THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIR GINIA - Garden Club of Virginia by jianghongl

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									THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA




                              Journal
                               VOL LII, NO. 1, MARCH 2007
                            F ROM          THE      E DITOR
   This issue launches two series of articles.

   Will Rieley, current Consulting Landscape Architect for The GCV, begins a series on
   landscape architects who have served as consultants for The Garden Club of Virginia.
   In this issue, he covers James L. Greenleaf and Charles F. Gillette. The drawing is a
   proposed arrangement of the Kenmore grounds. For more on this garden, see
   "Kenmore" in Historic Virginia Gardens: Preservations by The Garden Club of Virginia
   by Dorothy Hunt Williams, 1975.

   Members of the Development Committee will provide background information on
   the Funds of The GCV: The Garden Club of Virginia Endowment, The GCV
   Conservation Fund (new), The Common Wealth Award Fund and The SEED Fund.
   Ellen Saunders launches the series with an overview of The Common Wealth Award
   Fund.

   Holly Maillet will continue her series on historic plants in the June issue.

   The Editorial Board welcomes your input. Please let us know what you would like to
   see in future issues. The Board is listed below; please contact any of us.

                                                                                  -Peggy



                       Journal Editorial Board
                                      2006-2007
 Editor and Chairman, Peggy Federhart, The Garden Club of the Northern Neck

 ExOfficio Members
   The GCV President, Sally Guy Brown, The Garden Club of Alexandria
   The GCV Vice President & Chair of The GCV Communications Committee, Cabell West,
   The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton
   The GCV Director of Public Relations, Linda Consolvo, The Nansemond River Garden Club
   Journal Chair, Gail Braxton, The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club
   Journal Advertising Chairman, Betsy Agelasto, The Virginia Beach Garden Club

 Members
  Mason Beazley, The James River Garden Club, The Garden Club of the Northern Neck
  Fleet Davis, The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore
  Betty Delk, The Nansemond River Garden Club
  Ann Gordon Evans, The Huntington Garden Club
  Marietta Gwathmey, Harborfront Garden Club
  Sarah Pierson, The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club
  Lynne Rabil, The Franklin Garden Club

WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                   THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
                                               ON THE COVER...
                                               This issue is dedicated to The Hampton Roads
    The Garden Club of Virginia                Garden Club, host of The GCV Annual Meeting
             Journal                           2007, in memory of the founder, Miss Elizabeth Ivy.

   The Garden Club of Virginia Journal         IN THIS ISSUE...
   (USPS 574-520, ISSN 0431-0233) is           From the Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inside front cover
   published four times a year for members
   by The GCV, 12 East Franklin St.,           The Voice of Historic Garden Week . . . . . 3
   Richmond, VA 23219. Periodical              A New National Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
   postage paid in Richmond, VA. Single
                                               Four Centuries of Virginia Living . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
   issue price, $3.00.
                                               Greenleaf and Gillette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
   Copy and ad deadlines are:
                                               The 1607 Garden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   January 15 for the March issue
   April 15 for the June issue                 An Invitation to the Daffodil Show . . . . . . . . . . . 11
   July 15 for the September issue             The Common Wealth Award Fund . . . . . . . . . 12
   October 15 for the December issue
   Email copy to the Editor and advertising    Lessons from the BOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
   to the Ad Manager                           Some Horticulture on View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
   Journal Editor and Chairman of the          Horticulture Field Day Invitation . . . . . . . . . . 16
   Editorial Board:                            Ex Libris . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
   Peggy Federhart (Mrs. John A.)
   Post Office Box 247                         Don’t Toss That Outdated Computer . . . . . . 18
   Ophelia, VA 22530                           Flower Arranging 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                      20
   Phone: (804) 453-3064
                                               Rose Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
   Email: peggyfed@earthlink.net
                                               Activities at the Kent-Valentine House . . . . . 22
   Journal Advertising Chairman:
   Betsy Agelasto (Mrs. Peter A. III)          Lily Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
   Phone: (757) 428-1870                       Daffodil Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
   Email: betsyagelasto@mindspring.com
                                               Extra! Extra! Read All About Us . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
   President of The Garden Club of Virginia:   Contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
   Sally Guy Brown (Mrs. Thomas C., Jr.)
                                               No Deer in my Garden! . . . . . inside back cover
   Journal Committee Chairman:
   Gail Braxton (Mrs. H. Harrison, Jr.)

                                               OTHER REFERENCES...
                                               Kent-Valentine House
   Vol. LII, No. 1                             Phone: (804) 643-4137 Fax: (804) 644-7778
   Printed on recycled paper by                Email: administrator@gcvirginia.org
   Carter Printing Company
   Richmond, VA                                Historic Garden Week Office
                                               Phone: (804) 644-7776 Fax: (804) 644-7778
                                               Email: gdnweek@verizon.net
                                               www.VAGardenWeek.org

                                               POSTMASTER send address changes to:
                                               GCV Administrator
                                               12 East Franklin Street
                                               Richmond, VA 23219


MARCH 2007                                                                  WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                         1
2   WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG   THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
  The Voice of Historic Garden Week in Virginia
                                  By Beverly E. Bates
                               The Boxwood Garden Club


         or twenty years the


 F       person with the
         "perfect name" has
 been the cheerful voice
 answering the phone at the
 Kent Valentine House.
 Many people have laughed
 out loud when hearing
 Susan say, "Susan Flowers,
 Historic Garden Week."
 One person even asked if
 God had sent her to The Garden Club of Virginia to do this job.
   Most of us have never really thought about the many hats that Susan must wear
 as the Administrator of Historic Garden Week. The official job description reads:
 "This is a part-time job with key responsibilities. Applicant must be exceptionally
 well-organized and able to juggle multiple tasks, including bookkeeping, office
 administration and coordination of advertising for the Historic Garden Week guide-
 book." Of even greater importance may be the ability to work with hundreds and
 hundreds of volunteers over the years.
   Susan has witnessed technology changes in the office from one IBM Selectric
 typewriter, a mimeograph machine and two rotary dial phones to DSL high-speed
 Internet access allowing instant communication with people around the world. She
 and Suzanne Munson lived through the renovation of the Kent-Valentine House
 without wearing hardhats even though one-day plaster came tumbling down from
 the ceiling onto Susan's hair without causing any injuries, thank goodness.
   Susan and Bill's boys are now grown and their Maltese, Bailey, is 3 years old. It is
 time for Susan to dance, dance, dance. We shall all miss her very much and wish
 her many years of fun, good health, serenity, travel, and a good dash of excitement
 while she decides what to do in her second life.



