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									Measuring Student Progress Committee
Formative assessments prepare teachers to improve and optimize their instruction based
on the detailed knowledge and understanding of individual student performance.

The Measuring Student Progress Committee is developing a bank of formative
assessments that align to the Alaska State Grade Level Expectations in math, reading, and
writing grades 3-10. These formative assessments are being developed with consistent
and sound measurement practices (content validity, construct validity, reliability, and
assessment bias), and are intended for use by all teachers in Alaska.

We believe it is critical that teachers coach for individual growth with the goal of moving
each student as far and as fast as possible toward a level of proficiency with regard to
Alaska’s Content and Performance Standards, and ultimately, the Alaska State
Benchmark and High School Qualifying Examinations.

We want teachers across the state to use these assessments (and develop similar
assessments) to guide and adjust their instruction during the learning process to
differentiate instruction, so that the needs of each student will be met.

We do not want to see these assessments used as a checklist or summative evaluation;
rather, the GLEs and formative assessments need to be embedded in high-quality
standards and performance-based instruction.

It is the further belief of this committee that teachers receive explicit training to ensure
that the assessments are used as they were intended. Anything we do to gather and
interpret information about kids’ learning should provide accurate and helpful input for
nurturing children’s further growth.
W1.1 The student writes complete sentences with a subject and predicate, writes a
paragraph with a topic sentence and supporting details, and writes short stories or
compositions with a beginning, middle, and end.

1.1.1 (3rd Grade) Writing about a topic by writing complete sentences with a subject and
a predicate


Option #1
Directions: Using a picture prompt (from either a book being read by the class or
another that is teacher-chosen), write one good sentence describing it.


Option #2
Directions: Fill in the blanks with words that complete the sentence:

1. Teddy ______________________ his bike.

2. The little _____________________ went to school.


Option #3
Directions:   Fill in the circle next to the complete sentence.
          o    Ran through the house and into the street.
          o    Went hunting on Saturday.
          o    My first king salmon.
          o    I love to watch the sunrise in the morning.




W03_1.1.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
W1.1 The student writes complete sentences with a subject and predicate, writes a
paragraph with a topic sentence and supporting details, and writes short stories or
compositions with a beginning, middle, and end.

1.1.1 (3rd Grade) Writing about a topic by writing complete sentences with a subject and
a predicate


Option #1
Directions: Using a picture prompt (from either a book being read by the class or
another that is teacher-chosen), write one good sentence describing it.

Proficient Response: Mastery is indicated by a sentence that has both subject and
predicate.


Option #2
Directions: Fill in the blanks with words that complete the sentence:

1. Teddy ______________________ his bike.

2. The little _____________________ went to school.

Proficient Response:
1. The sentence requires a predicate. Sample correct answers could be (but are not
limited to):
        Teddy rode his bike.
        Teddy liked his bike.
        Teddy found his bike.
        Teddy hates his bike.
        Etc.

2. The sentence requires a subject. Sample correct answers could be (but are not limited
to):
       The little boy went to school.
       The little girl went to school.
       The little dog went to school.
       Etc.


Option #3
Directions:    Fill in the circle next to the complete sentence.
          o     Ran through the house and into the street.
          o     Went hunting on Saturday.
          o     My first king salmon.
          o     I love to watch the sunrise in the morning.


W03_1.1.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
Proficient Response: Fourth choice is correct answer.
           o Ran through the house and into the street.
           o Went hunting on Saturday.
           o My first king salmon.
           o I love to watch the sunrise in the morning.




W03_1.1.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
W1.1 The student writes complete sentences with a subject and predicate, writes a
paragraph with a topic sentence and supporting details, and writes short stories or
compositions with a beginning, middle, and end.

1.1.2 (3rd Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a paragraph on a single topic with two
or more supporting details.


Option #1
Directions: Using a picture prompt (from either a book being read by the class or
another book that is teacher chosen) write a one-paragraph description of the picture.
Include at least two supporting details.


Option #2
Directions: Choose the best topic sentence for the following paragraph and fill in the
circle next to your answer below the paragraph. Underline two details in each paragraph
that support the topic.

  Its hairy coat and large size keep the bumblebee warm. When the temperature is too
  cold for other insects to fly, bumblebees can shiver their flying muscles to warm
  themselves. Then they can collect nectar and pollinate the flowers on the Alaskan
  tundra.

Best Topic Sentence:
  Ο Alaska is cold.
  Ο Bees make honey.
  Ο Not just any bee can survive Alaska’s long cold winters and short cool summers,
      but the bumblebee can.
  Ο Bumblebees pollinate many plants around the world.




W03_1.1.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
W1.1 The student writes complete sentences with a subject and predicate, writes a
paragraph with a topic sentence and supporting details, and writes short stories or
compositions with a beginning, middle, and end.

1.1.2 (3rd Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a paragraph on a single topic with two
or more supporting details.


Option #1
Directions: Using a picture prompt (from either a book being read by the class or
another book that is teacher chosen) write a one-paragraph description of the picture.
Include at least two supporting details.

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on Grade 3 Scoring
Guide/Rubric for Organization

                    3rd Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

          Advanced                           Proficient                       Below Proficient
• Writes complex sentences            • All sentences are                •   Few sentences are
  with more than just a                 complete with a subject              complete with a subject
  subject and a predicate               and a predicate.                     and predicate.
  (e.g., adverb, adjective,           • Writes a simple                  •   No paragraphing
  prepositional phrase, etc.)           paragraph that is                    attempted.
• Paragraphs include a topic            connected to a common            •   No supporting details
  sentence, 3 or more                   theme.                               are evident.
  supporting details, and a           • Writing includes a topic         •   Struggles writing a
  conclusion sentence.                  sentence and at least                simple paragraph that
• Writing includes logical              two supporting details.              is connected to a
  organization.                                                              common theme.



Option #2
Directions: Choose the best topic sentence for the following paragraph and fill in the
circle next to your answer below the paragraph. Underline two details in each paragraph
that support the topic.

  Its hairy coat and large size keep the bumblebee warm. When the temperature is too
  cold for other insects to fly, bumblebees can shiver their flying muscles to warm
  themselves. Then they can collect nectar and pollinate the flowers on the Alaskan
  tundra.




W03_1.1.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 2 of 3
Best Topic Sentence:
  Ο Alaska is cold.
  Ο Bees make honey.
  Ο Not just any bee can survive Alaska’s long cold winters and short cool summers,
      but the bumblebee can.
  Ο Bumblebees pollinate many plants around the world.

Proficient Response: Its hairy coat and large size keep the bumblebee warm. When the
temperature is too cold for other insects to fly, bumblebees can shiver their flying
muscles to warm themselves. Then they can collect nectar and pollinate the flowers on
the Alaskan tundra.

Ο Alaska is cold.
Ο Bees make honey.
Ο Not just any bee can survive Alaska’s long cold winters and short cool summers,
  but the bumblebee can.
Ο Bumblebees pollinate many plants around the world.




W03_1.1.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
W1.1 The student writes complete sentences with a subject and predicate, writes a
paragraph with a topic sentence and supporting details, and writes short stories or
compositions with a beginning, middle, and end.

1.1.3 (3rd Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a story or composition with a
beginning, middle, and end. (Locally Assessed)

Directions: Stories tend to come out differently when people tell how they remember
things. What if the wolf told the story of “The Three Little Pigs” or the witch told the
story of “Hansel and Gretel”? Pick a well-known story that lots of people have read or
heard. Retell it as if you were a character in the story. Use your imagination to get inside
your character’s skin.




W03_1.1.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W1.1 The student writes complete sentences with a subject and predicate, writes a
paragraph with a topic sentence and supporting details, and writes short stories or
compositions with a beginning, middle, and end.

1.1.3 (3rd Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a story or composition with a
beginning, middle, and end. (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Stories tend to come out differently when people tell how they remember
things. What if the wolf told the story of “The Three Little Pigs” or the witch told the
story of “Hansel and Gretel”? Pick a well-known story that lots of people have read or
heard. Retell it as if you were a character in the story. Use your imagination to get inside
your character’s skin.

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Third Grade Scoring
Guide/Rubric for Organization.


                    3rd Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

         Advanced                        Proficient                     Below Proficient
•    Writes complex               •   All sentences are          •    Few sentences are
     sentences with more              complete with a                 complete with a subject
     than just a subject and          subject and a                   and predicate.
     a predicate (e.g.,               predicate.                 •    No paragraphing
     adverb, adjective,           •   Writes a simple                 attempted.
     prepositional phrase,            paragraph that is          •    Writing does not have a
     etc.)                            connected to a                  beginning, middle, and
•    Paragraphs include a             common theme.                   end.
     topic sentence, 3 or         •   Writing includes a         •    No supporting details
     more supporting                  beginning, middle               are evident.
     details and a                    and end with at least      •    Struggles writing a
     conclusion sentence.             two supporting                  simple paragraph that is
•    Writing includes a               details.                        connected to a common
     beginning, middle and                                            theme.
     end with logical
     organization.
     .




W03_1.1.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W1.2 Write for a specific audience, including self, other children, parents, and other
adults.

1.2.1 (3rd Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by choosing the
appropriate organizational structure to match a purpose and audience (e.g., letters and
notes, recounts, stories, and poems). (Locally Assessed)


Directions: You would like a longer recess. Which of the following would be best to
write to your principal to get a longer recess? Place a checkmark by your answer.
        Letter
        Poem
        Story
        Picture




W03_1.2.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W1.2 Write for a specific audience, including self, other children, parents, and other
adults.

1.2.1 (3rd Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by choosing the
appropriate organizational structure to match a purpose and audience (e.g., letters and
notes, recounts, stories, and poems). (Locally Assessed)


Directions: You would like a longer recess. Which of the following would be best to
write to your principal to get a longer recess? Place a checkmark by your answer.
        Letter
        Poem
        Story
        Picture

Proficient Response: The correct choice is “letter.”

        Letter
        Poem
        Story
        Picture




W03_1.2.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W1.2 Write for a specific audience, including self, other children, parents, and other
adults.

1.2.2 (3rd Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using expressive
language when responding to literature or producing text (e.g., journals, pictures
supported by text or poetry) (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write a sentence or two about the following picture. Use descriptive,
colorful, and emotional words to explain the scene.




________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




R03_1.2.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W1.2 Write for a specific audience, including self, other children, parents, and other
adults.

1.2.2 (3rd Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using expressive
language when responding to literature or producing text (e.g., journals, pictures
supported by text or poetry) (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write a sentence or two about the following picture. Use descriptive,
colorful, and emotional words to explain the scene.




Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Scoring
Guide/Rubric below.

                          3rd Scoring Guide/Rubric for Expression

        Advanced                        Proficient                      Below Proficient
 • Writer’s personality          • Language is clear and          • Words are general, vague,
   is clear with a sense           easy to understand.              or redundant and do not
   of purpose.                   • Uses adjectives,                 create a clear picture.
 • Writer attempts to use          adverbs, strong verbs,         • Words are often misused
   descriptive words to            etc.                             making the sentences
   create a clear image.                                            difficult to understand.
 • Writer often uses                                              • Uses few adjectives,
   adverbs, adjectives,                                             adverbs, strong verbs etc.
   strong verbs, etc.




R03_1.2.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W1.3 The student uses a variety of simple sentence structures and basic rules of
punctuation in written work, and proofreads writing for legibility, spelling,
capitalization, and punctuation when producing final drafts.

1.3.1 (3rd Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by writing a
variety of complete, simple sentences (i.e., statement, question, exclamation)


Directions: Write the correct punctuation mark at the end of each of the following
sentences.

        1. Ann went to the store to buy bread
        2. Can you please hand me a pencil
        3. Oh no, I forgot my homework
        4. I can’t wait to see my cousin
        5. We played ball until it was time for supper
        6. May I go to my friend’s house after school




R03_1.3.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W1.3 The student uses a variety of simple sentence structures and basic rules of
punctuation in written work, and proofreads writing for legibility, spelling,
capitalization, and punctuation when producing final drafts.

1.3.1 (3rd Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by writing a
variety of complete, simple sentences (i.e., statement, question, exclamation)


Directions: Write the correct punctuation mark at the end of each of the following
sentences.

        1. Ann went to the store to buy bread
        2. Can you please hand me a pencil
        3. Oh no, I forgot my homework
        4. I can’t wait to see my cousin
        5. We played ball until it was time for supper
        6. May I go to my friend’s house after school

Proficient Response: Five correct ending punctuation marks out of six indicates a
proficient response.
        1. period
        2. question mark
        3. exclamation mark
        4. exclamation mark
        5. period
        6. question mark




R03_1.3.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W1.3 The student uses a variety of simple sentence structures and basic rules of
punctuation in written work, and proofreads writing for legibility, spelling,
capitalization, and punctuation when producing final drafts.

1.3.2 (3rd Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by noticing
mistakes in spelling (e.g., grade-appropriate, high frequency words). (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Circle the word in each line that is spelled correctly.

1.      not            nott             nat

2.      aind           annd             and

3.      thay           they             theey

4.      hade           hed              had

5.      from           frum             farum

6.      awr            arre             are

7.      wuz            was              wase

8.      you            yuu              yoo

9.      phat           that             thot

10.     hav            heve             have




R03_1.3.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
W1.3 The student uses a variety of simple sentence structures and basic rules of
punctuation in written work, and proofreads writing for legibility, spelling,
capitalization, and punctuation when producing final drafts.

1.3.2 (3rd Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by noticing
mistakes in spelling (e.g., grade-appropriate, high frequency words). (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Circle the word in each line that is spelled correctly.

1.      not              nott             nat

2.      aind             annd             and

3.      thay             they             theey

4.      hade             hed              had

5.      from             frum             farum

6.      awr              arre             are

7.      wuz              was              wase

8.      you              yuu              yoo

9.      phat             that             thot

10.     hav              heve             have


Proficient Response: Correct spellings are underlined. Eighty percent is considered
proficient.

1.      not              nott             nat
2.      aind             annd             and
3.      thay             they             theey
4.      hade             hed              had
5.      from             frum             farum
6.      awr              arre             are
7.      wuz              was              wase
8.      you              yuu              yoo
9.      phat             that             thot
10.     hav              heve             have




R03_1.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                               Addendum for Spelling Grade 3

                       Sample grade appropriate high frequency list

Numerical order represents the frequency of word use. For example “the” is the #1
most frequently used word at this level, “of” is the #2 most frequently used word for
this level.


a [4]                             is (7)
and [3]                           it (9)
are [15]                          not (30)
as [16]                           of (2)
at [20]                           on (14)
be [21]                           one (28)
by [27]                           or (26)
for [12]                          that (10)
from [23]                         the (1)
had [29]                          they (19)
have [25]                         this (22)
he [11]                           to (5)
his (18)                          was (13)
I [24]                            with (17)
in [6]                            you (8)




R03_1.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
W1.3 The student uses a variety of simple sentence structures and basic rules of
punctuation in written work, and proofreads writing for legibility, spelling,
capitalization, and punctuation when producing final drafts.

1.3.3 (3rd Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
noticing mistakes in punctuation at the end of sentences and capitalization (i.e., beginning
of sentences and proper nouns) (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write each sentence with the correct punctuation and capitalization.

1. it is a misty morning

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


2. fred, sue, and bob live in fairbanks, alaska

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


3. my sister and I were born on january 5, 1995

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


4. how much will it cost to buy bread, jam, milk, and cookies

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


5. the best christmas pageant ever is my favorite book

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________




W03_1.3.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
6. dear mrs. jones,

       where were you today I couldn’t do my work because bob let the snake out of its
cage it was scary

your friend,
betsy

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


7. the principal said, “ all students must get on the pink bus”

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________




W03_1.3.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
W1.3 The student uses a variety of simple sentence structures and basic rules of
punctuation in written work, and proofreads writing for legibility, spelling,
capitalization, and punctuation when producing final drafts.

1.3.3 (3rd Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
noticing mistakes in punctuation at the end of sentences and capitalization (i.e., beginning
of sentences and proper nouns) (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write each sentence with the correct punctuation and capitalization.

1. it is a misty morning

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


2. fred, sue, and bob live in fairbanks, alaska

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


3. my sister and I were born on january 5, 1995

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


4. how much will it cost to buy bread, jam, milk, and cookies

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


5. the best christmas pageant ever is my favorite book

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________




W03_1.3.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
6. dear mrs. jones,

       where were you today I couldn’t do my work because bob let the snake out of its
cage it was scary

your friend,
betsy

__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________


7. the principal said, “ all students must get on the pink bus”

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________


Proficient Response: Correct answers are below. Proficiency is 27 out of 33 correct
answers.

1. It is a misty morning. (2 points possible)

2. Fred, Sue, and Bob live in Fairbanks, Alaska. (6 points possible)

3. My sister and I were born on January 5, 1995. (3 points possible)

4. How much will it cost to buy bread, jam, milk, and cookies? (2 points possible)

5. The Best Christmas Pageant Ever is my favorite book. (6 points possible)

6. Dear Mrs. Jones,
        Where were you today? I couldn’t do my work because Bob let the snake out of
   its cage. It was scary!

   Your friend,
    Betsy
  (11 points possible)

7. The principal said, “All students must get on the pink box.” (3 points possible)




W03_1.3.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
W1.3 The student uses a variety of simple sentence structures and basic rules of
punctuation in written work, and proofreads writing for legibility, spelling,
capitalization, and punctuation when producing final drafts.

1.3.4 (3rd Grade) The students writes and edits using conventions of Standard English
by rewriting handwritten work to improve legibility, if necessary, when producing final
drafts. (Locally Assessed)

Directions: This scoring guide may be used for assessing either cursive or manuscript on
any student writing sample.

                  3rd Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Handwriting

    Trait             Advanced                    Proficient                 Below Proficient
Letter          Each letter is formed        80% of the letters are       Less than 80% of the
Formation       correctly.                   formed correctly.            letters are formed
                                                                          correctly.

Letter Slant    All letters have a           Most letters have a          Slant of letters vary
                uniform slant.               uniform slant.               from letter to letter.

Neatness        There are no extra           There are 3-5 visible        There are more than 5
                visible marks or             marks or smudges on          visible marks or
                smudges on the paper.        the paper.                   smudges on the
                                                                          paper.

Relationship    All letters are located      Most letters are             Most letters are larger
To Line         correctly in                 located correctly in         or smaller than the
                relationship to the          relationship to the          space allowed by the
                lines.                       lines, but some are          line.
                                             slightly larger or
                                             smaller than the space
                                             allowed by the line.

Spacing         There is appropriate         There is consistently        There is inconsistent
                spacing between all          appropriate spacing          spacing between
                letters and words.           between most letters         letters and words.
                                             and words.




W03_1.3.4       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 1 of 1
W1.4 The student revises writing for detail and clarity, and provides appropriate
feedback to peers about written work.

1.4.1 (3rd Grade) Revising writing by rearranging and/or adding supporting details to
improve clarity


Option #1
Directions: Revise the following sentences to make them easier to understand.

1. Through a difficult time we’ve been going.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. Brad quietly sat.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


3. No one for a while said anything.

_______________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


4. For a long time I haven’t read a book.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




R03_1.4.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 6
5. On the basketball team John was.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


Option #2
Directions: Rewrite the following sentences adding at least two details to make them
more interesting.

1. Arlie wanted a bike.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. Marilyn drew a picture.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


3. I gave it to Jane.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




R03_1.4.1         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 6
4. The boy cried.

_______________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________



5. It’s simple.

_______________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




R03_1.4.1         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 6
W1.4 The student revises writing for detail and clarity, and provides appropriate
feedback to peers about written work.

1.4.1 (3rd Grade) Revising writing by rearranging and/or adding supporting details to
improve clarity


Option #1
Directions: Revise the following sentences to make them easier to understand.

1. Through a difficult time we’ve been going.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. Brad quietly sat.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


3. No one for a while said anything.

_______________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


4. For a long time I haven’t read a book.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




R03_1.4.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 6
5. On the basketball team John was.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


Proficient Response: Proficiency is four out of five sentences written correctly.

1. We’ve been going through a difficult time.

2. Brad sat quietly.

3. No one said anything for a while.
   Or: For a while, no one said anything.

4. I haven’t read a book for a long time.

5. John was on the basketball team.


Option #2
Directions: Rewrite the following sentences adding at least two details to make them
more interesting.

1. Arlie wanted a bike.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. Marilyn drew a picture.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




R03_1.4.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 6
________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


3. I gave it to Jane.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


4. The boy cried.

_______________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________



5. It’s simple.

_______________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


Proficient Response: Accept reasonable responses. Sample answers follow below.
Proficiency is four out of five sentences written correctly.

1.   Arlie really wanted to buy a new bike.
2.   Marilyn drew a beautiful picture of her home.
3.   I quickly gave the ball to Jane in the game Saturday because she was open.
4.   The young boy cried quietly in his room when he lost his beloved dog, Rebel.
5.    Learning how to make a paper airplane is very simple.




R03_1.4.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 6 of 6
W1.4 The student revises writing for detail and clarity, and provides appropriate
feedback to peers about written work.

1.4.2 (3rd Grade) Revising revises writing by giving/receiving appropriate feedback
about written work (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: This peer editing guide may be used for students giving feedback to other
students about their written work.

                                      Peer Editing Rubric

Editor

Editing the work of _________________________

Grammar and Parts of Speech

         Check the spelling of the words I have circled on your paper.

         Each sentence begins with a capital letter.

         Each sentence ends with an end mark.

         Each sentence has a subject and predicate.

Reasons for Writing:

         I can “see” what the writer is telling.

    I would like to know more about:

         __________________________________________

    I liked the part about:



Signatures:


__________________________                                 ______________________________
Writer                                                     Editor




R04_1.4.2         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
Option #2
Directions: The following six-trait scoring guide is matched to Grade 3 Grade Level Expectations.
It may be used as a peer or self-assessment tool to allow students to give appropriate feedback and
review work.
                         3rd Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric
      Trait               Advanced                 Proficient                           Below Proficient
  Ideas and        All of steps in proficient     • Sentences follow a           • Not all sentences follow a
  Content          column plus the following:       common theme.                  common theme.
                   • The paper is clear,          • Ideas are on one topic       • Writer shows little
                      focused, and enhanced         but themes and ideas           understanding of task. Poor
                      by details.                   may be simple.                 or no effort shown.
                   • Writer understands topic     • Goal of paper is clear to    • Writing is hard to follow.
                      well.                         reader and it is easy to     • Writer has a sketchy idea
                   • Writer starts to use           see where writer is            but little cohesion.
                      personal examples.            headed.                      • Goal of paper is unclear.
                                                  • Paper is original.
  Organization     • Writes complex               • All sentences are            • Some sentences are
                     sentences with more than       complete with a subject        incomplete without a subject
                     just a subject and a           and a predicate.               and predicate.
                     predicate (e.g., adverb,     • Writes a simple              • Struggles writing a simple
                     adjective, prepositional       paragraph that is              paragraph that is connected
                     phrase, etc.)                  connected to a common          to a common theme.
                   • Paragraphs include a           theme.                       • No paragraphing attempted
                     topic sentence, 4 or more    • Writing includes a topic       or structure is confusing.
                     supporting details and a       sentence and at least        • Fewer than three details are
                     conclusion sentence.           three supporting details.      evident.
                   • Writing includes a           • Writing includes a           • Ideas are fragmented and do
                     beginning, middle, and         beginning, middle, and         not have a beginning,
                     end with logical               end.                           middle, or end.
                     organization.                • Writing uses the most        • Organizational structure is
                   • Uses a unique and              appropriate                    confusing.
                     effective organizational       organizational structure
                     structure for the purpose      for the purpose and
                     and audience.                  audience.
  Voice            • Writer’s personality is      • Language is clear and easy   • Voice is inappropriate to the
                     clear with a sense of          to understand (not             topic, purpose, or audience.
                     purpose.                       flowery).
                                                  • Voice is appropriate to
                                                    topic, purpose, and
                                                    audience.
  Word Choice      • Writer attempts to use       • Final draft includes         • Words are vague, or
                     descriptive words to           supporting details to          redundant so that they do
                     create images and often        improve clarity (uses          not create a clear picture.
                     uses adverbs, adjective        adverbs, adjective           • Words often misused,
                     clauses, strong verbs,         clauses, strong verbs,         making the paper very
                     transition clauses, and        transition clauses, and/or     difficult to understand.
                     strong adjective clauses       strong adjective clauses     • Some words used
                     in paragraph(s).               in paragraph(s).               incorrectly which may
                                                                                   confuse the reader.
                                                                                 • Uses few adverbs, strong
                                                                                   verbs, transition clauses, and
                                                                                   strong adjective clauses in
                                                                                   paragraph(s).




  R04_1.4.2         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 2 of 3
Sentence      • Sentences begin to have        • All sentences are             • Some sentences do not
Fluency         variations in length and         complete, easy to               make sense, which
                beginnings.                      understand, and                 makes the paper hard to
              • Sentences start to have          grammatically correct.          understand.
                some rhythm and are easy       • All sentences contain a       • Some sentence
                to read.                         subject and a predicate.        fragments and run-on
                                                                                 sentences exist.

Conventions   • Simple punctuation is          • Capitals at the beginning     • Punctuation and
                used accurately, including       of sentences and on             capitalization is not
                commas in dates, series,         proper nouns are in place       always appropriate or in
                and in letters.                  and correct.                    place.
              • Capitalization in book         • Ending punctuation is in      • There are errors in
                titles is accurate and           place and correct.              subject/verb agreement.
                present when applicable.       • Spelling of grade             • Final draft is not legible
              • Spelling is 90 - 100%            appropriate/high                in cursive or
                accurate on grade                frequency words is at least     manuscript.
                appropriate/high                 80% accurate (Fry/Dolch       • Consistent errors in
                frequency words                  list 1-400, local spelling      spelling, capitalization
                (Fry/Dolch list 1-400,           words, etc.).                   and punctuation exist.
                local spelling words, etc.).   • Spelling of less frequent
              • Contractions are used            words shows errors.
                accurately.                    • Final draft is legible in
              • Final draft is neatly            cursive or manuscript.
                written in cursive or
                manuscript with
                conformation to size,
                slant, shape, and spacing.




R04_1.4.2      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 3 of 3
W1.5 The student lists titles and authors of books and other materials when used as
references in written work.

1.5.1 (3rd Grade) Documenting sources by listing sources and titles of books and other
materials when used as references in written work (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Have students write a report using at least three sources to gather
information.

Proficient Response: Use the following rubric to evaluate student citations in written
work.

                      3rd Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Citations

           Advanced                         Proficient                      Below Proficient
•   Student lists the author     •   Student lists the author        •    Student lists only the
    first in a citation then         and title of at least 3              title or author in the
    the title.                       books related to their               citations.
•   The author’s last name           topic.                          •    Student may not have at
    is written first.                                                     least 3 sources.
•   The list of sources is in     Who Moved My Cheese by
    alphabetical order.           Spencer Johnson                    Who Moved My Cheese

Johnson, Spencer, Who
Moved My Cheese




R03_1.5.1         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006     Page 1 of 1
The following scoring guide/rubric can be used to assess multiple third grade GLEs.
Teachers can use this scoring guide/rubric with any writing sample students produce to
evaluate their progress on third grade GLEs.

                           3rd Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric

    Trait              Advanced                          Proficient                          Not Proficient
Ideas and       All of steps in proficient    • Sentences follow a common            • Not all sentences follow a
Content         column plus the following:      theme.                                 common theme.
                • The paper is clear,         • Ideas are on one topic but themes    • Writer shows little
GLE: 1.1.2         focused and enhanced by      and ideas may be simple.               understanding of task. Poor or
                   details.                   • Goal of paper is clear to reader       no effort shown.
                • Writer understands topic      and it is easy to see where writer   • Writing is hard to follow.
                   well.                        is headed.                           • Writer has a sketchy idea but
                • Writer starts to use        • Paper is original.                     little cohesion.
                   personal examples.                                                • Goal of paper is unclear.

Organization    • Writes complex              • All sentences are complete with      • Some sentences are incomplete
                  sentences with more than      a subject and a predicate.             without a subject and predicate.
GLE: 1.1.1,       just a subject and a        • Writes a simple paragraph that is    • Struggles writing a simple
1.1.2, 1.1.3,     predicate (e.g., adverb,      connected to a common theme.           paragraph that is connected to a
1.2.1             adjective, prepositional    • Writing includes a topic sentence      common theme.
                  phrase, etc.)                 and at least three supporting        • No paragraphing attempted or
                • Paragraphs include a          details.                               structure is confusing.
                  topic sentence, 4 or more   • Writing includes a beginning,        • Fewer than three details are
                  supporting details and a      middle, and end.                       evident.
                  conclusion sentence.        • Writing uses the most                • Ideas are fragmented and do not
                • Writing includes a            appropriate organizational             have a beginning, middle, or
                  beginning, middle, and        structure for the purpose and          end.
                  end with logical              audience.                            • Organizational structure is
                  organization.                                                        confusing.
                • Uses a unique and
                  effective organizational
                  structure for the purpose
                  and audience.
Voice           • Writer’s personality is     • Language is clear and easy to        • Voice is inappropriate to the
                  clear with a sense of         understand (not flowery).              topic, purpose, or audience.
GLE: 1.2.1,       purpose.                    • Voice is appropriate to topic,
1.2.2                                           purpose, and audience.
Word Choice     • Writer attempts to use      • Final draft includes supporting      • Words are general, vague, or
                  descriptive words to          details to improve clarity (uses       redundant so that they do not
GLE: 1.2.2,       create images and often       adverbs, adjective clauses, strong     create a clear picture.
1.4.1             uses adverbs, adjective       verbs, transition clauses, and/or    • Words often misused making
                  clauses, strong verbs,        strong adjective clauses in            the paper very difficult to
                  transition clauses, and       paragraph(s)).                         understand.
                  strong adjective clauses                                           • Some words used incorrectly
                  in paragraph(s).                                                     which may confuse the reader.
                                                                                     • Uses few adverbs, strong verbs,
                                                                                       transition clauses, and strong
                                                                                       adjective clauses in
                                                                                       paragraph(s) to improve clarity.
Sentence       • Sentences begin to have        • All sentences are complete,         • Some sentences do not make
Fluency          variations in length and         easy to understand, and               sense, which makes the paper
                 beginnings.                      grammatically correct.                hard to understand.
GLE: 1.3.1     • Sentences start to have        • All sentences contain a subject     • Some sentence fragments and
                 some rhythm and are easy         and a predicate.                      run-on sentences exist.
                 to read.
Conventions    • Simple punctuation is          • Capitals at the beginning of        • Punctuation and
                 used accurately, including       sentences and on proper nouns         capitalization is not always
GLE: 1.3.2,      commas in dates, series,         are in place and correct.             appropriate or in place.
1.3.3, 1.3.4     and in letters.                • Ending punctuation is in place      • Errors in subject/verb
               • Capitalization in book           and correct.                          agreement.
                 titles is accurate and         • Spelling of grade                   • Final draft is not legible in
                 present when applicable.         appropriate/high frequency            cursive or manuscript.
               • Spelling is 90 - 100%            words is at least 80% accurate      • Consistent errors in spelling,
                 accurate on grade                (Fry/Dolch list 1-400, local          capitalization and punctuation
                 appropriate/high                 spelling words, etc.).                exist.
                 frequency words                • Spelling of less frequent words
                 (Fry/Dolch list 1-400,           shows errors.
                 local spelling words, etc.).   • Final draft is legible in cursive
               • Contractions are used            or manuscript.
                 accurately.
               • Final draft is neatly
                 written in cursive or
                 manuscript with
                 conformation to size,
                 slant, shape, and spacing.
W2.1 The student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that
addresses a single topic.

2.1.1 (4th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a paragraph that maintains a focused
idea and includes details that support the main idea.


Directions: Write a paragraph that answers the following prompt. Be sure to include a
main idea and details that support the main idea.

Prompt:
What qualities do you think a hero should possess? Explain what it means to be a hero.
You may wish to use someone from public life or someone you know personally as an
example.

________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.1.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.1 The student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that
addresses a single topic.

2.1.1 (4th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a paragraph that maintains a focused
idea and includes details that support the main idea.


Directions: Write a paragraph that answers the following prompt. Be sure to include a
main idea and details that support the main idea.

Prompt:
What qualities do you think a hero should possess? Explain what it means to be a hero.
You may wish to use someone from public life or someone you know personally as an
example.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Grade 4 Scoring
Guide/Rubric for Ideas and Content.

                 4th Grade Scoring/Guide Rubric for Ideas and Content

         Advanced                          Proficient             Below Proficient
•   Topic is well-               •    The paragraph is clear, • Writer shows little
    developed and details             focused and enhanced      understanding of the task.
    paint a clear picture.            by two or more details • Main idea of the paper is
•   Writes at least three             that support the main     unclear.
    paragraphs that are               idea.                   • Paper may not include at
    focused.                     •    The writing is at least   least two supporting
•   Paragraphs include a              one paragraph in          details.
    topic sentence, three or          length.
    more supporting
    details, and a
    conclusion sentence.




W04_2.1.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.1 The student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that
addresses a single topic.

2.1.2 (4th Grade) Writing about a topic by organizing ideas logically. (Locally
Assessed)

Option #1
Directions: Put the following sentences in the best order:
_____ A. Then, snapping madly, the crab tried to pinch his captor’s hands.
_____ B. Ernie picked up a rock from the shoreline.
_____ C. Then he saw legs stretch out from beneath the rock and pinchers
          unfold from its side.
_____ D. He was surprised to feel movement in his hand.
_____ E. “It’s a crab!” he told his mom.


Option #2
Directions: You have read stories that explain why something in nature is the way it is,
such as “Why the Camel Has a Hump.” Make up an imaginative story to tell why
something is the way it is. Avoid the purely scientific explanation or the realistic
approach and have fun creating a new explanation that is all your own. Your story must
include at least two paragraphs.

________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.1.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.1 The student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that
addresses a single topic.

2.1.2 (4th Grade) Writing about a topic by organizing ideas logically. (Locally
Assessed)

Option #1
Directions: Put the following sentences in the best order:
_____ A. Then, snapping madly, the crab tried to pinch his captor’s hands.
_____ B. Ernie picked up a rock from the shoreline.
_____ C. Then he saw legs stretch out from beneath the rock and pinchers
          unfold from its side.
_____ D. He was surprised to feel movement in his hand.
_____ E. “It’s a crab!” he told his mom.

Proficient Response:
       A. 5                        A.   5
       B. 1                        B.   1
       C. 3      or                C.   4
       D. 2                        D.   2
       E. 4                        E.   3

Option #2
Directions: You have read stories that explain why something in nature is the way it is,
such as “Why the Camel Has a Hump.” Make up an imaginative story to tell why
something is the way it is. Avoid the purely scientific explanation or the realistic
approach and have fun creating a new explanation that is all your own. Your story must
include at least two paragraphs.

Proficient Response:
Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Grade 4 Scoring Guide/Rubric for
Organization
                  4th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

            Advanced                         Proficient                    Below Proficient
 • The student writes at least 3   • Writing is focused and           • Writing is less than two
   paragraphs that are focused       includes at least two              paragraphs.
 • Paragraphs include a topic        paragraphs.                      • Writing has few, incoherent,
   sentence, 3 or more             • Writing is enhanced by two or      or jumbled ideas.
   supporting details, and a         more details that support the    • Writing does not have a
   conclusion sentence.              main idea.                         complete beginning, middle,
 • Writing includes a well         • Paper has logical sequencing       and/or end.
   developed beginning,              including a beginning, middle,   • Ending is abrupt: “The End.”
   middle, and end with              and ending with a concluding
   logical organization.             statement.




W04_2.1.2          Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 2 of 2
W2.1 The student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that
addresses a single topic.

2.1.3 (4th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a story or composition with a
beginning, middle, and ending with a concluding statement (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Kids today sometimes get negative publicity. Think of a kid you know who
has personal qualities that you admire and respect. Describe this person and what makes
him or her special to you. Include a strong concluding statement.

________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.1.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.1 The student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that
addresses a single topic.

2.1.3 (4th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a story or composition with a
beginning, middle, and ending with a concluding statement (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Kids today sometimes get negative publicity. Think of a kid you know who
has personal qualities that you admire and respect. Describe this person and what makes
him or her special to you. Include a strong concluding statement.

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Grade 4 Scoring
Guide/ Rubric for Organization.

                     4th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

         Advanced                          Proficient                      Not Proficient
•   Student writes at least 3     •   Writing is focused and        •   Writing is less than
    paragraphs that are               includes at least two             two paragraphs.
    focused.                          paragraphs.                   •   Writing has few,
•   Paragraphs include a          •   Writing is enhanced by            incoherent, or jumbled
    topic sentence, 3 or              two or more details that          ideas.
    more supporting details,          support the main idea.        •   Writing does not have
    and a strong conclusion       •   Paper has logical                 a complete beginning,
    sentence.                         sequencing including a            middle, and/or end.
•   Writing includes a well           beginning and middle,         •   Ending is abrupt: “The
    developed beginning,              and ending with a                 End.”
    middle, and end with              concluding statement.
    logical organization.




W04_2.1.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.1 (4th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing an
understandable story that incorporates setting, character, problem, and solution


Directions: Write a story to the following prompt.

Prompt: Two cross-country skiers come across an isolated cabin. The front door is
open. A hot meal is on the table. A car is in the garage, but no one appears to be home.
Use your imagination develop a story about what happens in this scene. Be sure to
describe the setting, character, problem, and solution.




W04_2.2.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.1 (4th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing an
understandable story that incorporates setting, character, problem, and solution


Directions: Write a story to the following prompt.

Prompt: Two cross-country skiers come across an isolated cabin. The front door is
open. A hot meal is on the table. A car is in the garage, but no one appears to be home.
Use your imagination develop a story about what happens in this scene. Be sure to
describe the setting, character, problem, and solution.

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Grade 4 Scoring
Guide/Rubric for Organization

                     4th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

        Advanced                         Proficient                      Below Proficient
•   Writes at least 3          •    Writing is focused, at       •    Writing has few,
    paragraphs that are             least one paragraph,              incoherent. or jumbled
    focused.                        and enhanced by two or            ideas.
•   Paragraphs include a            more details that            •    Writing does not have a
    topic sentence, 3 or            support the main idea.            complete beginning,
    more supporting            •    Paper has logical                 middle, and/or end.
    details, and a strong           sequencing including a       •    Ending is abrupt: “The
    concluding sentence.            beginning, middle, and            End.”
•   Writing includes a              concluding statement.        •    Writing is missing
    well-developed             •    Appropriately uses the            elements of a story
    beginning, middle,              organizational                    structure: setting,
    and end with logical            structures for a story            character, problem, or
    organization.                   and includes setting,             solution.
•   Uses a unique and               character, problem, and
    effective                       solution.
    organizational
    structure for a story
    and includes a well-
    developed setting,
    character, problem,
    and solution.




W04_2.2.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.2 (4th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing in a variety
of nonfiction forms using appropriate information and structure (i.e., personal letters,
recounts, descriptions, or observations)


Directions: Write a letter using the following prompt. Be sure to include a heading,
date, greeting, and closing. The body of your letter should be at least one paragraph.
Each paragraph should include a topic sentence, at least three supporting details, and a
concluding sentence.

Letter prompt: There are many special places to go and things to do in Alaska. Some
are famous and many people know about them, and some are known only to you or a few
other people. Write a letter to someone your age from a very different part of the world
explaining your favorite place or thing to do in Alaska.




W04_2.2.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.2 (4th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing in a variety
of nonfiction forms using appropriate information and structure (i.e., personal letters,
recounts, descriptions, or observations)


Directions: Write a letter using the following prompt. Be sure to include a heading,
date, greeting, and closing. The body of your letter should be at least one paragraph.
Each paragraph should include a topic sentence, at least three supporting details, and a
concluding sentence.

Letter prompt: There are many special places to go and things to do in Alaska. Some
are famous and many people know about them, and some are known only to you or a few
other people. Write a letter to someone your age from a very different part of the world
explaining your favorite place or thing to do in Alaska.

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 4th Grade Letter
Structure Scoring Guide/Rubric below.

                                       4th Grade Letter
                                Structure Scoring Guide/Rubric

         Advanced                           Proficient                      Below Proficient
Letter includes all of the         Letter includes most of the        Letter is missing many of
following elements in the          following elements in the          the following elements or
correct order and format:          correct order and format:          they are out or order:
Heading                            Heading                            Heading
Date                               Date                               Date
Greeting                           Greeting                           Greeting
Body                               Body                               Body
Closing                            Closing                            Closing

An engaging topic sentence,        Descriptive paragraph              Descriptive paragraph is
more than three supporting         includes a topic sentence, at      missing a topic sentence, at
details, and a concluding          least three supporting             least three supporting
sentence that restates the         details, and a concluding          details, or a concluding
main idea in a different           sentence.                          sentence.
way.




W04_2.2.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.3 (4th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using expressive
language when responding to literature or producing text (e.g., writer’s notebook,
memoirs, poetry, plays, or lyrics) (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write a paragraph or two about the following prompt. Use descriptive,
colorful, and emotional words to explain your topic.

Prompt: Think of a time when you felt frightened, annoyed, nervous, embarrassed,
satisfied, or surprised. Pick one feeling and tell the story of what happened.




W04_2.2.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
 W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
 different audiences.

 2.2.3 (4th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using expressive
 language when responding to literature or producing text (e.g., writer’s notebook,
 memoirs, poetry, plays, or lyrics) (Locally Assessed)


 Directions: Write a paragraph or two about the following prompt. Use descriptive,
 colorful, and emotional words to explain your topic.

 Prompt: Think of a time when you felt frightened, annoyed, nervous, embarrassed,
 satisfied, or surprised. Pick one feeling and tell the story of what happened.

 Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 4th Grade
 Voice/Word Choice Scoring Guide/Rubric

                    4th Grade Voice/Word Choice Scoring Guide/Rubric

Trait          Advanced                       Proficient                  Below Proficient
Voice    •   Writer’s                •    Language is clear           •   Voice is
             personality is               and easy to                     inappropriate to the
             clear with a sense           understand (not                 topic or purpose.
             of purpose.                  flowery).                   •   Writer’s voice is not
                                     •    Voice is appropriate            always appropriate
                                          for the topic,                  to the topic, purpose,
                                          purpose, audience,              audience, or
                                          and structure.                  structure.
Word •       Writer attempts to      •    Final draft includes        •   Limited or redundant
Choice       use descriptive              supporting details to           vocabulary
             words to create              improve clarity (uses       •   Words are vague and
             images and often             adverbs, adjective              general.
             uses adverbs,                clauses, strong             •   Words often
             adjectives,                  verbs, transition               misused, making the
             clauses, strong              clauses, and/or                 paper very difficult
             verbs, transition            strong adjective                to understand.
             clauses, and                 clauses in                  •   Words are general
             strong adjective             paragraphs).                    and vague so that
             clauses in                                                   they do not create a
             paragraphs.                                                  clear picture.
                                                                      •   Some words are used
                                                                          incorrectly, which
                                                                          may confuse the
                                                                          reader.




 W04_2.2.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 2 of 2
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work, and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.1 (4th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by writing a
variety of simple and compound sentences including the conjunctions and, or, but, or
because


Directions: Rewrite these groups of sentences into only one sentence that has the same
meaning. You can add words (and, or, but, because) or leave out some words.

1. Brad likes to eat smoked fish.
   His dad likes it too.
   Their favorite smoked fish is the fish dad makes.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. I was not cold.
   I was wearing all my winter gear.

_______________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.3.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
3. The brown rabbit sat up next to the trail.
   He was as still as a statue
   He thought he could not be seen.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.3.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work, and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.1 (4th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by writing a
variety of simple and compound sentences including the conjunctions and, or, but, or
because


Directions: Rewrite these groups of sentences into only one sentence that has the same
meaning. You can add words (and, or, but, because) or leave out some words.

1. Brad likes to eat smoked fish.
   His dad likes it too.
   Their favorite smoked fish is the fish dad makes.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. I was not cold.
   I was wearing all my winter gear.

_______________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.3.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
3. The brown rabbit sat up next to the trail.
   He was as still as a statue
   He thought he could not be seen.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


Proficient Response: Answers may vary. Accept reasonable responses. Sample
responses are listed below.

1. Brad and his dad like to eat smoked fish, but their favorite smoked fish is the fish his
   dad makes.

2. I was not cold because I was wearing all my winter gear.

3. The brown rabbit sat up next to the trail and thought he could not be seen because he
   was as still as a statue.




W04_2.3.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work, and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.2 (4th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in spelling (e.g., grade-appropriate, high-frequency
words and contractions) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Circle the word in each line that is spelled correctly.

1.             caled            called           colled

2.             annother         anuther          another

3.             becose           because          because

4.             coud             cood             could

5.             know             kno              gnow

6.             litle            littel           little

7.             thier            their            thare

8.             poeple           peeple           people

9.             what             wut              wat

10.            wich             which            whick


Option #2
Directions: Read the following and underline six misspelled words. Write the correct
spelling directly above it.

Randy ran across the playground to the ball field where everybody was gathered. He
lauphed when he bumped into Tony and asked him, “Do you know wether we’re playing
kickball or softball today?”


“What a silly question,” replied Tony. “Did’nt you see Mr. Gregory bring out all the big,
rubber balls? Sumtimes I wonder if you’re on vacation when we’re in the classroom!”



W04_2.3.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 5
“Sometimes I wish I was,” said Randy. “I would like to be off discovering beautifull
countrys, wouldn’t you?”




W04_2.3.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 5
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work, and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.2 (4th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in spelling (e.g., grade-appropriate, high-frequency
words and contractions) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Circle the word in each line that is spelled correctly.

1.               caled            called           colled

2.               annother         anuther          another

3.               becose           because          because

4.               coud             cood             could

5.               know             kno              gnow

6.               litle            littel           little

7.               thier            their            thare

8.               poeple           peeple           people

9.               what             wut              wat

10.              wich             which            whick

Proficient Response: Correct spellings are underlined. Proficiency is 80% correct;
advanced is 90% - 100%.

1.               caled            called           colled

2.               annother         anuther          another

3.               becose           because          because

4.               coud             cood             could

5.               know             kno              gnow

6.               litle            littel           little


W04_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 5
7.               thier            their            thare

8.               poeple           peeple           people

9.               what             wut              wat

10.              wich             which            whick


Option #2
Directions: Read the following and underline six misspelled words. Write the correct
spelling directly above it.

Randy ran across the playground to the ball field where everybody was gathered. He
lauphed when he bumped into Tony and asked him, “Do you know wether we’re playing
kickball or softball today?”


“What a silly question,” replied Tony. “Did’nt you see Mr. Gregory bring out all the big,
rubber balls? Sumtimes I wonder if you’re on vacation when we’re in the classroom!”


“Sometimes I wish I was,” said Randy. “I would like to be off discovering beautifull
countrys, wouldn’t you?”


Proficient Response: Student must identify and correctly spell 5 of the 6 words that are
misspelled.

        lauphed / laughed

        wether / whether

        Did’nt / Didn’t

        Sumtimes / Sometimes

        beautifull / beautiful

        countrys / countries




W04_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 5
                                Addendum to Grade 4 Spelling

                        Sample Fourth Grade High Frequency List

Numerical order represents the frequency of word use. For example, “but” is the #1
most frequently used word at this level, and “what” is the #2 most frequently used
word for this level.

about [18]                                             get [71]
after [64]                                             go [75]
all [3]                                                good [76]
also [88]                                              has [32]
an [9]                                                 her [34]
another [90]                                           him [37]
around [89]                                            how [19]
back [73]                                              if [14]
because [96]                                           into [31]
been [45]                                              its [46]
but [1]                                                just [67]
called [66]                                            know [70]
came [91]                                              like [36]
can [8]                                                little [62]
come [92]                                              long [61]
could [40]                                             look [86]
day [83]                                               made [51]
did [53]                                               make [42]
do [15]                                                man [81]
does [97]                                              many [25]
down [54]                                              may [59]
each [17]                                              me [80]
even [99]                                              more [33]
find [57]                                              most [69]
first [44]                                             much [74]




W04_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 5
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work, and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.3 (4th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and/or correcting mistakes in punctuation (i.e., ends of sentences, commas in
dates, salutations and closings in letters, and commas in series) and capitalization (i.e.,
book titles, beginnings of sentences, and proper nouns)


Directions: Write each sentence with the correct punctuation and capitalization.

1. jane marilyn and arlie live in Juneau Alaska

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. kim was born march 4 1947

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


3. how much will it cost to buy a coat mittens a scarf gloves and snow boots

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


4. stuart little is one of my favorite books

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


W04_2.3.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
5. may 6 2006

dear mr crumley

   i would like to congratulate you on your new book the world through a dog’s eyes.
i read the book and wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed your sense of humor

your friend


bob tate


________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.3.3         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work, and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.3 (4th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and/or correcting mistakes in punctuation (i.e., ends of sentences, commas in
dates, salutations and closings in letters, and commas in series) and capitalization (i.e.,
book titles, beginnings of sentences, and proper nouns)


Directions: Write each sentence with the correct punctuation and capitalization.

1. jane marilyn and arlie live in Juneau Alaska

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. kim was born march 4 1947

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


3. how much will it cost to buy a coat mittens a scarf gloves and snow boots

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


4. stuart little is one of my favorite books

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


W04_2.3.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
5. may 6 2006

dear mr crumley

   i would like to congratulate you on your new book the world through a dog’s eyes.
i read the book and wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed your sense of humor

your friend

bob tate

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

Proficient Response: Proficiency is 28 out of the 35 points possible.

1. Jane, Marilyn, and Arlie live in Juneau, Alaska. (6 points possible)
       The comma after Marilyn is optional.

2. Kim was born March 5, 1947. (4 points possible)

3. How much will it cost to buy a coat, mittens, a scarf, gloves, and snow boots?
   (5 points possible)
    The comma after gloves is optional.

4. Stuart Little is one of my favorite books. (4 points possible)

5.      May 6, 2006 (2 points)

        Dear Mr. Crumley, (4 points possible)

          I would like to congratulate you on your new book The World Through a
        Dog’s Eyes. I read the book and wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed
        your sense of humor. (10 points possible)

        Your friend, (2 points possible)

        Bob Tate (2 points possible)




W04_2.3.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work, and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.4 (4th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and/or correcting usage mistakes in subject/verb agreement (Locally
Assessed)


Directions: Circle the correct verb in the sentences below.

1. When will they ( throw , threw ) the surprise party for Kelly?

2. Who ( brung , brought ) brought you those beautiful flowers?

3. She ( doesn’t , don’t ) like what we are eating for dinner.

4. He ( have gone , went ) over to Tim’s house yesterday after school.

5. They all ( seen , saw ) the movie last weekend.




W04_2.3.4       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work, and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.4 (4th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and/or correcting usage mistakes in subject/verb agreement (Locally
Assessed)


Directions: Circle the correct verb in the sentences below.

1. When will they ( throw , threw ) the surprise party for Kelly?

2. Who ( brung , brought ) brought you those beautiful flowers?

3. She ( doesn’t , don’t ) like what we are eating for dinner.

4. He ( have gone , went ) over to Tim’s house yesterday after school.

5. They all ( seen , saw ) the movie last weekend.


Proficient Response: Proficiency is four of the five correct answers below.

1. When will they ( throw , threw ) the surprise party for Kelly?

2. Who ( brung , brought ) brought you those beautiful flowers?

3. She ( doesn’t , don’t ) like what we are eating for dinner.

4. He ( have gone , went ) over to Tim’s house yesterday after school.

5. They all ( seen , saw ) the movie last weekend.




W04_2.3.4 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progression of ideas and
supporting information by revising own and others’ work, and providing feedback
to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness of
writing.

2.4.1 (4th Grade) Revising writing by rearranging and/or adding details to improve focus
and to support main ideas


Option #1
Directions: Revise the following sentences to make them easier to understand.


1. Rooting through some leaves to find something good to eat was the monkey.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. The most important one is who?

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


3. Heal the sick the doctor knows how to.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.4.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 6
4. The right thing to do is what?

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


5. Into the mountains Nikolai hiked high up.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________



Option #2
Directions: Rewrite the following sentences adding at least two details to make them
easier to understand.

1. The basketball team won the game.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. We ran in the snow.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.4.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 6
3. The horse bucked.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


4. The teacher was surprised.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


5. It is snowing.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.4.1           Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 6
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progression of ideas and
supporting information by revising own and others’ work, and providing feedback
to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness of
writing.

2.4.1 (4th Grade) Revising writing by rearranging and/or adding details to improve focus
and to support main ideas


Option #1
Directions: Revise the following sentences to make them easier to understand.


1. Rooting through some leaves to find something good to eat was the monkey.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. The most important one is who?

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


3. Heal the sick the doctor knows how to.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W04_2.4.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 6
4. The right thing to do is what?

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


5. Into the mountains Nikolai hiked high up.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


Proficient Response: Proficiency is four out of five sentences written correctly.

1. The monkey was rooting through some leaves to find something good to eat.

2. Who is the most important one?

3. The doctor knows how to heal the sick.

4. What is the right thing to do?

5. Nikolai hiked high up into the mountains.


Option #2
Directions: Rewrite the following sentences adding at least two details to make them
easier to understand.

1. The basketball team won the game.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. We ran in the snow.




W04_2.4.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 6
________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


3. The horse bucked.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


4. The teacher was surprised.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


5. It is snowing.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


Proficient Response: Answers will vary. Accept reasonable responses. Sample answers
follow below.

1. The Warrior basketball team won the game in overtime when Jesse made a three-point
shot.

2. We ran and jumped with excitement in the deep snow.

3. The big roan horse bucked me off, and I landed on my shoulder when I hit the ground.

4. The new teacher was surprised when we brought a birthday cake to class.

5. It is snowing, and the wind is blowing fiercely.




W04_2.4.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 6 of 6
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progression of ideas and
supporting information by revising own and others’ work, and providing feedback
to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness of
writing.

2.4.2 (4th Grade) Revising writing by giving/receiving appropriate feedback and using
established criteria to review own and others’ work (e.g., peer conferences, checklists,
scoring guides, or rubrics) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: This peer editing guide may be used for students giving feedback to other
students’ written work.

Peer Editing Rubric

Editor

Editing the work of ______________________________________

Grammar and Parts of Speech

                 Check the spelling of the words I have circled on your paper.

                 Each sentence begins with a capital letter.

                 Each sentence ends with an end mark.

                 Each sentence has a subject and a predicate.

Reasons for Writing:

                 I can’t “see” what the writer is telling.

         I would like to know more about:

                                                                                       ______

         I liked the part about:




______________________________                             ____________________________
Writer (signature)                                               Editor (signature)




W04_2.4.2         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progression of ideas and
supporting information by revising own and others’ work, and providing feedback
to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness of
writing.

2.4.2 (4th Grade) Revising writing by giving/receiving appropriate feedback and using
established criteria to review own and others’ work (e.g., peer conferences, checklists,
scoring guides, or rubrics) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: This peer editing guide may be used for students giving feedback to other
students’ written work.

Proficient Response: All boxes checked and comments completed.


Option #2
Directions: The scoring guide/rubric on the following page can be used to assess
multiple fourth-grade Grade Level Expectations. Teachers can use this scoring
guide/rubric with any writing sample students produce to evaluate their progress on
fourth grade GLEs.




W04_2.4.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
                           4th Grade Scoring Guide/Writing Rubric

   Trait              Advanced                       Proficient                 Below Proficient
Ideas and         All of steps in             • The paper is clear,          • Writer shows little
Content           proficient column             focused, and enhanced          understanding of task.
                  plus the following:           by two or more details       • Goal of paper is unclear.
                 • Topic is well-               that support the main        • Composition doesn’t
                   developed and                idea.                          include one of the
                   details paint a clear      • Paper is original.             following: a clear
                   picture.                   • Composition has a clear        beginning, middle, or
                 • Writer understands           beginning, middle, and         ending with a
                   topic well.                  ends with a concluding         concluding statement.
                 • Writing includes             statement.
                   personal examples.
Organization     • Writes at least 3          • Writing is focused, at       • Struggles writing a
                   paragraphs that are          least one paragraph, and       simple paragraph that is
                   focused.                     enhanced by two or more        connected to a theme.
                 • Paragraphs include a         details that support the     • Writing has few,
                   topic sentence, 3 or         main idea.                     incoherent, or jumbled
                   more supporting            • Paper has logical              ideas. No logical
                   details, and a               sequencing including a         sequencing is apparent.
                   conclusion sentence.         beginning, middle, and       • Writing does not have a
                 • Writing includes a           ending with a concluding       complete beginning,
                   beginning, middle,           statement.                     middle, and/or end.
                   and end with logical       • Appropriately uses one       • Ending is abrupt: “The
                   organization.                of the following               End.”
                 • Uses a unique and            organizational structures:   • Organizational structure
                   effective                    letter, recount, story,        is confusing.
                   organizational               description, observation,    • If structure is a story, it
                   structure (e.g., letter,     writer’s notebook,             is missing one or more
                   recount, story,              memoir, play, poetry, or       of the following
                   description,                 lyric.                         elements: setting,
                   observation, writer’s      • If structure is a story,       character, problem, or
                   notebook, memoir,            writing includes setting,      solution.
                   play or lyric, poetry,       character, problem, and
                   directions, or report)       solution.
                   to match the purpose
                   and audience.
                 • If structure is a story,
                   writing includes a
                   descriptive setting,
                   advanced character
                   development, a
                   unique problem, a
                   creative solution, or
                   an advanced plot.
Voice            • Writer’s personality        • Language is clear and       • Voice is inappropriate to
                   is clear with a sense         easy to understand (not       the topic or purpose.
                   of purpose.                   flowery).                   • Writer’s voice is not
                                               • Voice is appropriate for      always appropriate to the
                                                 the topic, purpose,           topic, purpose, or
                                                 audience, and structure.      audience.




W04_2.4.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006            Page 3 of 4
Word             • Writer attempts to      • Final draft includes         • Limited or redundant
Choice             use descriptive           supporting details to          vocabulary.
                   words to create           improve clarity [uses        • Words often misused,
                   images and often          adverbs, adjective             making the paper very
                   uses adverbs,             clauses, strong verbs,         difficult to understand.
                   adjective clauses,        transition clauses, and/or   • Words are general and
                   strong verbs,             strong adjective clauses       vague so that they do not
                   transition clauses,       in paragraph(s)].              create a clear picture.
                   and strong adjective                                   • Some words used
                   clauses in                                               incorrectly, which may
                   paragraph(s).                                            confuse the reader.
Sentence          • Writing includes a       • All sentences are          • Some sentences do not
Fluency            variety of compound         complete,                    make sense, which
                   sentences (including        grammatically                makes the paper hard to
                   the conjunctions and,       complete, and easy to        understand.
                   or, but, or because).       understand.                • Some sentence
                  • Sentences vary in        • Writing includes             fragments and run-on
                   length, beginnings,         several compound             sentences exist.
                   and patterns                sentences (including       • Most sentences are
                   consistently.               the conjunctions and,        complete and easy to
                  • Sentences start to         or, but, or because).        understand but little
                   have some rhythm          • Sentences begin to           attempt to write
                   and are easy to read.       have variations in           compound sentences
                                               length, beginnings,          exists.
                                               and patterns.              • Most sentences are
                                                                            uniform in their length
                                                                            or the way they begin.
Conventions      • Spelling of grade         • Spelling of grade          • Spelling of grade
                   appropriate/high            appropriate/high             appropriate/high
                   frequency words is          frequency words is at        frequency words is less
                   90-100% accurate            least 80% accurate           than 80% accurate
                   (Fry/Dolch list 1-          (Fry/Dolch list 1-500,       (Fry/Dolch list 1-500,
                   500, local spelling         local spelling words,        local spelling words,
                   words, etc.).               etc.).                       etc.).
                 • Spelling of less          • Errors in spelling of      • Contractions are seldom
                   frequent words is           less frequent words.         spelled accurately.
                   usually correct.          • Contractions are           • Little or no punctuation
                 • Student begins to           spelled accurately.          and capitalization or
                   punctuate quotations.     • Ending punctuation;          consistent errors in
                 • Writing uses                commas in dates,             spelling, capitalization
                   subject/verb                salutations and              and punctuation.
                   agreement, verb             closings in letters; and   • Punctuation and
                   tense, and                  commas in series are         capitalization are not
                   possessives                 in place and correct.        always appropriate or in
                   correctly.                • Capitals at the              place.
                                               beginning of               • Some errors in
                                               sentences, on proper         subject/verb agreement
                                               nouns, and in titles are     exist.
                                               in place and correct.
                                             • Writing uses
                                               subject/verb
                                               agreement correctly.




W04_2.4.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006       Page 4 of 4
W2.5 Student gives credit for others’ ideas, images, and information by citing
information about sources, including title and author.

2.5.1 (4th Grade) Documenting resources by giving credit for others’ information by
citing the titles and source (e.g., author, storyteller, translator, songwriter, or artist)
(Locally Assessed)


Directions: Have students write a report using at least three sources to gather
information.




W04_2.5.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006     Page 1 of 2
W2.5 Student gives credit for others’ ideas, images, and information by citing
information about sources, including title and author.

2.5.1 (4th Grade) Documenting resources by giving credit for others’ information by
citing the titles and source (e.g., author, storyteller, translator, songwriter, or artist)
(Locally Assessed)


Directions: Have students write a report using at least three sources to gather
information.

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Scoring
Guide/Rubric below

                       4th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Citations

          Advanced                         Proficient                      Below Proficient
•   Student lists the author      •   Student lists the author       •   Student lists only the
    first in a citation, then         and title of at least 3            title or author in the
    the title.                        books related to the               citations.
•   The author’s last name            topic.                         •   Student may not have
    is written first.                                                    at least 3 sources.
•   The list of sources is in
    alphabetical order.

     Who Moved My                     Who Moved My                       Who Moved My
    Cheese by Spencer                 Cheese by Spencer                  Cheese
    Johnson                           Johnson




W04_2.5.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.6 Student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.1 (4th Grade) Using resources by looking up spelling or definitions of words in
dictionaries (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Put the following words in alphabetical order.

        another                                    1.
        around                                     2.
        people                                     3.
        which                                      4.
        their                                      5.
        water                                      6.
        time                                       7.
        would                                      8.
        could                                      9.
        through                                    10.


Option #2
Directions: Determine whether the following list of words would come on the page
with the guidewords listed. Fill in the answer circle next to yes or no.

Dictionary word                   Guide words               Yes              No

        A. heavy                  heat/heir

        B. tribe                  trap/travel

        C. model                  middle/mill

        D. tooth                  tone/topic

        E. lake                   label/latter




W04_2.6.1          Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 7
Option #3
Directions: What does the word “rare” mean in the following sentence? You may use a
dictionary to help you.

              He ordered a rare steak.

              o    not very many
              o    cooked so that the inside is still red
              o    excellent, very good
              o    thin, very fragile


Option #4
Directions: What does the word “batter” mean in the following sentence? You may use
a dictionary to help you.

              We put the cake batter in a pan.

              o     to beat or damage with repeated blows
              o     one who bats, the player whose turn it is to bat
              o     a soft mixture of mainly flour and water
              o     a delicious shrub from the eastern coast of South America


Option #5
Directions: Read each sentence. Fill in the answer circle next to the word that best
completes each sentence. You may use your dictionary to help you.

        A. We _____________ Jill for being such a kind person.
             o remain
             o admire
             o modify
             o amuse

        B. He is _______________ with his money, always putting some aside for the
           future.
               o faint
               o thrifty
               o rash
               o confused

        C. We should probably stay home, under the _____________.
             o circumstances
             o contents
             o structures
             o sections



W04_2.6.1         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 7
        D. In times of ________________, many people go hungry.
                o posture
                o direction
                o famine
                o detail

        E. My friend ________________ to me for breaking my pencil.
              o floated
              o drifted
              o awaited
              o apologized




W04_2.6.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 7
W2.6 Student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing..

2.6.1 (4th Grade) Using resources by looking up spelling or definitions of words in
dictionaries (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Put the following words in alphabetical order.

        another                                    1.
        around                                     2.
        people                                     3.
        which                                      4.
        their                                      5.
        water                                      6.
        time                                       7.
        would                                      8.
        could                                      9.
        through                                    10.

Proficient Response: Proficiency is 8 out of 10 correct responses. Advanced is 9 or 10
correct.

        1. another
        2. around
        3. could
        4. people
        5. their
        6. through
        7. time
        8. water
        9. which
        10. would




W04_2.6.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 7
Option #2
Directions: Determine whether the following list of words would come on the page
with the guidewords listed. Fill in the answer circle next to yes or no.

Dictionary word                   Guide words              Yes              No

        A. heavy                  heat/heir

        B. tribe                  trap/travel

        C. model                  middle/mill

        D. tooth                  tone/topic

        E. lake                   label/latter

Proficient Response: Proficiency is 4 out of 5 correct responses below.

        A. heavy                  heat/heir

        B. tribe                  trap/travel

        C. model                  middle/mill

        D. tooth                  tone/topic

        E. lake                   label/latter


Option #3
Directions: What does the word “rare” mean in the following sentence? You may use a
dictionary to help you.

                He ordered a rare steak.

                o   not very many
                o   cooked so that the inside is still red
                o   excellent, very good
                o   thin, very fragile

Proficient Response: Proficiency is as follows:

                o   not very many
                o   cooked so that the inside is still red
                o   excellent, very good
                o   thin, very fragile



W04_2.6.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 7
Option #4
Directions: What does the word “batter” mean in the following sentence? You may use
a dictionary to help you.

                We put the cake batter in a pan.

                 o   to beat or damage with repeated blows
                 o   one who bats, the player whose turn it is to bat
                 o   a soft mixture of mainly flour and water
                 o   a delicious shrub from the eastern coast of South America

Proficient Response: Proficiency is as follows:

                 o   to beat or damage with repeated blows
                 o   one who bats, the player whose turn it is to bat
                 o   a soft mixture of mainly flour and water
                 o   a delicious shrub from the eastern coast of South America

Option #5
Directions: Read each sentence. Fill in the answer circle next to the word that best
completes each sentence. You may use your dictionary to help you.

