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STUDENT DISABILITY GUIDE

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STUDENT DISABILITY GUIDE Powered By Docstoc
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STUDENT DISABILITY GUIDE
     Bellevue University
Disability Services Mission Statement
    Disability Services works with all aspects of the University and the community to provide
opportunities for students with disabilities and enables them to fully participate in and enjoy
the benefits of higher education. We recognize that disability reflects diverse characteristics
and experiences, and is an aspect of diversity integral to society. Disability Services achieves
individualized assistance by honoring the uniqueness of each student and through the
provision of resources and services that promote academic success and self-advocacy skills.
In addition, we collaborate with instructors, staff, and community members to create usable,
equitable, inclusive and sustainable learning environments.


What is Disability Services?

    Disability Services (DS) is an entity of the Academic Services division of Bellevue
University and is supervised by the Dean of Academic Services. Disability Services coordinates
services, provides advocacy and support to students with documented physical, learning, and
psychological disabilities. We also provide assistance to the general campus community in
responding appropriately to requests for accommodations based on disability.

    Disability Services is located in the R. Joe Dennis Learning Center building, Suite 579 on
the main campus, with an accessible entrance on the south side of the building. Disability
parking is located in the parking lot immediately west of the building. Office hours are from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m. during the business week throughout the calendar year. Contact us at (402)
557.7417, (402) 557.7422, or disability@bellevue.edu.


Student Rights

    Bellevue University is committed to ensuring programs are readily accessible to and usable
by people with disabilities, when viewed as a whole. Program access must be assured in the
most integrated setting appropriate to the needs of the individual and to the maximum extent
feasible. Bellevue University assures that no qualified person with a disability will be denied or
afforded limited participation in or the benefits of any programs solely based on a disability.
Bellevue University prohibits disability discrimination against qualified students. BU ensures all
students and others have an equal opportunity in accessing our institution.

    Bellevue University offers reasonable accommodations which will be made to guarantee
program access. Reasonable accommodations modify non-essential components of programs
so individuals will have equal footing to participate. All accommodation requests will be given
due process and consideration.

    Two primary laws give people with disabilities full civil rights protection at Bellevue
University. These laws are:

            •   Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act;
            •   Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990; and Amendments Act of 2008

   In addition to the actual statutes, regulations and case law give shape to these civil rights.
Specific information on these laws is available at the DS office. One may also contact the U.S.
Department of Education Office for Civil Rights or the Nebraska Equal Opportunity
Commission.




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Disability & Its Influence on Learning

    Bellevue University adheres to the civil rights definition of disability. In order to be eligible
for program modifications based on disability, students must provide Disability Services with
evidence that they have a physical or mental condition that substantially limits one or more
major life activities. Major life activities include walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, reading
and learning, to name a few. Disabilities types include physical, learning, psychological,
hearing impairments, vision impairments, speech impairments, and others (ADD, ADHD,
Asperger’s, Autism, Dysgraphia, etc).

     In addition to evidence of a disabling condition, students must provide evidence of how
their disability impacts participation in University programs in order to qualify for reasonable
accommodation. Disability Services refers to this impact of a disability on program access as a
functional limitation. Before Disability Services supports reasonable accommodations, a logical
link between the functional limitation and the program modification must be confirmed.

    Disability Services gives just as much weight to a student's self-report on how the
disability influences learning as the office does on a diagnostician's report. Disability Services
identifies functional limitations by interviewing students and by reviewing relevant disability
diagnostic reports. In cases where diagnostic reports of disability are required, the
documentation serves as a tool used by the disability services specialist and the student to
determine reasonable accommodations for that student and that area of study. Students may
then choose the types of accommodations requested to level the playing field.

    Disability Services provides no diagnostic services. If there is adequate documentation
available from other sources, we review that documentation. In cases where there is no
existing documentation, or the documentation is insufficient in some way, a referral to an
appropriate professional who can diagnose disability and its impact on learning. Disability
Services reserves the right to require a diagnostic report to authorize program
accommodations. A qualified licensed professional is required to complete the diagnostic
documentation. A qualified licensed professional is someone who has comprehensive training
and relevant expertise in the specialty and appropriate licensure or certification. This person
cannot be related to the student.

     Note that Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act
protects students with disabilities even when program modifications are unnecessary. These
civil rights laws prohibit discrimination for those who have a history of disability or who are
regarded as having a disability. In other words, disability discrimination may be caused by
hostile environments or stereotyping as well as by the denial of reasonable accommodations.
While Disability Services is the University’s entity responsible for reasonable accommodations
based on disability, we also serve students who experience discrimination based on a history
of disability or being regarded as having a disability, but who otherwise want no program
modifications.


Confidentiality & Student Records

   Disability Services strives to treat all personal information with the strictest confidentiality.
We respect the privacy of individuals, and will err in favor of confidentiality, whenever
possible.

     Disability Services regards the information it keeps about students as medical records.
The DS office prefers documentation of disabling conditions provided by students should be
limited to that which is necessary to establish the disability and the right to an accommodation
in an educational setting. Please refer to the section of the Student Disability Guide entitled
Requesting Accommodations & Documentation Requirements for more details on
verifying a disability and the right to accommodation.




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     Disability Services requires a release of information be signed before it will release
information to University faculty and staff. Information released is done so on the basis of
"need to know". The need to know must be based on compelling and legitimate educational
reasons for the information disclosure. Generally speaking, faculty and staff do not need to
know what the student's disability is. These University officials merely need to know that
Disability Services verified the disability and the student's right to reasonable
accommodations. Likewise, faculty and staff (outside of DS) have no right to access student
files directly.

    The student must provide written authorization before any confidential information is
released to persons or entities outside of the University. This includes parents. On occasion,
third parties such as courts of law, civil rights investigators, etc. may legally order Disability
Services to release information with or without a signed authorization from the student.

     For each student served, Disability Services creates a paper file that contains both internal
and external documents. The DS office owns and maintains these files in secure storage for up
to five years after the last year in which the student was enrolled at the University. After that
time, the DS office destroys the physical file and all its contents.

     Disability Services encourages students to obtain and keep copies of their documentation
for future uses. In addition, students may give written permission for copies of the file to go to
a third party. However, only Disability Services personnel may directly access the file.