MARCH 2007                                                   WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG           3
              A New National Park:
        The Captain John Smith Chesapeake
               National Water Trail
                                    By Hylah H. Boyd
                         The Tuckahoe Garden Club of Westhampton

     Heaven and earth never agreed better to frame a place for man's habitation.

            o said Captain John Smith about the lands, tributaries and waters of the

    S       Chesapeake Bay. Now, at long last, recognition is being given to the Great
            Captain for his commanding role in the founding of our country. The
    President signed bipartisan legislation in December to create a new national park to be
    added to our National Park system called The Captain John Smith Chesapeake
    National Water Trail. The new park will be administered by the National Park Service
    and will become a part of a system that includes the Pony Express, Lewis and Clark,
    and the Trail of Tears.
       As a result of its natural, cultural and historic importance, many agree that the
    Chesapeake Bay is a resource of even greater national significance than the well-known
    National Parks of the American West. A new National Park named for Captain John
    Smith will recognize finally the tremendous contributions of the great Captain. To
    quote Senator Paul Sarbanes of Maryland, "Smith's voyages helped to launch the
    English explorations of North America, his maps were the most definitive of the
    Chesapeake for nearly a century, and the water trail will spur people to explore the Bay
    in kayaks, canoes and small boats. This new historic water trail will inspire generations
    of Americans and visitors to follow Smith's journeys, to learn about the roots of our
    nation and to better understand the contributions of the Native Americans who lived
    within the Bay region."
       Virginia stepped out ahead last year with the dedication of a driving and a water
    trail called Captain John Smith's Adventures on the James River. Eventually, all the
    major Virginia rivers will be included in the project; but the James River is the first
    step in focusing national attention on the events that happened from 1607 to 1609 on
    and around the Chesapeake Bay. A handsome brochure with three folded maps
    depicts 40 sites on the James and York Rivers where a consensus of historians, archae-
    ologists, ecologists and native Americans agree Captain Smith's activities and those of
    native Americans intersected during that brief two year period. The maps tell the his-
    tory but also educate visitors about the environmental changes to the Bay that have
    taken place over time. Visitors will see, for instance, that in 1607-1609 oyster reefs
    rose several feet out of the water. Now only a tiny fraction of the reefs remain. More
    information on the state trail can be obtained at www.johnsmithtrails.com.



4     WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                  THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
            Garden Week 2007 Presents
          Four Centuries of Virginia Living
                                 By Suzanne Munson
                 Executive Director, Historic Garden Week in Virginia

     n a salute to America's 400th birthday, our Historic Garden Week guidebook

 I   and several events will have Jamestown-related themes this year. Four cen-
     turies of Virginia living will be presented on fascinating tours throughout
 the state, April 21-28.
    Visitors to the Williamsburg tour on April 24 can also travel by complimenta-
 ry shuttle to nearby Jamestown Island. With proceeds from Historic Garden
 Week, The Garden Club of Virginia has restored the Yeardley House garden on
 the island in honor of the Association for the Preservation of Virginia
 Antiquities (APVA), the organization most responsible for preserving and restor-
 ing historic sites in the area. Especially for Garden Week guests, The
 Williamsburg Garden Club will decorate the island's historic 17th century
 church with native flowers and foliage on April 24. The only residence on
 Jamestown Island, Godspeed Cottage, home of the Director of Archaeology for
 APVA, Preservation Virginia, will also be open for the tour.
    The cover of the 2007 Historic Garden Week guidebook features a charming
 statue of Pocahontas, arms outstretched in welcome to Virginia. Hylah
 Robinson created the statue in the 1930s and it graces a private property in the
 Middle Peninsula. During his early days of exploration, Captain John Smith vis-
 ited some of the scenic landscapes open for the April 28 tour in historic
 Gloucester. As a further tribute to the Jamestown observation, a number of GCV
 members and other gardeners are planting red, white and blue "America's
 Anniversary Gardens" for enjoyment in 2007. (For more information about this
 project, access www.ext.vt.edu/americasgarden) or The GCV's Website
 (www.GCVirginia.org).

                  Ghosts, Music and Foxhounds
    As we like to say, Garden Week offers "something for everyone". This April,
 various tours will feature friendly ghosts, a "roof angel," a graveyard wedding,
 fashion shows, musical interludes, tablescape presentations, vintage automobile
 collections, foxhound showings, demonstrations of crafts by Native Americans,
 and flower-arranging seminars.
    History was made in a number of the old homes open this year, including one
 in downtown Fredericksburg with an elegant ballroom where George Washington,
 Lafayette and Rouchambeau dined following the Peace Ball in 1784. In one of the
 properties open for the Albemarle County tour, a family lived in the basement
 while Union generals residing above directed 10,000 troops in the area. Brand new
 houses of the 21st century will also be showcased on several tours.
    Gardens are equally interesting and varied, ranging from formal Charles
 Gillette-inspired designs to those lovingly created by talented members of The


MARCH 2007                                                 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG        5
                                                               Garden Club of Virginia. The
                                                               Fairfax Garden Club's tour in the
                                                               Falls Church and Arlington areas
                                                               on April 24 features "gardeners'
                                                               gardens," including a wonderful
                                                               Oriental-style landscape designed
                                                               by Lester Collins, a former dean
                                                               of the Harvard University School
                                                               of Landscape Architecture who
                                                               also designed the Hirshhorn
                                                               Sculpture Garden in
    Brownsville, owned by The Nature Conservancy, is a         Washington, D.C.
    1,200-acre working farm and nature preserve on the            Guests of the April 25 tour in
    Eastern Shore.
                                                               the Virginia Beach area will see
    the oldest living tulip poplar east of the Mississippi River, registered as a
    Champion Tree with the National Register of Big Trees. According to local leg-
    end, the pirate Blackbeard
    visited this property in his
    hey-day. Willow Lawn, one
    of the historic properties
    open for the April 28 tour on
    the Eastern Shore, is named
    for its remarkable willow oak
    tree, a National Champion
    listed on the National
    Register of Big Trees. At the
    time of the registration, it
                                        Using a never-implemented designed by noted landscape architect
    was the largest in the United       Charles F. Gillette, the owners of this Richmond home sloped the
    States, having survived winter garden down a hill and sited it behind a Tudor-style house built in
    storms and ocean winds for          1920 for the granddaughter of Matthew Fontaine Maury.
    generations.
       For more information
    about these and other properties and events, please access the Tour Highlights
                                                               pages of the HGW Website:
                                                               www.VAGardenweek.org. This
                                                               section is updated annually with
                                                               noteworthy event details and
                                                               selected photos. Guidebook copy
                                                               for each tour is also attached by
                                                               event name on the Schedule page
                                                               of the site. The Guidebooks/Tickets
                                                               page offers tour tickets and guide-
                                                               books for sale with a credit card
    Reminiscent of homes in the Deep South, this gra-
                                                               and internet connection.
    cious residence in Virginia Beach overlooks a cove on
    Linkhorn Bay.