        A. We _____________ Jill for being such a kind person.
             o remain
             o admire
             o modify
             o amuse

        B. He is _______________ with his money, always putting some aside for the
           future.
               o faint
               o thrifty
               o rash
               o confused

        C. We should probably stay home, under the _____________.
             o circumstances
             o contents
             o structures
             o sections

        D. In times of ________________, many people go hungry.
                o posture
                o direction
                o famine
                o detail



W04_2.6.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 6 of 7
        E. My friend ________________ to me for breaking my pencil.
              o floated
              o drifted
              o awaited
              o apologized

Proficient Response: Proficiency is 4 out of 5 correct responses below.

        A. We _____________ Jill for being such a kind person.
             o remain
             o admire
             o modify
             o amuse

        B. He is _______________ with his money, always putting some aside for the
           future.
               o faint
               o thrifty
               o rash
               o confused

        C. We should probably stay home, under the _____________.
             o circumstances
             o contents
             o structures
             o sections

        D. In times of ________________, many people go hungry.
                o posture
                o direction
                o famine
                o detail

        E. My friend ________________ to me for breaking my pencil.
              o floated
              o drifted
              o awaited
              o apologized




W04_2.6.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 7 of 7
W2.6 Student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.2 (4th Grade) Using resources by using a thesaurus to find synonyms for common
words (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Read the passage below and answer the questions that follow. Fill in the
answer circle in front of the word or phrase that means the same or almost the same as the
underlined words or phrases. You may use a thesaurus to help you.

        Trent was playing fetch in the yard with his dog, Bo. Bo suddenly darted out into
    the street to chase a car that went by. He didn’t get hurt, but Trent was frightened for
    a few seconds thinking the car would hit Bo.
        “Bo, you shouldn’t go lunging into the street like that!” Trent scolded his pet.
    “That kind of reckless behavior is dangerous. You’ve got to be careful so you won’t
    get hurt. What would I do without you, Boy?”

            1. The word darted in this passage means _____________.
               o swam
               o fell
               o dashed
               o rowed

            2. The word lunging in this passage means ___________.
               o diving
               o looking
               o breathing
               o sauntering

            3. The word reckless in this passage means ___________.
               o polite
               o careless
               o dazzling
               o varied




W04_2.6.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
Option #2
Directions: Use a thesaurus to find a synonym for the following words.

        A. said

        B. walked

        C. give

        D. thin          ______________________________

        E. sober         ______________________________




W04_2.6.2          Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
W2.6 Student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.2 (4th Grade) Using resources by using a thesaurus to find synonyms for common
words (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Read the passage below and answer the questions that follow. Fill in the
answer circle in front of the word or phrase that means the same or almost the same as the
underlined words or phrases. You may use a thesaurus to help you.

        Trent was playing fetch in the yard with his dog, Bo. Bo suddenly darted out into
    the street to chase a car that went by. He didn’t get hurt, but Trent was frightened for
    a few seconds thinking the car would hit Bo.
        “Bo, you shouldn’t go lunging into the street like that!” Trent scolded his pet.
    “That kind of reckless behavior is dangerous. You’ve got to be careful so you won’t
    get hurt. What would I do without you, Boy?”

            1. The word darted in this passage means _____________.
               o swam
               o fell
               o dashed
               o rowed

            2. The word lunging in this passage means ___________.
               o diving
               o looking
               o breathing
               o sauntering

            3. The word reckless in this passage means ___________.
               o polite
               o careless
               o dazzling
               o varied




W04_2.6.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
Proficient Response: Proficient is 2 out of 3 correct responses.

            1. The word darted in this passage means _____________.
               o swam
               o fell
               o dashed
               o rowed

            2. The word lunging in this passage means ___________.
               o diving
               o looking
               o breathing
               o sauntering

            3. The word reckless in this passage means ___________.
               o polite
               o careless
               o dazzling
               o varied


Option #2
Directions: Use a thesaurus to find a synonym for the following words.

        A. said

        B. walked

        C. give

        D. thin          ______________________________

        E. sober         ______________________________

Proficient Response: Answers will vary. Accept reasonable responses. Proficiency is 4
out of 5 correct responses.

        A. said          whispered, yelled, screamed, understood, etc.

        B. walked        strolled, sauntered, hurried, staggered, etc.

        C. give          provide, offer, donate, present, etc.

        D. thin          skinny, slender, emaciated, etc.

        E. sober         serious, solemn, etc.



W04_2.6.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
W2.1 Write a well organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a single
topic.

2.1.1 (5th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing more than one paragraph that states
and maintains a focused idea and includes details that support the main idea of each
paragraph


Directions: Write more than one paragraph that answers the following prompt. Be sure to
include a focused idea and details that support the main idea.


Prompt: Pretend you get to choose one item from a catalog of your choice. What would
you buy? Describe what the special item looks like and what you would do with it.

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W05_2.1.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
W2.1 Write a well organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a single
topic.

2.1.1 (5th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing more than one paragraph that states
and maintains a focused idea and includes details that support the main idea of each
paragraph


Directions: Write more than one paragraph that answers the following prompt. Be sure to
include a focused idea and details that support the main idea.


Prompt: Pretend you get to choose one item from a catalog of your choice. What would
you buy? Describe what the special item looks like and what you would do with it.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Grade 5 Writing
Rubric for Organization, Ideas, and Content, on the following page.




W05_2.1.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                          5th Grade Six-Trait Score Guide/Rubric

         Advanced                           Proficient                    Below Proficient
• All of steps in proficient      • The paper is clear, focused       • Few sentences follow a
  column plus the                    ,and enhanced by two or             common theme. Writer
  following:                         more details that support the       shows little
• Topic is well-developed,           main idea of each                   understanding of task.
  details paint a clear              paragraph.                       • Writing is hard to
  picture, and includes a         • Paper is original.                   follow.
  lead or hook.                    • Writes at least 2 paragraphs     • Details are limited or do
• Writer understands topic           that are focused, connected         not enhance the main
  well.                              to a common theme, and              idea of the paper.
• Writing includes                   enhanced by two or more         • Struggles writing a
  personal examples.                 details that support the main      simple paragraph
• Writes more than 2                 idea of each paragraph.            connected to a common
  paragraphs that are              • Paper has logical                  theme.
  focused.                           sequencing including a clear    • Writing contains less
• Includes a topic sentence,         beginning, middle, and             than two details
  3 or more supporting               ending with a concluding           supporting the main
  details, and a concluding          statement.                         idea.
  statement.                       • Uses indents or paragraph       • Ideas are fragmented and
• Uses transition words or           breaks to establish                not sequential.
  phrases to reveal                  paragraph form.                 • No attempt to establish
  comparison/contrast.             • Appropriately uses one of          paragraph breaks.
• Uses indents or                    the following organizational    • Uses a somewhat
  paragraph breaks to                structures: letter, recount,       appropriate
  establish paragraph form           story, description,                organizational structure
  and places paragraph               observation, writer’s              to match the purpose and
  breaks appropriately.              notebook, memoir, play or          audience (e.g., letter,
• Uses a unique and                  lyric, directions, or report.      recount, story,
  effective organizational        • If structure is a story,            description, observation,
  structure (e.g., letter,           writing includes setting,          writer’s notebook,
  recount, story,                    character, problem, solution,      memoir, play or lyric,
  description, observation,          and plot.                          directions, or report).
  writer’s notebook,                                                 • If structure is a story,
  memoir, play or lyric,                                                writing is missing one of
  directions, or report).                                               the following elements:
                                                                        setting, character,
                                                                        problem, solution, or
                                                                        plot.




W05_2.1.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 3 of 3
W2.1 Write a well organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a single
topic.

2.1.2 ( 5th Grade) Writing about a topic by using paragraph form: indents or paragraph
breaks (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Rewrite these paragraphs from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K.
Rowling. Decide where the paragraph breaks should be and indent appropriately.

The escape of the Brazilian boa constrictor earned Harry his longest-ever punishment.
By the time he was allowed out of his cupboard again, the summer holidays had started
and Dudley had already broken his new video camera, crashed his remote control
airplane, and, first time out on his racing bike, knocked down old Mrs. Fig as she crossed
Privet Drive on her crutches. Harry was glad school was over, but there was no escaping
Dudley’s gang, who visited the house every single day. Piers, Dennis, Malcolm, and
Gordon were all big and stupid, but as Dudley was the biggest and stupidest of the lot, he
was the leader. The rest of them were all quite happy to join in Dudley’s favorite sport:
Harry Hunting. This was why Harry spent as much time as possible out of the house,
wandering around and thinking about the end of the holidays, where he could see a tiny
ray of hope. When September came, he would be going off to secondary school and, for
the first time in his life, he wouldn’t be with Dudley.




W05_2.1.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
W05_2.1.2   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
W2.1 Write a well organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a single
topic.

2.1.2 ( 5th Grade) Writing about a topic by using paragraph form: indents or paragraph
breaks (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Rewrite these paragraphs from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K.
Rowling. Decide where the paragraph breaks should be and indent appropriately.

The escape of the Brazilian boa constrictor earned Harry his longest-ever punishment.
By the time he was allowed out of his cupboard again, the summer holidays had started
and Dudley had already broken his new video camera, crashed his remote control
airplane, and, first time out on his racing bike, knocked down old Mrs. Fig as she crossed
Privet Drive on her crutches. Harry was glad school was over, but there was no escaping
Dudley’s gang, who visited the house every single day. Piers, Dennis, Malcolm, and
Gordon were all big and stupid, but as Dudley was the biggest and stupidest of the lot, he
was the leader. The rest of them were all quite happy to join in Dudley’s favorite sport:
Harry Hunting. This was why Harry spent as much time as possible out of the house,
wandering around and thinking about the end of the holidays, where he could see a tiny
ray of hope. When September came, he would be going off to secondary school and, for
the first time in his life, he wouldn’t be with Dudley.

Proficient Response: Proficiency is correctly rewriting the selection into three indented
paragraphs.

         The escape of the Brazilian boa constrictor earned Harry his longest-ever
punishment. By the time he was allowed out of his cupboard again, the summer holidays
had started and Dudley had already broken his new video camera, crashed his remote
control airplane, and, first time out on his racing bike, knocked down old Mrs. Fig as she
crossed Privet Drive on her crutches.
         Harry was glad school was over, but there was no escaping Dudley’s gang, who
visited the house every single day. Piers, Dennis, Malcolm, and Gordon were all big and
stupid, but as Dudley was the biggest and stupidest of the lot, he was the leader. The rest
of them were all quite happy to join in Dudley’s favorite sport: Harry Hunting.
         This was why Harry spent as much time as possible out of the house, wandering
around and thinking about the end of the holidays, where he could see a tiny ray of hope.
When September came, he would be going off to secondary school and, for the first time
in his life, he wouldn’t be with Dudley.




W05_2.1.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
W2.1 Write a well organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a single
topic.

2.1.3 ( 5th Grade) Writing about a topic by organizing ideas logically to establish clear
relationships within and between paragraphs (e.g., using transition words or phrases that
reveal order or chronology) (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write a story of at least two paragraphs that includes transition words (e.g.,
next, then, after, before, last, since, still, yet, etc.).

Prompt: October’s moon is called the Hunter’s Moon. It gets its name from the hunters
who used this time of year to prepare for the long winter ahead by filling their larders
with meat. Imagine you are one of those hunters, padding through the forest on a moonlit
night. Write a journal entry telling all about the things you see and do. To help you get
ready to write, answer the following questions.

        1. Where are you that night? Describe the setting.
        2. What three things do you do that night?
        3. What are three things you see that night?
        4. What do you like most about your night in the forest?
        5. What do you like least about your night in the forest?


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W05_2.1.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
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W05_2.1.3    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
W2.1 Write a well organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a single
topic.

2.1.3 ( 5th Grade) Writing about a topic by organizing ideas logically to establish clear
relationships within and between paragraphs (e.g., using transition words or phrases that
reveal order or chronology) (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write a story of at least two paragraphs that includes transition words (e.g.,
next, then, after, before, last, since, still, yet, etc.).

Prompt: October’s moon is called the Hunter’s Moon. It gets its name from the hunters
who used this time of year to prepare for the long winter ahead by filling their larders
with meat. Imagine you are one of those hunters, padding through the forest on a moonlit
night. Write a journal entry telling all about the things you see and do. To help you get
ready to write, answer the following questions.

        1.   Where are you that night? Describe the setting.
        2.   What three things do you do that night?
        3.   What are three things you see that night?
        4.   What do you like most about your night in the forest?
        5.   What do you like least about your night in the forest?

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 5th Grade Writing
Rubric for Organization.

                         5th Grade Writing Rubric for Organization

         Advanced                             Proficient                      Below Proficient
•   Writes more than 2             •   Writes at least 2 paragraphs       •   Struggles writing a
    paragraphs that are focused.       that are focused, connected to a       simple paragraph
•   Includes a topic sentence, 3       common theme, and enhanced             connected to a common
    or more supporting details,        by two or more details that            theme.
    and a concluding statement.        support the main idea of each      •   Writing contains less
•   Uses transition words or           paragraph.                             than two details
    phrases to reveal              •   Paper has logical sequencing,          supporting the main idea.
    comparison/contrast.               including a clear beginning,       •   Ideas are fragmented and
•   Uses indents or paragraph          middle, and ending with a              not sequential.
    breaks to establish                concluding statement.              •   No attempt to establish
    paragraph form and places      •   Uses transition words or               paragraph breaks.
    paragraph breaks                   phrases to reveal order or         •   Uses few transition
    appropriately.                     chronology between or within           words or phrases to
                                       paragraphs.                            reveal order or
                                   •   Uses indents or paragraph              chronology between or
                                       breaks to establish paragraph          within paragraphs.
                                       form.




W05_2.1.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 3 of 3
W2.1 Write a well organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a single
topic.

2.1.4 (5th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a concluding statement


Directions: Write a minimum of two paragraphs to the following prompt. Be sure to
include a concluding statement.

Prompt: Adopting a pet from a shelter is a great way to help control the pet population.
Prospective pet owners can choose from a variety of discarded pets rather than supporting
the dog breeding industry. Write an essay explaining what a prospective pet owner should
know and do as they prepare to adopt a pet. What is the most important point to consider
before adopting a pet?

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W05_2.1.4       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.1 Write a well organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a single
topic.

2.1.4 (5th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a concluding statement


Directions: Write a minimum of two paragraphs to the following prompt. Be sure to
include a concluding statement.

Prompt: Adopting a pet from a shelter is a great way to help control the pet population.
Prospective pet owners can choose from a variety of discarded pets rather than supporting
the dog breeding industry. Write an essay explaining what a prospective pet owner should
know and do as they prepare to adopt a pet. What is the most important point to consider
before adopting a pet?

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 5th Grade Writing
Rubric for Organization.

               5th Grade Writing Rubric/Scoring Guide for Organization

        Advanced                        Proficient                      Below Proficient
• Writes more than 2            • Writes at least 2 paragraphs    • Struggles writing a simple
  paragraphs that are             that are focused, connected       paragraph connected to a
  focused.                        to a common theme, and            common theme.
• Includes a topic sentence,      enhanced by two or more         • Writing contains less than 2
  3 or more supporting            details that support the main     details supporting the main
  details, and a concluding       idea of each paragraph.           idea.
  statement.                    • Paper has logical               • Ideas are fragmented and not
• Uses transition words or        sequencing including a clear      sequential.
  phrases to reveal               beginning, middle, and          • No attempt to establish
  comparison/contrast.            ending with a concluding          paragraph breaks.
• Uses indents or                 statement.                      • Uses a somewhat appropriate
  paragraph breaks to           • Uses transition words or          organizational structure to
  establish paragraph form        phrases to reveal order or        match the purpose and audience
  and places paragraph            chronology between or             (e.g., letter, recount, story,
  breaks appropriately.           within paragraphs.                description, observation,
• Uses a unique and             • Uses indents or paragraph         writer’s notebook, memoir, play
  effective organizational        breaks to establish               or lyric, directions, or report).
  structure (e.g., letter,        paragraph form.                 • Uses few transition words or
  recount, story,               • Appropriately uses one of         phrases to reveal or chronology
  description, observation,       the following organizational      between or within paragraphs.
  writer’s notebook,              structures: letter, recount,
  memoir, play or lyric,          story, description,
  directions, or report).         observation, writer’s
                                  notebook, memoir, play or
                                  lyric, directions, or report.




W05_2.1.4 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006       Page 2 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.1 (5th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing an
understandable story that incorporates setting, character, and basic plot


Directions: Write a story to the following prompt. Be sure to develop your setting,
characters, and plot.

Prompt: Picture in your mind a very old shoe. Think of whom this shoe might belong to
and how it came to be found alongside the road in your town. Write the story of what
happened.




W05_2.2.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.1 (5th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing an
understandable story that incorporates setting, character, and basic plot


Directions: Write a story to the following prompt. Be sure to develop your setting,
characters, and plot.

Prompt: Picture in your mind a very old shoe. Think of whom this shoe might belong to
and how it came to be found alongside the road in your town. Write the story of what
happened.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Grade 5 Scoring
Guide/Rubric for Ideas, Content, and Organization.

         5th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Ideas, Content, and Organization

         Advanced                             Proficient                      Below Proficient
All of steps in proficient        •   Writes at least 2 paragraphs that   •   Few sentences follow a
column plus the following:            are focused, connected to a             common theme. Writer
• Topic is well-developed,            common theme, and enhanced              shows little understanding
     details paint a clear            by two or more details that             of task.
     picture, and it includes a       support the main idea of each       •   Struggles writing a simple
     lead or hook.                    paragraph.                              paragraph.
• Writer understands topic        •   Paper is original.                  •   Writing is hard to follow.
     well.                        •   Paper has logical sequencing        •   Details are limited or do
• Writing includes personal           including a clear beginning,            not enhance the main idea
     examples.                        middle, and ending with a               of the paper.
• Writes more than 2                  concluding statement.               •   Ideas are fragmented and
     paragraphs that are          •   Uses transition words or phrases        not sequential.
     focused.                         to reveal order or chronology       •   Writing is missing one of
• Includes a topic sentence,          between and within paragraphs.          the following elements:
     3 or more supporting         •   Uses indents or paragraph breaks        setting, characters,
     details, and a concluding        to establish paragraph form.            problem, solution, or plot.
     statement.                   •   Writing includes setting,           •   No attempt to establish
• Uses transition words or            characters, problem, solution,          paragraph breaks.
     phrases to reveal                and plot.
     comparison/contrast.
• Uses indents or paragraph
     breaks to establish
     paragraph form and
     places paragraph breaks
     appropriately.
• Writing includes
     descriptive setting, well-
     developed characters,
     problem, solution, and
     detailed plot.




W05_2.2.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006           Page 2 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.2 (5th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing various
nonfiction forms using appropriate information and structure (i.e., step-by-step directions,
descriptions, observations, or report writing)


Directions: Write step-by-step directions using the following prompt. Be sure to include
a title, overview, specific steps (numbered), and a description of your end product. Your
steps should be in a logical order and include details that support understanding of the
process.

Prompt: Think of something you made with you own hands (a craft, food recipe, shop
object, etc.). How did you do it? Describe the process to make it from gathering the
materials to the finished product.




W05_2.2.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.2 (5th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing various
nonfiction forms using appropriate information and structure (i.e., step-by-step directions,
descriptions, observations, or report writing)


Directions: Write step-by-step directions using the following prompt. Be sure to include
a title, overview, specific steps (numbered), and a description of your end product. Your
steps should be in a logical order and include details that support understanding of the
process.

Prompt: Think of something you made with you own hands (a craft, food recipe, shop
object, etc.). How did you do it? Describe the process to make it from gathering the
materials to the finished product.

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 5th Grade Direction
Scoring Guide/Rubric below.

                          5th Grade Direction Scoring Guide/Rubric

          Advanced                            Proficient                      Below Proficient
Directions includes all of the      Directions include most of the      Directions are missing many of
following elements in the correct   following elements in the correct   the following elements or they
order and format:                   order and format:                   are out or order:
• Title                             • Title                             • Title
• Overview                          • Overview                          • Overview
• Specific steps (numbered)         • Specific steps (numbered)         • Specific steps (numbered)
• Description of product            • Description of product            • Description of product

•   Directions are specific,        •   Directions are focused,         •   Struggles to write focused
    focused, and enhanced by            connected to a common               directions connected to a
    numerous details that support       theme, and enhanced by              common theme.
    understanding.                      some details that support       •   Lacks necessary details to
•   Directions have logical             understanding.                      support understanding of
    sequencing and sense of         •   Directions usually have             steps.
    order.                              logical sequencing, including   •   Ideas are fragmented and not
•   Clear and appropriate               a clear beginning, middle,          sequential.
    transition words or phrases         and ending.                     •   Few or no transition words or
    enhance order or chronology     •   Transition words or phrases         phrases are used to reveal
    between steps.                      are used to reveal order or         order or chronology between
•   Appropriately a unique and          chronology between steps.           steps.
    effective organizational        •   Appropriately uses the          •   Inappropriately uses the
    structure for step-by-step          organizational structures for       organizational structures for
    instructions.                       step-by-step instructions.          step-by-step instructions.




W05_2.2.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006      Page 2 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.3 (5th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using expressive
language when responding to literature or producing text (e.g., writer’s notebook
memoirs, poetry, plays or lyrics) (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write an essay describing your favorite season. Use words that describe it in
terms of all five senses. Try to express yourself in such a way that the reader will
experience the season you are describing in the same way that you do. Use descriptive,
colorful, and emotional words to explain your topic.

Prompt: Each season of the year has its own distinctive qualities, qualities that appeal to
all of the senses. Which season do you like best? What makes that season special to you?
Why does it stand out from the others?




W05_2.2.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.2 The student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.3 (5th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using expressive
language when responding to literature or producing text (e.g., writer’s notebook
memoirs, poetry, plays or lyrics) (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write an essay describing your favorite season. Use words that describe it in
terms of all five senses. Try to express yourself in such a way that the reader will
experience the season you are describing in the same way that you do. Use descriptive,
colorful, and emotional words to explain your topic.

Prompt: Each season of the year has its own distinctive qualities, qualities that appeal to
all of the senses. Which season do you like best? What makes that season special to you?
Why does it stand out from the others?

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 5th Grade Voice and
Word Choice Scoring Guide/Writing Rubric

               5th Fifth Grade Voice/Word Choice Scoring Guide/Writing

Trait             Advanced                     Proficient                  Below Proficient
Voice     • Writer’s personality is    • Language is clear and        • Voice is inappropriate for
            clear with a sense of         easy to understand (not       the topic, purpose, and
            purpose.                      flowery).                     structure.
                                       • Voice is appropriate for     • Language is sometimes
                                         the topic, purpose,            difficult to understand.
                                         audience, and structure.
Word      • Final draft includes a     • Final draft includes         • Limited or redundant
Choice      variety of interesting and   supporting details to          vocabulary.
            engaging supporting          improve focus, to            • Words are general and
            details to improve focus,    support main ideas, and        vague. They do not create a
            to support main ideas, to    to make sequence clear         clear picture.
            make sequence clear, and     [uses adverbs, adjective     • Uses few adverbs, adjective
            to clarify the topic         clauses, strong verbs,         clauses, strong verbs,
            sentence [uses adverbs,      transition clauses, and/or     transition clauses, and
            adjective clauses, strong    strong adjective clauses       strong adjective clauses in
            verbs, transition clauses,   in paragraph(s)].              paragraph(s) to improve
            and/or strong adjective    • Writer modifies rough          focus, to support main
            clauses in paragraph(s)].    draft to include several       ideas, and to make
          • Writer modifies rough        precise/engaging words         sequence clear.
            draft to include             from a thesaurus.            • No evidence writer has
            precise/engaging words                                      modified rough draft to
            from a thesaurus                                            include precise/engaging
            whenever appropriate.                                       words from a thesaurus.




W05_2.2.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006       Page 2 of 2
W2.3 The student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in
written work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.1 (5th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by varying
the beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning of writing (Locally Assessed)

Option #1
Directions: Rewrite the following passage to improve the way it sounds. You may add
or leave out words.

Auntie Josie came to our house. It was summer. She came from the Lower 48. She lives
in Idaho. She brought her two sons. They are my cousins. One son is my age. His name is
Andy. Andy has never been to Alaska before. I can’t wait to go camping with him. I can’t
wait to go fishing either.

________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Option #2
Directions: Simple sentences have a subject and a verb. Compound sentences consist of
two or more sentences and are joined by conjunctions like “and,” “but,” and “or.”
Identify whether the following sentences are simple or compound.

Simple        Compound         I go to school, and I go to piano lessons.

Simple        Compound         Now, I use similes by the handfuls, and I also use several
                               metaphors.




W05_2.3.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
Simple      Compound        Even though painting is a lot of work, it is also fun
                            and relaxing.

Simple      Compound        Dad was supposed to eat out with a client, but he canceled
                            his meeting and met us at the pizza parlor.

Simple      Compound        My friend is sad.

Simple      Compound        I live in Denali National Park.

Simple      Compound        The lady with purple hair is my aunt.

Simple      Compound        I ate pizza, but you ate a salad.

Simple      Compound        My favorite sport is an exciting game of soccer.

Simple      Compound        Watch out for the sweeper in the river because it will
                            knock you out of your boat.




W05_2.3.1    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006      Page 2 of 4
W2.3 The student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in
written work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.1 (5th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by varying
the beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning of writing (Locally Assessed)

Option #1
Directions: Rewrite the following passage to improve the way it sounds. You may add
or leave out words.

Auntie Josie came to our house. It was summer. She came from the Lower 48. She lives
in Idaho. She brought her two sons. They are my cousins. One son is my age. His name is
Andy. Andy has never been to Alaska before. I can’t wait to go camping with him. I can’t
wait to go fishing either.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 5th Grade Scoring
Guide/Rubric for Sentence Fluency.

                   5th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Sentence Fluency

          Advanced                             Proficient                  Below Proficient
•   Sentences consistently vary in    • Many sentences vary in         • Some sentence fragments
    length, beginnings, and             length, beginnings, and          and run-on sentences exist.
    patterns to improve meaning         patterns to improve meaning.   • Most sentences are
    and style.                        • Writing includes several         complete and easy to
•   Sentences are purposeful and        compound sentences               understand, but little
    make meaning clear.                 (including the conjunctions      attempt to write complex
                                        and, or, but, or because).       sentences exists.



Option #2
Directions: Simple sentences have a subject and a verb. Compound sentences consist of
two or more sentences and are joined by conjunctions like “and,” “but,” and “or.”
Identify whether the following sentences are simple or compound.

Simple            Compound           I go to school, and I go to piano lessons.

Simple            Compound           Now, I use similes by the handfuls, and I also use several
                                     metaphors.

Simple            Compound           Even though painting is a lot of work, it is also fun
                                     and relaxing.

Simple            Compound           Dad was supposed to eat out with a client, but he canceled
                                     his meeting and met us at the pizza parlor.


W05_2.3.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006       Page 3 of 4
Simple           Compound         My friend is sad.

Simple           Compound        I live in Denali National Park.

Simple           Compound        The lady with purple hair is my aunt.

Simple          Compound          I ate pizza, but you ate a salad.

Simple          Compound         My favorite sport is an exciting game of soccer.

Simple          Compound         Watch out for the sweeper in the river because it will
                                 knock you out of your boat.


Proficient Response: A score of 80% is proficient. A score of 90%-100% is advanced.

Compound        I go to school, and I go to piano lessons.
Compound        Now, I use similes by the handfuls, and I also use several metaphors.
Simple          Even though painting is a lot of work, it is also fun and relaxing.
Compound        Dad was supposed to eat out with a client, but he canceled his meeting and
                met us at the pizza parlor.
Simple          My friend is sad.
Simple          I live in Denali National Park.
Simple          The lady with purple hair is my aunt.
Compound        I ate pizza, but you ate a salad.
Simple          My favorite sport is an exciting game of soccer.
Compound        Watch out for the sweeper in the river because it will knock you out of
                your boat.




W05_2.3.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
W2.3 The student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in
written work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.2 (5th Grade) Writing using conventions of Standard English by identifying and
correcting mistakes in spelling (e.g., grade-appropriate, high frequency words,
homophones, and contractions) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Circle the word in each line that is spelled correctly.

1.             betwene          between          beatween

2.             Juno             Jueno            Juneau

3.             don’t            dont             do’nt

4.             ruf              ruff             rouff

5.             nit              nigt             night

6.             inportant        important        importent

7.             mother           muther           moter

8.             children         cihldren         chidren

9.             fownd            fuound           found

10.            togeter          together         togheter


Option #2
Directions: Read the following paragraph and underline ten misspelled words. Write
the correct spelling directly above it.

Lee’s fother is a lardge man with broad shoulders and a strong back. He spent a number

of yeers working as a lumberjack in northrn Minnesota. Lee enjoyed his time in the

woodlands exploreing its many trails and waching the various aminals he encountered.

How ever, Lee’s time in this area came to an end abruptly when his father took a new job

as a mecanic in the oil fields of Alaksa.


W05_2.3.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
W2.3 The student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in
written work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.2 (5th Grade) Writing using conventions of Standard English by identifying and
correcting mistakes in spelling (e.g., grade-appropriate, high frequency words,
homophones, and contractions) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Circle the word in each line that is spelled correctly.

1.               betwene          between          beatween

2.               Juno             Jueno            Juneau

3.               don’t            dont             do’nt

4.               ruf              ruff             rouff

5.               nit              nigt             night

6.               inportant        important        importent

7.               mother           muther           moter

8.               children         cihldren         chidren

9.               fownd            fuound           found

10.              togeter          together         togheter

Proficient Response: Correct spellings are underlined. Proficiency is 80% correct.
Advanced is 90% - 100%.

1.               betwene          between          beatween

2.               Juno             Jueno            Juneau

3.               don’t            dont             do’nt

4.               ruf              ruff             rouff

5.               nit              nigt             night

6.               inportant        important        importent


W05_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
7.                      mother      muther              moter

8.                      children    cihldren            chidren

9.                      fownd       fuound              found

10.                     togeter     together            togheter


Option #2
Directions: Read the following paragraph and underline ten misspelled words. Write
the correct spelling directly above it.

Lee’s fother is a lardge man with broad shoulders and a strong back. He spent a number

of yeers working as a lumberjack in northrn Minnesota. Lee enjoyed his time in the

woodlands exploreing its many trails and waching the various aminals he encountered.

How ever, Lee’s time in this area came to an end abruptly when his father took a new job

as a mecanic in the oil fields of Alaksa.


Proficient Response: Correct spellings are underlined. Proficiency is 80% correct;
Advanced is 90% - 100%.

             father         large
Lee’s fother is a lardge man with broad shoulders and a strong back. He spent a number

     years                                   northern
of yeers working as a lumberjack in northrn Minnesota. Lee enjoyed his time in the

                      exploring                    watching             animals
woodlands exploreing its many trails and waching the various aminals he encountered.

However
However, Lee’s time in this area came to an end abruptly when his father took a new job

        mechanic                       Alaska
as a mecanic in the oil fields of Alaksa.




W05_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
                                 Addendum Grade 5 Spelling

                    Sample Fifth Grade High Frequency Spelling List

Numerical order represents the frequency of word use. For example, “place” is the
#1 most frequently used word at this level; “well” is the #2 most frequently used
word for this level.

above [83]                 give [29]                   often [56]                 under [34]
across [117]               going [62]                  old [14]                   until [66]
again [11]                 got [89]                    once [76]                  us [38]
air [30]                   great [16]                  own [33]                   want [63]
Alaska [135]               hand [93]                   page [88]                  well [2]
almost [86]                hard [112]                  paper [111]                went [13]
along [41]                 head [82]                   picture [102]              while [42]
always [53]                hear [129]                  place [1]                  white [109]
animal [77]                heard [131]                 put [8]                    whole [128]
answer [134]               help [7]                    read [35]                  why [6]
asked [58]                 here [4]                    saw [47]                   without [74]
away [10]                  high [94]                   say [19]                   world [61]
began [85]                 home [27]                   school [64]                year [95]
being [103]                house [59]                  second [105]               young [126]
below [46]                 however [120]               sentence [114]
best [116]                 important [65]              set [32]
better [115]               it's [123]                  several [132]
between [24]               Juneau [136]                should [26]
big [28]                   keep [69]                   show [54]
both [50]                  kind [84]                   side [73]
boy [75]                   knew [122]                  since [108]
change [133]               land [72]                   small [20]
children [70]              large [55]                  something [48]
country [98]               last [36]                   soon [106]
different [9]              left [39]                   sound [45]
don't [60]                 let [100]                   still [23]
during [118]               life [78]                   story [107]
earth [90]                 light [97]                  study [104]
end [40]                   line [31]                   such [3]
enough [79]                live [87]                   sun [127]
ever [110]                 men [18]                    sure [121]
every [21]                 might [43]                  take [5]
example [130]              mother [96]                 tell [17]
far [92]                   name [25]                   thing [128]
father [99]                near [113]                  those [52]
feet [71]                  need [91]                   thought [49]
few [51]                   never [37]                  today [119]
food [68]                  next [44]                   together [57]
form [67]                  night [101]                 told [125]
found [22]                 number [15]                 took [80]
four [81]                  off [12]                    try [124]




W05_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 4 of 4
W2.3 The student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in
written work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.3 (5th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in punctuation (i.e., ends of sentences, commas in
dates, salutations and closings in letters, and commas in a series) and capitalization


Option #1:
Directions: Write each sentence with the correct punctuation and capitalization.

1. jim and i really want to thank you for the candy flowers card and money while our
daughter was sick

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. debbie was born on december 24 1996, so sometimes she gets birthday presents for
christmas

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


Option #2:
3. Choose the sentence below that has the correct punctuation and capitalization.

        A. Carol, Billijo, and Ty work in Anchorage Alaska.

        B. The date today is October, 11, 2005.

        C. Are you sure you brought sunscreen a hat, and a towel?

        D. Where is your family going this year for Christmas vacation?


W05_2.3.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 5
4. Choose the sentence below that has the correct punctuation and capitalization.

        A. I would like to know more about the polar, bear, the musk, ox, the timber,
        wolf, and the snowshoe, hair.

        B. Is it possible to get a copy of your story before next thursday.

        C. Jessie told us that her brother cole would be at the school.

        D. Stacey never knew that President Kennedy was shot November 22, 1963.


Option #3:
5. Choose the correct punctuation for a heading (salutation) of a letter.

        A. Dear Dennis,

        B. dear Dennis,

        C. Dear Dennis

        D. Dear Dennis:

6. Choose the correct punctuation for the closing of a letter.

        A. Yours truly,

        B. yours truly,

        C. Yours Truly,

        D. Yours, Truly,




W05_2.3.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 5
W2.3 The student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in
written work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.3 (5th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in punctuation (i.e., ends of sentences, commas in
dates, salutations and closings in letters, and commas in a series) and capitalization


Option #1:
Directions: Write each sentence with the correct punctuation and capitalization.

1. jim and i really want to thank you for the candy flowers card and money while our
daughter was sick

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


2. debbie was born on december 24 1996, so sometimes she gets birthday presents for
christmas

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


Proficient Response: Proficiency is 80% correct = 8 points. Advanced is 90% correct =
9 points.

1. Jim and I really want to thank you for the candy, flowers, card, and money while our
daughter was sick. (6 points possible)

2. Debbie was born on December 24, 1996, so sometimes she gets birthday presents for
Christmas. (5 points possible)




W05_2.3.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 5
Option #2:
3. Choose the sentence below that has the correct punctuation and capitalization.

        A. Carol, Billijo, and Ty work in Anchorage Alaska.

        B. The date today is October, 11, 2005.

        C. Are you sure you brought sunscreen a hat, and a towel?

        D. Where is your family going this year for Christmas vacation?

4. Choose the sentence below that has the correct punctuation and capitalization.

        A. I would like to know more about the polar, bear, the musk, ox, the timber,
        wolf, and the snowshoe, hair.

        B. Is it possible to get a copy of your story before next thursday.

        C. Jessie told us that her brother cole would be at the school.

        D. Stacey never knew that President Kennedy was shot November 22, 1963.

Proficient Response: Proficiency is both answers correct.

3. Choose the sentence below that has the correct punctuation and capitalization. (1
point)
       A. Carol, Billijo, and Ty work in Anchorage Alaska.
       B. The date today is October, 11, 2005.
       C. Are you sure you brought sunscreen, a hat, and a towel?
       D. Where is your family going this year for Christmas vacation?



4. Choose the sentence below that has the correct punctuation and capitalization. (1
point)

        A. I would like to know more about the polar, bear, the musk, ox, the timber,
        wolf, and the snowshoe, hair.
        B. Is it possible to get a copy of your story before next thursday.
        C. Jessie told us that her brother cole would be at the school.
        D. Stacey never knew that President Kennedy was shot November 22, 1963.




W05_2.3.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 5
Option #3:
5. Choose the correct punctuation for a heading (salutation) of a letter.

        A. Dear Dennis,

        B. dear Dennis,

        C. Dear Dennis

        D. Dear Dennis:

6. Choose the correct punctuation for the closing of a letter.

        A. Yours truly,

        B. yours truly,

        C. Yours Truly,

        D. Yours, Truly,

Proficient Response: Proficiency is both answers correct.

5. Choose the correct punctuation for a heading (salutation) of a letter. (1 point)
      A. Dear Dennis,
      B. dear Dennis,
      C. Dear Dennis
      D. Dear Dennis:

6. Choose the correct punctuation for the closing of a letter. (1 point)
      A. Yours Truly,
      B. yours truly,
      C. Yours truly,
      D. Yours, Truly,




W05_2.3.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 5
W2.3 The student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in
written work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.4 (5th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in usage (i.e., subject/verb agreement, verb tense,
sentence fragments and run-on sentences, and possessives) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Circle the correct verb in the sentences below.
1. We ( doesn’t , don’t ) like to drive on icy roads.
2. I ( seen , saw ) Marty make a basket from half court.
3. They ( were , was ) eating dinner when I arrived.
4. Last night Lee and Jerry ( needed , need ) the key to the gym.
5. They ( will buy , bought ) the tickets the day after tomorrow


Option #2
6. Fill in the circle next to the complete sentence.
   o Fouled the ball in the last ten seconds and lost the game.
   o Closed the door before the chilly wind blew in.
   o The most beautiful drawing I had ever seen.
   o All of us cheered as loud as we could.

7. Fill in the circle next to the complete sentence.
   o Fished the swift current but didn’t catch anything.
   o He wore a black suit jacket.
   o The brilliant orange sun.
   o Rose over Denali late in the evening.


Option #3
Directions: Choose the correct form of the noun in the following sentences.
8. Every time I walk by ( Marys , Mary’s ), I pet him.
9. All of the (children’s , childrens’ ) coats hung in the hallway.
10. All the (boy’s , boys’ ) basketball uniforms were dirty.




W05_2.3.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
W2.3 The student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in
written work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.4 (5th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in usage (i.e., subject/verb agreement, verb tense,
sentence fragments and run-on sentences, and possessives) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Circle the correct verb in the sentences below.
1. We ( doesn’t , don’t ) like to drive on icy roads.
2. I ( seen , saw ) Marty make a basket from half court.
3. They ( were , was ) eating dinner when I arrived.
4. Last night Lee and Jerry ( needed , need ) the key to the gym.
5. They ( will buy , bought ) the tickets the day after tomorrow

Proficient Response: Proficiency is 8 out of 10 correct answers. Advanced is 9 or 10
correct answers.

1.   We ( doesn’t , don’t ) like to drive on icy roads.
2.   I ( seen , saw ) Marty make a basket from half court.
3.   They ( were , was ) eating dinner when I arrived.
4.   Last night Lee and Jerry ( needed , need ) the key to the gym.
5.   They ( will buy , bought ) the tickets the day after tomorrow.


Option #2
6. Fill in the circle next to the complete sentence.
   o Fouled the ball in the last ten seconds and lost the game.
   o Closed the door before the chilly wind blew in.
   o The most beautiful drawing I had ever seen.
   o All of us cheered as loud as we could.

7. Fill in the circle next to the complete sentence.
   o Fished the swift current but didn’t catch anything.
   o He wore a black suit jacket.
   o The brilliant orange sun.
   o Rose over Denali late in the evening.

Proficient Response: Proficiency is 8 out of 10 correct answers. Advanced is 9 or 10
correct answers.

6. Fill in the circle next to the complete sentence.
   o Fouled the ball in the last ten seconds and lost the game.
   o Closed the door before the chilly wind blew in.


W05_2.3.4 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
    o The most beautiful drawing I had ever seen.
    o All of us cheered as loud as we could.

7. Fill in the circle next to the complete sentence.
   o Fished the swift current but didn’t catch anything.
   o He wore a black suit jacket.
   o The brilliant orange sun.
   o Rose over Denali late in the evening.


Option #3
Directions: Choose the correct form of the noun in the following sentences.
8. Every time I walk by ( Marys , Mary’s ), I pet him.
9. All of the (children’s , childrens’ ) coats hung in the hallway.
10. All the (boy’s , boys’ ) basketball uniforms were dirty.

Proficient Response: Proficiency is 8 out of 10 correct answers. Advanced is 9 or 10
correct answers.

Directions: Choose the correct form of the noun in the following sentences.
8. Every time I walk by ( Marys , Mary’s ) dog I pet him.
9. All of the (children’s , childrens’ ) coats hung in the hallway.
10. All the (boy’s , boys’ ) basketball uniforms were dirty.




W05_2.3.4 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progression of ideas and
supporting information; revises own and others’ work and provides appropriate
feedback to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness
of writing.

2.4.1 (5th Grade) Revising writing by rearranging and/or adding details to improve
focus, to support main ideas, and to make sequence clear


Directions: Write a minimum of two paragraphs to the following prompt that
demonstrate clearly the sequence of directions.

Prompt: Find out how to perform an easy magic trick and then write an essay explaining
how to perform it. Be sure to give clear directions in the correct order.




W05_2.4.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progression of ideas and
supporting information; revises own and others’ work and provides appropriate
feedback to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness
of writing.

2.4.1 (5th Grade) Revising writing by rearranging and/or adding details to improve
focus, to support main ideas and to make sequence clear


Directions: Write a minimum of two paragraphs to the following prompt that
demonstrate clearly the sequence of directions.

Prompt: Find out how to perform an easy magic trick and then write an essay explaining
how to perform it. Be sure to give clear directions in the correct order.

Proficient Response: Proficient or advanced on the 5th Grade Scoring Guide/Writing
Rubric for Organization.

                5th Grade Scoring Guide/Writing Rubric for Organization

        Advanced                           Proficient                       Below Proficient
•   Writes more than 2           •   Writes at least 2 paragraphs    •   Struggles writing a simple
    paragraphs that are              that are focused, connected         paragraph connected to a
    focused.                         to a common theme, and              common theme.
•   Includes a topic sentence,       enhanced by two or more         •   Writing contains less than two
    3 or more supporting             details that support the main       details supporting the main
    details, and a concluding        idea of each paragraph.             idea.
    statement.                   •   Paper has logical               •   Ideas are fragmented and not
•   Uses transition words or         sequencing, including a clear       sequential.
    phrases to reveal                beginning, middle, and          •   No attempt to establish
    comparison/contrast.             ending with a concluding            paragraph breaks.
•   Uses indents or                  statement.                      •   Uses an inappropriate
    paragraph breaks to          •   Uses transition words or            organizational structure to
    establish paragraph form         phrases to reveal order or          match the purpose and
    and places paragraph             chronology between or               audience (e.g., letter, recount,
    breaks appropriately.            within paragraphs.                  story, description, observation,
•   Uses a unique and            •   Uses indents or paragraph           writer’s notebook, memoir,
    effective organizational         breaks to establish paragraph       play or lyric, directions, or
    structure (e.g., letter,         form.                               report).
    recount, story,              •   Appropriately uses one of
    description, observation,        the following organizational
    writer’s notebook,               structures: letter, recount,
    memoir, play or lyric,           story, description,
    directions, or report).          observation, writer’s
                                     notebook, memoir, play or
                                     lyric, directions, or report.




W05_2.4.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 2 of 2
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progression of ideas and
supporting information; revises own and others’ work and provides appropriate
feedback to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness
of writing.

2.4.2 ( 5th Grade) Revising writing by giving and receiving appropriate feedback and
using established criteria to review own and others’ written work (e.g., peer conferences,
checklists, scoring guides, or rubrics) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: This peer editing guide may be used for students giving feedback to other
students’ written work.

Peer Editing Rubric

Editor

Editing the work of ______________________________________

Grammar and Parts of Speech

                 Check the spelling of the words I have circled on your paper.

                 Each sentence begins with a capital letter.

                 Each sentence ends with an end mark.

                 Each sentence has a subject and a predicate.

Reasons for Writing:

                 I can’t “see” what the writer is telling.

         I would like to know more about:



         I liked the part about:




______________________________                             ____________________________
Writer (signature)                                         Editor (signature)




W05_2.4.2         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 6
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progression of ideas and
supporting information; revises own and others’ work and provides appropriate
feedback to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness
of writing.

2.4.2 ( 5th Grade) Revising writing by giving and receiving appropriate feedback and
using established criteria to review own and others’ written work (e.g., peer conferences,
checklists, scoring guides, or rubrics) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: This peer editing guide may be used for students giving feedback to other
students’ written work.

Peer Editing Rubric

Editor

Editing the work of ______________________________________

Grammar and Parts of Speech

                 Check the spelling of the words I have circled on your paper.

                 Each sentence begins with a capital letter.

                 Each sentence ends with an end mark.

                 Each sentence has a subject and a predicate.

Reasons for Writing:

                 I can’t “see” what the writer is telling.

         I would like to know more about:



         I liked the part about:




______________________________                             ____________________________
Writer (signature)                                         Editor (signature)




W05_2.4.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 6
Proficient Response: All boxes checked and comments completed


Option #2
Directions: The scoring guide/rubric on the next page can be used to assess multiple
fifth-grade Grade Level Expectations. Teachers can use this scoring guide/rubric with any
writing sample students produce to evaluate their progress on fifth grade GLEs.




W05_2.4.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 6
                     5th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Writing Rubric
                      P   P




    Trait                     Advanced                  Proficient                  Below Proficient
Ideas and        •    All of steps in            •    The paper is clear,       •    Few sentences follow a
Content               proficient column               focused, and enhanced          common theme. Writer
                      plus the following:             by two or more details         shows little
                 •    Topic is well-                  that support the main          understanding of task.
                      developed, details              idea of each              •    Writing is hard to
                      paint a clear picture,          paragraph.                     follow.
                      and includes a lead        •    Paper is original.        •    Details are limited or do
                      or hook.                                                       not enhance the main
                 •    Writer understands                                             idea of the paper.
                      topic well.
                 •    Writing includes
                      personal examples.
Organization     •    Writes more than 2         •   Writes at least 2          •   Struggles writing a
                      paragraphs that are            paragraphs that are            simple paragraph
                      focused.                       focused, connected to a        connected to a common
                 •    Includes a topic               common theme, and              theme.
                      sentence, 3 or more            enhanced by two or         •   Writing contains less
                      supporting details,            more details that              than two details
                      and a concluding               support the main idea          supporting the main idea.
                      statement.                     of each paragraph.         •   Ideas are fragmented and
                 •    Uses transition            •   Paper has logical              not sequential.
                      words or phrases to            sequencing including a     •   No attempt at
                      reveal                         clear beginning,               establishing paragraph
                      comparison/contrast.           middle, and ending             breaks.
                 •    Uses indents or                with a concluding          •   Uses an inappropriate
                      paragraph breaks to            statement.                     organizational structure
                      establish paragraph        •   Uses transition words          that doesn’t match the
                      form and places                or phrases to reveal           purpose and audience
                      paragraph breaks               order or chronology            (e.g., letter, recount,
                      appropriately.                 between or within              story, description,
                 •    Uses a unique and              paragraphs.                    observation, writer’s
                      effective                  •   Uses indents or                notebook, memoir, play
                      organizational                 paragraph breaks to            or lyric, directions, or
                      structure (e.g., letter,       establish paragraph            report).
                      recount, story,                form.                      •   If structure is a story,
                      description,               •   Appropriately uses one         writing is missing one of
                      observation, writer’s          of the following               the following elements:
                      notebook, memoir,              organizational                 setting, character,
                      play or lyric,                 structures: letter,            problem, solution, or
                      directions, or                 recount, story,                plot.
                      report).                       description,
                                                     observation, writer’s
                                                     notebook, memoir, play
                                                     or lyric, directions, or
                                                     report.
                                                 •   If structure is a story,
                                                     writing includes
                                                     setting, character,
                                                     problem, solution, and
                                                     plot.




W05_2.4.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006             Page 4 of 6
Voice            •   Writer’s personality     •   Language is clear and      •    Language is somewhat
                     is clear with a sense        easy to understand (not         clear and easy to
                     of purpose.                  flowery).                       understand.
                                              •   Voice is appropriate for   •    Writer’s voice is not
                                                  the topic, purpose,             always appropriate for
                                                  audience, and structure.        the topic, purpose,
                                                                                  audience, and structure.

Word Choice      •   Final draft includes a   •   Final draft includes       •   Limited or redundant
                     variety of                   supporting details to          vocabulary. Words are
                     interesting, engaging        improve focus, to              vague and general.
                     supporting details to        support main ideas, and    •   Words are general and
                     improve focus, to            to make sequence clear         vague and do not create a
                     support main ideas,          [uses adverbs, adjective       clear picture.
                     to make sequence             clauses, strong verbs,     •   Uses few adverbs,
                     clear, and to clarify        transition clauses,            adjective clauses, strong
                     the topic sentence           and/or strong adjective        verbs, transition clauses,
                     [uses adverbs,               clauses in                     and strong adjective
                     adjective clauses,           paragraph(s)].                 clauses in paragraph(s) to
                     strong verbs,            •   Writer modifies rough          improve focus, to support
                     transition clauses,          draft to include several       main ideas, and to make
                     and/or strong                precise/engaging words         sequence clear.
                     adjective clauses in         from a thesaurus.          •   No evidence writer has
                     paragraph(s)].                                              modified rough draft to
                 •   Writer modifies                                             include precise/engaging
                     rough draft to                                              words from a thesaurus.
                     include
                     precise/engaging
                     words from a
                     thesaurus whenever
                     appropriate.
Sentence         •   Sentences                •   Sentences vary in          •   Some sentence fragments
Fluency              consistently vary in         length, beginnings, and        and run-on sentences
                     length, beginnings,          patterns to improve            exist.
                     and patterns to              meaning.                   •   Most sentences are
                     improve meaning          •   Writing includes               complete and easy to
                     and style.                   several compound               understand but little
                 •   Sentences are                sentences (including           attempt to write
                     purposeful and make          the conjunctions and,          compound sentences
                     meaning clear.               or, but, or because).          exists.

Conventions      •   Compositions have        •   Spelling of grade          •   Spelling of grade
                     accurate spelling (1         appropriate/high               appropriate/high
                     or 2 misspelled              frequency words is at          frequency words is less
                     words per page)              least 80% accurate             than 80% accurate
                     after self-editing           (Fry/Dolch list 1-600,         (Fry/Dolch list 1-600,
                     with a dictionary.           local spelling words,          local spelling words,
                 •   Student begins to            etc.).                         etc.).
                     punctuate                •   Spelling of less           •   Contractions and
                     quotations.                  frequent words may             homophones are seldom
                 •   Writing uses                 show errors.                   spelled accurately.
                     subject/verb             •   Contractions and           •   Little or no punctuation
                     agreement, verb              homophones are                 and capitalization or
                     tense, possessives,          spelled accurately.            consistent errors in



W05_2.4.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006          Page 5 of 6
                     and pronouns           •   Ending punctuation             spelling, capitalization,
                     correctly.                 (commas in dates,              and punctuation.
                                                salutations, and           •   Regular errors in
                                                closings in letters, and       subject/verb agreement,
                                                commas in series) is in        verb tense, and/or
                                                place and correct.             possessives
                                            •   Capitals at the
                                                beginning of sentences,
                                                on proper nouns, and in
                                                titles are in place and
                                                correct.
                                            •   Writing uses
                                                subject/verb agreement,
                                                verb tense, and
                                                possessives correctly.




W05_2.4.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 6 of 6
W2.5 Student gives credit for others’ ideas, images, and information by citing
information about sources, including title and author.

2.5.1 (5th Grade) Documenting sources by giving credit for others’ ideas, images, and
information by citing title and source (e.g., author, storyteller, songwriter or artist.
(Locally Assessed)


Directions: Have students write a report using at least three sources to gather
information. Report must include a minimum of two images. Students must correctly cite
their resources and the sources for their images.




W05_2.5.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.5 Student gives credit for others’ ideas, images, and information by citing
information about sources, including title and author.

2.5.1 (5th Grade) Documenting sources by giving credit for others’ ideas, images, and
information by citing title and source (e.g., author, storyteller, songwriter or artist.
(Locally Assessed)


Directions: Have students write a report using at least three sources to gather
information. Report must include a minimum of two images. Students must correctly cite
their resources and the sources for their images.

Proficient Response: Use the following rubric to evaluate their citations.

                        5th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Citations

         Advanced                          Proficient                    Below Proficient
 • Student lists the author        • Student lists the author        • Student lists only the title
   first in a citation, then the     and title of at least 3           or author in the citations.
   title.                            books related to the topic.     • Student may not have at
 • The author’s last name is       • Student lists two                 least 3 sources.
   written first.                    images.MLA form is              • Student lists only partial
 • The list of sources is in         correct.                          information to cite the
   alphabetical order.                                                 image.
 • Student cites the sources          Who Moved My Cheese            • Student may not have 2
   for two images.                    by Spencer Johnson               images.
 • Images are listed:
   Artist’s last name is              “Rhesus Monkeys in the            Who Moved My Cheese
   written first.                     Zoo” by Greg Smith
   Title of image                                                       Monkey image
   Date of image
   Title of larger site
   Date of download
   Electronic address

    Johnson, Spencer, Who
    Moved My Cheese

    Smith, Greg. “Rhesus
    Monkeys in the Zoo.”
    No date. Online image.
    Monkey Picture Gallery.
    3 May 2003.
    http://monkeys.online.org
    /rhesus.jpg




W05_2.5.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006      Page 2 of 2
W2.6 Student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.1 (5th Grade) Using resources by looking up spelling or definitions of words in
dictionaries or correcting misspellings using software programs (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Observe student correcting misspelled words using the spelling function of a
software program.




W05_2.6.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.6 Student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.1 (5th Grade) Using resources by looking up spelling or definitions of words in
dictionaries or correcting misspellings using software programs (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Observe student correcting misspelled words using the spelling function of a
software program.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Scoring Guide below.

    5th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Correcting Misspellings Using Software

         Advanced                    Proficient                           Below Proficient
Student explains to others  Student correctly uses the               Student attempts to use the
how to correct misspellings proper tool bar (Tools in a              wrong tool bar (i.e., format
using a software program. Microsoft Word                             or table in a Microsoft
                            document).                               Word document).

                                  Student follows all                Student is unsure how to
                                  established procedures for         correct misspellings.
                                  correcting misspellings.




W05_2.6.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.6 Student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.2 (5th Grade) Using resources by using thesaurus to find synonyms for common
words. (Locally Assessed)


Directions:
1. Use a thesaurus to find a synonym for the following words.

        A. large

        B. thanks

        C. look

        D. have

        E. work




W05_2.6.2          Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.6 Student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.2 (5th Grade) Using resources by using thesaurus to find synonyms for common
words. (Locally Assessed)


Directions:
1. Use a thesaurus to find a synonym for the following words.

        A. large

        B. thanks

        C. look

        D. have

        E. work


Proficient Response: Proficiency is 4 out of 5 correct responses. Answers will vary.
Accept reasonable responses.

        A. large         big, enormous, great, huge, hefty, etc.

        B. thanks        gratitude, appreciation, recognition, etc.

        C. look          glance, see, stare, glimpse, etc.

        D. have          own, possess, hold, etc.

        E. work          labor, toil, job, vocation, occupation, etc.




W05_2.6.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.6 Student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.3 (5th Grade) Using resources by writing using a word processor (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Observe student writing using a word processor.




W05_2.6.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.6 Student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.3 (5th Grade) Using resources by writing using a word processor (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Observe student writing using a word processor.


Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 5th Grade Scoring
Guide/Rubric for Word Processor Use below.

                5th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Word Processor Use

        Advanced                          Proficient                     Below Proficient
Final document has no             Final document has few            Final document has many
errors.                           errors.                           errors.

Spell check has been used     Spell check has been used             Final document has several
and no spelling errors exist. and spelling errors that              spelling errors that a spell
                              exist are misused words.              check would have caught.




W05_2.6.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.1 Student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a
single topic.

2.1.1 (6th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a story or composition of at least two
paragraphs with a topic sentence (which may include a lead or hook), maintaining a
focused idea, and including supporting details


Directions: Write a story of at least two paragraphs to the following prompt. Use a topic
sentence, supporting details, and a conclusion sentence for each paragraph. Your
paragraphs should contain five details and transition words within and between
paragraphs.

Prompt: Write a story about the funniest thing that ever happened to you.




W06_2.1.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.1 Student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a
single topic.

2.1.1 (6th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a story or composition of at least two
paragraphs with a topic sentence (which may include a lead or hook), maintaining a
focused idea, and including supporting details


Directions: Write a story of at least two paragraphs to the following prompt. Use a topic
sentence, supporting details, and a conclusion sentence for each paragraph. Your
paragraphs should contain five details and transition words within and between
paragraphs.

Prompt: Write a story about the funniest thing that ever happened to you.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 6th Grade Scoring
Guide/Writing Rubric for Ideas and Content and Organization.

   6th Grade Scoring Guide/Writing Rubric for Ideas, Content, and Organization

         Advanced                            Proficient                      Below Proficient
 • All of steps in proficient      • Paper has well-developed topic     • Few sentences follow a
   column plus the following:        including a lead or hook.            common theme.
 • Writer understands topic        • Clear, relevant details enhance    • Goal of paper is unclear.
   well.                             the main idea of the paper.        • Writer shows little
 • Writing includes personal       • Paper is original.                   understanding of task.
   examples.                       • Writes at least 2 paragraphs       • Details are limited or do not
 • Reader’s questions are            that are focused, connected to a     enhance the main idea of the
   anticipated and answered.         common theme, and enhanced           paper.
• An inviting introduction draws     by clear, relevant details.        • Ideas are fragmented or not
  the reader in; a satisfying      • Writing includes a beginning,        sequential.
  conclusion leaves the reader       middle, and ending including a     • Composition doesn’t include
  with a sense of closure and        topic sentence and concluding        two or more of the
  resolution.                        statement.                           following: a clear beginning,
                                   • Story or composition includes        topic sentence, middle,
                                     an interest catcher/lead/hook.       ending, or concluding
                                                                          statement.
                                                                        • Struggles writing more than
                                                                          one paragraph connected to a
                                                                          common theme.




W06_2.1.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006       Page 2 of 2
W2.1 Student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a
single topic.

2.1.2 (6th grade) Writing about a topic by using paragraph form: indents or paragraph
breaks, and placing paragraph breaks appropriately. (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Write at least three paragraphs as a response to the following prompt. Your
paragraphs should contain details about the prompt and be written in proper paragraph
form using appropriately placed paragraph breaks or indents

Prompt: Think of an event that you will want to remember when you are old. Tell about
what happened in a way that is so clear that if you read this story again when you are
eighty, every detail will come flooding back as if it happened yesterday.


Option #2
Directions: In the story below, the author forgot to put in paragraph breaks. Read the
following story and answer the questions that follow.

                                           Mercury
1.
  Mercury is the planet which is closest to the sun. It is one of the four inner planets. 2.
These planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. 3. The inner planets are also called the
rocky planets, because they are made of rocks. 4. Mercury orbits the sun very quickly. 5. It
only takes it 88 days to go around the sun. 6. It takes Earth 365 days to orbit the sun in a
year. 7. One orbit around the sun is a year. 8. A year on Earth is 365 days. 9. A year on
Mercury is only 88 days long!10. Mercury spins very slowly on its axis. 11. It takes
Mercury 176 “earth days” to spin around on its axis one time. 12. It takes earth only 24
hours to spin all the way around. 13. Our day is 24 hours long because that is how long it
takes earth to spin around once. 14. A day on Mercury is 176 earth days long. 15. Could
you stay up that long?

Source: http://www.manatee.K12.fl.us/sites/elementary/palmasola/literalprac2.htm

1. Where would the second paragraph begin?
      A. at the beginning of sentence 3
      B. at the beginning of sentence 4
      C. at the beginning of sentence 5
      D. at the beginning of sentence 6

2. Where would the third paragraph begin?
      A. at the beginning of sentence 7
      B. at the beginning of sentence 8
      C. at the beginning of sentence 9
      D. at the beginning of sentence 10


W06_2.1.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
W2.1 Student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a
single topic.

2.1.2 (6th grade) Writing about a topic by using paragraph form: indents or paragraph
breaks, and placing paragraph breaks appropriately. (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Write at least three paragraphs as a response to the following prompt. Your
paragraphs should contain details about the prompt and be written in proper paragraph
form using appropriately placed paragraph breaks or indents

Prompt: Think of an event that you will want to remember when you are old. Tell about
what happened in a way that is so clear that if you read this story again when you are
eighty, every detail will come flooding back as if it happened yesterday.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 6th Grade Scoring
Guide/Writing Rubric for Organization

                 6th Grade Scoring Guide/Writing Rubric for Organization

          Advanced                          Proficient                     Below Proficient
•    Writes more than three       • Writes at least three            • Composition doesn’t include
     focused paragraphs             paragraphs that are focused,       at least three paragraphs or they
     enhanced by relevant and       connected to a common theme,       are not connected to a common
     unique details including       and enhanced by clear,             theme.
     personal examples.             relevant details.                 • Writing has few relevant
•    Always uses indents or       • Consistently uses indents or        details or details are unclear.
     paragraph breaks to            paragraph breaks to establish     • Does not establish paragraph
     establish paragraph form,      paragraph form and places           form using indents or
     and places paragraph           paragraph breaks                    paragraph breaks or
     breaks appropriately.          appropriately.                      sometimes misplaces
                                                                        paragraph breaks.




Option #2
Directions: In the story below, the author forgot to put in paragraph breaks. Read the
following story and answer the questions that follow.

                                               Mercury
1.
  Mercury is the planet which is closest to the sun. It is one of the four inner planets. 2.
These planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. 3. The inner planets are also called the
rocky planets, because they are made of rocks. 4. Mercury orbits the sun very quickly. 5. It
only takes it 88 days to go around the sun. 6. It takes Earth 365 days to orbit the sun in a
year. 7. One orbit around the sun is a year. 8. A year on Earth is 365 days. 9. A year on
Mercury is only 88 days long!10. Mercury spins very slowly on its axis. 11. It takes
Mercury 176 “earth days” to spin around on its axis one time. 12. It takes earth only 24


W06_2.1.2 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006       Page 2 of 3
hours to spin all the way around. 13. Our day is 24 hours long because that is how long it
takes earth to spin around once. 14. A day on Mercury is 176 earth days long. 15. Could
you stay up that long?

Source: http://www.manatee.K12.fl.us/sites/elementary/palmasola/literalprac2.htm

1. Where would the second paragraph begin?
      A. at the beginning of sentence 3
      B. at the beginning of sentence 4
      C. at the beginning of sentence 5
      D. at the beginning of sentence 6

2. Where would the third paragraph begin?
      A. at the beginning of sentence 7
      B. at the beginning of sentence 8
      C. at the beginning of sentence 9
      D. at the beginning of sentence 10


Proficient Response: Two correct answers out of two indicate proficiency.

1. Where would the second paragraph begin?
      A. at the beginning of sentence 3
      B. at the beginning of sentence 4
      C. at the beginning of sentence 5
      D. at the beginning of sentence 6

2. Where would the third paragraph begin?
      A. at the beginning of sentence 7
      B. at the beginning of sentence 8
      C. at the beginning of sentence 9
      D. at the beginning of sentence 10




W06_2.1.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
W2.1 Student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a
single topic.

2.1.3 (6th grade) Writing about a topic by organizing and sequencing ideas logically to
establish clear relationships within and between paragraphs (e.g., using transition words
or phrases that reveal order or chronology, comparison/contrast). (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write at least three paragraphs as a response to the following prompt. Use a
topic sentence, supporting details, and a conclusion sentence for each paragraph. Your
paragraphs should contain at least three details and use transition words to reveal order
(chronology) or comparisons/contrasts.

Prompt: Think of a rule you would like changed. Try to talk an adult into changing that
rule.




W06_2.1.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.1 Student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a
single topic.

2.1.3 (6th grade) Writing about a topic by organizing and sequencing ideas logically to
establish clear relationships within and between paragraphs (e.g., using transition words
or phrases that reveal order or chronology, comparison/contrast). (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write at least three paragraphs as a response to the following prompt. Use a
topic sentence, supporting details, and a conclusion sentence for each paragraph. Your
paragraphs should contain at least three details and use transition words to reveal order
(chronology) or comparisons/contrasts.

