NRCS Cooperative Projects and Assistance to the Indian Tribes of Wisconsin in FY by farmservice

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									2004 Summary Report, Wisconsin Pat Leavenworth, State Conservationist

NRCS Cooperative Projects and Assistance to the Indian Tribes of Wisconsin
Heirloom variety pumpkins, squash and tomatoes, from the Bad River and Red Cliff Gardening Projects

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Contents
Wisconsin Tribal Conservation Advisory Council......................................................3 Oneida Nation – Tony Bush, Oneida Tribal Liaison 920-490-8004 .........................3 Bad River Tribe -- Tom Cogger, Bad River Liaison (715) 682-9117........................5 Red Cliff Tribe -- Tom Cogger, Red Cliff Liaison (715) 682-9117............................7 Plant Materials Program ..............................................................................................7 Great Lakes Indian Fish And Wildlife Commission ...................................................8 Ho-Chunk Nation – Greg Yakle, Tribal Liaison 608-782-0180 ................................8 Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe --Mike Koehler, LCO Liaison (715) 532-7629 ...............10 St. Croix Tribe -- Tom Fredrickson, St. Croix Liaison (715) 635-8228 ...................11 Sokaogon Chippewa Community (Mole Lake) Pete Lindgren, (715) 362-5941 ........11 Lac Du Flambeau Chippewa Community -- -Pete Lindgren, (715) 362-5941...........12 Forest County Potawatomi Community -- Pete Lindgren, (715) 362-5941...............13 Menominee Nation -- Sherrie Zenk-Reed, Tribal Liaison (715) 799-3896 ...............13 Stockbridge-Munsee -- Sherrie Zenk-Reed, Tribal Liaison (715) 799-6380 ..............14 Patricia Leavenworth, State Conservationist
USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service 8030 Excelsior Drive, Madison Wisconsin 53717 608-662-4422 x 227 fax 608-662-4430 www.wi.nrcs.usda.gov
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326W, Whitten Building, 14th and Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice or TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Published March, 2005
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Wisconsin Tribal Conservation Advisory Council
The Wisconsin Tribal Conservation Advisory Committee (WTCAC) was organized in 2001, the first such council formed in the country. It is a subcommittee of the Wisconsin State Technical Committee. The purpose of the WTCAC is to advise the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service on the best and most efficient methods of delivery of USDA programs and technical assistance to the Indian Nations of Wisconsin.. One of the responsibilities of WTCAC, at the request of the NRCS State Conservationist, is to review and recommend funding for conservation proposals from the 11 federally recognized tribes in Wisconsin. WTCAC was allocated $55,000 in Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP) funds and $660,000 in Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) funds for Fiscal Year 2004 (FY 2004). More information on WTCAC is available at www.wi.nrcs.usda.gov/partnerships/tcac.html

