's eyes.
                      WILLIE
          No, Mr. Ross. I thank you.
Willie walks over to a table where MARY CORBETT, a thirty-
eight-year-old nurse sits eating her lunch.
                       MARY
              (in a thick Irish
               brogue)
          Coming to sit with me, Eddie?
Willie sits across the table from her.
                      WILLIE
          Hello Mary. I just had my lunch but
          I thought I'd sit with you a while.
              (pause)
          I also wanted to talk to you about
          something.
                      MARY
          What is it, Eddie?
                      WILLIE
          I'm leaving the Farm Colony.    I got
          a job selling real estate.
Mary raises her glass of water.
                      MARY
          Cheers to you. That's wonderful.
Mary takes a drink from the glass and places it back down on
the table.
                      WILLIE
          Thank you. I'm going to need a
          place to stay. Do you still have
          that room in your house to let out?
                       MARY
          Yes.   When would you like to move
          in?
                                                           59

                      WILLIE
          I can bring my things over tonight.

INT. COFFEE SHOP -- NIGHT
Willie sits in a booth with his back to the door, across
from Tommy Kling.
                      WILLIE
          Do you trust this DeVenuta
          character?
                      TOMMY
          We did time at Trenton State
          together. He's all right.
                      WILLIE
          I don't know, Tommy. Every time I
          take in a stranger, it ends up going
          bad for me.
                      TOMMY
          Judge for yourself. He'll be here
          soon. Then you decide.
                      WILLIE
          What about you Tommy?   Are you sure
          you're up for this?
                      TOMMY
          Ever since the slowdown on the
          docks, I haven't been able to earn
          an honest nickel. I've got no other
          choice.
                      WILLIE
          All right. It's your decision. Did
          you make sure to tell DeVenuta my
          name is Eddie Lynch?
                      TOMMY
          Sure. Just like you said.
              (pause)
          The papers say you pulled the Brinks
          job. They got your picture all over
          but you still do a nice job changing
          your look.
                      WILLIE
          I wasn't anywhere near Boston when
          that job was pulled but I wish I was
          in on it. That gang walked out with
          over a million on the heist.
                                                               60

                      TOMMY
          Yeah. They went in wearing
          Halloween masks. Ain't that
          something.
                      WILLIE
          Could you picture me pulling a job
          wearing a Halloween mask? But they
          have to suspect somebody. They even
          say I held up a bank in Puerto Rico.
          Next thing you know they'll include
          me on the blacklist saying I'm a
          Communist.
                      TOMMY
          Now that's something nobody could
          ever believe.
Tommy looks up toward the door.
                      TOMMY (CONT'D)
          Here he comes.
JOHN DEVENUTA, a sharp-dressed, medium-built man in his mid-
thirties, with a moustache and receding dark hair enters the
coffee shop with a confident swagger.
He approaches the booth, sits down next to Willie and
extends his hand.
                      JOHN
          John DeVenuta.
Willie shakes John's hand.
                      WILLIE
          Eddie Lynch. I hear good things
          about you. Tommy here says you know
          how to handle yourself.
                      JOHN
          You give me the layout, and I'll get
          the job done.
              (pause)
          Don't worry, you can depend on me,
          Slick Willie.
Willie and Tommy look at each other.
                      TOMMY
          I told you he was sharp.
                                                               61

INT. MARY CORBETT'S HOUSE -- NIGHT

Willie and Mary sit next to each other on a sofa in the
living room. Willie is smoking a cigarette. Two tea cups
are on the coffee table in front on them.
                      MARY
          My brother and his family seemed to
          take to you very well.
                      WILLIE
          They seemed to have enjoyed their
          visit here.
Mary lifts her tea cup, takes a sip, and then places it back
down. She slides over closer to Willie.
                      MARY
          They've been asking me to come back
          to Ireland for a visit for quite a
          while now.
Willie extinguishes his cigarette in the ashtray on the
coffee table, and then reaches over and takes Mary's hand.
                      WILLIE
          It sounds like a nice place where
          your family comes from. You should
          try to make a visit.
Mary rests her head on Willie's lap.
                      MARY
          What about you, Eddie? Would you
          like to visit Ireland with me?
Willie is in deep thought.
                      WILLIE
          Actually, it would be nice to see
          Ireland with you.
                      MARY
          I haven't been back there in quite a
          while.
                      WILLIE
          Listen, why don't you see if you can
          get some time off from the Farm
          Colony?
                      MARY
          Well, I am due for a holiday.
                                                               62

                       WILLIE
           I'm putting together a very big real
           estate deal. It should bring me a
           lot of money. If it works out the
           way it should, we'll go to Ireland
           for a couple of weeks.
Mary sits up, takes Willie's hand and looks deeply into his
eyes.
                       MARY
           Oh, Eddie. I will pray that your
           real estate deal is successful.
                       WILLIE
               (smiling)
           I think it'll work out just fine.
EXT.   STREET -- DAY
JAMES WESTON, a man in his forties, carrying a newspaper in
one hand, proceeds to open the door of a building with a
sign "Manufacturers Trust Company."
SUPER IN/OUT - "MARCH 9, 1950, QUEENS, NEW YORK"
As the sound of an elevated train ROARS, Willie and John
come up behind Weston, with pistols drawn, and push him into
the bank.
LATER -
INT. BANK -- DAY
Weston, with a chain around one leg, attached to a radiator
on the wall, opens the front door, as GENEVIEVE HELFER, a
twenty-six-year-old switchboard operator enters.
Tommy, lying across the radiator behind Weston motions with
his gun to Mrs. Helfer towards the stairs where Willie is
standing.
Mrs. Helfer walks to Willie.
                       WILLIE
           Good morning, Mrs. Helfer. Would
           you please join the rest of the
           party downstairs in the vault?
A telephone RINGS.
Willie stops Mrs. Helfer with his hand.
                                                              63

                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Wait. Answer that phone. Do it
          right and you won't get hurt.
          Everyone's life depends on how you
          do this, sister, so don't make any
          mistakes.
Mrs. Helfer walks over to a desk and picks up the telephone
receiver.
                      MRS. HELFER
              (into the telephone
               receiver)
          Good morning, Manufacturers Trust
          Company.
              (pause)
          I'm sorry Mr. Hoffman is not in yet,
          but I expect him shortly.

Mrs. Helfer picks up a pencil, scribbles something on a
piece of paper, and then puts the pencil back down.
                       MRS. HELFER (CONT'D)
          Yes sir.   I will give him the
          message.   Thank you.
Mrs. Helfer puts the telephone receiver back in its place.
                      WILLIE
          You better sit here and if the
          telephone rings, answer it right.
Mrs. Helfer sits in a chair at the desk.
                       WILLIE (CONT'D)
              (calling over to
               Willie)
          It's getting late. When's your
          manager going to get here?
                      MRS. HELFER
          He's usually here by now.
Willie looks outside, then walks over to Tommy and Weston.
                      WILLIE
              (to Tommy)
          He's crossing the street now.
MOMENTS LATER -
Weston opens the door and ROBERT HOFFMAN, the bank manager,
enters. Willie steps out, points his gun at Mr. Hoffman,
and shakes his head.
                                                               64

                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Why are you late today? You're
          ruining my schedule.
Willie motions with his gun toward the vault in the back.
Tommy remains on the radiator with Weston standing by the
door.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
              (to Hoffman)
          Let's take a walk.
Willie motions to Mrs. Helfer.
                         WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Okay sister.     You can join your
          friends now.

Mrs. Helfer stands up and walks toward the stairs.
Willie follows Mrs. Helfer, and Mr. Hoffman down the stairs.
INT. BANK BASEMENT -- DAY
Several employees are bound to chairs arranged across from
the vault. John is watching over them with his gun pointed.
                      JOHN
              (to employees)
          Everybody look down at the floor.    I
          don't want to see you looking up.
The employees look down.
Willie, Mrs. Helfer and Mr. Hoffman are standing in front of
the locked vault.
                      WILLIE
              (to Hoffman)
          Now open this.
                         MR. HOFFMAN
          I can't.
Willie raises his gun and points it at Hoffman's head.
                      WILLIE
          Open it or I'll blow your brains
          out.
                                                           65

                      MR. HOFFMAN
              (defiantly)
          Go ahead and blow my brains out if
          you want, but I am unable to open
          it.
Willie points the gun downward and smiles.
                      WILLIE
          I believe you, Mr. Hoffman. You're
          not lying when you say you can't
          open the vault.
Willie puts his arm around Mr. Hoffman.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          So, I want you to tell me who has
          the other half of the combination.

Mr. Hoffman remains silent and looks down.
One of the seated employees looks up.
                      JOHN
          Look down. This is the last time
          I'll warn you.
The employee looks back down.
                      WILLIE
              (to Hoffman)
          You may think you're a hero risking
          your own life. But you have to
          think about your employees. Now if
          you don't cooperate with me, you're
          going to be responsible for what we
          do to the others.
Mr. Hoffman looks up.
                      MR. HOFFMAN
          Ted Sands can open it with me.
Hoffman then hangs his head back down.
EXT. STREET -- DAY
Willie, Tommy, and John exit the front door of the bank
carrying black bags.
As they turn and walk up the street, they pass a POSTMAN
coming from the opposite direction.
                                                               66

SUDDENLY -

An ALARM goes off from inside the bank and the Postman
freezes.
He turns around, but by then the three men have already
disappeared around the corner.
INT. MARY CORBETT'S HOUSE -- DAY
The front door opens and Mary walks in.     She looks upset.
Willie comes out of the kitchen holding a cup of tea, which
he places on the coffee table.
                         WILLIE
             You're just in time.   Here's your
             tea, Mary.

                      MARY
              (voice cracking)
          Everyone saw the papers today. They
          all recognized you. You're not
          Edward Lynch. You're Willie Sutton,
          the bank robber.
Willie walks over to Mary, takes her by the hand and sits
her down on the sofa. He sits down next to her and hands
her the cup of tea.
Mary takes a sip of the tea, then places the cup back down.
                         MARY (CONT'D)
             Tell me the truth. That is all I
             ask.
                         WILLIE
             Yes. It's true. Please don't be
             angry with me. I couldn't tell you.
             This way if I was ever caught, you
             wouldn't be involved. I didn't tell
             you for your own protection.
                         MARY
             It's too dangerous for you to stay
             here any longer. You must leave.
                         WILLIE
             I know. I'm sorry, Mary. This
             means I can't come with you to
             Ireland. They'll be watching for me
             to try to leave the country.
                                                              67

                      MARY
          I don't want anything to happen to
          you. Wherever you go, whatever you
          do, please be careful.
                      WILLIE
          That's why I need to leave right
          now. My picture in the newspapers
          and now with these television sets,
          too many people know how I look.
                      MARY
          They recognized your picture at the
          Farm Colony. I fear someone will
          tell the police. I never told
          anybody that you're living here, but
          someone might figure it out.
Willie gets up and walks through the door of a bedroom.
MOMENTS LATER -
Willie comes out of the bedroom carrying a bag and walks to
the sofa where Mary is sitting.
Mary stands up and faces Willie, who puts his bag down.
They embrace and kiss, as Willie discreetly drops an
unsealed envelope on the coffee table, exposing some cash
inside.
They walk to the front door.
                      WILLIE
          I left some of my things behind. If
          they ever trace me back here, you
          can tell them that I went on a trip
          and said I'd be gone for a while.
                      MARY
          Please be careful.
                      WILLIE
          If they ever get to you, remember
          the man you knew living here was
          Edward Lynch. If they show you
          pictures, don't lie. Tell them that
          it looks like Edward Lynch. They
          can't accuse you of anything.
                                                               68

                      MARY
          I will pray for you, Eddie Lynch.

