SIRXCCS002A - Interact with customers

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					                          Certificate II
                               in
                             Retail

  Learning and Assessment Material




                    SIRXCCS002A
      INTERACT WITH CUSTOMERS


SIRXCCS002A   Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page i of 34
Contents
Identifying your customers …………………………………………………………………….4
Why are customers so important?……………………………………………………………..5
Internal customers ………………………………………………………………………………5
Service of customers with special needs …………………………………………………….6
Your main method: Clarify and confirm ……………………………………………………….6
Techniques for providing good service to customers with physical disabilities …………..7
Techniques for providing good service to customers with intellectual disabilities ……….8
Techniques for providing good service to customers who are blind or
vision impaired …………………………………………………………………………………..9
Techniques for providing good service to customers who are deaf or
hearing impaired ………………………………………………………………………………10
Techniques for providing good service to customers with non-English speaking
backgrounds ……………………………………………………………………………………11
Some common causes of misunderstanding ……………………………………………….12
Overcoming objections ……………………………………………………………………….12
What are your customers getting? …………………………………………………………...13
Getting customer feedback …………………………………………………………………..14
Who do you want to communicate with and at what level? ……………………………….14
What do you want to communicate?…………………………………………………………15
What response do you want?…………………………………………………………………15
Which media should you communicate through? ………………………………………….15
How effective was the communication?……………………………………………………..15
Customer service policies and procedures …………………………………………………16
What do quality and customer service mean? ……………………………………………..16
Researching your customers …………………………………………………………………17
The essentials of marketing ………………………………………………………………….17
Maintaining customer relationships ………………………………………………………….18
Four levels of customer satisfaction …………………………………………………………19
Handling customer complaints ……………………………………………………………….20
Training staff to be your best representative ………………………………………………..20
Refund and Returns policy ……………………………………………………………………21
Selling isn’t buying …………………………………………………………………………….21



        SIRXCCS002A     Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page ii of 34
Negotiating Sales………………………………………………………………………………22
Other Aspects of Negotiating Sales …………………………………………………………22
Negotiation Style ………………………………………………………………………………22
Learning How to Distinguish Negotiation Style ……………………………………………..23
Closing the Sale ……………………………………………………………………………….23
Maintain systems, records and reporting procedures to track changes in customer
satisfaction ……………………………………………………………………………………..25
TRAINING AND ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES AND QUESTIONS ………………………26
Assessment task ………………………………………………………………………………27
ASSESSMENT MODE A - Oral questioning ……………………………………………….28
ASSESSMENT MODE B - Skills observation checklist …………………………………..29
Participant survey of materials ………………………………………………………………33
Suggested Answers …………………………………………………………………………..34




                                 Hinson Institute of Training




        SIRXCCS002A    Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page iii of 34
SIRXCCS002A               INTERACT WITH CUSTOMERS


Element of competency:
1. Deliver service to customers
2. Respond to customer complaints
3. Receive and process sales orders
4. Identify customers’ special requirements



Identifying your customers

Customer service is the wide variety of help and support offered to customers
before, during, and after a sale.

One definition of a customer is 'a person, business or government department
to whom you sell your output, which may be a tangible object or a service'.

However, the person who works next to you is also your customer. They could
be the Charge Hands to whom you pass on customer orders, or the Sales
Office staff who pass orders to you. The first definition describes your external
customers. They are the buyers of goods and services who are not employed
by, or associated with, your workplace. The second describes your internal
customers. They are people or groups in your workplace who give you
completed work or to whom completed work is passed.

We play out the role of a customer many times before we even start our
working day. Whether it is as a listener to a radio station that wakes us in the
morning, as a commuter on the bus, train or tram that takes us to work, or as
the purchaser of the morning newspaper.

So how was the customer service you received this morning? Did you feel that
you were treated well? Did the person providing the service understand that
you were their customer?

The Macquarie Dictionary defines a customer as:

      One who purchases goods from another, a buyer, and a patron.

A more colloquial definition provided by the Macquarie is:

      A person one has to deal with.

At times you have probably had less complimentary definitions of customers,
especially if they have been demanding or rude.




  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 4 of 34
Why are customers so important?

The recent attention to customer service in Australia has resulted from a
number of forces:

      Consumers have become more aware and selective. They are
       unwilling to repeat business with companies giving less than excellent
       service.

      Local and international markets have become increasingly competitive.
       Our customers will compare our products with the best available from
       other countries such as the United States of America, Japan and
       Germany.

      Public sector departments (both state and federal), and their
       authorities, are increasingly required to be more competitive. Australia
       Post and Telstra have made major changes in their service delivery to
       provide a customer focus.


Internal customers


It is much more difficult for people to come to terms with the idea that their
work mates might also be their customers.

Customers are:

      Not only those who pay money for the goods and services you provide
      All staff in a business
      The staff in the warehouse.



You receive work instructions from a manager. You might pass on some of
these work instructions to the store person who then performs the work for
despatch.


All customers are affected by the quality of the output of an individual's
workgroup. An employee's well being, job security, promotion prospects and
work relationships depend on maintaining good relationships with all
customers.




  SIRXCCS002A       Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 5 of 34
Service of customers with special needs

In this step you will look at some practical things you can do when serving
customers with special needs.