Prompt: Think of a rule you would like changed. Try to talk an adult into changing that
rule.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 6th Grade Scoring
Guide/Writing Rubric for Ideas and Content and Organization

 6th Grade Scoring Guide/Writing Rubric for Ideas and Content and Organization

       Trait                Advanced                  Proficient               Below Proficient
 Ideas and Content     • All of steps in        • Paper has well-            • Few sentences follow
                         proficient column        developed topic              a common theme.
                         plus the following:      sentence (may include      • Goal of paper is
                       • Writer understands       a lead or hook).             unclear.
                         topic well.            • Clear, relevant details    • Writer shows little
                       • Writing includes         enhance the main idea        understanding of task.
                         personal examples.       of the paper.              • Details are limited or
                       • Reader’s questions     • Paper is original.           do not enhance the
                         are anticipated and                                   main idea of the paper.
                         answered.
Organization          • An inviting             • Writing includes a         • Composition doesn’t
                        introduction draws        beginning, middle and        include two or more of
                        the reader in; a          end including a topic        the following: a clear
                        satisfying conclusion     sentence and                 beginning, topic
                        leaves the reader         concluding statement.        sentence, middle,
                        with a sense of         • Paper has logical            ending, or concluding
                        closure and               sequencing.                  statement.
                        resolution.             • Consistently uses           • Ideas are fragmented
                      • Thoughtful                transition words or           or not sequential.
                        transitions clearly       phrases to reveal order,    • Seldom uses transition
                        show how ideas            chronology, or                words to reveal order,
                        connect.                  comparison/contrast           chronology, or
                                                  between or within             comparisons/contrasts
                                                  paragraphs.                   between or within
                                                                                paragraphs.




W06_2.1.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 2 of 2
W2.1 Student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a
single topic.

2.1.4 (6th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a concluding statement


Directions: Read this paragraph and write a concluding statement.

The old wooden canoe shifted on the sawhorses it had been laid upon many years ago.
The wind was blowing furiously, and it swooshed beneath the rotting boat and lifted it off
its supports as if it were made of cardboard. Bits of dust and dried grass were knocked
loose and picked up and swirled around by the gusts. Andy ran outside to tie the boat
down with ropes he brought with him. He didn’t want to lose his last connection with
Grandpa.

_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________




W06_2.1.4       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.1 Student writes a well-organized two-paragraph composition that addresses a
single topic.

2.1.4 (6th Grade) Writing about a topic by writing a concluding statement


Directions: Read this paragraph and write a concluding statement.

The old wooden canoe shifted on the sawhorses it had been laid upon many years ago.
The wind was blowing furiously, and it swooshed beneath the rotting boat and lifted it off
its supports as if it were made of cardboard. Bits of dust and dried grass were knocked
loose and picked up and swirled around by the gusts. Andy ran outside to tie the boat
down with ropes he brought with him. He didn’t want to lose his last connection with
Grandpa.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 6th Grade Scoring
Guide/Writing Rubric for Ideas and Content

              6th Grade Scoring Guide/Writing Rubric for Ideas and Content

           Advanced                            Proficient                    Below Proficient
• Conclusion summarizes the           • Conclusion is relevant and     • Conclusion does not connect
  main idea and is interesting,         logical, and utilizes            to the common theme or is
  creative, relevant, and logical.      ideas/details from the           illogical or unclear.
                                        selection.                     • Writer shows little
                                                                         understanding of task.

Answers will vary. Accept reasonable responses. Sample answers below.

Sample response #1: ndy frantically worked to save the canoe from the wind by securing
it to the tattered sawhorses.

Sample response #2: Andy secured his grandfather’s old canoe to the sawhorses.




W06_2.1.4 Answer Key     Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.2 Student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.1 (6th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing an
understandable story that incorporates story elements and literary devices (e.g., dialogue,
descriptive details)


Directions: Write a story to the prompt below. Be sure your writing includes setting,
character, problem, solution, and plot and at least one literary device such as dialogue,
descriptive details, characterization, mood, etc.

You arrive home and find a message for you on your phone’s answering machine. Tell
what this message was about, and tell the story of what happened to you as a result of this
message.




W06_2.2.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.2 Student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.1 (6th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing an
understandable story that incorporates story elements and literary devices (e.g., dialogue,
descriptive details)


Directions: Write a story to the prompt below. Be sure your writing includes setting,
character, problem, solution, and plot and at least one literary device such as dialogue,
descriptive details, characterization, mood, etc.

You arrive home and find a message for you on your phone’s answering machine. Tell
what this message was about, and tell the story of what happened to you as a result of this
message.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 5th Grade Scoring
Guide/Rubric for Ideas, Content, and Organization

         5th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Ideas, Content, and Organization

       Advanced                             Proficient                         Below Proficient
All of steps in proficient     • Writes at least 2 paragraphs that are   • Few sentences follow a
  column plus the                focused, connected to a common            common topic. Writer shows
  following:                     topic, and enhanced by two or more        little understanding of task.
• Topic is well-developed,       details that support the main idea of   • Struggles writing a simple
  details paint a clear          each paragraph.                           paragraph.
  picture, and includes a      • Paper is original.                      • Writing is hard to follow.
  lead or hook.                • Paper has logical sequencing            • Details are limited or do not
• Writer understands topic       including a clear beginning,              enhance the main idea of the
  well.                          middle, and ending with a                 paper.
• Writing includes personal      concluding statement.                   • Ideas are fragmented and not
  examples.                    • Writing includes setting, character,      sequential.
• Writes at least 2              problem, solution, and plot.            • Writing is missing one of the
  paragraphs that are          • Writing includes at least one             following elements: setting,
  focused, include a topic       literary device such as dialogue,         character, problem, solution,
  sentence, 3 or more            descriptive details,                      or plot.
  supporting details and a       characterization, mood, etc.            • Writing does not show
  concluding statement.                                                    evidence of any literary
• Writing includes                                                         devices such as dialogue,
  descriptive setting, well-                                               descriptive details,
  developed characters,                                                    characterization, mood, etc.
  problem, solution, and
  detailed plot.
• Writing includes several
  literary devices such as
  dialogue, descriptive
  details, characterization,
  mood, etc.




W06_2.2.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006          Page 2 of 2
W2.2 Student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.2 (6th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using diagrams,
charts, or illustrations with captions or labels in research projects or extended reports
(Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write a report on a topic of your choice. Before beginning, get your
teacher’s approval for writing on the topic. In your report be sure to include: note cards or
source cards, outline, title page, introduction, body paragraphs, diagrams, charts or
illustrations with labels, and a conclusion.




W06_2.2.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.2 Student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.2 (6th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using diagrams,
charts, or illustrations with captions or labels in research projects or extended reports
(Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write a report on a topic of your choice. Before beginning, get your
teacher’s approval for writing on the topic. In your report be sure to include: note cards or
source cards, outline, title page, introduction, body paragraphs, diagrams, charts or
illustrations with labels, and a conclusion.

Proficient Response: Score of proficient or advanced on the scoring guide below.

                      6th Grade Report Writing Structure/Scoring Guide

           Advanced                              Proficient                    Below Proficient
1. Detailed Note cards – Source         1. Note cards – Source cards.      One or more of the nine
cards (3”x5” cards or electronic       (3”x5” cards or electronic notes)   requirements are missing from
notes)                                 2. Outline.                         the report.
2. Comprehensive Outline.              3. Title page – Title, Name,
3. Creative, attractive Title page     Date, Teacher Name.
– Title, Name, Date, Teacher           4. Introduction – Clear
Name.                                  statement of thesis in first
4. Engaging Introduction – Clear       paragraph.
statement of thesis in first           5. Body Paragraphs:
paragraph.                                 • Topic sentences
5. Body Paragraphs:                             (possibly including
    • Lead or hook topic                        transition)
        sentences (possibly                • Opinions
        including transition)              • Details
    • Logical opinions                     • Summary statement
    • Interesting, relevant details             (possible transition
    • Summary statement,                        sentence)
        convincing conclusion          6. Diagrams, charts or
        (possible transition                illustrations with labels.
        sentence).                     7. Conclusion summarizes
6. Multiple diagrams, charts or        thesis and main points of the
illustrations with labels.             paper (clearly connects the
7. Conclusion – summarizes             introduction).
thesis and main points of the paper    8. Paper follows APA or MLA
(clearly connects the introduction).   format guidelines.
8. Paper follows APA or MLA            9. Bibliography – include all
format guidelines.                     sources whether cited directly or
9. Bibliography – include all          not – three sources minimum.
sources whether cited directly or
not – more than three sources.




W06_2.2.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006           Page 2 of 2
W2.2 Student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.3 (6th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using expressive
language when responding to literature or producing text (e.g., writer’s notebook
memoirs, poetry, plays or lyrics) (Locally Assessed)

Option #1
Directions: A limerick is a five-line poem written with one couplet and one triplet. If a
couplet is a two-line rhymed poem, then a triplet would be a three-line rhymed poem.
The rhyme pattern is a a b b a with lines 1, 2, and 5 containing 3 beats and rhyming, and
lines 3 and 4 having two beats and rhyming. Some people say that the limerick was
invented by soldiers returning from France to the Irish town of Limerick in the 1700s.

Limericks are meant to be funny. The last line of a good limerick contains the PUNCH
LINE or "heart of the joke."

Write a limerick about a girl who broke her leg.


Option #2
Directions:
1. Animals in Alaska each have their own distinctive qualities, qualities that appeal to all
of the senses. Write a paragraph that answers the following questions:
    • Which Alaskan animal do you like best?
    • What makes that animal special?
    • How does it stand out from the others?
2. Write a poem describing the animal you have chosen. Use descriptive, colorful, and
emotional words to explain your topic.
Tips:
    • Use words that describe it in terms of all five senses.
    • Try to express yourself in such a way that the reader will relate to the animal you
        are describing in the same way that you do.




W06_2.2.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
W2.2 Student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.3 (6th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using expressive
language when responding to literature or producing text (e.g., writer’s notebook
memoirs, poetry, plays or lyrics) (Locally Assessed)

Option #1
Directions: A limerick is a five-line poem written with one couplet and one triplet. If a
couplet is a two-line rhymed poem, then a triplet would be a three-line rhymed poem.
The rhyme pattern is a a b b a with lines 1, 2, and 5 containing 3 beats and rhyming, and
lines 3 and 4 having two beats and rhyming. Some people say that the limerick was
invented by soldiers returning from France to the Irish town of Limerick in the 1700s.

Limericks are meant to be funny. The last line of a good limerick contains the PUNCH
LINE or "heart of the joke."

Write a limerick about a girl who broke her leg.

Proficient Response: Answers will vary. Sample response included. A score of
“proficient” or “advanced” on the 6th Grade Limerick Scoring Guide/Rubric on the
following page indicates mastery.

Sample response:
There once was a pauper named Meg
Who accidentally broke her leg.
She slipped on the ice.
Not once, but thrice.
Take no pity on her, I beg.




W06_2.2.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
                          6th Grade Limerick Scoring Guide/Rubric

   Trait               Advanced                      Proficient                  Below Proficient
Organization   Limerick structure            Limerick structure includes      Limerick structure is missing
               includes all of the           at least four of the             more than two of the
               following features:           following features:              following features:
                • Five lines                  • Five lines                     • Five lines
                • Rhyme pattern a-a-b-        • Rhyme pattern a-a-b-b-         • Rhyme pattern a-a-b-b-a
                   b-a                            a                            • Lines 1, 2, and 5 contain
                • Lines 1, 2, and 5           • Lines 1, 2, and 5                 3 beats and rhyme.
                   contain 3 beats and            contain 3 beats and          • Lines 3 and 4 contain 2
                   rhyme.                         rhyme.                          beats and rhyme.
                • Lines 3 and 4 contain       • Lines 3 and 4 contain 2        • Last line is the punch
                   2 beats and rhyme.             beats and rhyme.                line.
                • Last line is the punch      • Last line is the punch
                   line.                          line.
Voice           • Writer’s personality is    • Language is clear and          • Voice is inappropriate to
                  clear with a sense of          easy to understand (not        the topic or purpose.
                  purpose.                       flowery).                    • Writer’s voice is not
                                             • Voice is appropriate for         always appropriate to the
                                                 the topic, purpose, and        topic and purpose.
                                                 organization.
Word            • Final draft includes       • Final draft includes           • Limited vocabulary often
Choice            supporting details to          supporting details to          repeated. Words are
                  improve focus, to              improve focus, to              vague and general.
                  support main ideas, to         support main ideas, and      • Words are general and
                  make sequence clear,           to make sequence clear         vague so that they do not
                  and to clarify the topic       [uses adverbs, adjective       create a clear picture.
                  sentence [uses                 clauses, strong verbs,       • Uses few adverbs,
                  adverbs, adjective             transition clauses, and/or     adjective clauses, strong
                  clauses, strong verbs,         strong adjective clauses       verbs, transition clauses,
                  transition clauses,            in paragraph(s)].              and strong adjective
                  and/or strong              • Writer modifies rough            clauses in paragraph(s) to
                  adjective clauses in           draft or paragraph to          improve focus, to
                  paragraph(s)].                 include several                support main ideas, and
                • Writer modifies rough          precise/engaging words.        to make sequence clear.
                  draft or paragraph to                                       • No evidence writer has
                  include                                                       modified rough draft or
                  precise/engaging                                              paragraph to include
                  words where                                                   precise/engaging words.
                  appropriate.



Option #2
Directions:
1. Animals in Alaska each have their own distinctive qualities, qualities that appeal to all
of the senses. Write a paragraph that answers the following questions:
    • Which Alaskan animal do you like best?
    • What makes that animal special?
    • How does it stand out from the others?
2. Write a poem describing the animal you have chosen. Use descriptive, colorful, and
emotional words to explain your topic.


W06_2.2.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006           Page 3 of 4
Tips:
   • Use words that describe it in terms of all five senses.
   • Try to express yourself in such a way that the reader will relate to the animal you
      are describing in the same way that you do.

Proficient Response: A score of proficient or advanced on the 6th Grade Voice and
Word Choice Scoring Guide/Rubric for each poem.

                  6th Grade Voice/Word Choice Scoring Guide/Rubric

Trait             Advanced                       Proficient               Below Proficient
Voice      • Writer’s personality        •   Language is clear         • Voice is inappropriate
             is clear with a sense           and easy to                 to the topic or
             of purpose.                     understand (not             purpose.
                                             flowery).                 • Writer’s voice is not
                                         •   Voice is appropriate        always appropriate to
                                             for the topic,              the topic and purpose.
                                             purpose, and
                                             organization.
Word       • Final draft includes        •   Final draft includes      • Limited vocabulary
Choice       supporting details to           supporting details to       often repeated. Words
             improve focus, to               improve focus, to           are vague and general.
             support main ideas,             support main ideas,       • Words are general and
             to make sequence                and to make                 vague so that they do
             clear, and to clarify           sequence clear [uses        not create a clear
             the topic sentence              adverbs, adjective          picture.
             [uses adverbs,                  clauses, strong           • Uses few adverbs,
             adjective clauses,              verbs, transition           adjective clauses,
             strong verbs,                   clauses, and/or             strong verbs, transition
             transition clauses,             strong adjective            clauses, and strong
             and/or strong                   clauses in                  adjective clauses in
             adjective clauses in            paragraph(s)].              paragraph(s) to
             paragraph(s)].              •   Writer modifies             improve focus, to
           • Writer modifies                 rough draft or              support main ideas,
             rough draft or                  paragraph to                and to make sequence
             paragraph to include            include several             clear.
             precise/engaging                precise/engaging          • No evidence writer has
             words from a                    words from a                modified rough draft
             thesaurus where                 thesaurus.                  or paragraph to
             appropriate.                                                include
                                                                         precise/engaging
                                                                         words from a
                                                                         thesaurus.




W06_2.2.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
W2.2 Student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.4 (6th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using diagrams,
charts, or illustrations with captions or labels in research projects or extended reports.
(Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write a report on a topic of your choice. Before beginning, get your
teacher’s approval for writing on the topic. In your report be sure to include: note cards or
source cards, outline, title page, introduction, body paragraphs, diagrams, charts or
illustrations with labels, and a conclusion.




W06_2.2.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.2 Student uses a variety of fiction and nonfiction forms when writing for
different audiences.

2.2.4 (6th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by using diagrams,
charts, or illustrations with captions or labels in research projects or extended reports.
(Locally Assessed)


Directions: Write a report on a topic of your choice. Before beginning, get your
teacher’s approval for writing on the topic. In your report be sure to include: note cards or
source cards, outline, title page, introduction, body paragraphs, diagrams, charts or
illustrations with labels, and a conclusion.

Proficient Response: Score of proficient or advanced on the scoring guide below.

                      6th Grade Report Writing Structure/Scoring Guide

           Advanced                              Proficient                      Below Proficient
1. Detailed note cards – Source         1. Note cards – Source cards.       One or more of the nine
    cards (3”x5” cards or                   (3”x5” cards or electronic      requirements are missing from
    electronic notes)                       notes)                          the report.
2. Comprehensive outline,              2. Outline
3. creative, attractive title page –   3. Title page – Title, Name,
    Title, Name, Date, Teacher              Date, Teacher Name
    Name                               4. Introduction – Clear
4. Engaging introduction – Clear           statement of thesis in first
    statement of thesis in first           paragraph
    paragraph                          5. Body Paragraphs:
5. Body Paragraphs:                         • Topic sentences
   • Lead or hook topic                         (possibly including
        sentences (possibly                     transition)
        including transition)               • Opinions
   • Logical opinions                       • Details
   • Interesting, relevant details          • Summary statement
   • Summary statement-                         (possible transition
        convincing conclusion                   sentence)
        (possible transition           6. Diagrams, charts, or
        sentence)                           illustrations with labels
6. Multiple diagrams, charts, or       7. Conclusion summarizes
    illustrations with labels               thesis and main points of the
7. Conclusion – summarizes                  paper (clearly connects the
    thesis and main points of the           introduction)
    paper (clearly connects the        8. Paper follows APA or MLA
    introduction)                           format guidelines
8. Paper follows APA or MLA            9. Bibliography includes all
    format guidelines                      sources whether cited
9. Bibliography includes all           directly
   sources whether cited directly          or not; three sources
   or not; more than three                 minimum
   sources




W06_2.2.4 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 2 of 2
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.1 (6th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by varying
the beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning of writing.


Option #1
Directions: Rewrite the following passage. You should vary the beginnings, lengths, and
patterns of the sentences to improve the way it sounds. You may add, revise, or leave out
words; combine sentences; or break sentences apart.

George is a good friend and he lives in Hooper Bay and likes to run. Last fall he ran with
the cross-country team. George saw a bear. The bear was a grizzly bear. Was at least six
feet tall. George is only five and a half feet tall. The bear fake-charged George. The bear
scared George. George froze when the bear charged him. George backed away slowly.
George eventually got away.




W06_2.3.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 5
Option #2
Directions: Combine the following sentences to improve their flow and meaning.

1. Canada is a rich country. Canada still has many poor people.




2. The ice on the river melts quickly. It melts under the warm March sun. ithout the ice,
the river looks like it’s lying exposed without its blanket of snow.




3. My friend is sad. She is my best friend. She is sad because her dog died last night.




4. There is an old man who is always on the corner of Spenard and International Airport
Road. He sells flowers. All the tourists in the summer buy his flowers.




5. I love to go to Mexico fishing. I love to catch marlin. I also love to catch dorado.




W06_2.3.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 5
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.1 (6th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by varying
the beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning of writing.


Option #1
Directions: Rewrite the following passage. You should vary the beginnings, lengths, and
patterns of the sentences to improve the way it sounds. You may add, revise, or leave out
words; combine sentences; or break sentences apart.

George is a good friend and he lives in Hooper Bay and likes to run. Last fall he ran with
the cross-country team. George saw a bear. The bear was a grizzly bear. Was at least six
feet tall. George is only five and a half feet tall. The bear fake-charged George. The bear
scared George. George froze when the bear charged him. George backed away slowly.
George eventually got away.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the 6th Grade Scoring
Guide/Rubric for Sentence Fluency

                  6th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Sentence Fluency

        Advanced                          Proficient                     Below Proficient
• All sentences vary in           • Most sentences vary in          • Some sentence fragments
  length, beginnings, and           length, beginnings, and           and run-on sentences
  patterns to improve               patterns to improve               exist.
  meaning and style.                meaning.                        • Most sentences are
                                  • Writing includes several          complete and easy to
                                    compound sentences                understand but little
                                    (including the                    attempt to write
                                    conjunctions and, or,             compound sentences
                                    but, or because).                 exist.


Option #2
Directions: Combine the following sentences to improve their flow and meaning.

1. Canada is a rich country. Canada still has many poor people.




W06_2.3.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 5
2. The ice on the river melts quickly. It melts under the warm March sun. ithout the ice,
the river looks like it’s lying exposed without its blanket of snow.




3. My friend is sad. She is my best friend. She is sad because her dog died last night.




4. There is an old man who is always on the corner of Spenard and International Airport
Road. He sells flowers. All the tourists in the summer buy his flowers.




5. I love to go to Mexico fishing. I love to catch marlin. I also love to catch dorado.




Proficient Response: Answers will vary. Accept reasonable responses. Proficiency is 4
out of 5 sentences written correctly.

1. Canada is a rich country. Canada still has many poor people.

Sample response:         Canada is a rich country, but still it has many poor people.
                         Even though Canada is a rich country it still has many poor people.

2. The ice on the river melts quickly. It melts under the warm March sun. Without the
ice, the river looks like it’s lying exposed without its blanket of snow.

Sample response:         Lying exposed without its blanket of snow, the ice on the river
                         melts quickly under the warm March sun.

3. My friend is sad. She is my best friend. She is sad because her dog died last night.

Sample response:         My best friend is sad because her dog died last night.




W06_2.3.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 5
4. There is an old man who is always on the corner of Spenard and International Airport
Road. He sells flowers. All the tourists in the summer buy his flowers.

Sample response:         The old man who is always on the corner of Spenard and
                         International Airport Road sells flowers to all the tourists in the
                         summer.

5. I love to go to Mexico fishing. I love to catch marlin. I also love to catch dorado.

Sample response:         I love to go marlin and dorado fishing in Mexico.




W06_2.3.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 5
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.2 (6th Grade) Writing and editing using the conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in spelling (e.g., grade-appropriate, high-frequent
words, homophones, and contractions)


Option #1
Directions: Circle the word in each line that is spelled correctly.

1.             american                 American                  Ammerican

2.             brout                    broght                    brought

3.             sertain                  certan                    certain

4.             compleet                 complete                  complete

5.             family                   fammily                   famely

6.             fish                     fissh                     fishe

7.             hundrede                 hundred                   hunndred

8.             I’ll                     Il’l                      Ill’

9.             laern                    learne                    learn

10.            notice                   notic                     noatice

11.            ready                    raedy                     reddy

12.            remeber                  rember                    remember

13.            short                    shorte                    shortt

14.            speciel                  speciall                  special

15.            surfac                   surface                   surrface

16.            though                   thoughe                   thoug

17.            tru                      truu                      true




W06_2.3.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 7
18.            usually                  usully                    usuallie

19.            voic                     vioce                     voice

20.            whether                  wether                    whetheer


Option #2
Directions: Read the following paragraph and underline ten misspelled words. Write
the correct spelling directly above it.

                                          Half-Truths

        Beware of those who use the truth to deceive. When someone tells you
something that is true, but leaves out important informaiton that should be included, he
can create a false impresion.
        For example, someone might say, “I just won a hundred dollars in the lottery. It
was great. I took that dollar ticket back to the store and turned it in for one hundred
dollars!”
        This guy’s a winner, right? Maybe. Maybe not. We then discoveer that he
bought two hundread tickets, and only one was a winner. He’s really a big loser!
        He didn’t say anything that was false, but he deliberately omitted importent
information. That’s called a half-truth. Half-truths are not technically lies, but they are
just as dishonnest.
        Untrustworthy candidates in political campaigns often use this tactic. Let’s say
that during Governor Smith’s last term, her staate lost one million jobs and gained three
milllion jobs. Then she seeks another term. One of her opponants runs an ad saying,
“During Governor Smith’s term, the state lost one million jobs! That’s true. However,
an honest statement would have been, “During Governor Smith’s term, the state had a net
gain of two million jobs!”
        Advertisers will sometimes use half-truths. It’s against the law to make falsse
claims so they try to mislead you with the truth.
Source: www.rhlschool.com/read8n1.htm




W06_2.3.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 7
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.2 (6th Grade) Writing and editing using the conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in spelling (e.g., grade-appropriate, high-frequent
words, homophones, and contractions)


Option #1
Directions: Circle the word in each line that is spelled correctly.

1.               american                 American                  Ammerican

2.               brout                    broght                    brought

3.               sertain                  certan                    certain

4.               compleet                 complete                  complete

5.               family                   fammily                   famely

6.               fish                     fissh                     fishe

7.               hundrede                 hundred                   hunndred

8.               I’ll                     Il’l                      Ill’

9.               laern                    learne                    learn

10.              notice                   notic                     noatice

11.              ready                    raedy                     reddy

12.              remeber                  rember                    remember

13.              short                    shorte                   shortt

14.              speciel                  speciall                  special

15.              surfac                   surface                   surrface

16.              though                   thoughe                   thoug

17.              tru                      truu                      true




W06_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 7
18.              usually                  usully                    usuallie

19.              voic                     vioce                     voice

20.              whether                  wether                    whetheer


Proficient Response: Correct spellings are underlined. Proficiency is 16 out of 20
correct. Advanced is 18 out of 20 correct.

1.               american                 American                  Ammerican

2.               broughtt                 broght                    brought

3.              sertain                   certan                    certain

4.               compleet                 complete                  complet

5.               family                   fammily                   famely

6.               fish                     fissh                     fishe

7.               hundrede                 hundred                   hunndred

8.               I’ll                     Il’l                      Ill’

9.               laern                    learne                    learn

10.              notice                   notic                     noatice

11.              ready                    raedy                     reddy

12.              remeber                  rember                    remember

13.              short                    shorte                    shortt

14.              speciel                  speciall                  special

15.              surfac                   surface                   surrface

16.              though                   thoughe                   thoug

17.              tru                      truu                      true

18.              usually                  usully                    usuallie




W06_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 7
19.             voic                      vioce                     voice

20.              whether                  wether                    whetheer


Option #2
Directions: Read the following paragraph and underline ten misspelled words. Write
the correct spelling directly above it.

                                           Half-Truths

        Beware of those who use the truth to deceive. When someone tells you
something that is true, but leaves out important informaiton that should be included, he
can create a false impresion.
        For example, someone might say, “I just won a hundred dollars in the lottery. It
was great. I took that dollar ticket back to the store and turned it in for one hundred
dollars!”
        This guy’s a winner, right? Maybe. Maybe not. We then discoveer that he
bought two hundread tickets, and only one was a winner. He’s really a big loser!
        He didn’t say anything that was false, but he deliberately omitted importent
information. That’s called a half-truth. Half-truths are not technically lies, but they are
just as dishonnest.
        Untrustworthy candidates in political campaigns often use this tactic. Let’s say
that during Governor Smith’s last term, her staate lost one million jobs and gained three
milllion jobs. Then she seeks another term. One of her opponants runs an ad saying,
“During Governor Smith’s term, the state lost one million jobs! That’s true. However,
an honest statement would have been, “During Governor Smith’s term, the state had a net
gain of two million jobs!”
        Advertisers will sometimes use half-truths. It’s against the law to make falsse
claims so they try to mislead you with the truth.
Source: www.rhlschool.com/read8n1.htm




W06_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 7
Proficient Response: Correct spellings are underlined. Proficiency is 80% correct;
Advanced is 90% - 100%.
                                    Half-Truths

        Beware of those who use the truth to deceive. When someone tells you

                                                  information
something that is true, but leaves out important informaiton that should be included, he
                    impression
can create a false impresion.

        For example, someone might say, “I just won a hundred dollars in the lottery. It
was great. I took that dollar ticket back to the store and turned it in for one hundred
dollars!”
        This guy’s a winner, right? Maybe. Maybe not. We then discoveer that he

           hundred
bought two hundread tickets, and only one was a winner. He’s really a big loser!

                                                                            important
        He didn’t say anything that was false, but he deliberately omitted importent
information. That’s called a half-truth. Half-truths are not technically lies, but they are

        dishonest
just as dishonnest.
        Untrustworthy candidates in political campaigns often use this tactic. Let’s say

                                             state
that during Governor Smith’s last term, her staate lost one million jobs and gained three

million                                                opponents
milllion jobs. Then she seeks another term. One of her opponants runs an ad saying,
“During Governor Smith’s term, the state lost one million jobs! That’s true. However,
an honest statement would have been, “During Governor Smith’s term, the state had a net
gain of two million jobs!”

                                                                                 false
        Advertisers will sometimes use half-truths. It’s against the law to make falsse
claims so they try to mislead you with the truth.




W06_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 6 of 7
                               Addendum for Grade 6 Spelling


                    Sample Sixth Grade High Frequency Spelling List
Numerical order represents the frequency of word use. For example, “room” is the
#1 most frequently used word at this level; “sea” is the #2 most frequently used
word for this level.

able [82]                  fast [112]                  open [46]                  tree [52]
add [71]                   feel [91]                   order [45]                 true [31]
against [3]                felt [113]                  perhaps [88]               turn [24]
ago [58]                   fine [135]                  person [103]               turned [5]
am [132]                   fire [92]                   piece [127]                United [40]
American [55]              fish [34]                   plants [35]                upon [21]
among [81]                 five [11]                   play [9]                   usually [13]
anything [105]             front [54]                  point [7]                  voice [118]
area [119]                 full [99]                   ran [98]                   whether [134]
became [70]                gave [44]                   ready [93]                 wind [77]
become [72]                green [94]                  really [49]                yes [95]
before [68]                ground [47]                 red [33]                   yet [7]
behind [78]                group [30]                  remember [51]
black [37]                 grow [73]                   rest [87]
body [20]                  half [32]                   river [129]
book [43]                  himself [12]                room [1]
box [123]                  hold [106]                  run [42]
brought [63]               horse [120]                 sad [59]
built [96]                 hot [104]                   sea [2]
cannot [79]                hundred [110]               seen [15]
can't [116]                idea [67]                   short [39]
car [17]                   I'll [61]                   shown [84]
certain [89]               I'm [19]                    six [90]
city [8]                   inside [57]                 space [56]
class [126]                kept [114]                  special [97]
close [64]                 later [23]                  stand [122]
cold [48]                  learn [6]                   start [124]
common [130]               learned [62]                state [107]
complete [101]             less [76]                   States [41]
course [53]                letter [80]                 stood [109]
cut [28]                   list [108]                  stop [131]
didn't [16]                lived [69]                  strong [117]
dog [83]                   living [36]                 surface [128]
done [29]                  matter [121]                table [50]
door [27]                  mean [85]                   talk [133]
draw [74]                  money [14]                  ten [111]
early [60]                 morning [18]                that's [125]
eat [38]                   move [25]                   though [66]
English [86]               nothing [65]                top [4]
face [26]                  notice [115]                toward [10]
family [22]                oh [102]                    town [100]



W06_2.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 7 of 7
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.3 (6th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in punctuation (i.e., quotation marks for dialogue,
commas in dates, salutations and closings in letters, and commas in a series) and
capitalization


Option #1
Directions: Rewrite this paragraph with the correct punctuation and capitalization (30
points possible).

         Robert frost was a well loved poet. He was born on March 26 1874. He spent his
first ten years in san francisco California. His father william frost died when robert frost
was ten. After his fathers death, Frost moved east to massachusetts with his mother. At
the age of twenty one, Frost attended harvard college.
         After several years as a teacher, Frost moved to England where he wrote many
poems there and lived on a farm. He published his first book of poems at the age of
fourty. Readers loved his poems He won the pulitzer prize four times. Twenty-eiht
universities gave him honorary degrees.
         Frost once talked to a Friend about poetry. He said “It begins as a lump in the
throat.” These are some of Frosts poems: “stopping by woods on a snowy evening,” “the
telephone,” and “To earthward.”

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________




W06_2.3.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 5
Option #2
Directions: Add the correct ending punctuation.
1. Al and his mother will put up new wallpaper
2. Has Al ever done this before
3. I hope he doesn’t make any mistakes
4. Is the new wallpaper for Al’s room
5. Wow, what a great job

Directions: Add commas in the sentences below.
1. Al took down his posters of New York Boston and Dallas.
2. Ralph and Rita sell paint wallpaper and curtains.
3. Good prices lots of choices and expert advice are their specialty.
4. They’ll help you spruce up your kitchen living room or bedroom.
5. That strip of wallpaper Al is not quite straight.
6. Yes you may need to take it down and try again.
7. Well maybe you can smooth it with a brush.
8. Once again my friend you have succeeded!
9. Al a careful worker is starting to feel tired.
10. His mother a strong and energetic woman is slowing down too.
11. Their lunch a plate of huge sandwiches will taste good.
12. Al and his mom patient workers know when to take a break.

Directions: Add quotation marks to the following sentences.
1. Mom, said Al, I look like a wallpaper mummy!
2. Although I like the paper,”he added, I don’t want to wear it!
3. His mom replied, I’m sorry! I meant to redecorate the room.
4. I didn’t mean to redecorate you, Al! she said with a chuckle.

Directions: Correctly punctuate the book titles in the following sentences.
1. Jeff bought Behold the Pickle as a birthday gift for his mom.
2. You will love the recipes in Easy Ways to Add Ketchup to Everything!
3. I borrowed Flour Power from the library.
4. I read The Best Christmas Pageant Ever.




W06_2.3.3         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 5
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.3 (6th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in punctuation (i.e., quotation marks for dialogue,
commas in dates, salutations and closings in letters, and commas in a series) and
capitalization


Option #1
Directions: Rewrite this paragraph with the correct punctuation and capitalization (30
points possible).

         Robert frost was a well loved poet. He was born on March 26 1874. He spent his
first ten years in san francisco California. His father william frost died when robert frost
was ten. After his fathers death, Frost moved east to massachusetts with his mother. At
the age of twenty one, Frost attended harvard college.
         After several years as a teacher, Frost moved to England where he wrote many
poems there and lived on a farm. He published his first book of poems at the age of forty.
Readers loved his poems He won the pulitzer prize four times. Twenty-eiht universities
gave him honorary degrees.
         Frost once talked to a Friend about poetry. He said “It begins as a lump in the
throat.” These are some of Frosts poems: “stopping by woods on a snowy evening,” “the
telephone,” and “To earthward.”

Proficient Response: Proficiency is 27 out of 33 corrected errors. Advanced is 30 out
of 33 corrected errors.

         Robert Frost was a well-loved poet. He was born on March 26, 1847. He spent
his first ten years in San Francisco, California. His father, William Frost, died when
Robert Frost was ten. After his father’s death, Frost moved East to Massachusetts with
his mother. At the age of twenty-one, Frost attended Harvard College.
         After several years as a teacher, Frost moved to England where he wrote many
poems there and lived on a farm. He published his first book of poems at the age of
forty. Readers loved his poems. He won the Pulitzer Prize four times. Twenty-eight
universities gave him honorary degrees.
         Frost once talked to a friend about poetry. He said, “It begins as a lump in the
throat.” These are some of Frost’s poems: “Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening,”
“The Telephone,” and “To Earthwood.”


Option #2
Directions: Add the correct ending punctuation.
1. Al and his mother will put up new wallpaper
2. Has Al ever done this before


W06_2.3.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 5
3. I hope he doesn’t make any mistakes
4. Is the new wallpaper for Al’s room
5. Wow, what a great job


Proficient Response:        Proficiency is 4 out of 5 correct answers.
1. Al and his mother will put up new wallpaper.
2. Has Al ever done this before?
3. I hope he doesn’t make any mistakes!
4. Is the new wallpaper for Al’s room?
5. Wow, what a great job!



Directions: Add commas in the sentences below.
1. Al took down his posters of New York Boston and Dallas.
2. Ralph and Rita sell paint wallpaper and curtains.
3. Good prices lots of choices and expert advice are their specialty.
4. They’ll help you spruce up your kitchen living room or bedroom.
5. That strip of wallpaper Al is not quite straight.
6. Yes you may need to take it down and try again.
7. Well maybe you can smooth it with a brush.
8. Once again my friend you have succeeded!
9. Al a careful worker is starting to feel tired.
10. His mother a strong and energetic woman is slowing down too.
11. Their lunch a plate of huge sandwiches will taste good.
12. Al and his mom patient workers know when to take a break.


Proficient Response: Proficiency is 15 out of 18 correctly placed commas. Advanced is
17 out of 18 correctly placed commas.

1. Al took down his posters of New York, Boston, and Dallas.
2. Ralph and Rita sell paint, wallpaper, and curtains.
3. Good prices, lots of choices, and expert advice are their specialty.
4. They’ll help you spruce up your kitchen, living room, or bedroom.



W06_2.3.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 5
5. That strip of wallpaper, Al, is not quite straight.
6. Yes, you may need to take it down and try again.
7. Well, maybe you can smooth it with a brush.
8. Once again, my friend, you have succeeded!
9. Al, a careful worker, is starting to feel tired.
10. His mother, a strong and energetic woman, is slowing down, too.
11. Their lunch, a plate of huge sandwiches, will taste good.
12. Al and his mom, patient workers, know when to take a break.

Directions: Add quotation marks to the following sentences.
1. Mom, said Al, I look like a wallpaper mummy!
2. Although I like the paper,”he added, I don’t want to wear it!
3. His mom replied, I’m sorry! I meant to redecorate the room.
4. I didn’t mean to redecorate you, Al! she said with a chuckle.

Proficient Response: Proficiency is 10 out of 12 correctly placed quotation marks.
Advanced is 11 out of 12 correctly placed quotation marks.

1. “Mom,” said Al, “I look like a wallpaper mummy!”
2. “Although I like the paper,” he added, “I don’t want to wear it!”
3. His mom replied, “I’m sorry! I meant to redecorate the room.”
4. “I didn’t mean to redecorate you, Al!” she said with a chuckle.

Directions: Correctly punctuate the book titles in the following sentences.
1. Jeff bought Behold the Pickle as a birthday gift for his mom.
2. You will love the recipes in Easy Ways to Add Ketchup to Everything!
3. I borrowed Flour Power from the library.

Proficient Response: Proficiency is 4 out of 4 correct answers.
1. Jeff bought Behold the Pickle as a birthday gift for his mom.
2. You will love the recipes in Easy Ways to Add Ketchup to Everything!
3. I borrowed Flour Power from the library.
4. I read The Best Christmas Pageant Ever.

Source: www.eduplace.com


W06_2.3.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 5
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.4 (6th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in usage (i.e. subject/verb agreement, verb tense,
sentence fragments, run-on sentences, possessives, and pronouns)


Directions: Circle the correct pronoun to complete the sentences.

1.      ( He, Him ) needed help with his math.

2.      Jane lent ( she, her ) five dollars.

3.      ( We, Us ) went to the game together.

4.      ( Them, Those ) are my favorite kind of flowers.

5.      I am going camping next week with ( they, them ).

Directions:
6. Choose the sentence that is written correctly.
       a. Plants like these don’t do good in full sun.
       b. He don’t like to eat oatmeal very much.
       c. Dave could of done better if he had tried.
       d. The weeds grew among the flowers.


Directions: In each sentence, one verb is missing. Write one verb to complete the
sentence.

7.      Our teacher                                to prepare us for the upcoming exam.

8.      Brandon                                    so high up into the tree that a limb cracked.

9.      The wealth that accompanies economic development enables people to

                                           more.

10.     Janet tried to                             the friendship by apologizing.

11.     High school students                               with their friends.




W06_2.3.4         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 1 of 6
Directions: In the following sentences, the subjects and verbs don’t match. Fix the
sentences by changing the underlined verbs.

12.     The grass are always greener on the other side of the fence.

13.     A rolling stone gather no moss.

14.     Two heads is better than one.

15.     Don’t bite the hand that feed you.

16.     Never looks a gift horse in the mouth.

17.     A bird in the hand are worth two in the bush.

18.     If the shoe fits, wears it.


Directions: Re-write these run-on sentences into separate sentences.

19.     The most common last name in the U.S. is Smith the most popular name for
        males is William.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

20.     How big is your heart it’s about the same size as your fist.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

21.     Americans seem to like peanuts the average American will eat 200 pounds of this
        food in a lifetime.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W06_2.3.4         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 6
22.     Have you seen bumps on your tongue they’re your taste buds

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W06_2.3.4       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 6
W2.3 Student uses a variety of simple and compound sentence structures in written
work; and proofreads and corrects grammar, sentence structure, paragraph
structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and usage in finished written work.

2.3.4 (6th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by
identifying and correcting mistakes in usage (i.e. subject/verb agreement, verb tense,
sentence fragments, run-on sentences, possessives, and pronouns)


Directions: Circle the correct pronoun to complete the sentences.

1.      ( He, Him ) needed help with his math.

2.      Jane lent ( she, her ) five dollars.

3.      ( We, Us ) went to the game together.

4.      ( Them, Those ) are my favorite kind of flowers.

5.      I am going camping next week with ( they, them ).

Directions:
6. Choose the sentence that is written correctly.
       e. Plants like these don’t do good in full sun.
       f. He don’t like to eat oatmeal very much.
       g. Dave could of done better if he had tried.
       h. The weeds grew among the flowers.


Directions: In each sentence, one verb is missing. Write one verb to complete the
sentence.

7.      Our teacher                                 to prepare us for the upcoming exam.

8.      Brandon                                     so high up into the tree that a limb cracked.

9.      The wealth that accompanies economic development enables people to

                                           more.

10.     Janet tried to                              the friendship by apologizing.

11.     High school students                                with their friends.




W06_2.3.4 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 6
Directions: In the following sentences, the subjects and verbs don’t match. Fix the
sentences by changing the underlined verbs.

12.     The grass are always greener on the other side of the fence.

13.     A rolling stone gather no moss.

14.     Two heads is better than one.

15.     Don’t bite the hand that feed you.

16.     Never looks a gift horse in the mouth.

17.     A bird in the hand are worth two in the bush.

18.     If the shoe fits, wears it.


Directions: Re-write these run-on sentences into separate sentences.

19.     The most common last name in the U.S. is Smith the most popular name for
        males is William.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

20.     How big is your heart it’s about the same size as your fist.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

21.     Americans seem to like peanuts the average American will eat 200 pounds of this
        food in a lifetime.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________




W06_2.3.4 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 6
22.      Have you seen bumps on your tongue they’re your taste buds

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________


Proficient Response: Proficiency is 18 out of 22 correct answers. Advanced is 20 out of
22 correct answers.

1.   he                           10.   answers will vary
2.   her                          11.   answers will vary
3.   we                           12.   is
4.   those                        13.   gathers
5.   them                         14.   are
6.   (d)                          15.   feeds
7.   answers will vary            16.   look
8.   answers will vary            17.   is
9.   answers will vary            18.   wear

19. The most common name in the U.S. is Smith.
    The most popular first name for males is William.

20. How big is your heart?
    It’s about the same size as your fist.

21. Americans seem to like peanuts.
    The average American will eat 200 pounds of this food in a lifetime.

22. Have you seen bumps on your tongue?
    They’re taste buds.




W06_2.3.4 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 6 of 6
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progressions of ideas and
supporting information; revises own and others’ work and provides appropriate
feedback to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness
of writing.

2.4.1 (6th Grade) Revising writing by rearranging and/or adding details to improve focus,
to support main ideas, to clarify topic sentence, and to make sequence clear


Source: www.6ReadQuizB.pdf

Option #1:
Directions:
Read the following paragraphs and identify the best topic sentences.

Paragraph #1
These dogs are smooth-haired and often have sad, wrinkled faces and floppy ears. They
are not fast runners, but they can keep on the hunt for hours. After tracking a raccoon
and treeing it, the coonhound will stand and bay for the hunters. The beagle and the
basset can single out the scent of small animals and follow them into the thickets where
they are hiding. The low-slung dachshund is an expert at digging badgers out of their
holes. One of the best known of the scent hounds is the bloodhound.

            The bloodhound has the best nose of all hunting dogs.
            Police use bloodhounds to track criminals and missing persons.
            Dogs that track their quarry by an extra keen sense of smell are called scent
            hounds.
            My dog’s name is Rebel.

Paragraph #2
At a small airport near us, a flying club was putting on a special program. The members
of the club were taking kids on free airplane rides! The troop leaders thought it would be
neat for our whole troop to go to the airport together. Our parents had to sign forms that
said we were allowed to fly in the planes. Then, on the first Saturday in June, all 15 of
the girls in my troop went to the airport together. We were so excited!

            The name of the flying club is Denali Air.
            My dad was a pilot in the Navy.
            My Girl Scout Troop meets on the first Wednesday of every month.
            My Girl Scout Troop had a great adventure at the end of the school year.

Paragraph #3
I was with Meg, Sarah, and Molly. Before we could go up, though, we had to walk
around the plane with our pilot, Genevieve. She was a good pilot. When we got into the
plane, I was surprised at how small the inside of the plane was. I’ve been inside cars that
were bigger! It was really noisy, too. Genevieve made us wear special headphones that


W06_2.4.1           Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
screened out the noise. She also could talk to us over the headphones, so we didn’t have
to shout. She showed us how she has to constantly look around and listen to the control
tower before she can take off.

            Finally, it was my turn to go up in the plane.
            Meg, Sarah, and Molly are my best friends.
            My family drives a GMC Suburban car.
            I want to be a pilot when I grow up.


Option #2:
Directions: Write paragraphs based on these topic sentences. Add details to clarify the
following topic sentences and support the main ideas.

Mary just won round-trip airline tickets to anywhere in the world. After
considering many exciting options, she decided to go to …
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

It was the biggest mistake I had ever made.
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________



W06_2.4.1           Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progressions of ideas and
supporting information; revises own and others’ work and provides appropriate
feedback to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness
of writing.

2.4.1 (6th Grade) Revising writing by rearranging and/or adding details to improve focus,
to support main ideas, to clarify topic sentence, and to make sequence clear


Source: www.6ReadQuizB.pdf

Option #1:
Directions:
Read the following paragraphs and identify the best topic sentences.

Paragraph #1
These dogs are smooth-haired and often have sad, wrinkled faces and floppy ears. They
are not fast runners, but they can keep on the hunt for hours. After tracking a raccoon
and treeing it, the coonhound will stand and bay for the hunters. The beagle and the
basset can single out the scent of small animals and follow them into the thickets where
they are hiding. The low-slung dachshund is an expert at digging badgers out of their
holes. One of the best known of the scent hounds is the bloodhound.

         The bloodhound has the best nose of all hunting dogs.
         Police use bloodhounds to track criminals and missing persons.
         Dogs that track their quarry by an extra keen sense of smell are called scent
         hounds.
         My dog’s name is Rebel.

Paragraph #2
At a small airport near us, a flying club was putting on a special program. The members
of the club were taking kids on free airplane rides! The troop leaders thought it would be
neat for our whole troop to go to the airport together. Our parents had to sign forms that
said we were allowed to fly in the planes. Then, on the first Saturday in June, all 15 of
the girls in my troop went to the airport together. We were so excited!

         The name of the flying club is Denali Air.
         My dad was a pilot in the Navy.
         My Girl Scout Troop meets on the first Wednesday of every month.
         My Girl Scout Troop had a great adventure at the end of the school year.

Paragraph #3
I was with Meg, Sarah, and Molly. Before we could go up, though, we had to walk
around the plane with our pilot, Genevieve. She was a good pilot. When we got into the
plane, I was surprised at how small the inside of the plane was. I’ve been inside cars that
were bigger! It was really noisy, too. Genevieve made us wear special headphones that


W06_2.4.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
screened out the noise. She also could talk to us over the headphones, so we didn’t have
to shout. She showed us how she has to constantly look around and listen to the control
tower before she can take off.

         Finally, it was my turn to go up in the plane.
         Meg, Sarah, and Molly are my best friends.
         My family drives a GMC Suburban car.
         I want to be a pilot when I grow up.

Proficient Response: Proficient is 2 correct items out of the 3 items. Advanced is all 3
items correct.

Paragraph #1 topic sentence:
Dogs that track their quarry by an extra keen sense of smell are called scent hounds.

Paragraph #2 topic sentence:
My Girl Scout Troop had a great adventure at the end of the school year.

Paragraph #3 topic sentence:
Finally, it was my turn to go up in the plane.


Option #2:
Directions: Write paragraphs based on these topic sentences. Add details to clarify the
following topic sentences and support the main ideas.

Mary just won round-trip airline tickets to anywhere in the world. After
considering many exciting options, she decided to go to …

It was the biggest mistake I had ever made.

Proficient Response: Advanced or proficient on the following scoring guide.

                       6th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

        Advanced                            Proficient                    Below Proficient
• Writer understands topic         • Sentences follow a               • Few sentences follow a
  well.                              common theme.                      common theme.
• Reader’s questions are           • Clear, relevant details          • Details are limited or do
  anticipated and                    enhance the main idea of           not enhance the main
  answered.                          the paper.                         idea of the paper.
                                   • Paper is original.




W06_2.4.1 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progressions of ideas and
supporting information; revises own and others’ work and provides appropriate
feedback to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness
of writing.

2.4.2 (6th Grade) Revising writing by giving/receiving appropriate feedback and using
established criteria to review own and others’ written work (e.g., peer conferences,
checklists, scoring guides, or rubrics) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: This peer editing guide may be used for students giving feedback to other
students’ written work.

                                     Peer Editing Rubric
Editor

Editing the work of

Grammar and Parts of Speech

                 Check the spelling of the words I have circled on your paper.
                 Each sentence begins with a capital letter.
                 Each sentence ends with an end mark.
                 Each sentence has a subject and a predicate.

Reasons for Writing:

                 I can’t “see” what the writer is telling.

         I would like to know more about:



         I liked the part about:




______________________________                             ____________________________
Writer (signature)                                               Editor (signature)




W06_2.4.2         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progressions of ideas and
supporting information; revises own and others’ work and provides appropriate
feedback to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness
of writing.

2.4.2 (6th Grade) Revising writing by giving/receiving appropriate feedback and using
established criteria to review own and others’ written work (e.g., peer conferences,
checklists, scoring guides, or rubrics) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: This peer editing guide may be used for students giving feedback to other
students’ written work.

                                      Peer Editing Rubric
Editor

Editing the work of

Grammar and Parts of Speech

                 Check the spelling of the words I have circled on your paper.
                 Each sentence begins with a capital letter.
                 Each sentence ends with an end mark.
                 Each sentence has a subject and a predicate.

Reasons for Writing:

                 I can’t “see” what the writer is telling.

         I would like to know more about:



         I liked the part about:




______________________________                              ____________________________
Writer (signature)                                                Editor (signature)


Proficient Response: All boxes checked and comments completed.




W06_2.4.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
Option #2
Directions: The following six traits scoring guide is matched to Grade Six Grade Level
Expectations. It may be used as a peer or self-assessment to allow students to give
appropriate feedback and review work.

                       6th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Writing Rubric

   Trait               Advanced                        Proficient                    Below Proficient
Ideas and       •   All of steps in            • Paper has well-developed        • Few sentences follow a
Content             proficient column            topic including a lead or         common theme.
                    plus the following:          hook.                           • Goal of paper is unclear.
                •   Writer understands         • Clear, relevant details         • Writer shows little
                    topic well.                  enhance the main idea of          understanding of task.
                •   Writing includes             the paper.                      • Details are limited or do not
                    personal examples.         • Paper is original.                enhance the main idea of the
                •   Reader’s questions         • Conclusion is relevant,           paper.
                    are anticipated and          logical and utilizes            • Conclusion does not connect
                    answered.                    ideas/details from the            to the common theme or is
                •   Conclusion                   selection.                        illogical or unclear.
                    summarizes the main
                    idea and is
                    interesting, creative,
                    relevant, and logical.
Organization    •   An inviting                • Writes at least 2 paragraphs    • Ideas are fragmented or not
                    introduction draws           that are focused, connected       sequential.
                    the reader in; a             to a common theme, and          • Composition doesn’t include
                    satisfying conclusion        enhanced by clear, relevant       two or more of the following:
                    leaves the reader with       details.                          a clear beginning, topic
                    a sense of closure and     • Writing includes a                sentence, middle, ending, or
                    resolution.                  beginning, middle, and end        concluding statement.
                •   Thoughtful transitions       including a topic sentence      • Does not establish paragraph
                    clearly show how             and concluding statement.         form using indents or
                    ideas connect.             • Story or composition              paragraph breaks.
                •   Uses a unique and            includes an interest            • Struggles writing more than
                    effective                    catcher/lead/hook.                one paragraph connected to a
                    organizational             • Paper has logical                 common theme.
                    structure (e.g., letter,     sequencing using transition     • Uses indents or paragraph
                    recount, story,              words or phrases to reveal        breaks to establish paragraph
                    description,                 order, chronology, or             form but sometimes
                    observation, writer’s        comparison/contrast               misplaces paragraph breaks.
                    notebook, memoir,            between or within
                    play or lyric,               paragraphs.
                    directions, or report).    • Uses indents or paragraph
                                                 breaks to establish
                                                 paragraph form and places
                                                 paragraph breaks
                                                 appropriately.
                                               • If structure is a story,
                                                 writing incorporates story
                                                 elements and literary
                                                 devices (e.g., dialogue,
                                                 descriptive details).
Voice           •   Writer’s personality       • Language is clear, precise,     • Language is usually clear and
                    is clear with a sense        and descriptive.                  easy to understand.
                    of purpose.                • Voice is appropriate for the    • Writer’s voice is not always
                •   An original, fresh           topic, purpose, audience, and     appropriate for the topic,
                    approach is achieved.        structure.                        purpose, audience, and
                                                                                   structure.




W06_2.4.2 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006               Page 3 of 4
Word            •   Words and phrases         • Final draft includes           • Limited or redundant
Choice              create pictures and         supporting details to            vocabulary.
                    linger in your mind.        improve focus, to support      • Some words used incorrectly
                •   Precision is obvious.       main ideas, to make              which may confuse the
                    The writer has chosen       sequence clear, and to           reader.
                    just the right word or      clarify the topic sentence     • Words are general and vague
                    phrase in just the          [uses adverbs, adjective         so that they do not create a
                    right spot.                 clauses, strong verbs,           clear picture.
                •   Writer modifies             transition clauses, and/or
                    rough draft to include      strong adjective clauses in
                    precise/engaging            paragraph(s)].
                    words from a              • Writer modifies rough draft
                    thesaurus where             to include several
                    appropriate.                precise/engaging words
                                                from a thesaurus.
Sentence        •   All sentences vary in     • Most sentences vary in         • Some sentence fragments and
Fluency             length, beginnings,         length, beginnings, and          run-on sentences exist.
                    and patterns to             patterns to improve            • Most sentences are complete
                    improve meaning and         meaning.                         and easy to understand but
                    style.                    • Writing includes several         little attempt to write
                                                compound sentences               compound sentences exists.
                                                (including the conjunctions
                                                and, or, but, or because).
Conventions     •   Compositions have         • Compositions have              • Compositions have numerous
                    accurate spelling (1 or     accurate spelling (4 or 5        spelling errors.
                    2 misspelled words          misspelled words per 100)      • Contractions and
                    per page) after self-       after self-editing with a        homophones are seldom
                    editing with a              dictionary.                      spelled accurately.
                    dictionary.               • Contractions and               • Little or no punctuation and
                •   Irregular plurals are       homophones are spelled           capitalization or consistent
                    spelled accurately.         accurately.                      errors in spelling,
                •   Apostrophes are in        • Ending punctuation;              capitalization and
                    place and correct.          commas in dates,                 punctuation.
                •   Writing uses                salutations and closings in    • Several errors in subject/verb
                    subject/verb                letters; commas in series;       agreement, verb tense,
                    agreement, verb             and quotations in dialogue       possessives and/or pronouns.
                    tense, possessives,         are in place and correct.
                    pronouns, and             • Capitals at the beginning of
                    sentence structure          sentences, on proper nouns,
                    correctly.                  and in titles are in place
                                                and correct.
                                              • Writing uses subject/verb
                                                agreement, verb tense,
                                                possessives, and pronouns
                                                correctly.




W06_2.4.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006              Page 4 of 4
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progressions of ideas and
supporting information; revises own and others’ work and provides appropriate
feedback to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness
of writing.

2.4.3 (6th Grade) Revising writing by combining sentences for fluency and selecting
precise, descriptive words to improve the quality and effectiveness of writing (Locally
Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Combine the following sentences to improve their flow and meaning.

1. The stray dog was skinny. He always came to our front door in the evening.




2. The dog would beg for food. My mother would usually feel sorry for him. She would
give him leftovers from dinner.




3. My dad would check his traps. The dog would follow him.




4. The dog and my dad became friends. They soon became inseparable.




5. The dog was a stray. We now call him Gus. He sleeps beside our woodstove.




W06_2.4.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 5
Option #2
Directions: Change the underlined word or words in the following sentences to a more
descriptive word to improve the quality and effectiveness of the sentence.

1. The stray dog was skinny.




2. I will answer questions only when I am asked.




3. I watched Doug eat a big piece of cake.




4. Kerry told her mom a lie.




5. Gary watched the snake move into the grass.




W06_2.4.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 5
W2.4 Student revises writing to improve the logical progressions of ideas and
supporting information; revises own and others’ work and provides appropriate
feedback to peers based on established criteria to improve quality and effectiveness
of writing.

2.4.3 (6th Grade) Revising writing by combining sentences for fluency and selecting
precise, descriptive words to improve the quality and effectiveness of writing (Locally
Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Combine the following sentences to improve their flow and meaning.

1. The stray dog was skinny. He always came to our front door in the evening.




2. The dog would beg for food. My mother would usually feel sorry for him. She would
give him leftovers from dinner.




3. My dad would check his traps. The dog would follow him.




4. The dog and my dad became friends. They soon became inseparable.




5. The dog was a stray. We now call him Gus. He sleeps beside our woodstove.




W06_2.4.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 5
Proficient Response: Answers may vary. Accept reasonable responses. A score of 4 out
of 5 correct sentences is considered proficient.

1. The stray dog was skinny. He always came to our front door in the evening.

Sample response:         The skinny, stray dog always came to our front door in the
                         evening.


2. The dog would beg for food. My mother would usually feel sorry for him. She would
give him leftovers from dinner.

Sample response:         The dog would beg for food, and my mother would usually feel
                         sorry for him and give him leftovers from dinner.


3. My dad would check his traps. The dog would follow him.

Sample response:         The dog would follow my dad when he went to check his traps.


4. The dog and my dad became friends. They soon became inseparable.

Sample response:         The dog and my dad soon became inseparable friends.


5. The dog was a stray. We now call him Gus. He sleeps beside our woodstove.

Sample response:         The stray dog is now called Gus, and he sleeps beside our
                         woodstove.


Option #2
Directions: Change the underlined word or words in the following sentences to a more
descriptive word to improve the quality and effectiveness of the sentence.

1. The stray dog was skinny.




2. I will answer questions only when I am asked.




W06_2.4.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 5
3. I watched Doug eat a big piece of cake.




4. Kerry told her mom a lie.




5. Gary watched the snake move into the grass.




Proficient Response: Answers may vary. Accept reasonable responses. Sample answers
are included. Proficiency is 4 out of 5 sentences correct.

1. The stray dog was skinny.
Sample responses: scrawny, thin, emaciated, etc.


2. I will answer questions only when I am asked.
Sample responses: respond to, reply to, counter, etc.


3. I watched Doug eat a big piece of cake.
Sample responses: enormous, huge, gigantic, etc.


4. Kerry told her mom a lie.
Sample responses: tall tale, fib, falsehood, etc.


5. Gary watched the snake move into the grass.
Sample responses: slither, slide, zip, etc.




W06_2.4.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 5
W2.5 The student gives credit for others’ ideas, images, and information by citing
information about sources including title and author.

2.5.1 (6th Grade) Documenting sources by giving credit for others’ ideas, images, and
information by citing title and source (e.g., author, storyteller, translator, songwriter or
artist) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Have students write a report using at least three sources to gather
information. Report must include a minimum of two images. Students must cite correctly
their resources and the sources for their images.


Option #2
Directions: Have students interview 5 friends or family members. Find out each
person’s favorite song, the CD it is on, the artist who recorded the CD, the year it was
published, and the company that produced it. Write 5 artists in alphabetical order
according to MLA citations.




W06_2.5.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
W2.5 The student gives credit for others’ ideas, images, and information by citing
information about sources including title and author.

2.5.1 (6th Grade) Documenting sources by giving credit for others’ ideas, images, and
information by citing title and source (e.g., author, storyteller, translator, songwriter or
artist) (Locally Assessed)


Option #1
Directions: Have students write a report using at least three sources to gather
information. Report must include a minimum of two images. Students must cite correctly
their resources and the sources for their images.

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Citation Scoring
Guide below

                        6th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Citations

         Advanced                             Proficient                       Below Proficient
• Student lists the author first    • Student lists the author and        • Student lists only the title or
  in a citation, then the title.      title of at least 3 books related     author in the citations.
• The author’s last name is           to their topic.                     • Student may not have at
  written first.                    • Student lists two images.             least 3 sources.
• The list of sources is in           MLA form is correct.                • Student lists only partial
  alphabetical order.                                                       information to cite the
• Student cites the sources for    Who Moved My Cheese by                   image.
  two images.                      Spencer Johnson                        • Student may not have 2
• Images are listed:                                                        images.
  Artist’s last name is            “Rhesus Monkeys in the Zoo” by
  written first                    Greg Smith                             Who Moved My Cheese
  Title of image
  Date of image                    Jack Johnson. Brushfire                Monkey image
  Title of larger site             Fairytales.
  Date of download                                                        Jack Johnson, songwriter
  Electronic address

Johnson, Spencer, Who Moved
My Cheese

Johnson, Jack. Brushfire
Fairytales. Enjoy Records.
2000.

Smith, Greg. “Rhesus Monkeys
in the Zoo.” No date. Online
image.

Monkey Picture Gallery. 3 May
2003. <http://www.
monkeysonline.org/rhesus.jpg>




W06_2.5.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006               Page 2 of 3
Option #2
Directions: Have students interview 5 friends or family members. Find out each
person’s favorite song, the CD it is on, the artist who recorded the CD, the year it was
published, and the company that produced it. Write 5 artists in alphabetical order
according to MLA citations.

Proficient Response: A score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the scoring guide below

                    6th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Song Citations

        Advanced                  Proficient             Below Proficient
• Students list more than • Student lists five sound • Student lists less than
  five sound recording      recording artists in       five sound recording
  artists in alphabetical   alphabetical order.        artists
  order.                  • MLA style is usually     • Artists may not be listed
• MLA style is always       correct.                   in alphabetical order.
  correct.                   o Last name, first      • MLA style is
  o Last name, first            name                   consistently incorrect.
       name                  o Name of song in          o Last name, first
  o Name of song in             quotes                      name
       quotes                o CD or audiocassette      o Name of song in
  o CD or audiocassette         title underlined            quotes
       title underlined      o Publisher                o CD or audiocassette
  o Publisher                o Date                         title underlined
  o Date                                                o Publisher
                                                        o Date




W06_2.5.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
W2.6 The student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.1 (6th Grade) Using resources by looking up spelling or definitions of words in
dictionaries or correcting misspellings using software programs, including choosing the
correct spelling option among several choices (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Observe student correcting misspelled words using the spelling function of a
software program.




W06_2.6.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.6 The student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.1 (6th Grade) Using resources by looking up spelling or definitions of words in
dictionaries or correcting misspellings using software programs, including choosing the
correct spelling option among several choices (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Observe student correcting misspelled words using the spelling function of a
software program.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Scoring Guide below

6th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Correcting Misspellings Using Software

       Advanced                            Proficient                   Below Proficient
• Student explains to              • Student correctly               • Student attempts to
  others how to correct              utilizes the proper tool          utilize the wrong tool
  misspellings using a               bar (Tools in a                   bar (i.e., format or table
  software program.                  Microsoft Word                    in a Microsoft Word
• Student helps others               document).                        document).
  look up definitions of           • Student identifies the          • Student is unsure how
  words in a dictionary.             correct spelling when             to use the “Spelling
                                     using the “Spelling and           and Grammar” tool or
                                     Grammar” tool.                    identifies an incorrect
                                   • Student correctly looks           choice when using this
                                     up the definition of              tool.
                                     words in the dictionary.        • Student is unable to use
                                                                       a dictionary to look up
                                                                       definitions.




W06_2.6.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 2 of 2
W2.6 The student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.2 (6th Grade) Using resources by using a thesaurus to find synonyms for common
words (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Use a thesaurus to find a synonym for the following words.

        A. danger

        B. part

        C. near

        D. write

        E. busy




W06_2.6.2          Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.6 The student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.2 (6th Grade) Using resources by using a thesaurus to find synonyms for common
words (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Use a thesaurus to find a synonym for the following words.

        A. danger

        B. part

        C. near

        D. write

        E. busy


Proficient Response: Proficiency is 4 or 5 correct responses. Answers will vary. Accept
reasonable responses.

        A. danger        peril, hazard, risk, threat, menace, etc.

        B. part          portion, piece, fraction, division, element, etc.

        C. near          close by, in the vicinity of, in close proximity to, etc.

        D. write         record, draft, script, etc.

        E. busy          occupied, engaged, unavailable, etc.




W06_2.6.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
W2.6 The student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.3 (6th Grade) Using resources by writing with a word processor using formatting
features to produce a final draft (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Observe student writing using a word processor.




W06_2.6.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
W2.6 The student uses resources such as computers, word processing software,
dictionaries, and thesauruses to make choices when writing.

2.6.3 (6th Grade) Using resources by writing with a word processor using formatting
features to produce a final draft (Locally Assessed)


Directions: Observe student writing using a word processor.

Proficient Response: Score of “proficient” or “advanced” on the Scoring Guide below

                6th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Word Processor Use

          Advanced                         Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Final document shows             • Final document shows            • Final document shows
   evidence of use of                evidence of use of font           no evidence of use of
   several font differences          differences (size, type,          font differences (size,
   (size, type, color,               color, underline,                 type, color, underline,
   underline, superscript,           superscript, etc.).               superscript, etc.).
   etc.).                          • Final document shows            • Final document shows
• Final document shows               evidence of use at least          no evidence of use of
  evidence of use more               one other formatting              formatting features
  than one other                     feature (bullets and              (bullets and numbering,
  formatting feature                 numbering, borders and            borders and shading,
  (bullets and numbering,            shading, direction, etc.).        direction, etc.).
  borders and shading,
  direction, etc.).