They embrace, kiss, then Willie opens the door and walks
out.
INT. CITY BUS -- NIGHT
The bus is stopped, as a POLICEMAN gets on and shows a
photograph to the driver, who looks at it and shakes his
head.
The policeman looks around the bus at the only passenger, a
man with his head down, appearing to be asleep.
The man's hand discreetly slips a gun underneath a newspaper
on his lap, without being noticed.
The policeman walks up to the man and taps him on the
shoulder.
                      POLICEMAN
          Excuse me sir.
The man awakens, shows his face, revealing it's Willie.
                      WILLIE
          Oh. Yes, officer.
The policeman shows Willie the photograph, which is that of
a young girl.
                      POLICEMAN
          She's been missing from the
          neighborhood since yesterday. If
          you see anyone that looks like her,
          contact the precinct.
                         WILLIE
          Yeah. Sure.
The policeman turns and walks off the bus.
INT. CAR -- DAY (MOVING)
Willie is driving a 1951 Chevrolet with the radio on.
                                                               69

                      RADIO ANNOUNCER (V.O.)
          Hartung down the line at third, not
          taking any chances. Lockman without
          too big of a lead at second, but
          he'll be running like the wind if
          Thomson hits one. Branca throws.
              (excitedly)
          There's a long drive. It's gonna be,
          I believe
              (more excitedly)
          The Giants win the pennant! The
          Giants win the pennant! The Giants
          win the pennant! Bobby Thomson hits
          it into the lower deck of the left-
          field stands! The Giants win the
          pennant and they're going crazy!
          They're going crazy! Oh-ho!
Willie, upset, turns the radio off and pounds on the
dashboard as he passes a red light.
A police car pulls alongside Willie and a POLICEMAN motions
him to pull over to the curb.
Willie pulls the car over and stops as he opens his glove
compartment, where a gun is revealed. He removes some
papers and closes the compartment with the gun still inside.
The policeman walks up to the driver's side of the car and
Willie hands him the papers.
The policeman looks at the papers then looks at Willie.
                      POLICEMAN
          What's your name?
                      WILLIE
          Charles Gordon. I live on Dean
          Street.
The policeman looks at the paper again then back up at
Willie.
                      POLICEMAN
          I stopped you because you just ran a
          red light back there.
                      WILLIE
          I'm sorry officer. I know I deserve
          a ticket, but I was very upset and
          wasn't paying any mind to the light.
                      POLICEMAN
          Bobby Thomson, eh?
                                                            70

Willie shakes his head.

                      WILLIE
          There goes another season and
          another pennant. How much longer do
          we have to wait for Brooklyn to win
          a world series?
The policeman hands Willie back his papers and shakes his
head.
                      POLICEMAN
          On a sad day like today, I don't
          have the heart to give a Dodger fan
          a summons. Just be more careful,
          will you?
                       WILLIE
          Thank you.   I will be careful.
EXT. UNION SQUARE PARK -- DAY
Willie, Tommy, and John walk through the park.
                      WILLIE
          I think it's time we stop pulling
          the small jobs and go for a big one.
                      JOHN
          I'm with you. One big heist and we
          can lay low for a while.
                      TOMMY
          I don't know Willie. You're too
          hot. Not just in this city, but all
          over.
                      WILLIE
          That's right. I'm the one that has
          to worry. It's me that's on the
          FBI's most wanted list. It's my
          picture splashed all over the
          newspapers.
              (pause)
          Then you have the television. All
          these people buying them get to see
          my mug in their living rooms. It's
          the television that's going to
          eventually get me nabbed again.
                      TOMMY
          Then why do you want to go for a big
          job?
                                                              71

                      WILLIE
          We can do it. I already started
          looking at a bank.
                      JOHN
          Here in the city?
                      WILLIE
          Over on Eighth Avenue and Fourteenth
          Street, there are three banks on
          different corners. The busiest one
          is Manufacturers Trust.
                      TOMMY
          Another Manufacturers Trust. Are
          you sure that's a smart idea?
                      WILLIE
          Why not? One thing I've learned
          over the years is no matter how
          smart the banks think they are, they
          will always be vulnerable. We study
          them and find where they are
          vulnerable and that's how we cash
          in.
                      JOHN
          That's a busy corner. Probably a
          lot of dough going into those banks.
                      WILLIE
          Right. You've got the wholesalers
          from the meat market. Then there's
          the Transit Authority depositing
          their daily take.
The three men sit down on a bench with Willie seated in the
middle.
                       TOMMY
          All right.   What's the set-up?
                      WILLIE
          The bank is attached to an apartment
          building. The porter who opens the
          bank in the morning lives in the
          building. When he opens the inside
          door to the bank, he never has to
          step outside to the street. So the
          outside door is always locked when
          he opens.
                      TOMMY
          How do we get in?
                                       72

            JOHN
Can we get into the apartment
building and wait for him there?
            WILLIE
That's what I'm thinking. In the
vestibule, there are two inside
doors. One to the bank and one to
the apartment building. His
apartment is on the top floor. I
got inside the building and there's
a spot we can wait for him when he
comes down.
            TOMMY
So we need to open the outside door
and the inside door to the apartment
building.

            WILLIE
I can take care of the locks.
            JOHN
Then we're in!
            WILLIE
That brings us to the next obstacle.
We have thirty minutes between the
time the vault opens until the bank
opens to the public. During that
time an armored car shows up to make
a pick-up every day.
            JOHN
Do they come the same time every
day?
            WILLIE
That's the problem. They show up
anytime within fifteen minutes
before the bank opens.
            TOMMY
That only gives us fifteen minutes
to load the money and get out.
That's not enough time.
            WILLIE
I figured out a way we can buy some
more time. I trailed the armored
car for a week and they take the
same route to the bank every day.
If they get stuck in heavy traffic,
they arrive at the bank late.
                                                              73

                      TOMMY
          But you won't know if there's heavy
          traffic at the time.
                      WILLIE
              (smiling)
          We'll know it if we create the
          traffic.
                      TOMMY
          That means we'll need one maybe two
          other men in cars. You're taking
          too many chances here.
                      WILLIE
          That's what I thought at first. But
          all we have to do is get two junk
          cars with phony plates and tell the
          men what to do. When and where to
          do it. They don't need to know
          anything about the job. We just pay
          them.
                      TOMMY
          John will have to get the two men.
          They shouldn't ever meet you or me.
                      JOHN
          I can get two good men.
                      TOMMY
              (to Willie)
          Any worries about getting noticed
          where you're living now?
                      WILLIE
          No. It's mostly a Spanish
          neighborhood. They don't watch the
          news or read the papers.   It's
          perfect, since I took a
          correspondence course in Spanish. I
          knew it would come in handy some
          day.
MARGIE MOORE, an attractive woman in her late twenties sits
down on a bench across from the men. She smiles at them.
                      WILLIE   (CONT'D)
          She smiled at me.    Not like she
          recognized me, but   like she wants me
          to go over and say   hello.
                                                            74

                      TOMMY
          She comes here every day and sits
          around while I feed the birds. She
          never smiled at me before.
Willie stands up and walks over to Margie. Tommy and John
just sit there and watch. Tommy pulls a bag of birdseed
from his pocket and starts feeding the birds that gather.
                      WILLIE
          That's a nice smile you have there.
                      MARGIE
          Oh, thank you. I'm very happy
          today.
Willie sits down next to her.
                      WILLIE
          Well why don't you tell me what is
          making you so happy today?
                       MARGIE
          I finally got a job. I've been
          trying to find work ever since I
          moved here. I'll be working as a
          housekeeper.
                      WILLIE
          My name is Charles.     What's yours?
                         MARGIE
          I'm Margie.
                      WILLIE
          Well there, Margie.     Congratulations
          on your new job.
                         MARGIE
            Thank you.
Margie nods in the direction of Tommy and John.
                      MARGIE (CONT'D)
          I see your friend over there feeding
          the birds every day.
                       WILLIE
          Oh yeah.   He loves birds.
Tommy and John stand up, tip their hats and walk away.
                                                               75

LATER -

                      MARGIE
          New York is so big. Just learning
          how to get around on the subway can
          be confusing.
                      WILLIE
          Have you seen much of the city yet?
                      MARGIE
          Only while looking for work.
                      WILLIE
          How about I show you around the town
          tonight?
                      MARGIE
          I'd like that.
She takes a pencil and paper out from her pocketbook, writes
something and hands the paper to Willie.
                      MARGIE (CONT'D)
          This is where I'm living now. What
          time will you be calling on me?
Willie looks at the paper, takes out his wallet, puts the
paper in, and returns the wallet to his inside jacket
pocket.
                      WILLIE
          I'll see you at seven tonight.
INT. SUBWAY CAR -- DAY (MOVING)
Willie sits in a seat on the subway train. His face is
partially obscured by the newspaper he appears to be
reading. He looks up, checks out his surroundings, and then
goes back to reading.
As the RUMBLING sound of the cars along the track comes to a
SCREECHING halt, the doors open. Passengers enter and exit
the train.
Among the entering passengers is ARNOLD SCHUSTER, a twenty-
four-year-old man, wearing a suit under his overcoat. He
sits across the aisle from Willie.
SUPER IN/OUT - "FEBRUARY 18, 1952, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK"
The train departs from the station with a RUMBLING sound.
                                                               76

Arnold looks up at Willie, looks down again, and then
quickly jerks his head back up.

Willie still appears to be reading the newspaper.
Arnold is staring directly at Willie.
Willie slowly lifts his eyes above the newspaper, looks
quickly at Arnold, and then drops his head again.
Arnold quickly looks away.
MOMENTS LATER -
The train comes to a SCREECHING halt at a station.
Willie slowly stands up, turns toward the exit door while
watching Arnold through the corner of his eye.