Wild Rice Establishment, Billy Boy Flowage, LCO

Oneida Nation – Tony Bush, Oneida Tribal Liaison

920-490-8004

EQIPFY04 - Due to the expansion of the grazing herd at the Nation’s beef facility, 700 feet of animal trails/walkways will be constructed in 2005. Additional gutters and downspouts will also be installed to improve roof runoff management. This project will make use of an estimated $5,346 in cost share funds. The Oneida Conservation Department will utilize $1,200 in EQIP dollars to install food plots as part of their overall upland wildlife habitat management strategy. Eight acres of food plots will be planted in 2005. Surface water crossing the farmstead at the Oneida organic operation, Tsyunhehkwa, has caused erosion problems and building damage. To address these problems, Tsyunhehkwa will install the following conservation practices: diversions, heavy use area protection, underground outlet, access road, subsurface drain, and critical area planting. Also, a hayland planting and cover crop will be established to reduce sheet and rill erosion, increase soil organic matter, and provide supplemental forage. Cost share for this project will total $6,377. In addition to Tsyunhehkwa’s projects, access roads will be constructed at five other locations with an estimated $9,797 in EQIP funds. These will provide improved entry for cropland and resource management while reducing erosion and water quality problems caused by vehicular
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Approximately $34,000 has also been set aside for the construction of 6 water and sediment control basins (WASCOBs) and 3 grassed waterways to remedy cropland erosion and water quality problems. Other practices that will be utilized under EQIP to address resource concerns across the Oneida Nation include filter strips, wetland restoration, obstruction removal and grade stabilization structures. These will bring the total EQIP funding allocated in 2004 to $68,427. As part of a larger project to improve water quality, and fish, invertebrate and other aquatic species habitat on Trout Creek, $6400 in WHIP funds will be utilized to establish spawning areas for brook and brown trout. This will be accomplished through bioengineering practices with the placement of log structures to stabilize banks, manipulate flow and control grade thus creating a stable pool habitat. Oneida Nation Farm: As part of the overall strategy to reduce pollutants entering surface and groundwater, and improve fish habitat, the Oneida Nation Farm will utilize the new NRCS 590 standard on 3122 acres of cropland. EQIP will provide $65,562 in incentive payments spread over three years for this project. They will also receive $9,660 in EQIP funding to establish a managed grazing system on 92 acres of cropland for their black angus beef operation at the farm’s headquarters. Tsyunhehkw^ Community Farm: Tsyunhehkw^ will place 29 acres of organic white corn, hay and vegetables under a nutrient and pest management plan. An additional 30 acres of pastureland will be placed under a managed grazing system for their beef operation. EQIP incentive payments for these projects will total $2,586. Both farm operations will employ certified crop advisors to develop their nutrient and pest management strategies. Conservation Reserve Program Although contracts have expired on many tracts, an additional 135 acres of tree plantings were placed into CRP in 2003, bringing the total to 887 acres. Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program The Oneida Nation has two contracts totaling 94 acres to establish prairie and restore wetlands in partnership with the BIA Circle of Flight Program. A native prairie seeding has been completed on 22 acres under one contract. Another 24 acres on the second contract will be completed this year. As part of a project to improve fish habitat, the Oneida Nation has contracted to have large woody debris placed along a 500-foot stretch of a Trout Creek tributary. They have been awarded $3,300 in WHIP funds to assist with this project. Great Lakes Buffer Project Initiative
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A partnership was established between the Oneida Nation, Outagamie County Land Conservation Department and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to target three sub-watersheds for conservation buffer implementation. The project was awarded a $75,000 grant from the Great Lakes Basin Commission to install buffers along watercourses and concentrated flow areas in crop fields. These buffers will address sediment load delivery to critical northern pike spawning areas of streams draining towards Green Bay. Glacierland RC&D serves as the Fiscal Agent for the grant funds, and the NRCS Tribal Liaison is responsible for conservation plans and contract development. Along with 63 acres formerly contracted with the Oneida State Farm an additional 20.2 acres of buffer were planned and contracted in 2002. The partnership has been awarded a second grant of $30,000 to continue their efforts. NRCS Environmental and Education Outreach The Oneida Nation was awarded two Environmental Education Outreach grants in 2001. Funds from one grant were used to develop an informational marketing brochure and conduct public meetings for landowners, developers, and government officials on designing subdivisions using the principles of conservation. Funds from the second grant were used to complete three projects concerning tribally important plants including an interpretive nature trail, a native plant demonstration area and a medicinal plant garden. Oneida Community Store and Farmers Market Received $230,000 from USDA to develop and establish an Oneida Nation Community Grocery Store and Farmers Market. The Store will sell general staples and traditional foods, while farmers participating in the Tsyunhe'hkw^ Outreach and Training Program will sells vegetables, crafts and other produce at the Farmers Market. Other Assistance The Oneida Sustainable Resource Advisory Council (Tribal Land Conservation Board) meets regularly to provide direction and assistance to NRCS for the protection and enhancement of natural resources within the Oneida tribal lands. An Oneida Business Committee member serves as the official Tribal representative to the Wisconsin Tribal Conservation Advisory Council (WTCAC).