6      WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                        THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
       Worldwide Web
      Spreads the Word
    For the first time, we expect to
 reach the 100,000 mark this year in
 visits to the Historic Garden Week
 Website, with inquiries coming
 from as far away as New Zealand.
 Another milestone was achieved this
 fall, with all guidebook copy and
 many lovely images submitted by
 clubs to headquarters via e-mail.
 Information about the tours is
 being sent from headquarters
 through the worldwide web to
 numerous tour groups, including the
 Seeders and Weeders Garden Club of
 Pasedena, California, who are eagerly
 anticipating their Virginia visit.
 Other visitors are learning about our Historic seaport houses like this one in Olde Towne
                                           Portsmouth have many stories, including those fea-
 tours through leading magazines,
                                           turing friendly ghosts.
 newspapers and tourism Websites.
    Dates for future Garden Week tours are April 19-27, 2008, and April 18-26,
 2009. In 2008, The Garden Club of Virginia will celebrate Historic Garden Week's
                                                   75th year; plans are already underway
                                                   to mark this very special occasion.
                                                   Tours have been held annually since
                                                   1929, with an intermission during
                                                   World War II while Club members
                                                   tended their Victory Gardens. And
                                                   what a wonderful tradition this has
                                                   been, with total proceeds exceeding
                                                   $12 million, and more than three
                                                   dozen important historic gardens
                                                   throughout our state beautifully
                                                   restored for the public to enjoy.
                                                       Once again, our sincere thanks to
                                                   those who are graciously opening
                                                   their doors and garden gates to the
                                                   public this year to benefit the cause of
                                                   historic restoration and to the legions
                                                   of dedicated GCV members who
                                                   labor to make this premier event
    On South Washington Street in Winchester       "happen" year after year.




MARCH 2007                                                      WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG              7
      James L. Greenleaf and Charles F. Gillette:
                   Setting the Bar
                                    By William D. Rieley
                      Landscape Architect for The Garden Club of Virginia

         n the early 1920s, Mrs. Thomas S. Wheelwright, second President of The Garden

    I    Club of Virginia, became personally interested in the preservation and restoration of
         the grounds at Kenmore, the Fredericksburg home of Fielding Lewis and his wife,
    Betty Washington, only sister of George Washington. Mrs. Wheelwright was charged
    with getting landscape architectural advice for the project. Thus began The Garden
    Club of Virginia's relationship with its first landscape architects, Charles F. Gillette and
    James L. Greenleaf.
       Greenleaf, an important early figure in landscape architecture in this country, helped
    establish the National Park Service and influenced the design of the nation's capital dur-
    ing his tenure on the Commission of Fine Arts. He also remains well known for his
    "country places" such as the Vanderbilt Mansion in Hyde Park, New York. Landscape
    historian Norman T. Newton described him as both gentle and gracious and one ". . .
    regarded with admiration by colleagues and affection by the younger generation, to
    whom he was unfailingly helpful." The GCV asked him to serve as a consultant to
    Gillette as Gillette developed the plans for Kenmore.




                                 Landscape Plan for Kenmore



8      WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                     THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
    By the time he began work on the Kenmore design, Gillette had practiced landscape
 architecture in Virginia on his own for a decade. He had trained as an apprentice to
 Warren H. Manning in Boston whose commissions in Virginia, principally the Master
 Plan for the University of Richmond, introduced Gillette to this region. His career here
 spanned 50 years and his projects in the Commonwealth include some of its most illus-
 trious sites such as the Executive Mansion, Agecroft Hall, and Virginia House. His
 designs are characterized by clarity of form, attention to detail, and a rich plant palette.
 His work at Kenmore led to additional GCV projects at the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace
 and Lee Chapel, both of which he completed in the 1930s.
    The Restoration Committee revisited Gillette's work for The GCV in recent years.
 His gardens are now being preserved as significant in their own right, being important
 examples of the Colonial Revival style. At the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace (now offi-
 cially the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library) for example, the garden pavilions and
 well house were returned to mint condition. It is fitting, too, that, 46 years after he
 completed work on the Executive Mansion in Richmond for Governor and Mrs.
 Thomas B. Stanley, the Commonwealth asked The Garden Club of Virginia to restore
 the East Garden, which Gillette had designed in 1953. The restoration, true to the
 original, reflects Gillette's classic style and honors his contribution not only to the work
 of The Garden Club of Virginia, but also to the Commonwealth.




MARCH 2007                                                      WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG              9
                           The 1607 Garden
                                 By Carol Hogg, President
                               The Huntington Garden Club

           he Huntington Garden Club received the 2005 Common Wealth Award for

 T         its permanent botanical exhibit, "Virginia's Botanical History, 1607 to Today,"
           at the Virginia Living Museum in Newport News. "The 1607 Garden," as it
 is known, will open in April 2007, named Horticulture Month by the promoters of
 the Jamestown 2007 Celebration.
    The 1607 Garden is located on approximately one fourth of an acre and is traversed
 by a serpentine pathway. It comprises several individual gardens and garden areas with
 special signage. The entrance will be just as though the visitors are settlers arriving in
 Virginia in 1607. In the Wild Virginia Garden, there will be a salt marsh of grasses
 and seaside perennials rising up to a shrub border of wax myrtle and marsh elder, fol-
 lowed by a woodland of pines, flowering trees and shrubs.
    As the visitors emerge from the woods, they enter the Native American Garden that
 includes native plants what were used by the native peoples for food, medicine, dyes,
 fiber and construction. Beans, corn, squash, sweet potato, sunflower and tobacco are
 just a few that will be displayed. Across from the Native American Garden is an area
 that will contain plants that sustained the colonists in their struggle to survive and
 were used for both food and also construction purposes.
    As more colonists arrived and towns began to form, people began to cultivate indi-
 vidual gardens where food, herb and medicinal plants were grown together. Visitors
 will have the opportunity to experience replicas of colonial gardens. In them, they will
 see the types of plants that were grown and learn how they were used.
    There is an area in The 1607 Garden dedicated to botanical explorers. These early
 naturalists and botanists such as John Bannister (1650-1692) and John Clayton (1694-
 1773) began to catalogue and name Virginia's flora. As they did, they discovered
                                                                    beautiful and unusual
                                                                    species that were
                                                                    prized by European
                                                                    collectors. Not only
                                                                    do we still enjoy them
                                                                    here, but also many of
                                                                    our native flowering
                                                                    trees and shrubs were
                                                                    collected and exported
                                                                    as exotic species from
                                                                    the New World.