    Disputes and complaints involving confidentiality may be pursued through University due
process. Please refer to the sections of the Disability Guide entitled ADA Grievance
Procedures.


What is a Reasonable Accommodation?

    Reasonable accommodations are changes in the learning environment that permit
students with disabilities to compete on equal footing with their peers at Bellevue University.
The accommodations modify non-essential elements of University programs. The Student
Disability Guide contains a list of reasonable accommodations and their descriptions in
successive pages.

Examples include, but not limited:

    •   extended testing times
    •   books on tape
    •   sign language interpreters, and
    •   adaptive technology


When Are Accommodation Requests Denied?

The University provides accommodations unless they fall under one of the following three
categories:

    •   Fundamental Alteration
    •   Undue Hardship
    •   Personal Service




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Fundamental Alteration
    If an accommodation reduces the academic standards of the University, its schools,
departments, or courses, the University denies the accommodation because it is unreasonable.
Academic standards are essential for every student. It is unreasonable to alter these
fundamental standards with an accommodation.

Undue Hardship
    If an accommodation is cost prohibitive or is impossible to administer, the University
denies the accommodation because it is unreasonable. An unjustifiable financial burden will
have an adverse effect on the entire University system. Therefore, decisions regarding undue
financial hardship can only be made by the administration of the University. An undue
administrative burden occurs when the University does not have the time or ability to respond
to a request.

Personal Service
    If a request for an accommodation resides under the definition of a personal service, the
University denies the request because it is unreasonable. Personal services are those that a
person with a disability must use regardless of attendance at the University. In addition,
personal services are those for which no correlation between the disability's functional
limitation and program access can be established. The University, for instance, does not
purchase wheelchairs or other assistive technologies used in every setting to compensate for
mobility impairments. Other examples of personal services include:

   •   independent living
   •   mental health
   •   rehabilitation
   •   remediation
   •   tutoring


Requesting Accommodations & Documentation Requirements

    Bellevue University will honor student accommodation choice whenever feasible, but
periodically may need to provide equally effective alternatives to that choice. Students with
disabilities who request disability support services at Bellevue University are required to
submit documentation to verify eligibility under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990/Amendment Act of 2008. Complete and
appropriate documentation is necessary to determine eligibility for accommodations, auxiliary
aids, and/or services. Accommodation requests may be made at Disability Services.

    Disability documentation should reflect current levels of skills, abilities, and needs for
support services. For most students, documentation should be no older than three years. For
students age 21 and older where sufficient evidence is provided by the student indicating that
the disability has been evaluated regularly without significant changes in skills and needs
across time, it may be appropriate to extend the length of time the documentation will be
considered valid. Disabilities that are sporadic or degenerative in nature may require more
frequent evaluation as needed for accommodation change. Generally, an Individualized
Educational Plan (IEP) or a 504 Plan is not sufficient documentation of a disability.
Documentation must be on official letterhead with names, titles, professional credentials,
addresses, and phone/fax numbers of the evaluator(s), as well as the official date(s) of
testing.

   Documentation guidelines are available to assist Disability Services in collaborating with
each student to ensure that the documentation is complete and to determine individualized
and appropriate accommodations, auxiliary aids, and/or services. The cost of obtaining
documentation will be borne by the student. DS will review the appropriateness of submitted



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documentation on a case-by-case basis. Accommodations are not retroactive. Additional
documentation may be requested to determine eligibility for services. Pending receipt of
documentation, DS reserves the right to deny accommodations, auxiliary aids, and/or
services. Note: Submission of documentation is not the same as the request for services. The
student must initiate requests for accommodations, auxiliary aids, and/or services by
contacting DS.

     Information regarding a student’s documentation is confidential. All documentation and
files related to a student’s disability are housed in the DS office and are not part of the
student’s university record. Students should keep a copy of their documentation. DS holds this
information for five years after the student leaves the University, at which time it is destroyed.


Documentation Guidelines

         Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

                                         (ADD/ADHD)

    ADD/ADHD is considered a medical or clinical diagnosis. Individuals qualified to render a
diagnosis for ADHD are practitioners who have been trained in the assessment of ADD/ADHD
and have direct experience working with adolescents and adults with ADD/ADHD.
Recommended practitioners may include clinical psychologists, neuropsychologists,
psychiatrists, and other qualified medical doctors. The diagnostician should be an impartial
individual who is not a family member of the student.

    Documentation serves as the foundation that legitimizes a student’s request for
appropriate accommodations. Documentation for eligibility should be current, preferably within
the last three years (the age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon the disabling
condition, the current status of the student, and the student’s request for accommodations).
The following guidelines are provided to assist the service provider in collaborating with each
student to determine appropriate accommodations.

      Documentation of a disability must be provided by a certified or licensed professional with
the expertise necessary to make the determination. In order to provide the best possible
accommodation, documentation including recommendations of accommodations done within
the last three years is the most helpful. In some cases where the student is under medication,
it is helpful to have information about medication and the possible side effects of the
medication.

Recommended documentation includes:

    1.    A specific diagnosis of ADD/ADHD based on the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. In clear,
          direct language, the report must identify the substantial limitation of a major life
          activity presented by the ADD/ADHD;
    2.    A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the
          diagnosis;
    3.    All quantitative information in standard scores and/or percentiles;
    4.    All relevant developmental, familial, medical, medication, psychosocial, behavioral,
          and academic information;
    5.    Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the
          postsecondary level. These recommendations should be based on significant functional
          limitations and should be supported by the diagnostic assessment.




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         Further assessment by an appropriate professional may be required if co-existing
learning disabilities or other disabling conditions are indicated. Appropriate accommodations
are collaboratively determined by the student and the Disability Services Specialist.

                                        Blind/Low Vision

     Ophthalmologists are the primary professionals involved in the diagnosis and medical
treatment of individuals who are blind or experience low vision. Optometrists provide
information regarding the measurement of visual acuity, as well as tracking and fusion
difficulties (including, but not limited to, eye movement disorders, inefficiency in using both
eyes together, and misalignment of the eyes, lazy eye, focusing problems, visual sensory
disorders, and motor integration). The diagnostician should be an impartial individual who is
not a family member of the student.

