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PREFACE

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Given a decline in the Negro family's economic and reproductive vitality under Jim Crow, the murderous assault on black men in the lynch-happy South, not to mention the burial of urban Negroes under northern prejudice, Du Bois concluded that the American state was at least passively contemplating the sacrifice of an entire race - held to be defective - to the rejuvenated national union. When Chip quotes Governor Allen Candler on the lynching of Hose, he points to the monstrous saturation of state power with racist ideology: in Chip's words, Candler "called on 'good negroes' to speak out against the sort of crimes that 'provofce' lynchings" (276; emphasis mine).

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