As Arnold rises from his seat, Willie brushes off his pants
with his hand, turns back around and sits down again.
Arnold walks out of the train door.
Willie cracks a slight smile after the doors close and he
hears the RUMBLING noise of the train departing the station.
He starts to read the newspaper again.
INT. SUBWAY STATION PLATFORM -- DAY
A sign on the station wall reads "Pacific Street."
Following the SCREECHING sound of an arriving train, the
doors open on the train as passengers exit and enter the
cars.
Willie gets up, steps out of the door, looks left, looks
right, and then walks toward the exit.
Arnold emerges from the next car of the train and heads in
the same direction as Willie.
EXT. STREET -- DAY
Willie walks up the stairs leading from the subway station
and heads up the street.
SECONDS LATER -
Arnold peaks up from the stairs, then quickly starts walking
in the same direction as Willie.
He follows Willie while staying behind some pedestrians, so
he is not noticed.
                                                              77

Arnold continues to follow Willie for a few city blocks,
staying a safe distant behind.

Willie stops at a repair garage of a gasoline station and
walks inside.
Arnold turns to the left at the corner and starts walking
quickly.
He stops at the first intersection, nervously looks around
in all directions, and then starts to jog forward.
By the time he reaches the next intersection, he is
breathing heavily, with sweat dripping from his face. He
stops, looks around and sees a police patrol car coming up
the street toward him.
With a burst of energy, Arnold jumps toward the street and
waves the car over.
The car pulls over to the curb as uniformed policemen, JOE
MCCLELLAN and DONALD SHEA, are inside. McClellan, in the
passenger's seat, rolls down his window and looks out at
Arnold.
                      MCCLELLAN
          What are you sweating about?
                      ARNOLD
              (breathing heavily)
          Don't think that I'm crazy, but I
          think Willie Sutton is at the
          gasoline station over on Third and
          Bergen.
MOMENTS LATER -
Willie leaves the garage carrying a large car battery as he
continues walking up the street.
McClellan and Shea follow in the patrol car not far behind.
Willie glances over his shoulder, sees the patrol car, but
continues walking.
Arnold follows the patrol car on foot about a half-block
away.
Willie stops in front of a Chevrolet, places the battery on
the ground and opens the hood of the car.
The patrol car pulls up and stops behind Willie's car.
                                                              78

McClellan and Shea both open their respective car doors and
step out.

Shea is holding a sheet of paper.   He looks at the paper.
SHEA'S P.O.V. - PAPER
The paper is an FBI flyer titled "Federal Bureau of
Investigation, United States Department of Justice. Wanted:
William Francis Sutton, Bank Robbery, Unlawful Flight to
Avoid Confinement (Armed Robbery)."
RETURN TO SCENE
Shea hands the paper back to McClellan and walks over to
Willie, who is working under the hood of his car. McClellan
remains by the patrol car, holding the paper.
                      SHEA
          What are you doing Mister?
Willie stops working under the hood and looks up.
                      WILLIE
          Fixing a dead battery.
                      SHEA
          Are you the owner of the car?
                        WILLIE
          Yes.
Willie reaches into his pocket, pulls out a card and hands
it to Shea.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Here's my car registration.
Shea looks at the card, nods his head, and then hands it
back to Willie.
                      SHEA
          Where do you live Mr. Gordon?
                      WILLIE
          340 Dean Street.
                      SHEA
          There's been a lot of cars stolen in
          the neighborhood. Just a routine
          check. Thank you, Mr. Gordon.
As Shea starts walking back to the patrol car, an unmarked
car pulls up behind and stops.
                                                               79

DETECTIVE LOUIS WEINER, wearing an overcoat over a suit and
a fedora hat steps out and walks over to the two uniformed
policemen, as the three men stand outside the patrol car.
McClellan hands the paper to Weiner, who looks at it as they
speak.
Weiner, still holding the paper, walks with Shea over to
Willie, who is back working under the hood of his car.
As they approach, Willie looks back up.
                      WEINER
              (to Willie)
          We're going to have to take you to
          the station with us.
                       WILLIE
          Why?   I haven't done anything.
                      WEINER
          You look like Willie Sutton.
Willie shakes his head.
                      WILLIE
          I'm Charles Gordon.
Weiner hands the sheet over to Willie, who stares at it.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          My name is Gordon. I've been
          working for five years at
          Consolidated Edison. This picture
          isn't me.
Weiner stares hard at Willie.
                      WEINER
          All right. Let's go down to the
          station. We'll check this out and
          if you are Charles Gordon, you'll be
          back here in no time.
Willie closes the hood of his car, puts the battery in the
back seat and closes the car door.
INT. POLICE STATION INTERROGATION ROOM -- NIGHT
Willie sits at a table with Detective Weiner across from
him. A pack of Chesterfield cigarettes, a box of matches,
and an ashtray are on the table in front of Willie. The
door to the room is closed.
                                                               80

                         WEINER
             The fingerprint report should be
             back soon.
Willie nods, then takes a cigarette, lights it and starts
smoking.
SUDDENLY -
There is a lot of noise of people cheering outside the room.
Willie shakes his head and puts out his cigarette in the
ashtray.
                         WILLIE
             Well detective, you've got me. I am
             Willie Sutton. I'm fifty-one and
             I'm tired of it all. I might as
             well be dead now. You can kill me
             for all I care.
The door BURSTS open as McClellan excitedly rushes in and
points to Willie.
                          MCCLELLAN
             It's him.   It's Willie Sutton.   We
             got him.
Several policemen are peering through the door as their
rejoicing continues.
Shea pushes his way through the crowd, enters the room and
closes it shut behind him.
Weiner stands up.
                         MCCLELLAN (CONT'D)
             All right Willie. Stand up and face
             the wall.
Willie rises from his seat and stands up facing the wall
with his hands above his head.
McClellan runs his hands down Willie's body and pulls a gun
tucked in Willie's waist. He holds the gun up, displaying
it to Shea and Weiner.
                         MCCLELLAN (CONT'D)
             Lou, didn't you frisk him? You've
             been sitting here all this time and
             he's carrying a loaded gun.
Weiner hesitates, shakes his head, then hangs it in
embarrassment.
                                                               81

McClellan continues to run his hands down each of Willie's
legs, the stops and steps back.

                      MCCLELLAN (CONT'D)
          All right. Now turn around, step
          over to the table and empty your
          pockets.
Willie turns, walks to the table and removes a wallet, keys,
and coins from his pockets and places all on the table.
Weiner walks over to the table, looks through the wallet,
pulls out a slip of paper and reads it.
                       WEINER
               (to Willie)
          Margie Moore. Averne Hotel, Fifteen
          West Ninety-First Street. Who is
          she?
                      WILLIE
          Just a girl I met.   She doesn't know
          anything.
                      WEINER
          We'll see about that.
Willie hangs his head.
                                              DISSOLVE TO:
EXT. BERGEN STREET POLICE STATION -- DAY
A large crowd gathers in front of the police station.
Several newspapermen, television and radio reporters,
cameramen, photographers, police officers, and average
citizens. All eyes, cameras, and lights are on POLICE
COMMISSIONER GEORGE P. MONAGHAN standing in front of several
microphones. On his left are Shea and McClellan. On his
right are Weiner and Arnold Schuster.
                      COMMISSIONER
          Yesterday, while riding the BMT
          subway train, Arnold Schuster
          noticed a rider resembling Willie
          Sutton.
Cameras FLASH.
                                                              82

                      COMMISSIONER (CONT'D)
          After following the man from the
          Pacific Street station, Mr. Schuster
          waved down a patrol car and informed
          Patrolmen McClellan and Shea.
          Joined by Detective Weiner, the
          three officers apprehended Willie
          Sutton.
              (pause)
          We got him. Willie the Actor.
          Slick Willie Sutton. The Babe Ruth
          of bank robbers.
REPORTER #1 points his hand up toward the Commissioner.
                      REPORTER #1
          Commissioner, what about Sutton's
          partners? How were you led to catch
          them?
                      COMMISSIONER
              (to Weiner)
          Detective Weiner?
Weiner leans into the microphones.
                      WEINER
          We located a young woman who
          associated with Sutton. She knew
          him as Charles Gordon. In our
          interview with her we got the
          information to locate and apprehend
          both of Sutton's partners.
The Commissioner steps into the microphone as Weiner steps
back.
                      COMMISSIONER
          Sutton's associates were apprehended
          this morning and are being held in
          Manhattan's Centre Street Station.
The Commissioner holds up his hand and straightens his back
to a proud stance.
                      COMMISSIONER (CONT'D)
          This culminates one of the greatest
          manhunts in the history of the
          department. Sutton was the most
          sought after criminal in the United
          States.
The Commissioner points to McClellan and Shea on his left.
                                                               83

                      COMMISSIONER (CONT'D)
          These men have done a great job. I
          am naming them both first grade
          detectives as of this moment, and
          that means a thousand dollars a year
          more for each of them.
McClellan and Shea smile as cameras FLASH.
The Commissioner points to Weiner on his right.
                      COMMISSIONER (CONT'D)
          I am promoting Detective Weiner from
          a third grade to a first grade
          detective, and he'll get five
          hundred dollars more a year. I
          think the people of New York can
          well afford the additional money it
          will have to pay these policemen.
          Believe me, it warms my heart to be
          able to announce this reward.
                      REPORTER #2
          What about Arnold Schuster?
The Commissioner smiles and points to Arnold.
                      COMMISSIONER
          This brave man who made it all
          possible will receive a handsome
          reward from both the New York City
          Police Department and the FBI.
REPORTER #3 points over to Arnold.
                      REPORTER #3
          How about some questions for Arnold?
The Commissioner steps back and waves Arnold over.
Schuster steps in front of the microphone to multiple camera
FLASHES.
LATER -
The crowd is still gathered outside the station, but
Schuster, Shea, McClellan, Weiner, and Commissioner Monaghan
are gone. The front door of the station opens as several
policemen walk out surrounding Willie, whose legs and hands
are shackled. The entourage stops in front of the
microphones.
The crowd CHEERS.
                                                          84

Cameras FLASH rapidly in succession.

Reporters move closer toward Willie with their handheld
microphones, as the policemen surround Willie.
                      REPORTER #1
          Willie, what have you been doing
          these past five years? You couldn't
          go to a ballgame.
                      WILLIE
          Extreme loneliness does things to a
          man. I went to church at least once
          a week. I read a lot. Especially
          psychology.
                      REPORTER #1
          But how did you keep from getting
          noticed and caught for so long?
                      WILLIE
          Whenever I went out I was never sure
          of who was around me. In
          restaurants and other public places,
          I would study people's faces and
          actions. I'd try to be aware of
          anyone who might betray me.
          Studying people became a habit for
          me.
CAMERAMAN #1 pushes his way to the front of the crowd.
                      CAMERAMAN #1
          Hey Willie, look this way.
Willie looks over and a camera FLASHES.
                      REPORTER #2
          What's your favorite restaurant?
The crowd LAUGHS.
                      WILLIE
          I had to change restaurants
          frequently. So I never went to any
          place that often. I thought that
          was wiser.
                      REPORTER #3
          Willie, it's reported that you never
          fired your gun at anyone. Why do
          you even carry one?
                                                            85

                      WILLIE
          I just figured a gun would scare a
          person long enough to give me a head
          start at getting away.
                      REPORTER #2
          Willie, why did you keep your money
          in that furnished room you were
          renting? Were you afraid a bank
          might get held up if your money was
          in it?
The crowd LAUGHS.
Willie grins and shakes his head.
The policemen take Willie from the microphones and escort
him forward through the crowd.