W06_2.6.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.1 (7th Grade) Writing a thesis statement that identifies the focus or controlling idea
for the entire composition


3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.6 (7th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g., dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, rubric, word processor)


Paragraph Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe your favorite free time activity. You could consider writing about
sports, games, music, or friends. Include why you prefer this activity above other choices.




W07_3.1.1a        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.1 (7th Grade) Writing a thesis statement that identifies the focus or controlling idea
for the entire composition


3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.6 (7th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g., dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, rubric, word processor)


Paragraph Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe your favorite free time activity. You could consider writing about
sports, games, music, or friends. Include why you prefer this activity above other choices.


This paper will be scored for Word Choice and Conventions, using the rubrics on the next
page. If you are interested, there is a 6 trait rubric/scoring guide to use on the web site.




W07_3.1.1a Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                        7th Grade Word Choice Scoring Guide/Rubric

Advanced                          Proficient                         Below Proficient
•   Words are specific,           •    Words are mostly correct      •       Language is so vague,
    accurate, striking.                and adequate but may                  inaccurate, and/or general
•   Language is natural, not           lack flair and color.                 that even the most
    overdone.                     •    Uses familiar words and               general message does not
•   Verbs are lively.                  phrases to communicate.               come through.
•   Nouns and modifiers are       •    Attempts at colorful          •       Words are frequently
    precise.                           language are made but                 used incorrectly, making
•   Clichés and jargon are             some may be overdone.                 the message hard to
    used sparingly and only       •    Clichés and jargon may                decipher.
    for effect.                        be used occasionally in       •       Problems with language
                                       place of fresh language.              leave the reader unable to
                                                                             understand what the
                                                                             writer is trying to say
                                                                             most of the time.

                        7th Grade Conventions Scoring Guide/Rubric

Advanced                           Proficient                            Below Proficient
•   Paragraphing reinforces        •   Paragraphing is attempted         •    Paragraphing is attempted
    the organizational                 but some paragraphs run                but many paragraphs run
    structure.                         together or begin in the               together or begin in the
•   Grammar and usage are              wrong place.                           wrong place
    correct (few, if any,          •   Problems with grammar or          •    Problems with grammar or
    errors) and contribute to          usage are not serious                  usage may be serious
    clarity and style.                 enough to impede or                    enough to impede or
•   Punctuation is accurate            distort meaning.                       distort meaning in some
    (few, if any, errors) and      •   End punctuation usually                instances but not overall.
    guides the reader through          correct; internal                 •    Terminal punctuation is
    the text.                          punctuation is sometimes               usually correct; internal
•   Spelling is generally              missing or incorrect.                  punctuation is sometimes
    correct, even of more          •   Spelling is usually correct            missing or incorrect and
    difficult words.                   or reasonably plausible on             errors may impede or
•   The writer may                     common words;                          distort meaning in some
    manipulate conventions             misspellings do not                    instances.
    for stylistic effect.              impede communication.             •    Spelling errors may
                                                                              impede or distort meaning
                                                                              in some instances but not
                                                                              overall.




W07_3.1.1a Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006       Page 3 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.1.1- 3.4.3 (7th Grade) Paragraph writing for word choice


Directions: Describe your favorite place or town. Include why you prefer this place or
town above other choices. Be sure to include the surroundings and atmosphere along
with the animals and people there.




W07_3.1.1b      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.1.1- 3.4.3 (7th Grade) Paragraph writing for word choice


Directions: Describe your favorite place or town. Include why you prefer this place or
town above other choices. Be sure to include the surroundings and atmosphere along
with the animals and people there.


                        7th Grade Word Choice Scoring Guide/Rubric

Advanced                          Proficient                         Below Proficient
•   Words are specific,           •   Words are mostly correct       •   Language is so vague,
    accurate, striking.               and adequate but may               inaccurate, and/or general
•   Language is natural, not          lack flair and color.              that even the most
    overdone.                     •   Uses familiar words and            general message does not
•   Verbs are lively.                 phrases to communicate.            come through.
•   Nouns and modifiers are       •   Attempts at colorful           •   Words are frequently
    precise.                          language are made but              used incorrectly, making
•   Clichés and jargon are            some may be overdone.              the message hard to
    used sparingly and only       •   Clichés and jargon may             decipher.
    for effect.                       be used occasionally in        •   Problems with language
                                      place of fresh language.           leave the reader unable to
                                                                         understand what the
                                                                         writer is trying to say
                                                                         most of the time.




W07_3.1.1b Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
                              Scoring Guide-Word Choice (6Traits)

Advanced = 6
Proficient = 4
Below proficient= 3
Far Below proficient=2

Advanced                             Proficient                         Below Proficient

6 Points                             4 Points                           3 Points
• Words are specific, accurate,      • Words are mostly correct and     • Words are mostly correct and
striking.                            adequate but may lack flair and    adequate with some lapses.
• Language is natural, not           color.                             • Familiar words and phrases
overdone.                            • Familiar words and phrases       communicate with some lapses.
• Verbs are lively.                  communicate.                       • Attempts at colorful language
• Nouns and modifiers are            • Attempts at colorful language    are rare or absent.
precise.                             are made but some may be           • Clichés and jargon may be used
• Clichés and jargon are used        overdone.                          as a crutch.
sparingly and only for effect.       • Clichés and jargon may be used
                                     occasionally in place of fresh     2 Points
5 Points                             language.                          • Language is so vague and
• Words are specific and accurate.                                      general that only the most general
• Lively verbs and picturesque                                          message comes through (e.g., It
words and phrases are                                                   was a fun time. We did lots of
occasionally used.                                                      neat stuff.)
• Language is natural, not                                              • Persistent redundancy distracts
overdone.                                                               the reader.
• Verbs are lively.                                                     • Words are often used
• Nouns and modifiers are                                               incorrectly, making the message
precise.                                                                hard to decipher.
• Clichés and jargon are used                                           • Clichés and jargon frequently
sparingly and only for effect.                                          serve as a crutch.
                                                                        • Problems with language leave
                                                                        the reader wondering what the
                                                                        writer is trying to say.

                                                                        1 Point
                                                                        • Language is so vague,
                                                                        inaccurate, and/or general that
                                                                        even the most general message
                                                                        does not come through.
                                                                        • Words are frequently used
                                                                        incorrectly, making the message
                                                                        hard to decipher.
                                                                        • Problems with language leave
                                                                        the reader unable to understand
                                                                        what the writer is trying to say
                                                                        most of the time.




W07_3.1.1b Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006     Page 3 of 4
                        7th Grade Conventions Scoring Guide/Rubric

Advanced                           Proficient                         Below Proficient
•   Paragraphing reinforces        •   Paragraphing is attempted      •    Paragraphing is attempted
    the organizational                 but some paragraphs run             but many paragraphs run
    structure.                         together or begin in the            together or begin in the
•   Grammar and usage are              wrong place.                        wrong place
    correct (few, if any,          •   Problems with grammar or       •    Problems with grammar or
    errors) and contribute to          usage are not serious               usage may be serious
    clarity and style.                 enough to impede or                 enough to impede or
•   Punctuation is accurate            distort meaning.                    distort meaning in some
    (few, if any, errors) and      •   End punctuation usually             instances but not overall.
    guides the reader through          correct; internal              •    Terminal punctuation is
    the text.                          punctuation is sometimes            usually correct; internal
•   Spelling is generally              missing or incorrect.               punctuation is sometimes
    correct, even of more          •   Spelling is usually correct         missing or incorrect and
    difficult words.                   or reasonably plausible on          errors may impede or
•   The writer may                     common words;                       distort meaning in some
    manipulate conventions             misspellings do not                 instances.
    for stylistic effect.              impede communication.          •    Spelling errors may
                                                                           impede or distort meaning
                                                                           in some instances but not
                                                                           overall.




W07_3.1.1b Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.1 (7th Grade) Writing a thesis statement that identifies the focus or controlling idea
for the entire composition

3.1.2 (7th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.1.4 (7th Grade) Writing a conclusion that supports the thesis or summarizes the main
ideas

Body Paragraphs
Organizing ideas
Conclusion tied to introduction

Directions: Writing a Book Analysis

Introduction:

Writing the opening: Your opening paragraph should hook your reader’s attention and
identify the focus of your analysis. Use the suggestions listed below to help you get
started on your opening.

    1. Summarize your subject very briefly. Include the title, author, and the type of
    book (or other literature form). This can be done with a statement of “what and how”
    about the book.

        In his novel Lord of the Flies, William Golding writes about [what?] the evil side
        of man [ how?] by describing the actions of a group of young boys who are
        marooned on a deserted island.

    2. Start with a quotation from the book and then comment upon its importance (think
    in terms of the focus of your analysis [characterization]).

    3. Begin with an explanation of the author’s purpose and how well you think he or
    she achieves this purpose (about the character you have selected).

    4. Open with a few general statements about life that relate to the focus of your
    analysis: “There comes a time when everyone has to...”

    5. Begin with a general statement about the type of literature you are analyzing.
    Then discuss your subject within this context: “The best science fiction always seems
    believable and logical within the context of the story line. This is certainly true in ...
    Now let’s examine Top Dog, the antagonist in this novel.”




W07_3.1.1c       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 5
Writing the Body: Develop or support your focus in the body or main part, of the
analysis. To make sure that you effectively explain each main point in your analysis,
follow these three steps:

    1. State each main point so that it clearly relates to the focus of your analysis (about
    your character).

    2. Support each main point with specific details or direct quotations from the text you
    are analyzing ...quote and document with page numbers.

    3. Explain how each of these specific details helps prove your point.

    4. Transitions between paragraphs are important.

    Special Note: Try to organize your writing so that each new paragraph deals with a
    separate main point.

Writing the Closing: In the final paragraph, tie all of the important points together and
make a final statement about the main focus of your analysis. (Give your readers [me
included] something to think about, something that will keep your analysis alive long
after it has been read.)




W07_3.1.1c       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 5
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.1 (7th Grade) Writing a thesis statement that identifies the focus or controlling idea
for the entire composition

3.1.2 (7th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.1.4 (7th Grade) Writing a conclusion that supports the thesis or summarizes the main
ideas

Body Paragraphs
Organizing ideas
Conclusion tied to introduction

Directions: Writing a Book Analysis


Scoring Guide:
Book Analysis Check Sheet                    Student Name________________

______ Present tense
______ Organization
______ Ideas and Content
______ Conventions (spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, grammar)
______Heading:               Left side     _______Student Name
                                           _______ English
                                           _______ Date
                                           _______ Book analysis
Introduction:
______ Book title w/ author’s name
______ Short summary of book (2-3 sentences)
______ Thesis statement (mentions what is in body paragraphs)


Body Paragraphs:
Paragraph #2:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete detail
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence




W07_3.1.1c Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 5
Paragraph #3:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete detail
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence

Paragraph #4:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete detail
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence

Conclusion:
Paragraph #5:
______ Starts out specific, becomes general
______ 40+ words, all commentary--no new information or quotes
______ Repeat thesis...No repeats of key words
______ Give opinion of book and recommendations



Note to teacher: You may use part of or all of the components in the rubric on the next
page to score your students’ papers.




W07_3.1.1c Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 5
                                7th Grade Expository Essay Rubric

                             Advanced                          Proficient                  Below Proficient
                    • Introductory paragraph is       • Introductory paragraph is      • Introductory paragraph is
                        engaging, clear, and              clear and narrows the            evident but fails to narrow
Main Idea:              narrows the topic.                topic.                           the topic.
Introductory        •   Thesis statement clearly      •   Thesis statement previews    •   Thesis statement is
Paragraph &             previews the body and the         the body and sequence of         evident but is confusing
Thesis Statement        sequencing of the essay.          the essay.                       and/or doesn’t preview
                                                                                           the body and sequence of
                                                                                           the essay.

                    • Each body paragraph             • Each body paragraph            • Supporting details are
                        contains one main point           contains one main point          accurate and relevant but
                        previewed by the thesis           previewed by the thesis          lack thoroughness.
Main Idea:              statement.                        statement.                   •   Assertions are sometimes
Body Paragraphs     •   Supporting details are        •   Supporting details are           supported by appropriate
& Supporting            convincing, thorough,             thorough, accurate and           evidence.
Details                 accurate and relevant.            relevant.
                    •   Assertions are authentic      •   Assertions are supported
                        and supported by                  by appropriate evidence.
                        appropriate evidence.

                    • Purposeful, effective           • Obvious, adequate              • Some lack of or misuse of
Organization:           transitions make links            transitions make links           transitions causes
                        between paragraphs and            between paragraphs and           confusion.
Transitions
                        supporting details very           supporting details clear
                        clear and smooth.                 and smooth.

                    • Concluding paragraph            • Concluding paragraph           • Concluding paragraph
Organization:           brings a natural sense of         adequately ends essay. It        abruptly ends the essay –
                        resolution to the essay. It       reinforces and supports          it simply restates the
Concluding              reinforces and supports           the thesis statement and         thesis statement and the
Paragraph               the thesis statement and          the main points from the         main points or is
                        main points.                      essay.                           contrived.


                    • Variety in types, length,       • Some variety in type,          • Many sentences begin the
                        and beginnings of                 length and beginning of          same way and follow the
                        sentences make essay read         sentences. Most sentences        same pattern with little
                        smoothly – sound has              read smoothly – meaning          variety. Phrasing does not
Sentence Style          been considered as well as        is clear with very few           sound natural. Sometimes
                        meaning. The sentences            stiff, awkward or choppy         the reader has to reread
                        build upon each other to          sentences. Fragments are         for meaning. Essay may
                        make sense for the reader.        used only for style or           contain many fragments.
                        Fragments are used only           effect.
                        for style or effect.

                    • Grammar, usage, spelling, • Problems with grammar,               • Problems with grammar,
                        and punctuation are               usage, or spelling are not       usage, or spelling are
                        correct with few, if any,         enough to affect meaning.        serious enough to
                        errors. Conventions may           End punctuation is               sometimes affect
Conventions             be manipulated for                correct. Internal                meaning. End punctuation
                        stylistic effect.                 punctuation is sometimes         is correct. Internal
                                                          missing or incorrect.            punctuation is missing or
                                                                                           incorrect and may affect
                                                                                           meaning.




W07_3.1.1c Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006                   Page 5 of 5
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.2 (7th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence
that supports the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement


3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.5 (7th Grade) Using appropriate voice for intended audience (e.g., humorous,
informal, formal, or technical)

Directions: Write about an incident that happened to a friend, teacher, or a parent and
how it made you feel. Select one of the following voices to write in: angry, happy, sad,
frustrated, or proud. This piece of writing will be 2-3 paragraphs.




W07_3.1.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.2 (7th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence
that supports the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement


3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.5 (7th Grade) Using appropriate voice for intended audience (e.g., humorous,
informal, formal, or technical)

Directions: Write about an incident that happened to a friend, teacher, or a parent and
how it made you feel. Select one of the following voices to write in: angry, happy, sad,
frustrated, or proud. This piece of writing will be 2-3 paragraphs.


                          7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Voice

          Advanced                           Proficient                      Below Proficient
•   Language is highly             •   Writing communicates           •    It is hard to sense the
    individual.                        in an earnest, pleasing             writer behind the words.
•   Reader senses the                  manner.                        •    The writer does not
    person behind the              •   Voice is inconsistent: it           seem to reach out to an
    words; feels an                    may emerge strongly,                audience or to anticipate
    interaction with the               then retreat behind                 the reader’s interests or
    writer.                            general, dispassionate              questions.
•   Tone gives the writing             language.                      •    Writing may
    flavor, adds interest.         •   Writing hides as much               communicate on a
•   Language is appropriate            of the writer as it                 functional level but does
    for purpose and                    reveals.                            not move or involve the
    audience.                      •   Writer seems aware of               reader.
•   Narrative writing seems            audience and purpose           •    Writer does not seem
    honest, appealing,                 but often weighs words              sufficiently at home
    heartfelt.                         too carefully or discards           with the topic to take
•   Expository or                      personal insights in                risks, share personal
    persuasive writing                 favor of safe                       insights, or make the
    reflects a strong                  generalities, but may not           topic/story personal and
    commitment to the                  “flesh out” the main                real for the reader.
    topic; anticipates                 point or story line.
    reader’s questions,            •   Original ideas may be
    shows why the reader               blended with ones that
    should care or want to             are more obvious or
    know more.                         predictable.


W07_3.1.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                    Additional Sample 6-Trait Scoring Guide, 7th Grade

          Advanced                            Proficient                       Below Proficient

6 Points                            4 Points                             3 Points
• Language is highly individual     • Writing communicates in an         • Writing communicates but
• Reader senses the person behind   earnest, pleasing manner             without much style or interest
the words; feels an interaction     • Voice is inconsistent: it may      • Writing hides the writer; the
with the writer                     emerge strongly, then retreat        reader has little or no sense of the
• Tone gives the writing flavor,    behind general, dispassionate        writer behind the words
adds interest                       language                             • Writer shows some awareness
• Language is appropriate for       • Writing hides as much of the       of audience and/ or purpose but is
purpose and audience                writer as it reveals                 inconsistent
• Narrative writing seems honest,   • Writer seems aware of audience     • Writer speaks in a monotone
appealing, heartfelt                and purpose but often weighs
• Expository or persuasive          words too carefully or discards      2 Points
writing reflects a strong           personal insights in favor of safe   • It is hard to sense the writer
commitment to the topic;            generalities                         behind the words
anticipates reader’s questions,                                          • The writer does not seem to
shows why the reader should care                                         reach out to an audience or to
or want to know more                                                     anticipate the reader’s interests or
                                                                         questions
5 Points                                                                 • Writing may communicate on a
• Reader senses the person behind                                        functional level but does not
the words                                                                move or involve the reader •
• There are occasional moments                                           Writer does not seem sufficiently
that surprise, amuse, or move the                                        at home with the topic to take
reader                                                                   risks, share personal insights, or
• Tone gives the writing flavor,                                         make the topic/story personal and
adds interest                                                            real for the reader
• Language is appropriate for
purpose and audience
• Narrative writing seems honest,                                        1 Point
appealing, heartfelt                                                     • The writer seems unaware of an
• Expository or persuasive                                               audience or reader; writing seems
writing reflects a strong                                                “painful” to the writer
commitment to the topic                                                  • Writing may not communicate
                                                                         on a functional level
                                                                         • Writer seems uncomfortable
                                                                         with the topic




W07_3.1.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006          Page 3 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.3 (7th Grade) Organizing ideas using appropriate structures (e.g., order by
chronology, importance, comparison, and contrast) to maintain the unity of the
composition with a variety of transitional words and phrases


Directions: Rewrite the following paragraph, using a variety of transitional words or
phrases, and changing some of the repeated words to add variety.


                   How to Check Out a Four-Wheeler Before Riding

You should always check over your four-wheeler before riding so that your trip will be a
safe one. Bounce the front and back up and down so you can see if the shocks are
working. Turn the lights on and walk around the vehicle to see if they are all working.
Check the turn signals. Put the machine in neutral and try to push it forward while
holding the brakes on to see if the brakes work. Check to make sure all the tires are fully
inflated. Check to see that the gas tank is full. Check to see that the oil reservoir is full.
Check to see that you have a helmet with a clean face shield. Check for loose parts.
Checking your four-wheeler will make your ride safer.




W07_3.1.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.3 (7th Grade) Organizing ideas using appropriate structures (e.g., order by
chronology, importance, comparison, and contrast) to maintain the unity of the
composition with a variety of transitional words and phrases


Directions: Rewrite the following paragraph, using a variety of transitional words or
phrases, and changing some of the repeated words to add variety.


                       How to Check Out a Four-Wheeler Before Riding

You should always check over your four-wheeler before riding so that your trip will be a
safe one. Bounce the front and back up and down so you can see if the shocks are
working. Turn the lights on and walk around the vehicle to see if they are all working.
Check the turn signals. Put the machine in neutral and try to push it forward while
holding the brakes on to see if the brakes work. Check to make sure all the tires are fully
inflated. Check to see that the gas tank is full. Check to see that the oil reservoir is full.
Check to see that you have a helmet with a clean face shield. Check for loose parts.
Checking your four-wheeler will make your ride safer.


Proficient Response:

                       How to Check Out a Four-Wheeler Before Riding

You should always check over your four-wheeler before riding so that your trip will be a
safe one. Begin by bouncing the front and back up and down so you can see if the shocks
are working. Then turn the lights on and walk around the vehicle to see if they all
function correctly. Don’t forget to check the turn signals along with the other lights. Put
the machine in neutral and try to push it forward while holding the brakes on to test the
brakes. Check to make sure all the tires are fully inflated. Make sure the gas tank is full
and pull the dipstick to see that the oil reservoir is full. Shake everything that you can
reach to ensure that no parts are loose. Put on a helmet with a clean face shield and you
will be ready for a safer ride.

See next page for scoring guide.




W07_3.1.3 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
               7th Grade Writing Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

Advanced                           Proficient                         Below Proficient
• Sequencing of ideas and          • Writing communicates in          • Sequencing needs work.
details is logical and             an earnest, pleasing manner.       • There is no real lead or
effective.                         • Voice is inconsistent: it        introduction to set up what
• Introduction is inviting—        may emerge strongly, then          follows.
draws in the reader.               retreat behind general,            • Conclusion is missing or
• Conclusion is satisfying—        dispassionate language.            does not wrap things up.
leaves reader with a sense         • Writing hides as much of         • Transitions seldom work
of resolution.                     the writer as it reveals.          well, with many
• Transitions are thoughtful;      • Writer seems aware of            connections between ideas
clearly show how ideas             audience and purpose but           unclear.
connect.                           often weighs words too             • Pacing feels awkward;
• Organization flows               carefully or discards              writer slows when the
smoothly, seems effortless.        personal insights in favor of      reader wants to move on,
                                   safe generalities.                 and vice versa.
                                                                      • Problems with
                                                                      organization make it hard to
                                                                      grasp the main point or
                                                                      story line.




W07_3.1.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.4 (7th Grade) Writing a conclusion that supports the thesis or summarizes the main
ideas


Directions: Write a concluding paragraph to the following essay that ties into the
introduction.

I love wolves because the sound of their howling sends shivers up and down my spine.
I hear wolves several times a year where I live in the village of Mentasta, Interior Alaska.
This is a small village of about 100 people, and we are 50 miles form the nearest town,
Tok, which has slightly over 1,000 people. We are surrounded by wildlife, including
moose, caribou, grizzly bear, porcupine, coyote, squirrels, beaver, all kinds of birds, and,
of course, wolves.

We hear sounds from a lot of these animals, from moose calls to the mumbling and
rattling of porcupines. The howling and yipping of coyotes is interesting, but nowhere
near the chill of hearing wolves howl. Maybe this is because of all the movies and stories
about packs of killer wolves, especially the story about people throwing sacrificial
victims to pursuing wolves from the backs of sleighs in order to give themselves time to
get away. Or maybe it’s the old werewolf stories and the idea that it takes a silver bullet
to kill one.

In any case, wolves have the scariest howls. A pack of sled dogs on a night when the
northern lights are dancing will howl like a pack of wolves, but it’s nowhere near as
scary. It’s like seeing a bull snake and then seeing a rattlesnake. Once you see the
rattlesnake you know you have seen the real thing.




W07_3.1.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.4 (7th Grade) Writing a conclusion that supports the thesis or summarizes the main
ideas


Directions: Write a concluding paragraph to the following essay that ties into the
introduction.

I love wolves because the sound of their howling sends shivers up and down my spine.
I hear wolves several times a year where I live in the village of Mentasta, Interior Alaska.
This is a small village of about 100 people, and we are 50 miles form the nearest town,
Tok, which has slightly over 1,000 people. We are surrounded by wildlife, including
moose, caribou, grizzly bear, porcupine, coyote, squirrels, beaver, all kinds of birds, and,
of course, wolves.

We hear sounds from a lot of these animals, from moose calls to the mumbling and
rattling of porcupines. The howling and yipping of coyotes is interesting, but nowhere
near the chill of hearing wolves howl. Maybe this is because of all the movies and stories
about packs of killer wolves, especially the story about people throwing sacrificial
victims to pursuing wolves from the backs of sleighs in order to give themselves time to
get away. Or maybe it’s the old werewolf stories and the idea that it takes a silver bullet
to kill one.

In any case, wolves have the scariest howls. A pack of sled dogs on a night when the
northern lights are dancing will howl like a pack of wolves, but it’s nowhere near as
scary. It’s like seeing a bull snake and then seeing a rattlesnake. Once you see the
rattlesnake you know you have seen the real thing.


Proficient Response:

Example: Wolves are the real thing, and hearing them howl is a unique Alaskan
experience. Knowing that I am one of the one-in-a-million lucky people in the world
who hear that sound is one of the things that sends those shivers up and down my back
and puts goose-bumps on my arms.




W07_3.1.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.1 (7th Grade) Writing a narrative using setting and character to advance the plot


Directions: Write a short story: 4-6 pages typed. Pretend you are marooned on an island
in the South Pacific or in Alaska. (You must have the following elements in your story.)
To teacher: This is a great checklist to give to the students to guide their writing.

Writing a Short Story check sheet Name __________________________

______ Description of Place (Setting)
              ______ Looks like (colors, specific types of trees, etc.)
              ______ Smells like
              ______ Sounds like
              ______ Feels like

______ Characterization (1) round as opposed to flat
             ______ Color of hair
             ______ Personality type (in actions and words)
             ______ Movements
             ______ Voice and type of words that character would use.

______ Characterization (static or dynamic)
             Name of character ______________________ type _____________
             _______indirect characterization (showing)
             _______ direct characterization (not telling)

______ Dialogue
              ______ Variety of Speaker tags…not just said
              ______ Interspersed throughout story

______ Point of View (which person did you write in and stick with it?)
               ______ 1st
               ______ 3rd limited
               ______ 3rd omniscient
______ 3-5 pages ( font sized 12 or 10)
______ Double spaced
______ Typed
______ Correctness of conventions
______ Plot diagram
______ Exposition
______ Rising action
______ Climax
______ Falling action
______ Denouement



W07_3.2.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 1
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.2 (7th Grade) Writing in a variety of nonfiction forms (e.g., letter, report and/or
autobiography) to inform or describe

Writing Business Letters
Identifying Business Letter Components

Directions: Label the sections of the sample business letter by writing the number of the
section on the sample letter.
                                  1. Complimentary Closing
                                  2. Inside Address
                                  3. Body
                                  4. Return Address
                                  5. Salutation

            5340 Tower Avenue
            Bolton, Mass, 01437
            February 28, 2000

            Mr. David Schroeder
            Schroeder Chevrolet and Pontiac
            1320 Highland Avenue
            Eau Claire, WI 01437

            Dear Mr. Schroeder:

            Mrs. Burton, your office manger, mentioned that you are in need of an auto
            mechanic in your shop. The enclosed resume will show you that automotive repair
            has been my occupation and my recreation.

            A successful dealership like yours depends on reputation. I have had good
            customer relations all the time I worked at Frank’s Texaco. My stock car
            experience has made me familiar with a variety of parts and engines.

            May I call you after 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, October 3, to set up a time and date for
            an interview? If this is not a convenient time, please call me any day after 2:30 at
            555-0000. I look forward to meeting you.

            Thank you for your consideration.

            Sincerely,



            Bob Keefe

            Enclosures



W07_3.2.2           Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006              Page 1 of 4
Directions: Read the following prompt. Write an effective business letter using correct
formatting, style and tone. Use a separate sheet of paper for your letter.

Prompt:
On May 4 you called George’s Flowers and requested May 10th delivery of the Bountiful
Birthday Bouquet to your friend Sue Jones. The bouquet and delivery cost you $37.00.
George’s Flowers delivered flowers, but the arrangement was full of wilted stems; within
one afternoon, all of the daisy petals had dropped off. Mary, the floral assistant who took
your order, insists that nothing can be done, but you would like to contact the owner of
the shop, which is located at 4444 Petal Place in your town.




W07_3.2.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.2 (7th Grade) Writing in a variety of nonfiction forms (e.g., letter, report and/or
autobiography) to inform or describe

Writing Business Letters
Identifying Business Letter Components

Directions: Label the sections of the sample business letter by writing the number of the
section on the sample letter.
                                  6. Complimentary Closing
                                  7. Inside Address
                                  8. Body
                                  9. Return Address
                                  10. Salutation

           5340 Tower Avenue
           Bolton, Mass, 01437
           February 28, 2000

           Mr. David Schroeder
           Schroeder Chevrolet and Pontiac
           1320 Highland Avenue
           Eau Claire, WI 01437

           Dear Mr. Schroeder:

           Mrs. Burton, your office manger, mentioned that you are in need of an auto
           mechanic in your shop. The enclosed resume will show you that automotive repair
           has been my occupation and my recreation.

           A successful dealership like yours depends on reputation. I have had good
           customer relations all the time I worked at Frank’s Texaco. My stock car
           experience has made me familiar with a variety of parts and engines.

           May I call you after 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, October 3, to set up a time and date for
           an interview? If this is not a convenient time, please call me any day after 2:30 at
           555-0000. I look forward to meeting you.

           Thank you for your consideration.

           Sincerely,



           Bob Keefe

           Enclosures



W07_3.2.2 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 3 of 4
Note to teacher: Now have the students write their own letter. See the above letter for
examplar.

Directions: Read the following prompt. Write an effective business letter using correct
formatting, style and tone. Use a separate sheet of paper for your letter.

Prompt:
On May 4 you called George’s Flowers and requested May 10th delivery of the Bountiful
Birthday Bouquet to your friend Sue Jones. The bouquet and delivery cost you $37.00.
George’s Flowers delivered flowers, but the arrangement was full of wilted stems; within
one afternoon, all of the daisy petals had dropped off. Mary, the floral assistant who took
your order, insists that nothing can be done, but you would like to contact the owner of
the shop, which is located at 4444 Petal Place in your town.


Proficient Response: Two points for the each of the following formatting and writing
criteria:

_____Proper Heading
_____Inside Address
_____Return Address
_____All information in body
_____Complimentary closing
_____Salutation
_____Correct Punctuation
_____Professional Tone
_____Extra points for extremely polite and beyond expectations

Total ______________

Grade Scale
18 points for Advanced
16 points for Proficient
12 points for Below Proficient
10 points for Far Below Proficient




W07_3.2.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.2 (7th Grade) Writing in a variety of nonfiction forms (e.g., letter, report and/or
autobiography) to inform or describe


Defining Business Letter Components

Directions: Write the purpose of each the following parts of a business letter. Use
complete sentences for your answers.

    1. Return Address:



    2. Salutation



    3. Inside Address



    4. Body



    5. Complimentary Closing




W07_3.2.2b       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.2 (7th Grade) Writing in a variety of nonfiction forms (e.g., letter, report and/or
autobiography) to inform or describe


Defining Business Letter Components

Directions: Write the purpose of each the following parts of a business letter. Use
complete sentences for your answers.

    1. Return Address:



    2. Salutation



    3. Inside Address



    4. Body



    5. Complimentary Closing



Proficient Response:

    1. Return Address: Putting the return address on the letter gives the recipient access
       to the address without having to save the envelope it came in.
    2. Salutation: This is just basic politeness; the same as greeting someone by name
       when speaking to them.
    3. Inside Address: This enables the recipient to determine that the letter was
       intended for their business.
    4. Body: This part contains the point of your message, the “meat in the sandwich.”
    5. Complimentary closing: This is again just basic politeness, the same as saying
       goodbye when ending a conversation.



W07_3.2.2b Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.2 (7th Grade) Writing in a variety of nonfiction forms (e.g., letter, report, and/or
autobiography) to inform, describe, or persuade


3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.3 (7th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., commas, quotation marks, and
apostrophes)


Directions: Write a story for the city newspaper about students’ opinions about the
hurricane in Louisiana or Tsunami in Malaysia (or some other recent news you have
discussed in class). You will be scored for conventions and paragraphing on this paper.




W07_3.2.2c       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.2 (7th Grade) Writing in a variety of nonfiction forms (e.g., letter, report, and/or
autobiography) to inform, describe, or persuade


3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.3 (7th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., commas, quotation marks, and
apostrophes)


Directions: Write a story for the city newspaper about students’ opinions about the
hurricane in Louisiana or Tsunami in Malaysia (or some other recent news you have
discussed in class). You will be scored for conventions and paragraphing on this paper.

                7th Grade Writing Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions

Advanced                          Proficient                         Below Proficient
•   Paragraphing reinforces       •    Paragraphing is attempted     •   Paragraphing is attempted
    the organizational                 but some paragraphs run           but many paragraphs run
    structure.                         together or begin in the          together or begin in the
•   Grammar and usage are              wrong place.                      wrong place.
    correct (few, if any,         •    Problems with grammar or      •   Problems with grammar or
    errors) and contribute to          usage are not serious             usage may be serious
    clarity and style.                 enough to impede or               enough to impede or
•   Punctuation is accurate            distort meaning.                  distort meaning in some
    (few, if any, errors) and     •    End punctuation is usually        instances but not overall.
    guides the reader through          correct; internal             •   Terminal punctuation is
    the text.                          punctuation is sometimes          usually correct; internal
•   Spelling is generally              missing or incorrect.             punctuation is sometimes
    correct, even of more         •    Spelling is usually correct       missing or incorrect and
    difficult words.                   or reasonably plausible on        errors may impede or
•   The writer may                     common words;                     distort meaning in some
    manipulate conventions             misspellings do not               instances.
    for stylistic effect.              impede communication.         •   Spelling errors may
                                                                         impede or distort meaning
                                                                         in some instances but not
                                                                         overall.


See the next page for an additional scoring guide.



W07_3.2.2c Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
    Additional Sample: 7th Grade 6-Point Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions

Advanced                             Proficient                           Below Proficient
6 Points                             4 Points                             3 Points
• Paragraphing reinforces the        • Paragraphing is attempted but      • Paragraphing is attempted but
organizational structure.            some paragraphs run together or      many paragraphs run together or
• Grammar and usage are correct      begin in the wrong place.            begin in the wrong place
(few, if any, errors) and            • Problems with grammar or           • Problems with grammar or
contribute to clarity and style.     usage are not serious enough to      usage may be serious enough to
• Punctuation is accurate (few, if   impede or distort meaning.           impede or distort meaning in
any, errors) and guides the reader   • End punctuation usually correct;   some instances but not overall.
through the text.                    internal punctuation sometimes       • Terminal punctuation is usually
• Spelling is generally correct,     missing or incorrect.                correct; internal punctuation is
even of more difficult words.        • Spelling is usually correct or     sometimes missing or incorrect
• The writer may manipulate          reasonably plausible on common       and errors may impede or distort
conventions for stylistic effect.    words; misspellings do not           meaning in some instances.
                                     impede communication.                • Spelling errors may impede or
5 Points                                                                  distort meaning in some instances
• Paragraphing reinforces the                                             but not overall.
organizational structure.
• Grammar and usage are correct                                           2 Points
(few, if any, errors) and                                                 • Paragraphing is missing,
contribute to clarity and style.                                          irregular, or so frequent (e.g.,
• Punctuation is accurate (few, if                                        every sentence) that it has no
any, errors).                                                             relationship to the organizational
• Spelling is generally correct,                                          structure of the text.
even of more difficult words.                                             • Errors in grammar or usage are
                                                                          very noticeable and may affect
                                                                          meaning.
                                                                          • Punctuation is often missing or
                                                                          incorrect.
                                                                          • Spelling errors are frequent,
                                                                          even of common words.
                                                                          • The reader must read once to
                                                                          decode, then again for meaning.

                                                                          1 Point
                                                                          • Paragraphing is missing,
                                                                          irregular, or so frequent that it has
                                                                          no relationship to the
                                                                          organizational structure of the
                                                                          text.
                                                                          • Errors in grammar or usage are
                                                                          frequent and impede meaning.
                                                                          • Punctuation is often missing or
                                                                          incorrect.
                                                                          • Spelling errors are frequent and
                                                                          impede meaning.
                                                                          • The reader may be unable to
                                                                          decode the writing.




W07_3.2.2c Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006            Page 3 of 3
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.3 (7th Grade) Student writes for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing
expressively when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials,
and/or newsletters)

Sample writing prompts/assignments

Directions: Select one.

A. Read a piece of literature. After each chapter (or scene, or section), write a paragraph
   or more in your journal describing your personal reaction to what you have just read.
   Sample questions:
   • How do you differ from the main character? In what way or ways are you
       similar?
   • Do you agree or disagree with the main character’s decision in this chapter (or
       scene, or section)? Why or why not?
   • What could the main character have done differently to change the outcome of the
       situation?
   • Have you ever found yourself with a similar problem? Describe how you resolved
       the problem, or, if you have not had this problem, how you would advise a friend
       to solve this problem.
B. Read a book of your choice. When you are finished, compose a rhyming poem at
   least 16 lines in length that will present the main ideas of the book to your classmates.
C. Think about problems you see in your society or your school. Compose a letter to the
   editor that expresses your thoughts on this problem.
D. Write 10 haiku that will give a reader 10 clear mental pictures of life in your area.
E. What have been the highlights of this school year so far? Choose one highlight, and
   write a description of it to be read by parents in our newsletter. Make sure you
   explain what was noteworthy about the highlight you chose.




W07_3.2.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.3 (7th Grade) Student writes for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing
expressively when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials,
and/or newsletters)

Sample writing prompts/assignments

Directions: Select one.

A. Read a piece of literature. After each chapter (or scene, or section), write a paragraph
   or more in your journal describing your personal reaction to what you have just read.
   Sample questions:
   • How do you differ from the main character? In what way or ways are you
       similar?
   • Do you agree or disagree with the main character’s decision in this chapter (or
       scene, or section)? Why or why not?
   • What could the main character have done differently to change the outcome of the
       situation?
   • Have you ever found yourself with a similar problem? Describe how you resolved
       the problem, or, if you have not had this problem, how you would advise a friend
       to solve this problem.
B. Read a book of your choice. When you are finished, compose a rhyming poem at
   least 16 lines in length that will present the main ideas of the book to your classmates.
C. Think about problems you see in your society or your school. Compose a letter to the
   editor that expresses your thoughts on this problem.
D. Write 10 haiku that will give a reader 10 clear mental pictures of life in your area.
E. What have been the highlights of this school year so far? Choose one highlight, and
   write a description of it to be read by parents in our newsletter. Make sure you
   explain what was noteworthy about the highlight you chose.

Scoring rubrics are on the next page.




W07_3.2.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
               Rubric for Sample A (Journal entries) for 7th and 8th grades

            Advanced                           Proficient                      Below Proficient
•   All parts of the question       •   All parts of the question      •   Question not addressed or
    are thoroughly addressed.           are addressed.                     not fully addressed.
•   Writer’s unique                 •   Writer’s unique                •   Writer’s unique perspective
    perspective is expressed            perspective is expressed           is expressed, but is not
    clearly.                            and is clear.                      clear.
•   Writer’s main points are        •   Main points are clear.         •   Main points are attempted,
    very clear.                     •   Detail sufficient to               but necessary detail is not
•   Detail gives a clear and            provide basic                      present.
    thorough understanding of           understanding of main          •   Response does not express
    the writer’s main points.           points.                            the writer’s feelings on the
•   Writer’s voice is               •   Writer’s voice is                  issue.
    appropriate and consistent          appropriate but does not       •   Writer’s voice is generic or
    and helps to convey the             enhance the meaning or             inappropriate.
    meaning and mood of the             mood of the response.
    response.


              Rubric for Sample A (Journal entries) for 9th and 10th Grades

          Advanced                             Proficient                      Below Proficient
• All parts of the question         •   All parts of the question      •   Question not addressed or
   are thoroughly addressed.            are addressed.                     not fully addressed,
• Writer’s unique                   •   Writer’s unique                •   Writer’s unique perspective
   perspective is expressed             perspective is expressed           is expressed, but is not
   clearly.                             and is clear.                      clear.
• Writer’s main points are          •   Main points are clear.         •   Main points are attempted,
   exceptionally clear.             •   Detail sufficient to               but necessary detail is not
• Extensive detail gives a              provide thorough                   present.
   clear and thorough                   understanding of main          •   Response does not express
   understanding of the                 points.                            the writer’s feelings on the
   writer’s main points.            •   Writer’s voice is                  issue.
 • Writer’s voice is                    appropriate but does not       •   Writer’s voice is generic or
    appropriate and                     always enhance the                 inappropriate.
    consistent and helps to             meaning or mood of the
    convey the meaning and              response.
    mood of the response.




W07_3.2.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.3 (7th Grade) Writing expressively when producing or responding to texts (e.g.,
poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective essays, and/or newsletters)


Directions: Write a reflective essay in response to a book you have read. Your essay
will be graded on the following criteria.

Here is a handout for your students to guide them while they analyze their individual
reading books. Copy and paste into your own document.

Book Analysis Check Sheet                Student Name________________

______ Present tense
______ Organization
______ Ideas and Content
______ Conventions (spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, grammar)
______Heading:               Left side     _______Student Name
                                           _______ English
                                           _______ Date
                                           _______ Book analysis
Introduction:
______ Book title w/ author’s name
______ Short summary of book (2-3 sentences)
______ Thesis statement (mentions what is in body paragraphs)

Body Paragraphs:
Paragraph #2:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete Detail
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence




W07_3.2.3a      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 5
Paragraph #3:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete Detail
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence

Paragraph #4:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete Detail
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence

Conclusion:
Paragraph #5:
______ Starts out specific, becomes general
______ 40+ words, all commentary--no new information or quotes
______ Repeat thesis...No repeats of key words
______ Give opinion of book and recommendations




W07_3.2.3a      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 5
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.3 (7th Grade) Writing expressively when producing or responding to texts (e.g.,
poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective essays, and/or newsletters)


Directions: Write a reflective essay in response to a book you have read. Your essay
will be graded on the following criteria.

Here is a handout for your students to guide them while they analyze their individual
reading books. Copy and paste into your own document. You may also use part of or all
of the components in the rubric on the following pages to score your students’ papers.

Book Analysis Check Sheet                    Student Name________________

______ Present tense
______ Organization
______ Ideas and Content
______ Conventions (spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, grammar)
______Heading:               Left side     _______Student Name
                                           _______ English
                                           _______ Date
                                           _______ Book analysis
Introduction:
______ Book title w/ author’s name
______ Short summary of book (2-3 sentences)
______ Thesis statement (mentions what is in body paragraphs)

Body Paragraphs:
Paragraph #2:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete Detail
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence




W07_3.2.3a Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 5
Paragraph #3:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete Detail
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence

Paragraph #4:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete Detail
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence

Conclusion:
Paragraph #5:
______ Starts out specific, becomes general
______ 40+ words, all commentary--no new information or quotes
______ Repeat thesis...No repeats of key words
______ Give opinion of book and recommendations




W07_3.2.3a Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 5
                                7th Grade Expository Essay Rubric

                  Advanced                          Proficient                       Below Proficient
                  • Introductory paragraph is       • Introductory paragraph is      • Introductory paragraph is
Main Idea:            engaging, clear and               clear and narrows the            evident but fails to
                      narrows the topic.                topic.                           narrow the topic.
Introductory
Paragraph &       •   Thesis statement clearly      •   Thesis statement             •   Thesis statement is
Thesis                previews the body and             previews the body and            evident but is confusing
                      the sequencing of the             sequence of the essay.           and/or doesn’t preview
Statement             essay.                                                             the body and sequence of
                                                                                         the essay.
                  • Each body paragraph             • Each body paragraph            •   Supporting details are
                      contains one main point           contains one main point          accurate and relevant but
                      previewed by the thesis           previewed by the thesis          lack thoroughness.
Main Idea:
Body
                      statement.                        statement.                   •   Assertions are sometimes
Paragraphs &      •   Supporting details are        •   Supporting details are           supported by appropriate
                      convincing, thorough,             thorough, accurate and           evidence.
Supporting            accurate and relevant.            relevant.
Details
                  •   Assertions are authentic      •   Assertions are supported
                      and supported by                  by appropriate evidence.
                      appropriate evidence.
                  •   Purposeful, effective         • Obvious, adequate              • Some lack of or misuse
Organization:         transitions make links            transitions make links           of transitions cause
                      between paragraphs and            between paragraphs and           confusion.
Transitions
                      supporting details very           supporting details clear
                      clear and smooth.                 and smooth.
                  • Concluding paragraph            • Concluding paragraph           • Concluding paragraph
Organization:         brings a natural sense of         adequately ends essay. It        abruptly ends the essay –
Concluding            resolution to the essay. It       reinforces and supports          it simply restates the
                      reinforces and supports           the thesis statement and         thesis statement and the
Paragraph
                      the thesis statement and          the main points from the         main points or is
                      the main points from the          essay.                           contrived.
                      essay.
                  •   Variety in types, length,     • Some variety in type,          • Many sentences begin
                      and beginnings of                 length and beginning of          the same way and follow
                      sentences make essay              sentences.                       the same pattern with
                      read smoothly – sound         •   Most sentences read              little variety.
                      has been considered as            smoothly – meaning is        •   Phrasing does not sound
Sentence Style        well as meaning.                  clear with very few stiff,       natural.
                  •   The sentences build upon          awkward or choppy            •   Sometimes the reader has
                      each other to make sense          sentences.                       to reread for meaning.
                      for the reader.               •    Fragments are used only     •   Essay may contain many
                  •   Fragments are used only           for style or effect.             fragments.
                      for style or effect.
                  •   Grammar, usage,               • Problems with grammar,         • Problems with grammar,
                      spelling, and punctuation         usage, or spelling are not       usage, or spelling are
                      are correct with few, if          enough to affect                 serious enough to
                      any, errors.                      meaning.                         sometimes affect
Conventions       •   Conventions may be            •   End punctuation is               meaning.
                      manipulated for stylistic         correct. Internal            •   End punctuation is
                      effect.                           punctuation is sometimes         correct. Internal
                                                        missing or incorrect.            punctuation is missing or
                                                                                         incorrect and may impact
                                                                                         meaning.




W07_3.2.3a Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006                  Page 5 of 5
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.4 (7th Grade) Using diagrams, charts, or illustrations with captions or labels in
research projects or extended reports


Directions: Read a section of your text and do one of the following:

    A. Students draw/create a diagram with captions or labels to accompany a set of
       directions they have written.
    B. Students research journey of Lewis and Clark and then create a map of the route
       labeled to indicate events from the journey they have specifically discussed in
       their papers.
    C. Students conduct a short survey on a topic of their choice by asking at least ten
       classmates a series of questions. Students then write a narrative summarizing their
       findings and create graphs and charts to illustrate those findings.
    D. Write a one-hundred word summary of a section of a text or book and include a
       diagram, chart, or illustration of what you think is most important in this section
       of the text.




W07_3.2.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.4 (7th Grade) Using diagrams, charts, or illustrations with captions or labels in
research projects or extended reports


Directions: Read a section of your text and do one of the following:

    E. Students draw/create a diagram with captions or labels to accompany a set of
       directions they have written.
    F. Students research journey of Lewis and Clark and then create a map of the route
       labeled to indicate events from the journey they have specifically discussed in
       their papers.
    G. Students conduct a short survey on a topic of their choice by asking at least ten
       classmates a series of questions. Students then write a narrative summarizing their
       findings and create graphs and charts to illustrate those findings.
    H. Write a one-hundred word summary of a section of a text or book and include a
       diagram, chart, or illustration of what you think is most important in this section
       of the text.

                7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Graphs and Charts

         Advanced                           Proficient                      Below Proficient
•   All graphs and charts         •    Most graphs and charts         •   Graphs and charts lack
    are neat and                       are neat and attractive.           visual appeal.
    exceptionally attractive.     •    Most information can be        •   Information is difficult
•   Any piece of                       found in under five                to find.
    information can be                 seconds.                       •   Labels are inaccurate.
    found in under five           •    Information is                 •   There are discrepancies
    seconds.                           accurately labeled.                in information between
•   Information is clearly        •    Information depicted               the graphs and the
    and accurately labeled.            matches information in             narrative.
•   Information depicted               the narrative.                 •   Titles for graphs and
    matches information in        •    Most graphs and charts             charts are missing or
    the narrative.                     have appropriate and               misleading.
•   All graphs and charts              accurate titles.               •   Distracting errors in
    have appropriate and          •    Most conventions on the            conventions.
    accurate titles.                   charts are correct.
•   All conventions on the
    charts are correct.




W07_3.2.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.1 (7th Grade) Varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow
and to enhance meaning and style of writing

Run-on Sentences

Directions: “Run-on Sally” wrote the following paragraph. Poor Sally has a rare disease
that affects her ability to stop and think, so when Sally talks or writes, she never pauses
for a breath or for punctuation. Help Sally out by rewriting her paragraph, inserting
punctuation when necessary, and creating sentences of varying lengths. If necessary, use
more than one paragraph and rearrange the order of her thoughts.



I love wolves because when they howl it sends shivers up and down my spine and I know
a lot about wolves because I’m an Athabascan girl who lives in a village in the interior of
Alaska where wolves come through the village all the time and when they howl,
particularly at night I get shivers up and down my spine because wolves are such scary
creatures who kill moose and caribou around the village and they kill so many moose
calves that my dad and my uncles trap them and sell the furs not only for money but also
to help the moose survive and besides that what if they’re werewolves who will come and
tear my throat out because I’ve seen in movies that werewolves do that and in movies
wolves also attack people but I have never heard of any wolves attacking people in
Alaska except in the case of those idiots who try to raise wolves or wolf and dog
crossbreeds as pets but I still can’t help getting chills up and down my spine when I hear
them howling at night especially when it’s a night when the northern lights are out
dancing and I see a pack running across the lake on the ice.




W07_3.3.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.1 (7th Grade) Varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow
and to enhance meaning and style of writing

Run-on Sentences

Directions: “Run-on Sally” wrote the following paragraph. Poor Sally has a rare disease
that affects her ability to stop and think, so when Sally talks or writes, she never pauses
for a breath or for punctuation. Help Sally out by rewriting her paragraph, inserting
punctuation when necessary, and creating sentences of varying lengths. If necessary, use
more than one paragraph and rearrange the order of her thoughts.

I love wolves because when they howl it sends shivers up and down my spine and I know
a lot about wolves because I’m an Athabascan girl who lives in a village in the interior of
Alaska where wolves come through the village all the time and when they howl,
particularly at night I get shivers up and down my spine because wolves are such scary
creatures who kill moose and caribou around the village and they kill so many moose
calves that my dad and my uncles trap them and sell the furs not only for money but also
to help the moose survive and besides that what if they’re werewolves who will come and
tear my throat out because I’ve seen in movies that werewolves do that and in movies
wolves also attack people but I have never heard of any wolves attacking people in
Alaska except in the case of those idiots who try to raise wolves or wolf and dog
crossbreeds as pets but I still can’t help getting chills up and down my spine when I hear
them howling at night especially when it’s a night when the northern lights are out
dancing and I see a pack running across the lake on the ice.

Proficient Response:
I love wolves because when they howl, it sends shivers up and down my spine. I know a
lot about wolves because I’m an Athabascan girl and I live in the interior of Alaska,
where wolves come through my village all the time. When they howl, particularly at
night, I get shivers up and down my spine. Wolves are scary creatures that kill moose and
caribou around the village. They kill so many moose calves that my dad and my uncles
trap them and sell the furs, not only for money, but also to help the moose survive.
Besides that, what if they’re werewolves who will come and tear my throat out? I’ve
seen in movies that werewolves do that and in movies wolves also attack people, but I
have never heard of any wolves attacking people in Alaska (except in the case of those
idiots who try to raise wolves or wolf and dog crossbreeds as pets).

I still can’t help getting chills up and down my spine when I hear them howling,
especially when it’s a night when the northern lights are out dancing and I see a pack
running across the lake on the ice.



W07_3.3.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.1 (7th Grade) The student writes and edits using conventions of standard English by
varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning and style of writing

Directions: Combine the following sentences in two different ways. Your new sentences
should still have the same meaning as the original sentences, though they may use
different vocabulary and/or order of ideas.

        1. Reading is a fun activity.
        2. Reading is useful tool for learning new things.
        3. Reading is a skill everyone needs to practice.




W07_3.3.1a       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.1 (7th Grade) The student writes and edits using conventions of standard English by
varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning and style of writing

Directions: Combine the following sentences in two different ways. Your new sentences
should still have the same meaning as the original sentences, though they may use
different vocabulary and/or order of ideas.

    1. Reading is a fun activity.
    2. Reading is useful tool for learning new things.
    3. Reading is a skill everyone needs to practice.


Advanced Response Examples:
 • Reading, a skill everyone needs to practice, is a fun activity that can help people
    learn new things.
 • Not only is reading a useful tool for learning new things, it is a fun activity as well.
    It is a skill everyone needs to practice.
 • Whether we read for fun or to learn new things, reading is a skill we all need to
    practice.


Proficient Response Examples:
 • Reading is a fun activity and is a useful tool for learning new things. Everyone
     needs to practice reading.
 • Reading is skill everyone has to practice, but it’s a fun activity, too. It can be a
     useful tool for learning new things.




W07_3.3.1a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.2 (7th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        i have a friend named tracie whom lives in anchorage Alaska she has live their all
her life and she go to school their I ask her to come visit me in Juneau but she dont want
to leave her home. in fact she haven’t ever been more then fifty miles from home why
hasn’t she been anywhere well its cause shes a Amish person the Amish does not
believe in using cars or airplanes to travel




W07_3.3.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.2 (7th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        i have a friend named tracie whom lives in anchorage Alaska she has live their all
her life and she go to school their I ask her to come visit me in Juneau but she dont want
to leave her home. in fact she haven’t ever been more then fifty miles from home why
hasn’t she been anywhere well its cause shes a Amish person the Amish does not
believe in using cars or airplanes to travel



Corrected Copy (Proficient Response):

        I have a friend named Tracie who lives in Anchorage, Alaska. She has lived there
all her life and she goes to school there. I asked her to come visit me in Juneau, but she
doesn’t want to leave her home. In fact, she has never been more then fifty miles from
home. Why hasn’t she been anywhere? Well, it’s because she is Amish. The Amish do
not believe in using cars or airplanes to travel.




W07_3.3.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.2 (7th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)

3.3.3 (7th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., commas, quotation marks, and
apostrophes)


Formatting Business Letters
Directions: Read the following letter. Underline or highlight five errors in the formatting
of the letter. Also, edit the letter for errors in spelling, spacing, and mechanics.


221 Fillmore Avenue
Milwaukee, Georgia 54321
MAY 15 2005

Misses Brenda Hightower
15 Park Place
Hoboken NJ, 53467

Dear, Miss Hightower,

I am writing to ask for your donation to a worthy cause, the Save the Baby Tortoise
Foundation. Every year, thousands of Tortoise egs are crushed along the sandy Georgia
shoreline by dune buggies.

You have shown generous support in past years with various contributions to wild life
causes. For your contribution of five, ten, or twenty dollars, a newly hatched tortoise will
be named in your honor. In addition, we will send you a photograph of your namesake to
thank you for your kindness.

Its’ people like you who make a difference!

Sincerely,
June Thomas,
SBTF President




W07_3.3.2a       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.2 (7th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)

3.3.3 (7th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., commas, quotation marks, and
apostrophes)


Formatting Business Letters
Directions: Read the following letter. Underline or highlight five errors in the formatting
of the letter. Also, edit the letter for errors in spelling, spacing, and mechanics.


221 Fillmore Avenue
Milwaukee, Georgia 54321
MAY 15 2005

Misses Brenda Hightower
15 Park Place
Hoboken NJ, 53467

Dear, Miss Hightower,

I am writing to ask for your donation to a worthy cause, the Save the Baby Tortoise
Foundation. Every year, thousands of Tortoise egs are crushed along the sandy Georgia
shoreline by dune buggies.

You have shown generous support in past years with various contributions to wild life
causes. For your contribution of five, ten, or twenty dollars, a newly hatched tortoise will
be named in your honor. In addition, we will send you a photograph of your namesake to
thank you for your kindness.

Its’ people like you who make a difference!

Sincerely,
June Thomas,
SBTF President




W07_3.3.2a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
Proficient Response:

221 Fillmore Avenue
Milwaukee, Georgia 54321
May 15, 2005

Mrs. Brenda Hightower
15 Park Place
Hoboken, NJ 53467

Dear Mrs. Hightower:

I am writing to ask for your donation to a worthy cause, the Save the Baby Tortoise
Foundation. Every year, thousands of tortoise eggs are crushed along the sandy Georgia
shoreline by dune buggies.

You have shown generous support in past years with various contributions to wild life
causes. For your contribution of five, ten, or twenty dollars, a newly hatched tortoise will
be named in your honor. In addition, we will send you a photograph of your namesake to
thank you for your kindness.

It’s people like you who make a difference!

Sincerely,
(insert three spaces and signature)
June Thomas
June Thomas, SBTF President




W07_3.3.2a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.3 (7th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., commas, quotation marks, and
apostrophes)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.


        Why do I live in Alaska I live here because I love the scenery and the wildlife,
and because the land is still relatively uncrowded. We also have four distinct seasons here
with spring bringing flowers summer bringing mosquitoes fall bringing the changing
colors in the leaves and winter bringing cold down to 60 degrees below zero




W07_3.3.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.3 (7th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., commas, quotation marks, and
apostrophes)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.


        Why do I live in Alaska I live here because I love the scenery and the wildlife,
and because the land is still relatively uncrowded. We also have four distinct seasons here
with spring bringing flowers summer bringing mosquitoes fall bringing the changing
colors in the leaves and winter bringing cold down to 60 degrees below zero



Proficient Response:

        Why do I live in Alaska? I live here because I love the scenery and the wildlife,
and because the land is still relatively uncrowded. We also have four distinct seasons
here, with spring bringing flowers, summer bringing mosquitoes, fall bringing the
changing colors in the leaves, and winter bringing cold down to 60 degrees below zero!




W07_3.3.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.2 The student selects and uses appropriate forms of fiction and nonfiction to
achieve different purposes when writing for different audiences.

3.2.2 (7th Grade) Writing in a variety of nonfiction forms (e.g., letter, report, and/or
autobiography) to inform, describe or persuade


3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.3 (7th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., commas, quotation marks, and
apostrophes)


Directions: Write the story of a week of the past year. Be sure to include highlights of
where you have been and what you have done. Be sure to give many specific details.




W07_3.3.3b       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.2 The student selects and uses appropriate forms of fiction and nonfiction to
achieve different purposes when writing for different audiences.

3.2.2 (7th Grade) Writing in a variety of nonfiction forms (e.g., letter, report, and/or
autobiography) to inform, describe or persuade


3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.3 (7th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., commas, quotation marks, and
apostrophes)


Directions: Write the story of a week of the past year. Be sure to include highlights of
where you have been and what you have done. Be sure to give many specific details.

                     7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions

          Advanced                          Proficient                     Below Proficient
•   Paragraphing reinforces       •    Paragraphing is attempted     •   Paragraphing is attempted
    the organizational                 but some paragraphs run           but many paragraphs run
    structure.                         together or begin in the          together or begin in the
•   Grammar and usage are              wrong place.                      wrong place
    correct (few, if any,         •    Problems with grammar or      •   Problems with grammar or
    errors) and contribute to          usage are not serious             usage may be serious
    clarity and style.                 enough to impede or               enough to impede or
•   Punctuation is accurate            distort meaning.                  distort meaning in some
    (few, if any, errors) and     •    End punctuation usually           instances but not overall.
    guides the reader through          correct; internal             •   Terminal punctuation is
    the text.                          punctuation sometimes             usually correct; internal
•   Spelling is generally              missing or incorrect.             punctuation is sometimes
    correct, even of more         •    Spelling is usually correct       missing or incorrect and
    difficult words.                   or reasonably plausible on        errors may impede or
•   The writer may                     common words;                     distort meaning in some
    manipulate conventions             misspellings do not               instances.
    for stylistic effect.              impede communication.         •   Spelling errors may
                                                                         impede or distort meaning
                                                                         in some instances but not
                                                                         overall.



See the next page for an additional scoring guide.




W07_3.3.3b Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                   Additional Sample: 7th Grade Six-Point Scoring Guide
Advanced                             Proficient                           Below Proficient
6 Points                             4 Points                             3 Points
• Paragraphing reinforces the        • Paragraphing is attempted but      • Paragraphing is attempted but
organizational structure.            some paragraphs run together or      many paragraphs run together or
• Grammar and usage are correct      begin in the wrong place.            begin in the wrong place.
(few, if any, errors) and            • Problems with grammar or           • Problems with grammar or
contribute to clarity and style.     usage are not serious enough to      usage may be serious enough to
• Punctuation is accurate (few, if   impede or distort meaning.           impede or distort meaning in
any, errors) and guides the reader   • End punctuation usually correct;   some instances but not overall.
through the text.                    internal punctuation sometimes       • Terminal punctuation is usually
• Spelling is generally correct,     missing or incorrect.                correct; internal punctuation is
even of more difficult words.        • Spelling is usually correct or     sometimes missing or incorrect
• The writer may manipulate          reasonably plausible on common       and errors may impede or distort
conventions for stylistic effect.    words; misspellings do not           meaning in some instances.
                                     impede communication.                • Spelling errors may impede or
5 Points                                                                  distort meaning in some instances
• Paragraphing reinforces the                                             but not overall.
organizational structure.
• Grammar and usage are correct                                           2 Points
(few, if any, errors) and                                                 • Paragraphing is missing,
contribute to clarity and style.                                          irregular, or so frequent (e.g.,
• Punctuation is accurate (few, if                                        every sentence) that it has no
any, errors).                                                             relationship to the organizational
• Spelling is generally correct,                                          structure of the text.
even of more difficult words.                                             • Errors in grammar or usage are
                                                                          very noticeable and may affect
                                                                          meaning.
                                                                          • Punctuation is often missing or
                                                                          incorrect.
                                                                          • Spelling errors are frequent,
                                                                          even of common words.
                                                                          • The reader must read once to
                                                                          decode, then again for meaning.

                                                                          1 Point
                                                                          • Paragraphing is missing,
                                                                          irregular, or so frequent that it has
                                                                          no relationship to the
                                                                          organizational structure of the
                                                                          text.
                                                                          • Errors in grammar or usage are
                                                                          frequent and impede meaning.
                                                                          • Punctuation is often missing or
                                                                          incorrect.
                                                                          • Spelling errors are frequent and
                                                                          impede meaning.
                                                                          • The reader may be unable to
                                                                          decode the writing.




W07_3.3.3b Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006            Page 3 of 3
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.4 (7th Grade) Applying rules of capitalization (e.g., titles and proper nouns)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        ms. roppel and mr. ward are going to the chamber of commerce christmas party.
the decorated trees will be auctioned off to participants and all proceeds will go to
charity. this couple won the bid on two trees.




W07_3.3.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.4 (7th Grade) Applying rules of capitalization (e.g., titles and proper nouns)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        ms. roppel and mr. ward are going to the chamber of commerce christmas party.
the decorated trees will be auctioned off to participants and all proceeds will go to
charity. this couple won the bid on two trees.



Proficient Response:

        Ms. Roppel and Mr. Ward are going to the Chamber of Commerce Christmas
party. The decorated trees will be auctioned off to participants and all proceeds will go to
charity. This couple won the bid on two trees.




W07_3.3.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.5 (7th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)

1. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    A.      Spelling is more easier if you study.
    B.      Spelling is easier if you study.
    C.      Spelling is easily if you study.
    D.      Studying is easiest if you spell.



2. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    A.      Me and Joe went fishing.
    B.      I and Joe went fishing.
    C.      Joe and me went fishing.
    D.      Joe and I went fishing.


3. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    A.      After the game.
    B.      At a student assembly.
    C.      Students cheered loudly.
    D.      Feel good about winning.




W07_3.3.5        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.5 (7th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)

1. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    E.      Spelling is more easier if you study.
    F.      Spelling is easier if you study.
    G.      Spelling is easily if you study.
    H.      Studying is easiest if you spell.



2. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    E.      Me and Joe went fishing.
    F.      I and Joe went fishing.
    G.      Joe and me went fishing.
    H.      Joe and I went fishing.


3. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    E.      After the game.
    F.      At a student assembly.
    G.      Students cheered loudly.
    H.      Feel good about winning.



Proficient Response:

1. B
2. D
3. C




W07_3.3.5 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.5 (7th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)

Directions: Correct the conventions in the following paragraph.

        The girls is going to the dance on friday night. She is wearing colorful dresses.
Because they like them.




W07_3.3.5b       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.5 (7th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)

Directions: Correct the conventions in the following paragraph.

        The girls is going to the dance on friday night. She is wearing colorful dresses.
Because they like them.




Proficient Response:

        The girls are going to the dance on Friday night. They are wearing colorful
dresses because they like them.




W07_3.3.5b Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.1 (7th Grade) Rearranging details to improve clarity and logical progression of ideas
(e.g., making chronological sequence clear, creating a logically consistent story line)


Directions: Rearrange the following paragraph so that the sentences are in sequential and
logical order.

  1. Behind my house, there is a path that leads into the woods.
  2. Jake barked wildly and strained at the leash while I squinted into the tangle of
      bushes to try to determine the cause of the noise.
  3. The crashing continued, but it seemed to get farther away.
  4. And then, our curiosity satisfied and our fear dispelled, we each continued our
      explorations of the woods.
  5. Jake quieted down and sniffed the air as the crashing diminished, and far up the
      stream, I could see branches swaying as something large went past.
  6. Jake and I stood still as the bear waded into the stream and sniffed cautiously at our
      scents.
  7. Just then, a huge grizzly bear lumbered into the open far upstream.
  8. For a long time, we looked and sniffed at one another from afar.
  9. For instance, one afternoon I was walking my dog Jake across a sparkling stream
      when we heard a tremendous crash in the brush to the left of the trail.
  10. It meanders for miles, and it has been my path to many thrilling adventures.