Existing special services
1. Find out if your workplace has any policies and procedures in place for
   serving people with special needs.

2. Find out if the following special services are available in your workplace
   and write a list of them.

      Translator services (list the languages, the name of the translator and
       his/her location):
      Access arrangements for wheelchairs:
      Any staff with special skills (list their names and their expertise):
      Staff training on customer service for people with disabilities:



Your main method: Clarify and confirm

This is the secret of all good customer service. It is doubly important when
serving customers with special needs.

Clarify: This means that the customer's needs are made CLEAR - You have
to work at it until this is achieved.

Confirm: This means you CHECK that you've understood clearly before
acting on the request.




  SIRXCCS002A       Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 6 of 34
Techniques for providing good service to customers
with physical disabilities

Read this interview with Leigh Lockrey, a research officer for Ability
Corporation at the Royal Rehabilitation Centre, Ryde, Sydney. Leigh has
cerebral palsy.

"I live alone and have to shop constantly, so I am quite an expert on customer
service for people with disabilities. I am in a wheel chair.

Most times when I shop with someone able-bodied, the most common
mistake is made: the shop assistant speaks to my friend and not to me. It is
assumed that my companion is the customer, not me.

Even if it is clear that I am the customer, most assistants continue treating my
friend as some sort of interpreter. That makes you feel pretty awful.


Another problem I experience is the height of counters in stores. It is almost
impossible to communicate from a wheelchair up and over the counter. The
assistant should come out from behind the counter and over to me.

The third problem is the questions of levels. Have you ever tried to talk to
someone when they are standing and you are sitting? It makes the
communication very difficult.

When I run staff training sessions as part of my work, I get people to talk to
each other, one sitting and the other standing. The standing person inevitably
dominates the conversation. When people both sit the conversation becomes
one between equals.

So I would advise shop assistants to pull up a chair or stool, or to sit on a step
next to the wheelchair. Then we can talk more freely.

It's fairly clear that shelving in supermarkets is not too friendly to people in
wheelchairs. I need help getting items off shelves that are out of my reach.
And some items are heavy or awkward to lift when you're sitting."




  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 7 of 34
Here are a few more suggestions:
      If you're having trouble understanding a person with cerebral palsy,
       don't pretend that you do understand. Let the person know that you
       haven't got it. Let them say it again.

      Make out that time is not important to you.

      If you rush people, put them under pressure, everything gets worse. It
       becomes even harder to understand. So go slow, be patient, let people
       say things again- and again if need be –without tension.

      When some shop assistants notice that people with cerebral palsy
       speak slowly and with difficulty, they speak the same way back to
       them. There's nothing wrong with the persons' hearing! You can speak
       quite normally.
      Be helpful without going over the top and trying too hard. It comes out
       as patronising. And if you don't know what to do for me, ask. I'll tell you.

      The biggest thing of all is: treat everyone, whoever they are, the same
       way.



Techniques for providing good service to customers
with intellectual disabilities

Some techniques of good service are:

Understand that people with intellectual disabilities may or may not have
physical disabilities as well.

      Serve them the same way you serve other customers: make them
       welcome, find out their needs, meet their needs, complete the sale and
       farewell them.

      Always first try to communicate directly with the customer.

If you cannot establish communication with the customer, communicate
second hand through the companion.

      Do not guess what the customer wants: clarify and confirm.

      Do not guess what the customer is like as a person.

Do establish a warm, humorous relationship if both you and the customer
genuinely share the warmth and humour.

      Find out by asking if there is any special service you can provide. Make
       your own suggestions too.

      Don't try too hard. It comes out as artificial. Being yourself is the best
       there is.

  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 8 of 34
Techniques for providing good service to customers
who are blind or vision impaired

Read this interview with Nicholas Gleeson, a training officer at the Royal Blind
Society. Nicholas's professional contacts, as well as his own experiences
being blind, have led him to some conclusions about ways to provide the best
customer service.

If you are serving customers who are blind or vision impaired, there are some
simple things you can do which make their shopping easier.

For a start, walk up to a customer straight away. It is awful standing in a store
for a long time waiting for someone to notice you.

Say something simple like, "Hi, would you like some help?" Then tell the
customer you are a salesperson to show you are not another customer.

Then ask the customer, 'What is your guiding technique?". Don't just grab the
customer's arm and start leading. The customer will tell you the best way to
guide.

Sometimes people shout at people with visual disabilities. In a way I can
understand their reaction. In fact I’ve got to watch that I don't do the same
thing to people with limited English. We all tend to shout and mimic when we
feel out of our depth. But obviously it's best to talk as you usually would.

To provide good service, you have to listen to the customer very well.
Recently I asked an assistant in a supermarket for prunes and when I got
home the prunes tasted very much like dates to me.

Shopping can be a real trial: a blind friend of mine was shopping once and
asked for some help. The store manager said, "We'll help you this once but
don't go telling all your blind friends." Incidents like this can really affect your
self-esteem.




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Techniques for providing good service to customers
who are deaf or hearing impaired

     These tips for communicating with people who are deaf or hearing
      impaired come from the Deaf Society of NSW:

     Get the person's attention before talking. A tap on the shoulder or a
      wave of the hand in their field of vision are two acceptable ways of
      doing this.