The crowd continues to CHEER as the policemen and Willie
continue walking forward.
Reporter #1 manages to slip a microphone inches away from
Willie.
                      REPORTER #1
          Did you pull the Brinks job, Willie?
                      WILLIE
          No. But I'll probably be blamed for
          it.
CAMERAMAN #2 jumps in front of the entourage.
                      CAMERAMAN #2
          Look down at those handcuffs Willie.
Willie smiles and looks down while he continues walking.
The cameras continue FLASHING. Cameraman #2 quickly steps
aside as Willie and the policemen walk past.
Reporter #2 speaks into his own microphone.
                      REPORTER #2
          Willie Sutton is being taken away
          from the Bergen Street Police
          Station here in Brooklyn. His next
          stop is Queens County Detention
          Center, where he will appear before
          witnesses of the Manufacturers Trust
          hold-up in Sunnyside, Queens, two
          years ago. These witnesses will be
          asked if Sutton was one of the
          robbers.
                                                               86

Reporter #1 holds a microphone in front of Captain Feeney.

                       REPORTER #1
          Mr. Feeney, as a retired police
          captain who arrested Slick Willie
          Sutton on two occasions, what can
          you tell us?
                      FEENEY
          Slick Willie Sutton? He's not that
          slick. He's nothing but a dirty,
          low-down crook. He was like that
          before and he hasn't changed a bit.
Reporter #3 speaks into his own microphone.
                      REPORTER #3
          The crowd here in Brooklyn cheers
          for Willie the Actor, treating him
          like he's a returning hometown hero.
EXT. STREET -- NIGHT
Arnold Schuster, wearing an overcoat over his suit and tie,
walks down the street. He is met by four young men as he
reaches a street corner.
SUPER IN/OUT - "MARCH 8, 1952, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK"
YOUNG MAN #1 extends his hand to Arnold, who takes it with a
handshake.
                      YOUNG MAN #1
          Are you coming to the party, Arnold?
                      ARNOLD
          I'm just going home to change my
          clothes and then coming right over.
                     YOUNG MAN #1
          All right. You're the man of the
          hour. We'll see you over there.
Arnold proceeds walking on as the four young men continue in
the opposite direction.
MOMENTS LATER -
Arnold continues walking down the empty street and hears a
RUSTLING noise from the hedges in front of the house he just
passed.
Arnold stops and turns around.
                                                               87

SUDDENLY -

A cat jumps out from between the hedges, MEOWS, and runs
off.
Arnold jumps back, takes a handkerchief and wipes his
forehead. He turns back around and continues walking.
MOMENTS LATER -
As Arnold proceeds further down the block, a figure emerges
from behind a tree and points a gun at him.
Four SHOTS are fired at Arnold.
Arnold drops to the ground as the shooter runs and turns the
corner.
INT. JAILHOUSE CORRIDOR -- NIGHT
A GUARD sits outside the jail cell where Willie is sleeping
on a cot.
FOOTSTEPS echo through the corridor as WARDEN MILTON KLEIN
approaches the cell.
                         WARDEN KLEIN
             Willie, you have to wake up.
Willie tosses a bit, then sits up.
                         WILLIE
             What's the matter, Warden?   What
             time is it?
                         WARDEN
             Willie, Arnold Schuster is dead.
Willie jumps up from his cot and stands at the cell bars.
                         WILLIE
              What? How did it happen?
                         WARDEN KLEIN
             He was shot, Willie. He was shot as
             he was walking home tonight.
Willie shakes his head.
                         WILLIE
             The poor kid. He didn't deserve
             that.
                                                             88

                      WARDEN KLEIN
          There's some men from the DA's
          office will probably want to talk to
          you about this.
                        WILLIE
          Why Warden?    I don't know anything
          about it.
                      WARDEN KLEIN
          Look at the situation, Willie. The
          fellow that fingered you gets gunned
          down in the street.
                      WILLIE
          Yeah. This doesn't help my case
          any. If they want to talk with me,
          I'll cooperate any way I can.

INT. JAILHOUSE VISITORS ROOM -- DAY
Willie sits at a table. His attorney, GEORGE HERZ enters
the room with KATHERINE BITSES, an attorney representing
Tommy Kling.
Willie stands up and shakes hands with Herz.
                      HERZ
          Willie, this is Katherine Bitses.
          She is working with the team
          representing Tommy.
Willie shakes hands with Katherine and looks deep into her
eyes. She returns the deep look.
                      WILLIE
          Is this fair, George? Tommy gets
          this beautiful doll and I end up
          with you.
They all chuckle and sit down.
                      HERZ
          I met with the DA's office and they
          are not charging you with having
          anything to do with Schuster's
          murder.
                      WILLIE
          They know my record. In all my
          years I never even fired my gun
          once. I never work with any
          triggermen. I don't know who could
          have done this.
                                                               89

                       HERZ
           Before Schuster's murder, we had a
           chance of beating this. The public
           was rooting for you, but that's all
           changed. In everyone's mind Willie
           Sutton is responsible for the death
           of Arnold Schuster.
                       WILLIE
           So, now I'm sunk.
Willie shakes his head.
                       WILLIE (CONT'D)
           That poor kid is dead all because he
           saw me riding on a train and I have
           no idea who killed him.
                       HERZ
           It will be difficult to find a jury
           that will be sympathetic toward you,
           but I'll do everything I can. They
           have two witnesses to identify you
           from the Manufacturers Trust
           robbery. But I have a trick or two
           up my sleeve.
INT.   COURT ROOM -- DAY
Willie sits at a rectangular table in the front of the
courtroom with his lawyers, Herz and JAMES MCARDLE.
On the other side of the aisle the prosecutor, JAMES
MCGRATTAN sits behind a rectangular table. Spectators are
seated in the courtroom.
JUDGE PETER T. FARRELL sits behind a large desk on a raised
platform in the front of the courtroom, facing everyone. A
name plate reading "Judge Peter T. Farrell" is in front of
the judge.
Mr. Hoffman, Manager of Manufacturers Trust Bank sits in the
witness box next to the judge's desk.
                       JUDGE FARRELL
           Mr. Herz, you may cross-examine the
           witness.
Herz stands up and walks up to Hoffman.
                       HERZ
           Mr. Hoffman, how good is your
           memory.
                                                90

                      MR. HOFFMAN
              (confidently)
          I'm proud to say that I have a
          perfect memory. Especially for
          faces.
                      HERZ
          Then I trust you recall my visit to
          the bank a few weeks ago.
                         MR. HOFFMAN
          Yes.
                         HERZ
          Was I alone?
                        MR. HOFFMAN
          No.    You were with another man.

                      HERZ
          Is this man in the courtroom?
                         MR. HOFFMAN
          Yes.
                      HERZ
          Would you please identify him for
          us?
Hoffman points at McArdle.
                      MR. HOFFMAN
          The gentleman seated with the
          defendant.
Herz turns and motions McArdle to stand up.
                      HERZ
          Mr. Hoffman, take a close look and
          tell me whether you are positive
          this is the man who was with me at
          the bank.
                      MR. HOFFMAN
              (without hesitation)
          Yes. Absolutely certain.
                      HERZ
          Let the records show that Mr.
          Hoffman positively identifies James
          McArdle as the individual who
          accompanied me to Manufacturers
          Trust Bank a few weeks ago.
                                                             91

Herz turns toward the spectators and motions to RAYMOND
HITZEL to stand up and come forward toward the wooden gate
separating the spectators from the front of the court.
Hitzel rises, walks forward and stops at the gate.
Herz turns back toward Hoffman.
                       HERZ (CONT'D)
          Mr. Hoffman, permit me to draw your
          attention to the gentleman standing
          at the gate.
Hoffman looks over and starts to sweat.
                      HERZ (CONT'D)
          Considering that you have a perfect
          memory for faces, I don't suppose
          there is any possibility that this
          could actually be the man who was
          with me?
Hoffman takes out a handkerchief and wipes his forehead.
                      MR. HOFFMAN
              (nervously)
          I'm not sure.
Herz turns, steps away and motions to both Hitzel and
McArdle to sit back down. Both men take their seats.
Herz turns again to face Hoffman.
                      HERZ
          When you were taken to a lineup, you
          identified the defendant, William
          Sutton, as one of the three men who
          held up the bank on March 5, 1950.
          Did you see Sutton before the lineup
          sitting with two detectives?
                        MR. HOFFMAN
                (abruptly)
          No!
                      HERZ
          At that time, before the lineup, did
          you look over to where Sutton was
          seated and ask the gentleman you
          were with "Which one is Sutton?"?
                       MR. HOFFMAN
          No.
                                                             92

Herz turns toward the spectators and motions to JAMES
MCDONALD to stand up.

McDonald rises and stands at his seat.
Herz turns back to Hoffman.
                      HERZ
          Mr. Hoffman, do you personally know
          the gentleman standing up?
                      HOFFMAN
          Yes. Jim McDonald. He's a lawyer
          I've known for years.
Herz turns his head, nods to McDonald, who sits back down,
and then turns back to Hoffman.
                      HERZ
          Was Mr. McDonald with you prior to
          your being brought to the police
          lineup when you identified Sutton?
Hoffman squirms nervously in the seat.
                         MR. HOFFMAN
                 (barely audible)
          Yes.
                      HERZ
          Can you speak up so the court can
          hear you, Mr. Hoffman?
                        MR. HOFFMAN
          Yes.
                      HERZ
          At that time, did you ask Mr.
          McDonald to look at three men seated
          in another room and ask him "Which
          one is Sutton?"?
Prosecutor McGrattan jumps up.
                      MCGRATTAN
          Objection, Your Honor. The question
          was already asked and answered.
Herz faces the judge.
                                                                 93

                      HERZ
          Your Honor, the question asked
          earlier referred to a general
          action. The current question is
          specific.
                      JUDGE FARRELL
          I'll allow it.
Hoffman sweats and stares with a frightened look.
INT. JAILHOUSE CORRIDOR -- DAY
Warden Klein walks up to Willie's cell.    The guard is seated
outside.
Willie, wearing a suit and tie, stands up and approaches the
bars.