10   WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                 THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
    An Invitation to the 2007 Daffodil Show
                              By Ann Harry and Laura Smart
                           The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club

            he Rappahannock Valley Garden Club cordially invites you to participate in

  T         the 73rd Annual Garden Club of Virginia Daffodil Show sanctioned by the
            American Daffodil Society. The show will be held on Wednesday, April 4th
  and 5th at the Jepson Alumni Executive Center of the University of Mary
  Washington. Entry acceptance will be Tuesday, April 3rd from 3 pm to 9 pm and
  Wednesday, April 4th from 7 am to 10 am. Show parking will be available on
  Hanover Street and in the Fredericksburg City parking garage. There is a small lot to
  the left of the Jepson Center for parking when leaving arrangements and specimens.
  All entries must be in place, ready for judging by 10 am on Wednesday, April 4th.
  On Wednesday, the doors open to the public from 2 pm until 8 pm. On Thursday,
  the show hours are 9 am to 1 pm. There is no admission fee but donations will be
  gratefully accepted.
     Fredericksburg's location at the fall line of the river inspired the show's theme, "On
  the Banks of the Rappahannock-A River Story." In the artistic divisions, beautiful
  arrangements of daffodils will interpret river sites, people, and conditions. In the
  Inter Club Classes the four Fredericksburg Garden Club of Virginia garden restora-
  tions will be recognized. The Inter Club Classes honor Kenmore Plantation with an
  Early Georgian arrangement, the Mary Washington House with a Late Colonial
  arrangement, Mary Washington Monument with a Traditional Line Mass arrange-
  ment, and Belmont with a Creative Mass arrangement.
     The complete schedule with photographs of the garden restorations is available on
  The Garden Club of Virginia Website. If you have questions about the schedule,
  contact Liz Thompson (540-371-4355). You may register in advance online.
  Questions should be directed to the show registrar, Susan Graves (540-371-5656).
     While you are in Fredericksburg, plan to visit The Garden Club of Virginia
  restorations at Kenmore, Mary Washington House, Mary Washington Monument,
  and Belmont. The Gari Melchers Home and Studio at Belmont is hosting a special
  event on Wednesday, April 4th beginning at 11 am in the beautiful new Studio
  Pavilion. Peggy Cornett, Director of the Center for Historic Plants at Monticello,
  will speak on Mr. Jefferson's bulbs. Lunch will be served and tours of the house and
  garden will be available. To make reservations contact Betsy Labar at 540-654-1848
  or email blabar@umw.edu.
     Traditionally, the Daffodil Show features hundreds of daffodil specimens and scores
  of artistic arrangements. Everyone interested in nature, gardening and flower arrang-
  ing is encouraged to attend this remarkable exhibition.



MARCH 2007                                                     WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG             11
              The Common Wealth Award Fund
                           By Ellen H. Saunders, Development Committee
                                The Nansemond River Garden Club

                istorians often wondered how the land of Virginia appeared to Captain John

     H          Smith as Smith explored the James River and traveled into the Nansemond River
                as the colony at Jamestown was established. Modern day visitors from around
     our nation and the world will tour our beloved Commonwealth in celebration of the
     400th Anniversary of the settlement at Jamestown. They will see restored historic gardens
     and communities enhanced by the hard work of generations of The Garden Club of
     Virginia members.
        While our restorations of historic gardens have made us famous and are considered by
     many to be the heart of The GCV, the projects that are unique to the towns of Virginia
     and have been accomplished by individual clubs are truly the soul of The GCV.
        Supported by the Common Wealth Award, these projects are as varied as Virginia's
     landscape and reflect either the history or the future of the towns where our members
     gave them life.
        Over the last 27 years $163,000 has been awarded to 35 clubs to fund projects that
     have enhanced our communities in the areas of conservation, education, beautification,
     horticulture and preservation. In an effort to make the Common Wealth Award more
     worthwhile and as part of the Strategic Plan, The GCV Board of Directors voted to raise
     the Common Wealth Award Fund to at least $300,000. This will be accomplished by
     taking five percent from Historic Garden Week net proceeds, after the funding for The
     GCV Endowment has been withdrawn, for up to 10 years.
        As the award amount increases, we hope that more clubs will apply for the Common
     Wealth Award. We encourage individual members to consider making a personal contri-
     bution as well. For your convenience, a remittance envelope is enclosed in the Journal.
     The Common Wealth Award supports the vision of the immensely capable members of
     The GCV and provides the opportunity for them to restore, maintain or create new beau-
     ty in their corner of Virginia. Our founding mothers and fathers, Virginia's Indian tribes
     past and present and Captain John Smith would be pleased.




12     WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                   THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
                       Lessons From the BOG
                         By C.J. Carter, GCV Horticulture Committee
                            The Garden Club of the Northern Neck

     Sounds a like a scary movie, doesn't it? Picture a foggy bog surrounded by dead
  trees dripping with Spanish moss. An algae covered man emerges from the muck and
  somewhere in the distance you hear Rod Serling say, "Welcome to the Twilight Zone."
     Our BOG, The GCV Board of Governors’ meeting, was held this past October in
  Roanoke and hosted by the Mill Mountain Garden Club. Club Presidents brought
  their clubs' horticulture exhibits that included up to three tips, tools or catalogues.
  The exhibits were well executed, creatively arranged, and provided great food for
  thought.

      Here are some of the "tips" we found particularly useful and inspiring.
           A trash barrel filled with water and fertilizer makes a handy dunk hole for a
           watering can.

           Use Pam to remove pine sap from your skin.

           Sweet gum balls planted under hosta will deter voles.
           Crushed egg shells scattered around your prized plants will deter slugs.

           Liquid fence deters deer as does 20# test fishing line strung at chest height.

           Prune your Annabelle hydrangea after the leaves begin to show in the spring

           Newspaper placed under mulch will keep the weeds from growing and it's
           biodegradable.

           Keep a diary of where, when and what you plant.

           Assess yourself and your lifestyle before planning your garden.

           Put a 5 cent plant in a 5 dollar hole.

           Household vinegar will kill grass and weeds in a driveway
  .
           Planting a big pot? Partially fill with golf or tennis balls before pouring in
           potting soil.