     Documentation serves as the foundation that legitimizes a student’s request for
appropriate accommodations. The age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon the
disabling condition, the current status of the student, and the student’s request for
accommodations. The following guidelines are provided to assist the service provider in
collaborating with each student to determine appropriate accommodations.

Recommended documentation includes:

    1.   A clear statement of vision-related disability with supporting numerical description;
    2.   A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the
         diagnosis and a summary of evaluation results;
    3.   Present symptoms that meet the criteria for diagnosis;
    4.   Medical information relating to the student’s needs and the status of the individual’s
         vision (static or changing) and its impact on the demands of the academic program;
    5.   Narrative or descriptive text providing both quantitative and qualitative information
         about the student’s abilities that might be helpful in understanding the student’s
         profile, including the use of corrective lenses and ongoing visual therapy (if
         appropriate);
    6.   Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the
         postsecondary level. These recommendations should be supported by the diagnosis.

     Further assessment by an appropriate professional may be required if coexisting learning
disabilities or other disabling conditions are indicated. Appropriate accommodations are
collaboratively determined by the student and the Disability Services Specialist.

                                   Deaf/Hard of Hearing

    Physicians, including otolaryngologists and otologists, are qualified to provide diagnosis
and treatment of hearing disorders. Audiologists may provide current audiograms. The
diagnostician should be an impartial individual who is not a family member of the student.

    Documentation serves as the foundation that legitimizes a student’s request for
appropriate accommodations. The age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon the
condition, the current status of the student, and the student’s request for accommodations.
The following guidelines are provided to assist the service provider in collaborating with each
student to determine appropriate accommodations.

Recommended documentation includes:

    1.   A clear statement of Deafness or hearing loss, with a current audiogram;



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   2.   A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the
        diagnosis and a narrative summary of evaluation results, if appropriate;
   3.   Medical information relating to the student’s needs and the status of the student’s
        hearing (static or changing) and its impact on the demands of the academic program;
   4.   A statement regarding the use of hearing aids (if appropriate);
   5.   Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the
        postsecondary level. These recommendations should be supported by the diagnosis.

     Further assessment by an appropriate professional may be required if coexisting learning
disabilities or other disabling conditions are indicated. Appropriate accommodations are
collaboratively determined by the student and the Disability Services Specialist.

                          Head Injury/Traumatic Brain Injury

        Head injury and traumatic brain injury are considered medical or clinical diagnoses.
Individuals qualified to render a diagnosis for these disorders are practitioners who have been
trained in the assessment of head injury or traumatic brain injury. Recommended practitioners
may include: physicians; neurologists; licensed clinical, rehabilitation, and school
psychologists; neuropsychologists; and psychiatrists. The diagnostician should be an impartial
individual who is not a family member of the student.

    Documentation serves as the foundation that legitimizes a student’s request for
appropriate accommodations. Documentation for eligibility should be current (the age of
acceptable documentation is dependent upon the disabling condition, the current status of the
student, and the student’s request for accommodations). The following guidelines are provided
to assist the service provider in collaborating with each student to determine appropriate
accommodations.

Recommended documentation includes:


   1.   A clear statement of the head injury or traumatic brain injury. In clear, direct
        language, the report must identify the substantial limitation of a major life activity
        presented by the injury;
   2.   A summary of cognitive and achievement measures used and evaluation results,
        including all scores, used to make the diagnosis;
   3.   A summary of present residual symptoms which meet the criteria for diagnosis;
   4.   Medical information relating to the student’s needs to include the impact of medication
        on the student’s ability to meet the demands of the postsecondary environment;
   5.   Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the
        postsecondary level. These recommendations should be based on significant functional
        limitations and should be supported by the diagnosis.

     Further assessment by an appropriate professional may be required if coexisting learning
disabilities or other disabling conditions are indicated. Appropriate accommodations are
collaboratively determined by the student and the Disability Services Specialist.

                                    Learning Disabilities

    Professionals conducting assessments and rendering diagnoses of specific learning
disabilities must be qualified. A qualified professional will need to hold a degree in a field
related to diagnosis of specific learning disability and have at least one year of diagnostic
experience with adults and late adolescents. Recommended practitioners may include certified
and/or licensed psychologists, learning disabilities specialists, educational therapists,
diagnosticians in public schools or colleges and rehabilitation services, and private


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practitioners with the above characteristics. The diagnostician should be an impartial individual
who is not a family member of the student.

     Documentation serves as the foundation that legitimizes a student’s request for
appropriate accommodations. Documentation for eligibility should be current, preferably within
the last three years (the age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon the disabling
condition, the current status of the student, and the student’s specific request for
accommodations). The following guidelines are provided to assist the service provider in
collaborating with each student to determine appropriate accommodations.
Recommended documentation includes:
    1.    Testing that is comprehensive, including a measure of both aptitude and
         achievement in the areas of reading, mathematics, and written language. The
         diagnostic assessment performed to verify a learning disability should show:
            a.     Significant intra cognitive discrepancy as measured by technically adequate,
                 standardized instruments of aptitude (e.g., Verbal IQ vs. Performance IQ;
                 Perceptual Organization vs. Verbal Comprehension on the Wechsler Adult
                 Intelligence Scale-Revised)
                                                 OR
            b.     Significant aptitude-achievement discrepancy as measured by technically
                 adequate, standardized instruments of aptitude (e.g., Wechsler Adult
                 Intelligence Scale- Revised; Woodcock -Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery,
                 Part I) and achievement (e.g., Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery,
                 Part II; Wide Range Achievement Test).
    2) A clear statement that a specific learning disability is present and the rationale for this
       diagnosis. (Note: "learning deficits," "learning styles," and "learning differences" do
       not, in and of themselves, constitute a learning disability.) In clear, direct language,
       the report must identify the substantial limitation of a major life activity presented by
       the learning disability;
    3) A narrative summary, including all scores, that supports the diagnosis;
    4) A statement of strengths and needs that will impact the student’s ability to meet the
       demands of the postsecondary environment;
    5) Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the
       postsecondary level. These recommendations should be based on significant functional
       limitations and should be supported by the diagnosis.