                      WARDEN KLEIN
          All right Willie, we're ready for
          you.
Warden Klein nods to the guard, who stands up and opens the
cell.
Willie steps out of the cell.
The guard starts to put shackles on his legs.
                        WILLIE
          Wait.    You can't let me go out like
          this.
The guard stops.
                      WARDEN KLEIN
          I'm sorry Willie. I have my orders.
                      WILLIE
          Look Warden. I haven't given you
          any trouble in here. Please, just
          this once.
Warden Klein looks at Willie and takes a deep breath.
                      WARDEN KLEIN
          All right. There will be two guards
          watching you inside the room at all
          times. Let's go.
                      WILLIE
          Thank you, Warden.
                                                            94

Warden Klein walks alongside Willie. The guard takes the
shackles in his hand and follows behind them.

As they approach a door, two guards are standing outside.
Warden Klein stops and turns to Willie.
                      WARDEN KLEIN
          Willie, I'm trusting you here.
          Don't disappoint me.
INT. JAILHOUSE VISITORS ROOM -- DAY
The door opens, one guard enters, followed by Willie and
finally the second guard. The guards separate and move to
opposite sides of the room, as the door closes.
Willie slowly looks up and smiles.

JEANE SUTTON, Willie's daughter, sits at a table in the
middle of the room. She stands up and cracks a slight
smile.
Jeane walks over to Willie as they kiss and embrace.
                      WILLIE
          You were just five years old the
          last time I held you.
Willie takes her by the arm and leads her to the table.
                       WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Come.   Let's sit down.
Willie pulls out the chair, as Jeane sits.   Willie sits
across from her.
                      JEANE
          If it were not for all the pictures
          of you in the newspapers and
          television, I would never know what
          you look like.
                      WILLIE
          You're all grown up and more
          beautiful than I ever imagined.
                      JEANE
          I would study the pictures of you
          from the papers and hope someday I'd
          see you riding the subway or walking
          down the street.
              (pause)
          Then I gave up hope.
                                                               95

                      WILLIE
          I never wanted this. For you
          visiting your father in a jailhouse.
                      JEANE
          Well, I'm just happy you're alive
          and all right. There has been so
          much in the news about you, that I
          don't know what to believe.
                       WILLIE
          Jeane, I've done a lot of bad things
          over the years. I've robbed banks.
          That's why I'm here. But I've never
          hurt anyone.
                      JEANE
          That boy who was murdered. They say
          you are responsible. I don't
          believe it.
Willie reaches over and takes Jeane's hand.
                      WILLIE
          Arnold Schuster's murder was a
          terrible tragedy. I had nothing to
          do with it. But they are using it
          to turn the public against me. You
          see, before he got killed, there was
          a chance for me. I was likable
          because the people knew I never hurt
          anyone. Now, they can turn everyone
          against me and it will be impossible
          to find an impartial jury.
                      JEANE
          I know.
                      WILLIE
          Tell me about you.
                      JEANE
          I'm married and have a daughter who
          is almost two.
Willie's smile gets bigger.
                      WILLIE
          I'm a grandfather?   What's her name?
Jeane opens her purse, takes out a picture, and places it on
the table in front of Willie.
One of the guards walks closer and looks over.
                                                               96

Willie looks up at the guard.

                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          It's a picture. My granddaughter.
The guard nods and steps back to his post.
                      JEANE
          Her name is Christine.
Willie holds the picture, looking at it.
                      WILLIE
          She's beautiful.
Willie places the picture on the table and passes it back to
Jeane.
                      JEANE
          It's yours to keep.
Willie looks up at the guard.
                      WILLIE
          Is it all right that I take this?
The guard nods.
Willie takes the picture and places it in his inside jacket
pocket.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          How is your mother?
                      JEANE
          She's living in Colorado now.
          Remarried for the second time.
                      WILLIE
          Do you speak to her much?
                      JEANE
          No.
              (pause)
          I read that you remarried also.
                      WILLIE
              (speaking softly)
          That was twenty years ago, after I
              (pause)
          took my vacation from Sing Sing.
          It's very lonely out there as a
          fugitive. I met a girl, Irene, and
          she was good to me.
                                                 97

                      JEANE
          What happened to her?

                      WILLIE
          When I was captured in Philly, I
          told her the same thing I told your
          mother a few years earlier. Get a
          divorce and start a new life without
          me. She remarried and has a good
          life. She keeps in touch with your
          Aunt Helen.
Jeane looks coldly at Willie.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          I want you to come back to see me
          and bring Christine with you.
                       JEANE
          When Mr. Herz called to say that you
          wanted to see me, I wasn't sure I
          should come.
              (pause)
          But he arranged with Warden Klein so
          I could get in and out of here
          without any of the reporters seeing
          me.
                      WILLIE
          Well, after this is all over, maybe
          you can come see me at my new home
          up the river.
                      JEANE
          I'm not sure.
              (pause)
          I've been able to live my life
          without anyone knowing that I'm
          Willie Sutton's daughter. It may
          not be such a good idea.
                      WILLIE
          I understand. This is something
          that can haunt you. Christine
          shouldn't have to grow up with
          people knowing who her grandfather
          is.
                      JEANE
          Perhaps when the time is right I can
          see you again.
                                                         98

                       WILLIE
           If you need to contact me for any
           reason, see my lawyer, George Herz.
           He's the man who arranged for you to
           come here. I will contact you
           through him as well. When the time
           is right and things quiet down,
           maybe you'll consider a visit. I
           think you'll know where to find me.
Jeane cracks a forced smile.
                         JEANE
           All right.
Willie looks up and nods to the guard.
                       WILLIE
           Now I have to go back. Seeing you
           made today the best day of my life.
Willie and Jeane both stand up, walk to each other and
embrace.
                       WILLIE (CONT'D)
           Sweet Jeanie. I love you, my little
           girl.
INT.   COURT ROOM -- DAY
Mary Corbett sits in the witness stand, as Prosecutor
McGrattan stands nearby.
                       MCGRATTAN
           Miss Corbett, would you please state
           your address.
                       MARY
           94 Kimball Street in the Westerleigh
           section of Richmond.
                       MCGRATTAN
           Do you know the defendant, Sutton?
                          MARY
                  (softly)
           Yes.
                       MCGRATTAN
           Could you speak up so the court can
           hear you.
                                       99

               MARY
       (louder)
Yes.
            MCGRATTAN
What name did you know him by?
            MARY
Edward Lynch.
            MCGRATTAN
Where did you first meet him?
            MARY
I met him at the Farm Colony. I
work there as a nurse, and he was a
porter.
             MCGRATTAN
Do you remember the eleventh day of
March, 1950?
            MARY
Yes, I do, sir.
            MCGRATTAN
Was the defendant living with you at
the time?
               MARY
       (hesitantly)
Yes.
            MCGRATTAN
When you came home from work that
evening, was he there?
              MARY
Yes.
            MCGRATTAN
Can you tell the court what you said
to him when you arrived home that
evening?
            MARY
When I came home
    (pause)
When I came home, I told him that
his picture was in the newspaper.
The people at the Farm Colony
recognized him and said he was
Willie Sutton.
                                                             100

LATER -

A DETECTIVE sits in the witness stand, as McGrattan stands
next to him holding a slip of paper, which he hands to the
detective.
                      MCGRATTAN
          Detective, do you recognize this
          slip of paper?
                      DETECTIVE
          Yes.
                      MCGRATTAN
          Would you please tell the court when
          you first saw this?
                      DETECTIVE
          When searching the home of Mary
          Corbett, it was among the belongings
          left behind by a man known as Edward
          Lynch.
                      MCGRATTAN
          After investigating the writing on
          this paper, what was determined?
                      DETECTIVE
          The handwriting matched that of
          Willie Sutton and the notations
          evidenced that Sutton was studying
          the movements of bank employees
          during the times when Manufacturers
          Trust Bank was actually robbed a few
          days earlier.
LATER -
John DeVenuta sits in the witness stand. McGrattan stands
next to John and hands him a slip of paper.
                      MCGRATTAN
          Have you ever seen this slip of
          paper before?
                      JOHN
          Yes.
                      MCGRATTAN
          Please read the first two lines.
                      JOHN
          Eight fifty-six a.m. one W. Nine
          a.m. one M, no topcoat, no hat.
                                                                101

                      MCGRATTAN
          Would you explain to the court what
          these notes mean?
                      JOHN
          They say at eight fifty-six in the
          morning one woman comes in to work
          at the bank. Then at nine, a man
          with no topcoat or hat shows up.
                      MCGRATTAN
          Is the bank you refer to
          Manufacturers Trust?
                      JOHN
          Yes.
                      MCGRATTAN
          Who wrote these notes.
                      JOHN
          Willie Sutton.
LATER -
McGrattan is standing in front of the jurors.    He turns and
points to Willie.
                      MCGRATTAN
          Some are looking at this fellow as a
          Robin Hood.
McGrattan turns back to the jury.
                      MCGRATTAN (CONT'D)
          Do not be fooled. He is not a Robin
          Hood. He is just a hood.
              (pause)
          They call him Willie the Actor.
          Call him Willie the crook, the bank
          robber. He robbed banks.
LATER -
Herz is standing in front of the jurors.
                      HERZ
          The District Attorney is giving
          credibility to the testimony of a
          rat. That is how John DeVenuta is
          described. A rat. A desperate man
          who will do anything and say
          anything in exchange for his
          freedom.
                                                                102

LATER -

                      JUDGE FARRELL
          Will the defendant please rise.
Willie stands up.
                      JUDGE FARRELL (CONT'D)
          Will the jurors please rise and face
          the defendant.
The jurors all stand and look at Willie.
                      JUDGE FARRELL (CONT'D)
          What is your verdict?
                      JURY FOREMAN
          We find the defendant guilty on all
          counts as charged in the indictment.
                                                 DISSOLVE TO:
INT. ATTICA MESS HALL -- DAY
INSERT - DAILY NEWS NEWSPAPER, OCTOBER 5, 1955
Headline reads "This Is Next Year!"
RETURN TO SCENE
Willie sits across from another INMATE in the mess hall
having breakfast.
                      WILLIE
          What I wouldn't have given to have
          been there watching the Dodgers
          finally beat the Yanks and win the
          World Series.
                      INMATE
          Yeah. They've been celebrating all
          through the night in Brooklyn.
                      WILLIE
          Yeah, good old Brooklyn.
                      INMATE
          I won't see Brooklyn again for
          another six years.
                                       103

             WILLIE
You're talking to a guy that's never
going to see anything except the
inside of these walls for the rest
of his life.
    (pause)
But, from what you were telling me
about your arrest and trial, you may
be able to get out much sooner.
            INMATE
How's that Willie?
            WILLIE
You appealed through the state
courts and lost, right?
             INMATE
Yeah.
            WILLIE
Did your lawyer tell you that was
the end of it?
             INMATE
Right.   We lost the appeal.
             WILLIE
Well two years ago there was a case
where the appeal lost. Just like
you.
     (pause)
But this guy's lawyer was able to do
something nobody else before could
do.
     (pause)
He was able to get the case heard at
the Supreme Court level.
            INMATE
So what does that mean?
            WILLIE
When you lost your appeal in the
state court, you thought you were
sunk with nowhere else to go. Now
you can appeal through the federal
court system.
            INMATE
How can I do that? I have no more
money to pay the lawyer.
                                                               104