Bad River Tribe -- Tom Cogger, Bad River Liaison (715) 682-9117
Stream Restoration: Graveyard Creek has been heavily affected by beaver dams, with stream braiding as a result of the dams. The Bad River Natural Resources Department has been removing beaver dams over the last several years. The stream channel remains heavily braided, affecting stream flows and fish migration. Through WHIP, soil bioengineering techniques will be used to block off channel braids and restore the stream channel to its original location. The restored channel will allow spawning migration of Coaster Brook Trout, a rare form of salmonid. The project will be completed by 2007 with the assistance of $15,732 in WHIP funds. Forest Restoration Project: This project’s objective is to return a higher level of plant diversity to
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forested areas on the Bad River Reservation. Much of the Reservation forest lands are presently dominated by aspen. The existing cover type does not represent the level of plant diversity that once characterized the area. Tribal staff will be conducting forest site preparation activities on 1,120 acres of tribal lands that, left untreated, would regenerate to aspen. This is the first step in promoting and restoring forest biodiversity on lands cut-over in the 1920's. Total cost of the site preparation portion of the project is estimated at $53,700. EQIP will provide $40,000 in cost share assistance. An additional $34,988 in EQIP funds will be used to plant conifer tree species to enhance plant diversity in forest areas. Bad River Well Decommissioning Project: The Bad River Tribe has a number of abandoned wells on the Reservation that are a potential source of groundwater contamination. The Bad River Natural Resources Department will decommission the wells according to NRCS technical standard 351. Total cost of the project is estimated at $7,400, with EQIP provided $5,550 in cost share assistance. Other NRCS Assistance NRCS engineering staff are helping tribal staff to rehabilitate and expand the tribes’ fish ponds. NRCS will develop a cost estimate as supporting documentation for a grant the tribe will be preparing. Developed a draft Study Plan, Task Agreement and Memorandum of Agreement for a Cranberry Restoration Project on the Kakagon/Bad River Sloughs that will outline a project with the Rose Lake Plant Materials Center (PMC). Wild cranberries were traditionally harvested by numerous tribal members according to anecdotal information provided by members and elders. Presently, few if any cranberries are harvested because of diminished plant populations. A collection of several plants from the Kakagon Sloughs was made in 2002. The plants were transferred to and successfully propagated at the PMC. The planned project will involve additional plant collection, propagation and a testing of re-introduction techniques into the Kakagon/Bad River Sloughs. Propagation and re-introduction protocols will be transferred to the Bad River Tribe. Eventually, the Gititganing Garden Committee will take over cranberry propagation and the Bad River Natural Resources Department will assist in re-introduction efforts. Community and Organic Gardening: NRCS assisted in developing a gardening class syllabus for organic gardening training for tribal members. Worked with the Gititganing Garden Committee VISTA employees to coordinate vegetable and fruit tree orders and distribution of plants for the 2004 growing season. In 2004, 100 fruit trees were distributed to tribal community members. The Bad River VISTA volunteers helped to produce approximately 4,000 vegetable bedding plants which were distributed in the annual plant give-a-way. NRCS is assisting VISTA workers in exploring heirloom vegetable seed sources and production methods. A focus of the community garden will be to grow heirloom vegetables and produce heirloom seeds. A long-term goal is to have enough seed production to allow for the sale or trade of seeds in the Chequamegon Bay region. NRCS is assisting Gititganing Garden Committee VISTA staff in the development of 10 different
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grants to fund various aspects of the Tribes community garden project. Helping VISTA staff explore several other grant sources and preparing for possible submission of grants. Lead development of a Project Work Plan for VISTA workers to insure timely completion of grant applications and coordination of projects for the community garden.

Red Cliff Tribe -- Tom Cogger, Red Cliff Liaison (715) 682-9117
Streambank Erosion Control: Streambank erosion on Red Cliff Creek is causing sediment to be deposited in fish habitat areas on this important reservation stream. Rock rip-rap and soil bioengineering will be used to stabilize the site. EQIP FY04 cost share funds totaling $10,000 will be used to address this problem site. Streambank Erosion Control: Secured funding through WHIP to address the replacement of failing rip-rap on Red Cliff Creek. Improperly installed rip-rap is allowing sediment to enter the stream. WHIP and Tribal funding will be used to install new streambank protection measures to control erosion. Red Cliff Creek is a priority stream for restoration of stream habitat to benefit Coaster Brook Trout and other aquatic resources important to the Tribe. Stream Restoration: Many sections of Red Cliff Creek are choked with small woody debris. Debris dams block fish passage and contribute to streambank erosion. EQIP funds were used to remove the small woody debris from a section of the stream. Within a week of completion of the project, gravel bars began appearing in the formerly sand choked channel. Any large woody debris encountered were left in place to provide fish habitat. Other NRCS Assistance NRCS is providing assistance in development of an Integrated Resource Management Plan (IRMP) for the Reservation. A “Fragile Areas” map has been developed for the Red Cliff Reservation which identifies fragile riparian/ lakeshore areas and zones that have a high potential for erosion on the reservation. The Land Use, Zoning and IRMP Committees are using the map as a planning tool in the development of reservation wide plans. Worked with tribal staff to develop a comprehensive plan for the newly purchased property that will be used as a tribal farm and community garden. Assisted tribal members and a representative from the National Tribal Development Outreach in development of a comprehensive farm development plan for the property.