           Three pieces of rebar cut to the same length can be wired together at the top and
           plunged into the ground to make a great growing tripod. Think really tall!

      And lastly two of my favorites:
           Chill the wine before working in the garden.

           The best time to transplant is when you have a shovel in your hand and the
           time to do it.




MARCH 2007                                                       WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG            13
     The 87th Meeting of the Board of Governors of
              The Garden Club of Virginia


     Placement and Text by Fleet Davis
                                         Some Horticu
                                                           Favorite Gar




14   WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                  THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
                            Hosted by:
                   Mill Mountain Garden Club
                        Roanoke Virginia

ulture on View                            Photos by Kay Van Allen
rdening Tools




      MARCH 2007                         WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG         15
              You are cordially invited to join us for
                     Horticultural Field Day
              Charlottesville, Virginia, May 17 - May 18, 2007
     On Thursday, stroll through the interesting pathways of two owner designed gardens
     while you enjoy the sweet fragrance of spring flowers and observe pond life from a love-
     ly gazebo. Tease your senses on Friday with visits to Bird Hill, Waterperry Farm and
     Whilton. Various features including rock walls, hedges, garden rooms, antique stone
     pieces, plant collections, color-themed borders and unusual plants will delight visitors.
     Three wonderful nurseries are within easy distance.

     When:           Thursday, May 17 - Noon - 5:00 p.m. Friday May 18- 8:30 a.m.
     Registration:   Mrs. John C Parrott, 3112 Somerset St., Roanoke, VA 24014
                     Online: www.gcvirginia.org
                     Details/directions mailed upon registration
     Hotel:          Courtyard by Marriott North
                     Tel: 1-800-321-2211
                     Rate: $89.00 until May 2 (ask for The GCV group block)
     Lunch:     Boxed lunches provided at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Ivy




16      WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                  THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
             Ex Libris:
  By Suzanne Wright, Kent-Valentine Librarian
         The Petersburg Garden Club

         hey say, "Good things come in small

 T       packages." The Garden Club of
         Virginia's library, located in the Kent-
 Valentine House, is a small one. Over the last
 few years, a concerted effort has been made to
 secure outstanding books for the library. A
 generous gift from The GCV Restoration
 Committee is enabling us to improve the col-
 lection of books on garden restoration and gar-
 den history. Other gifts helped to build depth
 in our collection of flower arranging books,
 which are very popular. We created a section
 called "A Passion for Gardening" and reviewed
 the first books in the 2006 September Journal.
 Members in plant societies are assisting with
 the selection of horticulture books.
     We are reviewing each subject category to
 weed slowly and carefully those books that are
 not so useful as they were in the past. For
 example, Charlotte Hundley, former Rose
 Committee Chairman, culled the rose books.
     Upon entering the library, you will notice
 that the books are clearly marked in subject
 categories such as Flower Arranging, Rose,
 Bulbs, Trees and Shrubs and Garden History.
 We visited the library at Lewis Ginter
 Botanical Garden to confirm that its library is
 arranged the same way.
     Take time to browse through the catalog on
 The GCV Website at gcvirginia.org. The list
 contains all books sorted by author, title and
 subject. You may check out a book for a
 two- week period by writing the title of the
 book and signing your name and telephone
 number on the yellow pad on the window sill.
 If you wish to check out a book via The GCV
 Website, you will find instructions in the
 library section.
     We welcome suggestions for the growing
 collection, and we are developing a "wish list."
 Giving a new book is a great way to honor a
 friend or fellow gardener. Nothing is more fun
 than spending time enjoying gorgeous books
 followed by a delicious lunch at one of
 Richmond's many fine restaurants. We do it
 as often as possible. Come join us.


MARCH 2007                                          WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG   17
           Don't Toss that Outdated Computer
              It could be Hazardous to your Health!
                                        By Carrie Dorsey
                                  The James River Garden Club


                                                      ow many cell phones do you have


                                           H          tucked away in drawers? How
                                                      about computers or printers that
                                           have become obsolete? 75% of individuals
                                           are hanging onto outdated electronics that
                                           have become known as electronic waste or e-
                                           waste. In the next 18 months more than 300
                                           million computers alone will become obso-
                                           lete. That's the equivalent of a 22-story pile
                                           of e-waste covering the entire city of Los
                                           Angeles. The surge in volume of electronic
     Got any of these around your house?   waste overtaking our landfills is mind bog-
     gling; but even more disconcerting is the dozens of hazardous metals in these
     components which threaten our environment and ultimately our health.
       Four of the most prominent hazardous metals in electronics are lead, mercury,
     chromium and barium. Every monitor has 6 - 8 pounds of lead in the glass.
     When monitors are crushed, lead particles are released into the air. Up to 50%
     of air borne lead is absorbed by the human body as opposed to 5% if it comes in
     contact with the skin. Mercury is the most toxic substance because it is potent in
     tiny amounts. It is found in circuit board switches and flat screen monitors (as
     well as fluorescent light bulbs). Microorganisms convert metal mercury into
     methyl mercury that is easily absorbed by fish and wildlife as many tainted fish
     reports have shown. Small amounts can cause severe sickness in humans through
     consumption. Chromium can cause lung and nasal cancers in concentrated
     amounts. Barium can affect the heart and nervous system.
       Three years ago I set out to find recycling options for my relic of a computer.
     To my amazement there were no options in the Richmond Metropolitan Area.
     After speaking with many officials in the Department of Environmental Quality
     and at local landfills, I discovered that there existed companies who recycled met-



18     WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
  als but they needed volume to ensure
  profitability. They, therefore, catered
  to large businesses. With no recycling
  opportunities in sight for individuals, I
  approached a local private school and
  created the first Electronics Recycling
  Collection in our area. We relied on
  volunteers and grass roots publicity.
  The response was overwhelming.
  When all was said and done, our one-
  day collection resulted with more than
  19 tons of material saved from landfills!
  Since then, Computer Recycling
  Initiative was formed and has organized
  5 other collections in the Richmond
  area saving more than 93 Tons of e-
  waste from landfills.
    Publicity is key to a successful
  turnout. The Internet has proven an
  invaluable tool in reaching many other
  groups outside of school communities.
  Media embraced our cause and ran sev-
  eral announcements. The sky is the
  limit with partnering with other organ-
  izations for publicity. My garden club
  was instrumental in getting the word
  out. It comes down to educating the
  public about the dangers of e-waste as
  well as making recycling opportunities
  convenient. Schools are a wonderful
  venue as they offer a receptive audience
  and an opportunity to teach the stu-
  dents about community service.
    For more information you may write
  Carrie Dorsey at www.crecycle@comcast.net