     Do not stand in front of a window or bright light. You are then easier to
      see.

     Look at the person as you talk.

     Speak naturally. Don't exaggerate your lip movements or speak louder.
      These distort your speech and make you harder to understand.

     Don't mumble, eat or smoke.

     Use simple language and sentence structure. Don't however,
      patronise. There is a difference between keeping things simple and
      being patronising.

     Avoid background noise.

     Use visual clues and gestures.

     Write down what you want to say.

     Be patient.

     Use a combination of speech and writing (and finger spelling and
      signing if you know them).




 SIRXCCS002A        Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 10 of 34
Techniques for providing good service to customers
with non-English speaking backgrounds

Remember: Clarify and Confirm
Clarify (make the need clear) speak slowly (but not loudly) use simple words
use simple sentence structures listen very carefully use open questions so
they give you a full picture: "Where will you use it?", "What colours do you
like?"

Confirm (check you've understood correctly before acting): repeat what you
understand they want: "You want a white one. Is that right?" get feedback
from the customer: "No", "Yes", "Bigger", "Another one", etc.

If a customers knows no English at all:
Ideally, find a translator once you have found out their language.

Keep your normal procedures in mind: make them welcome with a smile,
ascertain their needs, complete sale and make a friendly farewell. And as
always: clarify and confirm.

Even people with no English know a word or two. Use the few words they
know. Use body language. For example, use gestures: pointing, shaking and
nodding head, showing a garment is warm by hugging yourself and so on.


Draw pictures and diagrams if necessary Speak in English, otherwise the
encounter is unnaturally silent. Also your voice itself conveys meaning. An
example is when your voice rises when asking a question. Be warm, good
natured and patient.




  SIRXCCS002A     Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 11 of 34
Some common causes of misunderstanding

It's hard to understand each other sometimes
Customers whose main language is not English can sound rude when they
speak in English, even though this is the last thing they intend.

Below are some of the more common errors that customers from other
countries can make in speaking English. If you understand them you will not
take offence. You should explain these to workmates as well.

1. The English use of 'softeners'

We try not to say things too directly in English. These are some of the ways
we use language to try and sound polite: We often ask a question when we
want something rather than simply stating that we want it. E.g. "Do you mind if
I………..       '

We use "please", "thank-you" and "sorry " a lot. Many cultures do not use
"please" and "thank you" in commercial transactions, such as shopping.
"Sorry" is used to beg forgiveness, not for minor incidents like bumping into
someone in a lift.

We start off our requests with softeners like: "Could I try the bigger size?"
"Would you mind I tested it out before I bought it?" "I wonder if `I could
exchange this one for that one?" "Excuse me, could I have it wrapped?" "I'm
sorry to trouble you but I'd like to try this on

Towards the end of the sale the customer may question the suitability of the
item.

Overcoming objections

There are three main types of objections:

      Merchandise
      Time
      Price
Merchandise objections relate to the suitability of the goods. For example
"Will it really suit my décor?" Or, "I'm not sure that I'll be able to use it."

You can overcome these objections by restating the suitability of the product
or re-enforcing the benefits of the product/s.

Time objections are concerned with buying the goods now. For example,
"I'm not sure that I really need it now." These types of objections can be
overcome by telling the customer they may miss out if they delay their
decision.




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Price objections are concerned with value for money and getting the product
cheaper somewhere else. Relating the principle "you get what you pay for"
or "quality does cost more but, saves you more in the long run", is the
best technique to use in this situation.


What are your customers getting?


Customers are people with needs and wants. Part of the process of meeting
customers’ needs and wants is providing the right product or service. To do
that, you need to understand the benefits your product or service offers the
customers. What are they really buying from you?

The model on the next page suggests that products or services consist of
three layers.

The first layer is the core service or product. For example, the core service of
Australia Post is not stamps or courier services or even the postal system. It is
the means of solving communication problems cheaply and efficiently.

The second layer is called the tangible product or service. It could be the type
and quality of packaging used in your warehouse for despatching products.

And the third layer is the augmented, or add-ons which is the little extra you
offer which adds value. It could be a 1 800 help line for customers to check on
deliveries or place orders.

Think about who your customer really is. It's probably not the company you
despatch goods to. More likely it's the person in the receiving dock, the carrier
or maybe the person who pays the accounts.

Internal customers are extremely important because their operations affect the
way each of us adds value to what we provide.

What factors determine an internal customer's buying behaviour? The next
step is to determine whether you are dealing with an individual, or group of
individuals, such as a department.

If you are dealing with a group, you need to know who will define the needs
and expectations of that group.

The experience this person has and their position in the organisation as a
whole may be significant in helping you anticipate the customer's expectations
of you. You need to understand who your customer serves and how your
service or product will help your customer deliver their ultimate product or
service.




  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 13 of 34
Getting customer feedback

Feedback is a term applied to the means by which a person or organisation
looks at the result of a process, compares the actual result with the intended
result, and uses any difference to adjust or modify the process.

Getting feedback from your customers about the goods and services provided
will enable you to find out their perception of your service and increase your
business. It is part of the relationship between
supplier and customer and should be continuous. Unfortunately, many
organisations only communicate, or get feedback, from their customers when
there are problems or complaints.