     Further assessment by an appropriate professional may be required if coexisting learning
disabilities or other disabling conditions are indicated. Appropriate accommodations are
collaboratively determined by the student and the Disability Services Specialist.

                            Pervasive Developmental Disorders
                 Autism Spectrum Disorders, Asperger’s Disorders, etc.

    Pervasive Developmental disorders are considered medical or clinical diagnoses.
Individuals qualified to render a diagnosis for these disorders are practitioners who have been
trained in the assessment of pervasive developmental disorders. Recommended practitioners
may include: Psychologist, Licensed Clinical Psychologists, Neuropsychologists, Psychiatrists
and other relevantly trained medical doctors. The diagnostician should be an impartial
individual who is not a family member of the student.

    Documentation serves as the foundation that legitimizes a student’s request for
appropriate accommodations. Documentation for eligibility should be current (the age of
acceptable documentation is dependent upon the disabling condition, the current status of the
student, and the student’s request for accommodations). The following guidelines are provided



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to assist the service provider in collaborating with each student to determine appropriate
accommodations.


Recommended documentation includes:
    1.   A specific diagnosis of Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, or Pervasive Developmental
         Disorder based on the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. In clear, direct language, the report
         must identify the substantial limitation of a major life activity presented by the Autism,
         Asperger’s Syndrome, or Pervasive Developmental Disorder;
    2.   A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the
         diagnosis;
    3.   Current functional limitations on major life activities resulting from the Autism
         spectrum disorder. These may include but are not limited to:
             •   Communication or Language Skills
             •   Social Interaction
             •   Restricted, repetitive and/or stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests or
                 activities
             •   Sensory functioning, especially sensitivity to environmental conditions that
                 may be present in the educational setting
             •   Motor planning

    4.   Evidence to support the functional limitations statements made in #3. This may
         include but is not limited to:
             •   Aptitude/ Cognitive ability. Assessed using a standardized test such as the
                 Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – Third Edition or a similar instrument.
             •   Academic skill levels, especially if student has received accommodations for
                 academic skill levels in the past assessed using individually administered,
                 standardized measures.
             •   Standardized tests of language skills
             •   Clinical observations/Interview
             •   Teacher observations
             •   Standardized scales of symptoms related to autism

    5.   Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the
         postsecondary level. All accommodations should be directly related to functional
         limitations listed in #3. The rationale for each recommendation should be contained in
         #4 above.

    6.   Recommendations for other supports, strategies or services that may benefit the
         individual in a higher education environment. This includes suggestions for the use of
         assistive technology, how the use of medications may alleviate symptoms of the
         autism spectrum disorder as well as any other recommended interventions such as
         counseling services or occupational therapy. Other pertinent diagnoses or
         recommendations for other evaluations that may be needed.

     Further assessment by an appropriate professional may be required if coexisting learning
disabilities or other disabling conditions are indicated. Appropriate accommodations are
collaboratively determined by the student and the Disability Services Specialist.

                      Physical Disabilities & Systematic Illnesses

   Physical disabilities and systemic illnesses include, but are not limited to, mobility
impairments, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, chemical sensitivities, spinal cord injuries,
cancer, AIDS, muscular dystrophy, and spina bifida.
    Physical disabilities and systemic illness are considered to be in the medical domain and
require the expertise of a physician, including a neurologist, psychiatrist, or other medical



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specialist with experience and expertise in the area for which accommodations are being
requested. The diagnostician should be an impartial individual who is not a family member of
the student.
    Documentation serves as the foundation that legitimizes a student’s request for
appropriate accommodations. Documentation for eligibility should be current (the age of
acceptable documentation is dependent upon the disabling condition, the current status of the
student, and the student’s request for accommodations). The following guidelines are provided
to assist the service provider in collaborating with each student to determine appropriate
accommodations.
Recommended documentation includes:

    1.   A clear statement of the medical diagnosis of the physical disability or systemic illness.
         In clear, direct language, the report must identify the substantial limitation of a major
         life activity presented by the disability or illness;

    2.   A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the
         diagnosis, including evaluation results and standardized scores if applicable;

    3.   A description of present symptoms that meet the criteria for diagnosis;

    4.   Medical information relating to the student’s needs to include the impact of medication
         on the student’s ability to meet the demands of the postsecondary environment;

    5.   Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the
         postsecondary level. These recommendations should be based on significant functional
         limitations and should be supported by the diagnosis.

     Further assessment by an appropriate professional may be required if coexisting learning
disabilities or other disabling conditions are indicated. Appropriate accommodations are
collaboratively determined by the student and the Disability Services Specialist.


                          Psychiatric/Psychological Disabilities

    Psychiatric and psychological disorders include, but are not limited to depressive disorders,
post-traumatic stress disorders, bipolar disorders, and dissociative disorders.

     A diagnosis by a licensed mental health professional is required and must include the
license number. Recommended professionals may include licensed clinical social workers
(LCSW), licensed professional counselors (LPC), psychologists, psychiatrists, and neurologists.
The diagnostician should be an impartial individual who is not a family member of the student.

    Documentation serves as the foundation that legitimizes a student’s request for
appropriate accommodations. Documentation for eligibility should be current (the age of
acceptable documentation is dependent upon the disabling condition, the current status of the
student, and the student’s request for accommodations). The following guidelines are provided
to assist the service provider in collaborating with each student to determine appropriate
accommodations.

Recommended documentation includes:
    1.   A clear statement of the disability, including the DSM-IV diagnosis and a summary of
         present symptoms. In clear, direct language, the report must identify the substantial
         limitation of a major life activity presented by the disability;
    2.   A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the
         diagnosis and a summary of evaluation results, including standardized or percentile
         scores if appropriate;


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    3.   Medical information related to the student’s needs to include the impact of medication
         on the student’s ability to meet the demands of the postsecondary environment;

    4.   Relevant information regarding current treatment
    5.   Suggestions of reasonable accommodations that might be appropriate at the
         postsecondary level. These recommendations should be based on significant functional
         limitations and should be supported by the diagnostic assessment.