Directions: The following sentences are short, choppy, and repetitive. There is no logical
order in their presentation. Rewrite the paragraph, combining sentences or rewriting them
so that the passage has a smooth flow.

The black bear is a native of North America. The black bear has a very wide range.
Black bears are found in almost every state of the United States. Black bear range in size
from 200 pounds to 600 pounds in weight. They are found in Mexico. They are found in
Canada. The black bear is found almost everywhere because they can eat lots of kinds of
food. They eat meat. They can be any color from tan to brown to black. They eat fish.
They eat grain. They eat berries and acorns and nuts and grass. They can be found all
over.




W07_3.4.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.1 (7th Grade) Rearranging details to improve clarity and logical progression of ideas
(e.g., making chronological sequence clear, creating a logically consistent story line)


Directions: Rearrange the following paragraph so that the sentences are in sequential and
logical order.

  1. Behind my house, there is a path that leads into the woods.
  2. Jake barked wildly and strained at the leash while I squinted into the tangle of
      bushes to try to determine the cause of the noise.
  3. The crashing continued, but it seemed to get farther away.
  4. And then, our curiosity satisfied and our fear dispelled, we each continued our
      explorations of the woods.
  5. Jake quieted down and sniffed the air as the crashing diminished, and far up the
      stream, I could see branches swaying as something large went past.
  6. Jake and I stood still as the bear waded into the stream and sniffed cautiously at our
      scents.
  7. Just then, a huge grizzly bear lumbered into the open far upstream.
  8. For a long time, we looked and sniffed at one another from afar.
  9. For instance, one afternoon I was walking my dog Jake across a sparkling stream
      when we heard a tremendous crash in the brush to the left of the trail.
  10. It meanders for miles, and it has been my path to many thrilling adventures.

         .
Proficient Response:
Behind my house, there is a path that leads into the woods. It meanders for miles, and it
has been my path to many thrilling adventures. For instance, one afternoon I was walking
my dog Jake across a sparkling stream when we heard a tremendous crash in the brush to
the left of the trail. Jake barked wildly and strained at the leash while I squinted into the
tangle of bushes to try to determine the cause of the noise. The crashing continued, but it
seemed to get farther away. Jake quieted down and sniffed the air as the crashing
diminished, and far up the stream, I could see branches swaying as something large went
past. Just then, a huge grizzly bear lumbered into the open far upstream. Jake and I stood
still as the bear waded into the stream and sniffed cautiously at our scents. For a long
time, we looked and sniffed at one another from afar. And then, our curiosity satisfied
and our fear dispelled, we each continued our explorations of the woods.




W07_3.4.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
Directions: The following sentences are short, choppy, and repetitive. There is no logical
order in their presentation. Rewrite the paragraph, combining sentences or rewriting them
so that the passage has a smooth flow.

The black bear is a native of North America. The black bear has a very wide range.
Black bears are found in almost every state of the United States. Black bear range in size
from 200 pounds to 600 pounds in weight. They are found in Mexico. They are found in
Canada. The black bear is found almost everywhere because they can eat lots of kinds of
food. They eat meat. They can be any color from tan to brown to black. They eat fish.
They eat grain. They eat berries and acorns and nuts and grass. They can be found all
over.

Proficient Response:
Did you know that a black bear isn’t always black? It’s true. Black bears can be any color
from tan to brown to black. They can range in size, too, and can weigh anywhere between
200 to 600 pounds. The black bear can also be found in a variety of places in North
America; in fact, it can be found all over the continent. Native to North America, black
bears can be found in Canada and Mexico as well as in almost every state of the United
States. The reason these creatures have such a wide range is because they can eat so
many different kinds of food. These bears don’t just eat meat and fish – they can also eat
grain, berries, acorns, nuts, and grass. Black bears are truly amazing creatures.

See the next page for another scoring guide.




W07_3.4.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
                       7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

          Advanced                            Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Sequencing of ideas and           • Writing communicates in          • Sequencing needs work.
details is logical and              an earnest, pleasing manner.       • There is no real lead or
effective.                          • Voice is inconsistent: it        introduction to set up what
• Introduction is inviting—         may emerge strongly, then          follows.
draws in the reader.                retreat behind general,            • Conclusion is missing or
• Conclusion is satisfying—         dispassionate language.            does not wrap things up.
leaves reader with a sense          • Writing hides as much of         • Transitions seldom work
of resolution.                      the writer as it reveals.          well, with many
• Transitions are thoughtful;       • Writer seems aware of            connections between ideas
clearly show how ideas              audience and purpose but           unclear.
connect.                            often weighs words too             • Pacing feels awkward;
• Organization flows                carefully or discards              writer slows when the
smoothly, seems effortless.         personal insights in favor of      reader wants to move on,
                                    safe generalities.                 and vice versa.
                                                                       • Problems with
                                                                       organization make it hard to
                                                                       grasp the main point or
                                                                       story line.




W07_3.4.1 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.2 (7th Grade) The student revises writing by giving/receiving feedback and
evaluating writing based on established criteria (e.g. self-created checklists, peer
conference formats, scoring guides or rubrics.)

Directions: Student selects a piece of his/her writing from personal writing portfolio and
assesses it in the following manner:

Sample assessments:
A. Students grade sample essays using six-trait rubric. Students earn a grade according to
the accuracy of their scoring.

B. Before handing in an assignment, students use the teacher’s rubric to evaluate their
own work. Part of the grade for the paper is completing the self-evaluation.

C. Students create their own evaluation tools or collaborate to create an evaluation tool
for an assignment.

D. Students all evaluate the same paper. They are given a grade for providing appropriate
feedback for that paper.

Sample assessment

Student resource self-assessments

Spelling
        I have read through my paper and underlined any words I wasn’t sure were spelled
        correctly.
        I have used my resources (print dictionary, online dictionary, teacher, peers, word
        processing software, etc.) to check spelling of the word(s) in question.
        I believe every word in my paper is spelled correctly.
Conventions
        I have read through my paper and put stars next to the sentences I wasn’t sure were 100%
        correct in their grammar, usage, and punctuation.
        I have used my resources (print grammar guide, online grammar guide, teacher, peers,
        word processing software, etc.) to check my grammar, usage, and punctuation.
        I believe my grammar, usage, and punctuation in this paper are 100% correct.




W07_3.4.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006     Page 1 of 6
Word choice
       I have read through my paper and circled any words or passages I felt were weak and/or
       generic or could be more vivid.
       I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers, word
       processing software, etc.) to investigate and choose more vivid and precise wording
       where I needed to.
       The word choice in my paper is totally appropriate for the audience.
       My accurate and vivid word choice makes my paper engaging for the audience.
Ideas/Content
       I have read through my paper and compared it to the assignment prompt. I have
       highlighted sections that may not really address the prompt or that may be boring for a
       reader.
       I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to help make
       sure that my paper satisfies the assignment and is engaging to read.
       I believe that I have completed the assignment fully and done my best to make my paper
       interesting for a reader.
Sentence Fluency
       I have read my paper and put boxes around words or phrases that sound repetitive and/or
       choppy. I have also put boxes around any sentences I think might be incomplete, run-on,
       or rambling.
       I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers, etc.) to
       investigate and choose options for sentence structure to help improve my fluency.
       I believe my sentences are varied and sound good when read aloud. I believe that my
       paper is free from incomplete, run-on, or rambling sentences except where I put them in
       on purpose for effect.
Voice
       I have read my paper and put brackets around words or passages that I worried might not
       have an appropriate or engaging voice.
       I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to investigate
       and choose techniques and/or wording to improve the voice where I needed to.
       I believe the voice of this paper is appropriate for the purpose and audience and that my
       writing style is fresh and unique enough to engage the reader as much as possible.
Organization
       I have read my paper and have put a swirl next to paragraphs, sentences, or phrases where
       I worry I might be off topic or where I might need more of a transition to get to the next
       idea.
       I have drawn arrows next to paragraphs, sentences, or phrases that may in the wrong
       place within the paper.
       I can put my finger on a sentence in every paragraph that contains the main idea.
       I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to rearrange,
       delete, expand, and/or add transitions to passages that needed improvement in
       organization.
       I believe that every paragraph contains enough detail for the reader to understand and
       follow the main idea.
       I believe that my sentences and paragraphs are in the best possible order.
       I believe that the paper flows smoothly from one idea to the next thanks to my artful and
       varied transitional words and sentences.

_______________________________________
Signature of Student


W07_3.4.2         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 2 of 6
                   7th Grade Rubric for Student Peer Evaluation

               Advanced                      Proficient                    Below Proficient
7th and 8th    • Evaluator provided at       • Evaluator provided at       • Comments are not
                 least one comment of          least one comment of         adequate or specific enough
                 praise.                       praise.                      to help author improve the
               • Evaluator identified at     • Evaluator identified at      paper.
                 least one area for            least one area for          • Evaluator was
                 improvement.                  improvement.                 disrespectful to the author.
               • Evaluator provided at       • Evaluator provided at       • Comments and/or
                 least one concrete            least one concrete           proofreading marks are
                 suggestion for getting        suggestion for getting       difficult to understand.
                 the paper to the next         the paper to the next       • Many inaccurate
                 level.                        level.                       suggestions about
               • All comments and            • All comments and             conventions.
                 suggestions are               suggestions are
                 respectful to the author.     respectful to the author.
               • All proofreading marks      • Most proofreading
                 are                           marks are
                 legible/understandable.       legible/understandable.
               • All suggestions about       • Most suggestions about
                 conventions are               conventions are
                 accurate.                     accurate.

9th and 10th   • Evaluator gives             • Evaluator provided at       • Comments are not
                 multiple, specific            least one comment of          adequate or specific
                 comments of praise.           praise.                       enough to help author
               • Evaluator identified at     • Evaluator identified at       improve the paper.
                 least one specific area       least one area for          • Evaluator was
                 for improvement.              improvement.                  disrespectful to the author.
               • Evaluator provided          • Evaluator provided at       • Comments and/or
                 multiple concrete             least one concrete            proofreading marks are
                 suggestion for getting        suggestion for getting        difficult to understand.
                 the paper to the next         the paper to the next       • Many inaccurate
                 level                         level.                        suggestions about
               • All comments and            • All comments and              conventions.
                 suggestions are               suggestions are
                 respectful to the author.     respectful to the author.
               • All proofreading marks      • All proofreading marks
                 are                           are
                 legible/understandable.       legible/understandable.
               • All suggestions about       • All suggestions about
                 conventions are               conventions are
                 accurate.                     accurate.




W07_3.4.2      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006          Page 3 of 6
                    7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions

          Advanced                        Proficient                   Below Proficient
• Paragraphing reinforces       • Paragraphing is attempted       • Paragraphing is attempted
the organizational              but some paragraphs run           but many paragraphs run
structure.                      together or begin in the          together or begin in the
• Grammar and usage are         wrong place.                      wrong place.
correct (few, if any, errors)   • Problems with grammar           • Problems with grammar
and contribute to clarity       or usage are not serious          or usage may be serious
and style.                      enough to impede or distort       enough to impede or distort
• Punctuation is accurate       meaning.                          meaning in some instances
(few, if any, errors) and       •End punctuation usually          but not overall.
guides the reader through       correct; internal                 • Terminal punctuation is
the text.                       punctuation sometimes             usually correct; internal
• Spelling is generally         missing or incorrect.             punctuation is sometimes
correct, even of more           • Spelling is usually correct     missing or incorrect and
difficult words.                or reasonably plausible on        errors may impede or
• The writer may                common words;                     distort meaning in some
manipulate conventions for      misspellings do not impede        instances.
stylistic effect.               communication.                    • Spelling errors may
                                                                  impede or distort meaning
                                                                  in some instances but not
                                                                  overall.

See the next page for an additional scoring guide.




W07_3.4.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 4 of 6
                             7th Grade 6-point Scoring Guide/Rubric

            Advanced                           Proficient                        Below Proficient
6 Points                             4 Points                             3 Points
• Paragraphing reinforces the        • Paragraphing is attempted but      • Paragraphing is attempted but
organizational structure.            some paragraphs run together or      many paragraphs run together or
• Grammar and usage are correct      begin in the wrong place.            begin in the wrong place.
(few, if any, errors) and            • Problems with grammar or           • Problems with grammar or
contribute to clarity and style.     usage are not serious enough to      usage may be serious enough to
• Punctuation is accurate (few, if   impede or distort meaning.           impede or distort meaning in
any, errors) and guides the reader   • End punctuation usually correct;   some instances but not overall.
through the text.                    internal punctuation sometimes       • Terminal punctuation is usually
• Spelling is generally correct,     missing or incorrect.                correct; internal punctuation is
even of more difficult words.        • Spelling is usually correct or     sometimes missing or incorrect
• The writer may manipulate          reasonably plausible on common       and errors may impede or distort
conventions for stylistic effect.    words; misspellings do not           meaning in some instances.
                                     impede communication.                • Spelling errors may impede or
5 Points                                                                  distort meaning in some instances
• Paragraphing reinforces the                                             but not overall.
organizational structure.
• Grammar and usage are correct                                           2 Points
(few, if any, errors) and                                                 • Paragraphing is missing,
contribute to clarity and style.                                          irregular, or so frequent (e.g.,
• Punctuation is accurate (few, if                                        every sentence) that it has no
any, errors).                                                             relationship to the organizational
• Spelling is generally correct,                                          structure of the text.
even of more difficult words.                                             • Errors in grammar or usage are
                                                                          very noticeable and may affect
                                                                          meaning.
                                                                          • Punctuation is often missing or
                                                                          incorrect
                                                                          • Spelling errors are frequent,
                                                                          even of common words.
                                                                          • The reader must read once to
                                                                          decode, then again for meaning.

                                                                          1 Point
                                                                          • Paragraphing is missing,
                                                                          irregular, or so frequent that it has
                                                                          no relationship to the
                                                                          organizational structure of the
                                                                          text.
                                                                          • Errors in grammar or usage are
                                                                          frequent and impede meaning.
                                                                          • Punctuation is often missing or
                                                                          incorrect.
                                                                          • Spelling errors are frequent and
                                                                          impede meaning.
                                                                          • The reader may be unable to
                                                                          decode the writing,


See the next page for an additional scoring guide.




W07_3.4.2           Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006              Page 5 of 6
                   7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

          Advanced                         Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Sequencing of ideas and        • Writing communicates in          • Sequencing needs work.
details is logical and           an earnest, pleasing manner.       • There is no real lead or
effective.                       • Voice is inconsistent: it        introduction to set up what
• Introduction is inviting—      may emerge strongly, then          follows.
draws in the reader.             retreat behind general,            • Conclusion is missing or
• Conclusion is satisfying—      dispassionate language.            does not wrap things up.
leaves reader with a sense       • Writing hides as much of         • Transitions seldom work
of resolution.                   the writer as it reveals.          well, with many
• Transitions are thoughtful;    • Writer seems aware of            connections between ideas
clearly show how ideas           audience and purpose but           unclear.
connect.                         often weighs words too             • Pacing feels awkward;
• Organization flows             carefully or discards              writer slows when the
smoothly, seems effortless.      personal insights in favor of      reader wants to move on,
                                 safe generalities.                 and vice versa.
                                                                    • Problems with
                                                                    organization make it hard to
                                                                    grasp the main point or
                                                                    story line.




W07_3.4.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006     Page 6 of 6
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.3 (7th Grade) Combining sentences for fluency, using precise and descriptive words,
and/or eliminating irrelevant details to improve quality and effectiveness of writing

Directions: Combine the following set of short, choppy sentences into a single sentence.
Also, use the provided sentences to form the specified type of sentence. You may change
the details if necessary to form a sentence that makes sense.
        Henry walked through the woods.
        He followed a path.
        He heard many birds.
        He saw a moose, a fox and a beaver.
        Henry enjoys time alone.




Directions: Write a compound sentence.




Directions: Write a complex sentence.




W07_3.4.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 5
Directions: Compose an essay. Within your essay, incorporate effective style. Include
examples of each of the following. Then, identify each of the examples in your completed
essay.
    1.   Write at least one compound sentence.
    2.   Write at least one complex sentence.
    3.   Begin at least one sentence with an “-ly” word.
    4.   Begin at least one sentence with a prepositional phrase.
    5.   Expand at least one sentence with a prepositional phrase within the sentence.




Directions: Read the following passages and highlight the unnecessary or unrelated
details or sentences. Explain why you removed the details or sentences. Use terms
associated with writing paragraphs in your answer. Write in complete sentences.

    1. Mowing our yard has never been my favorite thing to do. We have huge front
       lawn that needs to be mowed every week. Cutting the immense lawn takes at least
       five hours. After the grass is cut, the clippings need to be hauled into the woods.
       The woods on our property are a great place to spend an afternoon. The hauling
       task takes another hour. Finally, the equipment needs to be cleaned and stored
       until the next week. I would rather spend my day playing in the woods.




    2. In the summer of 1980, a huge wind storm blew through my hometown, Eau
       Claire, Wisconsin. Winds recorded at over 100 miles-per-hour toppled trees
       throughout the city. Power lines fell, and many citizens were without electricity
       for over two weeks. At our house, we lost a side of beef that we had just put in the
       freezer. Roofs tore from the tops of buildings like shredded paper scattering
       insulation everywhere. Luckily, no one was injured in the devastating storm;
       however, clean up lasted for months afterward.




W07_3.4.3         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 5
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.3 (7th Grade) Combining sentences for fluency, using precise and descriptive words,
and/or eliminating irrelevant details to improve quality and effectiveness of writing

Directions: Combine the following set of short, choppy sentences into a single sentence.
Also, use the provided sentences to form the specified type of sentence. You may change
the details if necessary to form a sentence that makes sense.
        Henry walked through the woods.
        He followed a path.
        He heard many birds.
        He saw a moose, a fox and a beaver.
        Henry enjoys time alone.




Directions: Write a compound sentence.




Directions: Write a complex sentence.




                 7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Sentence Structure

           Advanced                        Proficient                      Below Proficient
•   Compound/complex              • Compound/complex                  • Compound/complex
    examples correct                examples correct                    examples not correct
•   All sentences punctuated      • All sentences punctuated          • Not all sentences
    correctly                       correctly                           punctuated correctly
•   All sentences make sense      • All sentences make sense          • Not all sentences make
    with details provided.          with details provided.              sense with details
•   Paragraph is particularly                                           provided.
    engaging for the reader.



W07_3.4.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 5
Directions: Compose an essay. Within your essay, incorporate effective style. Include
examples of each of the following. Then, identify each of the examples in your completed
essay.
             1.   Write at least one compound sentence.
             2.   Write at least one complex sentence.
             3.   Begin at least one sentence with an “-ly” word.
             4.   Begin at least one sentence with a prepositional phrase.
             5.   Expand at least one sentence with a prepositional phrase within the
                  sentence.



                       7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Sentence Style

Advanced                    Proficient                 Below Proficient         Far Below
                                                                                Proficient
• Variety in types,         • Some variety in type,    • Many sentences         • Sentences begin the
  length, and                 length and beginning       begin the same way       same way and follow
  beginnings of               of sentences.              and follow the same      the same pattern with
  sentences make essay                                   pattern with little      no variety.
  read smoothly –           • Most sentences read        variety. Phrasing
  sound has been              smoothly – meaning         does not sound         • Sentences sound
  considered as well as       is clear with very few     natural.                 choppy, incomplete,
  meaning.                    stiff, awkward or                                   and awkward.
                              choppy sentences.        • Sometimes the reader
• The sentences build                                    has to reread for      • Meaning is unclear
  upon each other to        • Fragments are used         meaning.                 forcing the reader to
  make sense for the          only for style or                                   reread.
                              effect.                  • Essay may contain
  reader.
                                                         many fragments.        • Essay contains many
• Fragments are used                                                              fragments.
  only for style or
  effect.




W07_3.4.3 Answer Key      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006     Page 4 of 5
Directions: Read the following passages and highlight the unnecessary or unrelated
details or sentences. Explain why you removed the details or sentences. Use terms
associated with writing paragraphs in your answer. Write in complete sentences.

        1. Mowing our yard has never been my favorite thing to do. We have huge front
            lawn that needs to be mowed every week. Cutting the immense lawn takes at
            least five hours. After the grass is cut, the clippings need to be hauled into the
            woods. The woods on our property are a great place to spend an afternoon.
            The hauling task takes another hour. Finally, the equipment needs to be
            cleaned and stored until the next week. I would rather spend my day playing
            in the woods.




        2. In the summer of 1980, a huge wind storm blew through my hometown, Eau
            Claire, Wisconsin. Winds recorded at over 100 miles-per-hour toppled trees
            throughout the city. Power lines fell, and many citizens were without
            electricity for over two weeks. At our house, we lost a side of beef that we had
            just put in the freezer. Roofs tore from the tops of buildings like shredded
            paper scattering insulation everywhere. Luckily, no one was injured in the
            devastating storm; however, clean up lasted for months afterward.




W07_3.4.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 5
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.4 (7th Grade) Clarifying thesis statement and/or topic sentence and adding details to
support main ideas, if needed


Directions: Read the paragraph, and select a thesis from the list below.

Dogs run wildly through the halls in the schools tripping students and eating the students’
lunches. Some students are allergic to dog dander and start sneezing. Parents are called
to remove the dogs. Students corner the dogs down at the end of the hall and one growls,
baring his teeth. The dogs seem confused, scared, and angry and are appearing
dangerous. The authorities arrive and take the dogs away.


    A.   All dogs are not good dogs as they might bite.
    B.   Teachers shouldn’t bring their dogs to school.
    C.   Some dogs in school buildings create problems.
    D.   Dogs cornered at the ends of halls might bite.
    E.   Students scare dogs in the schools.




W07_3.4.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.4 (7th Grade) Clarifying thesis statement and/or topic sentence and adding details to
support main ideas, if needed


Directions: Read the paragraph, and select a thesis from the list below.

Dogs run wildly through the halls in the schools tripping students and eating the students’
lunches. Some students are allergic to dog dander and start sneezing. Parents are called
to remove the dogs. Students corner the dogs down at the end of the hall and one growls,
baring his teeth. The dogs seem confused, scared, and angry and are appearing
dangerous. The authorities arrive and take the dogs away.


    A.   All dogs are not good dogs as they might bite.
    B.   Teachers shouldn’t bring their dogs to school.
    C.   Some dogs in school buildings create problems.
    D.   Dogs cornered at the ends of halls might bite.
    E.   Students scare dogs in the schools.


Proficient Response: C




W07_3.4.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.2 (7th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.5 (7th Grade) Using appropriate voice for intended audience (e.g., humorous,
informal, formal, or technical)


Directions: Write about an incident that you will remember forever. Select one of the
following voices to write in: angry, happy, sad, frustrated, or proud. Be sure to include an
introduction, body, and conclusion




W07_3.4.5        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.2 (7th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.5 (7th Grade) Using appropriate voice for intended audience (e.g., humorous,
informal, formal, or technical)


Directions: Write about an incident that you will remember forever. Select one of the
following voices to write in: angry, happy, sad, frustrated, or proud. Be sure to include an
introduction, body, and conclusion

This piece of writing will be 2-3 paragraphs.

                          7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Voice

          Advanced                           Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Language is highly               • Writing communicates in          • Writing communicates but
individual.                        an earnest, pleasing manner.       without much style or
• Reader senses the person         • Voice is inconsistent: it        interest.
behind the words; feels an         may emerge strongly, then          • Writing hides the writer;
interaction with the writer.       retreat behind general,            the reader has little or no
• Tone gives the writing           dispassionate language.            sense of the writer behind
flavor, adds interest.             • Writing hides as much of         the words.
• Language is appropriate          the writer as it reveals.          • Writer shows some
for purpose and audience.          • Writer seems aware of            awareness of audience and/
• Narrative writing seems          audience and purpose but           or purpose but is
honest, appealing, heartfelt.      often weighs words too             inconsistent.
• Expository or persuasive         carefully or discards              • Writer speaks in a
writing reflects a strong          personal insights in favor of      monotone.
commitment to the topic;           safe generalities.
anticipates reader’s
questions, shows why the
reader should care or want
to know more.

See the next page for an additional sample 6-trait scoring guide.




W07_3.4.5 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                              7th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide

          Advanced                           Proficient                      Below Proficient
6 Points                           4 Points                           3 Points
• Language is highly               • Writing communicates in an       • Writing communicates but
individual.                        earnest, pleasing manner.          without much style or interest.
• Reader senses the person         • Voice is inconsistent: it may    • Writing hides the writer; the
behind the words; feels an         emerge strongly, then retreat      reader has little or no sense of
interaction with the writer.       behind general, dispassionate      the writer behind the words.
• Tone gives the writing           language.                          • Writer shows some
flavor, adds interest.             • Writing hides as much of the     awareness of audience and/ or
• Language is appropriate for      writer as it reveals.              purpose but is inconsistent.
purpose and audience               • Writer seems aware of            • Writer speaks in a monotone.
• Narrative writing seems          audience and purpose but
honest, appealing, heartfelt.      often weighs words too             2 Points
• Expository or persuasive         carefully or discards personal     • It is hard to sense the writer
writing reflects a strong          insights in favor of safe          behind the words.
commitment to the topic;           generalities.                      • The writer does not seem to
anticipates reader’s questions,                                       reach out to an audience or to
shows why the reader should                                           anticipate the reader’s interests
care or want to know more.                                            or questions.
                                                                      • Writing may communicate
5 Points                                                              on a functional level but does
• Reader senses the person                                            not move or involve the
behind the words.                                                     reader.
• There are occasional                                                • Writer does not seem
moments that surprise, amuse,                                         sufficiently at home with the
or move the reader.                                                   topic to take risks, share
• Tone gives the writing                                              personal insights, or make the
flavor, adds interest.                                                topic/story personal and real
• Language is appropriate for                                         for the reader.
purpose and audience.
• Narrative writing seems                                             1 Point
honest, appealing, heartfelt.                                         • The writer seems unaware of
• Expository or persuasive                                            an audience or reader; writing
writing reflects a strong                                             seems “painful” to the writer.
commitment to the topic.                                              • Writing may not
                                                                      communicate on a functional
                                                                      level.
                                                                      • Writer seems uncomfortable
                                                                      with the topic.




W07_3.4.5 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 3 of 3
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.6 (7th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g., dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, rubric, word processor)


Directions: Have the student select a piece of writing from his/her portfolio and access it
according to the checklist.

Student resource self-assessments

Spelling
        I have read through my paper and underlined any words I wasn’t sure were spelled
        correctly.
        I have used my resources (print dictionary, online dictionary, teacher, peers, word
        processing software, etc.) to check spelling of the words in my paper.
        I believe every word in my paper is spelled correctly.
Conventions
        I have read through my paper and put stars next to the sentences I wasn’t sure were 100%
        correct in their grammar, usage, and punctuation.
        I have used my resources (print grammar guide, online grammar guide, teacher, peers,
        word processing software, etc.) to check my grammar, usage, and punctuation.
        I believe my grammar, usage, and punctuation in this paper are 100% correct.
Word choice
        I have read through my paper and circled any words or passages I felt were weak and/or
        generic or could be more vivid.
        I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers, word
        processing software, etc.) to investigate and choose more vivid and precise wording
        where I needed to.
        The word choice in my paper is totally appropriate for the audience.
        My accurate and vivid word choice makes my paper engaging for the audience.
Ideas/Content
        I have read through my paper and compared it to the assignment prompt. I have
        highlighted sections that may not really address the prompt or that may be boring for a
        reader.
        I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to help make
        sure that my paper satisfies the assignment and is engaging to read.
        I believe that I have completed the assignment fully and done my best to make my paper
        interesting for a reader.




W07_3.4.6        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 1 of 4
Sentence Fluency
       I have read my paper and put boxes around words or phrases that sound repetitive and/or
       choppy. I have also put boxes around any sentences I think might be incomplete, run-on,
       or rambling sentences.
       I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers, etc.) to
       investigate and choose options for sentence structure to help improve my fluency.
       I believe my sentences are varied and sound good when read aloud. I believe that my
       paper is free from incomplete, run-on, or rambling sentences except where I put them in
       on purpose for effect.
Voice
       I have read my paper and put brackets around words or passages that I worried might not
       have an appropriate or engaging voice.
       I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to investigate
       and choose techniques and/or wording to improve the voice where I needed to.
       I believe the voice of this paper is appropriate for the purpose and audience and that my
       writing style is fresh and unique enough to engage the reader as much as possible.
Organization
       I have read my paper and have put a swirl next to paragraphs, sentences, or phrases where
       I worry I might be off topic or where I might need more of a transition to get to the next
       idea.
       I have drawn arrows next to paragraphs, sentences, or phrases that may in the wrong
       place within the paper.
       I can put my finger on a sentence in every paragraph that contains the main idea.
       I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to rearrange,
       delete, expand, and/or add transitions to passages that needed improvement in
       organization.
       I believe that every paragraph contains enough detail for the reader to understand and
       follow the main idea.
       I believe that my sentences and paragraphs are in the best possible order.
       I believe that the paper flows smoothly from one idea to the next thanks to my artful and
       varied transitional words and sentences.

_______________________________________
Signature of Student




W07_3.4.6         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 2 of 4
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.6 (7th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g., dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, rubric, word processor)


Directions: Have the student select a piece of writing from his/her portfolio and access it
according to the checklist.

Student resource self-assessments

Spelling
        I have read through my paper and underlined any words I wasn’t sure were spelled
        correctly.
        I have used my resources (print dictionary, online dictionary, teacher, peers, word
        processing software, etc.) to check spelling of the words in my paper.
        I believe every word in my paper is spelled correctly.
Conventions
        I have read through my paper and put stars next to the sentences I wasn’t sure were 100%
        correct in their grammar, usage, and punctuation.
        I have used my resources (print grammar guide, online grammar guide, teacher, peers,
        word processing software, etc.) to check my grammar, usage, and punctuation.
        I believe my grammar, usage, and punctuation in this paper are 100% correct.
Word choice
        I have read through my paper and circled any words or passages I felt were weak and/or
        generic or could be more vivid.
        I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers, word
        processing software, etc.) to investigate and choose more vivid and precise wording
        where I needed to.
        The word choice in my paper is totally appropriate for the audience.
        My accurate and vivid word choice makes my paper engaging for the audience.
Ideas/Content
        I have read through my paper and compared it to the assignment prompt. I have
        highlighted sections that may not really address the prompt or that may be boring for a
        reader.
        I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to help make
        sure that my paper satisfies the assignment and is engaging to read.
        I believe that I have completed the assignment fully and done my best to make my paper
        interesting for a reader.




W07_3.4.6 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
Sentence Fluency
       I have read my paper and put boxes around words or phrases that sound repetitive and/or
       choppy. I have also put boxes around any sentences I think might be incomplete, run-on,
       or rambling sentences.
       I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers, etc.) to
       investigate and choose options for sentence structure to help improve my fluency.
       I believe my sentences are varied and sound good when read aloud. I believe that my
       paper is free from incomplete, run-on, or rambling sentences except where I put them in
       on purpose for effect.
Voice
       I have read my paper and put brackets around words or passages that I worried might not
       have an appropriate or engaging voice.
       I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to investigate
       and choose techniques and/or wording to improve the voice where I needed to.
       I believe the voice of this paper is appropriate for the purpose and audience and that my
       writing style is fresh and unique enough to engage the reader as much as possible.
Organization
       I have read my paper and have put a swirl next to paragraphs, sentences, or phrases where
       I worry I might be off topic or where I might need more of a transition to get to the next
       idea.
       I have drawn arrows next to paragraphs, sentences, or phrases that may in the wrong
       place within the paper.
       I can put my finger on a sentence in every paragraph that contains the main idea.
       I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to rearrange,
       delete, expand, and/or add transitions to passages that needed improvement in
       organization.
       I believe that every paragraph contains enough detail for the reader to understand and
       follow the main idea.
       I believe that my sentences and paragraphs are in the best possible order.
       I believe that the paper flows smoothly from one idea to the next thanks to my artful and
       varied transitional words and sentences.

_______________________________________
Signature of Student

These self-assessments might be used all together or individually. This assessment is
meant as a tool to inspire greater student awareness of the writing process and to help
facilitate discussion of revision strategies and resources between students and teachers. If
self-assessments are fully checked off and signed, yet the paper still suffers from major
problems in any self-assessed category and/or the student neglects the use of resources,
the teacher can use the self-assessments to identify which students might need more
training. Students might also prove through this assessment that they might need training
in choosing reliable resources and using them efficiently. Much of this self-assessment
could also be done orally in a discussion with the teacher.




W07_3.4.6 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.1 (7th Grade) Writing a thesis statement that identifies the focus or controlling idea
for the entire composition

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.1 (7th Grade) Rearranging details to improve clarity and logical progression of ideas
(e.g., making chronological sequence clear, creating a logically consistent story line)


Paragraph Writing for Ideas and Content

Directions: Describe your favorite movie. What did you like about the characters and
the setting? Be sure to have an introduction, body, and conclusion.




W07_3.4.6a       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.1 (7th Grade) Writing a thesis statement that identifies the focus or controlling idea
for the entire composition

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.1 (7th Grade) Rearranging details to improve clarity and logical progression of ideas
(e.g., making chronological sequence clear, creating a logically consistent story line)


Paragraph Writing for Ideas and Content

Directions: Describe your favorite movie. What did you like about the characters and
the setting? Be sure to have an introduction, body, and conclusion.

This paper will be scored for Ideas and Content and conventions.

                 7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Ideas and Content

          Advanced                           Proficient                    Below Proficient
• Ideas are fresh, original,       • Topic and direction are         • Topic and direction are
and/or insightful.                 evident, but more information     evident, but writer may digress
• Ideas are based on the           is needed to “fill in the         and go in a different direction
writer’s knowledge and/ or         blanks.”                          or introduce a different topic.
experience.                        • Ideas draw on knowledge         • Ideas may not draw on
• Details are relevant, telling,   and/or experience but may not     knowledge and/or experience;
and contribute to the whole.       move beyond general               may be general observations.
• Content goes beyond the          observations to specifics.        • Details are reasonably clear
obvious or predictable.            • Details are reasonably clear    but may not be detailed,
• Topic makes a point or tells a   but may not be detailed,          personalized, or expanded.
story.                             personalized, or expanded.        • Supporting details are
                                   • Supporting details are          present but may not “flesh
                                   present but may not “flesh        out” the main point or story
                                   out” the main point or story      line or may be irrelevant to it.
                                   line.                             • Original ideas are rare or
                                   • Original ideas may be           absent.
                                   blended with ones that are
                                   more obvious or predictable.

An expanded six-trait scoring guide is on the next page.




W07_3.4.6a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 2 of 3
            7th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric for Ideas and Content

          Advanced                           Proficient                    Below Proficient
6 Points                           4 Points                          3 Points
• Ideas are fresh, original,       • Topic and direction are         • Topic and direction are
and/or insightful.                 evident, but more information     evident, but writer may digress
• Ideas are based on the           is needed to “fill in the         and go in a different direction
writer’s knowledge and/ or         blanks.”                          or introduce a different topic.
experience.                        • Ideas draw on knowledge         • Ideas may not draw on
• Details are relevant, telling,   and/or experience but may not     knowledge and/or experience;
and contribute to the whole.       move beyond general               may be general observations.
• Content goes beyond the          observations to specifics.        • Details are reasonably clear
obvious or predictable.            • Details are reasonably clear    but may not be detailed,
• Topic makes a point or tells a   but may not be detailed,          personalized, or expanded.
story.                             personalized, or expanded.        • Supporting details are
                                   • Supporting details are          present but may not “flesh
5 Points                           present but may not “flesh        out” the main point or story
• Ideas are based on the           out” the main point or story      line or may be irrelevant to it.
writer’s knowledge and/ or         line.                             • Original ideas are rare or
experience.                        • Original ideas may be           absent.
• Details are relevant, telling,   blended with ones that are
and contribute to the whole.       more obvious or predictable.      2 Points
• Topic makes a point or tells a                                     • Topic and direction are not
story.                                                               evident; the writer has not
• Some ideas are fresh and                                           defined the topic in a
original.                                                            meaningful, personal way.
                                                                     • Information is very limited
                                                                     or unclear.
                                                                     • Text may be repetitious or
                                                                     read like a collection of
                                                                     disconnected, random
                                                                     thoughts.
                                                                     • The writer does not
                                                                     distinguish the main ideas or
                                                                     critical points from the
                                                                     supporting details or less
                                                                     critical points.

                                                                     1 Point
                                                                     • Topic and direction are
                                                                     missing.
                                                                     • Information is very limited
                                                                     or unclear.
                                                                     • Text may be repetitious, or
                                                                     may read like a collection of
                                                                     disconnected, random
                                                                     thoughts.




W07_3.4.6a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 3 of 3
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.1 (7th Grade) Correcting misspellings using available software programs, including
choosing the correct spelling option among several choices


Directions: Use the grammar and spelling tools on your computer to help you rewrite the
following sentences using proper syntax. Correct any misspelled words as you go.

    1. A party we have on Saterday.

    2. I wood my bike like to ride.

    3. Bern in March I was.

    4. Enjoi the movie did you?

    5. My comptor I want to use.

    6. My sled to hall wood we wood use.




W07_3.6.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.1 (7th Grade) Correcting misspellings using available software programs, including
choosing the correct spelling option among several choices


Directions: Use the grammar and spelling tools on your computer to help you rewrite the
following sentences using proper syntax. Correct any misspelled words as you go.

    1. A party we have on Saterday.

    2. I wood my bike like to ride.

    3. Bern in March I was.

    4. Enjoi the movie did you?

    5. My comptor I want to use.

    6. My sled to hall wood we wood use.


Proficient Response:

    1. On Saturday we have a party.

    2. I would like to ride my bike.

    3. I was born in March.

    4. Did you enjoy the movie?

    5. I want to use my computer.

    6. We would use my sled to haul wood.




W07_3.6.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.2 (7th Grade) Using a thesaurus to locate and choose effective synonyms for common
words


Directions: Use the thesaurus and dictionary function of your computer to change the
action verbs in the following sentences. Rewrite each sentence five times, changing the
verb each time. Each time you rewrite the sentence, use a one-word description of the
connotation of the new verb (the first one is done as an example). Look at the third page
before beginning work.

Active Verbs Worksheet

1. The boy walked down the road.
   Examples:
   Tired:    The boy trudged down the road.
   Lazy:     The boy ambled down the road.
   Injured: The boy hobbled down the road.
   Scared:   The boy scurried down the road.
   Happy:    The boy skipped down the road.
   Busy:     The boy hurried down the road.

2. The girl sat in the chair.




3. The ball went past his head.




4. He hit the ball into center field.




W07_3.6.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
5. She ate the apple.




6. He swam in the river.




7. She talked for a long time.




8. He threw the ball.




W07_3.6.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
Action verbs and denotation/connotation

Denotation=the most specific or literal meaning of a word
Connotation=an additional sense or senses associated with or suggested by a word or
phrase.

Does the phrase, “The boy was high,” mean that the boy was “above or stretching upward
from a known base level such as the sea or ground?” (denotation)
Does it mean he is on drugs? (connotation)

How about the expression, “We bad!” “Below an acceptable standard in quality or
performance”? Or “Cool”?

By using action verbs we can change the connotation of a phrase or sentence.

The coach yelled at me.                Probably bad news.
The coach shrieked at me.              Sounds out of control
The coach shouted at me.               A neutral sound to it
The coach screeched at me.             Again, out of control
The coach yelped at me.                Makes him sound surprised
The coach roared at me.                Definitely mad-like a lion
The coach bellowed at me.              Mad like a bull
The coach howled at me.                Sounds nuts
The coach hollered at me.              Could be friendly or just distance




W07_3.6.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.3 (7th Grade) The student uses resources by using formatting features to produce a
final draft by centering title, choosing appropriate font size and style, indentation,
pagination, and line spacing.

Directions: Write a four-paragraph essay on “less light in the winter” and what the
effects are on the student and his/her community. Make sure you center your title and put
your name, teacher’s name, class period, and date in the upper left-hand corner. Double
space and use font Times New Roman, size 12.

Sample assessment: Students open a poorly formatted essay and revise the formatting so
that the essay becomes neater, more professional, more consistent, and more accessible to
a reader.




W07_3.6.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.3 (7th Grade) The student uses resources by using formatting features to produce a
final draft by centering title, choosing appropriate font size and style, indentation,
pagination, and line spacing.

Directions: Write a four-paragraph essay on “less light in the winter” and what the
effects are on the student and his/her community. Make sure you center your title and put
your name, teacher’s name, class period, and date in the upper left-hand corner. Double
space and use font Times New Roman, size 12.

Sample assessment: Students open a poorly formatted essay and revise the formatting so
that the essay becomes neater, more professional, more consistent, and more accessible to
a reader.

                        7th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Format

          Advanced                           Proficient                     Below Proficient
•   Essay looks neat on the         •   Essay looks neat on the        •    Essay looks
    page.                               page.                               cluttered.
•   Formatting is completely        •   Formatting is almost           •    Formatting
    consistent.                         completely consistent.              inconsistent enough
•   Headings are easy to            •   Headings are easy to                to be confusing.
    identify.                           identify.                      •    Headings are missing
•   Font is professional,           •   Font is mostly                      or confusing – it’s
    consistent, and legible.            professional, consistent,           difficult to find the
•   Format follows an                   and legible.                        author’s name, etc.
    established standard such       •   Only minor formatting          •    Format looks
    as MLA.                             changes are needed.                 unprofessional, is
                                    •   Margins and font size               inconsistent, and/or
                                        are not distracting or              is difficult to read.
                                        inappropriate.                 •    Margins and/or font
                                                                            size are way too big
                                                                            or way too small.
                                                                       •    Major formatting
                                                                            changes are needed.




W07_3.6.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.1 (8th Grade) Writing a thesis statement that identifies the focus or controlling idea
for the entire composition

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.6 (8th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g., dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, rubric, word processor)

GLE 3.1.1-3.4.3
Paragraph Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe your favorite family vacation. Include the following: Who is
going; what will you be doing; when will you go; and where, why, and how did you have
or will you have fun?

Or

Describe your favorite person. Include why you prefer this person above other choices.
Be sure to include all characteristics including: behavior, where the person lives, and how
he or she influences and treats you.




W08_3.1.1a       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.1 (7th Grade) Writing a thesis statement that identifies the focus or controlling idea
for the entire composition

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.6 (7th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g., dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, rubric, word processor)

GLE 3.1.1-3.4.3
Paragraph Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe your favorite family vacation. Include the following: Who is
going; what will you be doing; when will you go; and where, why, and how did you have
or will you have fun?

Or

Describe your favorite person. Include why you prefer this person above other choices.
Be sure to include all characteristics including: behavior, where the person lives, and how
he or she influences and treats you.

This paper will be scored for Word Choice and conventions.

                    8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Word Choice

Advanced                          Proficient                         Below Proficient
• Words are specific,             • Words are mostly correct         • Language is so vague,
accurate, striking.               and adequate but may lack          inaccurate, and/or general
• Language is natural, not        flair and color.                   that even the most general
overdone.                         • Familiar words and phrases       message does not come
• Verbs are lively.               are used to communicate.           through.
• Nouns and modifiers are         • Attempts at colorful             • Words are frequently used
precise.                          language are made but some         incorrectly, making the
• Clichés and jargon are used     may be overdone.                   message hard to decipher.
sparingly and only for effect.    • Clichés and jargon may be        • Problems with language
                                  used occasionally in place of      leave the reader unable to
                                  fresh language.                    understand what the writer is
                                                                     trying to say most of the time.

An expanded six-trait scoring guide is shown on the next page.




W08_3.1.1a Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                8th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric for Word Choice

          Advanced                             Proficient                     Below Proficient
6 Points                             4 Points                           3 Points
• Words are specific, accurate,      • Words are mostly correct and     • Words are mostly correct and
striking.                            adequate but may lack flair and    adequate with some lapses.
• Language is natural, not           color.                             • Familiar words and phrases
overdone.                            • Familiar words and phrases       communicate with some lapses.
• Verbs are lively.                  communicate.                       • Attempts at colorful language
• Nouns and modifiers are            • Attempts at colorful language    are rare or absent.
precise.                             are made but some may be           • Clichés and jargon may be used
• Clichés and jargon are used        overdone.                          as a crutch.
sparingly and only for effect.       • Clichés and jargon may be used
                                     occasionally in place of fresh     2 Points
5 Points                             language.                          • Language is so vague and
• Words are specific and accurate.                                      general that only the most general
• Lively verbs and picturesque                                          message comes through (e.g., It
words and phrases are                                                   was a fun time. We did lots of
occasionally used.                                                      neat stuff.).
• Language is natural, not                                              • Persistent redundancy distracts
overdone.                                                               the reader.
• Verbs are lively.                                                     • Words are often used
• Nouns and modifiers are                                               incorrectly, making the message
precise.                                                                hard to decipher.
• Clichés and jargon are used                                           • Clichés and jargon frequently
sparingly and only for effect.                                          serve as a crutch.
                                                                        • Problems with language leave
                                                                        the reader wondering what the
                                                                        writer is trying to say.

                                                                        1 Point
                                                                        • Language is so vague,
                                                                        inaccurate, and/or general that
                                                                        even the most general message
                                                                        does not come through.
                                                                        • Words are frequently used
                                                                        incorrectly, making the message
                                                                        hard to decipher.
                                                                        • Problems with language leave
                                                                        the reader unable to understand
                                                                        what the writer is trying to say
                                                                        most of the time.




W08_3.1.1a Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006     Page 3 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.2 (8th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.5 (8th Grade) Using appropriate voice for intended audience (e.g., humorous,
informal, formal, or technical)


Directions: Write a 2-3 paragraph essay about the best place to live in Alaska. Include
concrete details to prove your point. Be sure to have an introduction, body, and
conclusion.




W08_3.1.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.2 (8th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.5 (8th Grade) Using appropriate voice for intended audience (e.g., humorous,
informal, formal, or technical)


Directions: Write a 2-3 paragraph essay about the best place to live in Alaska. Include
concrete details to prove your point. Be sure to have an introduction, body, and
conclusion.

                          8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Voice

          Advanced                           Proficient                      Below Proficient
• Language is highly               • Writing communicates in          • It is hard to sense the
individual.                        an earnest, pleasing manner.       writer behind the words.
• Reader senses the person         • Voice is inconsistent: it        • The writer does not seem
behind the words; feels an         may emerge strongly, then          to reach out to an audience
interaction with the writer.       retreat behind general,            or to anticipate the reader’s
• Tone gives the writing           dispassionate language.            interests or questions.
flavor, adds interest.             • Writing hides as much of         • Writing may communicate
• Language is appropriate          the writer as it reveals.          on a functional level but
for purpose and audience.          • Writer seems aware of            does not move or involve
• Narrative writing seems          audience and purpose but           the reader.
honest, appealing, heartfelt.      often weighs words too             • Writer does not seem
• Expository or persuasive         carefully or discards              sufficiently at home with
writing reflects a strong          personal insights in favor of      the topic to take risks, share
commitment to the topic;           safe generalities.                 personal insights, or make
anticipates reader’s                                                  the topic/story personal and
questions, shows why the                                              real for the reader.
reader should care or want
to know more.

See an expanded six-trait scoring guide on the next page.




W08_3.1.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                         8th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide for Voice

          Advanced                            Proficient                       Below Proficient
6 Points                            4 Points                             3 Points
• Language is highly individual.    • Writing communicates in an         • Writing communicates but
• Reader senses the person behind   earnest, pleasing manner.            without much style or interest.
the words; feels an interaction     • Voice is inconsistent: it may      • Writing hides the writer; the
with the writer.                    emerge strongly, then retreat        reader has little or no sense of the
• Tone gives the writing flavor,    behind general, dispassionate        writer behind the words.
adds interest.                      language.                            • Writer shows some awareness
• Language is appropriate for       • Writing hides as much of the       of audience and/ or purpose but is
purpose and audience.               writer as it reveals.                inconsistent.
• Narrative writing seems honest,   • Writer seems aware of audience     • Writer speaks in a monotone.
appealing, heartfelt.               and purpose but often weighs
• Expository or persuasive          words too carefully or discards      2 Points
writing reflects a strong           personal insights in favor of safe   • It is hard to sense the writer
commitment to the topic;            generalities.                        behind the words.
anticipates reader’s questions,                                          • The writer does not seem to
shows why the reader should care                                         reach out to an audience or to
or want to know more.                                                    anticipate the reader’s interests or
                                                                         questions.
5 Points                                                                 • Writing may communicate on a
• Reader senses the person behind                                        functional level but does not
the words.                                                               move or involve the reader.
• There are occasional moments                                           • Writer does not seem
that surprise, amuse, or move the                                        sufficiently at home with the
reader.                                                                  topic to take risks, share personal
• Tone gives the writing flavor,                                         insights, or make the topic/story
adds interest.                                                           personal and real for the reader
• Language is appropriate for
purpose and audience.                                                    1 Point
• Narrative writing seems honest,                                        • The writer seems unaware of an
appealing, heartfelt.                                                    audience or reader; writing seems
• Expository or persuasive                                               “painful” to the writer.
writing reflects a strong                                                • Writing may not communicate
commitment to the topic.                                                 on a functional level.
                                                                         • Writer seems uncomfortable
                                                                         with the topic.




W08_3.1.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006          Page 3 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.2 (8th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.1.3 (8th Grade) Organizing ideas using appropriate structures (e.g., order by
chronology, importance, comparison and contrast, classification and definition) to
maintain the unity of the composition with a variety of transitional words and phrases


3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.



Directions: You are stranded in a library or book store for 24 hours. In what section do
you spend the most time and why? Be sure to have an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Or

You are going to be on a new reality TV show. Describe the show and your role. Be sure
to have an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Or, see item bank

This piece of writing will be 3-5 paragraphs.




W08_3.1.2a      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.2 (8th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.1.3 (8th Grade) Organizing ideas using appropriate structures (e.g., order by
chronology, importance, comparison and contrast, classification and definition) to
maintain the unity of the composition with a variety of transitional words and phrases


3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.



Directions: You are stranded in a library or book store for 24 hours. In what section do
you spend the most time and why? Be sure to have an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Or

You are going to be on a new reality TV show. Describe the show and your role. Be sure
to have an introduction, body, and conclusion.
Or, see item bank.

This piece of writing will be 3-5 paragraphs.

                    8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Ideas and Content

           Advanced                              Proficient                       Below Proficient
• Ideas are fresh, original, and/or    • Topic and direction are evident,   • Topic and direction are evident,
insightful.                            but more information is needed to    but writer may digress and go in a
• Ideas are based on the writer’s      “fill in the blanks.”                different direction or introduce a
knowledge and/ or experience.          • Ideas draw on knowledge and/or     different topic.
• Details are relevant, telling, and   experience but may not move          • Ideas may not draw on
contribute to the whole.               beyond general observations to       knowledge and/or experience;
• Content goes beyond the              specifics.                           may be general observations.
obvious or predictable.                • Details are reasonably clear but   • Details are reasonably clear but
• Topic makes a point or tells a       may not be detailed, personalized,   may not be detailed, personalized,
story.                                 or expanded.                         or expanded.
                                       • Supporting details are present     • Supporting details are present
                                       but may not “flesh out” the main     but may not “flesh out” the main
                                       point or story line.                 point or story line or may be
                                       • Original ideas may be blended      irrelevant to it.
                                       with ones that are more obvious      • Original ideas are rare or absent
                                       or predictable.

See the next page for an expanded six-trait scoring guide.


W08_3.1.2a Answer Key     Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 2 of 3
             8th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric for Ideas and Content

           Advanced                              Proficient                       Below Proficient
6 Points                               4 Points                             3 Points
• Ideas are fresh, original, and/or    • Topic and direction are evident,   • Topic and direction are evident,
insightful.                            but more information is needed to    but writer may digress and go in a
• Ideas are based on the writer’s      “fill in the blanks.”                different direction or introduce a
knowledge and/ or experience.          • Ideas draw on knowledge and/or     different topic.
• Details are relevant, telling, and   experience but may not move          • Ideas may not draw on
contribute to the whole.               beyond general observations to       knowledge and/or experience;
• Content goes beyond the              specifics.                           may be general observations.
obvious or predictable.                • Details are reasonably clear but   • Details are reasonably clear but
• Topic makes a point or tells a       may not be detailed, personalized,   may not be detailed, personalized,
story.                                 or expanded.                         or expanded.
                                       • Supporting details are present     • Supporting details are present
5 Points                               but may not “flesh out” the main     but may not “flesh out” the main
• Ideas are based on the writer’s      point or story line.                 point or story line or may be
knowledge and/ or experience.          • Original ideas may be blended      irrelevant to it.
• Details are relevant, telling, and   with ones that are more obvious      • Original ideas are rare or absent.
contribute to the whole.               or predictable.
• Topic makes a point or tells a                                            2 Points
story.                                                                      • Topic and direction are not
• Some ideas are fresh and                                                  evident; the writer has not
original.                                                                   defined the topic in a meaningful,
                                                                            personal way.
                                                                            • Information is very limited or
                                                                            unclear.
                                                                            • Text may be repetitious or read
                                                                            like a collection of disconnected,
                                                                            random thoughts.
                                                                            • The writer does not distinguish
                                                                            the main ideas or critical points
                                                                            from the supporting details or less
                                                                            critical points.

                                                                            1 Point
                                                                            • Topic and direction are missing.
                                                                            • Information is very limited or
                                                                            unclear.
                                                                            • Text may be repetitious, or may
                                                                            read like a collection of
                                                                            disconnected, random thoughts.




W08_3.1.2a Answer Key     Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 3 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.2 (8th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.1.3 (8th Grade) Organizing ideas using appropriate structures (e.g., order by
chronology, importance, comparison and contrast, classification and definition) to
maintain the unity of the composition with a variety of transitional words and phrases

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.


Directions: Write an essay: Who would you have liked to have been in a past life and
who would you have hated to have been? Write a scene with dialogue between these two.
Be sure you have an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Or

Write a essay on how to do something or how to teach someone to do something. For
example: making a beaded necklace, washing a car, making a Power Point presentation,
developing film, babysitting.
Or see item bank.

This piece of writing will be 3-5 paragraphs.




W08_3.1.2b      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.2 (8th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.1.3 (8th Grade) Organizing ideas using appropriate structures (e.g., order by
chronology, importance, comparison and contrast, classification and definition) to
maintain the unity of the composition with a variety of transitional words and phrases

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.


Directions: Write an essay: Who would you have liked to have been in a past life and
who would you have hated to have been? Write a scene with dialogue between these two.
Be sure you have an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Or

Write a essay on how to do something or how to teach someone to do something. For
example: making a beaded necklace, washing a car, making a Power Point presentation,
developing film, babysitting.
Or see item bank.

This piece of writing will be 3-5 paragraphs.

                      8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

          Advanced                            Proficient                       Below Proficient
• Sequencing of ideas and details   • Writing communicates in an         • Sequencing needs work.
is logical and effective.           earnest, pleasing manner.            • There is no real lead or
• Introduction is inviting—draws    • Voice is inconsistent: it may      introduction to set up what
in the reader.                      emerge strongly, then retreat        follows.
• Conclusion is satisfying—         behind general, dispassionate        • Conclusion is missing or does
leaves reader with a sense of       language.                            not wrap things up.
resolution.                         • Writing hides as much of the       • Transitions seldom work well,
• Transitions are thoughtful;       writer as it reveals.                with many connections between
clearly show how ideas connect.     • Writer seems aware of audience     ideas unclear.
• Organization flows smoothly,      and purpose but often weighs         • Pacing feels awkward; writer
seems effortless.                   words too carefully or discards      slows when the reader wants to
                                    personal insights in favor of safe   move on, and vice versa.
                                    generalities.                        • Problems with organization
                                                                         make it hard to grasp the main
                                                                         point or story line.

See the next page for an expanded six-trait scoring guide.



W08_3.1.2b Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 2 of 4
                8th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

          Advanced                            Proficient                      Below Proficient
6 Points                            4 Points                            3 Points
• Sequencing of ideas and details   • Sequencing of ideas and details   • Sequencing is usually logical
is logical and effective.           is logical and effective.           but there may be lapses or
• Introduction is inviting—draws    • Introduction is inviting—draws    digressions.
in the reader.                      in the reader.                      • There may be an attempt to
• Conclusion is satisfying—         • Conclusion is satisfying—         write an introduction or
leaves reader with a sense of       leaves reader with a sense of       conclusion but it may not be
resolution.                         resolution.                         clearly recognizable as such; a
• Transitions are thoughtful;       • Transitions are thoughtful;       conclusion, in particular, may be
clearly show how ideas connect.     clearly show how ideas connect.     absent.
• Organization flows smoothly,      • Organization usually flows        • Transitions attempted but do not
seems effortless.                   smoothly                            work well; connections between
                                                                        ideas may be unclear.
5 Points                                                                • There are frequent lapses in
• Sequencing of ideas and details                                       pacing.
is logical and effective.                                               • There is an attempt at
• Introduction is inviting—draws                                        organization but it may depart
in the reader.                                                          from supporting the main point or
• Conclusion is satisfying—                                             story line.
leaves reader with a sense of
resolution.                                                             2 Points
• Transitions are thoughtful;                                           • Sequencing needs work.
clearly show how ideas connect.                                         • There is no real lead or
• Organization usually flows                                            introduction to set up what
smoothly.                                                               follows.
                                                                        • Conclusion is missing or does
                                                                        not wrap things up.
                                                                        • Transitions seldom work well,
                                                                        with many connections between
                                                                        ideas unclear.
                                                                        • Pacing feels awkward; writer
                                                                        slows when the reader wants to
                                                                        move on, and vice versa.
                                                                        • Problems with organization
                                                                        make it hard to grasp the main
                                                                        point or story line.

                                                                        1 Point
                                                                        • Sequencing is absent.
                                                                        • There is no introduction or
                                                                        conclusion.
                                                                        • Transitions are absent.
                                                                        • Organization is absent; writing
                                                                        may be a brief list.




W08_3.1.2b Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 3 of 4
                     8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions

          Advanced                          Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Paragraphing reinforces         • Paragraphing is attempted        • Paragraphing is attempted
the organizational structure.     but some paragraphs run            but many paragraphs run
• Grammar and usage are           together or begin in the           together or begin in the
correct (few, if any, errors)     wrong place.                       wrong place.
and contribute to clarity and     • Problems with grammar or         • Problems with grammar or
style.                            usage are not serious              usage may be serious
• Punctuation is accurate         enough to impede or distort        enough to impede or distort
(few, if any, errors) and         meaning.                           meaning in some instances
guides the reader through         • End punctuation usually          but not overall.
the text.                         correct; internal punctuation      • Terminal punctuation is
• Spelling is generally           sometimes missing or               usually correct; internal
correct, even of more             incorrect.                         punctuation is sometimes
difficult words.                  • Spelling is usually correct      missing or incorrect and
• The writer may                  or reasonably plausible on         errors may impede or distort
manipulate conventions for        common words;                      meaning in some instances.
stylistic effect.                 misspellings do not impede         • Spelling errors may
                                  communication.                     impede or distort meaning
                                                                     in some instances but not
                                                                     overall.




W08_3.1.2b Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.3 (8th Grade) Organizing ideas using appropriate structures (e.g., order by
chronology, importance, comparison and contrast, classification and definition) to
maintain the unity of the composition with a variety of transitional words and phrases


Directions: Write a paragraph with a topic sentence on how to do one of the following:
create a Power Point slide show, wash a car, fix something on a snowmobile, skin and gut
a moose, or smoke or cook fish, moose, or whale. Explain how to do this activity or job
chonologically (step by step).




W08_3.1.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 5
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.3 (8th Grade) Organizing ideas using appropriate structures (e.g., order by
chronology, importance, comparison and contrast, classification and definition) to
maintain the unity of the composition with a variety of transitional words and phrases


Directions: Write a paragraph with a topic sentence on how to do one of the following:
create a Power Point slide show, wash a car, fix something on a snowmobile, skin and gut
a moose, or smoke or cook fish, moose, or whale. Explain how to do this activity or job
chonologically (step by step).

Proficient Response:

              How to Use an Apple Computer and iPhoto to Print Pictures

Digital photography is very gratifying because it is fast and immediately rewarding. You
can take a photo and print it within two minutes.

Printing photographs using an up-to-date Apple computer and the iPhoto photo
management system is a relatively trouble-free process, thanks to the Apple Company’s
having pre-loaded their computers with all the programs an amateur photographer will
need.

Photographs may be printed using the following steps:

1. Begin with your computer turned on, and your camera and printer turned off.
   Assuming that you have pictures stored in your camera that you wish to transfer to
   your computer, use the USB cord that came with your camera to attach the camera to
   the computer. One end will have a USB slot, which plugs into the left side of your
   computer. The other end of the cord will have a little odd semi-pyramid-shaped
   connection that plugs into your camera (you will have to find and unlatch the
   protective cover for this connection).
2. Now that your camera is connected to your computer, turn the camera on. This will
   cause your computer to automatically start the iPhoto program, and prepare to
   download pictures. The computer calls this process “importing” and a question will
   appear on your screen asking if you wish to import photos. Click on yes and the
   computer will automatically import all the photos in your camera. (There is a small
   box that reads, “Delete photos as you import.” Clicking on this box will allow iPhoto
   to delete the photos from your camera as you download them.)
3. After your photos are downloaded, click and drag the camera icon from your desktop
   to the trash (which will show as an eject button). Then unplug your camera and put it
   and the cord aside. You are now ready to begin the printing process.




W08_3.1.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 5
4. Attach your printer to the computer using the USB connecter cord that came with the
   printer. (We are assuming that your printer already has its driver entered into the
   computer). Now turn the printer on and place photo-paper (either glossy or semi-
   glossy) into the paper tray with the side you wish to print on being face down.
5. Your computer screen will be showing the iPhoto Gallery with your recently
   imported pictures at the bottom of the gallery. Select one that you want to take a
   closer look at and double-click on it. This will put this photo into edit mode, and it
   will appear by itself as a larger image on your screen. At this point you can crop the
   picture (resize), enhance it, reduce red eye, or tweak it in other ways.
6. When you are ready to print, go to the file drop-down menu and click on print. A box
   will appear on your screen that gives you several options in printing. Use the style
   menu to choose which size prints you want, from full page to contact sheet size. Once
   you have selected the size you wish, click on the little blue button that says “print”
   and you will be rewarded with photo lab quality prints of your pictures.

    Place your photos in your album or frame, because you are now ready to go on your
    next printing adventure.

                       8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization
          Advanced                            Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Sequencing of ideas and           • Sequencing of ideas and          • Sequencing needs work.
details is logical and              details is logical and             • There is no real lead or
effective.                          effective.                         introduction to set up what
• Introduction is inviting—         • Introduction is inviting—        follows.
draws in the reader.                draws in the reader.               • Conclusion is missing or
• Conclusion is satisfying—         • Conclusion is satisfying—        does not wrap things up.
leaves reader with a sense          leaves reader with a sense         • Transitions seldom work
of resolution.                      of resolution.                     well, with many
• Transitions are thoughtful;       • Transitions are thoughtful;      connections between ideas
clearly show how ideas              clearly show how ideas             unclear.
connect.                            connect.                           • Pacing feels awkward;
• Organization flows                • Organization usually             writer slows when the
smoothly, seems effortless.         flows smoothly.                    reader wants to move on,
                                                                       and vice versa.
                                                                       • Problems with
                                                                       organization make it hard to
                                                                       grasp the main point or
                                                                       story line.

See the next page for an expanded six-trait scoring guide.




W08_3.1.3 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 5
                8th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

          Advanced                            Proficient                      Below Proficient
6 Points                            4 Points                            3 Points
• Sequencing of ideas and details   • Sequencing of ideas and details   • Sequencing is usually logical
is logical and effective.           is logical and effective.           but there may be lapses or
• Introduction is inviting—draws    • Introduction is inviting—draws    digressions.
in the reader.                      in the reader.                      • There may be an attempt to
• Conclusion is satisfying—         • Conclusion is satisfying—         write an introduction or
leaves reader with a sense of       leaves reader with a sense of       conclusion but it may not be
resolution.                         resolution.                         clearly recognizable as such; a
• Transitions are thoughtful;       • Transitions are thoughtful;       conclusion, in particular, may be
clearly show how ideas connect.     clearly show how ideas connect.     absent.
• Organization flows smoothly,      • Organization usually flows        • Transitions attempted but do not
seems effortless.                   smoothly                            work well; connections between
                                                                        ideas may be unclear.
5 Points                                                                • There are frequent lapses in
• Sequencing of ideas and details                                       pacing.
is logical and effective.                                               • There is an attempt at
• Introduction is inviting—draws                                        organization but it may depart
in the reader.                                                          from supporting the main point or
• Conclusion is satisfying—                                             story line.
leaves reader with a sense of
resolution.                                                             2 Points
• Transitions are thoughtful;                                           • Sequencing needs work.
clearly show how ideas connect.                                         • There is no real lead or
• Organization usually flows                                            introduction to set up what
smoothly.                                                               follows.
                                                                        • Conclusion is missing or does
                                                                        not wrap things up.
                                                                        • Transitions seldom work well,
                                                                        with many connections between
                                                                        ideas unclear.
                                                                        • Pacing feels awkward; writer
                                                                        slows when the reader wants to
                                                                        move on, and vice versa.
                                                                        • Problems with organization
                                                                        make it hard to grasp the main
                                                                        point or story line.

                                                                        1 Point
                                                                        • Sequencing is absent.
                                                                        • There is no introduction or
                                                                        conclusion.
                                                                        • Transitions are absent.
                                                                        • Organization is absent; writing
                                                                        may be a brief list.


                       See the next page for an additional scoring guide.




