Imperialism

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					Imperialism: For those with the new edition: Chapter 27 is both 27 & 28
Chapter 27 Due                                           Chapter 28 Due
   Yellow Press                                         Filipino-American War
   Josiah Strong                                        Open Door Policy
   Mahan                                                Boxer Rebellion
   Hawaii                                               Big Stick Policy
   Queen Liliuokalani                                   Roosevelt Corollary
   Maine Explosion                                      Panama Canal
   McKinley                                             Gentleman’s Agreement
   Teller Amendment
   Spanish American War
   Battle of Manila
   Rough Riders
   White Man’s Burden
   Foraker Act


Imperialism: For those with the new edition: Chapter 27 is both 27 & 28
Chapter 27 Due                                           Chapter 28 Due
   Yellow Press                                         Filipino-American War
   Josiah Strong                                        Open Door Policy
   Mahan                                                Boxer Rebellion
   Hawaii                                               Big Stick Policy
   Queen Liliuokalani                                   Roosevelt Corollary
   Maine Explosion                                      Panama Canal
   McKinley                                             Gentleman’s Agreement
   Teller Amendment
   Spanish American War
   Battle of Manila
   Rough Riders
   White Man’s Burden
   Foraker Act


Imperialism: For those with the new edition: Chapter 27 is both 27 & 28
Chapter 27 Due                                           Chapter 28 Due
   Yellow Press                                         Filipino-American War
   Josiah Strong                                        Open Door Policy
   Mahan                                                Boxer Rebellion
   Hawaii                                               Big Stick Policy
   Queen Liliuokalani                                   Roosevelt Corollary
   Maine Explosion                                      Panama Canal
   McKinley                                             Gentleman’s Agreement
   Teller Amendment
   Spanish American War
   Battle of Manila
   Rough Riders
   White Man’s Burden
   Foraker Act
AMERICA AS A WORLD POWER (INCLUDES IMPERIALISM)
Secretary of State James G. Blaine
“Pan-Americanism”—Opened door for future improved relations with Latin America.
Samoan Crisis, 1889—U.S. and Germany quarreled over territory; U.S. gained Pago Pago.
Venezuela Boundary Dispute, 1895-96—U.S. demanded Britain accept new border or face war.
-- Boost to Monroe Doctrine
Hawaii, Queen Lilioukalani—Overthrown by white planters; Cleveland refused to annex Hawaii.
Spanish American War, 1898 (―Splendid Little War‖): US gets Hawaii, Philippines, Puerto Rico,
Guam
―Yellow Journalism‖: Hearst & Pulitzer
Sinking of the Maine
Platt Amendment—Guaranteed Cuba would be dominated by U.S.
Philippine insurrection after the war, Emilio Aguinaldo
Anti-Imperialist League: opposed conquest of the Philippines
Open Door Policy (1899): Sought to give U.S. and other western countries access to China.
Secretary of State John Hay (McKinley)
Boxer Rebellion, 1900: U.S. helped defeat Chinese anti-foreigner ―Boxers.‖
Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine (“Big Stick Policy”)

Venezuela Crisis, 1902—TR issued Corollary & U.S. became ―Policeman‖ of Western
Hemisphere; aimed to keep Europeans out of Latin America.
Caribbean: U.S. troops sent to Dominican Republic (1905) and Cuba (1906)

Panama

Hay-Pauncefote Treaty, 1901—Britain agreed to let U.S. fortify isthmian canal; reversed
Clayton-Bulwer Treaty of 1850.

Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty, 1903—U.S. gained right from Panama to build canal.

“Gunboat Diplomacy”—U.S. tore Panama away from Colombia to build canal; U.S.
then dominated Panama.
Treaty of Portsmouth (1905) ends Russo-Japanese War; TR gets Nobel Prize
“Dollar Diplomacy”—Support U.S. foreign policy w/ U.S. $; U.S. gov’t supports U.S. investors
through foreign policy.
Under Taft, U.S. troops sent to Cuba, Honduras, Dominican Republic and Nicaragua (1912)
Wilson: “Moral Diplomacy”
U.S. troops sent to Haiti in 1915—Despite Wilson’s anti-imperialism rhetoric
Jones Act of 1916—Philippines became a territory
Jones Act of 1917—Puerto Ricans became citizens

U.S. intervention in Mexico: Vera Cruz, Huerta, Pancho Villa
Japan
“Gentleman’s Agreement”—S.F. School Board agrees to teach Japanese children; Japan agrees to
reduce Japanese immigration to U.S.
“Great White Fleet”, 1907
Root-Takahira Agreement (1908)—U.S. & Japan agreed to uphold Open Door in China
Lansing Ishii Agreement (1917)—U.S. & Japan again reiterated Open Door; aimed at keeping
Germans from dominating region during WWI.