            High School Individual Educational Plans that do not provide diagnostic
         information including actual testing results will not be accepted as adequate
                    documentation for accommodation planning purposes.

     Further assessment by an appropriate professional may be required if coexisting learning
disabilities or other disabling conditions are indicated. Appropriate accommodations are
collaboratively determined by the student and the Disability Services Specialist.


Provisional Accommodations
   Provisional accommodations may be provided during the time it takes to acquire
documentation of disability. These provisional accommodations may be discontinued if
supporting documentation is not received within 45 days.


ADA Grievance Procedures

         If at any time a student with a documented disability is dissatisfied with the services of
Disability Services, they are encouraged to bring the issues directly to Disability Services. If
resolution is not reached by the student and Disability Services, the student has the option to
file an appeal with the Dean of Academic Services.

         If at any time a student with a documented disability is dissatisfied with the provision
of services by an instructor, they are encouraged to bring the issues directly to Disability
Services. If the dispute is not resolved, the student may seek review by the instructor's
Program Chair. If resolution is not reached by the student and the Program Chair, the petition
may be referred to the appropriate College Dean and then, to the Dean of Academic
Services/Dean of Students.

        In the event that the dispute cannot be resolved at these levels, a formal grievance
procedure is in place. Please speak to Disability Services office for written information
regarding the formal grievance procedure.


Student Responsibilities

    Each student must meet or exceed the qualifications and standards of enrollment of
Bellevue University and its programs with or without accommodations. While the ADA protects
the civil rights of qualified students with disabilities, it also affirms their right to refuse any
accommodation. Thus, students are not required to register with Disability Services, identify
themselves to instructors, staff, or other students as having a disability, or accept
accommodations they do not need or want.

    However, if students wish to compete with their peers on a level playing field and if they
wish to enjoy their right to access and equality, they must advocate for those rights. Civil
rights protection does not exist for individuals who do not identify themselves and request the
appropriate accommodations. Students are encouraged to consider the following actions:




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    •   Register with Disability Services providing written documentation which verifies the
        need for the accommodations requested;

    •   Request and advocate for accommodations from faculty, staff or administration in a
        timely manner;

    •   Notify Disability Services immediately if and/or when an absence or delay of services
        occurs;

    •   Comply with all relevant regulations and student conduct guidelines as described in
        the Bellevue University catalog.


Faculty & Staff Responsibilities

    Each member of the Bellevue University community must share in the responsibility to
create an environment in which individuals are able to ask for access and raise concerns
without fear of retaliation. Each faculty or staff member has the following responsibilities in
providing access to Bellevue University:

    •   Maintain admission and academic standards

    •   Provide reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities upon request

    •   Notify students and the public of faculty and staff members' willingness to ensure
        equal access and opportunities

    •   Refer students with disabilities and suspected disabilities to Disability Services

    •   Refrain from retaliation against individuals advocating for accessibility


Institutional Responsibilities
    Bellevue University will meet the following responsibilities:

    •   Provide appropriate, reasonable education accommodations in a timely manner to
        qualified students following the university policies and procedures

    •   Prohibit unlawful discrimination against qualified people with disabilities

    •   Comply with or when possible to exceed the most progressive legal requirements for
        access

    •   Recognize that access is linked to quality and that academic freedoms and standards
        cannot be compromised

    •   Prohibit retaliation against individuals who advocate for accessibility


Obtaining Reasonable Accommodations

     Disability Services coordinates and provides reasonable accommodations to qualified
students with disabilities. Accommodations are individualized to address specific functional
limitations resulting from a disability. There must be a logical link between the functional
limitation and the accommodation. Students with disabilities are not charged a fee for
reasonable accommodations.

     Students with disabilities or suspected disabilities meet with Disability Services staff
confidentially as a first step in arranging accommodations. DS verifies the disability and
determines how functional limitations affect academic work. This is accomplished through
discussion with the student and review of documentation. Students with insufficient
documentation may be referred to physicians, psychologists or other qualified diagnosticians
for complete assessment before accommodations are granted.




                                                                                                  12
    After the disability and its functional limitations are verified, DS provides information about
the various reasonable accommodations which address the student's functional limitations.
The student then chooses the reasonable accommodations that best apply in a given course or
term.


Service Animals
         Service animals are animals trained to assist people with disabilities in the activities of
normal living. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) definition of service animal is ". . .
any . . . animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual
with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting
individuals who are hearing impaired to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or
rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, or fetching dropped items." If an animal meets this
definition, it is considered a service animal regardless of whether it has been licensed or
certified by a state or local government or a training program.
         The ADA and Nebraska law [Section 20-127] allows service animals accompanying
persons with disabilities to be on Bellevue University’s campuses. A service animal must be
permitted to accompany a person with a disability everywhere on campus except in situations
where safety may be compromised. If there are any questions as to whether an animal
qualifies as a service animal, a determination will be made by Disability Services. Therapy
animals do not assist an individual with a disability in the activities of daily living; therefore,
they are not protected by laws for service animals.
         The person the service animal assists is referred to as a partner. The partner's
disability may not be visible. If you are not sure whether a dog is a pet or a service dog, you
may ask the person holding the leash if the animal is his or her pet. This is non-controversial
and permits the person to identify the dog in a dignified manner. You may exercise your
judgment concerning whether the person's statements about the training and functions of the
animal make it reasonable to think that the animal is a service animal. Although you may ask
the person how the animal is assisting her or him, you may not require a person to tell you
details about his or her disability. Questions of a personal nature should be avoided.
        A service dog can be any breed or size. It might wear specialized equipment such as a
backpack, harness, or special collar or leash, but this is not a legal requirement. The person
who trains a service animal is referred to as a handler.
                                     Types of Services Animals:
    • Guide Dog is a carefully trained dog that serves as a travel tool by persons with severe
    visual impairments or who are blind.

    • Hearing Dog is a dog who has been trained to alert a person with significant hearing loss
    or who is deaf when a sound, e.g., knock on the door, occurs.

    • Service Dog is a dog that has been trained to assist a person who has a mobility or
    health impairment. Types of duties the dog may perform include carrying, fetching,
    opening doors, ringing doorbells, activating elevator buttons, steadying a person while
    walking, helping a person up after the person falls, etc. Service dogs are sometimes called
    assistance dogs.