MARCH 2007                                    WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG   19
             Flower Arranging 101 Revisited
                                     By Sandy Aman
                                The Garden Club of Fairfax

          emember Flower Arranging School last September? Remember how Lee

 R        Snyder, a member of the Harborfront Garden Club, showed us how to build a
          flower arrangement? Remember how she shed light on some of the "mysteries"
 of flower arranging, such as creative use of containers, indispensable mechanics and
 making a short flower taller? To coin a phrase, "SHE'S BACK."
     Lee will be the speaker, demonstrator and chief flower arranger at our annual
 Flower Arranging Workshop, to be held Tuesday, March 6, 2007 at the Lewis Ginter
 Botanical Garden. Come see Lee juggle all three hats and help us, too.
    After registration the day kicks off with light refreshments at 10:00 a.m. and contin-
 ues with Lee showing us how to arrange both a Federal and an Early American (aka
 "pick and stick") arrangement. These types of arrangements are always front and cen-
 ter in the historic homes featured during Historic Garden Week. This year the spot-
 light on period arrangements will be even brighter than usual with the Jamestown cele-
 brations going on.
    Next on the schedule, we students take clippers, containers, mechanics and flowers
                                                       in hand and make one of these
                                                       arrangements ourselves. Now, don't
                                                       panic. You will have all the help you
                                                       need from Lee and the members of
                                                       the Flower Shows Committee to
                                                       make your very own Federal or
                                                       Colonial arrangement. The
                                                       Committee will even provide you
                                                       with your working flowers, oasis and
                                                       container. All you have to bring are
                                                       clippers, workbasket, some filler
                                                       (greenery and line material) and
                                                       your enthusiasm. You will be so
                                                       proud of your accomplishment. Did
                                                       we mention that your efforts will
                                                       not be judged?
                                                          Check out the Registration Form
                                                       on the The GCV Website
                                                       (www.gcvirginia.org) for more
                                                       details. By the way, you may bring a
                                                       non-member friend to learn and
                                                       enjoy the experience along with you.
                                                       Hope to see you there!


20   WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                 THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
                                   RoseNotes
                              By Pat Taylor, GCV Rose Chairman
                                  The Boxwood Garden Club

              arch is the time to prune roses. For Hybrid Teas and Grandifloras, major prun-

 M            ing is necessary to rejuvenate the plant. For bushier-growing roses, such as
              Floribundas, Minis, Shrub Roses and Old Garden Roses, snip off one third of
 the length of the canes to shape the plant.
    Climbers require a different pruning technique. The long, arching major canes growing
 from the base of the plant should be trained and secured to encourage horizontal growth.
 Do not shorten these long canes, as they will not regain their length. Secondary canes, or
 laterals, erupt along the length of these long canes. It is from these laterals that flowering
 will occur. Find the second bud node on each lateral cane (probably about six inches above
 where it has emerged perpendicularly from the long, horizontally arching major cane) and
 prune there.
    Speaking of climbing roses, the American Rose Society recently changed the classifica-
 tion of the OGR Sombreuil™ to Large Flowering Climber (LCl). If you grow Sombreuil™
 and plan to exhibit it, please note that it is no longer eligible for the Dowager Queen
 Award; it must be exhibited as a climbing rose.
    If you will be planting bare root roses this spring, consider planting them initially above
 ground in large black plastic pots for a few months, then transplanting them into your gar-
 den. Many experts feel the heat absorbed from the dark plastic encourages more root
 growth than could be expected from roses planted below ground in the cool soil of the rose
 garden in spring. Why not give it a try.




MARCH 2007                                                        WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG              21
                        Activities at
                  The Kent-Valentine House
                                   By Missy Buckingham
                              Kent-Valentine House Chairman
                                The Boxwood Garden Club

        he Garden Club of Virginia Headquarters, the Kent-Valentine House, located at 12

 T      E. Franklin Street, Richmond, Va. is always the hub of numerous small and large
        meetings, luncheons and dinners as committee chairmen and The GCV garden clubs
 have gathered in her lovely rooms. Supported by ongoing generous gifts to The GCV
 Endowment Fund, the Kent-Valentine House is a Virginia State Landmark and source of
 pride among its members. Enjoy the photos of this beautiful house; but, better yet, visit its
 welcoming parlors, library and meeting rooms. Contact Pat Bryant, House Administrator, at
 804-643-4137 to reserve your club or private event.

                                  Lovely
                                  luncheon
                                  setting




                                                        Third floor meeting room




                    Living room excellence

                                                           Beautiful new balustrades




22   WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                   THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
                                  Lily Notes
                           Welcome, Oriental Lily!
                     By Mary Nelson Thompson, GCV Lily Chairman
                              The Franklin Garden Club

            any Tidewater gardeners report that

 M          Oriental Lilies are blooming in their
            gardens in time for the annual GCV
 Lily Show. This is a boon to them as many of the
 earlier blooming lilies are past season in mid June.
 Tidewater clubs, this is your chance. We wel-
 come your beautiful blooms. The Winchester-
 Clarke Garden Club will host The GCV 2007
 Lily Show in Winchester, June 20 -21, 2007.
    Oriental Lilies are allowed in artistic arrange-
 ments as well. As always, the arranger indicates
 "G" for garden grown and "F" for florist pro-
 cured. These spectacular lilies add a refined
 grace and elegance to any arrangement. The
 "Casablanca" (pure white) is the primadonna.             Le Reve, photo by David Diller
 Its magnificent 10-inch blooms, with velvety,
 cinnamon anthers and 3-4 foot stalks can be a focal point of any arrangement or gar-
 den. The deep pink and white "Stargazer" or the soft lavender "Le Reve" (see picture)
 are also favorites.
    When using lilies in arrangements, pollen is often a staining problem. Use clear tape
 or a soft artist brush to remove the pollen. Stains in fabric can be removed by applying
 "Joy" or "Shout." I wear dark clothing when working with lilies, so smudges won't
 matter. Please don't remove the anthers. The beauty of the lily is diminished when this
 is done. The altered lily looks like a lady in formal makeup... with no lipstick!
     Oriental Lilies are easy to grow. Their needs are simple:
       1. Plant in fall or spring
       2. Plant in full or partial sun (not harsh)
       3. Enrich soil and fertilize (3 times a year with 20-20-20)
       4. Water to keep moist, never soggy
       5. Stake if needed and lightly mulch
       6. Protect bulbs and plants from animals
       7. Cut back yellow stalks in fall
    For insect infestation, such as the Lily Beetle, employ the pick and squish method.
 For those who use chemicals, buy organic or botanically based products such as those
 based with Neem. Remember that beneficial insects like the ladybug or the bee may be
 killed. Use chemical products as a last resort and always follow the directions carefully.
    Those wishing to learn more about lilies will have the opportunity to participate in
 a two-year course, taught by the experts, and sponsored by the NALS and The GCV.
 This year's event will be on June 18, 2007, at Blandy Farm Educational Center.
 Information on this will accompany the Lily Show Registration on our Website at
 www.gcvirginia.org.

