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					Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks
Biographical Information • Rosa Louise McCauley was born on February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama to James and Leona McCauley • When she was born, she had a mother and a father. At age two her family, including a younger brother, moved in with her maternal grandparents. • Her father was a carpenter, her mother was a seamstress.

Brief History of Racism in American Society
Racism was a huge part of American society when Rosa Parks became famous. Black people were treated no better than animals. In an interview, she said, "Back then, we didn't have any civil rights. It was just a matter of survival, of existing from one day to the next. I remember going to sleep as a girl hearing the Klan ride at night and hearing a lynching and being afraid the house would burn down."

Rosa’s Inspiration
• Events in Rosa’s life that encouraged her to stand her ground began when she was small. She said,”Back in

Montgomery during my growing up there, it was completely legally enforced racial segregation, and of course, I struggled against it for a long time. I felt that it was not right to be deprived of freedom when we were living in the Home of the Brave and Land of the Free.”

The Major Event that Started It All
December 1, 1955: Refusal to give up her seat

Two policemen came on the bus and one asked me if the driver had told me to stand and I said, yes. And he wanted to know why I didn't stand, and I told him I didn't think I should have to stand up. And then I asked him, why did they push us around? And he said and I quote him "I don't know, but the law is the law and you are under arrest." And with that, I got off the bus, under arrest.

Rosa’s Feelings about her Actions
I don't remember feeling that anger, but I did feel determined to take this as an opportunity to let it be known that I did not want to be treated in that manner and that people have endured it far too long. However, I did not have at the moment of my arrest any idea of how the people would react.

Rosa’s Feelings about Segregation
Back in Montgomery during my growing up there, it was completely legally enforced racial segregation, and of course, I struggled against it for a long time. I felt that it was not right to be deprived of freedom when we were living in the Home of the Brave and Land of the Free. Of course, when I refused to stand up, on the orders of the bus driver, for a white passenger to take the seat, and I was not sitting in the front of the bus, as many people have said, and neither was my feet hurting, as many people have said. But... I made up my mind that I would not give in any longer to legally-imposed racial segregation... ...and of course my arrest brought about the protests for more than a year. And in doing so, Dr. Martin Luther King became prominent because he was the leader of our protests along with many other people. And I'm very glad that this experience I had then brought about a movement that triggered across the United States and in other places.

Changes Rosa Helped Bring About
•Most historians date the beginning of the modern civil rights movement in the United States to December 1, 1955. That was the day when an unknown seamstress in Montgomery, Alabama refused to give up her bus seat to a white passenger. This brave woman, Rosa Parks, was arrested and fined for violating a city ordinance, but her lonely act of defiance began a movement that ended legal segregation in America, and made her an inspiration to freedom-loving people everywhere. •Racial segregation, in large part, ended after Rosa’s refusal to give in to segregation on a city bus. •The effects that Rosa’s actions had have been long lived.


				
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