    • Sig Dog is a dog trained to assist a person with autism. The dog alerts the partner to
    distracting repetitive movements common among those with autism, allowing the person
    to stop the movement (e.g., hand flapping). A person with autism may have problems
    with sensory input and need the same support services from a dog that a dog might give
    to a person who is blind or deaf.

    • Seizure Response Dog is a dog trained to assist a person with a seizure disorder; how
    the dog serves the person depends on the person's needs. The dog may stand guard over
    the person during a seizure, or the dog may go for help. A few dogs have somehow
    learned to predict a seizure and warn the person in advance.


                                                                                                 13
    Things Faculty, Staff, & Students Should Know About Services
    Animals:
• Allow a service animal to accompany the partner at all times and everywhere on campus
except where safety may be compromised.
• Do not pet a service animal without first asking permission; touching the animal might
distract it from its work.
• Speak first to the person.
• Do not feed a service animal.
• Do not deliberately startle a service animal.
• Do not separate or attempt to separate a partner/handler from her or his service animal.
• In case of an emergency, every effort should be made to keep the animal with its
partner. However, the first effort should be toward the partner; this may necessitate
leaving an animal behind in certain emergency situations.


         Service Animals May Be Asked to Leave University Facilities or
         Grounds Under Circumstances That May Include the Following:
• The animal is unruly or disruptive or exhibits aggressive or fearful behavior. An animal
that engages in such disruptive behavior shows that it has not been successfully trained to
function as a service animal in public settings. Therefore, you are not required to treat it
as a service animal, even if the animal is one that performs an assistive function for a
person with a disability.
• The animal is destructive.
• The animal is ill. Service animals that are ill should not be taken into public areas.
• The animal is not clean.

         Requirements of Service Animals and Their Partners/Handlers

• Vaccination:
The animal must be immunized against diseases common to that type of animal. Dogs
must have had the general maintenance vaccine series, which includes distemper,
hepatitis, leptospirosis, para virus, corona, and rabies. Other animals must have had the
appropriate vaccination series for the type of animal. All vaccinations must be current.
Dogs must wear a current rabies vaccination tag.

• Health:
The animal must be in good health.

• Licensing:
According to Chapter 6, Bellevue City Code, all animals living within the city limits must be
licensed through the Nebraska Humane Society (402)444-7800. License must be renewed
each year and animal must wear the license. Fees are $5.00 if your pet is
spayed/neutered, and $15.00 if not.

• At Large:
According to Chapter 6, Bellevue City Code, generally, no person shall allow any animal to
run at-large within the city limits. Both City and University policy requires dogs and cats to
be kept under restraint at all times. Owners are responsible for their animals' actions.




                                                                                           14
    • Leash:
    According to University policy, the dog must be on a leash when walking the dog on
    campus grounds and when in University buildings.

    • Under Control of Partner/Handler:
    The partner/handler must be in full control of the animal at all times. The care and
    supervision of a service animal is solely the responsibility of its partner/handler.

    • Barking:
    According to Chapter 6, Bellevue City Code, any animal that is making noise that disturbs
    others for over ten minutes at a time may be declared a public nuisance and impounded
    by the City of Bellevue.

    • Cleanup Rule:
    The partner/handler must follow Bellevue City Code in cleaning up after the animal
    defecates. The code states: "The owner of every animal shall be responsible for the
    removal of any excreta deposited on public walks, recreation areas, or private property by
    his animal or deposited as a result of the owner's cleaning of an animal cage, pen, or other
    animal facility."
        o Individuals with disabilities who cannot clean up after their own service animal may
        not be required to pick up and dispose of feces. However, these individuals should use
        marked service animal toileting areas when such areas are provided.

    • Lost Animal:
    Call Nebraska Humane Society at (402)444-7800 immediately upon discovering an animal
    is lost.

                                  Conflicting Disabilities

         It is common for persons to have a disability that precipitates an allergic reaction to
animals. Persons who have asthma/allergy/medical issue with the animal are to be directed to
make the complaint to the Disability Services. The person making the complaint must provide
verifiable medical documentation to support their claim. Action will be taken to consider the
needs of both persons to resolve the problem as efficiently and effectively as possible.

                                          Grievances
        Any partner dissatisfied with a decision made concerning a service animal should
follow the applicable Bellevue University procedure for filing a complaint based on disability.


Distance Learning

    Bellevue University offers numerous online degree programs. All programs provide quality
career-oriented programs at undergraduate and graduate levels.

     Distance learning, just like any other Bellevue University program, requires effective
accommodations and assurances of program access. However, the unique challenges of
distance learning necessitate increased creativity and involvement by the student in the
accommodation process. For accommodations in distance learning, Disability Services adheres
to it’s over arching policies and procedures outlined elsewhere in the Student Disability Guide.

   Distance learning students may contact DS Staff via telephone, fax, e-mail, and other
means to request and arrange for accommodations.

    Those accommodations which can be provided centrally through DS such as production of
alternative formats and letters of verification will be administered from Bellevue University.



                                                                                                  15
Other accommodations such as the provision of auxiliary aids and services may occur at the
student's remote distance learning site. Technology such as Internet utilities, software, etc.
applied or provided by the University must be just as accessible to and usable by students
with disabilities as it is for other distance learners. However, Disability Services denies
requests to adapt a student's personal equipment if the distance learning program requires
students to provide their own equipment for the program.

Some mistakenly regard distance learning as an accommodation in and of itself. Distance
learning is an academic program and will not be applied as a disability accommodation for
other Bellevue University programs.


Reasonable Accommodations Listing; Skill and Leadership
Development Services; and Other Campus & Community Resources
Reasonable Accommodation
A more detailed description of these reasonable accommodations follows the list.