W08_3.1.3 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006       Page 4 of 5
                       8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions

          Advanced                             Proficient                       Below Proficient
• Paragraphing reinforces the        • Paragraphing is attempted but      • Paragraphing is attempted but
organizational structure.            some paragraphs run together or      many paragraphs run together or
• Grammar and usage are correct      begin in the wrong place.            begin in the wrong place.
(few, if any, errors) and            • Problems with grammar or           • Problems with grammar or
contribute to clarity and style.     usage are not serious enough to      usage may be serious enough to
• Punctuation is accurate (few, if   impede or distort meaning.           impede or distort meaning in
any, errors) and guides the reader   • End punctuation usually correct;   some instances but not overall.
through the text.                    internal punctuation sometimes       • Terminal punctuation is usually
• Spelling is generally correct,     missing or incorrect.                correct; internal punctuation is
even of more difficult words.        • Spelling is usually correct or     sometimes missing or incorrect
• The writer may manipulate          reasonably plausible on common       and errors may impede or distort
conventions for stylistic effect.    words; misspellings do not           meaning in some instances.
                                     impede communication.                • Spelling errors may impede or
                                                                          distort meaning in some instances
                                                                          but not overall.




W08_3.1.3 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 5 of 5
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.4 (8th Grade) Writing a concluding paragraph (e.g., restating the thesis and
summarizing the main point)


Directions: Write a concluding paragraph for the following short essay.

Have you ever been amazed at the many unique types of birds that exist in the United
States? Some have red heads and peck holes in trees, some migrate from Mexico to
Alaska every year, and some swallow fish whole. Alaska has one of the most unique
birds on earth. The capped chickadee in Alaska survives by losing 10 percent of its body
weight every night.

Most birds in Alaska migrate south to avoid the cold and find food; however, the black-
capped chickadee stays and survives the cold weather of interior Alaska. It survives
winter nights that have 50-60 degree below zero temperatures.

The chickadee survives by stuffing itself with seeds, grubs, and insects of any kind it can
find. It gains up to 30 percent its body weight each day then finds a chink or hole in tree
bark and climbs inside, hunkers down, and shivers all night long. It burns off all the body
weight that it gained during the day.




W08_3.1.4       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.1.4 (8th Grade) Writing a concluding paragraph (e.g., restating the thesis and
summarizing the main point)


Directions: Write a concluding paragraph for the following short essay.

Have you ever been amazed at the many unique types of birds that exist in the United
States? Some have red heads and peck holes in trees, some migrate from Mexico to
Alaska every year, and some swallow fish whole. Alaska has one of the most unique
birds on earth. The capped chickadee in Alaska survives by losing 10 percent of its body
weight every night.

Most birds in Alaska migrate south to avoid the cold and find food; however, the black-
capped chickadee stays and survives the cold weather of interior Alaska. It survives
winter nights that have 50-60 degree below zero temperatures.

The chickadee survives by stuffing itself with seeds, grubs, and insects of any kind it can
find. It gains up to 30 percent its body weight each day then finds a chink or hole in tree
bark and climbs inside, hunkers down, and shivers all night long. It burns off all the body
weight that it gained during the day.


Proficient Response:
We call this the chickadee diet.

Advanced Response:
The advanced conclusion might have up to 40 words to complete this essay.




W08_3.1.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.1 (8th Grade) Writing a narrative using setting and character to advance the plot


Directions: Write a short story, 4-6 pages typed (fiction). You have just won a date with
a celebrity of your choice. Explain what happened on the date. Where did you go and
what did you do on this date? Explain why you would pick this person and be sure to
develop the main character in your story. (You must have the following elements in your
story.)

This is a great checklist to give to the students to guide their writing.

Writing a Short Story check sheet Name __________________________

______         Description of Place (Setting)
               ______ Looks like (colors, specific types of trees, etc.)
               ______ Smells like
               ______ Sounds like
               ______ Feels like
______         Characterization (1) round as opposed to flat
               ______ Color of hair
               ______ Personality type (in actions and words)
               ______ Movements
               ______ Voice and type of words that character would use.
______         Characterization (static or dynamic)
               Name of character ______________________
               type    _____________________
               _______indirect characterization (showing)
               _______ direct characterization (not telling)
______         Dialogue
               ______ Variety of Speaker tags…not just said
               ______ Interspersed throughout story




W08_3.2.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
______      Point of View (which person did you write in and stick with it?)
            ______ 1st
            ______ 3rd limited
            ______ 3rd omniscient
______
______      3-5 pages ( font sized 12 or 10)
______      Double spaced
______      Typed
______      Correctness of conventions
______      Plot diagram
______      Exposition
______      Rising action
______      Climax
______      Falling action
______      Denouement




W08_3.2.1    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.2 (8th Grade) Writing in a variety of nonfiction forms (e.g., letter, report, and/or
autobiography) to inform or describe


Directions: Read the following prompt. Write an effective business letter using correct
formatting, style, and tone. Use a separate sheet of paper for your letter.

Writing a Business Letter

Prompt: You are in charge of finding a speaker for a local community club during
“Celebrity Week.” It is your job as speaker-committee chairperson to find a person who
will impress your audience, make them laugh, “wow” them. You just learned that Wild
Bill Hickock’s Wild West Show will be in the neighboring city the week of your June 11,
2006 program. His agent, Bob Sam Rayburn, who works at “Bob Sam’s Promotions” of
2225 Nature Drive in Tuscaloosa, Oklahoma, 55563, books all of Wild Bill’s
appearances. It costs $25,000 to get a performance, but you have only a budget of
$12,500. Write to Bob Sam and try to book appearances and attempt a bargain.




W08_3.2.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.2 (8th Grade) Writing in a variety of nonfiction forms (e.g., letter, report, and/or
autobiography) to inform or describe


Directions: Read the following prompt. Write an effective business letter using correct
formatting, style, and tone. Use a separate sheet of paper for your letter.

Writing a Business Letter

Prompt: You are in charge of finding a speaker for a local community club during
“Celebrity Week.” It is your job as speaker-committee chairperson to find a person who
will impress your audience, make them laugh, “wow” them. You just learned that Wild
Bill Hickock’s Wild West Show will be in the neighboring city the week of your June 11,
2006 program. His agent, Bob Sam Rayburn, who works at “Bob Sam’s Promotions” of
2225 Nature Drive in Tuscaloosa, Oklahoma, 55563, books all of Wild Bill’s
appearances. It costs $25,000 to get a performance, but you have only a budget of
$12,500. Write to Bob Sam and try to book appearances and attempt a bargain.




W08_3.2.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
Proficient Response:
Box 23158
Ketchikan, Alaska 99901
November 12, 2005

Bob Sam’s Promotions
2225 Nature Drive
Tuscaloosa, Oklahoma 55563
Re: Wild Bill Hickock’s Wild West Show

Dear Mr. Sam:

         I am the speaker-committee chairperson in charge of locating a speaker for a local community
club during “Celebrity Week.” We need a person who will impress our audience, make them laugh, “wow
them.” I noticed that the Wild Bill Hickock’s Wild West Show is going to be appearing in Juneau, a
neighboring city, next June, the same week as our needs. I realize that your costs are $25,000, but we only
have $12,500 in our budget for this venue. Since you already have to go to Juneau and have to stop in
Ketchikan anyway, what would you think of spending the night and performing for $12,500? We have
people in Ketchikan who have never seen a western show and would be excited to see your operation.

         We also have whale, reindeer, and eagle watching; fishing, kayaking, and yachting to offer you for
free. That might make up for some of the money you might not make. You know…like the benefits of
being on the road?

          Please consider coming to Ketchikan and entertaining our people and giving them the opportunity
to see the real Wild West. We will in turn share the “Last Frontier” with you.

        Thank you for your time and consideration and please let us book you that same week as Juneau’s
performance.

Respectfully,

Rosie Smith
Rosie Smith
Speaker-committee Chairperson

2 points for the each of the following formatting and writing criteria:
_____Proper Heading
_____Inside Address
_____Return Address
_____All information in body
_____Complimentary closing
_____Salutation
_____Correct Punctuation
_____Good Tone
_____Extra points for extremely polite and beyond expectations

Total ______________

Grade Scale
18 points for Advanced
16 points for Proficient
12 points for Below proficient
10 points for Far below proficient



W08_3.2.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006         Page 3 of 3
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.3 (8th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing expressively
when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective
essays, and/or newsletters)


Directions: Select one of the items and follow instructions.

Sample writing prompts/assignments

    A. Read a piece of literature. After each chapter (or scene, or section), write a
       paragraph or more in your journal describing your personal reaction to what you
       have just read.
       Sample questions:
           • How do you differ from the main character? In what way or ways are you
               similar?
           • Do you agree or disagree with the main character’s decision in this chapter
               (or scene, or section)? Why or why not?
           • What could the main character have done differently to change the
               outcome of the situation?
           • Have you ever found yourself with a similar problem? Describe how you
               resolved the problem, or, if you have not had this problem, how you would
               advise a friend to solve this problem.
    B. Read a book of your choice. When you are finished, compose a rhyming poem at
       least 16 lines in length that will present the main ideas of the book to your
       classmates.
    C. Think about problems you see in your society or your school. Compose a letter to
       the editor that expresses your thoughts on this problem.
    D. Write 10 haiku that will give a reader 10 clear mental pictures of life in the region
       where you live.
    E. What have been the highlights of this school year so far? Choose one highlight,
       and write a description of it to be read by parents in our newsletter. Make sure
       you explain what was noteworthy about the highlight you chose.




W08_3.2.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.3 (8th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing expressively
when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective
essays, and/or newsletters)


Directions: Select one of the items and follow instructions.

Sample writing prompts/assignments

    F. Read a piece of literature. After each chapter (or scene, or section), write a
        paragraph or more in your journal describing your personal reaction to what you
        have just read.
        Sample questions:
            • How do you differ from the main character? In what way or ways are you
                similar?
            • Do you agree or disagree with the main character’s decision in this chapter
                (or scene, or section)? Why or why not?
            • What could the main character have done differently to change the
                outcome of the situation?
            • Have you ever found yourself with a similar problem? Describe how you
                resolved the problem, or, if you have not had this problem, how you would
                advise a friend to solve this problem.
    G. Read a book of your choice. When you are finished, compose a rhyming poem at
        least 16 lines in length that will present the main ideas of the book to your
        classmates.
    H. Think about problems you see in your society or your school. Compose a letter to
        the editor that expresses your thoughts on this problem.
    I. Write 10 haiku that will give a reader 10 clear mental pictures of life in the region
        where you live.
What have been the highlights of this school year so far? Choose one highlight, and write
a description of it to be read by parents in our newsletter. Make sure you explain what
was noteworthy about the highlight you chose.

See the next page for scoring guides.




W08_3.2.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
              7th and 8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Journal Entries

          Advanced                            Proficient                       Below Proficient
• All parts of the question         • All parts of the question        • Question not addressed or not
  are thoroughly addressed.           are addressed.                     fully addressed.
• Writer’s unique                   • Writer’s unique                  • Writer’s unique perspective is
  perspective is expressed            perspective is expressed           expressed, but is not clear.
  clearly.                            and is clear.                    • Main points are attempted,
• Writer’s main points are          • Main points are clear.             but necessary detail is not
  very clear.                       • Detail sufficient to provide       present.
• Detail gives a clear and            basic understanding of           • Response does not express the
  thorough understanding of           main points.                       writer’s feelings on the issue.
  the writer’s main points.         • Writer’s voice is                • Writer’s voice is generic or
• Writer’s voice is                   appropriate but does not           inappropriate.
  appropriate and consistent          enhance the meaning or
  and helps to convey the             mood of the response.
  meaning and mood of the
  response.


             9th and 10th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Journal Entries

           Advanced                           Proficient                        Below Proficient
•   All parts of the question       •   All parts of the question       •   Question not addressed or
    are thoroughly addressed.           are addressed.                      not fully addressed.
•   Writer’s unique                 •   Writer’s unique                 •   Writer’s unique perspective
    perspective is expressed            perspective is expressed            is expressed, but is not
    clearly.                            and is clear.                       clear.
•   Writer’s main points are        •   Main points are clear.          •   Main points are attempted,
    exceptionally clear.            •   Detail sufficient to                but necessary detail is not
•   Extensive detail gives a            provide thorough                    present.
    clear and thorough                  understanding of main           •   Response does not express
    understanding of the                points.                             the writer’s feelings on the
    writer’s main points.           •   Writer’s voice is                   issue.
•   Writer’s voice is                   appropriate but does not        •   Writer’s voice is generic or
     appropriate and                    always enhance the                  inappropriate.
     consistent and helps to            meaning or mood of the
     convey the meaning and             response.
     mood of the response.




W08_3.2.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.3 (8th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing expressively
when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective
essays, and/or newsletters)


Directions: Write a reflective essay in response to a book you have read. Your essay will
be graded on the following criteria.

Here is a handout to help guide your students while they analyze the content in their
outside reading book. Copy and paste into your own document.

Book Analysis Check Sheet                 Student Name________________

______ Present tense
______ Organization
______ Ideas and Content
______ Conventions (spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, grammar)
_______Heading:              Left side     _______Student Name
                                     _______ English
                                     _______ 20 November 2001
                                     _______ Book analysis
Introduction:
______ Book title w/ author’s name
______ Short summary of book (2-3 sentences)
______ Thesis statement (mentions what is in body paragraphs)

Body Paragraphs:
Paragraph #2:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______(2) Concrete Detail
______Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence

Paragraph #3:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete Detail


W08_3.2.3a       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence

Paragraph #4:
______ 100+ words
______ 8 sentences minimum
______ Topic Sentence
______ (2) Concrete Detail
______ Quotes (2 or 3)
______ Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______ Concluding or transitional sentence

Conclusion:
Paragraph #5:
______ Starts out specific, becomes general
______ 40+ words, all commentary (cm) no new information or quotes
______ Repeat thesis...No repeats of key words
______ Give opinion of book and recommendations



You may use part of or all of the components in the rubric below to score your students’
papers. See rubric on next page.




W08_3.2.3a      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                      8th Grade Expository Essay Scoring Guide/Rubric
                          Advanced            Proficient        Below Proficient
                • Introductory paragraph • Introductory paragraph                • Introductory paragraph
                  is engaging, clear and     is clear and narrows the              is evident but fails to
Main Idea:        narrows the topic.         topic.                                narrow the topic.
Introductory    • Thesis statement clearly • Thesis statement                    • Thesis statement is
Paragraph &       previews the body and      previews the body and                 evident but is confusing
Thesis Statement the sequencing of the       sequence of the essay.                and/or doesn’t preview
                  essay.                                                           the body and sequence
                                                                                   of the essay.
                  • Each body paragraph           • Each body paragraph      • Supporting details are
                    contains one main point         contains one main point    accurate and relevant but
Main Idea:          previewed by the thesis.        previewed by the thesis    lack thoroughness.
Body                Supporting details are          statement. Supporting    • Assertions are
Paragraphs &        convincing, thorough,           details are thorough,      sometimes supported by
Supporting          accurate and relevant.          accurate and relevant.     appropriate evidence.
Details           • Assertions are authentic      • Assertions are supported
                    and supported by                by appropriate evidence.
                    appropriate evidence.
                  • Purposeful, effective         • Obvious, adequate         • Some lack of or misuse
                    transitions make links          transitions make links      of transitions causes
Organization:
                    between paragraphs and          between paragraphs and      confusion.
Transitions
                    supporting details very         supporting details clear
                    clear and smooth.               and smooth.
                  • Concluding paragraph          • Concluding paragraph      • Concluding paragraph
                    brings a natural sense of       adequately ends essay. It   abruptly ends the essay –
Organization:
                    resolution to the essay. It     reinforces and supports     it simply restates the
Concluding
                    reinforces and supports         the thesis statement and    thesis statement and the
Paragraph
                    the thesis statement and        the main points from the    main points or is
                    the main points from the        essay.                      contrived.
                    essay.
                  • Variety in types, length,     • Some variety in type,      • Many sentences begin
                    and beginnings of               length and beginning of      the same way and follow
                    sentences make essay            sentences.                   the same pattern with
                    read smoothly – sound         • Most sentences read          little variety.
                    has been considered as          smoothly – meaning is      • Phrasing does not sound
Sentence Style      well as meaning.                clear with very few stiff,   natural.
                  • The sentences build             awkward or choppy          • Sometimes the reader
                    upon each other to make         sentences.                   has to reread for
                    sense for the reader.         • Fragments are used only      meaning.
                  • Fragments are used only         for style or effect.       • Essay may contain many
                    for style or effect.                                         fragments.
                  • Grammar, usage,               • Problems with grammar, • Problems with grammar,
                    spelling, and punctuation       usage, or spelling are not   usage, or spelling are
                    are correct with few, if        enough to affect             serious enough to
                    any, errors.                    meaning.                     sometimes affect
                  • Conventions may be            • End punctuation is           meaning.
Conventions
                    manipulated for stylistic       correct. Internal          • End punctuation is
                    effect.                         punctuation is               correct. Internal
                                                    sometimes missing or         punctuation is missing or
                                                    incorrect.                   incorrect and may
                                                                                 impact meaning.




 W08_3.2.3a         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006                 Page 3 of 3
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.4 (8th Grade) Using research-based information and analysis in research projects or
extended reports


Prompt: Write an essay about a water mammal found here in Alaska. Be sure to have a
well-developed introduction, body, and conclusion. Be sure to document your sources.
You may use MLA or APA format.




W08_3.2.4       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

3.2.4 (8th Grade) Using research-based information and analysis in research projects or
extended reports


Prompt: Write an essay about a water mammal found here in Alaska. Be sure to have a
well-developed introduction, body, and conclusion. Be sure to document your sources.
You may use MLA or APA format.

Proficient Response:
                                               Moose

Moose are water mammals because
they eat water plants and live around
lakes, rivers, streams, and ponds. In
Athabascan their name is deniigi.

Moose (Scientific name—Alces alces)
are the biggest member of the deer
family. They can be as much as six and
one-half feet tall and weigh as much as
1,600 pounds. They have big noses and
large heads and are brownish-black in
color.

Moose live in evergreen forests in the
northern latitudes. They can live to be
15-20 years old, but their average
lifespan is 5-6 years because of cold
winters and predators. They have very
poor eyesight, but good hearing and a
good sense of smell.

Bull moose antlers are enormous, being
as wide as 70+ inches and weighing up
to 50 pounds. New antlers start growing
in April and are covered in velvet,
which is shed by late September. Bulls
polish their antlers by whacking them
against bushes and small trees. After
mating season the bulls shed their antlers in December and January.




W08_3.2.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
Male and female moose find each other during mating season, mid-September to late
October, by scent and by calling back and forth to one another. Bulls threaten each other
or even fight to get cows. Fights do not last long because interlocked horns or a long fight
would lead to death. Winners stay with the cow they fought over for a week or so and
then move on.

Both bulls and cows first breed at about two-and-a-half years of age. Eight months after
breeding season, one or two calves are born about the end of May. They can stand within
24 hours and swim in about two weeks. The calves are weaned at six months, but stay
with their mother until they are a year old. Cows are very protective of their young, but
drive them away after a year to make room for new calves.

Moose have long legs that allow them to run up to 35 miles per hour and wade in streams
and ponds to eat aquatic plants. They eat from 40 to 130 pounds of wet food a day,
including water lilies, pond weeds, and horsetails. A moose’s nose structure allows them
to close their nostrils so they can stick their heads underwater for up to one minute. They
also eat ferns, leaves, and grass. When ponds and streams are frozen, moose browse on
twigs from aspen, poplar, birch, and willow. In fact, moose means “eater of twigs” in
Algonquin.

                                             In addition to being able to run 35 miles
                                             per hour, moose can swim up to 6 miles
                                             per hour for two hours. This is another
                                             reason they live near water, since it helps
                                             them escape from their major predators,
                                             wolves and bears. Black bears, grizzly
                                             bears, and wolves can bring down a full
                                             grown moose, but they are most
                                             dangerous to calves. In some areas bears
                                             kill and eat up to 75% of newborn calves.
                                             Moose are hunted throughout most of
                                             their range and are a favorite food of
subsistence hunters in Canada and Alaska. Overall, however, their numbers are high and
they are not an endangered species.

One of the greatest dangers to moose populations is a combination of severe winters and
tick infestations, which can reduce moose numbers by up to 50%. Ticks irritate the
moose’s skin, causing it to rub off part of the hair they need for protection from extreme
winter cold. The moose then use up all their energy fighting the cold and do not make it
through the winter

In Alaska, moose are part of our daily life.

Works Cited
Students need to cite their resources. Go to www.thewritesource.com for the most recent
MLA or APA formatting.



W08_3.2.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.1 (8th Grade) Varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow
and to enhance meaning and style of writing


Directions: “Run-on Ralph” wrote the following paragraph. Poor Ralph has a rare
disease that affects his ability to stop and think, so when Ralph talks or writes, he never
pauses for a breath or for punctuation. Help Ralph out by rewriting his paragraph,
inserting punctuation when necessary and creating sentences of varying lengths. If
necessary, use more than one paragraph and rearrange the order his thoughts.

                                      Run-on Sentences

I love living in my condo up on the hill in Mrs. Smith’s house in the beginning I was
hopping around the neighborhood living off alders and tulip bulbs they were so tasty I
didn’t figure that the doggies would be also running around in the same neighborhood
one day when I ventured out across Mr. Jones’s grassy yard Grumpy the neighborhood
dog and bully came charging towards me I quickly ducked under the log and quivered
silently until his sniffing nose left I burrowed into the muskeg hoping I was would have a
safe haven until darkness fell Grumpy kept coming back terrorizing me I jumped up onto
Mrs. Smith’s porch and hid behind her very tasty plants one day she came out onto the
porch and discovered I had devoured her favorite tulips and had started eating her shrubs
she slipped plates of food by her door and one day she jumped out the door and captured
me I now live in a very neat little condo in her living room she picks me up and pets me
and clips my nails she brings me very tasty lettuce and in the spring alder sprouts my
favorite snacks are the different yogurt candies ‘specially made for rabbits Mrs. Smith is
very kind and takes very good care of me




W08_3.3.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.1 (8th Grade) Varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow
and to enhance meaning and style of writing


Directions: “Run-on Ralph” wrote the following paragraph. Poor Ralph has a rare
disease that affects his ability to stop and think, so when Ralph talks or writes, he never
pauses for a breath or for punctuation. Help Ralph out by rewriting his paragraph,
inserting punctuation when necessary and creating sentences of varying lengths. If
necessary, use more than one paragraph and rearrange the order his thoughts.

                                       Run-on Sentences
I love living in my condo up on the hill in Mrs. Smith’s house in the beginning I was
hopping around the neighborhood living off alders and tulip bulbs they were so tasty I
didn’t figure that the doggies would be also running around in the same neighborhood
one day when I ventured out across Mr. Jones’s grassy yard Grumpy the neighborhood
dog and bully came charging towards me I quickly ducked under the log and quivered
silently until his sniffing nose left I burrowed into the muskeg hoping I was would have a
safe haven until darkness fell Grumpy kept coming back terrorizing me I jumped up onto
Mrs. Smith’s porch and hid behind her very tasty plants one day she came out onto the
porch and discovered I had devoured her favorite tulips and had started eating her shrubs
she slipped plates of food by her door and one day she jumped out the door and captured
me I now live in a very neat little condo in her living room she picks me up and pets me
and clips my nails she brings me very tasty lettuce and in the spring alder sprouts my
favorite snacks are the different yogurt candies ‘specially made for rabbits Mrs. Smith is
very kind and takes very good care of me

Proficient Response:
I love living in my condo up on the hill in Mrs. Smith’s house. In the beginning, I was
hopping around the neighborhood living off alders and tulip bulbs. They were so tasty. I
didn’t figure that the doggies would be also running around in the same neighborhood.
One day when I ventured out across Mr. Jones’s grassy yard, Grumpy, the neighborhood
dog and bully, came charging towards me. I quickly ducked under the log and quivered
silently until his sniffing nose left. I burrowed into the muskeg hoping I would have a
safe haven until darkness fell. Grumpy kept coming back, terrorizing me. I jumped up
onto Mrs. Smith’s porch and hid behind her very tasty plants. One day, she came out onto
the porch and discovered I had devoured her favorite tulips and had started eating her
shrubs. She slipped plates of food by her door and one day she jumped out the door and
captured me. I now live in a very neat little condo in her living room. She picks me up
and pets me and clips my nails. She brings me very tasty lettuce and in the spring, alder
sprouts. My favorite snacks are the different yogurt candies especially made for rabbits.
Mrs. Smith is very kind and takes very good care of me.


W08_3.3.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.1 (8th Grade) Varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow
and to enhance meaning and style of writing


Directions: Combine the following sentences in two different ways. Your new sentences
should still have the same meaning as the original sentences, though they may use
different vocabulary and/or order of ideas.

        1. Anchorage is an exciting place to visit.
        2. Anchorage has interesting museums.
        3. Anchorage has sporting events, concerts, and shopping, too.




W08_3.3.1a       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.1 (8th Grade) Varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow
and to enhance meaning and style of writing


Directions: Combine the following sentences in two different ways. Your new sentences
should still have the same meaning as the original sentences, though they may use
different vocabulary and/or order of ideas.

        4. Anchorage is an exciting place to visit.
        5. Anchorage has interesting museums.
        6. Anchorage has sporting events, concerts, and shopping, too.


Proficient Responses:

            • Anchorage is an exciting place to visit because it has museums, sporting
              events, concerts, and shopping.
            • Anchorage’s museums, sporting events, concerts, and shopping make it an
              exciting place to visit.

Advanced Responses:

            • Anchorage, an exciting place to visit, has museums, sporting events,
              concerts, and shopping.
            • Anchorage has much to offer a visitor. Not only is it a great place to go
              shopping and visit museums, it’s also a great place to see concerts and
              attend sporting events.
            • Whether a visitor goes to Anchorage to go shopping, attend a concert,
              watch a sporting event, or to visit a museum, Anchorage is an exciting place
              to go.




W08_3.3.1a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.2 (8th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        i live in Tok alaska which is in the interior. Tok is a small community on the
alaskan hiway. Their are people living there who mush dogs race snowmobiles and hunt.
Fast eddies restaurant is one the places people remember most probly because f the salad
bar. I don’t think the womans they’re are typical of woman of the lower 48 as many of
them mush dogs cut firewould and hunt.




W08_3.3.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.2 (8th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        i live in Tok alaska which is in the interior. Tok is a small community on the
alaskan hiway. Their are people living there who mush dogs race snowmobiles and hunt.
Fast eddies restaurant is one the places people remember most probly because f the salad
bar. I don’t think the womans they’re are typical of woman of the lower 48 as many of
them mush dogs cut firewould and hunt.



Proficient Response:

        I live in Tok, Alaska, which is in the interior. Tok is a small community on the
Alaskan highway. There are people living there who mush dogs, race snowmobiles, and
hunt. Fast Eddie’s Restaurant is one of the places people remember most, probably
because of the salad bar. I don’t think the women there are typical of women of the lower
48 as many of them mush dogs, cut fire wood, and hunt.




W08_3.3.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.3 (8th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., commas, quotation marks,
apostrophes, parentheses, and colons)


Directions: Correct the punctuation in the following paragraph.



Dear Sally
        I hiked with Sammy up the Chilkoot Trail last spring He said to me I can’t keep
up with you in this muck and mud and am having a hard time climbing over the rocks I
didnt know what to say to him as he was falling way behind the group what do you think
I should have done
Sincerely
Rosie
Rosie




W08_3.3.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.3 (8th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., commas, quotation marks,
apostrophes, parentheses, and colons)


Directions: Correct the punctuation in the following paragraph.



Dear Sally
        I hiked with Sammy up the Chilkoot Trail last spring He said to me I can’t keep
up with you in this muck and mud and am having a hard time climbing over the rocks I
didnt know what to say to him as he was falling way behind the group what do you think
I should have done
Sincerely
Rosie
Rosie


Proficient Response:

Dear Sally,
        I hiked with Sammy up the Chilkoot Trail last spring. He said to me, “I can’t keep
up with you in this muck and mud and am having a hard time climbing over the rocks.” I
didn’t know what to say to him (as he was falling way behind the group). What do you
think I should have done?
Sincerely,
Rosie
Rosie




W08_3.3.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.4 (8th Grade) Applying rules of capitalization (e.g., titles and proper nouns)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.


        mr. and mrs. roosevelt have lived on 15 baron street in anchorage, alaska since
september 15, 2005. They had driven from washington, d.c. earlier in the year where
they visited many of their relatives on their way up to alaska. they drove through some of
the following states: minnesota, montana, and idaho.




W08_3.3.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.4 (8th Grade) Applying rules of capitalization (e.g., titles and proper nouns)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.


        mr. and mrs. roosevelt have lived on 15 baron street in anchorage, alaska since
september 15, 2005. They had driven from washington, d.c. earlier in the year where
they visited many of their relatives on their way up to alaska. they drove through some of
the following states: minnesota, montana, and idaho.



Proficient Response:

        Mr. and Mrs. Roosevelt have lived on 15 Baron Street in Anchorage, Alaska,
since September 15, 2005. They had driven from Washington, D.C., earlier in the year
where they visited many of their relatives on their way up to Alaska. They drove through
some of the following states: Minnesota, Montana, and Idaho.




W08_3.3.4 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.5 (8th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)

Directions:
1. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    A.       We likes to play basketball.
    B.       Us like to play basketball.
    C.       We liked to play basketball now.
    D.       We like to play basketball now.



2. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    A.       Why didn’t we go tomorrow?
    B.       Why don’t we go tomorrow?
    C.       Why doesn’t we go tomorrow?
    D.       Why didn’t we go tomorrow?


3. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    A.       Sam and Bill runned down the hill.
    B.       Sam and Bill ranned down the hill.
    C.       Sam and Bill will ran down the hill.
    D.       Sam and Bill ran down the hill.




W08_3.3.5a        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.5 (8th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)

Directions:
1. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    E.      We likes to play basketball.
    F.      Us like to play basketball.
    G.      We liked to play basketball now.
    H.      We like to play basketball now.



2. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    E.      Why didn’t we go tomorrow?
    F.      Why don’t we go tomorrow?
    G.      Why doesn’t we go tomorrow?
    H.      Why didn’t we go tomorrow?


3. Circle the letter of the sentence that is written correctly.
    E.      Sam and Bill runned down the hill.
    F.      Sam and Bill ranned down the hill.
    G.      Sam and Bill will ran down the hill.
    H.      Sam and Bill ran down the hill.


Proficient Response:

1. D
2. B
3. D




W08_3.3.5a Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.5 (8th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        i have a friend named tracie whom lives in anchorage Alaska she has live their all
her life and she go to school their I ask her to come visit me in Juneau but she dont want
to leave her home. in fact she haven’t ever been more then fifty miles from home befor
why hasn’t she been anywhere well its cause shes a Amish person the Amish does not
believe in using cars or airplanes to travel




W08_3.3.5b       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.

3.3.5 (8th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        i have a friend named tracie whom lives in anchorage Alaska she has live their all
her life and she go to school their I ask her to come visit me in Juneau but she dont want
to leave her home. in fact she haven’t ever been more then fifty miles from home befor
why hasn’t she been anywhere well its cause shes a Amish person the Amish does not
believe in using cars or airplanes to travel



Proficient Response:

        I have a friend named Tracie who lives in Anchorage, Alaska. She has lived there
all her life and she goes to school there. I asked her to come visit me in Juneau, but she
doesn’t want to leave her home. In fact, she has never been more than fifty miles from
home before. Why hasn’t she been anywhere? Well, it’s because she is Amish. The
Amish do not believe in using cars or airplanes to travel.




W08_3.3.5b Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.1 (8th Grade) Rearranging details to improve clarity and logical progression of ideas
(e.g., making chronological sequence clear, clarifying cause and effect, creating a
logically consistent story line)

Directions: Rearrange the following paragraph so that the sentences are in sequential and
logical order.

Sample assessments:

1. “Please,” I thought, “let it not be time to get up yet.”
2. At six o’clock, the sun peered cautiously over the mountain.
3. Taking a deep breath and clutching the corner of the quilt, I threw off the covers and
   forced myself upright into the sharp, bright grasp of the day.
4. As I felt the light pour onto my cheek, I snuggled into the pillow, as though digging
   deeper for the last few moments of sleep.
5. A ray of golden light shone through my cabin window and fell in a warm square on
   my face.
6. But the sun rose higher, baking me in my blankets and prying at my eyelids – I knew
   I could not stay in bed any longer.




W08_3.4.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.1 (8th Grade) Rearranging details to improve clarity and logical progression of ideas
(e.g., making chronological sequence clear, clarifying cause and effect, creating a
logically consistent story line)

Directions: Rearrange the following paragraph so that the sentences are in sequential and
logical order.

Sample assessments:

1. “Please,” I thought, “let it not be time to get up yet.”
2. At six o’clock, the sun peered cautiously over the mountain.
3. Taking a deep breath and clutching the corner of the quilt, I threw off the covers and
   forced myself upright into the sharp, bright grasp of the day.
4. As I felt the light pour onto my cheek, I snuggled into the pillow, as though digging
   deeper for the last few moments of sleep.
5. A ray of golden light shone through my cabin window and fell in a warm square on
   my face.
6. But the sun rose higher, baking me in my blankets and prying at my eyelids – I knew
   I could not stay in bed any longer.


Proficient Response:

At six o’clock, the sun peered cautiously over the mountain. A ray of golden light shone
through my cabin window and fell in a warm square on my face. As I felt the light pour
onto my cheek, I snuggled into the pillow, as though digging deeper for the last few
moments of sleep. “Please,” I thought, “let it not be time to get up yet.” But the sun rose
higher, baking me in my blankets and prying at my eyelids – I knew I could not stay in
bed any longer. Taking a deep breath and clutching the corner of the quilt, I threw off the
covers and forced myself upright into the sharp, bright grasp of the day.




W08_3.4.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.2 (8th Grade) Revising writing by giving/receiving feedback and evaluating writing
based on established criteria (e.g. self-created checklists, peer conference formats,
scoring guides or rubrics)


Directions: Student will select a piece of writing from his/her portfolio and assess it in
the following manner.

Sample assessments:

A. Students grade sample essays using six-trait rubrics. Students earn a grade according
to the accuracy of their scoring.

B. Before handing in an assignment, students use the teacher’s rubric to evaluate their
own work. Part of the grade for the paper is completing the self-evaluation.

C. Students create their own evaluation tools or collaborate to create an evaluation tool
for an assignment.

D. Students all evaluate the same paper. They are given a grade for providing appropriate
feedback for that paper.

See the following pages for additional scoring rubrics.




W08_3.4.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 10
Sample assessment:

                         8th Grade Rubric for Student Peer Evaluation

                            Advanced                             Proficient                   Below Proficient
 th         th
7 and 8          •   Evaluator provided at            •   Evaluator provided at          •   Comments are not
                     least one comment of                 least one comment of               adequate or specific
                     praise.                              praise.                            enough to help author
                 •   Evaluator identified at          •   Evaluator identified at            improve the paper.
                     least one area for                   least one area for             •   Evaluator was
                     improvement.                         improvement.                       disrespectful to the
                 •   Evaluator provided at            •   Evaluator provided at              author.
                     least one concrete                   least one concrete             •   Comments and/or
                     suggestion for getting the           suggestion for getting the         proofreading marks
                     paper to the next level.             paper to the next level.           are difficult to
                 •   All comments and                 •   All comments and                   understand.
                     suggestions are respectful           suggestions are respectful     •   Many inaccurate
                     to the author.                       to the author.                     suggestions about
                 •   All proofreading marks           •   Most proofreading marks            conventions.
                     are                                  are
                     legible/understandable.              legible/understandable.
                 •   All suggestions about            •   Most suggestions about
                     conventions are accurate.            conventions are accurate.

9th and 10th     • Evaluator gives multiple,          • Evaluator provided at            • Comments are not
                     specific comments of                 least one comment of             adequate or specific
                     praise.                              praise.                          enough to help author
                 •   Evaluator identified at          •   Evaluator identified at          improve the paper.
                     least one specific area for          least one area for             • Evaluator was
                     improvement.                         improvement.                     disrespectful to the
                 •   Evaluator provided               •   Evaluator provided at            author.
                     multiple concrete                    least one concrete             • Comments and/or
                     suggestion for getting the           suggestion for getting the       proofreading marks
                     paper to the next level.             paper to the next level.         are difficult to
                 •   All comments and                 •   All comments and                 understand.
                     suggestions are respectful           suggestions are respectful     • Many inaccurate
                     to the author.                       to the author.                   suggestions about
                 •   All proofreading marks           •   All proofreading marks           conventions.
                     are                                  are
                     legible/understandable.              legible/understandable.
                 •   All suggestions about            •   All suggestions about
                     conventions are accurate.            conventions are accurate.




W08_3.4.2            Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 2 of 10
Student resource self-assessments:

        Spelling
               I have read through my paper and underlined any words I wasn’t sure
               were spelled correctly.
               I have used my resources (print dictionary, online dictionary, teacher,
               peers, word processing software, etc.) to check spelling of the word(s) in
               question.
               I believe every word in my paper is spelled correctly.
        Conventions
               I have read through my paper and put stars next to the sentences I wasn’t
               sure were 100% correct in their grammar, usage, and punctuation.
               I have used my resources (print grammar guide, online grammar guide,
               teacher, peers, word processing software, etc.) to check my grammar,
               usage, and punctuation.
               I believe my grammar, usage, and punctuation in this paper are 100%
               correct.
        Word choice
               I have read through my paper and circled any words or passages I felt
               were weak and/or generic or could be more vivid.
               I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers,
               word processing software, etc.) to investigate and choose more vivid and
               precise wording where I needed to.
               The word choice in my paper is totally appropriate for the audience.
               My accurate and vivid word choice makes my paper engaging for the
               audience.
        Ideas/Content
               I have read through my paper and compared it to the assignment prompt. I
               have highlighted sections that may not really address the prompt or that
               may be boring for a reader.
               I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
               help make sure that my paper satisfies the assignment and is engaging to
               read.
               I believe that I have completed the assignment fully and done my best to
               make my paper interesting for a reader.
        Sentence Fluency
               I have read my paper and put boxes around words or phrases that sound
               repetitive and/or choppy. I have also put boxes around any sentences I
               think might be incomplete, run-on, or rambling sentences.
               I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers,
               etc.) to investigate and choose options for sentence structure to help
               improve my fluency.
               I believe my sentences are varied and sound good when read aloud. I
               believe that my paper is free from incomplete, run-on, or rambling
               sentences except where I put them in on purpose for effect.
        Voice



W08_3.4.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 10
              I have read my paper and put brackets around words or passages that I
              worried might not have an appropriate or engaging voice.
              I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
              investigate and choose techniques and/or wording to improve the voice
              where I needed to.
              I believe the voice of this paper is appropriate for the purpose and
              audience and that my writing style is fresh and unique enough to engage
              the reader as much as possible.
        Organization
              I have read my paper and have put a swirl next to paragraphs, sentences,
              or phrases where I worry I might be off topic or where I might need more
              of a transition to get to the next idea.
              I have drawn arrows next to paragraphs, sentences, or phrases that may be
              in the wrong place within the paper.
              I can put my finger on a sentence in every paragraph that contains the
              main idea.
              I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
              rearrange, delete, expand, and/or add transitions to passages that needed
              improvement in organization.
              I believe that every paragraph contains enough detail for the reader to
              understand and follow the main idea.
              I believe that my sentences and paragraphs are in the best possible order.
              I believe that the paper flows smoothly from one idea to the next thanks to
              my artful and varied transitional words and sentences.

_______________________________________
Signature of Student




W08_3.4.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 10
                         8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Voice

          Advanced                           Proficient                    Below Proficient
6 Points                          4 Points                          3 Points
• Language is highly              • Writing communicates in an      • Writing communicates but
individual.                       earnest, pleasing manner.         without much style or
• Reader senses the person        • Voice is inconsistent: it may   interest.
behind the words; feels an        emerge strongly, then retreat     • Writing hides the writer; the
interaction with the writer.      behind general, dispassionate     reader has little or no sense of
• Tone gives the writing          language.                         the writer behind the words.
flavor, adds interest.            • Writing hides as much of        • Writer shows some
• Language is appropriate for     the writer as it reveals.         awareness of audience and/ or
purpose and audience.             • Writer seems aware of           purpose but is inconsistent.
• Narrative writing seems         audience and purpose but          • Writer speaks in a
honest, appealing, heartfelt.     often weighs words too            monotone.
• Expository or persuasive        carefully or discards personal
writing reflects a strong         insights in favor of safe         2 Points
commitment to the topic;          generalities.                     • It is hard to sense the writer
anticipates reader’s questions,                                     behind the words.
shows why the reader should                                         • The writer does not seem to
care or want to know more.                                          reach out to an audience or to
                                                                    anticipate the reader’s
5 Points                                                            interests or questions.
• Reader senses the person                                          • Writing may communicate
behind the words.                                                   on a functional level but does
• There are occasional                                              not move or involve the
moments that surprise,                                              reader.
amuse, or move the reader.                                          • Writer does not seem
• Tone gives the writing                                            sufficiently at home with the
flavor, adds interest.                                              topic to take risks, share
• Language is appropriate for                                       personal insights, or make the
purpose and audience.                                               topic/story personal and real
• Narrative writing seems                                           for the reader.
honest, appealing, heartfelt.
• Expository or persuasive                                          1 Point
writing reflects a strong                                           • The writer seems unaware
commitment to the topic.                                            of an audience or reader;
                                                                    writing seems “painful” to the
                                                                    writer.
                                                                    • Writing may not
                                                                    communicate on a functional
                                                                    level.
                                                                    • Writer seems uncomfortable
                                                                    with the topic.




W08_3.4.2         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 5 of 10
                    8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions
            Advanced                   Proficient             Below Proficient
6 Points                             4 Points                             3 Points
• Paragraphing reinforces the        • Paragraphing is attempted but      • Paragraphing is attempted but
organizational structure.            some paragraphs run together or      many paragraphs run together or
• Grammar and usage are correct      begin in the wrong place.            begin in the wrong place.
(few, if any, errors) and            • Problems with grammar or           • Problems with grammar or
contribute to clarity and style.     usage are not serious enough to      usage may be serious enough to
• Punctuation is accurate (few, if   impede or distort meaning.           impede or distort meaning in
any, errors) and guides the reader   • End punctuation usually correct;   some instances but not overall.
through the text.                    internal punctuation sometimes       • Terminal punctuation is usually
• Spelling is generally correct,     missing or incorrect.                correct; internal punctuation is
even of more difficult words.        • Spelling is usually correct or     sometimes missing or incorrect
• The writer may manipulate          reasonably plausible on common       and errors may impede or distort
conventions for stylistic effect.    words; misspellings do not           meaning in some instances.
                                     impede communication.                • Spelling errors may impede or
5 Points                                                                  distort meaning in some instances
• Paragraphing reinforces the                                             but not overall.
organizational structure.
• Grammar and usage are correct                                           2 Points
(few, if any, errors) and                                                 • Paragraphing is missing,
contribute to clarity and style.                                          irregular, or so frequent (e.g.,
• Punctuation is accurate (few, if                                        every sentence) that it has no
any, errors).                                                             relationship to the organizational
• Spelling is generally correct,                                          structure of the text.
even of more difficult words.                                             • Errors in grammar or usage are
                                                                          very noticeable and may affect
                                                                          meaning.
                                                                          • Punctuation is often missing or
                                                                          incorrect.
                                                                          • Spelling errors are frequent,
                                                                          even of common words.
                                                                          • The reader must read once to
                                                                          decode, then again for meaning.

                                                                          1 Point
                                                                          • Paragraphing is missing,
                                                                          irregular, or so frequent that it has
                                                                          no relationship to the
                                                                          organizational structure of the
                                                                          text.
                                                                          • Errors in grammar or usage are
                                                                          frequent and impede meaning.
                                                                          • Punctuation is often missing or
                                                                          incorrect.
                                                                          • Spelling errors are frequent and
                                                                          impede meaning.
                                                                          • The reader may be unable to
                                                                          decode the writing.




W08_3.4.2           Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006             Page 6 of 10
                 8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Ideas and Content

            Advanced                        Proficient                     Below Proficient
6 Points                           4 Points                          3 Points
• Ideas are fresh, original,       • Topic and direction are         • Topic and direction are
and/or insightful.                 evident, but more information     evident, but writer may digress
• Ideas are based on the           is needed to “fill in the         and go in a different direction
writer’s knowledge and/ or         blanks.”                          or introduce a different topic.
experience.                        • Ideas draw on knowledge         • Ideas may not draw on
• Details are relevant, telling,   and/or experience but may not     knowledge and/or experience;
and contribute to the whole.       move beyond general               may be general observations.
• Content goes beyond the          observations to specifics.        • Details are reasonably clear
obvious or predictable.            • Details are reasonably clear    but may not be detailed,
• Topic makes a point or tells a   but may not be detailed,          personalized, or expanded.
story.                             personalized, or expanded.        • Supporting details are
                                   • Supporting details are          present but may not “flesh
5 Points                           present but may not “flesh        out” the main point or story
• Ideas are based on the           out” the main point or story      line or may be irrelevant to it.
writer’s knowledge and/ or         line.                             • Original ideas are rare or
experience.                        • Original ideas may be           absent.
• Details are relevant, telling,   blended with ones that are
and contribute to the whole.       more obvious or predictable.      2 Points
• Topic makes a point or tells a                                     • Topic and direction are not
story.                                                               evident; the writer has not
• Some ideas are fresh and                                           defined the topic in a
original.                                                            meaningful, personal way.
                                                                     • Information is very limited
                                                                     or unclear.
                                                                     • Text may be repetitious or
                                                                     read like a collection of
                                                                     disconnected, random
                                                                     thoughts.
                                                                     • The writer does not
                                                                     distinguish the main ideas or
                                                                     critical points from the
                                                                     supporting details or less
                                                                     critical points.

                                                                     1 Point
                                                                     • Topic and direction are
                                                                     missing.
                                                                     • Information is very limited
                                                                     or unclear.
                                                                     • Text may be repetitious, or
                                                                     may read like a collection of
                                                                     disconnected, random
                                                                     thoughts.




W08_3.4.2         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006       Page 7 of 10
                     8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

            Advanced                          Proficient                      Below Proficient
6 Points                            4 Points                            3 Points
• Sequencing of ideas and           • Sequencing of ideas and           • Sequencing is usually logical
details is logical and effective.   details is logical and effective.   but there may be lapses or
• Introduction is inviting—         • Introduction is inviting—         digressions.
draws in the reader.                draws in the reader.                • There may be an attempt to
• Conclusion is satisfying—         • Conclusion is satisfying—         write an introduction or
leaves reader with a sense of       leaves reader with a sense of       conclusion but it may not be
resolution.                         resolution.                         clearly recognizable as such; a
• Transitions are thoughtful;       • Transitions are thoughtful;       conclusion, in particular, may
clearly show how ideas              clearly show how ideas              be absent.
connect.                            connect.                            • Transitions attempted but do
• Organization flows                • Organization usually flows        not work well; connections
smoothly, seems effortless.         smoothly.                           between ideas may be unclear.
                                                                        • There are frequent lapses in
5 Points                                                                pacing.
• Sequencing of ideas and                                               • There is an attempt at
details is logical and effective.                                       organization but it may depart
• Introduction is inviting—                                             from supporting the main
draws in the reader.                                                    point or story line.
• Conclusion is satisfying—
leaves reader with a sense of                                           2 Points
resolution.                                                             • Sequencing needs work.
• Transitions are thoughtful;                                           • There is no real lead or
clearly show how ideas                                                  introduction to set up what
connect.                                                                follows.
• Organization usually flows                                            • Conclusion is missing or
smoothly.                                                               does not wrap things up.
                                                                        • Transitions seldom work
                                                                        well, with many connections
                                                                        between ideas unclear.
                                                                        • Pacing feels awkward; writer
                                                                        slows when the reader wants
                                                                        to move on, and vice versa.
                                                                        • Problems with organization
                                                                        make it hard to grasp the main
                                                                        point or story line.

                                                                        1 Point
                                                                        • Sequencing is absent.
                                                                        • There is no introduction or
                                                                        conclusion.
                                                                        • Transitions are absent.
                                                                        • Organization is absent;
                                                                        writing may be a brief list.




W08_3.4.2          Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 8 of 10
                   8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Sentence Fluency

            Advanced                           Proficient                        Below Proficient
6 Points                            4 Points                               3 Points
• Sentence construction makes       • Sentences are grammatical and        • Sentences are usually
meaning clear.                      hang together.                         grammatical and hang together
• Sentences are purposeful and      • Some variation in sentence           with some lapses.
build upon each other.              length and structure; sentence         • Little variation in sentence
• The writing has cadence; the      beginnings are not all alike.          length and structure; most
writer has thought about sound as   • Some transitions between             sentence beginnings are alike.
well as meaning.                    sentences are missing or hidden.       • Many transitions between
• Sentences vary in length and      • Parts may be stiff, awkward,         sentences are missing or hidden.
structure.                          choppy, or gangly.                     • Fragments may be present.
• Fragments are used only for       • Dialogue, if used, sounds stiff at   • Dialogue, if used, sounds stiff
style or effect.                    times.                                 and unnatural.
• Dialogue, if used, sounds
natural.                                                                   2 Points
                                                                           • Sentences are choppy,
5 Points                                                                   incomplete, rambling, or
• Sentence construction makes                                              awkward; there may be many
meaning clear.                                                             fragments.
• Sentences are purposeful and                                             • Phrasing does not sound natural;
build upon each other.                                                     the reader must sometimes reread
• Sentences vary in length and                                             to get the meaning.
structure.                                                                 • Many sentences begin the same
• Fragments are used only for                                              way and follow the same pattern
style or effect.                                                           (e.g., subject-verb-object) in a
• Dialogue, if used, sounds                                                monotonous pattern.
natural.                                                                   • Transitions between sentences
                                                                           are missing or hidden, or endless
                                                                           connectives create a massive
                                                                           jumble of language in which clear
                                                                           beginnings and endings are lost.

                                                                           1 Point
                                                                           • Sentences are choppy,
                                                                           incomplete, rambling, or
                                                                           awkward; there may be many
                                                                           fragments.
                                                                           • The reader must frequently
                                                                           pause or reread.
                                                                           • Sentences begin the same way
                                                                           and follow the same pattern (e.g.,
                                                                           subject-verb-object) in a
                                                                           monotonous pattern.




W08_3.4.2          Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006             Page 9 of 10
                    8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Word Choice

            Advanced                        Proficient                     Below Proficient
6 Points                          4 Points                           3 Points
• Words are specific, accurate,   • Words are mostly correct and     • Words are mostly correct and
striking.                         adequate but may lack flair        adequate with some lapses.
• Language is natural, not        and color.                         • Familiar words and phrases
overdone.                         • Familiar words and phrases       communicate with some
• Verbs are lively.               communicate.                       lapses.
• Nouns and modifiers are         • Attempts at colorful             • Attempts at colorful
precise.                          language are made but some         language are rare or absent.
• Clichés and jargon are used     may be overdone.                   • Clichés and jargon may be
sparingly and only for effect.    • Clichés and jargon may be        used as a crutch.
                                  used occasionally in place of
5 Points                          fresh language.                    2 Points
• Words are specific and                                             • Language is so vague and
accurate.                                                            general that only the most
• Lively verbs and picturesque                                       general message comes
words and phrases are                                                through (e.g., It was a fun
occasionally used.                                                   time. We did lots of neat
• Language is natural, not                                           stuff.).
overdone.                                                            • Persistent redundancy
• Verbs are lively.                                                  distracts the reader.
• Nouns and modifiers are                                            • Words are often used
precise.                                                             incorrectly, making the
• Clichés and jargon are used                                        message hard to decipher.
sparingly and only for effect.                                       • Clichés and jargon
                                                                     frequently serve as a crutch.
                                                                     • Problems with language
                                                                     leave the reader wondering
                                                                     what the writer is trying to
                                                                     say.

                                                                     1 Point
                                                                     • Language is so vague,
                                                                     inaccurate, and/or general that
                                                                     even the most general message
                                                                     does not come through.
                                                                     • Words are frequently used
                                                                     incorrectly, making the
                                                                     message hard to decipher.
                                                                     • Problems with language
                                                                     leave the reader unable to
                                                                     understand what the writer is
                                                                     trying to say most of the time.




W08_3.4.2         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006      Page 10 of 10
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.3 (8th Grade) Combining sentences for fluency, using precise and descriptive words
and/or eliminating irrelevant details to improve quality and effectiveness of writing



1. Directions: Combine the following set of short, choppy sentences into a single
   sentence. Also, use the provided sentences to form the specified type of sentence.
   You may change the details if necessary to form a sentence that makes sense.

    Michelle landed her airplane on a lake.

    The lake was one mile long.

    The lake had a great reflection.

    Michelle’s airplane was a Beaver.

    Michelle took her friend Betsey with her.




W08_3.4.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.3 (8th Grade) Combining sentences for fluency, using precise and descriptive words
and/or eliminating irrelevant details to improve quality and effectiveness of writing



2. Directions: Combine the following set of short, choppy sentences into a single
   sentence. Also, use the provided sentences to form the specified type of sentence.
   You may change the details if necessary to form a sentence that makes sense.

    Michelle landed her airplane on a lake.

    The lake was one mile long.

    The lake had a great reflection.

    Michelle’s airplane was a Beaver.

    Michelle took her friend Betsey with her.



Proficient Response:

Michelle flew her friend Betsey in her Beaver to land on a one-mile-long lake that had a
great reflection.




W08_3.4.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.1 Write a coherent composition/essay that includes a thesis statement, supporting
evidence, and a conclusion.

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.3 (8th Grade) Combining sentences for fluency, using precise and descriptive words
and/or eliminating irrelevant details to improve quality and effectiveness of writing


                           Sentence Fluency and Conventions

Directions: Write a story: Pick 5 words at random using a thesaurus, find an alternative
for each word, and write a story about all ten and how they relate to each other.

Or

Write an essay about the climate in your school.
Or see item bank. This piece of writing will be 3-5 paragraphs.




W08_3.4.3a      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
3.1 Write a coherent composition/essay that includes a thesis statement, supporting
evidence, and a conclusion.

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.3 (8th Grade) Combining sentences for fluency, using precise and descriptive words
and/or eliminating irrelevant details to improve quality and effectiveness of writing


                             Sentence Fluency and Conventions

Directions: Write a story: Pick 5 words at random using a thesaurus, find an alternative
for each word, and write a story about all ten and how they relate to each other.

Or

Write an essay about the climate in your school.
Or see item bank. This piece of writing will be 3-5 paragraphs.

                  8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Sentence Fluency

          Advanced                           Proficient                    Below Proficient
• Sentence construction makes     • Sentences are grammatical        • Sentences are choppy,
meaning clear.                    and hang together.                 incomplete, rambling, or
• Sentences are purposeful and    • Some variation in sentence       awkward; there may be many
build upon each other.            length and structure; sentence     fragments.
• The writing has cadence; the    beginnings are not all alike.      • Phrasing does not sound
writer has thought about sound    • Some transitions between         natural; the reader must
as well as meaning.               sentences are missing or           sometimes reread to get the
• Sentences vary in length and    hidden.                            meaning.
structure.                        • Parts may be stiff, awkward,     • Many sentences begin the
• Fragments are used only for     choppy, or gangly.                 same way and follow the same
style or effect.                  • Dialogue, if used, sounds        pattern (e.g., subject-verb-
• Dialogue, if used, sounds       stiff at times.                    object) in a monotonous
natural.                                                             pattern.
                                                                     • Transitions between
                                                                     sentences are missing or
                                                                     hidden, or endless connectives
                                                                     create a massive jumble of
                                                                     language in which clear
                                                                     beginnings and endings are
                                                                     lost.

See the following pages for additional rubrics.



W08_3.4.3a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
                   8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Sentence Fluency

          Advanced                             Proficient                        Below Proficient
6 Points                            4 Points                               3 Points
• Sentence construction makes       • Sentences are grammatical and        • Sentences are usually
meaning clear.                      hang together.                         grammatical and hang together
• Sentences are purposeful and      • Some variation in sentence           with some lapses.
build upon each other.              length and structure; sentence         • Little variation in sentence
• The writing has cadence; the      beginnings are not all alike.          length and structure; most
writer has thought about sound as   • Some transitions between             sentence beginnings are alike.
well as meaning.                    sentences are missing or hidden.       • Many transitions between
• Sentences vary in length and      • Parts may be stiff, awkward,         sentences are missing or hidden.
structure.                          choppy, or gangly.                     • Fragments may be present.
• Fragments are used only for       • Dialogue, if used, sounds stiff at   • Dialogue, if used, sounds stiff
style or effect.                    times.                                 and unnatural.
• Dialogue, if used, sounds
natural.                                                                   2 Points
                                                                           • Sentences are choppy,
5 Points                                                                   incomplete, rambling, or
• Sentence construction makes                                              awkward; there may be many
meaning clear.                                                             fragments.
• Sentences are purposeful and                                             • Phrasing does not sound natural;
build upon each other.                                                     the reader must sometimes reread
• Sentences vary in length and                                             to get the meaning.
structure.                                                                 • Many sentences begin the same
• Fragments are used only for                                              way and follow the same pattern
style or effect.                                                           (e.g., subject-verb-object) in a
• Dialogue, if used, sounds                                                monotonous pattern.
natural.                                                                   • Transitions between sentences
                                                                           are missing or hidden, or endless
                                                                           connectives create a massive
                                                                           jumble of language in which clear
                                                                           beginnings and endings are lost.

                                                                           1 Point
                                                                           • Sentences are choppy,
                                                                           incomplete, rambling, or
                                                                           awkward; there may be many
                                                                           fragments.
                                                                           • The reader must frequently
                                                                           pause or reread.
                                                                           • Sentences begin the same way
                                                                           and follow the same pattern (e.g.,
                                                                           subject-verb-object) in a
                                                                           monotonous pattern.




W08_3.4.3a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006            Page 3 of 4
                     8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions

Advanced                          Proficient                         Below Proficient
• Paragraphing reinforces         • Paragraphing is attempted        • Paragraphing is attempted
the organizational structure.     but some paragraphs run            but many paragraphs run
• Grammar and usage are           together or begin in the           together or begin in the
correct (few, if any, errors)     wrong place.                       wrong place.
and contribute to clarity and     • Problems with grammar or         • Problems with grammar or
style.                            usage are not serious              usage may be serious
• Punctuation is accurate         enough to impede or distort        enough to impede or distort
(few, if any, errors) and         meaning.                           meaning in some instances
guides the reader through         • End punctuation usually          but not overall.
the text.                         correct; internal punctuation      • Terminal punctuation is
• Spelling is generally           sometimes missing or               usually correct; internal
correct, even of more             incorrect.                         punctuation is sometimes
difficult words.                  • Spelling is usually correct      missing or incorrect and
• The writer may                  or reasonably plausible on         errors may impede or distort
manipulate conventions for        common words;                      meaning in some instances.
stylistic effect.                 misspellings do not impede         • Spelling errors may
                                  communication.                     impede or distort meaning
                                                                     in some instances but not
                                                                     overall.




W08_3.4.3a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.4 (8th Grade) Clarifying thesis statement and/or topic sentence and adding details to
support main ideas, if needed


Directions: Rewrite the following paragraph by making its thesis statement clearer and
adding details to support the main idea.

I like my mom’s cooking. She fixes really good food. Both my brothers and my dad like
her food too. We all eat a lot because she is such a good cook. She fixes lots of good
stuff.




W08_3.4.4       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.4.4 (8th Grade) Clarifying thesis statement and/or topic sentence and adding details to
support main ideas, if needed


Directions: Rewrite the following paragraph by making its thesis statement clearer and
adding details to support the main idea.

I like my mom’s cooking. She fixes really good food. Both my brothers and my dad like
her food too. We all eat a lot because she is such a good cook. She fixes lots of good
stuff.


Proficient Response:

My mom makes really great lasagna, probably the best in town. She never buys the
frozen kind, but always cooks it from scratch. Lasagna noodles, onion, hamburger,
provolone and ricotta cheeses, tomato sauce, bay leaves, garlic, plus secret ingredients—
all these go into her magic creation. First she makes the sauce, and then she cooks the
noodles. I usually volunteer to cut up the cheese because I like to be in the kitchen when
she layers the ingredients into the baking dish. Noodles, sauce, cheese; noodles, sauce,
cheese; layer by layer it builds up. Finally it goes into the oven and then I have to go
shoots baskets, because Mom can’t stand my bugging her until it’s done. What comes out
is heaven. But do you know what’s best about it? The leftovers for breakfast the next
morning!




W08_3.4.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition/essay that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.1.2 (8th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.4.5 (8th Grade) Using appropriate voice for intended audience (e.g., humorous,
informal, formal, or technical)


Directions: Write about a time when you saw someone get mad. Describe what that
person did and how you think he or she felt. Select one of the following voices to write
in: angry, happy, sad, frustrated, or proud.

This piece of writing will be 2-3 paragraphs.




W08_3.4.5       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition/essay that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.1.2 (8th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

3.4.5 (8th Grade) Using appropriate voice for intended audience (e.g., humorous,
informal, formal, or technical)


Directions: Write about a time when you saw someone get mad. Describe what that
person did and how you think he or she felt. Select one of the following voices to write
in: angry, happy, sad, frustrated, or proud.

This piece of writing will be 2-3 paragraphs.

                          8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Voice

          Advanced                           Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Language is highly               • Writing communicates in          • Writing communicates but
individual.                        an earnest, pleasing manner.       without much style or
• Reader senses the person         • Voice is inconsistent: it        interest.
behind the words; feels an         may emerge strongly, then          • Writing hides the writer;
interaction with the writer.       retreat behind general,            the reader has little or no
• Tone gives the writing           dispassionate language             sense of the writer behind
flavor, adds interest.             • Writing hides as much of         the words.
• Language is appropriate          the writer as it reveals.          • Writer shows some
for purpose and audience.          • Writer seems aware of            awareness of audience and/
• Narrative writing seems          audience and purpose but           or purpose but is
honest, appealing, heartfelt.      often weighs words too             inconsistent.
• Expository or persuasive         carefully or discards              • Writer speaks in a
writing reflects a strong          personal insights in favor of      monotone.
commitment to the topic;           safe generalities
anticipates reader’s
questions, shows why the
reader should care or want
to know more.

See additional six-trait scoring guide on the next page.




W08_3.4.5 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                   8th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric for Voice

          Advanced                           Proficient                      Below Proficient
6 Points                           4 Points                           3 Points
• Language is highly               • Writing communicates in an       • Writing communicates but
individual.                        earnest, pleasing manner.          without much style or interest.
• Reader senses the person         • Voice is inconsistent: it may    • Writing hides the writer; the
behind the words; feels an         emerge strongly, then retreat      reader has little or no sense of
interaction with the writer.       behind general, dispassionate      the writer behind the words.
• Tone gives the writing           language.                          • Writer shows some
flavor, adds interest.             • Writing hides as much of the     awareness of audience and/ or
• Language is appropriate for      writer as it reveals.              purpose but is inconsistent.
purpose and audience.              • Writer seems aware of            • Writer speaks in a monotone.
• Narrative writing seems          audience and purpose but
honest, appealing, heartfelt.      often weighs words too             2 Points
• Expository or persuasive         carefully or discards personal     • It is hard to sense the writer
writing reflects a strong          insights in favor of safe          behind the words.
commitment to the topic;           generalities.                      • The writer does not seem to
anticipates reader’s questions,                                       reach out to an audience or to
shows why the reader should                                           anticipate the reader’s interests
care or want to know more.                                            or questions.
                                                                      • Writing may communicate
5 Points                                                              on a functional level but does
• Reader senses the person                                            not move or involve the
behind the words.                                                     reader.
• There are occasional                                                • Writer does not seem
moments that surprise, amuse,                                         sufficiently at home with the
or move the reader.                                                   topic to take risks, share
• Tone gives the writing                                              personal insights, or make the
flavor, adds interest.                                                topic/story personal and real
• Language is appropriate for                                         for the reader.
purpose and audience.
• Narrative writing seems                                             1 Point
honest, appealing, heartfelt.                                         • The writer seems unaware of
• Expository or persuasive                                            an audience or reader; writing
writing reflects a strong                                             seems “painful” to the writer.
commitment to the topic.                                              • Writing may not
                                                                      communicate on a functional
                                                                      level.
                                                                      • Writer seems uncomfortable
                                                                      with the topic.




W08_3.4.5 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 3 of 3
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition/essay that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.1.1 (8th Grade) Writing a thesis statement that identifies the focus or controlling idea
for the entire composition

3.4.6 (8th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g., dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, rubric, word processor)


Directions: Describe your favorite Alaskan wild animal. You could consider writing
about aquatic mammals, birds, fish, or any land mammals. Include why you prefer this
animal above other choices.




W08_3.4.6        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition/essay that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.1.1 (8th Grade) Writing a thesis statement that identifies the focus or controlling idea
for the entire composition

3.4.6 (8th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g., dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, rubric, word processor)


Directions: Describe your favorite Alaskan wild animal. You could consider writing
about aquatic mammals, birds, fish, or any land mammals. Include why you prefer this
animal above other choices.


                       8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Word Choice

         Advanced                             Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Words are specific,               • Words are mostly correct         • Language is so vague,
accurate, striking.                 and adequate but may lack          inaccurate, and/or general
• Language is natural, not          flair and color.                   that even the most general
overdone.                           • Familiar words and               message does not come
• Verbs are lively.                 phrases communicate.               through.
• Nouns and modifiers are           • Attempts at colorful             • Words are frequently used
precise.                            language are made but some         incorrectly, making the
• Clichés and jargon are            may be overdone.                   message hard to decipher.
used sparingly and only for         • Clichés and jargon may be        • Problems with language
effect.                             used occasionally in place         leave the reader unable to
                                    of fresh language.                 understand what the writer
                                                                       is trying to say most of the
                                                                       time.