MARCH 2007                                                      WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG            23
                            Daffodil Notes
                                  By Lucy von Raab
                            The Hunting Creek Garden Club

           here are days that I look out my window and wonder if spring will ever


 T         come, but in just a few weeks March will roar in like a lion, and April
           showers will follow to bring the May flowers. April also brings The GCV
 Daffodil Show held April 3, 4 and 5, 2007, in Fredericksburg at Mary Washington
 University. The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club and the entire city of
 Fredericksburg look forward to our return.
     The schedule and the registration for the Daffodil Show are online on the GCV
 Website; so study now for that special piece of silver you would like to win. To
 ease the time pressures and to make things more convenient the morning of the
 show, pre-order your entry cards from The RVGC registrar. Name labels also save
 precious time.
     There have been a few changes in the schedule. The Section A, Class 2 collec-
 tion for The Mary McDermott Beirne Challenge Bowl has been revised to read 4
 all white daffodils, 3 stems each from a least 2 of the first 7 divisions. An exciting
 new addition will be the Aqua Ribbon by the American Daffodil Society. This rib-
 bon will be for the miniature daffodils with a collection of 9, staged in a block of 5
 in back and 4 in front. The next time you visit the Kent-Valentine House be cer-
 tain to look at all of the marvelous trophies currently housed in the new trophy
 cabinet donated by Di Cook and located on the third floor.
     Note the eligibility for the Intermediate Ribbon. It now includes blooms in the
 Intermediate, Youth, Small Growers and Collections classes. As such, the Best
 Intermediate may come from anywhere in the show other than the single standard
 stems and the vases of 3. Similarly the eligibility of the Historic Mini Ribbon has
 been revised to include those pre-1940 miniature daffodils that had since been
 removed from the miniature list due to size ineligibility. All of those historic
 "rejected" minis now have a place and can be shown again with pride.
     Due to confusion over staging the Throckmorton Collection, the Daffodil
 Committee decided that the collection would now be shown in "planks" rather
 than blocks. Throckmorton will now be viewed in 3 planks of 5 tubes each.
 Similarly our "club collections" of 12 stems will be staged in planks with 4 planks
 of 3 tubes each to eliminate cumbersome handling of all the individual vases. The
 eligibility of the club collections has been increased from the previous 6 years to 10
 years as will be listed in the schedule. An area will be established from 3:00 p.m.


24   WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                               THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
 until 5:00 p.m. for club collection chairmen and their assistants to receive assis-
 tance with staging collections. Let us help you and we can all learn together.
   Check The GCV Website for the 2007 Club Collection and the Tried and True
 Collection. Pictures and information of each bloom can be printed or copied for
 your convenience.


                    Daffodil Collections for 2007
   Club Collection                                Garden Tried and True Collection

   Arrowhead       6 Y-R                          Angel Eyes        9 W-GYO
   Calexico        2 O-R                          Merlin            3 W-YYR
   Cool River 11a W-Y                             High Society      2 W-GWP
   Lady Alice     7 Y-Y                           Redhill           2 W-R
   Ouzel          6 W-W                           Sweetness         7 Y-Y
   Rose Lake      2 W-P

                     Check gcvirginia.org for descriptions.



            Extra! Extra! Read All About Us
                           By Lynne Rabil, Editorial Board Member
                                 The Franklin Garden Club

              ith each issue of the Journal,


 W            the editorial board receives
              interesting articles that are
 specific to individual clubs within The
 GCV. We agonize over how to highlight
 club activities across the Commonwealth
 while preserving space for news and arti-
 cles that pertain to all members of The
 GCV. We decided to devote a section
 of the Journal to Club news. We encour-
 age you to keep us posted by sending a
 few words (less than 100) on special
 projects, unique fundraising activities,
 club announcements such as anniver-
 saries or any of your noteworthy                    Meadowlark Botanical Garden


MARCH 2007                                                     WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG      25
     extracurricular activities. We will include as many as possible in a timely manner, but
     please don't be miffed if your news is missing because these will be included on a
     "space available" basis. We hope you will find these tidbits to be valuable since all
     member clubs are involved in preservation, conservation, education, and beautifica-
     tion. We can certainly learn from each other.




                                The Augusta Garden Club’s new sign

       There are many ways our clubs can be involved in their communities. For exam-
     ple, The Augusta Garden Club recently purchased a digital fiberglass sign to be
     strategically placed near Lewis Creek, part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The sign
     will not only encourage public interest in keeping that area clean, but also is an excel-
     lent educational tool for Augusta County and the City of Staunton. Kudos to The
     Garden Club of Fairfax for purchasing two signs, as well as two educational touch
     screens and the associated programming for a pilot program being developed with
     Meadowlark Botanical Garden. One of the touch screens will be used with text being
     developed by a science resource teacher at the local elementary school, while the other
     is currently operating in the Visitor Center at Meadowlark. Congratulations to
     Princess Ann Garden Club for 75 years of notable contributions in Virginia Beach.
     The club has been involved with Seashore State Park, Lynnhaven House, The Marine
     Science Museum, Norfolk Botanical Gardens as well as many other beach institutions.
     Long may she wave. (wave/beach/get it? Oh, well)
       Our clubs do make a difference and we are anxious to help tell your stories, so
     please keep those articles coming.