                      WILLIE
          Here's what you do. I'll tell you
          where you can send for the court
          transcripts on your trial. When you
          get them, you bring them to me and
          I'll put together the writ for you.
                      INMATE
          You know how to do that?
                      WILLIE
          Sure. You've seen all the law books
          I've got in my cell. I can do these
          things just as good as any lawyer.
INT. ATTICA PRISON VISITOR'S ROOM -- DAY
Willie is seated in the Visitor's Room across from Katherine
Bitses.
                      KATHERINE
          I saw Tommy yesterday.
                       WILLIE
          How is he?
                      KATHERINE
          He's still hopeful that we can get
          his conviction overturned.   The
          written statement you gave me should
          help some.
                      WILLIE
          I hope so. I've been reading plenty
          of law books. That's one thing
          about being in here. I have lots of
          time to read and study.
              (pause)
          Let me know if there's anything else
          I can do to help.
Katherine smiles.
                      KATHERINE
          You've done plenty. We just have to
          put everything together, present it
          and hope for the best.
              (pause)
          Is there anything I can do for you,
          Willie?
Willie smiles.
                                                            105

                       WILLIE
          Considering my limitations,
          receiving a visit from you is all I
          can ask for.
              (pause)
          My own daughter won't even come up
          and see me. I've got a
          granddaughter I'll probably never
          meet.
                      KATHERINE
          Willie, don't ever give up hope.
EXT. PRISON YARD -- DAY
Willie is standing in the yard with CURT, an inmate. Both
are smoking cigarettes as the other inmates congregate in
the yard.

Curt looks around.
                      CURT
          I've got a proposition for you.
                      WILLIE
          What have you got?
                      CURT
          I've got someone that can get you
          out of here and across the Canadian
          border. It'll cost you five grand.
                      WILLIE
          It would be near impossible to get
          me out of here. I'm the most
          carefully watched con in this joint.
                      CURT
          I can't tell you who, but I've got a
          guard who will get you out. The
          only thing you need to do is get
          from the laundry to the garage.
                      WILLIE
          That's difficult.
                      CURT
          Look, if you can get to the garage
          when it's set up, he guarantees he
          can get you out.
                      WILLIE
          What's the set-up?
                                                            106

                      CURT
          You get to the garage and there'll
          be a truck waiting to take you out.
Willie shakes his head in disapproval.
                      WILLIE
          Those trucks are searched top to
          bottom. I don't see how I could
          slip out that way.
                      CURT
          The man is able to take care of
          everything. You don't have to
          worry. All you need to do is come
          up with five grand and get over to
          the garage when you get the word.
                      WILLIE
          So why aren't you making the break?
                      CURT
          I've only got fourteen months left
          to serve and I can't come up with
          the payoff dough.
Willie looks around the yard and sighs.
                      WILLIE
          I'm at the point in my life where
          I'm not willing to take those kinds
          of risks anymore.
                      CURT
          Willie, it's foolproof.
Willie looks hard at Curt.
                      WILLIE
          Nothing in this world is foolproof.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          I need to think about it.
INT. KATHERINE'S LAW OFFICE -- DAY
A SECRETARY brings Jeane into Katherine's office.
Katherine stands up, walks from her desk and shakes hands
with Jeane.
                      KATHERINE
          Thank you for coming, Jeane.
                                                                107

Katherine motions to a chair and Jeane sits down.   Katherine
takes her seat.

                      JEANE
          So you've been up to visit him?
                       KATHERINE
          Yes. I've been working on Tommy
          Kling's appeal and your father has
          been very forthcoming with helpful
          information.
                      JEANE
          So what does this have to do with
          me?
                      KATHERINE
          He talks about you a lot. He truly
          regrets missing out on being a
          father to you.
                      JEANE
          How can I consider him my father
          when I never even met him until I
          was twenty-one and it was in a
          county prison. He's said to have
          stolen over two million from banks.
          He hasn't given anything to me, his
          daughter. All I got was a Chevy
          with a dead battery. Where's he got
          all his money hidden?
Katherine smiles and leans forward.
                      KATHERINE
          Well, Jeane. Maybe you ought to
          take a trip up to Attica and ask him
          that yourself.
                                               DISSOLVE TO:
INT.   ATTICA PRISON VISITOR'S ROOM -- DAY
Willie is seated in the Visitor's Room across from Katherine
Bitses.
                      WILLIE
          Is there any special fellow you're
          dating these days?
                      KATHERINE
              (grinning)
          Other than you?
                                                             108

Willie chuckles.

                      WILLIE
          Well you have been coming up here
          more often than anyone else. That
          means a lot to me, Katherine. But
          really no one special back home?
                      KATHERINE
          With all the work I've got, who has
          time for dates?
                      WILLIE
          You mean to tell me that a dish like
          you doesn't have them breaking down
          your door?
Katherine stares hard at Willie.

                      KATHERINE
          Now I can see how you charmed your
          way into all those banks.
              (pause)
          Now let's see if I can charm you.
Katherine stands up and nods to the GUARD standing at the
entrance to the room.
Jeane and six-year-old CHRISTINE walk in.
Willie cracks a wide smile and his face beams.
                      WILLIE
          Katherine, you certainly know how to
          charm a fellow.
INT. WILLIE'S CELL -- NIGHT
Willie sits in his cell with law books piled on a desk. He
is writing on a pad.
JOEY GALLO, an inmate, walks into the cell smoking a
cigarette and holding a brown bag. He tosses the bag on
Willie's bed.
                      GALLO
          Slick Willie. Here you go.
                      WILLIE
          What have you got in there, Joey?
                      GALLO
          Some imported salami.
                                                           109

Willie picks up the bag, looks inside and nods.

                      WILLIE
          Thanks, Joey. That's nice of you.
          Now what bank do you want me to rob?
They both laugh as Gallo sits down on the cot next to
Willie.
                      GALLO
          You know something, Willie. I see a
          guy like you in here and I figure
          you're not just sitting here taking
          it all lying down. You're a real
          smart guy. A legend.
                      WILLIE
          I'm sixty-two years old Joey.   What
          am I going to do in here?
                      GALLO
          How many cons have you helped in
          here get appeals?
                      WILLIE
          I helped a few.
                      GALLO
          They all come to you because they
          know you're smart and you can help
          them.
              (pause)
          What I don't understand is why you
          can't find something in all those
          books to help yourself.
                      WILLIE
          There's no hope for me. If it was
          just one charge, I could do it. But
          there's too many convictions on me.
                      GALLO
          So what? Go at them one case at a
          time. If there's a way to beat it,
          you're the one that can find it.
                        WILLIE
          Maybe Joey.    Maybe.
INT. ATTICA VISITORS ROOM -- DAY
Willie sits at a table with Jeane. Other inmates sit at
tables with their respective visitors. Guards watch over
from different parts of the room.
                                                 110

                      WILLIE
          I still have cons approaching me
          with plans to bust out of here.
                      JEANE
          The food must be pretty bad in here.
Willie chuckles.
                      WILLIE
          You should hear some of the schemes
          I've been propositioned with in
          here. I never trusted any of them.
                      JEANE
          These dopes must be desperate
          thinking someone your age is going
          to try to break out.

                      WILLIE
          They just want is to brag that they
          tried to escape with Willie Sutton.
                      JEANE
          Even if you did escape, then what?
          You'd be back in hiding until they
          catch you again.
                      WILLIE
          I have no intention of becoming a
          fugitive again. Then I'd never be
          able to see you.
                      JEANE
          What about all those inmates you've
          helped to get their cases appealed?
          Why can't you help yourself?
Willie chuckles.
                       WILLIE
          That crazy Joey Gallo said the same
          thing to me.
                      JEANE
          Well maybe he's not so crazy.
                      WILLIE
          Joey Gallo is plenty crazy all
          right. But he's a lot smarter than
          people think. Maybe you’re both
          right. I will take a closer look at
          how to use the law to help me.
                                                            111

                      JEANE
          Can Katherine help you?

                      WILLIE
          I don't know. She couldn't do much
          for Tommy. I can't imagine anyone
          entertaining the thought of getting
          me released through the legal
          process.
                      JEANE
          Have you even tried?
                      WILLIE
          Everyone knows it's hopeless.
                       JEANE
          I would never have thought of you as
          someone who could give up so easily.
          With everything you've been studying
          about the law, you're bound to come
          up with something.
               (pause)
          So get to work and the next time
          Katherine comes to see you, talk to
          her.
EXT. PRISON YARD -- DAY
INSERT - DAILY NEWS NEWSPAPER, NOVEMBER 23, 1963"
Headline reads "PRESIDENT IS SLAIN.   Johnson Sworn In on
Plane; Suspect Kills Cop, Seized."
RETURN TO SCENE
Willie is standing alone, smoking a cigarette in the yard
watching his fellow inmates socializing.
Gallo walks up to him, smoking a cigarette and holding a
little red book in his other hand.
                      GALLO
          What's this world coming too? They
          can whack the President in broad
          daylight.
                      WILLIE
          They got the guy who did it.
                                                 112

                      GALLO
          That guy? Anybody who knows
          anything knows that guy wasn't in it
          alone. Kennedy made himself a lot
          of enemies.
              (pause)
          I met him you know. His brother
          too. They had me down for
          questioning when they were running
          that racketeering committee.
Willie nods toward the book Gallo is holding.
                      WILLIE
          What are you reading about now?
                      GALLO
          Mao Tse-tung. A real revolutionary.
          The guy has the right idea.
                      WILLIE
          So what's his right idea?
                      GALLO
          Revolution. You need to read this
          Willie. It will change your way of
          thinking.
Willie shakes his head.
                      WILLIE
          Why the hell would I want to be part
          of a revolution when I work alone?
Gallo holds the book up to Willie.
                      GALLO
          You read this and you'll change your
          mind about working alone.
                      WILLIE
          I doubt it. Let me ask you a
          question?
              (pause)
          In your revolution, what happens to
          bank robbers?
Gallo smiles.
                      GALLO
          Ah! After the revolution, there are
          no banks.
                                                          113

                      WILLIE
          No banks?