Native Americans
―Contact‖ starting with Columbus revolutionized life for Native Americans
 90% died by 1600, mostly due to disease
 Some groups were forced into slave labor (Spanish mission system)
 Some were sold into slavery (Carolinas)
Summary of relations between Europeans and Indians‖
Spain: Indians in West and Mexico forced into slave labor (Spanish mission system)
o Encomienda and hacienda systems
France: Indians of the eastern woodlands got along well with the French; fur trade and Jesuit
missionaries.
England: British American colonists pushed Indians further and further west; extermination
Colonial Indian wars: Pequot War (1636); King Philip’s War (1675)
Treaty of Grenville (1795) – Indians removed from Ohio Valley
Battle of Tippecanoe (1811) – Shawnee defeated (Tecumseh) and removed from Ohio Valley
Trail of Tears (1830s and 40s): ―Five Civilized Tribes‖ of southeast ultimately forced to relocate to
    Oklahoma: Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Seminole, (Chickasaw left voluntarily)
Some Oklahoma tribes fought for the Confederacy during Civil War
Transcontinental Railroad ushered in American movement into ―Great West‖ resulting in war with
     Plains Indians and others (incl Sioux, Apache, Nez Perce)
1890 Census: no longer a discernable frontier line
By 1890 nearly all Native Americans on reservations
Helen Hunt Jackson: A Century of Dishonor (1887) stimulated drive to protect Indians but also
Christianize and Americanize them
Dawes Severalty Act of 1887: allotment policy for heads of Indian households; destroyed tribal land
  ownership
Indian Reorganization Act (1934) during New Deal: overturned Dawes Act and restored tribal lands
American Indian Movement (AIM) protested poor reservation conditions for Indians and loss of
    Indian land in late 1960s and early 1970s
Wounded Knee 1973, Sioux blockaded roads and demanded compensation for lost fishing rights and
    lost lands; gained some rights as a result
Women’s Rights:
18th century: Abigail Adams and Mercy Otis Warren
   Mid-19th century:
Seneca Falls Convention: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott,
    Susan B. Anthony, et. al.
   Late 19th century
National Women’s Suffrage Association: Stanton and Anthony (no men)
American Women’s Suffrage Association: Lucy Stone (allowed men
Merger of two organizations = National American Women’s Suffrage Association
 Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) led by Francis Willard was most important
  20th century
Carrie Chapman Catt’s ―Winning Plan‖
Alice Paul – militant tactics – ERA
19th Amendment (1920) – impact of WWI
Margaret Sanger, birth control
Betty Friedan: The Feminine Mystique, 1963
National Organization for Women, 1966
Equal Rights Amendment (ERA)
Title IX
Increased access to job opportunities and the military
Roe v. Wade, 1973

Changes for women in the work place:
Throughout 19th century and first half of 20th century, work was considered inappropriate for middle-
class women.
Exceptions: Women worked in WWI; ―Rosie the Riveter‖ in WWII – 258,000 served in military
After WWII: women expected to go back home – many stayed in the workplace
Reemergence of cult of domesticity in the 1950s—some women began demand for opportunities in
the workplace.
Women’s Rights Movement exploded in 1960s: Betty Friedan – The Feminine Mystique
ERA passed in early 1970s but not ratified 3⁄4 of states by 1982.
Percentage of women in the workplace continues to rise until the present

Sexuality
―Republican Motherhood‖
―Cult of Domesticity‖ or ―Cult of True Womanhood‖
Comstock Law, 1873 – the ―New Morality‖
Automobile
1920s --Flappers
1910s & 1920s: Birth control, Margaret Sanger
1960s: the ―pill‖ starts sexual revolution
AIDS in the 1980s and 1990s

				
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