    •   Alternative formats:
        Braille, computer electronic text, large print, tape cassettes
    •   Alternative furniture and classroom facilities
    •   Auxiliary aids and services:
            - Note takers, readers, sign language interpreters, scribes, and other amanuenses.
            - Adaptive computer equipment, assistive listening devices, tape recorder/players,
              and other assistive technologies.
    •   Classroom changes for physical access
    •   Course substitution assistance
    •   Letters of verification and guidance on disclosure of disability
    •   Notice of civil right to program access
    •   Service Animal Policy
    •   Test accommodation services
    •   Other reasonable accommodations




Skill & Leadership Development Services

     In addition to reasonable accommodations, Disability Services provides skill and leadership
development services. This assistance enhances learning and participation in Bellevue
University as well as in independent living and vocations. While in keeping with the spirit of
civil rights for people with disabilities, these services exceed the requirements of the laws
prohibiting discrimination.

    o   Academic advising guidance
    o   Advocacy

Campus & Community Resources

    Many departments of Bellevue University offer services that are of particular interest to
students with disabilities. Disability Services will refer students to these supplemental services
and students seek out the departments on their own.

    •   Academic advising guidance
    •   Advocacy
    •   Computer training
    •   Career Services


                                                                                                 16
  •   Financial Aid
  •   Library Resources
  •   Transportation Resources
  •   Tutoring Services
  •   Writing Lab
  •   Other Services


Detailed Description
of Accommodations & Services
  •   Alternative formats
  •   Alternative furniture and classroom facilities
  •   Auxiliary aids and services:
  •   Career Services
  •   Classroom changes for physical access
  •   Course substitution assistance
  •   Student Financial Services
  •   Freeman/Lozier Library
  •   Letters of verification and guidance on disclosure of Disability
  •   Notice of civil right to program access
  •   Test accommodation services
  •   Transportation Resources
  •   Tutoring Services
  •   Writing Lab
  •   Other reasonable accommodations



      Academic Advising Guidance
      While Disability Services does not advise students on academic matters, we do work
      closely with academic advising. Students are encouraged to meet with DS staff to
      determine strategies for addressing program accommodations or modifications with
      their academic advisers.

      Advocacy
      Advocacy is the most vital skill students with disabilities can develop in their pursuit of
      equality in education and, later, in employment and society. DS staff work with
      students to help them understand their rights and responsibilities and to identify
      strategies for effective self-advocacy. This includes advocacy on a personal basis with
      instructors or other students, but also includes advocacy on a University-wide basis, or
      with non-University agencies.

      Alternate Formats
      Disability Services uses resources such as the Recordings for the Blind and Dyslexic
      and Listening Link to provide text in alternative format. Students may borrow playback
      devices from Disability Services loan program for a nominal fee each semester.
      Students are required to verify proof of purchase for each text requested in alternative
      format.

      Alternative Furniture and Classroom Facilities
      Alternative furniture may be provided to students for whom the standard desks and
      chairs in classrooms are inaccessible due to physical disability. Examples of alternative
      furniture include padded or supported seating and stand-up desks.

      Auxiliary Aids and Services
      Auxiliary aids and services include a wide range of people and devices that ensure



                                                                                              17
effective communication within Bellevue University. Communication between Bellevue
University and students-course lectures, publications, and telephone services-must be
just as effective for students with disabilities as for others. Disability Services honors
the reasonable preferences of students in deciding which aids and services to apply.
While DS staff authorizes auxiliary aids and services, management and application
responsibilities rest with the student.

Career Services
Educational Services Building 2nd Level                   (402) 557.7421

Career Services offers a variety of services to students including:

    •   Career counseling

    •   Web-Based Career Assessment Tools

    •   Career/employer information

    •   Job listings

    •   On-campus employment interviews
    •   Job Search Tips and Strategies

    •   Upcoming Events and Announcements

Please contact Career Services for more information.

Classroom Changes for Physical Access
Students with physical or health disabilities that result in mobility limitations have a
civil right to choose courses on the basis of time, instructor or any other appropriate
criteria regardless of where the course is initially located. Disability Services will work
with the registrar to coordinate classroom changes each semester to accommodate
students registered in courses located in classrooms that are inaccessible to them. The
only exceptions may be specifically equipped or dedicated classrooms.

Computer Training
Disability Services authorize training on adaptive computer equipment for qualified
students with disabilities. The DS staff conducts this specialized training with students.

Course Substitution Assistance
Bellevue University will not reduce academic standards. When the student petitions for
a course substitution, DS will verify the functional limitations of the disability and rate
the severity of need for the substitution. Petitions for substitution are considered on
the merits of individual circumstances. Each individual college grants such
substitutions, not Disability Services, since such petitions are strictly academic
questions.

Student Financial Services
Educational Services Building 3rd Level                    (402) 557.7326

All undergraduate and graduate aid, including scholarships, grants, fee waivers, loans,
and student employment, is monitored by this office. Students should request
applications and further information by contacting the Financial Aid Office.

Freeman/Lozier Library

The Freeman/Lozier library serves you with a variety of services for your educational
and personal needs. The collection includes more than 100,000 volumes and 5,200
current periodical titles. The University Library is technologically advanced with




                                                                                        18
numerous electronic services. Qualified staff is available to assist faculty and students
with research and information retrieval.

Phone Numbers
Main Number (402) 557.7314
Circulation/Renewals (402) 557.7314               Fax Number         (402) 557.5427
Inter/Library Loans  (402) 557.7307               Outreach Services (402) 557.7311
Reference            (402) 557.7313               Technical Services (402) 557.7317

Hours (Central Time Zone)
Monday through Friday 7:30 am – 10:30 pm
Saturday                8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sunday                  10:00 am – 7:00 pm

Letters of Verification and Guidance on Disclosure of Disability
Disability Services encourages students to advocate for reasonable accommodations
with faculty at the start of each semester. The DS Staff supplies letters of verification
to registered students upon request. Instructors have a legal right to request written
verification that
         - validates the student's request for a specific accommodation, and
         - verifies the functional limitations of the disability that substantiate the need
           for accommodation.

Although students may choose to advocate independently of the DS office, submitting
letters of verification from our office may serve the student as the best protection of
confidentiality.

Notice of Civil Right to Program Access
Everyone has a legal right to information about Bellevue University's methods of
compliance with civil rights laws. Notice that a variety of locations must be provided by
the University in such a way as to encourage people to request accommodations. The
Student Disability Guide serves as one means of publishing such notice. Others include
notice in student handbook, course catalogs, recruitment media and posters displayed
throughout campus.