                      GALLO
          There will be banks, but they'd
          belong to the people.
Willie shakes his head and points to a group of inmates
chatting amongst themselves.
                      WILLIE
          Between these maniacs who all think
          they're Clarence Darrow and now you
          trying to turn me into a Commie,
          it'll be a miracle if I don't end up
          in the nuthouse.
INT. ATTICA VISITORS ROOM -- DAY

Willie sits at a table with Katherine. Guards watch the
room where other inmates are speaking with visitors.
                      WILLIE
          Katherine, I'm so glad to see you.
          I think I know a way out of here.
Katherine flinches.
                      KATHERINE
          Willie, please don't tell me you're
          planning an escape?
                      WILLIE
          No. Nothing like that. I think
          there's a way out through the legal
          system.
Katherine shakes her head.
                      KATHERINE
          Willie, from everything I know about
          you and the case, you haven't a
          prayer.
                      WILLIE
          That's what I thought at first. But
          after a bit of research, I found a
          way to get my sentence reduced where
          I can get out of here in a few
          years.
Katherine smirks.
                                                 114

                      KATHERINE
          All right counselor. Convince me.

                      WILLIE
          Let's start with the conviction for
          the Rosenthal job in 1930.
              (pause)
          I got thirty years because I was
          sentenced as a second offender. The
          first offense they've been using on
          me is a 1926 attempted robbery of an
          Ozone Park bank. Suppose I found a
          technicality that invalidated that
          offense?
                      KATHERINE
          Then you would have to be
          resentenced for Rosenthal as a first
          offender.
                      WILLIE
          Right. Then my escape from Sing
          Sing would have taken place after my
          new sentence would have been served.
Katherine nods her head, smiling.
                      KATHERINE
          I understand precisely what you are
          trying to do, Willie. By
          invalidating the first offense, you
          have to get resentenced on all the
          subsequent offenses.
                      WILLIE
          Can you help me with this,
          Katherine.
                      KATHERINE
          I'll be back to see you next week on
          my way home from Buffalo. If you
          put together that technicality on
          your first offense, I'll start
          working on this with you. I know
          you can't afford to pay me. So
          don't worry, there's no fee.
                      WILLIE
          Thank you Katherine.   You're an
          angel from heaven.
                                                              115

INT. GRAND CENTRAL STATION, NEW YORK CITY -- NIGHT

The enormous room of the terminal is filled with onlookers
as dozens of uniformed policemen escort Willie through.
Amongst the crowd are news reporters and cameramen.
Cameras FLASH as the entourage passes through.
A REPORTER is speaking into a microphone.
                      REPORTER
          Slick Willie under heavy police
          escort on his way to Queens County.
          His destination is the same jail
          that held him some sixteen years ago
          when he was captured, tried, and
          given a life sentence. Now he
          returns while his attorney,
          Katherine Spyros Bitses, defends his
          case in hopes of an early parole.
INT. JAILHOUSE CORRIDOR -- NIGHT
Warden Klein walks up to Willie's cell where two guards sit
outside.
Willie sits on his cot, rises and walks to the bars when
Warden Klein arrives.
                      WILLIE
          Good evening, Warden.
Warden Klein smiles as he shakes his head.
                      WARDEN KLEIN
          Whose bright idea was this?
                      WILLIE
          You can blame it all on the legal
          system if you like.
                      WARDEN KLEIN
          Well. Welcome back Willie. I heard
          about your surgery. How are you
          feeling?
                      WILLIE
          Like shit. I've got plastic tubes
          in my chest replacing the clogged
          arteries, but at least the
          circulation is back in my legs so I
          can walk.
                                                        116

                      WARDEN KLEIN
          It's good that you got it fixed.

                       WILLIE
          Yeah. If I had croaked, those lousy
          bastards would probably have put my
          coffin back in the cell to serve out
          my sentence.
Warden Klein chuckles.
                      WARDEN KLEIN
          They'd also have it watched around
          the clock to make sure your corpse
          didn't slip out and escape.
                      WILLIE
          Don't forget Philly staking their
          claim to finish the sentence down
          there.
Warden Klein and Willie share a laugh.
Willie grabs his chest, grimacing in pain as he stops
laughing.
                      WARDEN KLEIN
          Are you all right Willie?
Willie breathes heavily and holds up his hand.
                      WILLIE
          I'm all right. It just hurts when I
          laugh.
                      WARDEN KLEIN
          Make sure you let me know if you
          need anything. All right?
                      WILLIE
          Sure Warden, and thank you.
                      WARDEN KLEIN
          Willie, I appreciated that you
          didn't cause me any trouble when you
          were here before. I wish you well.
              (pause)
          There are a lot of other people that
          are in your corner too.
                      WILLIE
          There are also those who are not.
                                                                 117

                                                  DISSOLVE TO:

EXT. QUEENS COUNTY JAILHOUSE -- NIGHT
Katherine Bitses is walking down the street as she
approaches the corner.
SUDDENLY -
Captain Feeney appears from around the corner of the
building and stands in front of Katherine.
Katherine jumps back and gasps.
                         FEENEY
             Do you know who I am?
Katherine stands up straight and looks directly at Feeney.

                         KATHERINE
             Yes. I know you. I know all about
             you. What are you doing here?
                         FEENEY
             I want to know what the hell you
             think you're doing?
                         KATHERINE
             What is it your business what I'm
             doing?
                         FEENEY
             When it comes to that punk Willie
             Sutton it's always my business.
                         KATHERINE
             Not anymore. You're no longer on
             the police force. You're retired
             and have no authority.
Feeney grabs Katherine by the arm and pushes her against the
building.
                         FEENEY
             You listen, you little whore. If
             you help get Sutton out of prison,
             both of you will regret it.
Katherine pulls her arm away from Feeney's grasp and stands
up to him.
                                                               118

                      KATHERINE
          Now you listen, Mr. Feeney. So help
          me I will not rest until Willie
          Sutton is a free man. I'll make
          sure he lives long after you drop
          dead, so he can piss on your rotten
          grave.
Feeney steps back as Katherine continues walking.
After a several steps, Katherine stops, turns and looks back
at the bewildered Feeney.
                       KATHERINE (CONT'D)
          And if you ever lay a hand on me
          again, I'll see that you are thrown
          in prison where a crooked cop like
          you belongs.

INT. JAILHOUSE VISITORS ROOM -- DAY
Willie sits with Katherine at a table.
                      KATHERINE
          Judge Farrell agreed to hear the
          motion to resentence you as a third
          offender instead of a fourth. That
          would set aside your existing life
          sentence for a new one.
                      WILLIE
          Would I get credit for the time
          already served?
                      KATHERINE
          You think I'm not looking out for
          you? Of course!
Willie smiles.
                      WILLIE
          Katherine, baby. Right now you're
          the most important person in my
          life.
                      KATHERINE
          Don't break out the champagne just
          yet. I have to get the detainers
          against you in Philly removed.
                      WILLIE
          But if I get resentenced before
          that, the reduction will be minimal.
                                                            119

                      KATHERINE
          Don't worry. Judge Farrell agreed
          to give us as much time as we need
          before scheduling the resentencing
              (pause)
          From what I hear about the courts in
          Philly, we're going to need that
          time.
INT. PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT ATTORNEYS OFFICE -- DAY
Katherine sits across from the District Attorney, seated
behind his desk.
                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          It really isn't necessary for you to
          continue coming down here Miss
          Bitses.

                      KATHERINE
          You assured me that your office
          would extend all the assistance I
          needed. Just send in the papers and
          you would see to the filing
          personally.
                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          That's right.
                      KATHERINE
          Yet when I sent the papers, somehow
          your office couldn't seem to find
          them.
                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          Things do get lost, Miss Bitses.   We
          have no control over that.
                      KATHERINE
              (angrily)
          All right. Things get lost. So I
          take the train down here to
          Filthadelphia, file them myself and
          then am told I'm not allowed to file
          because I'm not a member of the
          Pennsylvania bar!
The District Attorney smirks and leans back in his chair.
                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          Well you solved that by having the
          public defender's office file on
          your behalf. It's not my fault the
          judge dismissed the motion.
                                                         120

                      KATHERINE
              (sarcastically)
          Oh no. It's certainly not your
          fault. Given your political
          aspirations, you couldn't be held at
          fault.
The District Attorney's face turns serious.
                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          Would you please get to the point of
          your visit.
                      KATHERINE
          I've retained the services of the
          Dilworth firm and we are filing an
          appeal.
              (pause)
          I am not going away. I will take
          this as high up as necessary until
          justice prevails.
The District Attorney sighs and stands up.
                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          I'm going to excuse myself for a few
          moments. If you can wait here, we
          can continue with this when I
          return.
Later -
The District Attorney enters the room and takes a seat
behind his desk, across from Katherine.
                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY (CONT'D)
          All right Miss Bitses. I've given
          this matter some thought and believe
          we can arrive at a solution that is
          mutually acceptable.
                       KATHERINE
          All right.   What's the deal?
                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          While I believe the decision will
          stand through the appeal, you put
          this office in an awkward position.
                      KATHERINE
          I'll win the appeal and you know it.
                                                              121

                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          I don't agree with you, but I cannot
          afford to take the chance. If by
          some fluke the court rules in
          Sutton's favor, our courts would get
          flooded with writs by copycats
          throughout the city prisons.
                        KATHERINE
          Yes.    That will happen when we win.
                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          To prevent that, I propose that you
          withdraw the appeal. In return we
          will resentence your client based on
          a plea of guilty to a misdemeanor on
          the 1947 Holmesburg escape.
                      KATHERINE
          That's it? Credit for time served?
          He'll be free as far as Pennsylvania
          is concerned?
                        DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          Yes.    I think it's a fair deal.
                      KATHERINE
          The Supreme Court will cooperate and
          your office will not appeal the
          decision?
                      DISTRICT ATTORNEY
          That's correct.
INT. JAILHOUSE VISITORS ROOM -- DAY
INSERT - DAILY NEWS NEWSPAPER, JULY 21, 1969"
Headline reads "Men Walk on the Moon.    One Small Step for
Man, One Giant Leap for Mankind."
RETURN TO SCENE
Willie sits with Katherine at a table.
                      WILLIE
          Katherine, you're doing what we
          thought was impossible.
                      KATHERINE
          We're not done yet. In addition to
          the reduced sentences, Judge Farrell
          orders that you appear in Brooklyn
          before Judge Hyman Barshay.
                                                               122

                       WILLIE
           Sure. Then we're home free. We won
           in Philly, Queens, and Westchester.
           Hell, in Brooklyn I'm the hometown
           favorite.
                       KATHERINE
           It's not going to be so easy,
           Willie. The DA is going to fight it
           hard. They're going to bring up the
           Schuster murder and nobody's
           forgotten about that.
                       WILLIE
           Damn it! That will haunt me for the
           rest of my life. I had nothing to
           do with it. That poor kid. If only
           he got on a different train.