Plant Materials Program
Developed Community Garden Guides for: High Tunnel Season Extension, Floating Row Cover Season Extension, Field Tunnel Season Extension, Hoophouses, and Seed Starting. The Community Garden Guides provide detailed “how to” information for many aspects of gardening
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in the northern Great Lakes region. The guides include color photographs and line drawings and have been published through the Rose Lake Plant Materials Center. Eventually, the Community Garden Guides will be available on the Plant Materials Program web site.

Great Lakes Indian Fish And Wildlife Commission
The Purple Loosestrife EQIP Project has been completed. Chemical control of Loosestrife in the Chequamegon Bay Watershed is beginning to curtail the spread of this exotic pest plant. Beetles that feed exclusively on Purple Loosestrife were grown and were released on a number of sites as a long term control measure. Field assessments indicate that the beetles have established themselves at the release sites. The Northwood’s Weed Initiative (NWI), a partnership including: NRCS, GLIFWC, The Nature Conservancy, USFWS, USFS, WDNR, UWEX and private citizens, is working to slow the spread of Leafy Spurge and other invasive plants that have been identified in the area. This invasive plant poses a threat to tribal gathering rights as it will disrupt plant communities, outcompeting plants used by tribal members. The first efforts to control and contain Leafy Spurge were begun on private lands within the Ceded Territory. An educational poster on Leafy Spurge is in development and will be distributed state-wide.

Ho-Chunk Nation – Greg Yakle, Tribal Liaison 608-782-0180
Vernon County - Billings Creek/Kickapoo Trust Lands Wildlife Habitat Establishment – 30 Acres - $4500 cost-share Thirty acres of highly erodible cropland will be seeded to native grasses and forbs. The soils in this area are steep and in need of protection. Native wildlife habitat is needed to preserve an existing population of nesting game and songbirds. This practice is scheduled for implementation in 2005 Streambank Protection – 504 Feet - $11,350 cost-share Project will stabilize eroding stream banks and improve the fisheries in Billings Creek. Construction is planned for summer, 2005. Severely eroding banks will be backsloped to allow vegetation to establish. Rip-rap will be placed on the base of the bank to the average flood plain elevation. Some narrowing of the stream to increase water speed and placement of materials to provide fish habitat will also be done. Completed Projects: 23.4 Ac of native grass/forb seeding for the Conservation Reserve Program, 12.0 Ac. native grass/forb seeding for the Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program, and 41.8 Ac. native grass seeding for the Environmental Quality Incentive Program were completed in 2004. These projects were completed on what was formerly highly erodible cropland now converted to wildlife habitat.
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Jackson County - Parmenter Property Access Road – 250 Feet - $1250 cost-share Repair badly eroding road used to gain field access to portions of the property. Construction is planned for 2005. Grassed Waterway – 0.5 Ac. - $4000 cost-share Repair of eroding grassed waterway. Construction is planned for 2005. Monroe County/La Crosse County - Whirling Thunder Property Grade Stabilization Structure – 1 - $5000 cost-share Repair badly eroding gully. The site is on a washed out diversion where sediment from the gully enters a nearby stream. Construction is planned for 2005. Rockland Property Well Decommissioning – 2 - $8000 cost-share Decommission two wells from abandoned sites where a hazard to groundwater from surface water contamination exists. The project is planned for 2005. Grade Stabilization Structures - 3 - $8000 cost-share Install rock chute structures at three sites along a feeder stream to repair gully erosion. These items are planned from a 2001 EQIP contract. Completed projects: 10 acres of wetland restoration and 1.0 acres of grassed waterway were completed in 2004. The wetland restoration was completed on a site that was formerly drained for agricultural production. The site is being converted to wildlife habitat and includes the planting of some native wetland forbs in wetter areas. The waterway was constructed to repair a bably eroding gully. 16 acres of native grass/forb seeding as part of a CREP contract. This area borders the feeder stream and was installed to protect water quality and establish wildlife habitat. Wetland Restoration and Interpretive Trail Learning about wetland ecosystems, the tribal history of the Ho-Chunk People and their traditional use of native plants are just a part of the White Otter Wetland Restoration and Educational Trail. With a $15,000 educational grant from NRCS, this interpretive trail and observation deck will helps explain other conservation practices that make this property unique. The Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) provided funding and technical help for environmental enhancements, including stream crossings, streambank restoration, trout, habitat
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improvement and extensive oak savanna and prairie restorations. As the project is completed this area will host environmental education classes for tribal and non-tribal youth. Conservation Planning: NRCS District Conservationists have been asked to develop or update the conservation plans for the tribal holdings in their counties. Cultural Resources-- The Ho-Chunk have assisted NRCS with the archeology and cultural resource work involving the repair of PL 566 structure in Vernon County.

Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe --Mike Koehler, LCO Liaison (715) 5327629
Environmental Quality Incentives Program Two projects were funded through EQIP in 2004. Five miles of logging roads will be seeded down for erosion control and wildlife habitat. Shoreline stabilization on the Chippewa Flowage using log revetments will also be completed. The total of the EQIP contract is $4680. Chippewa Flowage Shoreline Erosion Control Projects. This project was needed to control shoreline erosion and protect cultural resources on the Flowage. A long-term agreement was completed, and $75,000 contracted in 2001. Surveys and designs have been completed on several islands for shoreline stabilization. Construction of shoreline stabilization was completed on Skull Island and Middle Three Sisters Island using AJAX blocks for armoring of 305 feet. This will protect a Tribal burial ground on Skull Island. An additional $150,000 was funded and contracted in 2002 for shoreline stabilization work. In 2004, an additional 1137 feet of shoreline on 3 more islands was completed. A total of $131,686 has been paid out so far. More work is scheduled for the summer of 2005. AJAX blocks were transported out to the islands on the ice this winter. Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program Two projects were funded through WHIP in 2004 to restore waterfowl nesting habitat and establish wild rice. Much of the natural nesting habitat has been lost due to development. The LCO will put out 100 wood duck houses and 12 loon nesting platforms. The other project is for planting of 12 acres of wild rice. A total of $7,050 in WHIP funds were allocated to these projects. Re-establishment of wild rice on the Chippewa Flowage and nearby lakes is needed to restore wetland wildlife habit which was destroyed when the flowage was created. One site was complete in 1999 on the Billy Boy Flowage, with about 7 acres seeded. This was very successful and now covers over 20 acres. Seed was very limited so no additional acres were seeded for several years. The Tribe harvested its own seed from Billy Boy Flowage last fall and seeded 4 more acres through a WHIP contract from 2003
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Other Assistance NRCS is currently working with the LCO on plans to expand the fish rearing ponds at the hatchery. We are also assisting with plans to convert current cranberry marsh into wild rice beds. This would eliminate the pollution from discharge from the cranberry beds.

St. Croix Tribe -- Tom Fredrickson, St. Croix Liaison (715) 635-8228
• • The St. Croix Tribe received $3,780 through EQIP in FY04 for 180 acres of 590- Nutrient Management for a fish waste storage structure. Conservation Reserve Program -- warm season grasses are well-established on an 8.2 acre CRP field in Eastern Burnett County. A wildlife food plot is planted to sunflowers and soybeans. St. Croix Grade Stabilization Structure: An eroded area just upstream of the confluence of the Yellow River and the St. Croix River is impairing wild rice beds downstream on the St. Croix River. The Grade Stabilization Structure will have a total cost of $25,000, with EQIP funds totaling $18,750. Waste Storage Facility: This storage facility will be installed to deal with effluent generated from the aquaculture facility. The facility will deal with waste only, no offal from the fish processing will be routed through this system. Total cost of the system is $61,660. EQIP will provide $43,162 in cost share assistance. Aquaculture Facility Well: The well will provide water for the rearing of food fish and walleye and perch fingerlings for restocking efforts. Total estimated cost is $19,918. EQIP will provide $2,000 in cost share assistance. Work continues on Big Sand Lake EQIP project in Burnett County to stabilize eroding shoreline. Three wells were sealed and properly abandoned to protect groundwater quality. Through the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program, a walleye spawning reef will be installed on Big Round Lake in Polk County, $10,000 costshare from NRCS.