Feedback can be very informal, such as that gained by simply talking to your
customer. More formal feedback can be obtained by conducting market
research, using questionnaires and interviews.

To ensure your communication with your external customers is effective it is
important to consider these five points:

1. Who do you want to communicate with and at what level?
2. What do you want to communicate?
3. What response do you want?
4. Which media should you communicate through?
5. How effective was the communication?

Let's look at each of the points in more detail.



Who do you want to communicate with and at what
level?

To identify the 'who' and 'what' you need to answer these questions:

      Who is the person in your customer's organisation who selects the
       supplier and influences the purchasing decisions?
      Who places the order?
      Who pays for the goods/services?
      Who pays for the purchase?




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What do you want to communicate?

This will depend on who you are communicating with. If you want to check the
level of short shipments, or timeliness of your deliveries with a consignee, it is
essential to know the person in charge of receiving records. It would not be
appropriate to communicate with this person about payment procedures.

It is more effective to communicate one message at a time.




What response do you want?


There may be many individuals to communicate with, but what you want is for
your organisation to be the preferred supplier. You want a long-term
relationship with your customers.


Which media should you communicate through?

The choice depends on what you want to communicate. There are many ways
to choose from.

Your workplace may already use one or more of these:

      Telephoning the customer
      Sending out newsletters or brochures
      Having a suggestion box
      Using progress reports and focus groups
      Using the industry grapevine
      Participating in trade fairs
      Using a prepaid complaint form
      Using a 1 800 toll free line.



How effective was the communication?

If you have staff dealing regularly with specific customers, you will be able to
monitor the progress of any communication efforts on a daily or weekly basis.
It is important to continually evaluate each type of communication to judge its
effectiveness and make improvements where necessary.




  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 15 of 34
Customer service policies and procedures

What customer service policies and procedures are used in your workplace?
Some of these policies may not be written. They could include:

      Policy on the return of damaged goods
      Procedures for direct checking
      Quality checking procedures
      Procedures for handling telephone complaints
      Procedures for obtaining information about a lost consignment.

Examples of customer service policies can be seen in other workplaces. Next
time you have your car serviced, stay in a hotel or visit another warehouse,
look out for examples of customer service policies. Many workplaces now
have them displayed for customers.



What do quality and customer service mean?

Quality is a term that is increasingly used in our society. As business and
industry become more competitive, so ‘Quality’ and ‘Standards’ are being
improved.

Some definitions of 'quality' are:


      Fitness for purpose (Australian Standards AS 1057 - 1985)
      Quality is meeting customer needs (W.E. Deming)
      Quality consists of freedom from deficiencies (Joseph Juran Quality
       Control Handbook)
There are four steps to quality customer service that you can apply in your
workplace.

Step 1: Send a positive attitude.

      An attitude is a state of mind influenced by feelings, thought and
       actions.
      The attitude you show is usually the attitude you receive.
Step 2: Identify the needs of your customers.

Step 3: Provide for the needs of your customers.

Step 4: Make sure your customers return.




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Researching your customers


There are many methods businesses have used over the years to get
feedback on their products and services. Two such methods are described
below:

      Most retailers have a policy of accepting goods returned by customers
       without question.

      Manufactured goods sold with warranties provide feedback about
       customers' problems, but do not provide any feedback from satisfied
       customers.

Both these strategies provide feedback, but it's usually from unsatisfied
customers.

A business succeeds when it gives customers what they want. Finding out
what they want is a difficult task. Customers do not always know what they
want.



The essentials of marketing


Marketing can be defined as identifying, anticipating and satisfying customers'
needs and wants.
Organisations that have a clearer idea of the identity and expectations of their
customers are much more likely to be successful.


Marketing involves far more than simply selling output or providing a service
to those who are willing to pay for it. Some of the most significant aspects of
marketing are:


      Market research
      Product/service planning
      Sales
      Product/service development
      Financial analysis
      Distribution
      Advertising
      After sales
      service and customer service.




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Some factors that can determine the success or failure of the service you
provide are:


      After-sales and customer service
      Price and terms of sale (eg extended credit)
      The perception of quality of the service
      The effectiveness of advertising and promotion
      The ease of availability of the service
      The availability of substitutes which, even if not of high quality, can
       save money or time
      Consumer confidence.



Maintaining customer relationships


Some methods for maintaining relationships between businesses and their
customers are explained by Rapp and Collins (1990).


Form a customer club
This can offer members rewards for loyalty, such as discounts and special
offers, and provide the marketer with a profile of existing and potential
customers. Among the largest 'clubs' of this type in Australia is one for users
of Omo, a washing powder.

Distribute a company magazine or newsletter.
This provides readers with articles of interest alongside advertisements for the
customer's products. It can be particularly effective if the product is a complex
one that is upgraded, from time to time, such as computer software.

Offer customers educational programs
Many complex products, such as computer software, are profitably backed by
educational services. In some cases, failure to offer these programs means
that the user does not get full value from the product, and the possibility of
repeat business is consequently reduced.

Offer benefits to frequent buyers
It is widely accepted that frequent buyers deserve recognition and positive
reinforcement. One of the most publicised at the time of writing is the
frequent-flyer programs run by most airlines. These offer benefits to regular
customers, such as free flights, based on the number of kilometres they have
travelled and on the class of travel – first, business or economy.