26     WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                   THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
                                         CONTRIBUTIONS
                  Report Period From 10/1/06 Through 12/31/06
                                            Common Wealth Award Fund
 Donor:                                                                                                                          In Honor of:
 Dolley Madison Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rosemary Wallinger
 The Garden Club of Warren County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. William Marshall
                                                                                                                               Mrs. William Trenary
 Mary Page F. Hickey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sally Guy Brown
 Glenn M. Hodge and Sandra K. Hodge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glenna Graves

                                                     Kent-Valentine House
 Donor:
 Mrs. F. Turner Reuter

                                                               Restoration
 Donor:                                                                                                                          In Honor of:
 The Little Garden Club of Winchester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . William D. Rieley
 The Garden Club of Warren County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . William D. Rieley


                                The Garden Club of Virginia Endowment
 Donor:
 The Spotswood Garden Club
 Florence Bryan Fowlkes
 Sara Scott Hargrove
 Hubard Family Trusts
 Lorene M. Latourette
 Mr. and Mrs. W. Randolph Robins
 Laura Ungerman
 The Cameron Foundation
 Suzanne P. Wright

 Donor:                                                                                                                          In Honor of:
 The Ashland Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susan Wight
 The Blue Ridge Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frances Brooke, 56 years of membership
                                                                           Mary Stuart Gilliam, 50 years of membership
                                                                                            Jane Stubbs, 50 years of membership
                                                                                                                Mrs. Richard C. Wight III
 The Boxwood Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nita Bagnell
                                                                                                                       Mary Lawrence Harrell
 The Charlottesville Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allison Schildwachter
 Chatham Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matilda Bradshaw
 The Garden Club of Danville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sally Guy Brown
 The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . William D. Rieley
 The Garden Club of Fairfax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Martha Lynch
 Fauquier and Loudoun Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sally Guy Brown
 The Lynchburg Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June Britt
                                                                                                                                Sally Guy Brown
 The Rappahannock Valley Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Martha Lynch




MARCH 2007                                                                                              WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                               27
 Mrs. Herbert L. Aman III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helen Aman Epley
                                                                                                                                 Virginia Brown Guild
                                                                                                                                     Charlotte Hundley
                                                                                                                                        Helen Murphy
                                                                                                                            Mary Nelson Thompson
 Anne G. Baldwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sally Guy Brown
 Dottie Glaize Ballard, Mary Bruce Glaize, and Lucy D. Rockwood . . . . . . . . Dorothy H. Glaize (Dolly)
 John and Matilda Bradshaw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Frank T. Ellett
 Sally Guy Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Hart Darden
 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Brown, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . Past Presidents of The Garden Club of Virginia
 Mrs. Horace Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. G. Powell Davis
 Ford's Colony Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dianne Spence
 Karen Jamison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The GCV Board of Directors
 M. F. Moorman Family Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bessie Carter
                                                                                                                                          Rossie Fisher
 Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr.
 Nina W. Mustard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Hart Darden
 Dianne N. Spence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Hart Darden
 Robert H. and Lorraine W. Strickler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beverly B. Strickler
 Ann and Charles Wentworth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emma Read Oppenhimer
 Catherine C. Whitham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GCV Leadership, Past and Present

 Donor:                                                                                                                            In Memory of:
 The Ashland Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia English
 Leesburg Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Donald Devine
 The Garden Club of the Northern Neck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Bertie Zuger
 Mr. and Mrs. Stafford Balderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dorothy D. Kellam
 Mrs. Benjamin W. Mears, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. George L. Turner
 Betty M. Michelson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandra P. Sawyer Mizell
 Mrs. L. Franklin Moore, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. L. Franklin Moore
                                                                                                                                 Mrs. Edward L. Stone
 Helen Scott Reed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lucy P. Minor
 Mr. and Mrs. Whitney G. Saunders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Clarence D. Linens, Jr.
 Suzanne S. and John W. Wescoat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dorothy D. Kellam
 Janet C. Whitehead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dorothy D. Kellam
 Timmi Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marie Bach


                                              The GCV Conservation Fund
 Donor:
 Florence Bryan Fowlkes

 Donor:                                                                                                                               In Honor of:
 Susan Mullin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mina Wood

 Donor:                                                                                                                            In Memory of:
 Mrs. W. Moultrie Guerry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Jack Greer (Sara)
 Mrs. John W. Lindquist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marjorie Arundel
 Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Womack, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. John J. Neal, Jr.

                                                            The SEED Fund
 Donor:
 Candace Carter Crosby




28   WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG                                                                         THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
                   No Deer in my Garden!
                                   By Susie Taylor
                            The Charlottesville Garden Club

           ur delightful neighborhood has been overrun with deer for years. Although

O          it is a moot question of who is the invader, it is discouraging to plant and
           plant only to have everything disappear in the space of one night. In the
meadow beyond the garden, we watched as the deer romped and frolicked, the darling
little Bambis evidently taught by their elders to consider the garden their very own
smorgasbord and the terrace plants as well. One neighbor posted a sign during
Garden Week: Deer Café Menu-Azaleas, Hosta, Daylilies, Roses, etc. It was a des-
perate situation. What to do?
    The Wildlife Center advised deterrents that moved and made noise. Accordingly, I
went to the Party Store and purchased rolls of streamers that were attached to a wire
around the most vulnerable parts of the yard. Amazingly, this must have alarmed the
deer and the garden was relatively safe for about 3 years as the lengths of colorful (are
deer color blind?) streamers rustled and blew about in the slightest breeze. Eventually,
though, the canny lovelies decided the strange things were harmless and resumed
feeding. More and different strategies were called for!
    The new plan opened on several fronts as follows. Next to the meadow where the
deer roamed and on the sides as well, I planted barberry bushes; the next layer was
"Little Princess" spirea (which they never have touched), augmented by Joe Pye Weed
and Cleome. At two possible entrances, I lay down heavy hardware wire "doormats"
(as observed in landscaped South Carolina gardens). At another, several Society Garlic
bulbs stand guard. Inside the garden itself, I planted lots of Salvia, Sage, Catnip,
Agastache, Butterfly Bushes, Bee Balm, Daisies and Coreopsis, trying to concentrate
on pungent plants and wildflowers. This year, even the Autumn Sedum, Rudbeckias
and Purple Coneflowers
have survived and the
terrace planters as well.
     Maybe these ideas
will be helpful to other
gardeners, but they are
not guaranteed! Deer
have been known to
develop a sudden
appetite for plants for-
merly ignored.
The Garden Club of Virginia Journal                    Periodicals
         (USPS 574-520)                               Postage Paid
      12 East Franklin Street                    At Richmond, Virginia
    Richmond, Virginia 23219                     And Additional Offices
  THE GARDEN CLUB OF VIRGINIA
        CALENDAR 2007
March 6       Flower Arranging School, Louis
              Ginter Botanical Garden
April 3-5     Daffodil Show, The Rappahannock
              Valley Garden Club
April 21-28   Historic Garden Week in Virginia
May 8-10      The GCV Annual Meeting
May 17        Horticulture Field Day,
              The Charlottesville Garden Club
May 31        Elizabeth Cable Dugdale Award
              nomination deadline
June 17-19    The GCV Lily Show, Winchester
              Clarke Garden Club

								
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