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Sokaogon Chippewa Community (Mole Lake) --Pete Lindgren, Tribal Liaison (715) 362-5941
• The Sokaogon Chippewa Community has two new EQIP Contracts in 2004. The first, $59,400 contract, will construct two access roads for a total of 3,300 feet including stream crossings. These roads will provide access for logging and plant gathering on historic tribal forest lands. The second cooperative contract is for land jointly owned and controlled with the Forest County Potawatomi Community to decommission 278 wells. The Sokaogon Chippewa community will be responsible for decommissioning 188 wells for a cost share amount of $45,800. The Sokaogon Tribal Community will contract to have fish stream habitat improved on 31,680 feet of cold water streams on the reservation. These tributaries flow into Rice Lake. The debris removal will allow for proper fish passage and restore historic spring flow. Opening water flow into Rice Lake will help the wild rice re-establishment efforts underway from previous WHIP and EQIP projects. A total of $5000 has been committed to this WHIP project. Environmental Education Outreach Grant, $15,000 completed with training for tribal environmental department on GIS, ArcView, with purchase of hardware and software for tribal planning activities. Stream Corridor and Wetland Restoration Project: The natural flow of Swamp Creek has been altered, resulting in the burgeoning of a cattail stand at the mouth of the Creek. This acts as a false bank deflecting stream flow from its natural channel through Rice Lake. As a result, yellow pond lily has been growing, and the wild rice beds important to the Sokaogan Chippewa have decreased in size. This project includes wetland restoration, removal of nuisance plant species, reseeding wild rice, removal of debris from stream banks and beds, and an access road for tribal use. The total cost of the project is $64,710. EQIP will provide $47,780 of this amount. Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program - Contract completed for wild rice reestablishment on 34 acres one Rice Lake., 2004-2009, including control of exotic/invasive species.

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Lac Du Flambeau Chippewa Community -- -Pete Lindgren, Tribal Liaison (715) 362-5941
EQIP: Forest Site Preparation will be completed on 200 acres, Forest Stand Improvement on 250 acres, a prescribed burn on 223 acres and three structures for water control with cost share dollars totaling $54,160.
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WHIP: The Lac du Flambeau Community will be completing a prescribed burn on 112 acres in the Powell Marsh near Chewalah Lake. This will control undesirable invasive vegetation, and improve waterfowl habitat. This project will supplement additional acreages cost shared with the EQIP program funds for greater benefit. The total cost share for the WHIP portion of the prescribed burn will be $8400. • Shoreland Protection: Three erosion prone areas will be treated including two located on Flambeau Lake and one located on Pokegama Lake. Undercutting and sloughing of banks is occurring due to wind and wave action. The erosion is causing sedimentation, adverse effects on water quality, as well as aquatic and riparian habitat damage. Streambank and shoreline stabilization, critical area planting, tree and shrub establishment, grade stabilization structure, and heavy use area protection will protect these sites. Total project cost is $53,350, with EQIP providing $40,000. Well Abandonment: Six abandoned wells will be sealed according to NRCS standard 351, protecting groundwater resources. Total cost is estimated at $13,400. EQIP cost share is $10,026.

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Forest County Potawatomi Community -- Pete Lindgren, Tribal Liaison (715) 362-5941
Two EQIP projects were funded for 2004. The first project, for $59,620, will be used to complete forest site preparation and tree/ shrub establishment on 72 acres. Cost share funds will also be used to complete two access roads totaling of 5000 feet in length. The roads will provide forest access for logging, and for gathering on forest lands, as well as access to historic cultural and social tribal gathering areas. The second project is a cooperative effort with the Sokaogon Chippewa to decommission 278 wells on jointly controlled lands. Potawatomi Community will be responsible for closing 90 wells for a total cost share of $19,200. The remainder of the wells will be addressed by the Sokaogon. Erosion Control on Forest County Potawatomi Lands. Erosion control projects are: stabilization of an eroding bank at Bug Lake which is contributing sediment to waters important to the tribe; critical area planting of native grass species to reduce runoff, stabilize soil, and improve wildlife habitat; treatment of erodible areas contributing sediment to Devils Lake, and provide access to important tribal waters for subsistence food-gathering. The total project cost is $53,050, with EQIP providing $39,787 in cost share funds.