  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 18 of 34
Enlist customers for third party selling
Using satisfied customers as a means of selling can help to generate sales
and build relationships.



Four levels of customer satisfaction


Dr Karl Albrecht, an American expert in customer service, describes in the
video Total Quality Service (1992) four levels of customer satisfaction.

When customers place an order with your warehouse they want to receive it;
this is the basic level of satisfaction. They expect to receive it on time. If the
order arrives, well packed with a note explaining unfilled delivery items, this is
desired satisfaction. However, its the little extra, like a follow up phone call to
check the customer is satisfied, that is the unanticipated level of customer
satisfaction and service.

The levels can be drawn as a set of steps. As you climb the steps, so the level
of customer satisfaction resulting from increased service, is higher. It is the
top step, the unanticipated, which will ensure you have satisfied customers.
This is the step your staff must be aware of.




                  Figure 2: Levels of customer satisfaction




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Handling customer complaints

If customer complaints are not handled effectively and quickly an ongoing
customer relationship can be damaged and difficult to retrieve.

It is essential to the reputation of the business that complaints are addressed
appropriately. Effort must be made to ensure the customer continues to know
they are important and valued and that everything is being done to resolve
whatever issues they may have.

Keeping them informed as to the progress of their complaint is important so
they know it's being dealt with. It is highly likely, in any busy warehouse , that
mistakes are made with a customer's order. If part of an order is incorrectly
dispatched, telling the customer what's happening, such as a correct
consignment has been arranged, will pacify them. Offering to personally
deliver it may diffuse the situation and maintain the relationship.

Accepting responsibility for whatever has gone wrong is essential to
maintaining customer relations. If you say, 'that isn't my fault or my problem',
you will not only lose customers, you'll also make sure they tell as many
people as possible about your poor service.

Staff need to be trained in handling customer complaints. Providing effective
resolution to complaints may be something that sets your warehouse apart
from your competition. If people know they are being looked after, they will
return.


Training staff to be your best representative

Every business needs to develop some type of policy in regard to customer
service. You may be aware of such a policy in your warehouse. It may be
pinned on a notice board in the warehouse or in the tearoom.

These policies need to be documented and communicated to others. There is
little point in only you or your manager knowing what to do about customer
service.

Staff training is an essential part of good management practice. Each person
needs to be familiar with customer service policy so that if one person, maybe
you, is not available, another can discuss issues with the customer and
address their needs. This provides flexibility in the workplace and a sense of
involvement for all staff.

Here are four practical approaches to developing an awareness of customer
service in your warehouse:

      Introduce staff to their customers
      Counsel staff on negative attitudes
      Teach people to be positive in their approach to customers
      Create a positive and supportive workplace.


  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 20 of 34
Refund and Returns policy

Customers are entitled to a repair, replacement or refund if the item:

      Had a fault they did not know about at time of purchase;
      Is not as described by the seller or advertisement;
      Did not do the job they were led to believe it would;
      Did not match the sample; or
      Did not last for a reasonable time.

Under Queensland laws, refunds do not have to be provided if the customer:

      Changes their mind or no longer wants the product;
      Found the same item cheaper somewhere else;
      Chose the wrong colour, size or style;
      Knew about a fault before the purchase;
      Was responsible for causing a fault or damage; or
      Does not provide proof of purchase.


Selling isn’t buying

Selling a product or service is about listening to your customers, finding out
what they want, and persuading them that your business offers them just that.
If you do this well, customers are more likely to decide to buy from you. But
remember that only the customer can actually decide when to spend their
money and on what. Not you.

People who are good at selling are communication specialists. They tend to
understand:

      Who is the key person they are really selling to (it might not be the
       person you first deal with who makes the final decision)
      How people use facial expressions and body language to communicate
      How important it is to listen and develop a relationship with the
       customer
      How important trust is for customers
      How important it is to be able to deal with people’s worries and
       objections
      How important it is to be able to close the sale by asking for a firm
       order.




  SIRXCCS002A       Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 21 of 34
False friendliness and pushiness won’t win people over. Even if customers
buy once, they most likely won’t come back. Be yourself, and learn some of
the communication skills if you feel you don’t already have them.


Negotiating Sales

Learning negotiation techniques for an increase in your negotiating sales can
prove to be helpful and contribute to future sales relationships. Negotiation
tactics used in the sales markets can be a little different, as a strong
understanding of customer care and sensibility is necessary. Learning to
obtain a positive outcome for yourself, and also understanding and abiding by
the needs of your customers is an art form in itself.

With sales for any company, productivity is the most important part of the
game, as without continuing production, the company cannot exist. However,
you cannot achieve strong production if you do not have a customer following
that believes in your products and continues to be loyal consumers. This is
why developing a clientele base with sensitivity and understanding is very
important in contributing to the success of your company.


Other Aspects of Negotiating Sales

Learning to negotiate by giving a little while you take what you need, will prove
to be beneficial to your negotiations. Customers and clients respect sales
people who show that they genuinely care about what they are selling and
how it will effect them. Learning tactics of sensitivity and creative marketing
can be useful to help you achieve successful sales negotiations.