Test Accommodation Services
Students are responsible for arranging test accommodations with their instructors.
Disability Services notifies the Bellevue University Test Center of all students with
testing accommodations. Students with test accommodations must schedule exam
appointments with the Test Center two days prior to the date of the exam. Instructors
are responsible for providing the exam two days prior to the exam date.

Modifications in testing may include but not limited to:
   - Testing in a quiet environment
   - Extended testing time of one and a half and/or twice the standard time
         (Unlimited extended time is unreasonable)
   - Provision of readers, sign language interpreters, and scribes
   - Provision of assistive technologies such as computers and calculators
   - Provision of test in alternative format such as Braille, tape cassette, computer
      file, and large print
   - Other reasonable accommodations

Transportation Resources
Bellevue University has no intra-campus transportation system. Community
transportation services may be available with routes that run by campus for
accessibility to one of our campuses. Here is a brief list of community transportation
services.




                                                                                          19
-Shared Mobility Coach
 (402) 345-6640

- City of Bellevue Specialized Transportation Service
(402) 293-3138

- MOBY (Demand-responsive paratransit service)
(402) 341-7560

- Metro Area Transit (MAT)
(402) 341-0800

Tutoring Services
R. Joe Dennis Learning Center Room #538                        (402) 557.7426
Peer tutoring for all levels is available to Bellevue University students free of charge
for the following areas:
 Writing Lab (On campus and online 7 days a week)
 Math Lab/ Stats (On campus and online Monday through Friday)
 Accounting (On campus and online Monday through Friday)
 Computers (On campus and online Monday through Friday)

For more information, please contact the Tutor/Study Skills Manager at (402)
557.7426

Writing Laboratory
Writing Assistance on Campus
Our tutors work with you one-on-one on a variety of writing projects in any discipline
at any stage of the writing process - from brainstorming to outlining, revising, to
polishing the final draft.

Writing Assistance Online
Our ONLINE and OFFSITE students are encouraged to seek assistance via email!
Your paper can be sent for revision as an email attachment. If you do not have access
to email, you can fax the paper for review to (402) 557.5449.
Other Reasonable Accommodations
Students with disabilities may have unique needs for accommodation. If an
accommodation doesn't appear in this handbook, inquire at DS office by discussing the
request with the DS Staff.




                                                                                           20
Local, State & National Resources
         Bellevue University is a community partner. Here are a few resources that students
                                         may find helpful:
                  Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services
                           1313 Farnam-on-the-Mall, 3rd Floor
                                Omaha, NE 68102-1870
                                      (402) 595-2850
                                www.hhs.state.ne.us/index.htm

              Vocational Rehabilitation Nebraska Department of Education
                                  Omaha Service Office
                                 1313 Farnam on the Mall
                                 Omaha, Nebraska 68102
                                    (402) 595-2100 V;
                                  (402) 595-2107 V/TT;
                                 (800) 554-3382 toll free
                                  vr.omaha@vr.ne.gov
                          http://www.vocrehab.state.ne.us/

                                  Nebraska Relay Services
                                   Hamilton Internet Relay
                                        P.O. Box 285
                                      Aurora, NE 68818
                                   V/TTY: 1-800-618-4781
                         http://www.hamiltonrelay.com/states/ne.htm

                        AHEAD on the Web -- www.ahead.org
AHEAD provides information about disability services in post-secondary education throughout
             the world. Bellevue University is a member of this association.

                           RFB&D on the Web -- www.rfbd.org
                        RFB&D-Recordings for the Blind & Dyslexic
                                     20 Roszel Road
                                  Princeton, NJ 08540
                                    (800) 221-4792

 RFB&D provides recorded and computerized educational books to people with print disabilities
- blindness, low vision, learning disabilities and other physical impairments that affect reading.
 RFB&D has a lending library of books already recorded and a recording service for new titles.

                              APH on the Web -- www.aph.org
                                1839 Frankfort Ave., PO 6085
                                  Louisville, KY 40206-0085
                                (502) 892-2405 (Phone/FAX)

The American Printing House for the Blind provides technologies and textbooks for students
who are blind, learning disabled or otherwise unable to read standard print. The technologies
  include tape recorders and Braille production equipment and textbooks in a number of
                    different formats (Braille, large print, disk and tape).




                                                                                               21
World Wide Web Sites of Interest

                                          o Access Board
                                          www.access-board.gov

  The Access Board is the federal agency that develops and publishes guidelines for access,
       such as the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines, or ADAAG.

                             o U.S. Dept. of Justice ADA Home Page
                               www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/adahom1.htm

      The Dept. of Justice enforces most aspects of the civil rights law for people with
                                       disabilities.


                  o       Disability Access Information and Support <(DAIS)
                                         www.janejarrow.com

  Jane Jarrow has been active and visible in AHEAD and now has her own, private consulting
  firm on disability and higher education issues. She publishes an excellent email newsletter
                  for a subscription, and her web site is full of great resources.


 The U.S. Office of Civil Rights (OCR) is the entity that receives disability discrimination
 complaints relative to higher education. Kansas City is the Regional OCR office that serves
                                          Nebraska:
                                      Kansas City Office
                                    Office for Civil Rights
                            Frank O. Campbell, Regional Manager
                                    Office for Civil Rights
                       U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
                              601 East 12th Street - Room 248
                                   Kansas City, MO 64106
                                 Voice Phone (816)426-7278
                                     FAX (816)426-3686
                     TDD (816)426-7065 U.S. Department of Education
                                    Email: OCR@ed.gov

                                  o   Job Accommodation Network
                                            janweb.icdi.wvu.edu

The Jobs Accommodation Network has long been an important resource for people with
disabilities and for vocational rehabilitation professionals alike. Their job is to help figure out
                   ways to accommodate your job accommodation network.

                      o    Project EASI, Equal Access to Software and Information
                                         http://people.rit.edu/easi/

 EASI is an excellent resource for on line workshops, technical information and webcasts on
          important topics related to assistive technology and access to technology.

                              o        World Institute on Disability
                                           www.wid.org




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