If you are interested, there is a six-trait scoring guide/rubric to use on the web site.




W08_3.4.6 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.1 The student writes a coherent composition/essay that includes a thesis statement,
supporting evidence, and a conclusion.

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.1.1- 3.4.3 (8th Grade) Paragraph Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe your favorite person. Include why you prefer this person above
other choices. Be sure to include all characteristics including: behavior, what he or she
does for a living, where he or she lives, and how he or she influences and treats you.




W08_3.4.6b       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.1 Write a coherent composition/essay that includes a thesis statement, supporting
evidence, and a conclusion.

3.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

3.1.1- 3.4.3 (8th Grade) Paragraph Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe your favorite person. Include why you prefer this person above
other choices. Be sure to include all characteristics including: behavior, what he or she
does for a living, where he or she lives, and how he or she influences and treats you.

See the next page for a six-trait scoring guide/rubric.




W08_3.4.6b Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                8th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric for Word Choice

          Advanced                             Proficient                     Below Proficient
6 Points                             4 Points                           3 Points
• Words are specific, accurate,      • Words are mostly correct and     • Words are mostly correct and
striking.                            adequate but may lack flair and    adequate with some lapses.
• Language is natural, not           color.                             • Familiar words and phrases
overdone.                            • Familiar words and phrases       communicate with some lapses.
• Verbs are lively.                  communicate.                       • Attempts at colorful language
• Nouns and modifiers are            • Attempts at colorful language    are rare or absent.
precise.                             are made but some may be           • Clichés and jargon may be used
• Clichés and jargon are used        overdone.                          as a crutch.
sparingly and only for effect.       • Clichés and jargon may be used
                                     occasionally in place of fresh     2 Points
5 Points                             language.                          • Language is so vague and
• Words are specific and accurate.                                      general that only the most general
• Lively verbs and picturesque                                          message comes through (e.g., It
words and phrases are                                                   was a fun time. We did lots of
occasionally used.                                                      neat stuff.).
• Language is natural, not                                              • Persistent redundancy distracts
overdone.                                                               the reader.
• Verbs are lively.                                                     • Words are often used
• Nouns and modifiers are                                               incorrectly, making the message
precise.                                                                hard to decipher.
• Clichés and jargon are used                                           • Clichés and jargon frequently
sparingly and only for effect.                                          serve as a crutch.
                                                                        • Problems with language leave
                                                                        the reader wondering what the
                                                                        writer is trying to say.

                                                                        1 Point
                                                                        • Language is so vague,
                                                                        inaccurate, and/or general that
                                                                        even the most general message
                                                                        does not come through.
                                                                        • Words are frequently used
                                                                        incorrectly, making the message
                                                                        hard to decipher.
                                                                        • Problems with language leave
                                                                        the reader unable to understand
                                                                        what the writer is trying to say
                                                                        most of the time.




W08_3.4.6b Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006     Page 3 of 3
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.1 (8th Grade) Correcting misspellings using available software programs, including
choosing the correct spelling option among several choices


Directions: Use the grammar and spelling tools on your computer to help you rewrite the
following sentences using proper syntax. Correct any misspelled words as you go.

1. Tommorow to the dentist I go.



2. A test we have on Wendsday.



3. I wood to the store like to go.



4. A buttifull girl I saw yesterday.



5. Born in Febuary I was.



6. Enuff to eat did you get?



7. Asked he an importent question.



8. Put down over their the books.




W08_3.6.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.1 (8th Grade) Correcting misspellings using available software programs, including
choosing the correct spelling option among several choices


Directions: Use the grammar and spelling tools on your computer to help you rewrite the
following sentences using proper syntax. Correct any misspelled words as you go.

1. Tommorow to the dentist I go.


2. A test we have on Wendsday.


3. I wood to the store like to go.


4. A buttifull girl I saw yesterday.


5. Born in Febuary I was.


6. Enuff to eat did you get?


7. Asked he an importent question.


8. Put down over their the books.


Proficient Response:

1. Tomorrow I go to the dentist.
2. We will have a test on Wednesday.
3. I would like to go to the store.
4. I saw a beautiful girl yesterday.
5. I was born in February.
6. Did you get enough to eat?
7. He asked an important question.
8. Put the books down over there.




W08_3.6.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.2 (8th Grade) Using a thesaurus to locate and choose effective synonyms for common
words

                                  Active Verbs Worksheet

Directions: Use the thesaurus and dictionary function of your computer to change the
action verbs in the following sentences. Rewrite each sentence five times, changing the
verb each time. Each time you rewrite the sentence, use a one-word description of the
connotation of the new verb (the first one is done as an example). Look at the third page
before beginning work.

        1. The boy walked down the road.

            Tired:     The boy trudged down the road.
            Lazy:      The boy ambled down the road.
            Injured:   The boy hobbled down the road.
            Scared:    The boy scurried down the road.
            Happy:     The boy skipped down the road.
            Busy:      The boy hurried down the road.


        2. The girl sat in the chair.




        3. The ball went past his head.




        4. He hit the ball into center field.




W08_3.6.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
        5. She ate the apple.




        6. He swam in the river.




        7. She talked for a long time.




        8. He threw the ball.




W08_3.6.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
Hint: Action verbs and denotation/connotation.

Denotation = the most specific or literal meaning of a word
Connotation = an additional sense or senses associated with or suggested by a word or
phrase.

Study the example:
1.     a. Does the phrase “the boy was high” mean that the boy was “above or
       stretching upward from a known base level such as the sea or ground?”
       (denotation)
       b. Does it mean he is on drugs? (connotation)

How about the expression, “We bad!”
Does above expression mean, We are below an acceptable standard in quality or
performance or does it mean We are cool?

2. By using action verbs we can change the connotation of a phrase or sentence.


The coach yelled at me.                Probably bad news.
The coach shrieked at me.              Sounds out of control
The coach shouted at me.               A neutral sound to it
The coach screeched at me.             Again, out of control
The coach yelped at me.                Makes him sound surprised
The coach roared at me.                Definitely mad-like a lion
The coach bellowed at me.              Mad like a bull
The coach howled at me.                Sounds nuts
The coach hollered at me.              Could be friendly or just distance




W08_3.6.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.2 (8th Grade) Using a thesaurus to locate and choose effective synonyms for common
words


Follow-up practice: Action verbs and denotation/connotation

Denotation = the most specific or literal meaning of a word
Connotation = an additional sense or senses associated with or suggested by a word or
phrase.

Example:

By using action verbs we can change the connotation of a phrase or sentence.


The coach yelled at me.                Probably bad news.
The coach shrieked at me.              Sounds out of control
The coach shouted at me.               A neutral sound to it
The coach screeched at me.             Again, out of control
The coach yelped at me.                Makes him sound surprised
The coach roared at me.                Definitely mad-like a lion
The coach bellowed at me.              Mad like a bull
The coach howled at me.                Sounds nuts
The coach hollered at me.              Could be friendly or just distance

Directions: Use the thesaurus function on your word processor to help you find words to
change the connotation of the following sentences.

The girl walked down the road.         Neutral
The girl ________ down the road.       Make her sound happy.
The girl ________ down the road.       Make her sound sad.
The girl ________ down the road.       Make her sound like she has a secret.
The girl ________ down the road.       Make her sound like she is frightened
The girl ________ down the road.       Make her sound like she is angry.
The girl ________ down the road.       Make her sound like she is nervous.
The girl ________ down the road.       Make her sound like she is in a hurry.
The girl ________ down the road.       Make her sound like she is NOT in a hurry.
The girl ________ down the road.       Effect: ___________________________________
The girl ________ down the road.       Effect: ___________________________________




W08_3.6.2a      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 1
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.3 (8th Grade) Using resources by selecting and using formatting features to produce
final draft (e.g. centering title, choosing appropriate font size and style, indentation,
pagination, and line spacing)


Directions: Students open a poorly written flyer and revise the formatting so that the
flyer becomes neater, more professional, more eye-catching, and more accessible to a
reader.



THE HOMER HIGH SCHOOL CHRISTMAS PARTY

When                           Dec. 15, 2005
Where                          The Homer High School Gym
Whaz Happnin                   Bobbing for apple, a root beer drinking contest, a free
                               throw contest, a three point contest, a play, Christmas
                               carols


Teacher might want to show a number of types of flyers students could replicate.




W08_3.6.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
Proficient Response:



         THE HOMER HIGH
        SCHOOL CHRISTMAS
              PARTY
                                   Dec. 15, 2005

                         The Homer High School Gym


         A Christmas Play: The Gift of the Magi

                                    Bobbing For Apples

                              Root Beer Drinking Contest

                                    Free Throw Contest

                                    Three Point Contest

                                   Christmas Carols

  Be there at 2:00 P.M. on Thursday, December 15th

See the next page for a suggested scoring guide.



W08_3.6.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                       8th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Flyer Format

             Advanced                             Proficient                   Below Proficient
•   Flyer looks neat on the          •   Flyer looks neat on the        •   Flyer looks cluttered.
    page, fits on a single page.         page.                          •   Formatting inconsistent
•   Important information            •   Almost all the important           enough to be
    catches the eye first.               information catches the            confusing.
•   Information is easy to find          eye first.                     •   It takes work to find
    – it is not a struggle to find   •   It isn’t necessary to hunt         the information.
    information.                         for important information.     •   Format looks
•   Font is legible and              •   Font is mostly legible and         unprofessional, is
    appropriate to the purpose.          appropriate to the                 inconsistent, and/or is
•   Flyer is attractive from a           purpose.                           difficult to read.
    distance.                        •   Only minor formatting          •   Major formatting
•   Word art and/or clip art             changes are needed.                changes are needed.
    are used to create a desired     •   Flyer is attractive.           •   Flyer is not attractive.
    effect.                          •   Word art and/or clip art           It does not inspire
                                         are slightly underused,            people to read it.
                                         misused, or overused.          •   Word art and/or clip art
                                                                            are underused,
                                                                            misused, or overused.




W08_3.6.3 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 3 of 3
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.1 (9th Grade) Correcting misspellings using available software programs, including
choosing the correct spelling option among several choices


Directions: Type the following questions into a Word application document. Use the
grammar and spelling tools on your computer to help you rewrite the following sentences
using proper syntax. Correct any misspelled words as you go.

1. The dog your planning to walk?


2. Two much spagety you have eaten.


3. Sun the ryses east in the.


4. Legs have to chikens.


5. City Anchorage the by oshean is.


6. Several peepal are going at the country club to the dance.


7. Moose an akwatic animal are.


8. Over the hill is the tradisional fishing camp of the Athabascan natives.




W09_3.6.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.1 (9th Grade) Correcting misspellings using available software programs, including
choosing the correct spelling option among several choices


Directions: Type the following questions into a Word application document. Use the
grammar and spelling tools on your computer to help you rewrite the following sentences
using proper syntax. Correct any misspelled words as you go.

1. The dog your planning to walk?


2. Two much spagety you have eaten.


3. Sun the ryses east in the.


4. Legs have to chikens.


5. City Anchorage the by oshean is.


6. Several peepal are going at the country club to the dance.


7. Moose an akwatic animal are.


8. Over the hill is the tradisional fishing camp of the Athabascan natives.


Proficient Response:
1. Are you planning to walk the dog?
2. You have eaten too much spaghetti.
3. The sun rises in the East.
4. Chickens have two legs.
5. The city of Anchorage is by the ocean.
6. Several people are going to the country club to dance.
7. Moose are aquatic animals.
8. The traditional fishing camp of the Athabascan natives is over the hill.




W09_3.6.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.2 (9th Grade) Using a thesaurus to locate and choose effective synonyms for common
words

                                  Active Verbs Worksheet

Directions: Use the thesaurus and dictionary function of your computer to change the
action verbs in the following sentences. Rewrite each sentence five times, changing the
verb each time. Each time you rewrite the sentence, use a one-word description of the
connotation of the new verb (the first one is done as an example). Look at the second
page before beginning work.


        1. The girl walked down the dock.
           Tired:     The boy trudged down the dock.
           Lazy:      The boy ambled down the dock.
           Injured: The boy hobbled down the dock.
           Scared:    The boy scurried down the dock.
           Happy:     The boy skipped down the dock.
           Busy:      The boy hurried down the dock.

        2. The boy walked down the street.




        3. The basketball got past his hand.




        4. He hit the ball into center field.




W09_3.6.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
        5. She ate the orange.




        6. He swam in the river.




        7. She talked for a long time.




        8. He threw the ball.




Hint: Action verbs and denotation/connotation

Denotation = the most specific or literal meaning of a word
Connotation = an additional sense or senses associated with or suggested by a word or
phrase.

Study the example:
1.      a. Does the phrase “the boy was high” mean that the boy was “above or
       stretching upward from a known base level such as the sea or ground?”
       (denotation)
       b. Does it mean he is on drugs? (connotation)

How about the expression “We bad”?
Does above expression mean We are below an acceptable standard in quality or
performance or does it mean We are cool?




W09_3.6.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
2. By using action verbs we can change the connotation of a phrase or sentence.


The coach yelled at me.                Probably bad news.
The coach shrieked at me.              Sounds out of control
The coach shouted at me.               A neutral sound to it
The coach screeched at me.             Again, out of control
The coach yelped at me.                Makes him sound surprised
The coach roared at me.                Definitely mad-like a lion
The coach bellowed at me.              Mad like a bull
The coach howled at me.                Sounds nuts
The coach hollered at me.              Could be friendly or just distance




W09_3.6.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.3 (9th Grade) The student uses resources by selecting and using formatting features
to produce final draft (e.g. centering title, choosing appropriate font size and style,
indentation, pagination, and line spacing)


Directions: Students open a poorly formatted flyer and revise the formatting so that the
flyer becomes neater, more professional, more eye-catching, and more accessible to a
reader. See proficient example on the next page.




W09_3.6.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.3 (9th Grade) The student uses resources by selecting and using formatting features
to produce final draft (e.g. centering title, choosing appropriate font size and style,
indentation, pagination, and line spacing)


Directions: Students open a poorly formatted flyer and revise the formatting so that the
flyer becomes neater, more professional, more eye-catching, and more accessible to a
reader. See proficient and below proficient examples below.

Below Proficient:

Saturday Flea Market

Held at the fairgrounds

Saturday from 9-5
Tables available 5 bucks
Free parking
Admission 2 dollars


Below Proficient:

THE HOMER HIGH SCHOOL CHRISTMAS PARTY

When                              Dec. 15, 2005
Where                             The Homer High School Gym
Whaz Happnin                      Bobbing for apple, a root beer drinking contest, a free
                                  throw contest, a three point contest, a play, Christmas
                                  carols




W09_3.6.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
Proficient Response:


         THE HOMER HIGH
        SCHOOL CHRISTMAS
              PARTY
                                   Dec. 15, 2005

                         The Homer High School Gym


         A Christmas Play: The Gift of the Magi

                                   Bobbing For Apples

                             Root Beer Drinking Contest

                                   Free Throw Contest

                                   Three Point Contest

                                   Christmas Carols

  Be there at 2:00 P.M. on Thursday, December 15th




W09_3.6.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
                  9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Brochure Format

Advanced                         Proficient                        Below Proficient
• Brochure looks neat all        • Brochure looks neat most        • Brochure looks cluttered.
  the way through.                 of the way through.             • Formatting inconsistent
• Important information          • Almost all the important          enough to be confusing.
  catches the eye first.           information catches the         • Content of the brochure
• Content of the brochure is       eye first.                        is not implied by the
  clearly implied by the         • Content of the brochure           cover.
  cover.                           is implied by the cover.        • It takes work to find the
• Information is easy to         • Font is mostly legible            information.
  find – it is not a struggle      and appropriate to the          • Sections of the brochure
  to find information.             purpose.                          are not delineated or
• All sections of the            • Most sections of the              focus of sections is not
  brochure have a clear and        brochure have a clear and         identifiable.
  easily identifiable focus.       easily identifiable focus.      • Format looks
• Font is legible and            • Only minor formatting             unprofessional, is
  appropriate to the               changes are needed.               inconsistent, and/or is
  purpose.                       • Brochure is adequately            difficult to read.
• Brochure is attractive.          attractive.                     • Major formatting
• Word art, shading,             • Word art, shading,                changes are needed.
  borders, and/or clip art         borders and/or clip art         • Brochure is not
  are used to create a             mostly enhance the                attractive. It does not
  desired effect.                  presentation.                     inspire people to read it.
                                                                   • Word art, shading,
                                                                     borders and/or clip art
                                                                     are underused, misused,
                                                                     or overused.




W09_3.6.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.4 (9th Grade) The student uses resources by selecting correct choice when using
grammar-checking software (e.g. accepts suggested change or disregards inappropriate
suggested change)


Directions: Students open up a document on a computer that contains grammar errors.
Students must use the grammar check function to revise the paper correctly. The teacher
watches the student work and evaluates the student’s skills with the process.

Practice paper:

We be going to the fair this summer. Don’t not be telling me we didn’t have fun.
The bulls was a real gas, cause they was all puffed up and full of theirselves. The rides
was a lotta fun too. We eat cotton candy and hot dogs, and then be getting sick from the
rides. That were a lot of fun. The pickle-bottling contest be a hoot, too. I don’t git it that
they was giving prizes for pickles. Whom eats those things, anyway?




W09_3.6.4         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.4 (9th Grade) The student uses resources by selecting correct choice when using
grammar-checking software (e.g. accepts suggested change or disregards inappropriate
suggested change)


Directions: Students open up a document on a computer that contains grammar errors.
Students must use the grammar check function to revise the paper correctly. The teacher
watches the student work and evaluates the student’s skills with the process.

Practice paper:

We be going to the fair this summer. Don’t not be telling me we didn’t have fun.
The bulls was a real gas, cause they was all puffed up and full of theirselves. The rides
was a lotta fun too. We eat cotton candy and hot dogs, and then be getting sick from the
rides. That were a lot of fun. The pickle-bottling contest be a hoot, too. I don’t git it that
they was giving prizes for pickles. Whom eats those things, anyway?

Proficient Response:

We went to the fair this summer. We really had a good time. The bulls were fun because
they were all puffed up and full of themselves. The rides were a lot of fun, too. We ate
cotton candy and hot dogs, and then kept getting sick from the rides. That was a lot of
fun. The pickle-bottling contest was a hoot, too. I don’t understand why they were giving
prizes for pickles. Who eats those things, anyway?


              9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Using Editing Software

Advanced                           Proficient                         Below Proficient
Student is able to use the         Student is able to use the         Student is not able to use
software to edit the               software to edit the               the software to edit the
document with accuracy             document with near perfect         document independently
and without help from the          accuracy. May still need to        and/or consistently accepts
teacher.                           ask the teacher a minor            inappropriate suggestions
                                   question or two.                   for changes.




W09_3.6.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.1 (9th Grade) Incorporating the thesis statement, which identifies the focus or
controlling idea for the entire composition, into an introductory paragraph (the
introductory paragraph may include a lead or hook, such as an anecdote, startling statistic
or quotation)

4.1.2 (9th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement, grouping ideas logically
within the paragraph, and placing paragraph breaks logically

4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.6 (9th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g. dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, genre exemplars, style manual, rubric, word
processor)


Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe what type of work you would like to do when you take your first
job. You could consider writing about working in tourism, athletics, tutoring handicapped
children, etc. Include why you prefer this work above other choices.




W09_4.1.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.1 (9th Grade) Incorporating the thesis statement, which identifies the focus or
controlling idea for the entire composition, into an introductory paragraph (the
introductory paragraph may include a lead or hook, such as an anecdote, startling statistic
or quotation)

4.1.2 (9th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement, grouping ideas logically
within the paragraph, and placing paragraph breaks logically

4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.6 (9th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g. dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, genre exemplars, style manual, rubric, word
processor)


Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe what type of work you would like to do when you take your first
job. You could consider writing about working in tourism, athletics, tutoring handicapped
children, etc. Include why you prefer this work above other choices.

                    9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Word Choice

         Advanced                           Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Words are specific,             • Words are mostly correct         • Language is so vague,
accurate, striking.               and adequate but may lack          inaccurate, and/or general
• Language is natural, not        flair and color.                   that even the most general
overdone.                         • Familiar words and               message does not come
• Verbs are lively.               phrases communicate.               through.
• Nouns and modifiers are         • Attempts at colorful             • Words are frequently used
precise.                          language are made but some         incorrectly, making the
• Clichés and jargon are          may be overdone.                   message hard to decipher.
used sparingly and only for       • Clichés and jargon may be        • Problems with language
effect.                           used occasionally in place         leave the reader unable to
                                  of fresh language.                 understand what the writer
                                                                     is trying to say most of the
                                                                     time.

See the next page for an additional rubric.




W09_4.1.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                     9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions

          Advanced                          Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Paragraphing reinforces         • Paragraphing is attempted        • Paragraphing is attempted
the organizational structure.     but some paragraphs run            but many paragraphs run
• Grammar and usage are           together or begin in the           together or begin in the
correct (few, if any, errors)     wrong place.                       wrong place.
and contribute to clarity and     • Problems with grammar or         • Problems with grammar or
style.                            usage are not serious              usage may be serious
• Punctuation is accurate         enough to impede or distort        enough to impede or distort
(few, if any, errors).            meaning.                           meaning in some instances
• Spelling is generally           • End punctuation usually          but not overall.
correct, even of more             correct; internal punctuation      • Terminal punctuation is
difficult words.                  sometimes missing or               usually correct; internal
                                  incorrect.                         punctuation is sometimes
                                  • Spelling is usually correct      missing or incorrect and
                                  or reasonably plausible on         errors may impede or distort
                                  common words;                      meaning in some instances.
                                  misspellings do not impede         • Spelling errors may
                                  communication.                     impede or distort meaning
                                                                     in some instances but not
                                                                     overall.




W09_4.1.1 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.1 (9th Grade) Incorporating the thesis statement, which identifies the focus or
controlling idea for the entire composition, into an introductory paragraph (the
introductory paragraph may include a lead or hook, such as an anecdote, startling statistic
or quotation)


Directions: Select the best-written thesis in an essay containing the following
information.

Dogs, cats, parrots, and gerbils.

    a.   Sparky, Kitty, and gerbils are great pets.
    b.   Sparky, Yacky, and Harry are great pets.
    c.   Dogs, cats, parrots, and gerbils make great pets.
    d.   Dogs and cats are the best pets.




W09_4.1.1a        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.1 (9th Grade) Incorporating the thesis statement, which identifies the focus or
controlling idea for the entire composition, into an introductory paragraph (the
introductory paragraph may include a lead or hook, such as an anecdote, startling statistic
or quotation)


Directions: Select the best-written thesis in an essay containing the following
information.

Dogs, cats, parrots, and gerbils.

    a.   Sparky, Kitty, and gerbils are great pets.
    b.   Sparky, Yacky, and Harry are great pets.
    c.   Dogs, cats, parrots, and gerbils make great pets.
    d.   Dogs and cats are the best pets.


Proficient Response:
c. Dogs, cats, parrots, and gerbils make great pets.




W09_4.1.1a Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.2 (9th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.5. (9th Grade) Using appropriate voice for intended audience (e.g., humorous,
informal, formal, or technical)


Directions: Write an essay about subsistence or outdoor activities taking place in your
area. Include what your favorite activity is and why.

This piece of writing will be 2-3 paragraphs.




W09_4.1.2       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.2 (9th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement

4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.5. (9th Grade) Using appropriate voice for intended audience (e.g., humorous,
informal, formal, or technical)


Directions: Write an essay about subsistence or outdoor activities taking place in your
area. Include what your favorite activity is and why.

This piece of writing will be 2-3 paragraphs.

                          9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Voice

          Advanced                           Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Language is highly               • Writing communicates in          • Writing communicates but
individual.                        an earnest, pleasing manner.       without much style or
• Reader senses the person         • Voice is inconsistent: it        interest.
behind the words; feels an         may emerge strongly, then          • Writing hides the writer;
interaction with the writer.       retreat behind general,            the reader has little or no
• Tone gives the writing           dispassionate language.            sense of the writer behind
flavor, adds interest.             • Writing hides as much of         the words.
• Language is appropriate          the writer as it reveals.          • Writer shows some
for purpose and audience.          • Writer seems aware of            awareness of audience and/
• Narrative writing seems          audience and purpose but           or purpose but is
honest, appealing, heartfelt.      often weighs words too             inconsistent.
• Expository or persuasive         carefully or discards              • Writer speaks in a
writing reflects a strong          personal insights in favor of      monotone.
commitment to the topic;           safe generalities.
anticipates reader’s
questions, shows why the
reader should care or want
to know more.

See additional six-trait scoring guide on the next page.




W09_4.1.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                    9th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric for Voice

          Advanced                            Proficient                       Below Proficient
6 Points                            4 Points                             3 Points
• Language is highly individual.    • Writing communicates in an         • Writing communicates but
• Reader senses the person behind   earnest, pleasing manner.            without much style or interest.
the words; feels an interaction     • Voice is inconsistent: it may      • Writing hides the writer; the
with the writer.                    emerge strongly, then retreat        reader has little or no sense of the
• Tone gives the writing flavor,    behind general, dispassionate        writer behind the words.
adds interest.                      language.                            • Writer shows some awareness
• Language is appropriate for       • Writing hides as much of the       of audience and/ or purpose but is
purpose and audience.               writer as it reveals.                inconsistent.
• Narrative writing seems honest,   • Writer seems aware of audience     • Writer speaks in a monotone.
appealing, heartfelt.               and purpose but often weighs
• Expository or persuasive          words too carefully or discards      2 Points
writing reflects a strong           personal insights in favor of safe   • It is hard to sense the writer
commitment to the topic;            generalities.                        behind the words.
anticipates reader’s questions,                                          • The writer does not seem to
shows why the reader should care                                         reach out to an audience or to
or want to know more.                                                    anticipate the reader’s interests or
                                                                         questions.
5 Points                                                                 • Writing may communicate on a
• Reader senses the person behind                                        functional level but does not
the words.                                                               move or involve the reader.
• There are occasional moments                                           • Writer does not seem
that surprise, amuse, or move the                                        sufficiently at home with the
reader.                                                                  topic to take risks, share personal
• Tone gives the writing flavor,                                         insights, or make the topic/story
adds interest.                                                           personal and real for the reader.
• Language is appropriate for
purpose and audience.                                                    1 Point
• Narrative writing seems honest,                                        • The writer seems unaware of an
appealing, heartfelt.                                                    audience or reader; writing seems
• Expository or persuasive                                               “painful” to the writer.
writing reflects a strong                                                • Writing may not communicate
commitment to the topic.                                                 on a functional level.
                                                                         • Writer seems uncomfortable
                                                                         with the topic.




W09_4.1.2 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006          Page 3 of 3
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.3 (9th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement, grouping ideas logically
within the paragraph, and placing paragraph breaks logically

Directions:
Write a composition/essay: If you could live anywhere in Alaska or anywhere else in the
world, where would you choose? Would you rather live where you do now? Explain why
you would choose to move or why you would stay. You should have at least 4-5
paragraphs. You will be scored for ideas and content, and conventions.




W09_4.1.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
                 9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Ideas and Content

           Advanced                           Proficient                    Below Proficient
• Ideas are fresh, original,       • Topic and direction are          • Topic and direction are
and/or insightful.                 evident, but more                  evident, but writer may
• Ideas are based on the           information is needed to           digress and go in a different
writer’s knowledge and/or          “fill in the blanks.”              direction or introduce a
experience.                        • Ideas draw on knowledge          different topic.
• Details are relevant,            and/or experience but may          • Ideas may not draw on
telling, and contribute to the     not move beyond general            knowledge and/or
whole.                             observations to specifics.         experience; may be general
• Content goes beyond the          • Details are reasonably           observations.
obvious or predictable.            clear but may not be               • Details are reasonably
• Topic makes a point or           detailed, personalized, or         clear but may not be
tells a story.                     expanded.                          detailed, personalized, or
                                   • Supporting details are           expanded.
                                   present but may not “flesh         • Supporting details are
                                   out” the main point or story       present but may not “flesh
                                   line.                              out” the main point or story
                                   • Original ideas may be            line or may be irrelevant to
                                   blended with ones that are         it.
                                   more obvious or                    • Original ideas are rare or
                                   predictable.                       absent.

See the six-trait scoring guide on the next page for more advanced scoring.




W09_4.1.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                   9th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide for Ideas and Content

           Advanced                              Proficient                       Below Proficient
6 Points                               4 Points                             3 Points
• Ideas are fresh, original, and/or    • Topic and direction are evident,   • Topic and direction are evident,
insightful.                            but more information is needed to    but writer may digress and go in a
• Ideas are based on the writer’s      “fill in the blanks.”                different direction or introduce a
knowledge and/or experience.           • Ideas draw on knowledge and/or     different topic.
• Details are relevant, telling, and   experience but may not move          • Ideas may not draw on
contribute to the whole.               beyond general observations to       knowledge and/or experience;
• Content goes beyond the              specifics.                           may be general observations.
obvious or predictable.                • Details are reasonably clear but   • Details are reasonably clear but
• Topic makes a point or tells a       may not be detailed, personalized,   may not be detailed, personalized,
story.                                 or expanded.                         or expanded.
                                       • Supporting details are present     • Supporting details are present
5 Points                               but may not “flesh out” the main     but may not “flesh out” the main
• Ideas are based on the writer’s      point or story line.                 point or story line or may be
knowledge and/ or experience.          • Original ideas may be blended      irrelevant to it.
• Details are relevant, telling, and   with ones that are more obvious      • Original ideas are rare or absent.
contribute to the whole.               or predictable.
• Topic makes a point or tells a                                            2 Points
story.                                                                      • Topic and direction are not
• Some ideas are fresh and                                                  evident; the writer has not
original.                                                                   defined the topic in a meaningful,
                                                                            personal way.
                                                                            • Information is very limited or
                                                                            unclear.
                                                                            • Text may be repetitious or read
                                                                            like a collection of disconnected,
                                                                            random thoughts.
                                                                            • The writer does not distinguish
                                                                            the main ideas or critical points
                                                                            from the supporting details or less
                                                                            critical points.

                                                                            1 Point
                                                                            • Topic and direction are missing.
                                                                            • Information is very limited or
                                                                            unclear.
                                                                            • Text may be repetitious, or may
                                                                            read like a collection of
                                                                            disconnected, random thoughts.




W09_4.1.3 Answer Key     Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006          Page 3 of 3
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.3 (9th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement, grouping ideas logically
within the paragraph, and placing paragraph breaks logically


Directions: Write a 4-6 paragraph essay. Imagine that you and your best friend are
planning a weekend adventure. Explain in detail your preparations and planning. Where
would you go? What activities would you do along the way and when you get there?
How would you pay for it? Where would you stay—camping, motels, friends? What
safety precautions would you use? Make your response as complete as possible. You will
be scored on how well you organize your ideas.




W09_4.1.3b      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.3 (9th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement, grouping ideas logically
within the paragraph, and placing paragraph breaks logically


Directions: Write a 4-6 paragraph essay. Imagine that you and your best friend are
planning a weekend adventure. Explain in detail your preparations and planning. Where
would you go? What activities would you do along the way and when you get there?
How would you pay for it? Where would you stay—camping, motels, friends? What
safety precautions would you use? Make your response as complete as possible. You will
be scored on how well you organize your ideas.

                    9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

          Advanced                           Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Sequencing of ideas and          • Writing communicates in          • Sequencing needs work.
details is logical and             an earnest, pleasing manner.       • There is no real lead or
effective.                         • Voice is inconsistent: it        introduction to set up what
• Introduction is inviting—        may emerge strongly, then          follows.
draws in the reader.               retreat behind general,            • Conclusion is missing or
• Conclusion is satisfying—        dispassionate language.            does not wrap things up.
leaves reader with a sense         • Writing hides as much of         • Transitions seldom work
of resolution.                     the writer as it reveals.          well, with many
• Transitions are thoughtful;      • Writer seems aware of            connections between ideas
clearly show how ideas             audience and purpose but           unclear.
connect.                           often weighs words too             • Pacing feels awkward;
• Organization flows               carefully or discards              writer slows when the
smoothly, seems effortless.        personal insights in favor of      reader wants to move on,
                                   safe generalities.                 and vice versa.
                                                                      • Problems with
                                                                      organization make it hard to
                                                                      grasp the main point or
                                                                      story line.

See the next page for an additional six-trait rubric.




W09_4.1.3b Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                      9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Organization

          Advanced                            Proficient                      Below Proficient
6 Points                            4 Points                            3 Points
• Sequencing of ideas and details   • Sequencing of ideas and details   • Sequencing is usually logical
is logical and effective.           is logical and effective.           but there may be lapses or
• Introduction is inviting—draws    • Introduction is inviting—draws    digressions.
in the reader.                      in the reader.                      • There may be an attempt to
• Conclusion is satisfying—         • Conclusion is satisfying—         write an introduction or
leaves reader with a sense of       leaves reader with a sense of       conclusion but it may not be
resolution.                         resolution.                         clearly recognizable as such; a
• Transitions are thoughtful;       • Transitions are thoughtful;       conclusion, in particular, may be
clearly show how ideas connect.     clearly show how ideas connect.     absent.
• Organization flows smoothly,      • Organization usually flows        • Transitions attempted but do not
seems effortless.                   smoothly.                           work well; connections between
                                                                        ideas may be unclear.
5 Points                                                                • There are frequent lapses in
• Sequencing of ideas and details                                       pacing.
is logical and effective.                                               • There is an attempt at
• Introduction is inviting—draws                                        organization but it may depart
in the reader.                                                          from supporting the main point or
• Conclusion is satisfying—                                             story line.
leaves reader with a sense of
resolution.                                                             2 Points
• Transitions are thoughtful;                                           • Sequencing needs work.
clearly show how ideas connect.                                         • There is no real lead or
• Organization usually flows                                            introduction to set up what
smoothly.                                                               follows.
                                                                        • Conclusion is missing or does
                                                                        not wrap things up.
                                                                        • Transitions seldom work well,
                                                                        with many connections between
                                                                        ideas unclear.
                                                                        • Pacing feels awkward; writer
                                                                        slows when the reader wants to
                                                                        move on, and vice versa.
                                                                        • Problems with organization
                                                                        make it hard to grasp the main
                                                                        point or story line.

                                                                        1 Point
                                                                        • Sequencing is absent.
                                                                        • There is no introduction or
                                                                        conclusion.
                                                                        • Transitions are absent.
                                                                        • Organization is absent; writing
                                                                        may be a brief list.




W09_4.1.3b Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006      Page 3 of 3
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.4 (9th Grade) Writing a concluding paragraph that connects concluding elements to
the introductory elements


Directions: Write a concluding paragraph to the following essay that ties into the
introduction.

                  The Bridge to Nowhere and the Knik Arm Bridge
In 2005, the proposed Ketchikan and Anchorage bridges were the cause of a lot
discussion around the state and the United States. Some people thought the bridge money
should have been used for other projects and some really wanted the bridge built for a lot
of good reasons.

The main reason people don’t want the bridges is because the $452 million could be used
for other projects. The Anchorage Daily News made reference to these bridges in their
article of November 8, 2005, as “pork-barrel” spending. Some people feel that the money
could be better used for the reconstruction of the damage that occurred when the
Hurricane Katrina destroyed many cities and towns including New Orleans. Even though
many people all over the Lower 48 don’t want the bridges, 60% of people in the state of
Alaska do want them.

People feel the bridges would enhance dwindling economic opportunities in both the
Knik Arm and Ketchikan. They might also open up land for purchase and development
besides providing jobs. Ketchikan has had little waterfront property for sale and the price
of land has been so high that most people couldn’t afford a piece of property.




W09_4.1.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.1.4 (9th Grade) Writing a concluding paragraph that connects concluding elements to
the introductory elements


Directions: Write a concluding paragraph to the following essay that ties into the
introduction.

                       The Bridge to Nowhere and the Knik Arm Bridge
In 2005, the proposed Ketchikan and Anchorage bridges were the cause of a lot
discussion around the state and the United States. Some people thought the bridge money
should have been used for other projects and some really wanted the bridge built for a lot
of good reasons.

The main reason people don’t want the bridges is because the $452 million could be used
for other projects. The Anchorage Daily News made reference to these bridges in their
article of November 8, 2005, as “pork-barrel” spending. Some people feel that the money
could be better used for the reconstruction of the damage that occurred when the
Hurricane Katrina destroyed many cities and towns including New Orleans. Even though
many people all over the Lower 48 don’t want the bridges, 60% of people in the state of
Alaska do want them.

People feel the bridges would enhance dwindling economic opportunities in both the
Knik Arm and Ketchikan. They might also open up land for purchase and development
besides providing jobs. Ketchikan has had little waterfront property for sale and the price
of land has been so high that most people couldn’t afford a piece of property.


Proficient Response:
A student could write either a pro or con opinion about the bridges.




W09_4.1.4 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.1 (9th Grade) Writing a narrative using setting and character to advance the plot

Directions: Write a short story that is 4-6 pages typed. You have just been playing
basketball in the gym. It is dark and you are walking home with your basketball. You trip
over something in the road. Write a story about what this was and what had happened.

To teacher: This is a great checklist to give to the students to guide their writing.

Writing a Short Story check sheet Name __________________________

______         Description of Place (Setting)
               ______ Looks like (colors, specific types of trees, etc.)
               ______ Smells like
               ______ Sounds like
               ______ Feels like
______         Characterization (1) round as opposed to flat
               ______ Color of hair
               ______ Personality type (in actions and words)
               ______ Movements
               ______ Voice and type of words that character would use.
______         Characterization (static or dynamic)
               Name of character ______________________
               type    _____________________
               _______indirect characterization (showing)
               _______ direct characterization (not telling)
______         Dialogue
               ______ Variety of Speaker tags…not just said
               ______ Interspersed throughout story




W09_4.2.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006      Page 1 of 2
______      Point of View (which person did you write in and stick with it?)
            ______ 1st
            ______ 3rd limited
            ______ 3rd omniscient
______      3-5 pages ( font sized 12 or 10)
______      Double spaced
______      Typed
______      Correctness of conventions
______      Plot diagram
______      Exposition
______      Rising action
______      Climax
______      Falling action
______      Denouement




W09_4.2.1    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.2 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing in a variety
of nonfiction forms (e.g. letter, report, autobiography, and/or essay) to inform, describe,
or persuade

Sample writing prompts:

Directions: Select one of the options below.

A. Compose a business letter to a potential employer, college, technical school, or
training program about which you would like more information. Request the information
you need.

B. What did you think was the most exciting event from the piece of literature you just
read? Compose a newspaper article relating this event to the people of your town.

C. Research a career of your choice. Then compose a report to be read by your peers
containing the following information about this occupation:
       Educational requirements
       Skill requirements
       Salary Range
       Outlook for this job (i.e. Is this a field that is likely to grow in the future?)
       Description of a typical day on this job
       Description of what region or type of location it would be possible to do this job

D. Think of an issue you have a strong opinion about. Compose a five-paragraph essay to
persuade your peers on this topic.




W09_4.2.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.2 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing in a variety
of nonfiction forms (e.g. letter, report, autobiography, and/or essay) to inform, describe,
or persuade

Sample writing prompts:

Directions: Select one of the options below.

A. Compose a business letter to a potential employer, college, technical school, or
training program about which you would like more information. Request the information
you need.

B. What did you think was the most exciting event from the piece of literature you just
read? Compose a newspaper article relating this event to the people of your town.

C. Research a career of your choice. Then compose a report to be read by your peers
containing the following information about this occupation:
       Educational requirements
       Skill requirements
       Salary Range
       Outlook for this job (i.e. Is this a field that is likely to grow in the future?)
       Description of a typical day on this job
       Description of what region or type of location it would be possible to do this job

D. Think of an issue you have a strong opinion about. Compose a five-paragraph essay to
persuade your peers on this topic.

See the next page for scoring information for option D.




W09_4.2.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
Proficient Response:
Advanced: 90-100
Proficient: 60-89
Not Proficient: 0-59
                          9th Grade Persuasive Essay Scoring Rubric

Thesis                                                                               ____ out of 5
         Thesis statement is present.
         Thesis statement is clear.
Introduction                                                                         ____ out of 10
         Thesis statement is placed logically in the paragraph.
         Introduction engages reader’s attention.
         Introduction prepares readers to hear arguments for thesis.
Body Paragraph 1                                                                     ____ out of 15
         There is a topic sentence.
         The topic sentence is clear.
         The topic supports the thesis.
         It is adequately clear how the paragraph supports the thesis.
         The paragraph sticks to its topic.
         There is adequate explanation of the topic.
         There is at least one example of the topic.
         Order of the sentences is clear and logical.
Body Paragraph 2                                                                     ____ out of 15
         There is a topic sentence.
         The topic sentence is clear.
         The topic supports the thesis.
         It is adequately clear how the paragraph supports the thesis.
         The paragraph sticks to its topic.
         There is adequate explanation of the topic.
         There is at least one example of the topic.
         Order of the sentences is clear and logical.
Body Paragraph 3                                                                     ____ out of 15
         There is a topic sentence.
         The topic sentence is clear.
         The topic supports the thesis.
         It is adequately clear how the paragraph supports the thesis.
         The paragraph sticks to its topic.
         There is adequate explanation of the topic.
         There is at least one example of the topic.
         Order of the sentences is clear and logical.
Conclusion                                                                           ____ out of 10
         Conclusion makes the paper feel complete and finished.
         Conclusion functions to make the main point “stick” in the reader’s mind.
Transitions                                                                          ____ out of 10
         Ideas within a paragraph flow smoothly.
         Ideas flow smoothly between one paragraph and the next.
Overall sentence fluency and conventions                                             ____ out of 10
Effectiveness/appropriateness of voice and word choice                               ____ out of 10

TOTAL SCORE:                                                                         ____ out of 100

Comments:




W09_4.2.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006      Page 3 of 3
4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.2 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing in a variety
of nonfiction forms (e.g. letter, report, autobiography, and/or essay) to inform, describe,
or persuade


Writing Business Letters

Directions: Read the following prompt. Write an effective business letter using correct
formatting, style, and tone. Use a separate sheet of paper for your letter.

Prompt:

The Helping Hearts Club, a group in which you are a member, has offered to paint the
exterior of the local community center. You have volunteered, as vice-president of the
group, to locate a company who will help your efforts through a donation of painting
supplies. Carter’s Paint Supply has been a generous supporter of other club events,
especially the Spring Fun Run. Members of your group are willing to volunteer at the
paint supply store in exchange for supplies. Contact George Carter, the owner of the
store. The store is located at 3344 Cypress Hill in Elk Mound, Wisconsin. The zip code is
44556. You need 20 gallons of paint, 15 brushes, and assorted paint supplies. Write to
Mr. Carter and attempt a bargain.




W09_4.2.2a       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.2 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing in a variety
of nonfiction forms (e.g. letter, report, autobiography, and/or essay) to inform, describe,
or persuade


Writing Business Letters

Directions: Read the following prompt. Write an effective business letter using correct
formatting, style, and tone. Use a separate sheet of paper for your letter.

Prompt:

The Helping Hearts Club, a group in which you are a member, has offered to paint the
exterior of the local community center. You have volunteered, as vice-president of the
group, to locate a company who will help your efforts through a donation of painting
supplies. Carter’s Paint Supply has been a generous supporter of other club events,
especially the Spring Fun Run. Members of your group are willing to volunteer at the
paint supply store in exchange for supplies. Contact George Carter, the owner of the
store. The store is located at 3344 Cypress Hill in Elk Mound, Wisconsin. The zip code is
44556. You need 20 gallons of paint, 15 brushes, and assorted paint supplies. Write to
Mr. Carter and attempt a bargain.

Proficient Response:
2 points for the each of the following formatting and writing criteria:
____    Proper Heading
____    Inside Address
____    Return Address
____    All information in body
____    Complimentary closing
____    Salutation
____    Correct punctuation
____    Good tone
____    Extra points for extremely polite and beyond expectations

Total ______________

Grade Scale
18 points for Advanced
16 points for Proficient
12 points for Below proficient
10 points for Far below proficient


W09_4.2.2a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
Example of Proficient Business Letter:

Box 23158
Ketchikan, Alaska 99901
November 12, 2005

Bob Sam’s Promotions
2225 Nature Drive
Tuscaloosa, Oklahoma 55563
Re: Wild Bill Hickock’s Wild West Show

Dear Mr. Sam:

       I am the speaker-committee chairperson in charge of locating a speaker for a local
community club during “Celebrity Week.” We need a person who will impress our
audience, make them laugh, “wow them.” I noticed that the Wild Bill Hickock’s Wild
West Show is going to be appearing in Juneau, a neighboring city, next June, the same
week as our needs. I realize that your costs are $25,000, but we only have $12,500 in our
budget for this venue. Since you already have to go to Juneau and have to stop in
Ketchikan anyway, what would you think of spending the night and performing for
$12,500? We have people in Ketchikan who have never seen a western show and would
be excited to see your operation.

       We also have whale, reindeer, and eagle watching, fishing, kayaking, and
yachting to offer you for free. That might make up for some of the money you might not
make. You know…like the benefits of being on the road?

       Please consider coming to Ketchikan and entertaining our people and giving them
the opportunity to see the real Wild West. We will in turn share the “Last Frontier” with
you.
       Thank you for your time and consideration and please let us book you that same
week as Juneau’s performance.

Respectfully,
Rosie Smith

Rosie Smith
Speaker-committee Chairperson




W09_4.2.2a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.3 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing expressively
when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective
essays, and/or newsletters)

Sample writing prompts/assignments

    A. Read a piece of literature. After each chapter (or scene, or section), write a
       paragraph or more in your journal describing your personal reaction to what you
       have just read.
       Sample questions:
           • How do you differ from the main character? In what way or ways are you
               similar?
           • Do you agree or disagree with the main character’s decision in this chapter
               (or scene, or section)? Why or why not?
           • What could the main character have done differently to change the
               outcome of the situation?
           • Have you ever found yourself with a similar problem? Describe how you
               resolved the problem, or, if you have not had this problem, how you would
               advise a friend to solve this problem.
    B. Read a book of your choice. When you are finished, compose a rhyming poem at
       least 16 lines in length that will present the main ideas of the book to your
       classmates.
    C. Think about problems you see in your society or your school. Compose a letter to
       the editor that expresses your thoughts on this problem.
    D. Write 10 haiku that will give a reader 10 clear mental pictures of spring in your
       area.
    E. What have been the highlights of this school year so far? Choose one highlight,
       and write a description of it to be read by parents in our newsletter. Make sure
       you explain what was noteworthy about the highlight you chose.
    F. After reading a piece of literature about a hero, have students write an essay
       explaining at least three heroic characteristics the hero demonstrated in the story.
    G. Have students read a piece of literature appropriate for the grade level. Have
       groups of students adapt the literature (or a section of it) as a short play.




W09_4.2.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.3 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing expressively
when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective
essays, and/or newsletters)

Sample writing prompts/assignments

    H. Read a piece of literature. After each chapter (or scene, or section), write a
       paragraph or more in your journal describing your personal reaction to what you
       have just read.
       Sample questions:
           • How do you differ from the main character? In what way or ways are you
               similar?
           • Do you agree or disagree with the main character’s decision in this chapter
               (or scene, or section)? Why or why not?
           • What could the main character have done differently to change the
               outcome of the situation?
           • Have you ever found yourself with a similar problem? Describe how you
               resolved the problem, or, if you have not had this problem, how you would
               advise a friend to solve this problem.
    I. Read a book of your choice. When you are finished, compose a rhyming poem at
       least 16 lines in length that will present the main ideas of the book to your
       classmates.
    J. Think about problems you see in your society or your school. Compose a letter to
       the editor that expresses your thoughts on this problem.
    K. Write 10 haiku that will give a reader 10 clear mental pictures of spring in your
       area.
    L. What have been the highlights of this school year so far? Choose one highlight,
       and write a description of it to be read by parents in our newsletter. Make sure
       you explain what was noteworthy about the highlight you chose.
    M. After reading a piece of literature about a hero, have students write an essay
       explaining at least three heroic characteristics the hero demonstrated in the story.
Have students read a piece of literature appropriate for the grade level. Have groups of
students adapt the literature (or a section of it) as a short play.

See the next page for scoring rubrics.




W09_4.2.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                 7th and 8th Grade Rubric for Sample A (Journal entries)

          Advanced                           Proficient                       Below Proficient
• All parts of the question        • All parts of the question        • Question not addressed or not
  are thoroughly addressed.          are addressed.                     fully addressed.
• Writer’s unique                  • Writer’s unique                  • Writer’s unique perspective is
  perspective is expressed           perspective is expressed           expressed, but is not clear.
  clearly.                           and is clear.                    • Main points are attempted,
• Writer’s main points are         • Main points are clear.             but necessary detail is not
  very clear.                      • Detail sufficient to provide       present.
• Detail gives a clear and           basic understanding of           • Response does not express the
  thorough understanding of          main points.                       writer’s feelings on the issue.
  the writer’s main points.        • Writer’s voice is                • Writer’s voice is generic or
• Writer’s voice is                  appropriate but does not           inappropriate.
  appropriate and consistent         enhance the meaning or
  and helps to convey the            mood of the response.
  meaning and mood of the
  response.

                9th and 10th Grade Rubric for Sample A (Journal entries)

          Advanced                           Proficient                       Below Proficient
• All parts of the question        • All parts of the question        • Question not addressed or not
  are thoroughly addressed.          are addressed.                     fully addressed.
• Writer’s unique                  • Writer’s unique                  • Writer’s unique perspective is
  perspective is expressed           perspective is expressed           expressed, but is not clear.
  clearly.                           and is clear.                    • Main points are attempted,
• Writer’s main points are         • Main points are clear              but necessary detail is not
  exceptionally clear.             • Detail sufficient to               present.
• Extensive detail gives a           provide thorough                 • Response does not express the
  clear and thorough                 understanding of main              writer’s feelings on the issue.
  understanding of the               points.                          • Writer’s voice is generic or
  writer’s main points.            • Writer’s voice is                  inappropriate.
• Writer’s voice is                  appropriate but does not
  appropriate and consistent         always enhance the
  and helps to convey the            meaning or mood of the
  meaning and mood of the            response.
  response.




W09_4.2.3 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.3 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing expressively
when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective
essays, and/or newsletters)


After writing plays, students might use this list to have students write reflective essays to
internalize their playwriting process.

Playwriting

Directions: Write a play and be sure to include the following three parts (each worth 100
points). 300 total

1. _______ 100 pts 2 copies of your final play with cover and names of authors
2. _______ 100 pts Rough drafts of play with revisions. I expect you to have
revisions...with notes, etc.
3. _______ 100 pts Reflective piece typed (see below for instructions)

Be sure you number your answers and put the question in the answer. Type and attach to
this sheet. The following topics will be covered in your reflective piece about your play:

        1. Name of your play and how you came up with the name.
        2. What was the theme of your play and why did you choose this theme?
        3. Where did you get your ideas for the play? What influenced your play?
        4. What did you learn about playwriting? Be very conclusive about:
               • characterization and how you came up with the characters
               • characters that oppose each other’s styles of living or ideas about life
               • a change in your character or plot
               • the form of the play,
               • stage settings as being different from movies or TV
               • importance of conflict in keeping your audience’s attention
        5. What were you trying to do in your play? What was problematic?
        6. How did reading your play out loud before your peers influence the way you
           wrote your play?
        7. How did reading your play in front of visitors influence how you wrote your
           play?
        8. What was the issue your play was about?
        9. What was the main conflict? Where did it occur in your play?
        10. Who were your main characters? How were they alike and/or different?
        11. What were you trying to tell the world through your play?
        12. How did people react to your play and what did you think about it?


W09_4.2.3b       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
        13. How are plays different from writing essays or stories?
        14. What did you learn about yourself by writing this play?
        15. What are stereotypes? Did you have any? Are you now able to recognize
            stereotypes in literature and daily life? What were some stereotypes that
            popped up in your class?
        16. Is it possible to use stereotyping effectively in your play? Is it possible to
            use controversial issues in plays and respectfully write about them? How
            can one do that?
        17. Once you get your issue set up in your play, how hard is it to come up with a
            story to surround it?
        18. How important is revision and getting feedback from your peers and
            teachers in writing your play?
        19. Would you recommend doing this process again, and why?
        20. Do you find playwriting more exciting than other types of writing in
            English class, and why? Is it a valuable assignment?
        21. Did you have to examine your own values while play writing?
        22. Would you like to continue to work on this next quarter? Would you like
             class time to do this? Would it warrant being considered as an ELP 10%
             project?

*(This is additional for people who co-authored their plays)
       23. Collaborative Writing
               • What is collaborative writing?
               • How did your collaborative process work?
               • Did one person do more work than another?
               • Who did the writing?
               • Who came up with the ideas?
               • How did each playwright contribute to the play in order to get credit
                 for being part of the play?
               • Should some people get more credit than others?
               • How did you come up with your ideas for your characters?
               • What were the plot, issues, conflict, and setting?




W09_4.2.3b       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
This is a great checklist to give to the students to guide their writing.

Writing a Short Story/Play Check Sheet Name __________________________

______ Description of Place (Setting)
                ______ Looks like (colors, specific types of trees, etc.)
                ______ Smells like
                ______ Sounds like
                ______ Feels like
______ Characterization (1) round as opposed to flat
                ______ Color of hair
                ______ Personality type (in actions and words)
                ______ Movements
                ______ Voice and type of words that character would use.
______ Characterization (static or dynamic)
                Name of character ______________________
                type      _____________________
                _______indirect characterization (showing)
                _______ direct characterization (not telling)
______ Dialogue
                ______ Variety of Speaker tags…not just said
                ______ Interspersed throughout story
______ Point of View (which person did you write in and stick with it?)
                ______ 1st
                ______ 3rd limited
                ______ 3rd omniscient
______          3-5 pages ( font sized 12 or 10)
______ Double spaced
______ Typed
______ Correctness of conventions
______ Plot diagram
______ Exposition
______ Rising action
______ Climax
______ Falling action
______ Denouement




W09_4.2.3b          Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.3 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing expressively
when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective
essays, and/or newsletters)


After reading narrative poems, i.e. “Casey at the Bat,” students will write their own
narrative poems.

Directions:

• Students or teacher will read “Casey at the Bat” poem in class.
• Students and teachers will orally discuss the plot.
• Students will draw plot diagrams (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action,
denouement).
• Students will then use the model poems to write their own poems.
• Students will create their own plot diagrams on their own poems.




W09_4.2.3c       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.3 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing expressively
when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective
essays, and/or newsletters)


After reading narrative poems, i.e. “Casey at the Bat,” students will write their own
narrative poems.

Directions:

• Students or teacher will read “Casey at the Bat” poem in class.
• Students and teachers will orally discuss the plot.
• Students will draw plot diagrams (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action,
denouement).
• Students will then use the model poems to write their own poems.
• Students will create their own plot diagrams on their own poems.


Proficient Response:

____10 points for plot diagram

5 points for each of the following:

____consistent rhyme
____rhyme scheme
____rhythm
____word choice
____exposition
____rising action
____climax
____falling action
____denouement

____10 points for correctness (spelling, etc.)
____10 points for typed product

____25 points student analysis of own poem, typed

_____Total 100 points




W09_4.2.3c Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.2 The student selects and uses appropriate forms of fiction and nonfiction to
achieve different purposes when writing for different audiences.

4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.3 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing expressively
when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective
essays, and/or newsletters)

Sample writing prompts/assignments


Directions:

    A. Read a piece of literature. After each chapter (or scene, or section), write a
       paragraph or more in your journal describing your personal reaction to what you
       have just read.
       Sample questions:
           • How do you differ from the main character? In what way or ways are you
               similar?
           • Do you agree or disagree with the main character’s decision in this chapter
               (or scene, or section)? Why or why not?
           • What could the main character have done differently to change the
               outcome of the situation?
           • Have you ever found yourself with a similar problem? Describe how you
               resolved the problem, or, if you have not had this problem, how you would
               advise a friend to solve this problem.
    B. Read a book of your choice. When you are finished, compose a rhyming poem at
       least 16 lines in length that will present the main ideas of the book to your
       classmates.
    C. Think about problems you see in your society or your school. Compose a letter to
       the editor that expresses your thoughts on this problem.
    D. Write 10 haiku that will give a reader 10 clear mental pictures of life in the region
       where you live.
    E. What have been the highlights of this school year so far? Choose one highlight,
       and write a description of it to be read by parents in our newsletter. Make sure
       you explain what was noteworthy about the highlight you chose.




W09_4.2.3d       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
3.2 The student selects and uses appropriate forms of fiction and nonfiction to
achieve different purposes when writing for different audiences.

4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.3 (9th Grade) Writing for a variety of purposes and audiences by writing expressively
when producing or responding to texts (e.g. poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective
essays, and/or newsletters)

Sample writing prompts/assignments


Directions:

    F. Read a piece of literature. After each chapter (or scene, or section), write a
       paragraph or more in your journal describing your personal reaction to what you
       have just read.
       Sample questions:
           • How do you differ from the main character? In what way or ways are you
               similar?
           • Do you agree or disagree with the main character’s decision in this chapter
               (or scene, or section)? Why or why not?
           • What could the main character have done differently to change the
               outcome of the situation?
           • Have you ever found yourself with a similar problem? Describe how you
               resolved the problem, or, if you have not had this problem, how you would
               advise a friend to solve this problem.
    G. Read a book of your choice. When you are finished, compose a rhyming poem at
       least 16 lines in length that will present the main ideas of the book to your
       classmates.
    H. Think about problems you see in your society or your school. Compose a letter to
       the editor that expresses your thoughts on this problem.
    I. Write 10 haiku that will give a reader 10 clear mental pictures of life in the region
       where you live.
    J. What have been the highlights of this school year so far? Choose one highlight,
       and write a description of it to be read by parents in our newsletter. Make sure
       you explain what was noteworthy about the highlight you chose.

See the next page for scoring rubrics.




W09_4.2.3d Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                 7th and 8th Grade Rubric for Sample A (Journal entries)

          Advanced                           Proficient                          Below Proficient
• All parts of the question are    • All parts of the question are       • Question not addressed or not fully
  thoroughly addressed.              addressed.                            addressed.
• Writer’s unique perspective is   • Writer’s unique perspective is      • Writer’s unique perspective is
  expressed clearly.                 expressed and is clear.               expressed, but is not clear.
• Writer’s main points are very    • Main points are clear.              • Main points are attempted, but
  clear.                           • Detail sufficient to provide          necessary detail is not present.
• Detail gives a clear and           basic understanding of main         • Response does not express the
  thorough understanding of the      points.                               writer’s feelings on the issue.
  writer’s main points.            • Writer’s voice is appropriate but   • Writer’s voice is generic or
• Writer’s voice is appropriate      does not enhance the meaning          inappropriate.
  and consistent and helps to        or mood of the response.
  convey the meaning and mood
  of the response.

                9th and 10th Grade Rubric for Sample A (Journal entries)

          Advanced                           Proficient                          Below Proficient
• All parts of the question are    • All parts of the question are       • Question not addressed or not fully
  thoroughly addressed.              addressed.                            addressed.
• Writer’s unique perspective is   • Writer’s unique perspective is      • Writer’s unique perspective is
  expressed clearly.                 expressed and is clear.               expressed, but is not clear.
• Writer’s main points are         • Main points are clear               • Main points are attempted, but
  exceptionally clear.             • Detail sufficient to provide          necessary detail is not present.
• Extensive detail gives a clear     thorough understanding of main      • Response does not express the
  and thorough understanding of      points.                               writer’s feelings on the issue.
  the writer’s main points.        • Writer’s voice is appropriate       • Writer’s voice is generic or
• Writer’s voice is appropriate      but does not always enhance the       inappropriate.
  and consistent and helps to        meaning or mood of the
  convey the meaning and mood        response.
  of the response.




W09_4.2.3d Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 3 of 3
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.2 The student demonstrates understanding of elements of discourse (purpose,
speaker, audience, form) when completing expressive (creative, narrative,
descriptive), persuasive, research-based, informational, or analytic writing
assignments.

4.2.3 (9th Grade) Writing expressively when producing or responding to texts (e.g.,
poetry, journals, editorials, drama, reflective essays, and/or newsletters)

4.2.4 (9th Grade) Using research-based information and/or analysis in research projects
or extended reports

Directions: Write a book analysis on a book you have read. Be sure to have a well
developed introduction, body, and conclusion. You will be scored on the following
rubric:

Book Analysis Scoring Rubric Student name __________________Pd.__
With MLA documentation of quotes from text
______ (5) Present tense
______ (10) Organization
______ (10) Ideas and Content
______ (10) Conventions (10 points) (spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, grammar)
______ (10) MLA format (10 points)
              ____• 2 Work cited
              ____• 3 Quotes set up properly
              ____• 5 Heading:      Left side      ______• Student Name
                                                   ______ • English ___ Pd. ___
                                                   ______ • Teacher (spelled correctly)
                                                   ______ • 20 November 2001
                                                   ______ • Book analysis
Introduction:
______ (5) Book title w/ author’s name
______ (5) Short summary of book (2-3 sentences)
______ (5) Thesis statement (mentions what is in body paragraphs)

Body Paragraphs:
Paragraph #2:
______ (1) 200+ words
______ (1) 8 sentences minimum
______ (1) Topic Sentence
_______(2) Concrete Detail - Quotes (2 or 3)
_______(1) Commentary (2-3 sentences)
_______(1) Concluding Sentence (or transitional sentence)



W09_4.2.4       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 4
Paragraph #3:
______(1) 200+ words
______(1) 8 sentences minimum
______(1) Topic Sentence
______(2) Concrete detail - Quotes (2 or 3)
______(1) Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______(1) Concluding sentence (or transitional sentence)

Paragraph #4:
______(1) 200+ words
______(1) 8 sentences minimum
______(1) Topic Sentence
______(2) Concrete detail - Quotes (2 or 3)
______(1) Commentary (2-3 sentences)
______(1) Concluding sentence (or transitional sentence)

Conclusion:
Paragraph #5:
______ (1) Starts out specific, becomes general
______ (1) 40+ words, all commentary (cm) no new information or quotes
______ (1) Repeat thesis...No repeats of key words
______ (1) Give opinion of book and recommendations


Total ____= _____% Grade ________
       85    100%
or

Sample assessment

Student resource self-assessments
      Spelling
             I have read through my paper and underlined any words I wasn’t sure
             were spelled correctly.
             I have used my resources (print dictionary, online dictionary, teacher,
             peers, word processing software, etc.) to check spelling of the word(s) in
             question.
             I believe every word in my paper is spelled correctly.
      Conventions
             I have read through my paper and put stars next to the sentences I wasn’t
             sure were 100% correct in their grammar, usage, and punctuation.
             I have used my resources (print grammar guide, online grammar guide,
             teacher, peers, word processing software, etc.) to check my grammar,
             usage, and punctuation.
             I believe my grammar, usage, and punctuation in this paper are 100%
             correct.



W09_4.2.4       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
        Word choice
               I have read through my paper and circled any words or passages I felt
               were weak and/or generic or could be more vivid.
               I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers,
               word processing software, etc.) to investigate and choose more vivid and
               precise wording where I needed to.
               The word choice in my paper is totally appropriate for the audience.
               My accurate and vivid word choice makes my paper engaging for the
               audience.
        Ideas/Content
               I have read through my paper and compared it to the assignment prompt. I
               have highlighted sections that may not really address the prompt or that
               may be boring for a reader.
               I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
               help make sure that my paper satisfies the assignment and is engaging to
               read.
               I believe that I have completed the assignment fully and done my best to
               make my paper interesting for a reader.
        Sentence Fluency
               I have read my paper and put boxes around words or phrases that sound
               repetitive and/or choppy. I have also put boxes around any sentences I
               think might be incomplete, run-on, or rambling.
               I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers,
               etc.) to investigate and choose options for sentence structure to help
               improve my fluency.
               I believe my sentences are varied and sound good when read aloud. I
               believe that my paper is free from incomplete, run-on, or rambling
               sentences except where I put them in on purpose for effect.
        Voice
               I have read my paper and put brackets around words or passages that I
               worried might not have an appropriate or engaging voice.
               I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
               investigate and choose techniques and/or wording to improve the voice
               where I needed to.
               I believe the voice of this paper is appropriate for the purpose and
               audience and that my writing style is fresh and unique enough to engage
               the reader as much as possible.
        Organization
               I have read my paper and have put a swirl next to paragraphs, sentences,
               or phrases where I worry I might be off topic or where I might need more
               of a transition to get to the next idea.
               I have drawn arrows next to paragraphs, sentences, or phrases that may in
               the wrong place within the paper.
               I can put my finger on a sentence in every paragraph that contains the
               main idea.




W09_4.2.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
            I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
            rearrange, delete, expand, and/or add transitions to passages that needed
            improvement in organization.
            I believe that every paragraph contains enough detail for the reader to
            understand and follow the main idea.
            I believe that my sentences and paragraphs are in the best possible order.
            I believe that the paper flows smoothly from one idea to the next thanks to
            my artful and varied transitional words and sentences.

_______________________________________
Signature of Student




W09_4.2.4    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 4
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.1 (9th Grade) The student writes and edits using conventions of Standard English by
varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning and style of writing


Directions: Combine the following sentences in two different ways. Your new sentences
should still have the same meaning as the original sentences, though they may use
different vocabulary and/or order of ideas.

        1. Snow machines are important for life in Bush Alaska.
        2. Riding snow machines is an exhilarating activity.
        3. Snow machines are useful for hunting.
        4. Snow machines are a predominant form of transportation in areas where there
            are not many roads.




W09_4.3.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.1 (9th Grade) The student writes and edits using conventions of Standard English by
varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning and style of writing


Directions: Combine the following sentences in two different ways. Your new sentences
should still have the same meaning as the original sentences, though they may use
different vocabulary and/or order of ideas.