Creating and building lasting relationships with your customers is an important
aspect of negotiating sales. You want your clients to return and to tell their
friends about you, as this can only increase your sales. By caring about the
well-being and happiness of your customers, you can develop strong relations
and add to your productivity.


Negotiation Style

Developing your own negotiation style can be a fun and creative process in
which you may incorporate many negotiation techniques, negotiation tactics,
philosophies and workable ethics. Everyone is different in his or her
experiences and take on life, and the way they communicate with others
would be different because of this. You can use your strengths and attributes
when developing your own style of negotiating, and learn more about yourself
and how you relate to others.

Personalising your business attitude and approach can be a fun process and
a great learning experience. Learning the techniques of negotiating and
applying them to your own personal perception and the reactions can be
challenging, but also a beneficial tool in your business life. Understanding
your strengths and weaknesses can also help you to determine areas in which
you can excel, and the areas that may need more work.

  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 22 of 34
Learning How to Distinguish Negotiation Style

Your quick perception of others, and learning to determine what kind of style
of negotiation they project may help you to be more aware of what is going on,
and how you can better relate with them. Recognising what tactics and
strategies they are using can help you be prepared for what is coming, and
how to better handle any given situation. You can use your intuitions and
enhance what you can foresee and pick up on by learning techniques that
others use, and how to incorporate them one way or another into your
techniques.

There are many elements to each individual's negotiation style, and learning
about all of the aspects of the negotiation arena, and what different people
bring to it can help you develop your own counter reacting style. A course or
class on negotiating techniques can help you prepare more for this type of
awareness. Executing any business transaction requires some kind of
preparation and keen sensibility.


Closing the Sale

Closing a sale - getting your prospect to say yes - can sometimes be as easy
as asking for it. Once you've laid the foundation by qualifying your prospect,
discovering their needs, and showing how your product/service meets those
needs, it's time to ask for the order. These tips can help you make this
process easy and natural.

Lay the Proper Groundwork
If, in your sales process, you have found out what their needs are and have
helped them to recognize that what you are selling is meeting their needs, a
"close" should not be necessary. If you are frequently wondering how to close,
you should probably examine your methods for uncovering your customer's
needs and demonstrating the benefits of your product or service.

Reach the Decision Maker
Make sure you are speaking with the person who makes the buying decisions.
Sometimes a person won't say "yes" to your product or service because
they're not authorized to do so. If this is the case, find out if there is anybody
else that gets involved in this decision that your prospect recommends you
speak with.




  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 23 of 34
Provide a Deadline

If you have a customer who is vacillating, one way to close is to tell them that
your service will not be available past a certain date. For example, if a client
says they are interested in hiring your firm but cannot make a commitment,
set a deadline date or say that you will be unavailable for a certain amount of
time. This is high risk because it can mean that you won't work with this client
in the near future. However, it will also separate live prospects from prospects
who are likely to drag on forever without making a decision. Forcing a
decision, one way or the other, is good for your business. If they decide not to
buy, it frees you to pursue other business.

Work Back from the Date They Need It
Find out when your customer needs the product or service you are selling and
then work back from that date to make a case for why closing now is
important. For instance, if you are a PR firm, you would want to know when
your prospect intends to introduce their next product. You could then explain
why they would need to hire you now to ensure their press efforts are a
success.

Use the Threat of a Price Increase

If your business plans to raise prices in January, start calling people in
October to get them to buy before the price increase occurs. Positioning here
is critical - remember that you are calling to provide a service to your prospect,
not to intimidate them into buying. Not only will this help you close, but your
prospects and clients will appreciate the advance notice.

Talk About the Implication of Not Moving Forward on a Sale
Ask them questions in order to get them to say what it would cost them if they
didn't buy your product - a disaster without insurance, a car accident because
of a lack of a tune-up or new tires, an off-base product launch because of a
lack of market research. Cost can be financial, time, reputation, among other
things.




  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 24 of 34
Maintain systems, records and reporting procedures
to track changes in customer satisfaction

To follow up the implementation of your customer service strategy, you will
need to ensure that systems, records and reporting procedures in your
organisation are able to track changes in customer satisfaction levels.

These systems may include:

      Departmental reports on customer requests and complaints;
      Market research, including focus groups and phone surveys;
      Follow up phone calls or feedback forms;
      Phone, e-mail or face-to-face contact between staff;

      Sales statistics and refund, return and replacement statistics; and
       periodic staff/management meetings.

These monitoring methods are an essential part of your long-term business
plan because they will help you do the following:

      Determine whether customer feedback on your strategy is positive or
       negative.

      Distinguish any shift in purchasing patterns and profit turnover.

      Highlight any unexpected demands on resources.

      Pinpoint any short-term or long-term adjustments that need to be made
       to your approach.

A sharp decrease in profits is an obvious indicator of a drop in customer
satisfaction. However, if there are systems, records and reporting procedures
in place there will be warning signs well before your business is knee-deep in
crisis.

The same is true of a positive trend in customer satisfaction. Procedures that
monitor customer satisfaction can determine exactly why your clients love
your product or service and if there are any other immediate opportunities to
capitalise on this success.