                       KATHERINE
           I'm going to do my best. This is
           the final hurdle. If it gets rough
           in that courtroom, I may have to use
           a different approach. Look, if a
           man can walk on the moon, I can sure
           as hell get Willie Sutton out of
           prison.
INT.   COURT ROOM -- DAY
Willie sits at a rectangular table in the front of the
courtroom with JOAN HARNES, Katherine's associate.
JUDGE HYMAN BARSHAY is seated behind a large desk on a
raised platform in the front of the courtroom, facing
everyone. A name plate reading "Judge Hyman Barshay" is in
front of the judge.
Katherine and DISTRICT ATTORNEY MARTHA PRINCE stand in front
of Judge Barshay.
                       MARTHA PRINCE
           In addition to his participation in
           the long list of armed robberies
           cited, Mr. Sutton refused to
           cooperate with the authorities in
           the attempts to apprehend the
           murderer of Arnold Schuster in 1952.
                                       123

            KATHERINE
This is ridiculous. There is not
and never has been the slightest
evidence that my client had any
involvement in that murder. This
continuous attempt to link Mr.
Sutton to Arnold Schuster's murder
needs to stop right now.
            JUDGE BARSHAY
I have in front of me a report from
Detective William McKeever of the
sixty-sixth precinct in Borough
Park. Detective McKeever has headed
the investigation of the unsolved
Schuster murder for the past
seventeen years. Miss Prince, as I
trust you've reviewed this report,
have you found any proof that Mr.
Sutton was involved in this murder?
            MARTHA PRINCE
No, Your Honor.
            JUDGE BARSHAY
Upon my review of this report, I
conclude that after the hundreds of
investigations conducted, there is
not a single matter of proof that
implicates Mr. Sutton.
    (pause)
I cannot substitute suspicion,
rumor, surmise, and guess for proof.
            KATHERINE
Thank you, Your Honor.
            JUDGE BARSHAY
Now, Miss Bitses.
    (pause)
Your tenacity and dedication to your
client is commendable. However,
upon reviewing his probation report,
I find the worst criminal record of
any man that has ever appeared
before me in forty-five years.
            KATHERINE
Your Honor, Mr. Sutton's health has
deteriorated to the point where he
is incapable of committing a crime
of any nature. He is sixty-seven
years old and has spent the majority
of his adult life in prison.
                                                             124

                      JUDGE BARSHAY
          Based on his record, he has received
          the proper sentencing as prescribed
          by law.
Willie hangs his head.
                      JUDGE BARSHAY (CONT'D)
          However, I must consider, as Judge
          Farrell did, the only ground upon
          which I will give mercy to him.
          That is the medical reports.
Willie looks back up.
Katherine smiles.
                      JUDGE BARSHAY (CONT'D)
          I am convinced that these doctors
          have given the correct diagnosis of
          the defendant's condition.
              (pause)
          Mr. Sutton, will you please rise.
Willie stands up.
                      JUDGE BARSHAY (CONT'D)
          This court imposes a sentence of no
          less than fifteen years and no more
          than twenty years on these charges.
              (pause)
          The sentence is hereby suspended and
          you will be placed on probation.
                      WILLIE
          Thank you, Your Honor.
                      JUDGE BARSHAY
          At the conclusion of this trial, you
          will be returned to Attica State
          Prison where you are currently
          serving your sentence. It will then
          be the decision of the parole board
          as to whether you will be set free.
INT. WILLIE'S CELL -- DAY
A GUARD approaches Willie's cell holding a large bundle of
mail and hands it to Willie.
                      GUARD
          More fan mail for you, Willie.
          You've got to be the most popular
          inmate Attica has ever seen.
                                                             125

Willie starts flipping through the envelopes.

                      GUARD (CONT'D)
          The one you're looking for is on the
          bottom.
Willie pulls out an envelope from the bottom, opens it and
starts reading.
                      GUARD (CONT'D)
          So when are you checking out of
          here?
Willie puts the letter on his cot, shakes his head, and
looks up sadly.
                       WILLIE
          I'm never getting out of here.    I've
          been denied.
INT. WARDEN'S OFFICE -- DAY
Katherine is standing in front of a desk, where WARDEN
MANCUSI is seated. She is angrily gesturing as she speaks.
                      KATHERINE
          I don't understand it. We fought
          for over a year and a half to get
          sentences reduced and the parole
          board shows up and denies his
          release? What sort of cruel system
          is this?
                      WARDEN MANCUSI
          Katherine, I had nothing to do with
          this. Please believe me. When it
          comes to the parole board, they make
          the final decision.
                      KATHERINE
          What about your report to them? He
          hasn't given you any trouble here.
          Didn't you speak favorably of him?
                      WARDEN MANCUSI
          Yes. Of course I did. After
          everything you did for him and that
          he's done for himself, I want to see
          him released. But I'm powerless in
          the decision.
                                                               126

                      KATHERINE
          Now he's not eligible to apply again
          until 1971. That's two more years,
          after his hopes have been raised
          that he could be home in a matter of
          days.
                      WARDEN MANCUSI
          I'm sorry Katherine. There's just
          nothing else I can do.
                      KATHERINE
          Well I'm not going to quit on him.
          I'll find a way to get Willie Sutton
          out of here before the end of the
          year. I owe it to him.
                      WARDEN MANCUSI
          I don't see how Katherine. The
          parole board denied him. The only
          thing that can get him released now
          is a pardon from the governor.
                      KATHERINE
          If that's what it takes, then I'll
          go right to Governor Rockefeller
          myself and won't leave until he
          pardons Willie.
EXT. ATTICA STATE PRISON -- NIGHT
A crowd of people including reporters and cameramen are
gathered outside the front entrance of Attica Prison.
Willie walks out the front gate with Katherine to a CHEERING
crowd, as cameras FLASH.
SUPER IN/OUT - "DECEMBER 24, 1969, ATTICA, NEW YORK"
Reporters surround Willie and Katherine, holding out their
microphones, as cameras continue to FLASH.
                      REPORTER #1
          Willie, did you think this day would
          ever come?
                      WILLIE
          I owe everything to Katherine Spyros
          Bitses. She never gave up and
          wouldn't take no for an answer.
                                                 127

                      REPORTER #2
          Miss Bitses, how did you do it?
          Especially after Willie's parole was
          denied?
                      KATHERINE
          After the parole board, our last
          hope was getting Governor
          Rockefeller to issue a pardon.
          Willie Sutton received a great deal
          of public support. The New York
          Post especially got behind him and
          letters started pouring into the
          Governor's office.
                      REPORTER #3
          Willie, you've become a hero to
          many. Is it true that you receive
          hundreds of fan letters regularly?
                      WILLIE
          I appreciate the support and kind
          words I've received. But I don't
          want to be looked at as a hero.
          Nobody should try to follow in my
          footsteps. I've spent most of my
          adult life in prison or hiding out.
          That's no way to live.
                       REPORTER #1
          What are you going to do now that
          you're free?
Willie smiles and holds up a paycheck.
                      WILLIE
          Well, I got paid $169 for my work
          here in prison. I guess I should go
          to a bank and open up an account.
The crowd laughs.
                      REPORTER #1
          Are you going to stay in New York?
                      WILLIE
          Why should I? The Dodgers left
          Brooklyn while I was away. Maybe
          I'll move to California and watch
          them play out there?
                      REPORTER #2
          What about the Mets? They won the
          World Series this year.
                                                               128

                      WILLIE
          Well, with a former Brooklyn Dodger,
          Gil Hodges, managing them, they did
          good. But they play in Queens, and
          I haven't had such good luck in
          Queens.
The crowd laughs.
                      REPORTER #1
          Willie, retired Captain Feeney
          passed away eleven days ago. He
          swore that if you were ever
          released, he'd be waiting for you.
          Do you have any comment?
                      WILLIE
          He was a tough cop and I believe he
          would have been waiting for me,
          retired or not.
                      REPORTER #3
          So now that you're a free man, what
          will you do now?
Willie smiles.
                                                DISSOLVE TO:
INT. FILM STUDIO -- DAY
INSERT - DAILY NEWS NEWSPAPER, OCTOBER 19, 1977
Headline reads "Jax' 3 Homers Rip LA, Reggie a Record-Setter
in 8-4 Win."
RETURN TO SCENE
Cameras, lights and props are set up on a commercial film
set where Willie stands wearing a blue blazer and red tie.
A DIRECTOR, CAMERAMAN and several other STAGE HANDS are
working on the set.
A MAKE-UP ARTIST finishes brushing Willie's face and steps
away.
                         DIRECTOR
          Okay Willie.     Three, Two, One,
          Action.
Willie holds up a Master Charge Card in his left hand.
                                                              129

                      WILLIE
          New Britain Bank and Trust has a new
          kind of Master Charge Card. They
          call it the face card.
Willie turns the card around, revealing the back, which has
his photo on it.
                       WILLIE (CONT'D)
          You see it has your face right on
          it. If your card is lost or stolen,
          don't worry.    Nobody can use your
          card because nobody has your face.
          Now when I say I'm Willie Sutton,
          people believe me.
Willie smiles.
                     DIRECTOR
          Cut. Okay Willie, that was great.
          Thank you.
Willie walks off the set.   Jeane comes up to him and they
hug.
                       JEANE
          Are you upset that the Yankees beat
          the Dodgers?
Willie shakes his head.
                      WILLIE
          Since those bums moved out to
          California they've never been the
          same.
Willie looks around.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          You've been careful that nobody
          knows who you are. Right?
                      JEANE
          Yes, Dad. I've done everything
          you've told me. Now come on over
          here. I have a surprise for you.
Willie's granddaughter CHRISTINE, now twenty-seven years
old, is standing by a car, holding the hand of an adorable
five-year-old girl, named CHRISTY.
                      JEANE (CONT'D)
          Remember your granddaughter,
          Christine?
                                                             130

                      WILLIE
          I still keep her picture with me.

Willie comes over and hugs Christine.
He looks over at CHRISTY.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Who is this charming young lady?
Christine leans over to Christy.
                      CHRISTINE
          Tell your great-grandfather your
          name.
                      CHRISTY
          My name is Christy and you're my
          great-grandfather.
Willie bends down and hugs little Chisty.
                      WILLIE
          Look at you. You look just like
          your Grandma did when she was five-
          years old. You look just like her.
          Go with your mommy, and we'll see
          you back at the hotel.
Christine and Christy get back in their car and drive off.
                      JEANE
          Aren't they special.
                      WILLIE
          I remember seeing you at five before
          I went a away. I knew what I missed
          out on.
Willie's eyes start to tear up.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          Seeing this beautiful little girl
          reminds me of what I gave up. Well,
          that's never going to happen again.
                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          I need to make a stop first.   Let's
          go to the bank.
Jeane shoots a worried look in Willie's direction.
Willie smiles and pulls out a check.
                                                            131

                      WILLIE (CONT'D)
          To cash this check so I can buy some
          gifts for all of you.
                      JEANE
          Dad, why did you rob banks?
                      WILLIE
          Why do you think?
              (pause)
          It's where the money was.
Willie smiles.
                                                 FADE OUT

				
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