        5. Snow machines are important for life in Bush Alaska.
        6. Riding snow machines is an exhilarating activity.
        7. Snow machines are useful for hunting.
Snow machines are a predominant form of transportation in areas where there are not
many roads.


Proficient Responses:

• Snow machines are important for life in Bush Alaska since they are so useful for
  hunting and are such a predominant form of transportation in areas where there are not
  many roads. In addition, riding snow machines is an exhilarating activity.

• Because snow machines are useful for hunting, are a vital form of transportation, and
  are exhilarating to ride, they are important for life in Bush Alaska.


• Whether they are used for hunting, transportation, or just for fun, snow machines are an
  important part of life in Bush Alaska.




W09_4.3.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.1 (9th Grade) The student writes and edits using conventions of Standard English by
varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning and style of writing


                                     Sentence Fluency

Directions: What kind of music do you prefer? Classical? Rap? Country? R&B? Other?
In a single paragraph, describe your music and why you like it. Make your response as
complete as possible.




W09_4.3.1a      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.1 (9th Grade) The student writes and edits using conventions of Standard English by
varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning and style of writing


                                          Sentence Fluency

Directions: What kind of music do you prefer? Classical? Rap? Country? R&B? Other?
In a single paragraph, describe your music and why you like it. Make your response as
complete as possible.


                   9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Sentence Fluency

          Advanced                             Proficient                        Below Proficient
• Sentence construction makes       • Sentences are grammatical and        • Sentences are choppy,
meaning clear.                      hang together.                         incomplete, rambling, or
• Sentences are purposeful and      • Some variation in sentence           awkward; there may be many
build upon each other.              length and structure; sentence         fragments.
• The writing has cadence; the      beginnings are not all alike.          • Phrasing does not sound natural;
writer has thought about sound as   • Some transitions between             the reader must sometimes reread
well as meaning.                    sentences are missing or hidden.       to get the meaning.
• Sentences vary in length and      • Parts may be stiff, awkward,         • Many sentences begin the same
structure.                          choppy, or gangly.                     way and follow the same pattern
• Fragments are used only for       • Dialogue, if used, sounds stiff at   (e.g., subject-verb-object) in a
style or effect.                    times.                                 monotonous pattern.
• Dialogue, if used, sounds                                                • Transitions between sentences
natural.                                                                   are missing or hidden, or endless
                                                                           connectives create a massive
                                                                           jumble of language in which clear
                                                                           beginnings and endings are lost.
                                                                           • Sentences are choppy,
                                                                           incomplete, rambling, or
                                                                           awkward; there may be many
                                                                           fragments.
                                                                           • The reader must frequently
                                                                           pause or reread.
                                                                            • Sentences begin the same way
                                                                           and follow the same pattern (e.g.,
                                                                           subject-verb-object) in a
                                                                           monotonous pattern.


See the next page for an expanded scoring guide.




W09_4.3.1a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006           Page 2 of 3
             9th Grade Six-Trait Scoring Guide/Rubric for Sentence Fluency

          Advanced                             Proficient                        Below Proficient
6 Points                            4 Points                               3 Points
• Sentence construction makes       • Sentences are grammatical and        • Sentences are usually
meaning clear.                      hang together.                         grammatical and hang together
• Sentences are purposeful and      • Some variation in sentence           with some lapses.
build upon each other.              length and structure; sentence         • Little variation in sentence
• The writing has cadence; the      beginnings are not all alike.          length and structure; most
writer has thought about sound as   • Some transitions between             sentence beginnings are alike.
well as meaning.                    sentences are missing or hidden.       • Many transitions between
• Sentences vary in length and      • Parts may be stiff, awkward,         sentences are missing or hidden.
structure.                          choppy, or gangly.                     • Fragments may be present.
• Fragments are used only for       • Dialogue, if used, sounds stiff at   • Dialogue, if used, sounds stiff
style or effect.                    times.                                 and unnatural.
• Dialogue, if used, sounds
natural.                                                                   2 Points
                                                                           • Sentences are choppy,
5 Points                                                                   incomplete, rambling, or
• Sentence construction makes                                              awkward; there may be many
meaning clear.                                                             fragments.
• Sentences are purposeful and                                             • Phrasing does not sound natural;
build upon each other.                                                     the reader must sometimes reread
• Sentences vary in length and                                             to get the meaning.
structure.                                                                 • Many sentences begin the same
• Fragments are used only for                                              way and follow the same pattern
style or effect.                                                           (e.g., subject-verb-object) in a
• Dialogue, if used, sounds                                                monotonous pattern.
natural.                                                                   • Transitions between sentences
                                                                           are missing or hidden, or endless
                                                                           connectives create a massive
                                                                           jumble of language in which clear
                                                                           beginnings and endings are lost.

                                                                           1 Point
                                                                           • Sentences are choppy,
                                                                           incomplete, rambling, or
                                                                           awkward; there may be many
                                                                           fragments.
                                                                           • The reader must frequently
                                                                           pause or reread.
                                                                            • Sentences begin the same way
                                                                           and follow the same pattern (e.g.,
                                                                           subject-verb-object) in a
                                                                           monotonous pattern.




W09_4.3.1a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006            Page 3 of 3
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.1 (9th Grade) The student writes and edits using conventions of Standard English by
varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning and style of writing

3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.


Directions: Combine the following sentences in two different ways. Your new sentences
should still have the same meaning as the original sentences, though they may use
different vocabulary and/or order of ideas.

        1. Reading is a fun activity.
        2. Reading is useful tool for learning new things.
        3. Reading is a skill everyone needs to practice.




W09_4.3.1b       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.1 (9th Grade) The student writes and edits using conventions of Standard English by
varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow and to enhance
meaning and style of writing

3.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English including grammar,
sentence structure, paragraph structure, punctuation, spelling, and usage in written
work.


Directions: Combine the following sentences in two different ways. Your new sentences
should still have the same meaning as the original sentences, though they may use
different vocabulary and/or order of ideas.

        4. Reading is a fun activity.
        5. Reading is useful tool for learning new things.
            Reading is a skill everyone needs to practice.


9th and 10th Grade Proficient Responses:
 • Reading, a skill everyone needs to practice, is a fun activity that can help people learn
    new things.
 • Not only is reading a useful tool for learning new things, it is a fun activity as well. It
    is a skill everyone needs to practice.
 • Whether we read for fun or to learn new things, reading is a skill we all need to
    practice.

7th and 8th Grade Proficient Responses:
 • Reading is a fun activity and is a useful tool for learning new things. Everyone needs
    to practice reading.
 • Reading is skill everyone has to practice, but it’s a fun activity, too. It can be a useful
    tool for learning new things.




W09_4.3.1b Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.


4.3.2 (9th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)

Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        Ketchikan is a town in s.e. Alaska where it rains 180 inches a year. Most of the
peoples that live their have Alaskan sneakers which is red rubber boots. They can walked
in the muskeg and jump out of they’re boats and airplanes onto the beaches usally
without getting there feet wet. Most of the time it blows at least 20-90 miles per hour
during rainstorms therefore umbrellas is rarely useful as they blow inside out. The eagles
and ravens hangs tight on the branches during these rainstorms while people check to see
if there boats are still afloat at the marina. Sometimes they sink. If you don’t like rain,
doesnt come to Ketchikan.




W09_4.3.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.


4.3.2 (9th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)

Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        Ketchikan is a town in s.e. Alaska where it rains 180 inches a year. Most of the
peoples that live their have Alaskan sneakers which is red rubber boots. They can walked
in the muskeg and jump out of they’re boats and airplanes onto the beaches usally
without getting there feet wet. Most of the time it blows at least 20-90 miles per hour
during rainstorms therefore umbrellas is rarely useful as they blow inside out. The eagles
and ravens hangs tight on the branches during these rainstorms while people check to see
if there boats are still afloat at the marina. Sometimes they sink. If you don’t like rain,
doesnt come to Ketchikan.



Proficient Response:

        Ketchikan is a town in S.E. Alaska where it rains 180 inches a year. Most of the
people that live there have Alaskan sneakers, which are red rubber boots. They can walk
in the muskeg and jump out of their boats and airplanes onto the beaches, usually without
getting their feet wet. Most of the time it blows at least 20-90 miles per hour during
rainstorms; therefore, umbrellas are rarely useful as they blow inside out. The eagles and
ravens hang tightly on the branches during these rainstorms while people check to see if
their boats are still afloat at the marina. Sometimes they sink. If you don’t like rain,
don’t come to Ketchikan.




W09_4.3.2 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.3 (9th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by applying
rules of punctuation (i.e. comma, quotation marks, apostrophes, semicolons, colons,
dashes, hyphens, and parentheses)


Directions: Read the sentence below and circle true or false for the statements below.

Teachers students and parents these people are equally responsible in creating great
school climate for learning therefore no bullying should be allowed.

T or F         1. There should be a hyphen between the words “equally” and
               “responsible.”

T or F         2. There should be a semicolon between the words “learning” and
               “therefore.”

T or F         3. There should be a dash between the words “parents” and “these.”

T or F         4. There should be a comma between the words “teachers” and
               “students.”

T or F         5. There should be an apostrophe in the word “teachers.”

T or F         6. There should be a set of quotation marks around the phrase “students
               and parents.”




W09_4.3.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.3 (9th Grade) Writing and editing using conventions of Standard English by applying
rules of punctuation (i.e. comma, quotation marks, apostrophes, semicolons, colons,
dashes, hyphens, and parentheses)


Directions: Read the sentence below and circle true or false for the statements below.

Teachers students and parents these people are equally responsible in creating great
school climate for learning therefore no bullying should be allowed.

T or F          1. There should be a hyphen between the words “equally” and
                “responsible.”

T or F          2. There should be a semicolon between the words “learning” and
                “therefore.”

T or F          3. There should be a dash between the words “parents” and “these.”

T or F          4. There should be a comma between the words “teachers” and
                “students.”

T or F          5. There should be an apostrophe in the word “teachers.”

T or F 6. There should be a set of quotation marks around the phrase “students and
parents.”


9th Grade:                                         10th Grade:
Advanced: 6                                        Proficient: 6
Proficient: 5                                      Not Proficient: 0-5
Not Proficient: 0-4


Proficient Response:
1. F
2. T
3. T
4. T
5. F
6. F




W09_4.3.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.4 (9th Grade) Applying rules of capitalization (e.g., titles and proper nouns)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        craig, alaska, is situated on prince of wales island (not to be confused with whales
that are mammals.) people that live there enjoy native culture fishing, and hunting.




W09_4.3.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.4 (9th Grade) Applying rules of capitalization (e.g., titles and proper nouns)


Directions: Correct the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization in the following
paragraph.

        craig, alaska, is situated on prince of wales island (not to be confused with whales
that are mammals.) people that live there enjoy native culture fishing, and hunting.


Proficient Response:

        Craig, Alaska, is situated on Prince of Wales Island (not to be confused with
whales that are mammals). People that live there enjoy Native culture, fishing, and
hunting.




W09_4.3.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.5 (9th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)


Directions: Circle the sentences with the correct conventions in the following:

1.
     a. Sharon are going to kill me if I doesn’t ask her to the dance.
     b. Sharon is going to kill me if I doesn’t ask her to the dance.
     c. Sharon is going to kill me if I don’t ask her to the dance.
     d. Sharon are going to kill me if I doesn’t ask her to the dance.


2.
     a. Several people is going to paint the gym for there homecoming dance.
     b. Several people are going to paint the gym for they’re homecoming dance.
     c. Several people are going to paint the gym for there homecoming dance.
     d. Several people are going to paint the gym for their homecoming dance.
3.
     a. I gone to town yesterday to get my mom’s prescription fill.
     b. I going to town yesterday to get my mom’s prescription filled.
     c. I am going to town tomorrow to get my mom’s prescription fill.
     d. I am going to town tomorrow to get my mom’s prescription filled.




W09_4.3.5         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure,
punctuation, spelling, and usage.

4.3.5 (9th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)


Directions: Circle the sentences with the correct conventions in the following:

1.
     a. Sharon are going to kill me if I doesn’t ask her to the dance.
     b. Sharon is going to kill me if I doesn’t ask her to the dance.
     c. Sharon is going to kill me if I don’t ask her to the dance.
     d. Sharon are going to kill me if I doesn’t ask her to the dance.


2.
     a. Several people is going to paint the gym for there homecoming dance.
     b. Several people are going to paint the gym for they’re homecoming dance.
     c. Several people are going to paint the gym for there homecoming dance.
     d. Several people are going to paint the gym for their homecoming dance.
3.
     a. I gone to town yesterday to get my mom’s prescription fill.
     b. I going to town yesterday to get my mom’s prescription filled.
     c. I am going to town tomorrow to get my mom’s prescription fill.
     d. I am going to town tomorrow to get my mom’s prescription filled.


Proficient Response:
1. C
2. D
3. D




W09_4.3.5 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.1 (9th Grade) Reviewing content and organization and making appropriate changes to
improve clarity and logical progression of ideas (e.g., increasing elaboration or support
for ideas/thesis, providing relevant details, examples, definitions, narrative anecdotes,
illustrative scenarios, or counter arguments appropriate to the genre)


Directions:
   Read the following paragraph from a persuasive essay. Revise the paragraph so that:
          a. the topic sentence is adequately explained;
          b. the paragraph provides an example that proves the topic sentence; and
          c. it is adequately clear how the body paragraph supports the thesis.

    Thesis: Athletes participating in school sports should be drug tested.
    Topic Sentence: Athletes who use drugs are unable to perform up to their potential.
    Paragraph: Athletes who use drugs are unable to perform up to their potential.

Keeping the body healthy should be just as important to an athlete as winning is. Drugs
can negatively affect an athlete’s performance in a number of ways. A student who uses
drugs may not be as healthy as a drug-free student.




W09_4.4.1       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.1 (9th Grade) Reviewing content and organization and making appropriate changes to
improve clarity and logical progression of ideas (e.g., increasing elaboration or support
for ideas/thesis, providing relevant details, examples, definitions, narrative anecdotes,
illustrative scenarios, or counter arguments appropriate to the genre)


Directions:
   Read the following paragraph from a persuasive essay. Revise the paragraph so that:
          d. the topic sentence is adequately explained;
          e. the paragraph provides an example that proves the topic sentence; and
          f. it is adequately clear how the body paragraph supports the thesis.

    Thesis: Athletes participating in school sports should be drug tested.
    Topic Sentence: Athletes who use drugs are unable to perform up to their potential.
    Paragraph: Athletes who use drugs are unable to perform up to their potential.

Keeping the body healthy should be just as important to an athlete as winning is. Drugs
can negatively affect an athlete’s performance in a number of ways. A student who uses
drugs may not be as healthy as a drug-free student.


Proficient Response:

Athletes who use drugs are unable to perform up to their potential. Drugs can negatively
affect an athlete’s body in a number of ways, and these effects can impair an athlete’s
performance. For instance, a basketball player who smokes marijuana may not have the
same lung capacity as a drug-free athlete, causing him or her to get winded more easily
during the game. An athlete using marijuana may also experience impairment to the
short-term memory, making it more difficult for that athlete to remember strategies and
plays discussed before the game and during time-outs. Clearly, an athlete who is not on
drugs has a better chance of performing at his or her best than one who is. Therefore, it
makes sense to use a drug test to ensure that everyone maximizes his or her potential as
an athlete.




W09_4.4.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.2 (9th Grade) The student revises writing by giving/receiving feedback and
evaluating writing based on established criteria (e.g. self-created checklists, peer
conference formats, scoring guides, or rubrics)


Sample assessments

Directions: Students select a piece of their writing from their portfolio and assess it in
the following manner:

Directions: Select one of the below to write:
A. Students grade sample essays using six-trait rubric. Students earn a grade according to
the accuracy of their scoring.

B. Before handing in an assignment, students use the teacher’s rubric to evaluate their
own work. Part of the grade for the paper is completing the self-evaluation.

C. Students create their own evaluation tools or collaborate to create an evaluation tool
for an assignment.

D. Students all evaluate the same paper. They are given a grade for providing appropriate
feedback for that paper.

Sample assessment

Student resource self-assessments
      Spelling
             I have read through my paper and underlined any words I wasn’t sure
             were spelled correctly.
             I have used my resources (print dictionary, online dictionary, teacher,
             peers, word processing software, etc.) to check spelling of the word(s) in
             question.
             I believe every word in my paper is spelled correctly.
      Conventions
             I have read through my paper and put stars next to the sentences I wasn’t
             sure were 100% correct in their grammar, usage, and punctuation.
             I have used my resources (print grammar guide, online grammar guide,
             teacher, peers, word processing software, etc.) to check my grammar,
             usage, and punctuation.
             I believe my grammar, usage, and punctuation in this paper are 100%
             correct.




W09_4.4.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006     Page 1 of 4
        Word choice
               I have read through my paper and circled any words or passages I felt
               were weak and/or generic or could be more vivid.
               I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers,
               word processing software, etc.) to investigate and choose more vivid and
               precise wording where I needed to.
               The word choice in my paper is totally appropriate for the audience.
               My accurate and vivid word choice makes my paper engaging for the
               audience.
        Ideas/Content
               I have read through my paper and compared it to the assignment prompt. I
               have highlighted sections that may not really address the prompt or that
               may be boring for a reader.
               I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
               help make sure that my paper satisfies the assignment and is engaging to
               read.
               I believe that I have completed the assignment fully and done my best to
               make my paper interesting for a reader.
        Sentence Fluency
               I have read my paper and put boxes around words or phrases that sound
               repetitive and/or choppy. I have also put boxes around any sentences I
               think might be incomplete, run-on, or rambling sentences.
               I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers,
               etc.) to investigate and choose options for sentence structure to help
               improve my fluency.
               I believe my sentences are varied and sound good when read aloud. I
               believe that my paper is free from incomplete, run-on, or rambling
               sentences except where I put them in on purpose for effect.
        Voice
               I have read my paper and put brackets around words or passages that I
               worried might not have an appropriate or engaging voice.
               I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
               investigate and choose techniques and/or wording to improve the voice
               where I needed to.
               I believe the voice of this paper is appropriate for the purpose and
               audience and that my writing style is fresh and unique enough to engage
               the reader as much as possible.
        Organization
               I have read my paper and have put a swirl next to paragraphs, sentences,
               or phrases where I worry I might be off topic or where I might need more
               of a transition to get to the next idea.
               I have drawn arrows next to paragraphs, sentences, or phrases that may in
               the wrong place within the paper.
               I can put my finger on a sentence in every paragraph that contains the
               main idea.




W09_4.4.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
            I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
            rearrange, delete, expand, and/or add transitions to passages that needed
            improvement in organization.
            I believe that every paragraph contains enough detail for the reader to
            understand and follow the main idea.
            I believe that my sentences and paragraphs are in the best possible order.
            I believe that the paper flows smoothly from one idea to the next thanks to
            my artful and varied transitional words and sentences.

_______________________________________
Signature of Student




W09_4.4.2    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
                      Sample Rubric for Student Peer Evaluation

                   Advanced                        Proficient               Below Proficient
            • Evaluator provided at        • Evaluator provided at         • Comments are not
 th
7 and
8th           least one comment of           least one comment of           adequate or specific
              praise.                        praise.                        enough to help
            • Evaluator identified at      • Evaluator identified at        author improve the
              least one area for             least one area for             paper.
              improvement.                   improvement.                  • Evaluator was
            • Evaluator provided at        • Evaluator provided at          disrespectful to the
              least one concrete             least one concrete             author.
              suggestion for getting         suggestion for getting        • Comments and/or
              the paper to the next          the paper to the next          proofreading marks
              level.                         level.                         are difficult to
            • All comments and             • All comments and               understand.
              suggestions are                suggestions are               • Many inaccurate
              respectful to the author.      respectful to the author.      suggestions about
            • All proofreading marks       • Most proofreading              conventions.
              are                            marks are
              legible/understandable.        legible/understandable.
            • All suggestions about        • Most suggestions about
              conventions are accurate.      conventions are accurate.

9th and     • Evaluator multiple,          • Evaluator provided at         • Comments are not
10th          specific comments of           least one comment of            adequate or
              praise.                        praise.                         specific enough to
            • Evaluator identified at      • Evaluator identified at         help author
              least one specific area        least one area for              improve the paper.
              for improvement.               improvement.                  • Evaluator was
            • Evaluator provided           • Evaluator provided at           disrespectful to the
              multiple concrete              least one concrete              author.
              suggestions for getting        suggestion for getting        • Comments and/or
              the paper to the next          the paper to the next           proofreading
              level.                         level.                          marks are difficult
            • All comments and             • All comments and                to understand.
              suggestions are                suggestions are               • Many inaccurate
              respectful to the author.      respectful to the author.       suggestions about
            • All proofreading marks       • All proofreading marks          conventions.
              are                            are
              legible/understandable.        legible/understandable.
            • All suggestions about        • All suggestions about
              conventions are accurate.      conventions are accurate.




W09_4.4.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 4 of 4
4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.3 (9th Grade) Combining sentences for fluency, using precise and descriptive words
and/or eliminating irrelevant details to improve quality and effectiveness of writing


Sample assessments:

1. Directions: Combine the following set of short, choppy sentences into a single
   sentence. Also, use the provided sentences to form the specified type of sentence.
   You may change the details if necessary to form a sentence that makes sense.

            A. Murv drove his car to Homer.

            B. The truck was blue.

            C. The truck is a Honda Ridgeline

            D. He loves his truck.

            E. Murv has a new pickup truck.




2. Directions: Write a compound sentence.




3. Directions: Write a complex sentence.




4. Directions: Compose an essay. Within your essay, incorporate effective style. Include
examples of each of the following. Then, identify each of the examples in your completed
essay.
    1.   Write at least one compound sentence.
    2.   Write at least one complex sentence.
    3.   Begin at least one sentence with an “ly” word.
    4.   Begin at least one sentence with a prepositional phrase.

Expand at least one sentence with a prepositional phrase within the sentence.




W09_4.4.3         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 5
5. Directions: Read the following passages and highlight the unnecessary or unrelated
details or sentences. Explain WHY you removed the details or sentences. Use terms
associated with writing paragraphs in your answer. Write in complete sentences.




    A. Mowing our yard has never been my favorite thing to do. We have huge front
       lawn that needs to be mowed every week. Cutting the immense lawn takes at least
       five hours. After the grass is cut, the clippings need to be hauled into the woods.
       The woods on our property are a great place to spend an afternoon. The hauling
       task takes another hour. Finally, the equipment needs to be cleaned and stored
       until the next week. I would rather spend my day playing in the woods.




    B. In the summer of 1980, a huge wind storm blew through my hometown, Eau
       Claire, Wisconsin. Winds recorded at over 100 miles per hour toppled trees
       throughout the city. Power lines fell, and many citizens were without electricity
       for over two weeks. At our house, we lost a side of beef that we had just put in the
       freezer. Roofs tore from the tops of buildings like shredded paper scattering
       insulation everywhere. Luckily, no one was injured in the devastating storm;
       however, clean up lasted for months afterward.




W09_4.4.3        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 5
4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.3 (9th Grade) Combining sentences for fluency, using precise and descriptive words
and/or eliminating irrelevant details to improve quality and effectiveness of writing


Sample assessments:

1. Directions: Combine the following set of short, choppy sentences into a single
   sentence. Also, use the provided sentences to form the specified type of sentence.
   You may change the details if necessary to form a sentence that makes sense.

            A. Murv drove his car to Homer.

            B. The truck was blue.

            C. The truck is a Honda Ridgeline

            D. He loves his truck.

            E. Murv has a new pickup truck.


Proficient Response: Murv loves driving his new blue Honda Ridgeline pickup to
Homer.



2. Directions: Write a compound sentence.




3. Directions: Write a complex sentence.



4. Directions: Compose an essay. Within your essay, incorporate effective style. Include
examples of each of the following. Then, identify each of the examples in your completed
essay.
    5.   Write at least one compound sentence.
    6.   Write at least one complex sentence.
    7.   Begin at least one sentence with an “ly” word.
    8.   Begin at least one sentence with a prepositional phrase.

Expand at least one sentence with a prepositional phrase within the sentence.


W09_4.4.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 5
                9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Compound Sentences

           Advanced                        Proficient                      Below Proficient
•   Compound/complex              • Compound/complex                  • Compound/complex
    examples are correct.           examples are correct.               examples are not correct.
•   All sentences are             • All sentences are                 • Not all sentences are
    punctuated correctly.           punctuated correctly.               punctuated correctly.
•   All sentences make sense      • All sentences make sense          • Not all sentences make
    with details provided.          with details provided.              sense with details
•   Paragraph is particularly                                           provided.
    engaging for the reader.


5. Directions: Read the following passages and highlight the unnecessary or unrelated
details or sentences. Explain WHY you removed the details or sentences. Use terms
associated with writing paragraphs in your answer. Write in complete sentences.




         A. Mowing our yard has never been my favorite thing to do. We have huge front
            lawn that needs to be mowed every week. Cutting the immense lawn takes at
            least five hours. After the grass is cut, the clippings need to be hauled into the
            woods. The woods on our property are a great place to spend an afternoon.
            The hauling task takes another hour. Finally, the equipment needs to be
            cleaned and stored until the next week. I would rather spend my day playing
            in the woods.




         B. In the summer of 1980, a huge wind storm blew through my hometown, Eau
            Claire, Wisconsin. Winds recorded at over 100 miles per hour toppled trees
            throughout the city. Power lines fell, and many citizens were without
            electricity for over two weeks. At our house, we lost a side of beef that we had
            just put in the freezer. Roofs tore from the tops of buildings like shredded
            paper scattering insulation everywhere. Luckily, no one was injured in the
            devastating storm; however, clean up lasted for months afterward.




W09_4.4.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 5
                        9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Sentences

     Advanced                  Proficient             Not Proficient               Far Below
                                                                                   Proficient
• Variety in types,      • Some variety in         • Many sentences          • Sentences begin the
  length, and              type, length and          begin the same way        same way and
  beginnings of            beginning of              and follow the            follow the same
  sentences make           sentences. Most           same pattern with         pattern with no
  essay read               sentences read            little variety.           variety.
  smoothly – sound         smoothly –
                                                   • Phrasing does not       • Sentences sound
  has been                 meaning is clear
                                                     sound natural.            choppy,
  considered as well       with very few stiff,
                                                                               incomplete, and
  as meaning.              awkward or choppy       • Sometimes the
                                                                               awkward.
                           sentences.                reader has to reread
• The sentences build
                                                     for meaning.            • Meaning is unclear
  upon each other to     • Fragments are used
                                                                               forcing the reader
  make sense for the       only for style or       • Essay may contain
                                                                               to reread.
  reader. Fragments        effect.                   many fragments.
  are used only for                                                          • Essay contains
  style or effect.                                                             many fragments.




W09_4.4.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 5
4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.3 (9th Grade) Combining sentences for fluency, using precise and descriptive words
and/or eliminating irrelevant details to improve quality and effectiveness of writing


Sample assessments:

Directions: Combine the following set of short, choppy sentences into a single sentence.
Also, use the provided sentences to form the specified type of sentence. You may change
the details if necessary to form a sentence that makes sense.

    1. Betsey kayaked down the river.

    2. The river had big rapids.

    3. People were afraid of the rapids.

    4. Betsey was 14 years old.




W09_4.4.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.4.3 (9th Grade) Combining sentences for fluency, using precise and descriptive words
and/or eliminating irrelevant details to improve quality and effectiveness of writing


Sample assessments:

Directions: Combine the following set of short, choppy sentences into a single sentence.
Also, use the provided sentences to form the specified type of sentence. You may change
the details if necessary to form a sentence that makes sense.

    5. Betsey kayaked down the river.

    6. The river had big rapids.

    7. People were afraid of the rapids.

    8. Betsey was 14 years old.


Proficient Response: Betsey, 14, kayaked down the big scary rapids in the river.




W09_4.4.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

4.4.4 (9th Grade) Clarifying thesis statement and/or topic sentence and adding details to
support main ideas, if needed


Directions: Rewrite the following paragraph by making its thesis statement clearer and
adding details to support the main idea.


I like to fish. I go whenever I can. My mom cooks the fish that I catch.




W09_4.4.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

4.4.4 (9th Grade) Clarifying thesis statement and/or topic sentence and adding details to
support main ideas, if needed


Directions: Rewrite the following paragraph by making its thesis statement clearer and
adding details to support the main idea.


I like to fish. I go whenever I can. My mom cooks the fish that I catch.


Proficient Response:
I love to fish from the shore for king salmon. Living on the Kenai Peninsula I fish every
year. Only two king salmon can be kept per year from the Kenai River so I release most
of the fish that I catch. This last summer I kept a 52-pound female and a 58-pound buck.
I processed the female’s eggs for next year’s bait.




W09_4.4.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

4.4.5 (9th Grade) Revising writing by making style, diction, voice, or persona more
consistent with form (e.g. organizational structure or writing genre) and the perspective
conveyed

Sample assessment:

Directions: Read the following letter. Revise the letter so that the tone and word choice
are appropriate for the type of formal letter, but make the basic content the same.

PO Box 12679
Ketchikan, AK 99901
September 16, 2005

The person I spoke to yesterday
Harrisberg Valley Hospital
476 Ferry Rd.
Austin, TX 78003-7829

Hi there!
Listen, I had a total blast yesterday when you sat me down and interviewed me. Thanks a
lot for taking time out to do that. I could hardly handle it.

I really want to work with you guys. I think that hospital totally rocks and you all do
good stuff over there. The baby ward was awesome, and I’m pretty sure I’d fit right in
with the team, especially since I have a humongous experience with babies. Remember
how we talked about that?

Thanks for talking to me yesterday. I want the job real bad because I am down and out. If
you want to chat some more, you can give me a buzz at 823-9667. I might not be home
(‘cause I do have a life), but you can leave me a message.

Peace out,

Sal
Sally Burton




W09_4.4.5        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
4.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

4.4.5 (9th Grade) Revising writing by making style, diction, voice, or persona more
consistent with form (e.g. organizational structure or writing genre) and the perspective
conveyed

Sample assessment:

Directions: Read the following letter. Revise the letter so that the tone and word choice
are appropriate for the type of formal letter, but make the basic content the same.

PO Box 12679
Ketchikan, AK 99901
September 16, 2005

The person I spoke to yesterday
Harrisberg Valley Hospital
476 Ferry Rd.
Austin, TX 78003-7829

Hi there!
Listen, I had a total blast yesterday when you sat me down and interviewed me. Thanks a
lot for taking time out to do that. I could hardly handle it.

I really want to work with you guys. I think that hospital totally rocks and you all do
good stuff over there. The baby ward was awesome, and I’m pretty sure I’d fit right in
with the team, especially since I have a humongous experience with babies. Remember
how we talked about that?

Thanks for talking to me yesterday. I want the job real bad because I am down and out. If
you want to chat some more, you can give me a buzz at 823-9667. I might not be home
(‘cause I do have a life), but you can leave me a message.

Peace out,

Sal
Sally Burton




W09_4.4.5 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
Proficient Response:

P.O. Box 12679
Ketchikan, AK 99901
September 16, 2005

Ms. Rosalia Vasquez
Harrisberg Valley Hospital
476 Ferry Rd.
Austin, TX 78003-7829


Dear Ms. Vasquez:

Thank you for the interview yesterday. I very much enjoyed meeting you and the other
staff members at Delilah Valley Hospital.

I am excited about the possibility of joining the Harrisberg Valley Hospital team. I was
extremely impressed with Harrisberg Valley and the important work you and the other
staff members do there. The obstetrics unit was especially impressive, and I feel that my
experience in obstetrics, which we discussed yesterday, would be an asset to this unit.

Thank you for your consideration. Should you have any more questions or require further
information, I can be reached by phone or message at 823-9667. I look forward to
hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Sally Burton
Sally Burton




W09_4.4.5 Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 3
4.1 Write a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is supported with
evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

4.4.5 (9th Grade) Revising writing by making style, diction, voice, or persona more
consistent with form (e.g. organizational structure or writing genre) and the perspective
conveyed


Directions: Write an essay of at least 4-6 paragraphs.

Prompt: Write about an incident that happened to a friend, teacher, or a parent and your
feelings about that event. Select one of the following voices to write in: angry, happy,
sad, frustrated, proud.




W09_4.4.5a       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
4.1 Write a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is supported with
evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

4.4.5 (9th Grade) Revising writing by making style, diction, voice, or persona more
consistent with form (e.g. organizational structure or writing genre) and the perspective
conveyed


Directions: Write an essay of at least 4-6 paragraphs.

Prompt: Write about an incident that happened to a friend, teacher, or a parent and your
feelings about that event. Select one of the following voices to write in: angry, happy,
sad, frustrated, proud.


Proficient Response:
                          9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Voice

          Advanced                           Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Language is highly               • Reader senses the person         • Writing communicates but
individual.                        behind the words.                  without much style or
• Reader senses the person         • There are occasional             interest.
behind the words; feels an         moments that surprise,             • Writing hides the writer;
interaction with the writer.       amuse, or move the reader.         the reader has little or no
• Tone gives the writing           • Tone gives the writing           sense of the writer behind
flavor, adds interest.             flavor, adds interest.             the words.
• Language is appropriate          • Language is appropriate          • Writer shows some
for purpose and audience.          for purpose and audience.          awareness of audience and/
• Narrative writing seems          • Narrative writing seems          or purpose but is
honest, appealing, heartfelt.      honest, appealing, heartfelt.      inconsistent.
• Expository or persuasive         • Expository or persuasive         • Writer speaks in a
writing reflects a strong          writing reflects a strong          monotone.
commitment to the topic;           commitment to the topic.
anticipates reader’s
questions, shows why the
reader should care or want
to know more.




W09_4.4.5a Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
4.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

4.4.6 (9th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g., dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, genre exemplars, style manual, rubric, word
processor)

Sample assessment:

Directions: Write an essay about a noise—or a silence—that won’t go away. During
your editing and revision process, use the following checklist.

Student resource self-assessments
        Spelling
                I have read through my paper and underlined any words I wasn’t sure were
                spelled correctly.
                I have used my resources (print dictionary, online dictionary, teacher, peers,
                word processing software, etc.) to check spelling of the word(s) in question.
                I believe every word in my paper is spelled correctly.
        Conventions
                I have read through my paper and put stars next to the sentences I wasn’t sure
                were 100% correct in their grammar, usage, and punctuation.
                I have used my resources (print grammar guide, online grammar guide, teacher,
                peers, word processing software, etc.) to check my grammar, usage, and
                punctuation.
                I believe my grammar, usage, and punctuation in this paper are 100% correct.
        Word choice
                I have read through my paper and circled any words or passages I felt were weak
                and/or generic or could be more vivid.
                I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers, word
                processing software, etc.) to investigate and choose more vivid and precise
                wording where I needed to.
                The word choice in my paper is totally appropriate for the audience.
                My accurate and vivid word choice makes my paper engaging for the audience.
        Ideas/Content
                I have read through my paper and compared it to the assignment prompt. I have
                highlighted sections that may not really address the prompt or that may be boring
                for a reader.
                I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to help
                make sure that my paper satisfies the assignment and is engaging to read.
                I believe that I have completed the assignment fully and done my best to make
                my paper interesting for a reader.
        Sentence Fluency
                I have read my paper and put boxes around words or phrases that sound repetitive
                and/or choppy. I have also put boxes around any sentences I think might be
                incomplete, run-on, or rambling sentences.




W09_4.4.6         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 1 of 2
                I have used my resources (print thesaurus, online thesaurus, teacher, peers, etc.)
                to investigate and choose options for sentence structure to help improve my
                fluency.
                I believe my sentences are varied and sound good when read aloud. I believe that
                my paper is free from incomplete, run-on, or rambling sentences except where I
                put them in on purpose for effect.
        Voice
              I have read my paper and put brackets around words or passages that I worried
              might not have an appropriate or engaging voice.
              I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
              investigate and choose techniques and/or wording to improve the voice where I
              needed to.
              I believe the voice of this paper is appropriate for the purpose and audience and
              that my writing style is fresh and unique enough to engage the reader as much as
              possible.
        Organization
              I have read my paper and have put a swirl next to paragraphs, sentences, or
              phrases where I worry I might be off topic or where I might need more of a
              transition to get to the next idea.
              I have drawn arrows next to paragraphs, sentences, or phrases that may in the
              wrong place within the paper.
              I can put my finger on a sentence in every paragraph that contains the main idea.
              I have used my resources (teacher, peers, examples, grading rubric, etc.) to
              rearrange, delete, expand, and/or add transitions to passages that needed
              improvement in organization.
              I believe that every paragraph contains enough detail for the reader to understand
              and follow the main idea.
              I believe that my sentences and paragraphs are in the best possible order.
              I believe that the paper flows smoothly from one idea to the next thanks to my
              artful and varied transitional words and sentences.

_______________________________________
Signature of Student

These self-assessments might be used all together or individually. This assessment is
meant as a tool to inspire greater student awareness of the writing process and to help
facilitate discussion of revision strategies and resources between students and teachers. If
self-assessments are fully checked off and signed, yet the paper still suffers from major
problems in any self-assessed category and/or the student is observed to neglect the use
of resources, the teacher can use the self-assessments to identify which students might
need more training in the use of resources to address problem areas. Students might also
prove through this assessment that they might need training in choosing reliable resources
and using them efficiently. Much of this self-assessment could also be done orally in a
discussion with the teacher.




W09_4.4.6        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006      Page 2 of 2
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure, and
punctuation.

4.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

4.1.1 (9th Grade) Incorporating the thesis statement, which identifies the focus or
controlling idea for the entire composition, into an introductory paragraph (the
introductory paragraph may include a lead or hook, such as an anecdote, startling statistic
or quotation)

4.1.2 (9th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement, grouping ideas logically
within the paragraph, placing paragraph breaks logically

4.3.1 (9th Grade) Varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow
and to enhance meaning and style of writing

4.3.2 (9th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)

4.3.3 (9th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., comma, quotation marks,
apostrophes, semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, and parentheses)

4.3.4 (9th Grade) Applying rules of capitalization (e.g., titles and proper nouns)

4.3.5 (9th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)

4.3.1 (9th Grade) Varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow
and to enhance meaning and style of writing

4.3.2 (10th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)

4.3.3 (10th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., comma, quotation marks,
apostrophes, semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, and parentheses)

4.3.4 (10th Grade) Applying rules of capitalization (e.g., titles and proper nouns)




W09_4.4.6a       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 1 of 4
4.3.5 (10th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)

4.4.6 (9th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g. dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, genre exemplars, style manual, rubric, word
processor)

                                Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe what type of work you would like to do when you take your first
job. You could consider writing about working in tourism, athletics, tutoring handicapped
children, etc. Include why you prefer this work above other choices.




W09_4.4.6a      Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 4
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.3 The student uses the conventions of standard English independently and
consistently including grammar, sentence structure, paragraph structure, and
punctuation.

4.4 The student revises writing to improve organization, word choice, paragraph
development, and voice appropriate to the purpose; and forms and explains own
standards or judgments of quality writing.

4.1.1 (9th Grade) Incorporating the thesis statement, which identifies the focus or
controlling idea for the entire composition, into an introductory paragraph (the
introductory paragraph may include a lead or hook, such as an anecdote, startling statistic
or quotation)

4.1.2 (9th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
support the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement, grouping ideas logically
within the paragraph, placing paragraph breaks logically

4.3.1 (9th Grade) Varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow
and to enhance meaning and style of writing

4.3.2 (9th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)

4.3.3 (9th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., comma, quotation marks,
apostrophes, semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, and parentheses)

4.3.4 (9th Grade) Applying rules of capitalization (e.g., titles and proper nouns)

4.3.5 (9th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)

4.3.1 (9th Grade) Varying beginnings, lengths, and patterns of sentences to improve flow
and to enhance meaning and style of writing

4.3.2 (10th Grade) Applying rules of spelling (e.g., homophones, irregular plurals, and
contractions)

4.3.3 (10th Grade) Applying rules of punctuation (i.e., comma, quotation marks,
apostrophes, semicolons, colons, dashes, hyphens, and parentheses)

4.3.4 (10th Grade) Applying rules of capitalization (e.g., titles and proper nouns)




W09_4.4.6a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 4
4.3.5 (10th Grade) Applying rules of usage (i.e., verb tense, subject/verb agreement,
possessives, pronouns, and sentence structure)

4.4.6 (9th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g. dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, genre exemplars, style manual, rubric, word
processor)

                                     Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe what type of work you would like to do when you take your first
job. You could consider writing about working in tourism, athletics, tutoring handicapped
children, etc. Include why you prefer this work above other choices.

               9th Grade Suggested Scoring Guide/Rubric for Word Choice

          Advanced                             Proficient                        Below Proficient
• Words are specific, accurate,      • Words are mostly correct and       • Language is so vague, inaccurate,
striking.                            adequate but may lack flair and      and/or general that even the most
• Language is natural, not           color.                               general message does not come
overdone.                            • Familiar words and phrases         through.
• Verbs are lively.                  communicate.                         • Words are frequently used
• Nouns and modifiers are            • Attempts at colorful language      incorrectly, making the message
precise.                             are made but some may be             hard to decipher.
• Clichés and jargon are used        overdone.                            • Problems with language leave the
sparingly and only for effect.       • Clichés and jargon may be used     reader unable to understand what
                                     occasionally in place of fresh       the writer is trying to say most of
                                     language.                            the time.




                       9th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions

          Advanced                             Proficient                       Below Proficient
• Paragraphing reinforces the        • Paragraphing is attempted but      • Paragraphing is attempted but
organizational structure.            some paragraphs run together or      many paragraphs run together or
• Grammar and usage are correct      begin in the wrong place.            begin in the wrong place.
(few, if any, errors) and            • Problems with grammar or           • Problems with grammar or
contribute to clarity and style.     usage are not serious enough to      usage may be serious enough to
• Punctuation is accurate (few, if   impede or distort meaning.           impede or distort meaning in
any, errors) and guides the reader   • End punctuation usually correct;   some instances but not overall.
through the text.                    internal punctuation sometimes       • Terminal punctuation is usually
• Spelling is generally correct,     missing or incorrect.                correct; internal punctuation is
even of more difficult words.        • Spelling is usually correct or     sometimes missing or incorrect
• The writer may manipulate          reasonably plausible on common       and errors may impede or distort
conventions for stylistic effect.    words; misspellings do not           meaning in some instances.
                                     impede communication.                • Spelling errors may impede or
                                                                          distort meaning in some instances
                                                                          but not overall.




W09_4.4.6a Answer Key Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006          Page 4 of 4
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.1 (10th Grade) Correcting misspellings using available software programs, including
choosing the correct spelling option among several choices


Directions: Use the grammar and spelling tools on your computer to help you rewrite the
following sentences using proper syntax. Correct any misspelled words as you go.

    1.      To fly is the best way to cover lots of Alaska teirain while hunting.


    2.      Groaning and clutching his leg, the path streched out before him without
            seeming to have an end.


    3.      Thundering over the tundra, I watched the cariboo heard migrating north.


    4.      By remembering where he stored seeds during the summer and fall the brutal
            Alaskan winter is servived by the black-capped chickadee.


    5.      His belly acking with hunger, the wedding cake was more than he could resist
            in the window.




W10_3.6.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.1 (10th Grade) Correcting misspellings using available software programs, including
choosing the correct spelling option among several choices


Directions: Use the grammar and spelling tools on your computer to help you rewrite the
following sentences using proper syntax. Correct any misspelled words as you go.

    6.      To fly is the best way to cover lots of Alaska teirain while hunting.


    7.      Groaning and clutching his leg, the path streched out before him without
            seeming to have an end.


    8.      Thundering over the tundra, I watched the cariboo heard migrating north.


    9.      By remembering where he stored seeds during the summer and fall the brutal
            Alaskan winter is servived by the black-capped chickadee.


His belly acking with hunger, the wedding cake was more than he could resist in the
window.


Proficient Response:

    1.      Flying is the best way to cover a lot of Alaskan terrain while hunting.
    2.      Groaning and clutching his legs, he saw the path stretched out before him,
            endlessly.
    3.      I watched the caribou herd thundering over the tundra, migrating north.
    4.      The black-capped chickadee survives the brutal Alaskan winter by
            remembering where he stored seeds during the summer and fall.
    5.      The wedding cake in the window was more than he could resist because his
            belly was aching with hunger.




W10_3.6.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.2 (10th Grade) Using a thesaurus to locate and choose effective synonyms for
common words

                                  Active Verbs Worksheet

Directions: Use the thesaurus and dictionary function of your computer to change the
action verbs in the following sentences. Rewrite each sentence five times, changing the
verb each time. Each time you rewrite the sentence, use a one-word description of the
connotation of the new verb (the first one is done as an example). Look at the second
page before beginning work.

        1. She walked down the road.
           Tired:    She trudged down the road.
           Lazy:     She ambled down the road.
           Injured: She hobbled down the road.
           Scared:   She scurried down the road.
           Happy:    She skipped down the road.
           Busy:     She hurried down the road.



        2. He looked at the girl.




        3. She stayed at the lake.




        4. He wrote a note.




        5. She ate lunch.



        6. She wrote a note to a friend.




W10_3.6.2        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 2
        Action verbs and denotation/connotation

Denotation    =         the most specific or literal meaning of a word
Connotation =           an additional sense or senses associated with or suggested by a
word or phrase.

Does the phrase “the boy was high” mean that the boy was “above or stretching upward
from a known base level such as the sea or ground?” (denotation)
Does it mean he is on drugs? (connotation)

How about the expression, “We bad!” “Below an acceptable standard in quality or
performance”? “Or cool”?

By using action verbs we can change the connotation of a phrase or sentence.


The coach yelled at me.                  Probably bad news
The coach shrieked at me.                Sounds out of control
The coach shouted at me.                 A neutral sound to it
The coach screeched at me.               Again, out of control
The coach yelped at me.                  Makes him sound surprised
The coach roared at me.                  Definitely mad-like a lion
The coach bellowed at me.                Mad like a bull
The coach howled at me.                  Sounds nuts
The coach hollered at me.                Could be friendly or just distance




W10_3.6.2         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 2
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.3 (10th Grade) Using resources by selecting and using formatting features to produce
final draft (e.g. centering title, choosing appropriate font size and style, indentation,
pagination, and line spacing)

Sample assessment
Directions: Students open a poorly formatted resume document and revise the
formatting so that the resume becomes neater, more professional, more consistent, and
more accessible to a reader.


Bob Jones       P.O. Box 1234 Barrow, AK 99723                   (907) 852-1111
        BJONES@HOTMAIL.COM



High School Diploma 1.6 GPA
2004 Barrow High School


Summer 2003 Craft Assistant
Arts and recreation council, Barrow
Babysat 4-year-olds in the summer Coordinated activities with clay, tie-dye, paint
Supervised the playground


Babysitting 2003-2004 school year
8-year-old twins
every day after school
Boy, were they a handful!!! ☺


Babysitter during annual band fundraiser
2001
2002
2003
2004
I probably watched 100 kids total.
They were all ages, too. I played with them lots, and they
all had a real good time. By the way, I didn’t get paid for
it, either.

CPR certification – July 2002

Student council member 2001-2004



W10_3.6.3       Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 6
Wrestling 2002-2004
Peer counselor 2003-2004


Coursework:
Health
Certified life guard
drivers education – I got my license

Awards:
none



References: Available upon request


             I have three gold medals in welding.




W10_3.6.3     Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 6
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.3 (10th Grade) Using resources by selecting and using formatting features to produce
final draft (e.g. centering title, choosing appropriate font size and style, indentation,
pagination, and line spacing)

Sample assessment
Directions: Students open a poorly formatted resume document and revise the
formatting so that the resume becomes neater, more professional, more consistent, and
more accessible to a reader.


Bob Jones       P.O. Box 1234 Barrow, AK 99723                       (907) 852-1111
        BJONES@HOTMAIL.COM



High School Diploma 1.6 GPA
2004 Barrow High School


Summer 2003 Craft Assistant
Arts and recreation council, Barrow
Babysat 4-year-olds in the summer Coordinated activities with clay, tie-dye, paint
Supervised the playground


Babysitting 2003-2004 school year
8-year-old twins
every day after school
Boy, were they a handful!!! ☺


Babysitter during annual band fundraiser
2001
2002
2003
2004
I probably watched 100 kids total.
They were all ages, too. I played with them lots, and they
all had a real good time. By the way, I didn’t get paid for
it, either.

CPR certification – July 2002

Student council member 2001-2004



W10_3.6.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 6
Wrestling 2002-2004
Peer counselor 2003-2004


Coursework:
Health
Certified life guard
drivers education – I got my license

Awards:
none



References: Available upon request


                I have three gold medals in welding.




W10_3.6.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 6
Sample Proficient Response:

                                       Bob Jones
                               P.O. Box 1234 Barrow, AK 99723
                          (907) 852-1111        bjones@hotmail.com


Job Objective: Child Care Provider

Education
        High School Diploma
        Barrow High School                         Barrow                             2004

Experience
        Craft Assistant
        Arts and Recreation Council           Barrow                         Summer 2003
        Coordinated activities for four-year-olds involving clay, tie-dye, and paint.
        Supervised playground

        Babysitter
        The Brower family                    Barrow                       2003-2004
        Supervised eight-year-old twins for two hours every day after school.

        Babysitter
        Barrow High School Band              Barrow                        2001-2004
        Volunteered as a babysitter during annual band fundraiser. Supervised and
        successfully entertained approximately 100 children total.

Coursework/Certifications
        Health                          Barrow High School                            2002
        Received training in first aid, nutrition, and fitness
        CPR Certification                                                             2002
        Certified Life Guard
        Valid Alaska Driver’s License with clean driving record

Extracurricular Activities
        Student Council                                                               2001-2004
        Wrestling                                                                     2002-2004
        Peer Counselor                                                                2003-2004

References
        Helen Brower                       Babysitting Employer                       852-2237
        Glenn Leavitt                      Health Instructor                          852-0975
        Qaiyaan Ungarook                   Director Arts and Rec. Council             852-7712



W10_3.6.3 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006     Page 5 of 6
                    10th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Resumes
                  Advanced              Proficient            Below Proficient
Format            • Resume looks neat on the       • Resume looks neat on the     • Resume looks
                    page, fits on a single page.     page.                          cluttered.
                  • Formatting is consistent       • Formatting is almost         • Formatting is
                    between and within               completely consistent          inconsistent enough to
                    sections.                        between and within             be confusing.
                  • Headings are easy to             sections.                    • Headings are
                    identify.                      • Headings are mostly easy       confusing.
                  • Font is professional,            to identify.                 • Format looks
                    consistent, and legible.       • Font is mostly                 unprofessional, is
                                                     professional, consistent,      inconsistent, and/or is
                                                     and legible.                   difficult to read.
                                                   • Only minor formatting        • Major formatting
                                                     changes are needed.            changes are needed.
Organization • Information is sorted into          • Information is sorted into   • Information seems to
                    clear, familiar categories.      categories.                    be placed randomly on
                  • All information is placed      • Most information is            the page.
                    into an appropriate              placed in an appropriate     • Major rearranging is
                    category.                        category.                      needed.
                  • Most                           • Some rearranging of          • Dates and places are
                    important/impressive             categories would help the      missing or very
                    categories are listed first.     resume.                        difficult to find.
                  • Dates and places are easy      • Dates and places can be      • A reader has to read
                    to find.                         found without too much         the entire resume
                  • Any piece of information         searching.                     carefully to find most
                    can be found within 3          • Any piece of information       pieces of information.
                    seconds when scanning.           can be found within 5
                                                     seconds when scanning.
Word Choice • Descriptions of                      • Descriptions of              • Descriptions are
                       experience begin with         experience are clear and       missing or confusing.
                       action verbs.                 dynamic.                     • Wording is not
                  •    All wording is              • Most wording is                professional and/or
                       professional and              professional and               not appropriate.
                       appropriate.                  appropriate.                 • Much description is
                  •    Enough description is       • Adequate description is        missing.
                       given without being too       present.
                       wordy.
Content           •    Relevant information is      • Relevant information is    •    Some very important
                       included.                      included.                      information is
                  •    Irrelevant information is    • Most irrelevant                missing.
                       not included.                  information is not         •    Many incidents of
                  •    Resume leaves reader           included.                      irrelevant information.
                       with a positive              • Resume leaves reader       •    Resume leaves reader
                       impression.                    with a positive                with poor impression.
                  •    Skills and experience          impression.                •    Skills and experience
                       prove competence.            • Skills and experience          don’t suggest
                                                      suggest competence.            competence.
Conventions      • There are NO errors in          • Only one or two minor      •     Many and/or glaring
                       grammar, usage, or             errors in grammar, usage,       errors in grammar,
                       spelling.                      or spelling.                    usage, or spelling.




W10_3.6.3 Answer Key    Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006        Page 6 of 6
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.4 (10th Grade) Using resources by selecting correct choice when using grammar-
checking software (e.g. accepts suggested change or disregards inappropriate suggested
change)


Sample assessment
Directions: Students open up a document on a computer that contains grammar errors.
(Teacher may want to copy and paste this document for students to use.)

Then students must use the grammar and spell check function to revise the paper
correctly. The teacher watches the student work and evaluates the student’s skills with the
process.

         Moose are water mammals because they eats water plants and live around lakes,
rivers, streams, and ponds.        Meese (Scientific name—Alces alces) are the biggest
member of the deers family. They can be as much as six and one-half feet tall and waid
as much as 1600 pounds. They have big noses and large heads and is brownish-black in
color.
         Moose in evergreen forests in the northern latitudes. They can live to be 15-20
years old, but their average lifespan is 5-6 years because of cold winters and predators.
They has very poor eyesight, but good hearing and a good sense of smell.
         Bull moose antler are enoormous, being as wide as 70+ inches and weighing up to
50 pounds. New antlers start growing in April and are covered in velvet, which is shed
by late September. Bulls polish their antlers by whacking them aginst bushes and small
trees. After mating season the bulls shedd their antlers in December and Janary.
         Male and female moose find each other during mating season, mid-September to
late October, by scent and by calling back and forth to one another. Bulls threatens eachs
other or even fight to get cows. Fight do not last long because interlocked horns or a long
fight would lead to death. Winners stay with the cow they fought over for a week or so
and then move on.
         Both bulls and cows first breed at about two and a half years of age. Eight
months after breeding season one or two calves are born about the end of May. They can
stand within 24 hours and swimmed in about two weeks. The calves are weaned at six




W10_3.6.4         Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 6
months, but stay with their mother until they are a year old. Cows are very protective of
their young, but drives them away after a year to make room for new calfes.
Moose have long legs that allow them to run up to 35 miles per hour and to wade in
streams and ponds to eat aquatic plants. They eat from 40 to 130 pounds of wet food a
day, including water lilies, pond weeds, and horsetails. Mooses nose structure allows
them to close their nostrals so they can stick their heads underwater for up to one minute.
They also eat ferns, leaves, and grass. When ponds and streams are frooze moose browse
on twigs from aspen, poplar, birch, and willow. In fact, moose means “eater of twigs” in
Algonquin.
        In addition to being able to run 35 miles per hour, moose can swimmed up to six
miles per hour for two hours. This is another reason they live near water, since it helps
them escape from their major predators, wolves and bears. Black bears, grizzly bears,
and wolves can bring down a full grow moose. but they are most dangerous to calves. In
some areas bears kill and eat up to 75% of newborn calves.                   Mooses are hunted
throughout most of their range and are a favorite food of subsistence hunters in Canada
and Alaska. Overall however, their numbers are high and they hold Non-Threatened
conservation status.
        One of the greatest dangers to moose populations is a combination of severe
winters and tick infestations, which can reduce moose numbers by up to 50%. Ticks
irritates the moose’s skin, causing it to rub off part of the hair they need for protection
from extreme winter cold. The moose then use up all their energy fighting the cold and
do not make it through the winter.




W10_3.6.4        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006    Page 2 of 6
3.6 The student composes and edits a composition with a word processing program.

3.6.4 (10th Grade) Using resources by selecting correct choice when using grammar-
checking software (e.g. accepts suggested change or disregards inappropriate suggested
change)


Sample assessment
Directions: Students open up a document on a computer that contains grammar errors.
(Teacher may want to copy and paste this document for students to use.)

Then students must use the grammar and spell check function to revise the paper
correctly. The teacher watches the student work and evaluates the student’s skills with the
process.

         Moose are water mammals because they eats water plants and live around lakes,
rivers, streams, and ponds.         Meese (Scientific name—Alces alces) are the biggest
member of the deers family. They can be as much as six and one-half feet tall and waid
as much as 1600 pounds. They have big noses and large heads and is brownish-black in
color.
         Moose in evergreen forests in the northern latitudes. They can live to be 15-20
years old, but their average lifespan is 5-6 years because of cold winters and predators.
They has very poor eyesight, but good hearing and a good sense of smell.
         Bull moose antler are enoormous, being as wide as 70+ inches and weighing up to
50 pounds. New antlers start growing in April and are covered in velvet, which is shed
by late September. Bulls polish their antlers by whacking them aginst bushes and small
trees. After mating season the bulls shedd their antlers in December and Janary.
         Male and female moose find each other during mating season, mid-September to
late October, by scent and by calling back and forth to one another. Bulls threatens eachs
other or even fight to get cows. Fight do not last long because interlocked horns or a long
fight would lead to death. Winners stay with the cow they fought over for a week or so
and then move on.
         Both bulls and cows first breed at about two and a half years of age. Eight
months after breeding season one or two calves are born about the end of May. They can
stand within 24 hours and swimmed in about two weeks. The calves are weaned at six




W10_3.6.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 3 of 6
months, but stay with their mother until they are a year old. Cows are very protective of
their young, but drives them away after a year to make room for new calfes.
Moose have long legs that allow them to run up to 35 miles per hour and to wade in
streams and ponds to eat aquatic plants. They eat from 40 to 130 pounds of wet food a
day, including water lilies, pond weeds, and horsetails. Mooses nose structure allows
them to close their nostrals so they can stick their heads underwater for up to one minute.
They also eat ferns, leaves, and grass. When ponds and streams are frooze moose browse
on twigs from aspen, poplar, birch, and willow. In fact, moose means “eater of twigs” in
Algonquin.
        In addition to being able to run 35 miles per hour, moose can swimmed up to six
miles per hour for two hours. This is another reason they live near water, since it helps
them escape from their major predators, wolves and bears. Black bears, grizzly bears,
and wolves can bring down a full grow moose. but they are most dangerous to calves. In
some areas bears kill and eat up to 75% of newborn calves.                      Mooses are hunted
throughout most of their range and are a favorite food of subsistence hunters in Canada
and Alaska. Overall however, their numbers are high and they hold Non-Threatened
conservation status.
        One of the greatest dangers to moose populations is a combination of severe
winters and tick infestations, which can reduce moose numbers by up to 50%. Ticks
irritates the moose’s skin, causing it to rub off part of the hair they need for protection
from extreme winter cold. The moose then use up all their energy fighting the cold and
do not make it through the winter.


Proficient Response:
                                               Moose

        Moose are water mammals because they eat water plants and live around lakes,
rivers, streams, and ponds. Moose (Scientific name—Alces alces) are the biggest member
of the deer family. They can be as much as six-and-one-half feet tall and weigh as much
as 1,600 pounds. They have big noses and large heads and are brownish-black in color.




W10_3.6.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 4 of 6
        Moose live in evergreen forests in the northern latitudes. They can live to be 15-
20 years old, but their average lifespan is 5-6 years because of cold winters and predators.
They have very poor eyesight, but good hearing and a good sense of smell.
        Bull moose antlers are enormous, being as wide as 70+ inches and weighing up to
50 pounds. New antlers start growing in April and are covered in velvet, which is shed by
late September. Bulls polish their antlers by whacking them against bushes and small
trees. After mating season, the bulls shed their antlers in December and January.
        Male and female moose find each other during mating season, mid-September to
late October, by scent and by calling back and forth to one another. Bulls threaten each
other or even fight to get cows. Fights do not last long because interlocked horns or a
long fight would lead to death. Winners stay with the cow they fought over for a week or
so and then move on.
        Both bulls and cows first breed at about two-and-a-half years of age. Eight
months after breeding season, one or two calves are born at about the end of May. They
can stand within 24 hours and swim in about two weeks. The calves are weaned at six
months, but stay with their mother until they are a year old. Cows are very protective of
their young, but drive them away after a year to make room for new calves.
        Moose have long legs that allow them to run up to 35 miles per hour and to wade
in streams and ponds to eat aquatic plants. They eat from 40 to 130 pounds of wet food a
day, including water lilies, pond weeds, and horsetails. Moose nose structure allows them
to close their nostrils so they can stick their heads underwater for up to one minute. They
also eat ferns, leaves, and grass. When ponds and streams are frozen, moose browse on
twigs from aspen, poplar, birch, and willow. In fact, moose means “eater of twigs” in
Algonquin.
        In addition to being able to run 35 miles per hour, moose can swim up to six miles
per hour for two hours. This is another reason they live near water, since it helps them
escape from their major predators, wolves and bears. Black bears, grizzly bears, and
wolves can bring down a full-grown moose, but they are most dangerous to calves. In
some areas bears kill and eat up to 75% of newborn calves. Moose are hunted throughout
most of their range and are a favorite food of subsistence hunters in Canada and Alaska.




W10_3.6.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 5 of 6
Overall, however, their numbers are high and they hold Non-Threatened conservation
status.
          One of the greatest dangers to moose populations is a combination of severe
winters and tick infestations, which can reduce moose numbers by up to 50%. Ticks
irritate the moose’s skin, causing it to rub off part of the hair it needs for protection from
extreme winter cold. The moose then use up all their energy fighting the cold and do not
make it through the winter.




                   10th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Software Use

         Advanced                            Proficient                     Below Proficient
Student is able to use the         Student is able to use the         Student is not able to use
software to edit the               software to edit the               the software to edit the
document with accuracy             document with near perfect         document independently
and without help from the          accuracy. May still need to        and/or consistently accepts
teacher.                           ask the teacher a minor            inappropriate suggestions
                                   question or two.                   for changes.




W10_3.6.4 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 6 of 6
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.1.1 (10th Grade) Incorporating the thesis statement, which identifies the focus or
controlling idea for the entire composition, into an introductory paragraph (the
introductory paragraph may include a lead or hook, such as an anecdote, startling statistic
or quotation)

4.1.2 (10th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
supports the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement, grouping ideas logically
within the paragraph, and placing paragraph breaks logically

4.1.3 (10th Grade) Organizing ideas using appropriate structure to maintain the unity of
the composition (e.g., chronology order, order of importance, comparison and contrast,
cause and effect, classification and definition) using a variety of transitional words and
phrases

4.4.6 (10th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g. dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, genre exemplars, style manual, rubric, word
processor)

                          Paragraph Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe the perfect senior trip. Describe where you are going, how you
would get there, and what you are going to do.




W10_4.1.1        Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 1 of 3
4.1 The student writes a coherent composition with a thesis statement that is
supported with evidence, well-developed paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion.

4.4 The student revises writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and
subtlety of meaning in relation to the purpose and audience.

4.1.1 (10th Grade) Incorporating the thesis statement, which identifies the focus or
controlling idea for the entire composition, into an introductory paragraph (the
introductory paragraph may include a lead or hook, such as an anecdote, startling statistic
or quotation)

4.1.2 (10th Grade) Writing in paragraphs that include relevant details and evidence that
supports the main idea of the paragraph and thesis statement, grouping ideas logically
within the paragraph, and placing paragraph breaks logically

4.1.3 (10th Grade) Organizing ideas using appropriate structure to maintain the unity of
the composition (e.g., chronology order, order of importance, comparison and contrast,
cause and effect, classification and definition) using a variety of transitional words and
phrases

4.4.6 (10th Grade) Using resources throughout the writing process (e.g. dictionary,
thesaurus, peer conference, scoring guide, genre exemplars, style manual, rubric, word
processor)

                             Paragraph Writing for Word Choice

Directions: Describe the perfect senior trip. Describe where you are going, how you
would get there, and what you are going to do.


                   10th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Word Choice

         Advanced                            Proficient                      Below Proficient
• Words are specific,              • Words are mostly correct         • Language is so vague,
accurate, striking.                and adequate but may lack          inaccurate, and/or general
• Language is natural, not         flair and color.                   that even the most general
overdone.                          • Familiar words and               message does not come
• Verbs are lively.                phrases communicate.               through.
• Nouns and modifiers are          • Attempts at colorful             • Words are frequently used
precise.                           language are made but some         incorrectly, making the
• Clichés and jargon are           may be overdone.                   message hard to decipher.
used sparingly and only for        • Clichés and jargon may be        • Problems with language
effect.                            used occasionally in place         leave the reader unable to
                                   of fresh language.                 understand what the writer is
                                                                      trying to say most of the time.



W10_4.1.1 Answer Key   Alaska GLE Formative Assessments for Classroom Use, February 2006   Page 2 of 3
                       10th Grade Scoring Guide/Rubric for Conventions

          Advanced                            Proficient                     Below Proficient
• Paragraphing reinforces           • Paragraphing is attempted        • Paragraphing is attempted
the organizational structure.       but some paragraphs run            but many paragraphs run
• Grammar and usage are             together or begin in the           together or begin in the
correct (few, if any, errors)       wrong place.                       wrong place.
and contribute to clarity and       • Problems with grammar or         • Problems with grammar or
style.                              usage are not serious              usage may be serious
• Punctuation is accurate           enough to impede or distort        enough to impede or distort
(few, if any, errors) and           meaning.                           meaning in some instances
guides the reader through           • End punctuation usually          but not overall.
the text.                           correct; internal punctuation      • Terminal punctuation is
• Spelling is generally             sometimes missing or               usually correct; internal
correct, even of more               incorrect.                         punctuation is sometimes
difficult words.                    • Spelling is usually correct      missing or incorrect and
• The writer may                    or reasonably plausible on         e