  SIRXCCS002A      Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 25 of 34
SIRXCCS002A                INTERACT WITH CUSTOMERS

TRAINING AND ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES AND QUESTIONS

The Trainee will be required to demonstrate competence on the job, in
practical demonstration; observation, question/answer and role-play
situations, incorporating verbal questions and written work, including
completing workplace forms, either to the RTO Trainer or Supervisor, under
the guidance of the RTO Trainer.


Element of competency:
1. Deliver service to customers
2. Respond to customer complaints
3. Receive and process sales orders
4. Identify customers’ special requirements


1.       What is a customer?




2. Name four of your external customers.




     SIRXCCS002A   Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 26 of 34
3.        Describe how you would handle a customer complaint?




4.     Are there any improvements you could suggest and implement in your
       workplace?




Assessment task

Your workplace assessor will observe your performance as you demonstrate
your ability to:


           Deliver service to customers
           Respond to customer complaints
           Receive and process sales orders
           Identify customers’ special requirements




     SIRXCCS002A       Interact with customers   November 2007   Version 1   Page 27 of 34
   ASSESSMENT MODE A - Oral questioning
Trainee name:
Name of Workplace:
RTO Trainer name:
Unit/s of competency:      SIRXCCS002A
Unit Name:                 INTERACT WITH CUSTOMERS
Date of training/
assessment visit:

Instructions: In addition to written answers provided above, the trainee is required to
provide verbal answers to the following questions that will be asked by the RTO Trainer.
Read the questions prior to the Trainer’s visit, and be prepared to answer them, obtaining
help where necessary.
Did the trainee satisfactorily answer the following questions:                 Yes           No

1. What is a customer?                                                                      
2. Name four of your external customers.                                                    
3. Describe how you would handle a customer complaint?                                      
4. Are there any improvements you could suggest and implement in your                       
   workplace?
5. How do you implement changes to customer service levels?                                 
6. What records do you keep of customer complaints?                                         

The trainee’s underpinning knowledge was:
Satisfactory                                  Not Satisfactory 
Notes/comments :
Question 1:


Question 2:


Question 3:


Question 4:


Question 5:


Question 6:


RTO Trainer signature:
Trainee signature:
Date of assessment:




      SIRXCCS002A           Interact with customers      November 2007   Version 1   Page 28 of 34
ASSESSMENT MODE B - Skills observation checklist
Trainee name:
Name of workplace:
RTO Trainer name:
Unit/s of competency:      SIRXCCS002A
Unit Name:                 INTERACT WITH CUSTOMERS
Date of training/
assessment visit:

During the demonstration of skills, did the trainee:                        Yes        No          N/A
Communication with customers conducted in a professional, courteous                                
manner, according to store policy.
Customer needs and reasonable requests met or referred to supervisor                               
according to store policy or legislative requirements.
Customer details and information recorded where necessary.                                         
Possible problems identified, anticipated and action taken to minimise                             
the effect on customer satisfaction.
Opportunities to deliver additional levels of service beyond the                                   
customer's immediate request recognised and acted upon.
Contact with customer maintained until sale is completed according to                              
store policy.
Customer farewelled appropriately and courteously according to store                               
policy.
Verbal and non-verbal communication used to develop rapport with                                   
customers during service delivery.
Repeat customers encouraged by promotion of appropriate services or                                
products according to store policy.
Customer returns or refunds processed according to store policy and                                
procedures.
Positive helpful attitude conveyed to customers when handling                                      
complaints.
Complaints handled sensitively, courteously and with discretion.                                   
Nature of complaint established by active listening and questioning and                            
confirmed with the customer.
Action taken to resolve complaint to customers' satisfaction wherever                              
possible.
Unresolved customer dissatisfaction or complaints promptly referred to                             
supervisor.
Opportunities taken to turn incidents of customer dissatisfaction into a                           
demonstration of high quality service to customers in line with store
policy.
Documentation regarding customer dissatisfaction or complaints                                     
completed accurately and legibly.
Follow up action taken as necessary to ensure customer satisfaction.                               
Customers' details and information recorded accurately.
Customers promptly referred to appropriate area as required.
Customers provided with information in clear, concise manner.
Sales orders processed, recorded and acted upon according to store
policy.
Customers with special needs or requirements identified promptly by
observation and questioning.
A willingness to assist conveyed verbally and non-verbally.



   SIRXCCS002A           Interact with customers      November 2007        Version 1        Page 29 of 34
Customers' needs promptly serviced, referred or redirected as required.
The trainee’s performance was:                   Not Satisfactory          Satisfactory      
Feedback to trainee:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------


-----------------------------------------------------------------------


-----------------------------------------------------------------------


Trainee signature:


RTO Trainer signature:




I confirm competence for this unit SIRXCCS002A                             _________________
                                                                            (Manager signature)

                                                                           _________________
                                                                                 (Date)




    SIRXCCS002A             Interact with customers        November 2007    Version 1      Page 30 of 34
                                            COMPETENCY RECORD - SIRXCCS002A
After assessment the assessor, the supervisor and participant should sign the competency record. If competency is not achieved at the first attempt, strategies to
address the performance gaps need to be identified and a time for re-assessment organized.