Menominee Nation -- Sherrie Zenk-Reed, Tribal Liaison (715) 7993896
The Menominee Nation will utilize $673 of EQIP funds to improve a boat launch in Spring 2005, used heavily by tribal members for subsistence fishing. The site is in poor condition with erosion from the approach road causing sedimentation to Bass Lake. The project will consist of the
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installation of a diversion to redirect water flow off of the approach road and rebuild the launch to make it more stable during boat launches. • Garlic Mustard Control: The Menominee Nation wants to gain control of an infestation of garlic mustard, before this invasive species becomes unmanageable. It is currently limited to small areas on the Reservation north of Neopit. Approximately five acres will be treated at a total cost of $845. EQIP costs are $549. Work was completed in June 2004. Little W. Branch Trout Stream Improvement: This project will remove woody vegetation along both sides of the stream to allow grassy vegetation to dominate on the streambanks. This should result in the growth of aquatic plants and increase the abundance of aquatic invertebrates, and eventually, a narrower and deeper channel, with a bare gravel bottom. Total cost of this project is $15,000. EQIP will cost share $11,250. This project was approximately 90% completed by October 2004. NRCS assisted in the organization of an “Uncommon Forest Products Workshop” for participants to gain entrepreneurial ideas using their surrounding forest products. This workshop was held in conjunction with the tribes annual tribal breakfast on October 11, 2003, at the Menominee Logging Museum and was co-sponsored by the Lumberjack RC&D and Niijii. It was well attended with over 40 participants. With the strong interest the tribe repeated the workshop in the Fall of 2004. NRCS Tribal Liaison Sherrie Zenk Reed taught a 3-credit course in Environmental Science at the College of Menominee Nation, Spring and Fall 2002, Spring 2003, Spring 2004 and Spring 2005. NRCS and Pheasants Forever worked with the Tribes Environmental Services Department and the Menominee County Forester to once again, for the third year, hire a “Buffer Intern” from the College of Menominee Nation to work with both entities through the summer and fall 2004. This individual is also an NRCS Earth Team Volunteer. NRCS successfully organized and held in Keshena a “Working Effectively with Native American – Harmony Training” training course for USDA employees. Planning began in January 2004 and the training was held the first week of October 2004. The training was very successful in meeting its objectives. NRCS Tribal Liaison Sherrie Zenk-Reed wrote and published a 3-part series of informational articles on soils for the Menominee tribal newspaper, Spring 2004.

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Stockbridge-Munsee -- Sherrie Zenk-Reed, Tribal Liaison (715) 7996380
• The Stockbridge-Munsee Community will utilize EQIP dollars for two different projects. The first project, completed in Fall 2004, consisted of improving two stream crossings by stabilizing banks, improving access roads and replacing/installing proper sized culverts. This project used $2,537 of EQIP cost share funds. The second project consists of
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restoring 750 feet of stream. Restoration activities will include woody debris removal from the stream channel and minimal brush clearing on either side of the stream bed. The project site currently has low water velocities, sedimentation in areas as a result of woody obstructions and offers overall poor habitat for fish. This project will utilize $11,250 of EQIP cost share funds and will be completed Summer 2005.
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The Stockbridge-Munsee Community will be utilizing $6,225 in FY04 WHIP funding to combat the spread of buckthorn, a non-native invasive plant. Fifty acres will be treated for two years using a combination of brushing and chemical application on the cut stems. The objective of this WHIP project is to rid the treated areas of buckthorn to ensure the healthy growth of the tribes’ timberland. This project will begin in Summer 2005. As a result of the 2003 CRP sign-up, the Stockbridge-Munsee will be planting 216 acres of hardwoods trees over a 3-year period. The Tribal Liaison will be providing conservation planning and technical support for this practice. Prairie Establishment: The Stockbridge-Munsee propose the establishment of 99.6 acres of permanent warm season grasses and forbs on fields that lie in areas of high ground water nitrate concentrations. This will ensure no further addition nitrates to these fields. Upland habitat management will be utilized to implement this proposal. EQIP will provide $14,940 towards this project. This project was completed Spring of 2004. Prairie Establishment using WHIP funds: The Stockbridge-Munsee will be planting 17 acres of prairie using $3072.75 of WHIP funds to establish a permanent corridor between two water bodies. This project was completed Spring of 2004.

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