     Assessment Strategies                                Assessor Comments
     C U R R E N T
     C O M P E T E N C I E S

     Oral/written questions                                              _____________________________________________
     Activities
                                                                         _____________________________________________
     Workplace project
                                                                         _____________________________________________
     Supervisor/3rd party report
                                                                         _____________________________________________
     Self-Assessment                                                     _____________________________________________
     Other                                                               _____________________________________________

                                                                             Valid            Sufficient             Authentic            Current
     The evidence supplied is:
                                                                                                                                        
                                                               The participant is competent has shown competence in all of the
                                                               following elements:


                                                                Deliver service to customers
                                                                Respond to customer complaints
                                                                Receive and process sales orders
                                                                Identify customers’ special requirements

                                                          _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   D A T E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
     Trainee Signature:
                                                          _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   D A T E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
     Supervisor Signature:

     Trainer Signature                                    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   D A T E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _



     The Trainee is                                                             D A T E     F O R     R E A S S E S S M E N T :         _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
     NOT YET COMPETENT:

     Strategies to address gaps in
     trainee performance:




                  SIRXCCS002A               Interact with customers           November 2007              Version 1         Page 31 of 34
                                                                 Off-the-Job Training Log

Trainee Name: ____________________________________                               Supervisor signature: _________________________________

Company: __________________________________________________________________                                                    Date: ______/______/200____

Certificate:     II             III     IV            in
 Business (Office Admin/Admin)                    Civil Construction                  Extractive Industries                          Food Processing
 Hospitality                                      Process Manufacturing               Retail Operations                              TDT (Road Transport)
 TDT (Warehousing)                                Telecommunications (Call Centres)                                                   _________________
List below the times allocated to “Off-the-Job” training for:                                                SIRXCCS002A – Interact with customers

               Activity                               Activity                                   Activity                                  Activity
  Date          code       Duration       Date         code           Duration      Date          code           Duration       Date        code      Duration




Activity Code
   1.    Read self-paced guides                                                      2. Developed knowledge of use and safety requirements
   3.    Met with Workplace Coach                                                    4. Worked on assessment tasks
   5.    Discussion on phone                                                         6. Discussed assessment tasks
   7.    Researched store policy and procedures                                      8. Researched legislative requirements
   9.    Researched workplace policies and procedures                                10. Researched industry codes of practice
   11.   Observed other staff member/s interacting with customers                    12. Performance appraisal
   13.   Other research                                                              14. Read relevant industry publications
   15.   Staff training                                                              16. Talking to the supervisor
   17.   Complete appropriate paperwork relevant to task                             18. Other: (specify) __________________________________________




                                    SIRXCCS002A        Interact with customers   November 2007       Version 1       Page 32 of 34
                                      Participant survey of materials


Unit code: SIRXCCS002A                                                     Unit name: Interact with customers

Date……..……………


                                                       Instructions:
Please complete the questionnaire by circling the one number that best describes your answer to each
question. Please read each question carefully. For mailed surveys, place the completed questionnaire in
the enclosed reply paid envelope and post it back within seven days




Q1.      Thinking in general about the material you were given for this unit, how would you
         rate it overall?

                       Circle only one answer
Poor ………………………………………………………………………….…... 1
Fair ……………………………………………………………………………….. 2
Good …………………………………………………………………………..…. 3
Very Good ……………………………………………………………………….. 4
Excellent ...……………………………………………………………………….. 5
Don’t know ……………………………………………………...…………...….. 6

Q2.   How strongly do you agree or disagree with the following statements about the unit
material?
                                  Circle one answer only for each statement



                                                                                                                               Don’t know
                                                                                              Agree nor
                                                                     Disagree


                                                                                 Disagree




                                                                                              Disagree
                                                                     Strongly




                                                                                                                    Strongly
                                                                                               Neither




                                                                                                           Agree



                                                                                                                     Agree



                                                                                                                                  / NA
 a. The layout of the reading material made it easy to use/read        1         2                3        4          5           6
 b. The layout of the assessment material made it easy to use/read     1         2                3        4          5           6
 c. The font size of the material was large enough                     1         2                3        4          5           6
 d. The reading material assisted me to complete the assessment        1         2                3        4          5           6
 e. The material was easy to understand                                1         2                3        4          5           6
 f. The graphics/pictures were useful                                  1         2                3        4          5           6
 g. The graphics/pictures were sufficient in number                    1         2                3        4          5           6
 h. The graphics/pictures were legible                                 1         2                3        4          5           6
 i. The materials was free from typing errors                          1         2                3        4          5           6
 j. The material was relevant to my job/workplace                      1         2                3        4          5           6

Comments: Please expand on the above points if you rated any of them less than 3
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________



           SIRXCCS002A             Interact with customers       November 2007              Version 1     Page 33 of 34
                                   Suggested Answers

               SIRXCCS002A                          Interact with customers


1. What is a customer?

      A person who pays my wages

      Part of my job

      The reason our warehouse exists

      Not just a statistic – a real person

      A person who is not dependent on our organisation but our organisation depends
       on them

      The person who monitors my service.


2. Name four of your external customers.


This will be dependant on the workplace.


3. Describe how you would handle a customer complaint?

This will depend on the nature of the complaint and workplace policies.


4. Are there any improvements you could suggest and implement in your
   workplace?

This will be dependant on the workplace.




        SIRXCCS002A       Interact with customers     November 2007   Version 1   Page 34 of 34

				
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